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Perfectville - Miami Dolphins
Buffalo Bills Beat Reporter Muki Hawkins

Perfectville - Miami Dolphins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 23:12


BONUS EPISODE Muki Hawkins visits the Town of Perfectville to talk all things Buffalo Bills. How did they get so good, so fast? Can they be beat this year? How does Miami matchup in week three? And is it possible that Josh Allen and company aren't even firing on all cylinders yet?!?!?! Sam discusses all of this and more with the Program Director for Power 96.5/WUFO 1080 out of Buffalo, as well as the Host of the BLEAV in Bills podcast, Muki Hawkins! Enjoy and Welcome To Perfectville!

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 60 – Unstoppable Prolific Author with Diane Bator

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 60:00


Prolific author among other things. Diane Bator has written 13 mysteries and has five more in process. In addition, she works for a theater where she lives which has given her the opportunity to begin work on her first play.   Diane is a mother of three adult children. She is extremely active in the writer's community in Canada.   If you were to ask her about writing your own book Diane would encourage you to do it. Personally, I agree. Everyone has stories they can and possibly should tell. As an author coach, Diane puts her money where her pen is. That is, she actively encourages aspiring authors. After listening to our episode here, reach out to Diane and see where her coaching may take you as a writer.   About the Guest:   Diane Bator is a mom of three, a book coach, and the author of over a dozen mystery novels and many works-in-progress. She has also hosted the Escape With a Writer blog to promote fellow authors and is a member of Sisters in Crime Toronto, the Writers Union of Canada, and a board member of Crime Writers of Canada. When she's not writing and coaching authors, she works for a professional theatre. No surprise she's written her first play, which may lead to more.     About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes: Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.     Michael Hingson  01:20  Hi, everyone, and welcome back to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today we get to interview Diane Bator, and gee, what can I say she's a mom. She's a coach. She's written a bunch of books, 12 mysteries specifically. And she also says she has many works in progress. That sounds scary, maybe she'll give us some clues. She also has been writing and been involved in the escape with a writer blog escape, we'll have to explore that. But she's been very involved in writing in a lot of different ways. And that's really kind of exciting, and really looking forward to learning more about all of that. So Diane, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Diane Bator  02:05 Oh, thank you, Michael. It's so great to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:08 And before we started, we've been been talking about all sorts of things like one of my files disappeared. And so the aliens came and took it, obviously, and maybe Diane can write a mystery about that and solve it. But you know, we'll go on. Well, tell me a little bit about you growing up or anything that you want people to know. Oh,   Diane Bator  02:27 my goodness.   Michael Hingson  02:29 How's that for an open ended question? Huh? Right.   Diane Bator  02:31 Oh, my goodness. No, I'm, I'm, I live in Canada. So I grew up in Alberta, in the prairies. And I currently live in Southern Ontario in a small town, which actually was the inspiration for my very first book that I got published. The bookstore lady, I set in two places in town, a local coffee shop, as well as a local bookstore, which is kind of fun to go to both of them and say, Hey, your story is in here. So that was that was very cool. I have three boys who are all young men now off doing their own thing. And they've all been very encouraging of my writing. And when I told my one son who was doing podcast, he was so excited for me. So it's a lot of fun.   Michael Hingson  03:21 Well, that's pretty cool. And so you, you obviously went to school, did you go to college,   Diane Bator  03:28 I went to college, I actually took Business Business Business Administration, and I did a couple of years of university, but I just couldn't get into what I wanted to get into. I guess I just wasn't enjoying it as much as I hope to so I just went off and did business school and got into life and had got married had kids, that sort of thing. So   Michael Hingson  03:50 So college and university, it just wasn't you.   Diane Bator  03:53 Well, I like I said, I got my diploma in business, but the university stuff was Yeah, I had a bit of a struggle. So   Michael Hingson  04:02 happens. Yeah. So you got your business degree as it were. And then what did you do?   Diane Bator  04:08 Um, basically, I got married, had kids. And then I started to working once we moved across the country. Basically, I started working in just was trying to find a job I really liked. And I ended up working at a karate school. So I was a receptionist at a karate school, which inspired a whole other series of books on my Gilda write mysteries. And currently I work for a live stage theater. So I run the box office at a theater and I've written my very first play. So we're, I'm waiting on that we're supposed to be workshopping it, so we'll see what the future   Michael Hingson  04:52 brings. When you say workshopping and what does that mean.   Diane Bator  04:55 That just means they bring in some actors and they just sit around a table and read the script. At or do it virtually whatever works the best.   Michael Hingson  05:02 Right? So when you do that, and you get to hear other people reading what you wrote, does it also cause you to maybe think about, oh, I need to change this? Or does it cause you to reflect? Are you pretty satisfied by the time that happens?   Diane Bator  05:18 Usually, that's why you workshop, the play before it ever goes to stage is that you can listen to it. I've been fortunate I actually did a writing conference last fall, and a couple of members of the group said, Hey, can we read a little bit of your play during the open mics section? So I got to hear a little bit of it. Actually workshopped then and went, Oh, okay, well, there's a couple little tweaks I have to make here. So it works. So that's I mean, that's what workshopping is for is to actually listen to it, make sure everything works. I mean, you can read something 100 times, but until you hear it out loud, in your, your, your words coming from someone else. It's like, oh, okay, I get that this works. This doesn't work, that sort of thing. Yeah, I   Michael Hingson  06:05 know, as a speaker, I always enjoy input from people. But also, how do I say this, I enjoy hearing myself speak because I think that I tend to analyze probably more critically than anyone else, because I'm close to the subject. So hearing myself, and when I do these podcasts, I go back and edit them, and listen to them. I listen to every one. So I also get a chance to listen to how I deal with questions and, and deal with everyone. But I also get to hear the other people again. And it's one of the ways that I learn a lot, not only about subjects, but I do get to learn a lot about how I'm doing and hopefully improve over time. Right. And that's, that's an important thing to do. I I'm a firm believer and people who have listened to this podcast before have heard me say I'm a firm believer in self appraisal and sales analytics, analytical behavior and introspection. And I think that we should all do a lot more of that than we do. So I'm glad you're doing the the workshop that'll that'll be pretty interesting.   Diane Bator  07:12 Oh, absolutely. I'm looking forward to it.   Michael Hingson  07:15 Well, I want to be in the audience when you win a Tony.   Diane Bator  07:18 Yeah. Me too.   Michael Hingson  07:21 I think it would be I think it would be kind of fun. We watch the Tonys every year. I guess. Angela Lansbury is getting a lifetime award this year. And that'll be fun. As always, like Angel and spear. Yeah. We've seen her and, you know, not just Murder She Wrote, but we actually saw a few plays with her on television. never got to see her live, but I bet it would be a lot of fun.   Diane Bator  07:43 Oh, a bat. She's just so in such an interesting person, for sure.   Michael Hingson  07:48 Well, what I learned this morning is she started performing at 17. And she is 96. So go Angela.   Diane Bator  07:55 right within inspiration.   Michael Hingson  07:59 So you were in a karate school now. Where was that?   Diane Bator  08:03 Um, that was here in orange Ville where I live. Okay, it's a goes your roof. So it's hard, soft, you know. And they trained for a few years along with working there. Which kind of gave me the inspiration for the series and everything.   Michael Hingson  08:19 You said you moved across country. So where did you come from? Um, we   Diane Bator  08:23 lived in Edmonton, Alberta. Ah, okay. So it is kind of a cross country. It's kind of a cross country. Yeah. It's about 2000 miles.   Michael Hingson  08:32 So cold is cold in the winter. So you know,   Diane Bator  08:35 yeah, yeah. I'd mentioned cold is a whole lot different than, than Southern Ontario cold.   Michael Hingson  08:42 But it's still cold. It's still cold. It's   Diane Bator  08:45 dry cold when your nostrils freeze shut that sort of   Michael Hingson  08:48 Yeah. Yeah. More humidity and in Ontario?   Diane Bator  08:53 Absolutely.   Michael Hingson  08:55 We're live on the high desert in California in Southern California. So we're very used to the dry heat. And here, we did live in New Jersey for six years. And before that I lived in Boston several years before that. So had my own exposure to the humidity. And I was born in Chicago, but don't remember much about the weather for the first five years when I was going to Well, growing up to be five and going to kindergarten and all that. I don't remember the weather much. But Chicago also has its level of humidity in the summer and of course cold weather in the winter. Oh, yeah. So how did you get into writing?   Diane Bator  09:33 You know, it's one of those things I've always kind of done. I've always written stories and that sort of thing since I was in school. And actually, I still have copies of things I wrote when I was in junior high. So though in when I was actually in the ninth grade, I wrote a poem and my teacher physically grabbed me by the arm and took me down to the school newspaper and said, Okay, you need to publish this. So that'd be became my first published piece. So it was a really good that particular teacher, Mr. Coleman was fantastic and very encouraging and, and really opened my eyes to different genres as well as whatever, you know, silly things I was doing on my own thought, ah,   Michael Hingson  10:19 is the newspaper try to grab you to be a writer for them?   Diane Bator  10:23 I ended up being a writer for the newspaper. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  10:26 There you go horoscopes? Did you? How did you do that? How did that work?   Diane Bator  10:33 Wing in a prayer. Sometimes, you know, people going through things and kind of make a little thing directed at them, but not really. So yeah. And it was funny how many people would come over and go, Oh, my gosh, that was so true. I don't know how you knew that. Like?   Michael Hingson  10:53 Did you do? Or do you do any kind of research to look at whatever's going on with the stars and so on on a particular day to help with the process? Or do you just make it up as you went along? Oh,   Diane Bator  11:04 not back then I was only, like, 1415. So yeah, it was just make it up as you go.   Michael Hingson  11:11 Hey, whatever works. That's it. But it it made it into the newspaper and help with copies. And so the editor must have been a little bit happy.   Diane Bator  11:20 Oh, yeah. And she had fun doing it.   Michael Hingson  11:23 Did you do any other writing for the paper? Besides the horse cup? Did you write any other poems or articles or anything?   Diane Bator  11:30 Oh, my gosh, that's such a long time ago. Um, yeah, I know, I wrote little bits here and there, just depending on what we needed to, if we needed space fillers, or whatever the case, so   Michael Hingson  11:40 I didn't write much. I did a little bit of writing in a couple of English courses. But I went into radio as opposed to the newspaper, the new university, the new you at UC Irvine. We had a couple of radio people who were pretty talented. And one was especially a writer, he actually went to work at some point for the Philadelphia Inquirer and just retired not too long ago from doing that. But I remember some of the articles that that he wrote, and he had a lot of fun doing. And he also had a lot of fun doing radio, so we got to to work together. I was the Program Director of the station at the time. And John and a friend of his Matt had a show on Sunday night right after my show. So there's a lot of fun, they did a lot of creative things. And yeah, like writing, radio, and writing are creative. And you can do some some things. The only thing I kind of miss from radio that I never did was really created something from the beginning, there are some science fiction things I would have loved to have seen, actually turned into radio broadcasts or radio series and still have not done anything with that. But it'd be kind of fun, because I can see some of the some of the things would be great. Well, so you got into writing, which was great. How did you get from writing of one sort or another into the whole idea of fiction? And mystery specifically?   Diane Bator  13:10 You know, I always kind of wrote fiction stuff. I've never really been big on the nonfiction, I'll read it, but I don't really write it. It was my gosh, but 2010 and I stumbled across. It was a contest, it was called murdering, Inc. and it was put on by a small publisher here in Ontario. And the premise was you take one of those old murder mystery party games. And they would give you all the characters, all the clues, everything, you had to work it into a story, you had to write it into 10 chapters, and each chapter was in the point of view of a different character, and kind of going, Okay, well, if I can do this, I can do anything because this is crazy. But I did it. And I also won the contest, which was my very first novella that was published. And it was just really a great lesson in making your characters voices and everything. It was a lot of fun. And it was, what was really cool is the very first copy that came off the press, the publisher, put it in an envelope, which it's still in the envelope to this day, it says on their first book, and it's still on my shelf as my first book in the envelope on touch. So that was very cool. But doing that I kind of sat there and let you know, I kind of like writing this mystery stuff. And that's how I started on the path down the mystery genre.   Michael Hingson  14:39 So if all of your books been separate books, or do you have a series   Diane Bator  14:44 actually have four series. One of them the Khan lady, which has just come out in March is the final book in my wildblue mystery series. And that's the one I started to write when I moved to Ontario and kind of That loosely on the small town where I live now,   Michael Hingson  15:03 can you have three other series?   Diane Bator  15:04 I do. Sorry, I have a dry spot. dry throat. Yeah, I have my karate series. So Gilda right mysteries is based on a karate school. Glitter Bay mysteries is in a small town in Oregon with two young ladies who run a small vintage boutique. And my fourth series is sugar with mysteries which is set in a small Ontario town. And Audra and her friend merrily run a craft store, and it's cozy mystery. They get into all kinds of trouble.   Michael Hingson  15:39 I've heard the term cozy mystery referred, while referring to a lot of different kinds of mystery books. What are cozy mysteries,   Diane Bator  15:47 cozy mysteries are set and smells when we were talking about Angela Lansbury. Right. Murder She Wrote, she wrote a sick, classic, cozy mystery sweat in this small town normally, or a small town character who has a reason to solve these mysteries. There's usually not a lot of swearing, blood, guts, Gore, that sort of thing. It's just quaint, small town. You know, just a nice, light friendly read.   Michael Hingson  16:16 For me, I like those kinds of mysteries more than most anything else I really although we we read some James Patterson and stuff like that. I like puzzles. And I like mysteries that really present puzzles. That's one of the reasons I think I've always been a fan of the Rex Stout, and now Robert Goldsboro follow on Nero Wolfe, because Rex Stout always wrote puzzles. And if you really read them, you you may not be able to figure them out. And usually, I had a pretty hard time I worked hard at figuring them out. I was more successful figuring out Mary Higgins Clark, but Rex Stout I had significant problems with but by the time we'll solve the cases, yeah, that was pretty obvious. Why didn't I pick up on that? Which was of course, the whole point.   Diane Bator  17:07 Yeah, I know. That's for me. That's always been a big thing. I love puzzles. I love just the mystery of it all. And just trying to put things together. And, you know, I love throwing up the red herrings because I don't like it when somebody beta reads a book and goes, Oh, I knew that from page three. Yeah, like, well, that's not fun.   Michael Hingson  17:28 Yeah, that doesn't help the mystery. The mystery process at all? No, no, my favorite one of my favorite television shows it was only on for three years. Start Georgia part. It was called Banacek Banacek. Assurance investigation. I love Banacek I've got to go find them somewhere because I'd like to watch those shows again, but he always was involved with puzzles. Yeah,   Diane Bator  17:51 yeah. We got a channel called cozy TV and I found Banacek on there a couple of times and Murder She Wrote all those great   Michael Hingson  18:00 ones. Well, yeah, a Hallmark Channel down here. He has Murder She Wrote most every night. And of course, obviously that's worth watching and, and a number of murder. She wrote stories have been in books on Donald Bane and others have written murder. She wrote books. So they are fun, man. Again, it is puzzles, which is great. Until you see Angela Lansbury. And something like Sweeney Todd. But that's another story.   Diane Bator  18:25 Actually, one of one of my Facebook friends just started writing the murder. She wrote series, Terry Morin. She's just taken over for the last two, I think she's done to one or two now. Just trying to remember but   Michael Hingson  18:40 look her up and see if we can find any of any of hers because that would that would be fun to be able to to get them and have access to them. But Murder She Wrote is is a fun series by any standard. So they're, they're fun to have.   Diane Bator  19:00 I was enjoyed, like one of my first real cozies I started reading was the Kathy series.   Michael Hingson  19:07 Yes, yeah. Lily in Jackson Browne. Um, we have read all of those. I've taught my wife along the way to listen to books, she, she also has a disability. She's in a wheelchair, but she sees and likes to read. But since we don't find a lot on television, usually worth watching. And obviously, if you're watching television, it's kind of hard to do a lot of stuff if you're really focusing on the screen. So I read audio books anyway. But I've taught her to be able to listen to an audio book as well. So we pipe audio books around the house. And so we've done a whole bunch of the cat who books that way. And the ones that she didn't read that way she has read in paper form, but also we've we've put them out there so she gets access to them anyway. Now she's really into what we bought With our JD Robb Oh, yeah. Which is a little bit more in the violence side, but still always a great puzzle. So, Karen, well, we're both on number 22 in the series. And so we've got a ways to go, Well, how do you come up with the plots? How do you create a plot and create an idea for a mystery?   Diane Bator  20:23 You know, it sounds silly. So well, sometimes, they just kind of come, you just kind of get an idea out of the blue. And sometimes it's things you see in the newspaper or on television, even something else spark of thought that goes a completely different direction. Just things you see things you hear, like just about anywhere,   Michael Hingson  20:45 so something, something piques your interest, and then your brain just starts to work and you create a story around it.   Diane Bator  20:54 Yeah, pretty much.   Michael Hingson  20:56 It's, it's fun to be creative, isn't it?   Diane Bator  20:59 It really is. And you can take things, you know, like you said, even if you see something on television, and it's just like a little blip of a thing that you just go, that's pretty neat. I could make this different and do a different spin on it. And that's, that's the part that I love doing.   Michael Hingson  21:18 Have you ever looked at real life events of one sort or another and turn them into some sort of a mystery and use that as the springboard for it, or even just taking something that happened in life, that was a mystery that maybe got solved and thought about writing a book about it? It's kind   Diane Bator  21:35 of funny, my publisher, they've decided to do a Canadian historical mystery series. So they have one writer from each province, and you have to come up with kind of a local mystery that you write about, and it has to be historical. And as soon as she mentioned that, to me, I started kind of Googling and going local mysteries, I don't really know too much. The story that came up out of all the weirdest things in the world. There's a local rumor, and it's only a rumor. Nobody's ever substantiated it, that Jesse James buried gold, about 20 miles from here. So I'm like, oh, you know what I can take that. It's sort of has a weird basis in truth, but not really. And I can just take it and run and make it a totally fun, historical mystery.   Michael Hingson  22:30 Well, do we know that Jesse James was ever up in Canada,   Diane Bator  22:34 there is rumors, and that's pretty much all it is, is a rumor, because the story goes that somebody from his gang was related to somebody that lives in a town nearby. So they had reason to come up and hide out in the area. And they, you know, the guest is, oh, he buried all this money from this last for one of these heists. Right. And, and it's like, it's not completely true, but it's not completely false either. So there's just no proof. Yeah. So when possible, but yeah, yeah. That's what makes it fun, though. That's it. That's what I figured.   Michael Hingson  23:13 So your books have been published more traditionally, as opposed to doing self publishing? Yeah, I   Diane Bator  23:19 actually, big long story. But I ended up with this wonderful little together a little bit. They're not exactly a small publisher. They're a little bit bigger than that. But they're out of Alberta. And they've been fantastic. I've been with them for my gosh, but 10 years now 11 years, and 13 books in and we're still going and they still ask me to write stuff. And they pick dates and say, Okay, can I send you this one for this time? And they're like, Sure. So it's, it's been really good, a great learning experience for sure.   Michael Hingson  23:57 If any of the books made it to audio, or they just all been print,   Diane Bator  24:02 right now, they're all just in print. Audio, they don't do audio there. Because it's just too much for them right now. But I've been looking into it. I just have to know sometimes money can be kind of a little bit of an issue, but   Michael Hingson  24:20 I don't know how it works. But what about something like Audible? They have audible originals. So they take they've taken books from other people or had work specifically created for them and they've converted into audio. Have you explored that?   Diane Bator  24:32 I have not? No, I definitely will though.   Michael Hingson  24:36 It seems like that might be an interesting way. If you've had success as a writer and you obviously have and you've had success with publishing books, then maybe it would be something that audible would be interested in doing. It'd be a little bit of a different process for you, but it would probably be kind of fun and they think their own people to do it.   Diane Bator  24:57 Now that sounds like a great plan to check I do when   Michael Hingson  25:01 we did thunder dog, and it was published in 2011, Thomas Nelson Publishers had arranged for Oasis audio to record the book. So I don't know how any of that happened and what the arrangements were. But the book did get recorded, and then was also sent to Audible. And so it was done. So I don't know all the ins and outs of it. Some people have also explored just using computer generated voices to, to if you will play or read out loud a book and the problem was computer generated voices are still not totally human sounding. So it isn't as natural.   Diane Bator  25:41 Yeah, I have a couple of friends that they listen to their books with the computer generated, and   Michael Hingson  25:47 oh, I can do it. But it isn't the same. And it's not something you have to concentrate more on. So it is still where an issue where human reading is better. Maybe someday it will get to be better than it is to be able to have a computer generated system, but not yet. Yeah. So it's a process. Well, so you've done 13 books today. They've all been mysteries. Yeah. So with that in mind, how many books do you have coming up? Or projects do you have going on right now?   Diane Bator  26:24 Right now? I'm probably oh my gosh, I've got one book for this year, for sure. Two more for next year. And then probably two more for the year after that. So probably about five than that. That's the only things from my publisher that doesn't include any little side projects or anything like that.   Michael Hingson  26:46 Have you started on all five to one degree or another? If they're   Diane Bator  26:51 not, I don't really plot them out. But I do have like little blurbs about what I'm going to write about. So everything is kind of got blurbs, at least the one for this fall, I'm just finishing the rough draft to get into editing. So a new series or? No, it's actually Book Two of my sugar wood series.   Michael Hingson  27:16 Yeah, so all of your series are like three or four books long, and then you end the series.   Diane Bator  27:23 Um, it depends my first series, The Wild Blue mysteries, the con ladies book five. And that was, that was the final book in this series. But it still kind of leaves me a loophole to come back later if I want. And continue on. But for the most part, I aiming for about three, but we'll see how the series goes.   Michael Hingson  27:48 I interviewed someone a couple of weeks ago, we were talking about writing series, he's not a great fan of series, because he says he likes to see things in and wants to stay alive long enough to see the end of a series. And I can appreciate that. But we mentioned JD Robb A while ago, the the other side of the fact that she's written now what 353 or 54, in the in depth series. They're still all standalone. That is you can read any of them without reading the ones before or after. Although if you start from the beginning, the beginning you can see an evolution in the process. And so, you know, I went when you write a series, is it really probably best and most important to start at the beginning and go through the series? Or can each of the books be read by themselves without too much of a problem?   Diane Bator  28:43 I think in particular for wildblue mysteries, I think they can all be read as a standalone until the end. And I know somebody said well, the last one's great, but now I want to go back and read the rest. So I don't know if that meant that they didn't quite get something or they just wanted to go read the rest of the books. But for the most part there, you can read them as a standalone.   Michael Hingson  29:08 We started reading the Joe Pickett CJ box series. Have you ever read those? I have not. CJ box is the author. The protagonist is a game warden in Wyoming. And when we discovered it, we we started reading book 18 and fairly close to the beginning. We got very intrigued but they made a reference to something that happened in the previous book. We could have gone on and read it but we just decided to stop and because we were intrigued and we really liked the portrayal of the character is weeping. My wife and I. We went back and started at the beginning. So it was like over a year before we got back up to book 18 And what happened in the previous book was relevant and interesting. It wasn't necessary for the reading of book 18. But it sure made it a lot more fun to go back to the beginning. And so we we did and, and thoroughly enjoyed it. Well, I'm anxious to to have the opportunity to read some of yours, maybe I'll have to figure out a way to download them. Or maybe they'll get converted to audio at some point. But if we, we get a chance, I'll have to go hunt them down some way and be able to read them. Are they available? Are they available as ebooks anywhere?   Diane Bator  30:32 They are? Yeah, they're all over anywhere. You can buy ebooks, so   Michael Hingson  30:36 Okay, so we can, can go find them. And that's pretty important. How sales been obviously enough to please your publisher, but if you had any that people classified as bestsellers,   Diane Bator  30:48 I wish not really at this point. I mean, it's a lot of it is the marketing as well. And it's hard to juggle, raising kids working full time doing the marketing, doing the writing, and it's. So I've hired a PR guy lately, just to see if that will kind of help give a boost. And Mickey's been really great. So we'll just see how that goes. Has he?   Michael Hingson  31:15 has he gotten you some good PR?   Diane Bator  31:17 Oh, excellent stuff. It's been a very busy couple of months, that's for sure.   Michael Hingson  31:22 Yeah, I've met Mickey. And we actually started working with him. I think we talked about that, and so anxious to see how that how all that goes because we did thunder dog, but that was published through Thomas Nelson. And we couldn't get running with Roselle to be picked up by a publisher. It was written more for youth, although more adults by then than youth. But in the time that we had when it was written, no one seemed to want to pick it up. So we self published it. And so we're looking forward to Mickey helping to make that one more visible. We just started writing our third book, which is going to be talking about controlling fear and continuing not the story, but to teach lessons of things I learned that helped me survive on September 11. But doing it from the standpoint of the fact that I've used a guide dogs, and so we're going to have a very strong animal involvement in terms of how animals help enhance what we do, and a faith involvement as well. So that one, however, has been picked up. And we've signed the contract and we're riding away on it.   Diane Bator  32:34 Oh, congratulations. That's exciting. So that   Michael Hingson  32:37 will be a lot of fun. And I hope it will help people learn that they don't need to let fear overwhelm them. And by not doing something that just allows you to be completely as I would call it blinded by fear. You can make more intelligent and substantial relat well reasonable decisions in your life, rather than just doing it out of fear. Yeah. So we're hoping that that goes, well. Well, what do you think the best thing is about being a writer,   Diane Bator  33:06 I get to make up all kinds of stuff and do all kinds of stuff in my head. I think it's really awesome to be able to sit down and make up like whole worlds whole towns, whole, all kinds of people and to be inspired by people and things around.   Michael Hingson  33:23 So as you're making things up here, you're obviously using your own experiences to create the towns and the scenes and so on. Oh, absolutely. Do other people give you ideas for scenes Do you? Do you let anybody look at your writing and they come along and they say things like, you might want to consider adding this in or adding this scene in or making it appear differently than maybe you originally started? Not normally.   Diane Bator  33:48 Usually nobody sees it until at least the rough draft is written. I get lots of people going, I have an idea for a book you should write. So I have a few of those kicking around. And I actually have a friend of mine. He's been wanting to write a book his whole life. And he's 65 now. And he doesn't he doesn't consider himself a writer. But he makes the line and gives it to me for every chapter so that I can do the writing part of it. So one day, we'll get it done.   Michael Hingson  34:25 Collaboration. Yep. There's nothing wrong with with doing that. So what does your family think of you being a writer and having all these things that you create and so on?   Diane Bator  34:37 My kids love it. They think it's very cool. My youngest when he was I think I can't remember if it was kindergarten at grade one. He needed to pack a shoe box for school. And he's got this shoe box and he's got all these things in it. So I'm like, Well, what did you bring in your shoe box? I'm curious and one of the Things was my very first book my novella. And so why do you have my book in there? And he says, Well, I know from this that if you can write a book, I can do anything. So I just say it was always like, Oh, he got me right in the heart. So, so that just was always cool. And one of his brothers, my middle son always tells me well, when your books are made into a movie, we're going to take the limousine down to the premiere, like, okay, fine, there you go. Right. So they're very encouraging. Well, we're   Michael Hingson  35:33 looking toward the day, the thunder dog will be a movie, we've got some people who are working on it. And we're making progress, nothing that we can talk about yet. But it should be a movie, in my opinion, and a lot of other people have said the same thing. And if it if it is, hopefully, it will be able to keep the same kind of motif and theme of the book, and that it will help teach people about blindness, and it will help people maybe learn some lessons about September 11. But also, it's important that it be entertaining. So it'll be kind of fun. No, that's so cool. My, my agent for writing thunder dog is still advocating to this day that he wants Brad Pitt to play him not that he had a big part in any of it. I said, Well, that seems fair to me, you know. But, but we'll see. Yes, any   Diane Bator  36:25 input on the script, he'll have a bigger role.   Michael Hingson  36:30 We haven't given him that. But it will be kind of fun to just see how it goes. How old are your kids?   Diane Bator  36:38 Oh my gosh, my youngest just turned 21. It makes me feel really old. 2123 and 25.   Michael Hingson  36:49 Yeah. Well, so now what is your husband think of all of this?   Diane Bator  36:54 I'm actually divorced. So divorce, so he doesn't think about it. He didn't think a whole lot of it. So it kind of contributed No   Michael Hingson  37:03 fun.   Diane Bator  37:04 No, no,   Michael Hingson  37:05 but you got? Yeah, go ahead.   Diane Bator  37:07 No, I was gonna say when somebody tells you writing is not a career, then that's yeah, it doesn't work out. So well.   Michael Hingson  37:15 Gee, what did he do for a living?   Diane Bator  37:18 Um, I'm not sure what he's doing. Now. He was not a plant manager. But he works for big plant. Well, operations and stuff. Very logical thinker.   Michael Hingson  37:31 Well, that's fine. But even managers have to write budgets and other things. So what a thing to say to you. Yeah. Ready comes in all forms. And people, and people have made writing a great success. I know Suzy Florrie who I worked with on thunder dog does a lot of writing. And then the book we're writing now Carrie Wyatt, Kent and I are working on the carries a friend of Susie, Susie is in a Ph. D. program. So didn't have time. But Carrie and I are working on this. And we're we're very excited about the directions that this book is going to go. But clearly, she also has made a career out of it. And needless to say, there have been a number of people who make careers out of writing. Of course, it's a career of course, it's a worthwhile endeavor. Yeah, I just told them never say that to Stephen King. Uh, yeah. Yeah. Partly because you never know where you might end up in a book, or, or in real life. You know, you could be the next person in pet cemetery, but you know, right. And he continues to be sick and look at his kids.   Diane Bator  38:40 Go, yeah, yeah, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  38:44 And going back to mysteries, not with too much more graphics, but Clive Cussler, and the directed series and so on. Yeah, he's had a little success at making making books a good career. And he did. And, of course, he's passed away, but the family is continuing it.   Diane Bator  39:00 Yeah, I was fortunate to get to have a video chat with Robin Purcell, who was riding with him as well. So ah, yeah, that was very interesting.   Michael Hingson  39:10 Then there's always the Louis L'Amour family. And of course, talk about, you know, everybody can scoff about westerns and so on. But he made a an incredible career out of it. And they're continuing that process. And I've never got to meet any of those people. But I think it'd be a lot of fun.   Diane Bator  39:29 Very neat. It would be really great discussion, that's for sure.   Michael Hingson  39:33 I think it would well, if you ever get a chance to to know any of them and, and get a chance to refer them to us to talk on the podcast. We'd love to do it. I think it would be a lot of fun. Well, so if you had something that you wanted to advise people who are interested in writing to do or, or thoughts that you would have for people about being a writer, what would you say to   Diane Bator  40:00 do it anyways, you know, just write what you love to write, find an editor, somebody who actually knows how to edit a book, not just, you know, the guy next door who likes to read, and just do it, give it your best shot, you got nothing to lose.   Michael Hingson  40:20 Good editors are hard to find. But also good editors really understand what it means to help you shape the book, rather than trying to write it the way they want it written. Yeah,   Diane Bator  40:33 there's nothing worse than having somebody edit your book and take your voice out of it. And it's just, it's very frustrating. And I know I've worked with a few different writers as well. And in a very intentional to leave in things that are them. Things that are obviously very wrong, we can we can have to tweak that, because that doesn't work. But things that are very much them and how they're, how they would speak and how they would write, those things have to stay.   Michael Hingson  41:06 So when you're, when you're working with people, you've you've, you've done some things you we talked about your blog, writing the blog piece, and so on. And you've been a writing coach, tell me more about that, if you would,   Diane Bator  41:18 I that was something I started through COVID. So I've only worked with a handful of people. But I was working with people before then. And doing the same thing, just doing the edits and helping to make sure that book flowed and worked. And the story made sense. I was just doing one for somebody not too long ago, he's actually doing rewrites right now. And the very first read of his very first chapter, I sent it back to him. And he said, This reads like a textbook, or a movies scripts, like it's a very point for more than an actual story flow. So he's reworking right now. But we'll see what ends up happening.   Michael Hingson  42:00 I wish we could get textbook writers to make their books less boring. I think even even the most calm, well convoluted or incredible textbook could have stories in it. You know, a lot of people when I was getting my master's degree in physics, a lot of people talked all about the math and physics. And they talked about the philosophy. But the books, did all the math and never really discussed in in a more engaging way the philosophies of physics or these authors who were very famous physicists didn't tell stories in them. And I submit that they would get a lot more engagement from people, if they really talk not just about the math part of it, not just about the physics itself, but the philosophy and tell stories of how they got where they did and engage people to be more interested, especially at the undergraduate level, I would think,   Diane Bator  43:03 Oh, yeah, I agree with that. Just make it more relatable and more. Yeah, I think that's great.   Michael Hingson  43:10 How do you get how do you get people to do that? It's a challenge. So tell me about the blog, what kind of things have happened with your blog, and what that's doing for folks.   Diane Bator  43:22 I started escape with the writer in September 2018. Because I'd had a blog forever, and I was awful at keeping it up and writing stuff on it. So I thought, You know what I'm gonna share. And I started sharing other people's works on my blog. I still, you know, once every so often I take a day, and this is my stuff. But I work with Mickey, I've got a bunch of his writers who I post their stuff on it, and the people that I find that I post personally, I always send them questions to answer and we make it really personable and fun. And you get to know more about the person, the writer, as a person, as opposed to just here's my book. Yeah. So I think that's, that's the part I have a lot of fun with.   Michael Hingson  44:15 Well, it makes it more engaging and more relevant all the way around, because it's, it's great to read books and so on, but it is nice to know more about the writer, the people who are writing the books and getting more engaged with them, and then makes you more interested and fascinated in what they write. No, absolutely. So you've had some success with the with the blog.   Diane Bator  44:39 It's still going. I started with two days a week and now I'm at three days a week and I could probably do four if I want to. But it's takes up a lot of time. So three is just right for now. Yeah, I   Michael Hingson  44:54 haven't had the discipline to keep my blog up like I need to and that's one of the things that I have to Want to work toward Chris being involved with accessibe and helping to make internet websites more accessible? Takes a lot of time. And the podcast is probably the things that keeps me the most busy right now. But even that engagement, we need to be out there doing more writing stuff. So it's one of the efforts that's gotta happen over time. Yep, exactly. But it is all fun to do when it is fun to interact with people. What do you think that social media has done in terms of affecting the writing industry affecting what you do and so on, not just your blog. But in general,   Diane Bator  45:40 there's lots of good and bad for sure. I mean, in the good side, you can get connected with writers all over the world. So I've been fortunate because of that, that I've had writers literally from just about every country can think of that had been on my blog that I've gotten to know in a different way than just, you know, liking their posts. And then other ways, you get people that are just downright nasty, and they know everything and tell other writers, you know, give up what you just posted as awful. Or there's a typo in the meme, you shared that somebody, you know, 80 people removed for you and had posted, right? So it's just you have to, there's lots of good, but sometimes you just have to take the bad with it.   Michael Hingson  46:26 Yeah. And you kind of wonder about some of the people who just do that sort of stuff. I wonder if they would do it face to face, you know, and that's the problem with social media is that you're not really making the same level of connections. Yeah, that's very true. And we lose and have lost so much of the art of conversation, because that happens. And it's so unfortunate that we don't connect like we used to. And I realized that the other side of that is that we live in a world where there is so much technology that gives us the opportunity to connect and so on. But we don't really connect if we don't take full advantage of that. And when we just get in social media, and we don't have conversations and other things like that, then we're really missing a lot of what's available to us.   Diane Bator  47:18 Oh, absolutely. That was one thing that I know. Canada In particular, we had a lot of lockdowns, especially in Ontario. So there was a lot of things we could not get to do. But joining some of these groups, like I part of Sisters in Crime and crime writers of Canada and that sort of thing, and being able to sit in on some of these really great webinars, and even just a meeting where people are chit chatting back and forth, which was really great, because you get to meet different people and learn different things. And, you know, people, we have a writing group that literally has writers from Vancouver, all the way over to Halifax, so from west to east, and everybody in between, which is really neat, because we never would have met otherwise. And you can have those kinds of conversations,   Michael Hingson  48:11 all sorts of different writing styles. So not just mystery, and not just fiction.   Diane Bator  48:16 No, it's the one particular group was with the writers union of Canada, and everybody's very mixed genres. You know, we help each other out, we give each other support and it's just just a really nice group to hang out with.   Michael Hingson  48:31 Do you ever associate with any of the writers groups or whatever? Through writers in Canada? Do you associate with any of the groups in the US?   Diane Bator  48:40 Absolutely. Sisters in Crime has been really great because they have groups all over the place and I've been able to sit in on different webinars and different meetings. Oh my gosh, Grand Canyon has a great group Arizona together group I was with I can't even remember where they were New Jersey, I want to say something like that.   Michael Hingson  49:04 There's a lot of crime to talk about back there. But there's a lot of   Diane Bator  49:07 crime everywhere. It's been really great to get all these other perspectives and and just some great ideas. Well, that   Michael Hingson  49:18 is, you know, really cool. And that's of course, the whole point by connecting with other people. You do get other ideas, don't you? So now you have to create a a book or a series involving all the Sisters in Crime and but you can have a lot of fun or that   Diane Bator  49:35 actually, I've had some kind of a similar idea to that. But yeah,   Michael Hingson  49:40 how about brothers in crime?   Diane Bator  49:43 Maybe you know,   Michael Hingson  49:44 equality after after   Diane Bator  49:46 course. Well, Sisters in Crime also has brothers in there. So it's not just sisters out there.   Michael Hingson  49:54 There you go. Have you thought of writing any other genres like you know, science fiction or, or, or other kinds of fiction types of things.   Diane Bator  50:04 Actually, this, the book that I'm collaborating on with my friend is fantasy. So he's a huge fantasy buff. And he's, like I said, he's making all the notes and making all the little fine tune details. And I just have to sit down and write the story. I also have a YA fantasy that I've been working on, when I have nothing else to do. And that will come out one day as well. And I also wrote my first stage place. So that's when they, you know, we'll end up doing the workshop with and then we'll see what happens. So like, what can you tell us   Michael Hingson  50:39 about the play?   Diane Bator  50:40 It is a ghost story.   Michael Hingson  50:43 Now we're getting there, right?   Diane Bator  50:45 Because I work in the theater. It's a very old book. The building was built in 1875. And, yes, we have our ghosts. I haven't seen any of them. But every now and then you something will happen. They get let go. Okay.   Michael Hingson  51:01 Of course, down here in California, in San Diego, there's the Del Coronado hotel. I don't know if you're familiar with the del, but they have ghosts, there is a one room where a woman has died. And she she haunts that room. And a number of people have said that they have seen her. She's not a mean ghost. Now they've stayed in the room. And they've seen her in the halls. But people have said they've seen her in the room. So everybody wants to stay in that room, of course. But the Dell apparently has several ghosts, and nobody is near as I read. Recall, her understand, seems to be a bad ghost, which is good. Yeah. And it's, it's a lot more fun. But well, I'm looking forward to hearing more about the ghost story when it's done. So you don't have to come up and do a book with a blind character. And I'll be glad to help you with that. But we haven't seen that many that are that are really portraying blind people very well, in in a lot of things with disabilities in general. There have been various books of one sort or another. And of course, there have been plays in movies and television shows. But a lot of the time the actors aren't people with disabilities, which really leaves out dimensions that we would add to it. Dakota, of course, won the Oscar this year for Best Picture. And I think part of what made it successful was that they were really dealing with people who were deaf, which is important.   Diane Bator  52:24 Yeah, absolutely. So yeah, we should   Michael Hingson  52:27 should talk about doing a book with blank character   Diane Bator  52:30 works for me characters.   Michael Hingson  52:31 There you go. Well,   Diane Bator  52:33 we can do that's great. For sure.   Michael Hingson  52:34 Well, any last thoughts that you have? We've been doing this for a while, are there any last thoughts that you'd like to bring up about anything we discussed or advice you want to give to people?   Diane Bator  52:45 Just as I say, you know, if you if anybody out there you're looking to write a book, do a little research, find out anything you need to know any questions you have. Find people who have written books, ask questions, contrary to what you may hear on social media. And my favorite saying is there are no stupid questions I've already asked them. So ask the questions, look for people to help support you and write the book.   Michael Hingson  53:15 I am a firm believer, and there is no such thing as a stupid question. Or I think that when people ask what you regard as stupid questions, sometimes you do wonder how much they observed. For example, I once spoke to a book club, they said, we read your book, we read Thunderdome, we'd really like you to come in and talk with us. And we happen to actually be in Novato, California, where I was living at the time. And all these people said, we read it, we really want to talk with you about the book. I go and we start talking and I open the floor to questions. And the first question that someone asked is, why were you in the World Trade Center? Now, we spent a lot of time talking about that in the book, which makes you really wonder what they were thinking and maybe they were just trying to be engaging. But to ask that question. Is is still what have you been observing? And how much did you absorb of what you read? There are so many other ways to have asked that and gotten more content into it. But then I took the question and said, well, the vision issue isn't what I was doing in the World Trade Center on that day, but how I got there, so I you know, you can you can deal with that. But still, I'm amazed sometimes at what people observe and don't observe. Yeah. Which goes back to your comment about negativity on social media a lot of the time, but we we we cope. Oh, absolutely. Well, if people want to learn more about what you're doing, if they want to learn about the blog and possibly start reading it, if they want to find your books and so on. Can you tell us all about that? How do they do that?   54:58 easiest place to find it Everything is my website. And it's Diane Bater.ca. Links. Yeah, D I A N E B A T O R are all one word, dot a, you're saying you have links. I have links to all kinds of fun things that needs a little bit of updating the blog, the escape with the writer blog, I've got some fun little videos that I do up, we go up on to Lake Huron, and I take a bunch of little 22nd videos, which just kind of peace and quiet and calm. All of my books, there's links to buy sites for all of my books. I've got, oh, my goodness, books that I'm helping other people with, or have helped other people with. You name it stuff about book coaching.   55:52 Well, great. Well, I hope people will go to Dianebetor.ca. And check it all out. And we'll engage with you, I assume that there's a way to contact you on the website. Yeah, definitely. Cool. So I hope people will do that. This has definitely been fun and informative. And I think that it's always exciting to to meet people who are creative and write and are able to express themselves and engage other people. So I really appreciate you taking the time to be with us today. And giving us a lot of your time and information.   Diane Bator  56:31 Oh, thank you. I appreciate being on cares. I loved reading about your story and finding out what you do. So this has really been fascinating for me as well.   56:41 Well, it's definitely figuring out ways to work together, I'd love to explore that. That sounds terrific. And for all of you listening, reach out to Diane and Dianebator.ca and engage her. And also we'd like you to engage us so please feel free to email me if you've got thoughts or comments about this or any of our episodes. You can reach us at Michaelhi, M I C H A E L H I  accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. So MichaelhI at accessibe.com. Or you can go to our podcast page, which is www dot Michael hingson.com M I C H A E L H I N G S O N.com/podcast. And we'd love to hear your thoughts. I hope that you will give us a five star rating after listening to this episode. And when this goes up, Diane, we will definitely make sure that you know about it and you can share it everywhere you'd like to share it as well.   Diane Bator  57:45 Absolutely. I'll put the link on my website as well. So well thank you   Michael Hingson  57:49 all for listening. And we hope that you enjoyed this and that she'll be back next time and Diane once more. Thanks very much for being with us.   Diane Bator  57:56 Thank you as well Michael, really appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  58:02 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Hope Motivates Action
S11 | E06 The Language of Strengths with Tina Clem

Hope Motivates Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 33:16


Kids who have had trouble in the past don't always get a fair shake. They've shoplifted or been in other trouble with the law so the community writes them off as “bad news” or “a lost cause.” But really, the challenge is likely that they just haven't had the resources and support they need to be successful.That's where people like Tina Clem and the Calgary Youth Justice Society (CYJS) come in. Tina has worked with youth in many capacities, from residential care to early intervention to sexuality education in high schools. But after her son was born, she wanted to shift her energies. Tina has always had hope for youth and their success, but in the last 10 years, she's come to believe that hope must be paired with purposeful and thoughtful action.With CYJS, Tina works with community volunteers to support youth that have been in the court system, helping them to see hope in their own lives. Together, CYJS and Tina equip young people with language around strengths so they can begin to develop their leadership skills and potential.I love the mindset that while the youth Tina works with may have had troubled pasts, they possess strengths that can help turn their lives around. Listen in for more!About Tina Clem:Tina proudly calls herself a youth worker by trade and at heart with over 25 years experience working with vulnerable youth that includes residential treatment, positive youth development and prevention programming, comprehensive sexuality education and formal mentoring programming.  She strives to combine direct service delivery experience with a solid understanding of youth development theories, frameworks and research when developing and delivering quality programming for youth.As the current Program Director at Calgary Youth Justice Society, Tina leads and supports a team of passionate high performers to deliver quality strengths based programming and drives strategic change for the organization through innovation, quality and expanding the reach of our programming. Tina has a BA Psychology from U of C and CYCC Diploma from Mount Royal College/University.Mentioned In This Episode:Calgary Youth Justice SocietyConnect with Calgary Youth Justice Society on LinkedInFollow Calgary Youth Justice Committees on InstagramFollow In The Lead on InstagramWellness WebinarExpert in Hope

On Religion
On Literary Persecutions, Sex Scandals, and American Minority Religions

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 68:34


Megan Goodwin, Ph.D., is Program Director for Sacred Writes, a Luce-funded project promoting public scholarship on religion hosted by Northeastern University. Her first book, Abusing Religion: Literary Persecutions, Sex Scandals, and American Minority Religions is available through Rutgers. Visit Dr. Megan Goodwin's website here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

We're Not Kidding
Researching Single, Never-Married, Childfree Women of Color with Kimberly Martinez Phillips

We're Not Kidding

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 67:45


Kimberly Martinez Phillips is a Doctoral Candidate at Memorial University in Newfoundland and Labrador. Her dissertation studies single, never-married, childfree women of color. She has a bachelor's degree in both Cultural Anthropology and Criminology, a master's in Sociology, and has been teaching sociology courses in colleges and universities for over 24 years. Previous to her work in academia she was a Program Director, Jury Consultant, Local Evaluator, Safety Educator, and Health Educator working in extremely diverse communities. In this episode, Kimberly shares what is coming to light from her research interviewing single, never-married, childfree women of color. We also talk about her past study on the portrayal of the single woman in films and how what she's learning from her research participants is that they are gloriously happy and fulfilled counter to the crazy cat lady narrative. Follow and connect with Kimberly: Website: ichoosefeminism.com Twitter: @ichoosefeminism Instagram: @kimmartinezphillips Listen to additional interviews featuring Kimberly Martinez Phillips: New Legacy Radio Spinsterhood Reimagined ______________________ Join a growing global network of childfree people: wnk-club.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/anna-marie-olson/message

Real Life Real Crime
Fire Chief Part 1

Real Life Real Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 53:36


Woody tells the story of a trusted Fire Chief who's horrific past and current life choices finally catch up with him! #TrueCrime #TrueCrimeCommunity #FireChief #RealLifeRealCrime #Podcast This weeks Sponsors: SHOPIFY click the link to get a free 14 day trial and the full suite of features for rlrc listeners! (15:06) Last weeks Sponsors:  JUST THRIVE: Use code rlrc at checkout to get 15% off site wide for RLRC listeners! (11:44) We ask for the continued support of the Coco family as they go through this next chapter. Please continue to call in tips about Barbara Blount @225-395-1302 or use the TIP button on Real Life Real Crime, the app. Want more episodes? Download our app in the app store or Google Play and listen straight from the app! Follow us on: INSTAGRAM: @REALLIFEREALCRIME, @OVERTONWOODY Twitter: @reallifecrime For Business Inquiries ONLY, please contact: cyndi@realliferealcrime.com RLRC LOVES: LOPA- Woody loves LOPA. You hear him mention it at the end of each episode. Please click the LOPA link and REGISTER. It takes 2 minutes and just 1 donor can save up to 8 LIVES! RLRC has raised thousands of dollars for LOPA. Merakey Gateway is near and dear to RLRC. This transition service provides comprehensive transition training for individuals diagnosed with autism & related orders as they transition into a life of greater independence. Their programs work with the individual to identify personal goals and create a plan to accomplish their dreams. Whether an individual wants to get a job, go to college, or just become more independent, the Gateway team can assist with an individualized pathway to success. The transition plan will include skills related to employment, community life, housing, finances and independent living. Gateway Ink is a social enterprise screen printing business which trains & employs participants as they learn vocational skills. Their Shop Manager and Program Director work together in developing individual training techniques and identifying accommodation needs for the participant to bring into their future careers. Orders placed through Gateway Ink Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 97: Industrial AI

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 47:41


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. The topic is Industrial AI. Our guest is Professor Jay Lee, the Ohio Eminent Scholar, the L.W. Scott Alter Chair Professor in Advanced Manufacturing, and the Founding Director of the Industrial AI Center at the University of Cincinnati (https://www.iaicenter.com/). In this conversation, we talk about how AI does many things but to be applicable; the industry needs it to work every time, which puts additional constraints on what can be done by when. If you liked this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 81: From Predictive to Diagnostic Manufacturing Augmentation (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/81). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Industrial AI is a breakthrough that will take a while to mature. It implies discipline, not just algorithms. In fact, it entails a systems architecture consisting of data, algorithm, platform, and operation. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Industrial AI. Our guest is Professor Jay Lee, the Ohio Eminent Scholar, and the L.W. Scott Alter Chair Professor in Advanced Manufacturing, and the Founding Director of the Industrial AI Center at the University of Cincinnati. In this conversation, we talk about how AI does many things but to be applicable, industry needs it to work every time, which puts on additional constraints on what can be done by when. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Jay, it's a pleasure to have you here. How are you today? JAY: Good. Thank you for inviting me to have a good discussion about industrial AI. TROND: Yeah, I think it will be a good discussion. Look, Jay, you are such an accomplished person, both in terms of your academics and your industrial credentials. I wanted to quickly just go through where you got to where you are because I think, especially in your case, it's really relevant to the kinds of findings and the kinds of exploration that you're now doing. You started out as an engineer. You have a dual degree. You have a master's in industrial management also. And then you had a career in industry, worked at real factories, GM factories, Otis elevators, and even on Sikorsky helicopters. You had that background, and then you went on to do a bunch of different NSF grants. You got yourself; I don't know, probably before that time, a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Columbia. The rest of your career, and you correct me, but you've been doing this mix of really serious industrial work combined with academics. And you've gone a little bit back and forth. Tell me a little bit about what went into your mind as you were entering the manufacturing topics and you started working in factories. Why have you oscillated so much between industry and practice? And tell me really this journey; give me a little bit of specifics on what brought you on this journey and where you are today. JAY: Well, thank you for talking about this career because I cut my teeth from the factory early years. And so, I learned a lot of fundamental things in early years of automation. In the early 1980s, in the U.S, it was a tough time trying to compete with the Japanese automotive industry. So, of course, the Big Three in Detroit certainly took a big giant step, tried to implement a very good manufacturing automation system. So I was working for Robotics Vision System at that time in New York, in Hauppage, New York, Long Island. And shortly, later on, it was invested by General Motors. And in the meantime, I was studying part-time in Columbia for my mechanical engineering, Doctor of Engineering. And, of course, later on, I transferred to George Washington because I had to make a career move. So I finished my Ph.D. Doctor of Science in George Washington later. But the reason we stopped working on that is because of the shortage of knowledge in making automation work in the factory. So I was working full-time trying to implement the robots automation in a factory. In the meantime, I also found a lack of knowledge on how to make a robot work and not just how to make a robot move. Making it move means you can program; you can do very fancy motion. But that's not what factories want. What factories really want is a non-stop working system so they can help people to accomplish the job. So the safety, and the certainty, the accuracy, precision, maintenance, all those things combined together become a headache actually. You have to calibrate the robot all the time. You have to reprogram them. So eventually, I was teaching part-time in Stony Brook also later on how to do the robotic stuff. And I think that was the early part of my career. And most of the time I spent in factory and still in between the part-time study and part-time working. But later on, I got a chance to move to Washington, D.C. I was working for U.S. Postal Service headquarters as Program Director for automation. In 1988, post service started a big initiative trying to automate a 500 mil facility in the U.S. There are about 115 number one facilities which is like New York handled 8 million mail pieces per day at that time; you're talking about '88. But most are manual process, so packages. So we started developing the AI pattern recognition, hand-written zip code recognition, robotic postal handling, and things like that. So that was the opportunity that attracted me actually to move away from automotive to service industry. So it was interesting because you are working with top scientists from different universities, different companies to make that work. So that was the early stage of the work. Later on, of course, I had a chance to work with the National Science Foundation doing content administration in 1991. That gave me the opportunity to work with professors in universities, of course. So then, by working with them, I was working on a lot of centers like engineering research centers and also the Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program, and later on, the materials processing manufacturing programs. So 1990 was a big time for manufacturing in the United States. A lot of government money funded the manufacturer research, of course. And so we see great opportunity, like, for example, over the years, all the rapid prototyping started in 1990s. It took about 15-20 years before additive manufacturing came about. So NSF always looks 20 years ahead, which is a great culture, great intellectual driver. And also, they're open to the public in terms of the knowledge sharing and the talent and the education. So I think NSF has a good position to provide STEM education also to allow academics, professors to work with industry as well, not just purely academic work. So we support both sides. So that work actually allowed me to understand what is real status in research, in academics, also how far from real implementation. So in '95, I had the opportunity to work in Japan actually. I had an opportunity...NSF had a collaboration program with the MITI government in Japan. So I took the STA fellowship called science and technology fellow, STA, and to work in Japan for six months and to work with 55 organizations like Toyota, Komatsu, Nissan, FANUC, et cetera. So by working with them, then you also understand what the real technology level Japan was, Japanese companies were. So then you got calibration in terms of how much U.S. manufacturing? How much Japanese manufacturing? So that was in my head, actually. I had good weighting factors to see; hmm, what's going on here between these two countries? That was the time. So when I came back, I said, oh, there's something we have to do differently. So I started to get involved in a lot of other things. In 1998, I had the opportunity to work for United Technologies because UTC came to see me and said, "Jay, you should really apply what you know to real companies." So they brought me to work as a Director for Product Environment Manufacturing Department for UTRC, United Technology Research Center, in East Hartford. Obviously, UTC business included Pratt & Whitney jet engines, Sikorsky helicopters, Otis elevators, Carrier Air Conditioning systems, Hamilton Sundstrand, et cetera. So all the products they're worldwide, but the problem is you want to support global operations. You really need not just the knowledge, what you know, but also the physical usage, what you don't know. So you know, and you don't know. So how much you don't know about a product usage, that's how the data is supposed to be coming back. Unfortunately, back in 1999, I have to tell you; unfortunately, most of the product data never came back. By the time it got back, it is more like a repair overhaul recur every year to a year later. So that's not good. So in Japan, I was experimenting the first remote machine monitoring system using the internet actually in 1995. So I published a paper in '98 about how to remotely use physical machine and cyber machine together. In fact, I want to say that's the first digital twin but as a cyber-physical model together. That was in my paper in 1998 in Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture. TROND: So, in fact, you were a precursor in so many of these fields. And it just strikes me that as you're going through your career here, there are certain pieces that you seem to have learned all along the way because when you are a career changer oscillating between public, private, semi-private, research, business, you obviously run the risk of being a dilettante in every field, but you seem to have picked up just enough to get on top of the next job with some insight that others didn't have. And then, when you feel like you're frustrated in that current role, you jump back or somewhere else to learn something new. It's fascinating to me because, obviously, your story is longer than this. You have startup companies with your students and others in this business and then, of course, now with the World Economic Forum Lighthouse factories and the work you've been doing for Foxconn as well. So I'm just curious. And then obviously, we'll get to industrial AI, which is so interesting in your perspective here because it's not just the technology of it; it is the industrial practice of this new domain that you have this very unique, practical experience of how a new technology needs to work. Well, you tell me, how did you get to industrial AI? Because you got there to, you know, over the last 15-20 years, you integrated all of this in a new academic perspective. JAY: Well, that's where we start. So like I said earlier, I realized industry we did not have data back in the late 1990s. And in 1999, dotcom collapsed, remember? TROND: Yes, yes. JAY: Yeah. So all the companies tried to say, "Well, we're e-business, e-business, e-commerce, e-commerce," then in 2000, it collapsed. But the reality is that people were talking about e-business, but in the real world, in industrial setting, there's no data almost. So I was thinking, I mean, it's time I need to think about how to look at data-centric perspectives, how to develop such a platform, and also analytics to support if one-day data comes with a worry-free kind of environment. So that's why I decided to transition to an academic career in the year 2000. So what I started thinking, in the beginning, was where has the most data? As we all know, the product lifecycle usage is out there. You have lots of data, but we're not collecting it. So eventually, I called a central Intelligent Maintenance System called IMS, not intelligent manufacturing system because maintenance has lots of usage data which most developers of a product don't know. But if we have a way to collect this data to analyze and predict, then we can guarantee the product uptime or the value creation, and then the customer will gain most of the value back. Now we can use the data feedback to close-loop design. That was the original thinking back in the year 2000, which at that time, no cell phone could connect to the internet. Of course, nobody believed you. So we used a term called near-zero downtime, near-zero downtime, ZDT. Nobody believed us. Intel was my first founding member. So I made a pitch to FANUC in 2001. Of course, they did not believe it either. Of course, FANUC in 2014 adopted ZDT, [laughs] ZDT as a product name. But as a joke, when I talked to the chairman, the CEO of the company in 2018 in Japan, Inaba-san that "Do you know first we present this ZDT to your company in Michigan? They didn't believe it. Now you guys adopted." "Oh, I didn't know you use it." So when he came to visit in 2019, they brought the gift. [laughs] So anyway, so what happened is during the year, so we worked with the study of 6 companies, 20 companies and eventually they became over 100 companies. And in 2005, I worked with Procter & Gamble and GE Aircraft Engine. They now became GE Aviation; then, they got a different environment. So machine learning became a typical thing you use every day, every program, but we don't really emphasize AI at that time. The reason is machine learning is just a tool. It's an algorithm like a support-vector machine, self-organizing map, and logistic regression. All those are just supervised learning or now supervised learning techniques. And people use it. We use it like standard work every day, but we don't talk about AI. But over the years, when you work with so many companies, then you realize the biggest turning point was Toyota 2005 and P&G in 2006. The reason I'm telling you 2005 is Toyota had big problems in the factory in Georgetown, Kentucky, where the Camry factory is located. So they had big compressor problems. So we implemented using machine learning, the support-vector machine, and also principal component analysis. And we enable that the surge of a compressor predicted and avoided and never happened. So until today -- TROND: So they have achieved zero downtime after that project, essentially. JAY: Yeah. So that really is the turning point. Of course, at P&G, the diaper line continues moving the high volume. They can predict things, reduce downtime to 1%. There's a lot of money. Diaper business that is like $10 billion per year. TROND: It's so interesting you focus on downtime, Jay, because obviously, in this hype, which we'll get to as well, people seem to focus so much on fully automated versus what you're saying, which is it doesn't really, you know, we will get to the automation part, but it is the downtime that's where a lot of the savings is obviously. Because whether it's a lights out or lights on, humans are not the real saving here. And the real accomplishment is in zero downtime because that is the industrialization factor. And that is what allows the system to keep operating. Of course, it has to do with automation, but it's not just that. Can you then walk us through what then became industrial AI for you? Because as I've now understood it, it is a highly specific term to you. It's not just some sort of fluffy idea of very, very advanced algorithms and robots running crazy around autonomously. You have very, very specific system elements. And they kind of have to work together in some architectural way before you're willing to call it an industrial AI because it may be a machine tool here, and a machine tool there, and some data here. But for you, unless it's put in place in a working architecture, you're not willing to call it, I mean, it may be an AI, but it is not an industrial AI. So how did this thinking then evolve for you? And what are the elements that you think are crucial for something that you even can start to call an industrial AI? Which you now have a book on, so you're the authority on the subject. JAY: Well, I think the real motivation was after you apply all the machine learning toolkits so long...and a company like National Instruments, NI, in Austin, Texas, they licensed our machine learning toolkits in 2015. And eventually, in 2017, they started using the embedding into LabVIEW version. So we started realizing, actually, the toolkit is very important, not just from the laboratory point of view but also from the production and practitioners' point of view from industry. Of course, researchers use it all the time for homework; I mean, that's fine. So eventually, I said...the question came to me about 2016 in one of our industry advisory board meeting. You have so many successes, but the successes that happen can you repeat? Can you repeat? Can you repeatably have the same success in many, many other sites? Repeatable, scalable, sustainable, that's the key three keywords. You cannot just have a one-time success and then just congratulate yourself and forget it, no. So eventually, we said, oh, to make that repeat sustainable, repeatable, you have a systematic discipline. TROND: I'm so glad you say this because I have taken part in a bunch of best practice schemes and sometimes very optimistically by either an industry association or even a government entity. And they say, "Oh yeah, let's just all go on a bunch of factory visits." Or if it's just an IT system, "Let's just all write down what we did, and then share it with other people." But in fact, it doesn't seem to me like it is that easy. It's not like if I just explain what I think I have learned; that's not something others can learn from. Can you explain to me what it really takes to make something replicable? Because you have done that or helped Foxconn do that, for example. And now you're obviously writing up case studies that are now shared in the World Economic Forum across companies. But there's something really granular but also something very systemic and structured about the way things have to be explained in order to actually make it repeatable. What is the sustainability factor that actually is possible to not just blue copy but turn it into something in your own factory? JAY: Well, I think that there are basically several things. The data is one thing. We call it the data technology, DT, and which means data quality evaluation. How do you understand what to use, what not to use? How do you know which data is useful? And how do you know where the data is usable? It doesn't mean useful data is usable, just like you have a blood donation donor, but the blood may not be usable if the donor has HIV. I like to use an analogy like food. You got a fish in your hand; wow, great. But you have to ask where the fish comes from. [chuckles] If it comes from polluted water, it's not edible, right? So great fish but not edible. TROND: So there's a data layer which has to be usable, and it has to be put somewhere and put to use. It actually then has to be used. It can't just be theoretically usable. JAY: So we have a lot of useful data people collect. The problem is people never realized lots of them are not usable because of a lack of a label. They have no background, and they're not normalized. So eventually, that is a problem. And even if you have a lot of data, it doesn't mean it is usable. TROND: So then I guess that's how you get to your second layer, which I guess most people just call machine learning, but for you, it's an algorithmic layer, which is where some of the structuring gets done and some of the machines that put an analysis on this, put in place automatic procedures. JAY: And machine learning to me it's like cooking ware like a kitchen. You got a pan fry; you got a steamer; you got the grill. Those are tools to cook the food, the data. Food is like data. Cooking ware is like AI. But it depends on purpose. For example, you want fish. What do you want to eat first? I want soup. There's a difference. Do you want to grill? Do you want to just deep fry? So depending on how you want to eat it, the cooking ware will be selected differently. TROND: Well, and that's super interesting because it's so easy to say, well, all these algorithms and stuff they're out there, and all you have to do is pick up some algorithms. But you're saying, especially in a factory, you can't just pick any tool. You have to really know what the effect would be if you start to...for example, on downtime, right? Because I'm imagining there are very many advanced techniques that could be super advanced, but they are perhaps not the right tool for the job, for the workers that are there. So how does that come into play? Are these sequential steps, by the way? So once you figure out what the data is then, you start to fiddle with your tools. JAY: Well, there are two perspectives; one perspective is predict and prevent. So you predict something is going to happen. You prevent it from happening, number one. Number two, understand the root causes and potential root causes. So that comes down to the visible and invisible perspective. So from the visible world, we know what to measure. For example, if you have high blood pressure, you measure blood pressure every day, but that may not be the reason for high blood pressure. It may be because of your DNA, maybe because of the food you eat, because of lack of exercise, because of many other things, right? TROND: Right. JAY: So if you keep measuring your blood pressure doesn't mean you have no heart attack. Okay, so if you don't understand the reason, measuring blood pressure is not a problem. So I'm saying that you know what you don't know. So we need to find out what you don't know. So the correlation of invisible, I call, visible-invisible. So I will predict, but you also want to know the invisible reason relationship so you can prevent that relationship from happening. So that is really called deep mining those invisibles. So we position ourselves very clearly between visible-invisible. A lot of people just say, "Oh, we know what the problem is." The problem is not a purpose. For example, the factory manufacturing there are several very strong purposes, number one quality, right? Worry-free quality. Number two, your efficiency, how much you produce per dollar. If you say that you have great quality, but I spent $10,000 to make it, it is very expensive. But if you spend $2 to make it, wow, that's great. How did you do it? So quality per dollar is a very different way of judging how good you are. You got A; I spent five days studying. I got A; I spent two hours studying. Now you show the capability difference. TROND: I agree. And then the third factor in your framework seems to be platform. And that's when I think a lot of companies go wrong as well because platform is...at least historically in manufacturing, you pick someone else's platform. You say I'm going to implement something. What's available on the market, and what can I afford, obviously? Or ideally, what's the state of the art? And I'll just do that because everyone seems to be doing that. What does platform mean to you, and what goes into this choice? If you're going to create this platform for industrial AI, what kind of a decision is that? JAY: So DT is data, AT is algorithm, and PT is platform, PT platform. Platform means some common things are used in a shared community. For example, kitchen is a platform. You can cook. I can cook. I can cook Chinese food. I can cook Italian food. I can cook Indian food. Same kitchen but different recipe, different seasoning, but same cooking ware. TROND: Correct. Well, because you have a good kitchen, right? JAY: Yes. TROND: So that's -- JAY: [laughs] TROND: Right? JAY: On the platform, you have the most frequently used tool, not everything. You don't need 100 cooking ware in your kitchen. You probably have ten or even five most daily used. TROND: Regardless of how many different cuisines you try to cook. JAY: Exactly. That's called the AI machine toolkit. So we often work with companies and say, "You don't need a lot of tools, come on. You don't need deep learning. You need a good logistic regression and support-vector machine, and you're done." TROND: Got it. JAY: Yeah, you don't need a big chainsaw to cut small bushes. You don't need it. TROND: Right. And that's a very different perspective from the IT world, where many times you want the biggest tool possible because you want to churn a lot of data fast, and you don't really know what you're looking for sometimes. So I guess the industrial context here really constrains you. It's a constraint-based environment. JAY: Yes. So industry, like I said, the industry we talked about three Ps like I said: problems, purposes, and processes. So normally, problem comes from...the main thing is logistic problems, machine, and factory problems, workforce problems, the quality problems, energy problem, ignition problem, safety problems. So the problem happens every day. That's why in factory world, we call it firefighting. Typically, you firefight every day. TROND: And is that your metaphor for the last part of your framework, which is actually operation? So operation sounds really nice and structured, right? JAY: [chuckles] Yes. TROND: As if that was like, yeah, that's the real thing, process. We got this. But in reality, it feels sometimes, to many who are operating a factory; it's a firefight. JAY: Sometimes the reason lean theme work, Six Sigma, you turn a problem into a process, five Ss process, okay? And fishbone diagram, Pareto chart, and Kaizen before and after. So all the process, SOP, so doesn't matter which year workforce comes in, they just repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat. So in Toyota, the term used to be called manufacturing is just about the discipline. It's what they said. The Japanese industry manufacturing is about discipline, how you follow a discipline to everyday standard way, sustainable way, consistent way, and then you make good products. This is how the old Toyota was talking about, old one. But today, they don't talk that anymore. Training discipline is only one thing; you need to understand the value of customers. TROND: Right. So there are some new things that have to be added to the lean practices, right? JAY: Yes. TROND: As time goes by. So talk to me then more about the digital element because industrial AI to you, clearly, there's a very clear digital element, but there's so many, many other things there. So I'm trying to summarize your framework. You have these four factors: data, algorithms, platforms, and operations. These four aspects of a system that is the challenge you are dealing with in any factory environment. And some of them have to do with digital these days, and others, I guess, really have to do more with people. So when that all comes together, do you have some examples? I don't know, we talked about Toyota, but I know you've worked with Foxconn and Komatsu or Siemens. Can you give me an example of how this framework of yours now becomes applied in a context? Where do people pick up these different elements, and how do they use them? JAY: There's a matrix thinking. So horizontal thinking is a common thing; you need to have good digital thread including DT, data technology, AT, algorithms or analytics, PT, platform, edge cloud, and the things, and OT operation like scheduling, optimizations, stuff like that. Now, you got verticals, quality vertical, cost vertical, efficiency verticals, safety verticals, emission verticals. So you cannot just talk about general. You got to have focus on verticals. For example, let me give you one example: quality verticals. Quality is I'm the factory manager. I care about quality. Yes, the customer will even care more, so they care. But you have a customer come to your shop once a month to check. You ask them, "Why you come?" "Oh, I need to see how good your production." "How about you don't have to come? You can see my entire quality." "Wow, how do I do that?" So eventually, we develop a stream of quality code, SOQ, Stream Of Quality. So it's not just about the product is good. I can go back to connect all the processes of the quality segment of each station. Connect them together. Just like you got a fish, oh, okay, the fish is great. But I wonder, when the fish came out of water, when the fish was in the truck, how long was it on the road? And how long was it before reaching my physical distribution center and to my home? So if I have a sensor, I can tell you all the temperature history inside the box. So when you get your fish, you take a look; oh, from the moment the fish came out of the boat until it reached my home, the temperature remained almost constant. Wow. Now you are worry-free. It's just one thing. So you connect together. So that's why we call SOQ, Stream Of Quality, like a river connected. So by the time a customer gets a quality product, they can trace back and say, "Wow, good. How about if I let you see it before you come? How about you don't come?" I say, "Oh, you know what? I like it." That's what this type of manufacturing is about. It just doesn't make you happy. You have to make the customer happy, worry-free. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: So, Jay, you took the words out of my mouth because I wanted to talk about the future. I'm imagining when you say worry-free, I mean, you're talking about a soon-to-be state of manufacturing. Or are you literally saying there are some factories, some of the excellence factories where you've won awards in the World Economic Forum or other places that are working towards this worry-free manufacturing, and to some extent, they have achieved it? Well, elaborate for me a little bit about the future outlook of manufacturing and especially this people issue because you know that I'm engaged...The podcast is called Augmented Podcast. I'm engaged in this debate about automation. Well, is there a discrepancy between automation and augmentation? And to what extent is this about people running the system? Or is it the machines that we should optimize to run all the system? For you, it's all about worry-free. First of all, just answer this question, is worry-free a future ideal, or is it actually here today if you just do the right things? JAY: Well, first of all, worry-free is our mindset where the level of satisfaction should be, right? TROND: Yep. JAY: So to make manufacturing happen is not about how to make good quality, how to make people physically have less worry, how to make customers less worry is what is. But the reason we have a problem with workforce today, I mean, we have a hard time to hire not just highly skilled workers but even regular workforce. Because for some reason, not just U.S., it seems everywhere right now has similar problems. People have more options these days to select other living means. They could be an Uber driver. [laughs] They could be...I don't know. So there are many options. You don't have to just go to the factory to make earnings. They can have a car and drive around Uber and Lyft or whatever. They can deliver the food and whatever. So they can do many other things. And so today, you want to make workforce work environment more attractive. You have to make sure that they understand, oh, this is something they can learn; they can grow. They are fulfilled because the environment gives them a lot of empowerment. The vibe, the environment gives them a wow, especially young people; when you attract them from college, they'd like a wow kind of environment, not just ooh, okay. [laughs] TROND: Yeah. Well, it's interesting you're saying this. I mean, we actually have a lack of workers. So it's not just we want to make factories full of machines; it's actually the machines are actually needed just because there are no workers to fill these jobs. But you're looking into a future where you do think that manufacturing is and will be an attractive place going forward. That seems to be that you have a positive vision of the future we're going into. You think this is attractive. It's interesting for workers. JAY: Yeah. See, I often say that there are some common horizontal we have to use all the day. Vertical is the purpose, quality. I talked about vertical quality first, quality. But what are the horizontal common? I go A, B, C, D, E, F. What's A? AI. B is big data. C is cyber and cloud. D is digital or digital twin, whatever. E is environment ecosystem and emission reduction. What's F? Very important, fun. [laughs] If you miss that piece, who wants to work for a place there's no fun? You tell me would you work for...you and I, we're talking now because it's fun. You talk to people and different perspectives. I talk to you, and I say, wow, you've built some humongous network here in the physical...the future of digital, not just professional space but also social space but also the physical space. So, again, the fun things inspire people, right? TROND: They do. So talking about inspiring people then, Jay, if you were to paint a picture of this future, I guess, we have talked just now about workers and how if you do it right, it's going to be really attractive workplaces in manufacturing. How about for, I guess, one type of worker, these knowledge workers more generally? Or, in fact, is there a possibility that you see that not just is it going to be a fun place to be for great, many workers, but it's actually going to be an exciting knowledge workplace again? Which arguably, industrialization has gone through many stages. And being in a factory wasn't always all that rosy, but it was certainly financially rewarding for many. And it has had an enormous career progression for others who are able to find ways to exploit this system to their benefit. How do you see that going forward? Is there a scope, is there a world in which factory work can or perhaps in an even new way become truly knowledge work where all of these industrial AI factors, the A to the Fs, produce fun, but they produce lasting progression, and career satisfaction, empowerment, all these buzzwords that everybody in the workplace wants and perhaps deserves? JAY: That's how we look at the future workforce is not just about the work but also the knowledge force. So basically, the difference is that people come in, and they become seasoned engineers, experienced engineers. And they retire, and the wisdom carries with them. Sometimes you have documentation, Excel sheet, PPT in the server, but nobody even looks at it. That's what today's worry is. So now what you want is living knowledge, living intelligence. The ownership is very important. For example, I'm a worker. I develop AI, not just the computer software to help the machine but also help me. I can augment the intelligence. I will augment it. When I make the product happen, the inspection station they check and just tell me pass or no pass. They also tell me the quality, 98, 97, but you pass. And then you get your score. You got a 70, 80, 90, but you got an A. 99, you got an A, 91, you got an A, 92. So what exactly does A mean? So, therefore, I give you a reason, oh, this is something. Then I learn. Okay, I can contribute. I can use voice. I can use my opinion to augment that no, labeled. So next time people work, oh, I got 97. And so the reason is the features need to be maintained, to be changed, and the system needs to be whatever. So eventually, you have a human contribute. The whole process could be consisting of 5 experts, 7, 10, 20, eventually owned by 20 people. That legacy continues. And you, as a worker, you feel like you're part of the team, leave a legacy for the next generation. So eventually, it's augmented intelligence. The third level will be actual implementation. So AI is not about artificial intelligence; it is about actual implementation. So people physically can implement things in a way they can make data to decisions. So their decision mean I want to make an adjustment. I want to find out how much I should adjust. Physically, I can see the gap. I can input the adjustment level. The system will tell me physically how could I improve 5%. Wow, that's good. I made a 5% improvement. Your boss also knows. And your paycheck got the $150 increase this month. Why? Because my contribution to the process quality improved, so I got the bonus. That's real-world feedback. TROND: Let me ask you one last question about how this is going to play out; I mean, in terms of how the skilling of workers is going to allow this kind of process. A lot of people are telling me about the ambitions that I'm describing...and some of the guests on the podcasts and also the Tulip software platform, the owner of this podcast, that it is sometimes optimistic to think that a lot of the training can just be embedded in the work process. That is obviously an ideal. But in America, for example, there is this idea that, well, you are either a trained worker or an educated worker, or you are an uneducated worker. And then yes, you can learn some things on the job. But there are limits to how much you can learn directly on the job. You have to be pulled out, and you have to do training and get competencies. As you're looking into the future, are there these two tracks? So you either get yourself a short or long college degree, and then you move in, and then you move faster. Or you are in the factory, and then if you then start to want to learn things, you have to pull yourself out and take courses, courses, courses and then go in? Or is it possible through these AI-enabled training systems to get so much real-time feedback that a reasonably intelligent person actually never has to be pulled out of work and actually they can learn on the job truly advanced things? So because there are two really, really different futures here, one, you have to scale up an educational system. And, two, you have to scale up more of a real-time learning system. And it seems to me that they're actually discrepant paths. JAY: Sure. To me, I have a framework in my book. I call it the four P structure, four P. First P is principle-based. For example, in Six Sigma, in lean manufacturing, there's some basic stuff you have to study, basic stuff like very simple fishbone diagram. You have to understand those things. You can learn by yourself what that is. You can take a very basic introduction course. So we can learn and give you a module. You can learn yourself or by a group, principle-based. The second thing is practice-based. Basically, we will prepare data for you. We will teach you how to use a tool, and you will do it together as a team or as individual, and you present results by using data I give to you, the tool I give to you. And it's all, yeah, my team A presented. Oh, they look interesting. And group B presented, so we are learning from each other. Then after the group learning is finished, you go back to your team in the real world. You create a project called project-based learning. You take a tool you learn. You take the knowledge you learn and to find a project like a Six Sigma project you do by yourself. You formulate. And then you come back to the class maybe a few weeks later, present with a real-world project based on the boss' approval. So after that, you've got maybe a black belt but with the last piece professional. Then you start teaching other people to repeat the first 3ps. You become master black belt. So we're not reinventing a new term. It really is about a similar concept like lean but more digital space. Lean is about personal experience, and digital is about the data experience is what's the big difference. TROND: But either way, it is a big difference whether you have to rely on technological experts, or you can do a lot of these things through training and can get to a level of aptitude that you can read the signals at least from the system and implement small changes, perhaps not the big changes but you can at least read the system. And whether they're low-code or no-code, you can at least then through learning frameworks, you can advance, and you can improve in not just your own work day, but you can probably in groups, and feedbacks, and stuff you can bring the whole team and the factory forward perhaps without relying only on these external types of expertise that are actually so costly because they take you away. So per definition, you run into this; I mean, certainly isn't worry-free because there is an interruption in the process. Well, look, this is fascinating. Any last thoughts? It seems to me that there are so many more ways we can dig deeper on your experience in any of these industrial contexts or even going deeper in each of the frameworks. Is there a short way to encapsulate industrial AI that you can leave us with just so people can really understand? JAY: Sure. TROND: It's such a fundamental thing, AI, and people have different ideas about that, and industry people have something in their head. And now you have combined them in a unique way. Just give us one sentence: what is industrial AI? What should people leave this podcast with? JAY: AI is a cognitive science, but industrial AI is a systematic discipline is one sentence. So that means people have domain knowledge. Now we have to create data to represent our domain then have the discipline to solve the domain problems. Usually, with domain knowledge, we try with our experience, and you and I know; that's it. But we have no data coming out. But if I have domain become data and data become discipline, then other people can repeat our success even our mistake; they understand why. So eventually, domain, data, discipline, 3 Ds together, you can make a good decision, sustainable and long-lasting. TROND: Jay, this has been so instructive. I thank you for spending this time with me. And it's a little bit of a never-ending process. JAY: [laughs] TROND: Industry is not something that you can learn it and then...because also the domain changes and what you're doing and what you're producing changes as well. So it's a lifelong -- JAY: It's rewarding. TROND: Rewarding but lifelong quest. JAY: Yeah. Well, thank you for the opportunity to share, to discuss. Thank you. TROND: It's a great pleasure. You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Industrial AI. And our guest was Professor Jay Lee from University of Cincinnati. In this conversation, we talked about how AI in industry needs to work every time and what that means. My takeaway is that industrial AI is a breakthrough that will take a while to mature. It implies discipline, not just algorithms. In fact, it entails a systems architecture consisting of data, algorithm, platform, and operation. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 81: From Predictive to Diagnostic Manufacturing Augmentation. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes, and if so, do let us know by messaging us. We would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects the people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and is empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring. You can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Jay Lee.

Choose To Be with Choose Recovery Services; Betrayal Trauma Healing
Navigating Betrayal Trauma With Tony Overbay (An Interview with Alana & Luke on the Virtual Couch Podcast)

Choose To Be with Choose Recovery Services; Betrayal Trauma Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 79:46


If you're new to the work of Tony Overbay, we're so glad to be the ones to introduce you. Tony is, among many things, a licensed marriage and family therapist and host of The Virtual Couch podcast. Today's episode is a real treat, because it's an interview with Luke and Alana on The Virtual Couch for a betrayal trauma podcast. In conversation with Tony, Luke and Alana share vulnerable insights from behind-the-scenes in their marriage – including their history with betrayal trauma and their subsequent healing journey. It was (and is) a long journey to navigate betrayal trauma and embark on a healing journey. Through PTSD, separation, no-contact periods, recommitting to the relationship, and raising five kids, Luke and Alana's story is full of moments you can relate to no matter where you might be in your recovery journey. You'll Learn: Why “staggered disclosure” is such a common theme in partner betrayal The difference between disclosures that are healing and disclosures that are harmful The cost of not having a mental health professional in the early days of their healing How to understand trauma triggers with the analogy of the box Ongoing Courses: Am I In An Abusive Relationship? - Free, self-paced workshop to help you identify key red flags that might be showing up in your relationship. Road To Recovery - Join Luke and Alana Gordon, Founders of Choose Recovery Services and Program Directors for the Men of Moroni and The Worth Group for a free monthly couples webinar. Navigating the relational aspects on the road to recovery can be complex and confusing. Choose 180 Male Support Group - Led by Luke Gordon In 180 we help men move through the pains of addiction, relationship healing, managing emotions, and moving past shame. You'll learn how to better connect with other men, understand your own emotional experience, and build a deep self respect. Upcoming Events: Body Love Workshop- Monday October 3rd @ 6:00pm PT Join this FREE upcoming workshop where Amie walks you through some basic steps to lean to love your body again after betrayal. Believing In You- Group Coaching Program - GET YOUR SPOT FOR NEXT ROUND IN JANUARY!! Take your healing to the NEXT LEVEL in Amie's group coaching program where you will gain more awareness that will help you heal in ways you didn't even know you needed. For more information on what this class entails click the link to find out more. Follow Amie and Alana on social media for daily content and messages of healing and recovery.

Speaking Of Show - Making Healthcare Work for You & Founder's Mission Series
Removing Barriers & Welcoming Innovation, Interview with Dr. Katherine Twombley, MUSC

Speaking Of Show - Making Healthcare Work for You & Founder's Mission Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 18:01


Dr. Katherine Twombley, Chief of Pediatric Nephrology at the Medical University of South Carolina talks about the culture ofputting patients first, and about her work in nephrology.    Interview Copy:   Dr. Katherine Twombley, says the culture at the Medical University of South Carolina removes barriers in the interest of putting patients first, and empowers medical teams to do the right thing because it's the right things to do.    As a Professor of Pediatrics, Chief of Pediatric Nephrology, Medical Director of the Pediatric Kidney Transplant Program, and Program Director of the Pediatric Nephrology Fellowship at MUSC, she knows how important it is to get treatment to patients.    She tells us that by removing administrative hurdles, providers at MUSC can focus on treating the patient right away, rather than delaying much-needed care due to red-tape.   Dr. Twombley shares an example of getting a new therapy approved for a patient within days, whereas it may take months in other systems. She says this is a game-changer for patients, and gives them hope.  provide hope for patients and families.   Check out the full interview with Dr. Twombley to hear more about putting the patient first, and some of the life-changing treatments she and her team offer.    You can also listen to the interview in podcast form:   Apple podcast link:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/speaking-of/id1549592446     I Heart podcast link: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-speaking-of-76708275/#     Spotify podcast link: https://open.spotify.com/show/1g2LUGr0SzxbBmSHB3FHyL?si=PNO79sBOReGXQJu_CrsJEg   Learn more about the Medical Univ. of South Carolina: https://muschealth.org    Learn more about the MUSC Children's Hospital: https://musckids.org    Topical time codes: 00:57 - Treating the patient, not the disease 1:53 - Culture at MUSC 3:06 - Removing barriers and admin hurdles 6:23 - Doing things because it's the right thing to do 8:10 -  Providing hope to patients 9:03 - LDL-Aphaeresis 12:28 - Patient referrals 14:11 - Nephrotic syndrome trials, precision medicine 16:17 - Changing lives through precision medicine   __________________________ Thanks to the following organizations for supporting the Making Healthcare Work for You mission.   Informed Consulting works with insurance carriers, digital health companies, insurtech organizations, and venture capital firms to drive distribution solutions in the employee benefits ecosystem. They help companies reach revenue potential, confidently navigate a complex ecosystem, and position benefit ecosystem innovations for more efficient growth.   Visit https://www.informed.llc to learn more.   UpStream is the fastest-growing primary healthcare solution provider in the US.    UpStream underwrites and supports the delivery of value-based care for older patients and people living with chronic conditions. By working in partnership with healthcare practices and clinics UpStream offers a comprehensive risk-free solution for physicians that finances, delivers and sustains better outcomes for everyone. Visit https://www.upstream.care  to learn more. __________________________

Mental Health for Leaders
S07 | E02 Permission to be Human at Work with Jane M. Chun, PhD

Mental Health for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 34:31


Compassion and empathy are two words that are used interchangeably, and neither are necessarily accepted in the workplace. Sure, we all know the importance of taking personal experiences and challenges into consideration. But these are loaded words that aren't always accepted.The thing is, compassion and empathy are two different things. Compassion is about recognizing someone else's suffering while empathy is the response to that suffering. Compassion is inherent; humans naturally have this quality…until it's trained out of us. And that is a tragedy.This week on the podcast, I'm talking with Jane M. Chun, PhD about encouraging leaders and teams to be human at work by practicing compassion on the job. There's a whole field of compassion science and a movement toward more compassion and it felt so good to talk to someone whose whole career is built on compassion.In the episode, we talk about how leaders can be intentional about cultivating compassion, why changing your thinking about compassion might feel challenging, the difference between compassion and empathy, and why compassion is such a loaded word.About Jane M. Chun, PhD:Jane M. Chun is the Program Director overseeing Compassion Institute's work in the health and systems transformation sectors. Jane's expertise includes program development, change facilitation, partnership development, and research and learning.Jane has worked with intergovernmental and nonprofit organizations including UNICEF, UNDP, IOM, and Search for Common Ground, and has conducted research for institutions such as The Brookings Institution, Oxford Refugee Studies Center, and Viet Nam Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.Throughout the pandemic, Jane and her team have supported the mental health of healthcare and public health workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Through her experience in a range of settings, she has come to believe that deep social and systems transformation can only occur hand-in-hand with inner transformation. Focusing primarily on WHAT we do is not enough. We need to also inquire into HOW and WHY we do that work.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Compassion InstituteConnect with Jane on LinkedInSeason 5 Episode 1: Live the Life You LoveMental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscriptionWhere to ListenSpotifyAppleGoogleAmazon

eLABorate Topics
Episode 36: The Importance of Resiliency and Self-Awareness in your Lab Career (featuring Sean McNair)

eLABorate Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 42:26


In this episode, co-hosts Stephanie Whitehead and Tywauna Wilson talk with Sean McNair, MPH, CT(ASCP) about his professional journey and the themes of resiliency and self awareness that he has experienced throughout his career.   Tune in as Sean details how he has used innovation and flexibility to make an impact in the cytopathology community and the laboratory medicine profession! Special Guest Bio:Sean McNair, MPH, CT(ASCP) has been the Cytology Education Coordinator for the Department of Pathology at MSK since 2015. His responsibilities include coordination of the Cytology Staff Conference series, and coordination of Cytology Service educational activities. He also provides educational content to Cytopathology fellows and participates in Cytology clinical service duties. Mr. McNair is also the Program Director for the Advanced Certificate in Cytotechnology for Hunter College, a collaborative Cytotechnology training program in which the students are trained exclusively at MSK. Mr. McNair has overseen the evolution and transition of the Memorial Sloan Kettering School of Cytotechnology, which existed for over 50 years and has provided MSK and neighboring institutions with highly skilled Cytotechnologists. Outside of MSK, Mr. McNair is actively in several professional societies, including the ASCP and ASC as a committee member, working to continue to drive the evolution of today's Cytotechnologist to tomorrow's Pathology professional. Mr. McNair completed his Cytology training at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, and subsequently completed his MPH in Health Policy and Management.  Listeners can connect with Sean McNair at:smcnair0328@gmail.comLinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sean-mcnair-5412511b/Twitter:   https://twitter.com/smcnair0328 Podcast Call to ActionWe would love to feature YOU!!!Share your favorite takeaway from today's episode or anyone from this season: Video ReviewBe an eLABorate Supporter!1.     Listen on directimpactbroadcasting.com, Spotify, Apple Podcast, or your favorite podcast platform2.     Don't forget to subscribe to the show on your phone, tablet, or notebook so you never miss an episode! 3.     Be sure to leave a comment, and share it with fellow medical laboratory professionals!4.     Join our eLABorate Topics Group on LinkedIn5.     Leave us a Video Review and we will feature you on our Social Media: Video Review Be a Guest on our show!If you have a leadership or laboratory message to share and would like to be a guest on the show, please reach out to us by completing the guest interest form or send us an e-mail us at elaboratetopics@directimpactbroadcasting.com.Please tune in next week to hear another amazing episode of eLABorate Topics!

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words
The Afterword on Loans and Lending Part 2

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 27:18


How are economic justice and fair lending connected? There is NO such thing as “easy money” so when we hear lenders advertising this message, we need to put up our guards! Keri Smith the SC President of Self-Help Credit Union  and Susan Stall, Program Director at Village Engage explain the dangerous marketing aspects of predatory lending. We learn the stories surrounding how to protect consumers from these predatory practices and how to be an advocate for fair lending!

Napcast
Napcast Ep39 - What is "Normal" Anyways Part 2

Napcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 52:57


Coming back for part 2 of 2, we continue our conversation with our colleague Suzette (she/they), an educator, mother, and advocate who currently serves as the Senior Education Specialist for the City of Seattle Department of Education and Early Learning. In this episode, you'll hear our thoughts around how we can create space for different needs and abilities, what healing for neurodiverse people could look like, and what we want to see in an equitable world. If you haven't listened to part 1, go back and listen! Since meeting over 5 years ago at Hilltop Children's Center and Educator Institute in Seattle, WA (Coast Salish Territory), Nick Terrones (he/him) and Mike Browne (he/him) have been working towards a critical reimagination of ECE spaces for BIPOC educators and youth. In 2020, they teamed up to deliver a podcast titled Napcast, where they explore the intersection of early childhood education with race, identity, and culture. Now in new roles, Nick as the Program Director of Daybreak Star Preschool at United Indians of All Tribes, and Mike, Sr. Director of Community Engagement at Cultivate Learning, they combine their experience from their time in the classroom with their insights as ECE leaders in order to challenge your perspective on the ways we teach, play, and love society's youngest citizens. Please share your questions, comments, and thoughts at our new email address - Napcast206@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hilltopcc/support

The Shanon Show: The Best Military Kids Podcast
Ep. 87 - Kirtley | It's A Military Child Life, Finding Support During Deployments, and MilKid Issues

The Shanon Show: The Best Military Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 43:17


For today's show, I was joined by Kirtley who is the Program Director for It's A Military Child Life. Her and I talk about her experiences as a young military spouse and mother, her inspiration to help other military families, and we share our opinions on some key military child issues. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theshanonshow/support

Quiet Waters Podcast
Ep 42: Horses are good for the soul

Quiet Waters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 43:59


Horses have a healing effect on our minds and bodies.  They teach us how to be aware in the moment, to pay attention to what is, and deepen our listening skills. Their soulful presence has the capacity to ease our anxieties, calm our mind and bring us reassurance that all is good and well. As Winston Churchill once said, “There's something about the outside of a horse that's good for the inside of a man.”, a quote Queen Elizabeth was very fond of. Join me as I interview Kathy Baine, Program Director at Loudoun Therapeutic Riding Foundation, Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor, and Equine Specialist as she educates us about therapeutic riding, the soulful presence of horses, and shares stories of “healing with horses”. 

KGI: Innovation in Applied Life Sciences & Healthcare
#144—Emily Quinn, New MSGC Program Director

KGI: Innovation in Applied Life Sciences & Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 5:43


In this episode of the KGI podcast, we talk with Emily Quinn, the newly appointed program director for the Master of Science in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling program.

America’s Land Auctioneer
How Landowners Can Better Manage Environmental Sensitive Land, With Wanda Braton, USDA Program Director!

America’s Land Auctioneer

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 43:50


America's Land Auctioneer, is joined by Wanda Braton, Program Director for the North Dakota Farm Service Agency specializing in Conservation Programs.  Since the inception of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) in the mid-1980s, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, and Montana have ranked in the top 15 states with acres enrolled in CRP.   Wanda Braton describes the many variation programs under the CRP umbrella and how landowners can better manage environmental sensitive land and better preserve highly erodible soils and wetlands.Follow Kevin at www.americalandauctioneer.com and on Instagram & Facebook

CBC Newfoundland Morning
As students return to school, education around consent can play a key role in preventing sexual violence on campus. We'll hear from a group that's doing its part in the campaign

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 7:04


This is Consent Awareness Week in NL. The annual campaign aims to spark critical conversations around consent and sexual violence in Canada. Holly Foxall is Program Director of Action Now Atlantic, in Halifax.

Climate Changemakers
Episode 3.1 - Uzma Noormohamed

Climate Changemakers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 10:01


Climate Changemakers is a podcast series highlighting leaders in equity work and climate action. For season three, we're centering artists and creators producing content about the environment and climate crisis in innovative ways. By passing the mic to them, we can together explore how to expand this important conversation through art and media, bringing in people who might not otherwise have participated. UZMA NOORMOHAMED – EPISODE 1 Uzma Noormohamed is the Program Director at the Illinois Science and Energy Innovation Foundation in Chicago. Uzma has over a decade of experience working on climate and energy issues and is most recently proud of leading E(art)H Chicago, a grant program supporting the use of art and stories to stimulate community engagement on climate change, natural resource use, and environmental justice in Chicago neighborhoods. This episode was recorded in the "Elevate Cafe" at our Green Street headquarters in Chicago. Website: https://www.ElevateNP.org About Elevate: We design and implement programs that reduce costs, protect people and the environment, and ensure the benefits of clean and efficient energy use reach those who need them most. Elevate seeks to create a world in which everyone has clean and affordable heat, power, and water in their homes and communities — no matter who they are or where they live. Making the benefits and services of the clean energy economy accessible to everyone is how we fight climate change while supporting equity.

Future of Field Service
Advice to Drive Service Transformation Success

Future of Field Service

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 39:10


Sarah talks with Berit Hallgren, Program Director at Tetra Pak, about lessons learned in her 30+ year career with the company on what it takes to achieve the strategic alignment, prioritization, and change management that contribute to a successful service transformation. This conversation is from the Stockholm Live Tour event.

NCSEA On Location
Invisible Sentence: Recognizing, Supporting and Advocating for Children of Incarcerated and Returning Parents

NCSEA On Location

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 23:25


Today's episode comes to you on location from California and North Carolina. Veronica Riley (Assistant Director, San Joaquin County Department of Child Support Services) and Tammy Pearson (YoungWilliams) co-host Melissa Radcliff, the Program Director for Our Children's Place of Coastal Horizons in Durham, North Carolina. They discuss how communities can support children who have an incarcerated or returning from incarceration parent. They engage in a discussion about what it means for the child and their parent who's been incarcerated and who's now coming home. They talk about barriers to re-entry, re-establishing relationships, what the concerns are about child support, and what child support professionals should know about incarcerated parents and children of incarcerated parents.

Talk2MeDoc
A Meeting with the PD- How to "Rise Up" with Dr. Alysia Kwiatkowski

Talk2MeDoc

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 31:50


Recruitment season is coming our way. If you are planning to apply for residency or want to learn tips on recruitment processes, join your host Andrew Tisser with his guest, Dr. Alysia Kwiatkowski, as they talk about screening and choosing the ideal resident. “Dr. K” is the program director for the internal medicine residency program at the State University of New York, Buffalo. She views the ideal resident as someone to whom she could entrust her loved ones. She shares the things she looks for in the application, describes 360 degree reviews, and others tips for the candidate!In this episode you will learn: On her journey to the field of Education Filters and other approaches regarding recruitmentThe ideal residentThe couple's matchOne factor that would kill an application About Dr. Alysia Kwiatkowski:Alysia Kwiatkowski DO, MS is the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Training Program at the State University of New York SUNY at Buffalo (UB). In her work with the training program, Dr. Kwiatkowski has redesigned and transitioned the curriculum to interactive, multifaceted, near-peer and learner centered models. She also focuses on empowering her learners to be integral parts of their educational experiences. Dr. Kwiatkowski works in the Medical Education and Educational Research Institute (MEERI) on faculty development, interactive learning models and medical education research. She completed the Jacobs Excellence Educator Program, a faculty development program to enhance teaching and evaluation skills, the SUNY SAIL Leadership Academy, is a member of the Gold Humanism Honor Society and has received multiple teaching awards. Dr. Kwiatkowski earned her doctorate from the New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed her residency and chief residency at Albany Medical Center, the major academic center associated with Albany Medical College, Dr. Kwiatkowski completed her fellowship in Rheumatology at Rush University Medical Center where she received a certification in Teaching Excellence. She earned her Masters of Science in the Natural Sciences from the University at Buffalo/Roswell Park Cancer Institute.Connect with Dr. Alysia Kwiatkowski:Website : https://medicine.buffalo.edu/faculty/profile.html?ubit=avk6LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alysia-kwiatkowski-do-ms-403834a0/ Connect with Talk2Medoc on:Website:          https://www.andrewtisserdo.com/LinkedIn:         https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewtisserdo/Facebook:       https://www.facebook.com/andrew.tisserInstagram:       https://www.instagram.com/talk2medoc_llc/Twitter:            https://twitter.com/Talk2MeDocYouTube:        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0O_Sf3aYLavYaJ_hg7bM8g     

Thinking Poker
Episode 385: Josh Nixon

Thinking Poker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 111:22 Very Popular


Josh Nixon was a student in the Boston Debate League when Andrew was the director. In the years since then, Josh been a serious Magic: The Gathering player, taken an interest in poker, and become a Program Director for the BDL. ... Read more...

The One Way Ticket Show
Robert Graham, MD, MPH, ABOIM, FACP & Chef - Doctor/Co-Founder FRESH Med

The One Way Ticket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 50:24


Dr. Graham is a Harvard-trained researcher and physician. He is board certified in both Internal and Integrative Medicine, trained in Holistic and Functional Medicine. Dr. Graham received a Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health while completing three additional fellowships in General Internal Medicine and Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies at Harvard Medical School as well as Medical Education at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His clinical research focused on health disparities, integrative therapies including dietary supplements amongst racial and ethnic minorities. He also completed course-work in Mind/Body Medicine, Positive Psychology, Lifestyle Medicine, Culinary Medicine, Botanical and Traditional Chinese Medicine. In 2018, Dr. Graham became one of less than twenty doctor/chef's worldwide, as he obtained his culinary degree from the Natural Gourmet Institute. Dr. Graham is a public health scientist, health service researcher, TED speaker, food activist and Chef. Dr. Graham believes medicine needs a FRESH start. Together with his wife, they founded FRESH Medicine and FRESH Med U. FRESH Medicine is an integrative health and wellness center located in NYC. FRESH is an acronym for the five ingredients in their recipe to health: Food, Relaxation, Exercise, Sleep and Happiness. Dr. Graham is the proud son of a farmer and an immigrant born and raised in Jackson Heights in Queens, NYC. A lifelong "food fighter" and a leader in the field of Integrative/Functional and Holistic Medicine he has prescribed “food as medicine” for over 15 years, has taught over 1000 healthcare workers, mostly doctors, how to cook whole food, plant-based meals, and created the first edible rooftop garden on a hospital in NYC. He served as Medical Director of Internal Medicine Primary Care Center, Program Director of Internal Medicine, Director of Integrative Therapies, Head of Employee Wellness for a large healthcare system in New York and provided strategic oversight, direction and leadership across all activities related to the health and wellness, health promotion and disease prevention. When not seeing patients, Dr. Graham trades his white lab coat for chef's whites with the goal of expanding his toolkit both for use as a healthcare provider and as an advocate for a new model of integrative, “food-first” lifestyle-focused healthcare called Culinary Medicine. Dr. Graham serves as the first Chief Health Officer of a food company called Performance Kitchen where he not only advises but also designs medically tailored meals for patients with chronic diseases. This allows doctors to prescribe meals, or “food as medicine” which are covered by Advantage Medicare Plans and hopefully Medicare under Bill H.R.5370 - Medically Tailored Home-Delivered Meals Demonstration Pilot Act. In 2019, he and Julie launched an online self-care "university," called FRESH MED U. FRESH MED U allows people and companies to learn remotely, on their own time, using their intrinsic motivation to achieve their FRESH goals and live healthier and happier lives. They currently consult with multiple Fortune 2000 companies as corporate employee wellness vendors. Lastly, in the fall of 2021, Dr. Graham was asked to be part of NYC Mayor Eric Adams Food Transition team, focusing on institutional foods, a true honor for a native New Yorker.  On this episode, Dr. Graham shares his one way ticket to ancient Greece in the 5th century BCE during the time of Hippocrates, the father of medicine. In the course of our conversation, Dr. Graham shares some of Hippocrates' teaching including "Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food." Dr. Graham also shares his work on FRESH, with NYC Mayor Eric L. Adams, the Aman Hotels, and more. Dr. Robert Graham is just one of the exceptional individuals featured on the podcast where Host Steven Shalowitz explores with his guest where they would go if given a one way ticket, no coming back! Their destinations may be in the past, present, future, real, imaginary or state of mind.  Steven's guests have included: Nobel Peace Prize Winner, President Jose Ramos-Horta; General David H. Petraeus, US Army (Ret.); Legendary Talk Show Host, Dick Cavett; Law Professor, Alan Dershowitz; Fashion Expert, Tim Gunn; Broadcast Legend, Charles Osgood; International Rescue Committee President & CEO, David Miliband; Former United States Senator, Joseph I. Lieberman; Playwright, David Henry Hwang; Journalist-Humorist-Actor, Mo Rocca; SkyBridge Capital Founder & Co-Managing Partner, Anthony Scaramucci; Abercrombie & Kent Founder, Geoffrey Kent; Travel Expert, Pauline Frommer, as well as leading photographers, artists, chefs, writers, intellectuals, etc.

FAIRGAME, Featuring Champion Golfer Adam Scott
Episode 23: The Midwest Golf Scene

FAIRGAME, Featuring Champion Golfer Adam Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 51:08


What state in the country do you think has the most golfers per capita? Here's a hint - it's not New York - or California… or even Florida. It's Minnesota! After hearing that, this golfing hotspot got our attention.  We hit up a few of our friends from Minnesota to learn more about the golf scene in their hometown and what they've been up to this season. One is John Mooty, the man behind Sentinel Golf, a modern golf accessory brand making some major moves in the golf space. The other is Greg Jameel, the Program Director at the Solomon Hughes Jr. Golf Academy, a youth focused program in Minneapolis that uses golf as a bridge to encourage academic and athletic greatness. THE FAIRGAME GOLF APP: Now Available on iOS and Android: https://www.fairgamegolf.com/the-app Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHjuYRDjjPLbyedMooYs3Nw Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fairgamegolf/?hl=en

Tony Diaz #NPRadio
To Live, Love, Heal & Experience Violence as a Black Person w/ Jasminne Mendez

Tony Diaz #NPRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 58:00


Nuestra Palabra: To Live, Love, Heal & Experience Violence as a Black Person w/ Jasminne Mendez Jasminne Mendez talks to Tony Diaz about her book, "City Without Altar" and how her book helped her redefine her identity as a Black woman and better understand what it means to be Black. Jasminne Mendez is a Dominican-American poet, playwright, translator and award winning author of several books for children and adults. She is the author of two hybrid memoirs, Island of Dreams (Floricanto Press) and Night-Blooming Jasmin(n)e: Personal Essays and Poetry (Arte Público Press). Her second YA memoir, Islands Apart: Becoming Dominican American (Arte Público Press) is forthcoming in May 2022 and her debut poetry collection, City Without Altar, was a finalist for the Noemi Press Book Award for Poetry and will be released in August 2022. Her debut middle grade book Anina del Mar Jumps In (Dial) is a novel in verse about a young girl diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and is set to release in 2023. Her debut picture book Josefina's Habichuelas (Arte Público Press), was released last year. Mendez has had poetry and essays published by or forthcoming in numerous journals and anthologies including The Kenyon Review, New England Review, the YA Latinx Anthology Wild Tongues Can't be Tamed edited by Saraciea Fennell (Flatiron/Macmillan), and in The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 4: LatiNext (Haymarket Books). She has translated and written poetry and a libretto for the Houston Grand Opera and she translated Amanda Gorman's best-selling Change Sings into the Spanish edition La canción del cambio. The dramatized version of her play in verse City Without Altar received its world premiere at Milagro theatre in Portland, Oregon this spring. She is an MFA graduate of the creative writing program at the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University, a University of Houston alumni, and a Canto Mundo Fellow. Based in Houston, she is the Co-Founder and Program Director of the Houston based Latinx literary arts organization Tintero Projects and a co-host to the poetry and writing podcast series InkWell, a collaboration between Tintero Projects and Inprint Houston. She is a Canto Mundo Fellow, a Kenyon Review Writer's Workshop Peter Taylor Fellow and a Macondo and VONA alumni. When she's not writing or napping in her hammock she enjoys playing with sand on the beach with her daughter, swimming in the ocean or a pool, practicing yoga, baking cupcakes and laughing with her partner in poetry and in life Lupe Mendez - the Texas State Poet Laureate. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jmendezmemoirs/ Twitter: @jasminnemendez Instagram: @jasminnemendez Website: https://www.jasminnemendez.com/ * This is part of a Nuestra Palabra Multiplatform broadcast. * Video airs on www.Fox26Houston.com. * Audio airs on 90.1 FM Houston, KPFT, Houston's Community Station, where our show began. * Live events. Thanks to Roxana Guzman, Multiplatform Producer Rodrigo Bravo, Jr., Audio Producer Radame Ortiez, SEO Director Marc-Antony Piñón, Graphics Designer Leti Lopez, Music Director Bryan Parras, co-host and producer emeritus Liana Lopez, co-host and producer emeritus Lupe Mendez, Texas Poet Laureate, co-host, and producer emeritus Writer and activist Tony Diaz, El Librotraficante, hosts Latino Politics and News and the Nuestra Palabra Radio Show on 90.1 FM, KPFT, Houston's Community Station. He is also a political analyst on “What's Your Point?” on Fox 26 Houston. He is the author of the forthcoming book: The Tip of the Pyramid: Cultivating Community Cultural Capital. www.Librotraficante.com www.NuestraPalabra.org www.TonyDiaz.net Nuestra Palabra is funded in part by the BIPOC Arts Network Fund.

Integrity Restored Podcast
Episode 131 - Spiritual Direction 101 with Maria Brackett

Integrity Restored Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 22:56


Maria Brackett, Divine Mercy University's Program Director for the Spiritual Direction Certificate joins Jim to discuss what is Spiritual Direction, Why do you need it and how do you find one. Check out divinemercy.edu Takeaways: 1. Spiritual Direction is an important pillar in recovery according to the experts 2. Spiritual Direction along with the grace of the sacraments can be a helpful part of your overall recovery plan. 3. Whether you struggle with an addiction or the betrayal trauma from a loved one's addiction, spiritual direction helps you find God and healing where ever you are right now. Our program at DMU to train spiritual directors: https://divinemercy.edu/academics/spiritual-direction-certificate/ Site where our alumni are listed: https://divinemercy.edu/alumni/alumni-directory/ Catholic site to find spiritual directors: https://seekdirection.app/#/home

Wireless: 100 Years of WGY
"Programmers, Music Guys and News/Sports Talk Show Hosts"

Wireless: 100 Years of WGY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 64:29


Ron "Buzz" Brindle was Program Director of WGY starting in the late 1980's, after a long career that included stops at MTV in the early days (where he helped Albany resident Martha Quinn get a job as one of the original VJ's). Buzz was part of the team at WGY as the station started to transition to a News/Talk format, in fact it was Buzz who lobbied to bring a new Talk Show Host to the Capital Region, by the name of Rush Limbaugh.Tom Mailey has had a long career in broadcasting, and not just at WGY. His start here was in the mid 1980's when he auditioned for (and became the host of) "The Big Money Movie" on WRGB, which gave him the chance to do a number of fill in shifts on WGY, including for Don Weeks on the WGY Morning Show, and also on Joe Gallagher's show. Tom later used his time as an Air Personality and News Anchor to become the face and voice of Stewart's.Tred Hulse has frankly done it all. The Capital Region first met him from his ten years of the Morning Show on sister station 99.5 The River in the 1990's. From there he would fill in on WGY for J.R. Gach, Don Weeks, Chuck Custer and Joe Gallagher. Eventually he hosted his own Sports Talk Show on Fox Sports 980.

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words
The Afterword on Loans & Lending

The Afterword: A Conversation About the Future of Words

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 43:06


At some point in everyone's life, we will need to ask for money- whether it is from a parent, friend, or a bank. Most of us can't take on big purchases and at times need to have a bit of extra money to start up a business or begin a project. How do we navigate the process of loans and lending without being sent to the poor house? Our guests explain that we should never panic when we need a loan and should never borrow ourselves out of debt. Susan Stall, Program Director at Village Engage along with Kerri Smith the SC President of Self-Help Credit Union help us uncover key principles in our conversation about loans and lending.

The IMG Roadmap Podcast
102. From IMG to Program Director? Critical Care Specialist Dr. Amira Mohamed reveals how she did it! (IMG Roadmap Series #97)

The IMG Roadmap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 37:46


Want to stay inspired with content tailored specifically to IMG's looking to create their medical success story? Sign up for the IMG Roadmap Newsletter so you never miss a beat! ***** Have you ever wondered what exactly program directors are looking for when reviewing residency applications from IMGs? Do you also one day see yourself as a program director? Dr. Amira Mohamed is here today to share some valuable insight. Keep listening to learn more about her fascinating journey! After finishing medical school in Khartoum, Sudan where she was born and raised, Dr. Mohamed made the bold decision to start pursuing medical residency in the US. Here's how she managed to navigate through the process and some of the highlights of her journey: Since she didn't know the pathway, she took a year off and did a lot of her own research. During that year, she moved to the US and did a Step One prep course in Washington DC. She eventually landed a job as a medical assistant for a gastroenterologist at Howard University hospital, while studying for exams. Finally, she scored a 3 year internal medicine residency, then a 2 year critical care fellowship. She was an attending physician for a few years, before transitioning into being an associate program director and then a program director. Right now she works in the Bronx, New York at the Montefiore Medical Center which is a part of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. There, she serves as a critical care medicine fellowship program director. Dr. Mohamed also works with the residency program of her institution as part of the clinical competency committee and at the adjoint medical school as a teacher. Therefore, while she primarily works with fellows, she also works with residents and students. As a program director, here is some of the advice that Dr. Mohamed has for IMGs: Letters of recommendation should be written by someone who knows you and can highlight your good qualities. These letters should also be geared towards your intended specialty. Speak to people who have been down your intended path and heed their relevant advice to make your journey easier. If you can, avoid applying to multiple specialties - if you have to, ensure that you show priority to the specialty you're most passionate about. Apply on time--if you have to be late, send an email explaining the situation. Take the time to plan your interview cycle carefully—place the programs that you are most interested in, last. That way you can overcome any early interview jitters with lower stakes. Be careful about the questions you ask. Ensure that your questions demonstrate your interest in the field and willingness to commit. Know your audience! Have a post-residency plan – what educational, research and other CV building opportunities does your residency have that you can take advantage of? Networking is key! Go up to the people you admire and ask them how they did it! As a program director she loves when candidates show initiative and go the extra mile. Don't hesitate to reach out to programs to show your interest! If you have any further questions, you can reach out to Dr. Mohamed via twitter @amiramohamedmd. Listen to the full episode on Spotify, Apple & Google Podcasts --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ninalum/support

Higher Education Anti-Racist Teaching (H.E.A.R.T.) Podcast
Supporting Undocumented/DACAmented Students & Communities

Higher Education Anti-Racist Teaching (H.E.A.R.T.) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 43:51


Susie Ximenez, the Program Director for Adelante Student Voices in New York whose mission is to support undocumented students' journey towards higher education and Reyna Montoya, the founder and CEO of Aliento in Arizona who transforms trauma into hope and action for those most impacted by the harms associated with lacking immigration status, are grassroots organizers that focus on the upliftment of students and parents. In spite of discriminatory state policies and violence in their home countries, they sought a better future for themselves and for future generations. Join us to hear about how they work to fight for rights to help undocumented and DACAmented communities to support their trajectory to achieve a higher education.

Like It Or Not
Ep. 104 w/Alicia Bales

Like It Or Not

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 81:34


Alicia Bales is the Program Director at KZYX, the listener supported community radio station. She also is the host of the show Byline Mendocino on Friday mornings from 9-10am.

K12ArtChat the Podcast
Episode 93 – Dr. Janice Wyatt Ross – Culture & Climate: Creating a Positive Impact On ALL Learners

K12ArtChat the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 48:04


In This episode, the Creativity Department is joined by the Program Director of the Success Academy, Dr. Janice Wyatt Ross. During the discussion they dive into strategies for building environments that welcome students, provide a positive impact on their engagement and equity, and foster pride and ownership. Listen in for ideas on strengthening the climate and culture in your own school to ensure it is both welcoming and nurturing

The Crisis in Education Podcast
Dr. Jonathan Tarbox on Addressing Mental Health in Education through Behavior Science

The Crisis in Education Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 45:01


In this episode, Dr. Jonathan Tarbox discusses an approach for addressing mental health issues in education called Acceptance Commitment Training, or ACT.  ACT is a very practical but well-researched behavioral approach that can help students and educators  better recognize and overcome internal and external challenges and move them towards their values.  Jonathan Tarbox, PhD, BCBA-D, is the Program Director of the Master of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis program at the University of Southern California, as well as Director of Research at FirstSteps for Kids. Dr. Tarbox is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice and serves on the editorial boards of several scientific journals related to autism and behavior analysis. He has published four books on autism treatment, is the Series Editor of the Elsevier book series Critical Specialties in Treating Autism and Other Behavioral Challenges, and an author of well over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles and chapters in scientific texts.  His research focuses on behavioral interventions for teaching complex skills to individuals with autism, applications of Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) inside of applied behavior analysis, and applications of applied behavior analysis to issues of diversity and social justice. Download his vitae here. Email Dr. Tarbox here. Visit Dr. Tarbox's Google Scholar profile here. 

The Hamilton Review
Lisa Pewe: An Equine Professional on Facilitating the Victory of Inner Growth and Healing

The Hamilton Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 33:01


This week on The Hamilton Review Podcast, Dr. Bob welcomes to the show, Lisa Pewe!  Lisa is an equine professional that now facilitates, not the winning of championship ribbons, but the victory of inner growth and healing for individuals in all areas of life. In this conversation, Lisa walks us through how the power of horses can help heal.  Don't miss this great conversation!   Lisa Pewe bio:   Lisa Péwé (pronounced Pay-Way) has been an equine professional for over 40 years. She started out as a youth learning to ride, train, and show Arabian horses. This led to a professional career of training, showing, and coaching dozens of horses and riders to regional and national awards. Her success as a coach and trainer was based mainly on her ability to understand and read the horses at any given moment, and be able to communicate to the rider how to “meld” or synchronize themselves with the horse. Her technique for building champion riders was always based on helping the rider create a foundation of personal “centeredness and emotional congruence”, as well as identifying individual learning and motivational styles of the rider. Lisa now facilitates, not the winning of championship ribbons, but the victory of inner growth and healing for individuals in all areas of life. Lisa joined the equine therapeutic community in 2007 when she became the Equine Director and later the Program Director for a PATH Intl premiere therapeutic riding center in Phoenix AZ. Lisa rebuilt and managed the riding and equine care and management programs for instructors and volunteer training program for over 10 instructors and 50 volunteers, as well as equine care, selection, and training. Additionally, from 2012-2021 she co-founded and was the board chair and executive director of a new therapeutic non-profit center in Phoenix, Arizona, Envision Therapeutic Horsemanship Inc. She developed her own unique program of bonding with a horses and gaining inner healing that has been used successfully with sex trafficked youth, homeless youth, victims of domestic violence, individuals in substance abuse recovery, cancer recovery, foster care families and many others. She has presented her model and innovative programs at regional and international conferences for PATHintl.org and conducts workshops and trainings for mental health professionals and aspiring equine specialists. Lisa holds certifications from PATHIntl as a therapeutic riding Instruction (CTRI) and as an Equine Specialist in mental health and learning (ESMHL.) Lisa's passion for helping others in achieving inner victory and growth began with her own personal journey of 7 years of intensive trauma recovery leading to emotional freedom and healing. Her journey allowed her to gain extensive experience with multiple trauma-healing models, support group facilitation, as well as traditional 12-step recovery models. She is a trained abuse-recovery support group facilitator by Mending the Soul, a biblically based abuse recovery model. She has been trained in the Freedom program; a biblically based inner- healing journey based on prayer. She has also facilitated small groups in post- abortion healing and biblical financial principles. Lisa holds a B.A. in Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Grand Canyon University. She has also completed masters level courses from Phoenix seminary and Ottawa university. She loves to be part of worship teams in her church, participate in missions trips, and enjoys her family and seven grandchildren How to contact Lisa Pewe: Lisa Pewe's email: How to contact Dr. Bob: Dr. Bob on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChztMVtPCLJkiXvv7H5tpDQ Dr. Bob on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drroberthamilton/ Dr. Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bob.hamilton.1656 Dr. Bob on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drroberthamilton/ Dr. Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bob.hamilton.1656 Dr. Bob on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drroberthamilton/ Dr. Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bob.hamilton.1656 Dr. Bob on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drroberthamilton/ Dr. Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bob.hamilton.1656

Compassion In Action
Returning Citizen Roundtable Part 2 feat. Jason Bryant, Eldra Jackson III and Robert Mosqueda

Compassion In Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 40:56


Join CPP Founder Fritzi Horstman and guests as they discuss the objectives and approaches involved in bringing trauma awareness and compassionate healing to the forefront of public conversation. https://youtu.be/59fKdmiB4MU Originally filmed to be included in our Trauma Talks program, this conversation includes a discussion about resilience and solitary confinement. It is our goal that we break the cycle of violence that exists in our prisons, our communities and our families. Our Returning Citizen Roundtable Part 2 features Jason Bryant, Eldra Jackson III and Robert Mosqueda. Jason Bryant is the Program Director for CROP (Creating Restorative Opportunities and Programs), holds a BA from Adams State University with an MA in Philosophy from California State University and an MS in Psychology from California Coast University. He has 20 years of lived experience within the CDCR. Jason dedicated his term of incarceration to higher education and serving other people through thoughtful conversations and coaching about new possibilities for people's lives. In 2020, Jason's sentence was commuted by Governor Newsom who ordered his immediate release from prison due to his remarkable contributions in transformative and rehabilitative work while incarcerated. Eldra Jackson III is the Co-Executive Director of Inside Circle. A writer and sought after public speaker on the topics of at-risk youth advocacy, effective criminal justice rehabilitation and turning around ‘toxic' masculinity, Eldra brings clarity of purpose, mission focus, and inspiration to his role at Inside Circle. He was living at New Folsom Prison when he found Inside Circle and began the inner personal journey that eventually led to his release in 2014 and his current leadership role. A living example of successful rehabilitation and re-entry, Eldra has dedicated his free time on the outside to serving at-risk youth, acting as a facilitator, trainer, and mentor for organizations like Youth Empowerment and Goals Association, Shoulder to Shoulder, and the Alternatives to Violence Project. Robert Mosqueda is the Program Manager with the Women Center Youth and Family Services located in Stockton, CA. He is passionate about criminal justice; having grown up in the Department of Corrections with a father who was an Associate Warden and was incarcerated in California Department of Corrections. He speaks from personal experience how those in correction play a vital role in the rehabilitation process. Donate to our non-profit Compassion Prison Project