Podcasts about cnc

Computer control of machine tools, lathes and milling machines, also used on 3D printers

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Latest podcast episodes about cnc

Woodshop Life Podcast
Tambour Doors, No Table Saw in The Shop?, Dead Flat Assembly Table & MUCH More!

Woodshop Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 55:06


Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/woodshoplife Sponsored by 3M Xtract   Sean 1) I've found some really nice walnut burl veneer  that I would like to use on the tambours. I plan on veneering these on to solid walnut in the hopes of both accounting for wood movement in the veneer, and not seeing an ugly MDF substrate when opening the doors. Am I going overboard by using solid walnut for the backing substrate, or is there a way to hide the edges of the MDF as to not see them when moving the doors? And would using MDF as a substrate cause issue with the veneer moving over time? I plan on using the heat lock veneer glue to adhere the veneers to the substrate. 2) Hello Sean, Guy, and Huy. You guys always make one of the best podcasts and i love hearing your different outlooks on topics. My question today is about design and encouraging creativity. Obviously, this will be different depending on whether or not there is a client involved, but how do you decide on a direction for the design of a piece of furniture? How do you begin, with the design or the materials? Have you ever looked at a piece (or stack) of lumber and designed your project to highlight something special about it? On the other hand, have you ever designed a piece, and then had to find the perfect piece of lumber to make it with? Thank you,  Joshua from The Blackdog Studios (finding beauty in former trees) Huy 1) So I've heard of some folks making the decision to not have a table saw in their shops. 2 main reasons cited being safety (IF ITS NOT A SAWSTOP YOU WILL DIE) and also space. Personally, I understand their position, but don't think I could do it. I simply like my saw too much. Would any of you consider it? Additionally, what operations does the table saw perform that you could not duplicate on/with another machine? I realize this is more of a thought experiment than question, but I thought I'd throw it out there. thanks for the great show! Mark 2) Hey all, thanks for the great show. I notice I have been getting diminished quality cuts from my full kerf glue line rip blade on my table saw. (That is- minor saw blade marks, occasional burning)  in addition, I notice a touch of increased resistance as I begin to exit my rip cuts, and the blade seems to make contact again as the board moves past the blade. To address these issues, I have adjusted the blade to about 2 thou to the left (I cut on the right of my blade generally) and adjusted my fence. I have an older , beat up Powermatic 64B  contractor saw. I have noticed the plastic faces of the fence are a bit wavy (again, a few thousands, maybe about 10-15 thou variation throughout) but I have the extreme front and back of the fence perfectly aligned. My rips aren't perfect when I cut from the left of the blade, but the resistance feels more consistent and predictable. I am currently transitioning from hobbyist to full time and would like to solve this annoyance, as it occasionally affects my panel glue ups, and cutting board season is nearly upon us. I think for now, I will clamp on an MDF fence to see if that can help suck out the issue. If it is a fence face or alignment issue. Do you think I should maybe invest in a better fence, or should I consider replacing my glorious Powermatic saw with a  SawStop Cabinet  saw exclusively to spite Guy. I do have 220 in the shop now powering my heater and  big Grizzly bandsaw, with amperage remaining for a 3hp cabinet. It would also be great to have a table saw with dust collection. Side note: Sorry for the length, y'all always ask for more details. And a replacement cabinet saw wouldn't have to be a SawStop, but I think it may be good insurance when I can afford to hire an employee. That said, this would be an upgrade maybe 3-8 months down the line if I'm making consistent money. Longer if I can get the Powermatic figured out. I do a range of things. From small CNC projects, shelves, cutting boards, and  plan to move onto selling furniture. Dillon Guy 1) Got one more question for ya. Shorter this time. I recently popped open a can of water based poly that I've had in storage for a while. The top 3/4 of the can was great but when I got to the bottom 1/4 it had turned in to a thick gel like substance. I did some quick googling and found a forum post where somebody suggested creating CO2 gas by mixing baking soda and vinegar in a jar and “pouring” that gas in to a partially used can of poly. The CO2 will displace the oxygen in the can and then you seal it up. This preserves the leftover poly as the reaction with oxygen is what hardens it. Obviously it's too late for my can but have you all ever heard of this? If so have you ever done it? Thought it was pretty interesting regardless. Thanks, Jon 2) Hi guys love the podcast.  My question is this ,  is it of absolute importance to have a dead flat assembly table to glue up your work square and keep it square? I ask because I built a dresser and glued it up checked it for square and moved it to my floor which is steel plates, rechecked it for square and it was fine.  Came beck the next morning and took it out of clamps and out of square it was had to disassemble and re glue very frustrating.  So now looking to build an assembly table that is flat and level so I want to know how flat does it need to be. Thanks keep up the good work. Fred clarke

Church on the North Coast
Pastor Lou Kayatin II - What Are You Building With Your Life?

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022


September 21, 2022 - Pastor Lou Kayatin II - What Are You Building With Your Life? | cnclove.org

Church on the North Coast
Pastor Troy Thompson - Becoming A Dangerous Christian

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022


September 21, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Becoming A Dangerous Christian | cnclove.org 

We Built A Thing
166 - 2 Truths & A Lie

We Built A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 57:54 Very Popular


In this one, Mark releases ANOTHER video...kicking off his Man Cave build. Bruce cleans a laser. Drew ships a 7lb push stick. Plus, a ton more! This episode is sponsored by OneFinity CNC! We have partnered with them and would love it if you would go to their website and check them out: https://www.onefinitycnc.com/ (we don't have a coupon code at this time, but if you're able to mention that we sent you, it helps!) Become a patron of the show! http://patreon.com/webuiltathing OUR TOP PATREON SUPPORTERS: -YouCanMakeThisToo YT: http://bit.ly/38sqq7v -Tom's Woodwork-Tim Morrill-Brent Jarvis IG: https://bit.ly/2OJL7EV -Scott @ Dad It Yourself DIY YT: http://bit.ly/3vcuqmv-Broken Lead Woodworks IG: https://bit.ly/38vQij8 -Chris Simonton-Maddux Woodworks YT: http://bit.ly/3chHe2p-Ray Jolliff  -Ryder Clark-Wilker's Woodcraft -Deo Gloria Woodworks: https://www.instagram.com/deogloriawoodworks/ -Kris -Wayne's Woodshed -Brad Hoff-TwoRedDogsWoodworking -Tommy Trease New: -TwoRedDogsWoodworking-Derek Vanderkleed-Michael Brown-Will Courson   Support our sponsors: MagSwitch: https://mag-tools.com -use code "WBAT" for 10% off SurfPrep: https://www.surfprepsanding.com/?aff=48  -use code "FISHER10" for 10% off RZmask: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Bits & Bits: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Starbond: use code "BRUCEAULRICH" Rotoboss: "GUNFLINT" We Built A Thing T-shirts! We have two designs to choose from! (You can get one of these as a reward at certain levels of support) https://amzn.to/2GP04jf  https://amzn.to/2TUrCr2 ETSY SHOPS: Bruce: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BruceAUlrich?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=942512486 Drew: https://www.etsy.com/shop/FishersShopOnline?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=893150766 Mark: https://www.etsy.com/shop/GunflintDesigns?ref=search_shop_redirect Bruce's most recent video: https://youtu.be/mXdTJsoS1Xc Drew's most recent video: https://youtu.be/m7SVAuQhevg Mark's most recent video: https://youtu.be/xf1jjEFRdkU We are all makers, full-time dads and all have YouTube channels we are trying to grow and share information with others. Throughout this podcast, we talk about making things, making videos to share on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, etc...and all of the life that happens in between.  CONNECT WITH US: WE BUILT A THING: www.instagram.com/webuiltathingWE BUILT A THING EMAIL: webuiltathing@gmail.com FISHER'S SHOP: www.instagram.com/fishersshop/ BRUDADDY: www.instagram.com/brudaddy/ GUNFLINT DESIGNS: https://www.instagram.com/gunflintdesigns Music by: Jay Fisher (Thanks, Jay!)

Talkin Shop with ShopSabre
Ep.74: Servo vs Stepper Motors

Talkin Shop with ShopSabre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 50:29


The official Talkin Shop podcast hosted by Brandon and Jesse from ShopSabre covers all things CNC and business. In this episode we talk about Servo vs Stepper motors and their differences, strengths, and applications. Learn More and Follow Us: https://www.instagram.com/shopsabre/ https://www.facebook.com/Shopsabre

Radio Duna - Información Privilegiada
Comercio en feriados, mercado y dólar post 18 y las indicaciones tributarias

Radio Duna - Información Privilegiada

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022


En la edición AM, hablamos con Bernardita Silva, Gerenta de Estudios de la CNC; Gonzalo Guerra, abogado del área tributaria de Arteaga Gorziglia; y con Felipe Posada, director de análisis y estrategias de Avatrade.

Radio Duna | Información Privilegiada
Comercio en feriados, mercado y dólar post 18 y las indicaciones tributarias

Radio Duna | Información Privilegiada

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022


En la edición AM, hablamos con Bernardita Silva, Gerenta de Estudios de la CNC; Gonzalo Guerra, abogado del área tributaria de Arteaga Gorziglia; y con Felipe Posada, director de análisis y estrategias de Avatrade.

Another Woodshop Podcast
Episode 125: Long September w/ Casey Reeves [CReevesMakes]

Another Woodshop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 101:04 Very Popular


Episode 125Casey is helping out his kids with a cart for their school's band equipment and building it with another dad in the community. Dan finished the last of the 3 beams at his customer's house, knocking out the tip boxes, getting ready to tackle 12 doors for one customer, and knocking out some cutting boards to stock up for Christmas.Pete is celebrating his anniversary with Emma, finished up the ice climbing tool projects, did a bunch of printer maintenance, and he's making a bunch of cutting boards and other projects for a local county fair where he'll have a booth.Mike is working on a dining room set, falling in love with building chairs, getting a pentarouter, planning out moving his CNC into the other building, knocking out a large laser job.Special Guest - Casey Reeveshttps://www.instagram.com/creeves_makes/https://www.youtube.com/c/CReevesMakesSponsor:3M XTRACTgo.3M.com/xtract13M Xtract – Sand less. Make more Sign up for Patreon for Early access, and special Patreon-only content:https://www.patreon.com/anotherwoodshoppodcastVoicemails:Mark OhlmsWhat are your business goals for 2023?ThomasTSG MakesDo you have a bandsaw blade recommendation?Special Links:Alex Snodgras - Bandsaw Life:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2VkHpI4Gm2Q_U8bm_ilUKwYou can send in your question to get answered on the podcast! Record your question or comment on your phones voice memo app and email it to anotherwoodshoppodcast@gmail.comYou can follow us all and the podcast on Instagram and YouTube!Podcast:https://www.instagram.com/anotherwoodshoppodcast/https://www.youtube.com/anotherwoodshoppodcast https://www.etsy.com/shop/awpstore Pete:https://www.instagram.com/ptreesworkshop/ https://www.youtube.com/ptreesworkshophttps://www.etsy.com/shop/pTreesWorkShop Dan:https://www.instagram.com/danieldunlap.woodworks/ https://www.youtube.com/danieldunlap  https://www.etsy.com/shop/ddwwstore Mike:https://www.instagram.com/coffeycustombuilds/ https://www.youtube.com/coffeycustombuilds https://www.etsy.com/shop/coffeycustombuilds Support the show

Church on the North Coast
Pastors Troy and Rebecca Thompson - Not For Sale

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022


Church on the North Coast
Pastors Marlon and Michelle Sadler - Unity in Division

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022


Here I Am Podcast with Alexandra Nye
Ep. 114: Emotional Eating with Coach Christina Hathaway

Here I Am Podcast with Alexandra Nye

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 35:09


A big shoutout to Coach Christina Hathaway MFT, CPT, CNC, for her sharing her knowledge and expertise on emotional eating. You can find Christina on Instagram @fitmrshathaway Her website is www.mindsetofmatter.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anyehilationnutrition/support

Connecting the Dots
Tom Root speaks about Lean in a High-Variability Business

Connecting the Dots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 31:07


 Tom Root is an entrepreneur who originally envisioned Zingeman's Mail Order and started it up as a co-partner and then founded the Maker Works as his second business. In 2002, Zingerman's Mail Order and Zingermans.com merged and Tom took on the role of Chief Financial Officer of the resulting business (known simply as Zingerman's Mail Order). As CFO, Tom has championed open book management and taken the lead on educating staff about the financial ins and outs of the business. In 2004, Tom was introduced to the concepts of Lean Manufacturing popularized by Toyota. Building on his experience with open book finance, Tom worked to bring the philosophy of continuous improvement and waste elimination to Mail Order. For the last 10 years Tom has been practicing Lean thinking though process improvement, class development and teaching. In 2008, Tom was inspired by the financial crisis to start Maker Works. Maker Works is 11,000 sq ft manufacturing facility that is operated like a health club. Individuals or businesses purchase memberships to have access to high-tech tools like laser cutters, 3D printers and CNC plasma cutters. The mission of Maker Works is to democratize the tools of manufacturing to foster job creation, community and self-sustainability. In September of 2014, Maker Works celebrated its 3-year anniversary. It has attracted more than 700 members, added 16,000 sq ft of tenant space and played a role in a handful of start-ups including Sight Machine, a venture funded computer vision start-up. Link to claim CME credit: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3DXCFW3 (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3DXCFW3) CME credit is available for up to 3 years after the stated release date Contact CEOD@bmhcc.org if you have any questions about claiming credit.

Five & Thrive
September 15th's Weekly Rundown

Five & Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 5:02


Welcome to Five & Thrive: a weekly podcast highlighting the Southeast's most interesting news, entrepreneurs, and information of the week, all under 5 minutes.  My name is Jon Birdsong and I'm with Atlanta Ventures. Product of the Week: Last week we covered an innovative hardware product to deter car break-ins, this week we're back at it with another hardware company led by Akshita Iyer. This company is called Ome. Ome upgrades your kitchen starting with the most vulnerable and dangerous areas - the stove. More specifically the stove knob. Ome Kitchens smart knobs connect to your mobile app so you have full control of the stove, even when you're not in the kitchen. Akshita turned down $800k from the Shark Tank judges,  a product and name iteration before their current offering today. From the sounds of it, product is being developed and stoves are getting smarter and safer. Give Ome Kitchen a look.   Another product of the week is called BackSpace run by serial entrepreneur, Faiz Imran. After successfully building a marketing agency and working with dozens of influencers and builders of online communities, he saw and felt the acute pain that brand builders and community galvanizers face which is monetizing their community. For example, let's say you're a fitness influencer through Instagram and Tik Tok and want to engage deeper and deliver differentiated product offerings throughout the community experience. Enter BackSpace where communities around people and products can engage through live chat, premium community levels, and simple mechanisms to up sell and cross sell passionate consumers. If you or any of your friends have built substantial communities online, check out BackSpace.  Companies Worth Applying To:  This week the company worth applying to is called Itential as they are looking for a Senior Accountant. This would be a great opportunity to work with a software company from a finance perspective and get great experience a level or two under C-level leadership. Ian Bresenhan, is the CEO of Itential and they make it simple for businesses to navigate a dual network ecosystem into one. What does that mean? Over the past few decades companies have built their businesses on physical or on-premise networks. Then the cloud came along. Now, how does a business who has some networks on prem and some networks in the cloud co-exist, coordinate data, and seamlessly operate. Welcome to Itential. They are hiring for several roles.  Events to Put on the Calendar:  Atlanta Healthcare Entrepreneurs Meetup is on Wednesday, October 5th with Atlanta Ventures Partner A.T. Gimbel who will be interviewing Ascend Medical CEO, Jason Madsen. The topic of conversations will be around the lessons and learnings Jason experienced co-founding WellStreet Medical and now running Ascend Medical which brings the doctor's office to you. Ranging from telemedicine to home visits to mobile testing, Ascend is reimagining the healthcare experience starting with location.  Beta Product of the Week:  This company is truly laying brick by brick and producing a strong foundation and that company is called ToolPath. Andy Powell, co-Founder of Atlanta success story CallRail, is on to his next company which is focused on manufacturing technology. ToolPath is making it easier to create CNC machined parts — from prototyping to mass production, and they are doing this by building cloud-based CAM software to automatically create g-code programs for CNC machines. Let's elaborate on those hieroglyphics.   CNC machining is a procedure used in most manufacturing operations. CNC stands for Computer Numeric Control and deals with the use of a single-setup or more computer to administer actions of different machine tools and in ToolPath's case, specifically mills for now. And CAM stands for computer aided software. So now with ToolPath, the opportunity for CNC just moved from the horse and buggy to a car because the software brings accessibility and convenience to the CNC market. Keep tabs on ToolPath and go to their website for an early look.    Annnnd, that's 5 minutes. Thank you for listening to Five and Thrive. We provide 5 minutes of quality information, so you can thrive in the upcoming week. Please subscribe to the show and spread the good word!  Resources discussed in this episode:   Product of the Week:  Ome Kitchen BackSpace Companies Worth Applying To: Itential Rolls Open Events to Put on your Calendar:  Atlanta Healthcare Entrepreneurship Meetup  Beta Product of the Week: ToolPath

Sawdust Nation
Evolution of Industry!

Sawdust Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 75:47


Episode 116 is in the books and we have our returning guest and biggest sponsor Daniel from PWNCnc on for some industry changing news!! He has yet again put the makers community in awe with his aftermarket CNC accessories. Making things better and better, making it more simple for any maker at any level to enjoy and get into CNC work with his easy plug and play spindle kits and all the goodies he talks about in this episode. Nap has been having some issues with his laser since it may have been more than he could handle, but he is looking to settle the score with his laser. Josh has a lot going on with jobs in his shop and continues to push things out the door. Nick is finishing up some high profile jobs and has taken a  small pause on the AVID build since he has been super busy. You do not want to miss this episode full of fun and great content.  Go make some sawdust, SAWDUST NATION OUT!!!GUESTDaniel MoranSee Sponsors for info!!MentionsClinthttps://www.instagram.com/caraway_cnc/Victorhttps://www.instagram.com/wimm_design/Greghttps://www.instagram.com/plattevalleywoodworks/CompaniesMaker Stockhttps://www.instagram.com/makerstockinfo/SAWDUST10 (onetime promo code)Affiliate LinksOMTech Laserhttps://www.instagram.com/omtechlaser/Follow the link: https://omtechlaser.com/?ref=sawdustnationCODE: SAWDUSTNATIONBrent JarvisClean Cut Woodworking (Brent Jarvis)https://instagram.com/cleancutwoodworking/Clean Cut WoodworkingWebsite Promo: SDNPOD22 (5% off)Sponsors:PWN CNCUsers Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/2993800347512326Website   https://pwncnc.com/Instagram https://www.instagram.com/pwncnc/5% off Promo/Affiliate Code: "sawdustnation981" (Also works for new spindle sets)Totalboathttps://www.instagram.com/totalboat/Support the show

We Built A Thing
165 - We Should Sue Europe

We Built A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 62:26 Very Popular


In this one, Mark releases a new video about his drum sander. Bruce goes to Maker Faire. Drew gets in the production game. Plus, a ton more! This episode is sponsored by OneFinity CNC! We have partnered with them and would love it if you would go to their website and check them out: https://www.onefinitycnc.com/ (we don't have a coupon code at this time, but if you're able to mention that we sent you, it helps!) Become a patron of the show! http://patreon.com/webuiltathing OUR TOP PATREON SUPPORTERS: -YouCanMakeThisToo YT: http://bit.ly/38sqq7v -Tom's Woodwork-Tim Morrill-Brent Jarvis IG: https://bit.ly/2OJL7EV -Scott @ Dad It Yourself DIY YT: http://bit.ly/3vcuqmv-Broken Lead Woodworks IG: https://bit.ly/38vQij8 -Chris Simonton-Maddux Woodworks YT: http://bit.ly/3chHe2p-Ray Jolliff  -Ryder Clark-Wilker's Woodcraft -Deo Gloria Woodworks: https://www.instagram.com/deogloriawoodworks/ -Kris -Wayne's Woodshed -Brad Hoff New:-Blaz Malezic-Seth Williams-Byrom's Custom Woodworks-Stephen McDowell-Steven Gilmore Support our sponsors: MagSwitch: https://mag-tools.com -use code "WBAT" for 10% off SurfPrep: https://www.surfprepsanding.com/?aff=48  -use code "FISHER10" for 10% off RZmask: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Bits & Bits: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Starbond: use code "BRUCEAULRICH" Rotoboss: "GUNFLINT" We Built A Thing T-shirts! We have two designs to choose from! (You can get one of these as a reward at certain levels of support) https://amzn.to/2GP04jf  https://amzn.to/2TUrCr2 ETSY SHOPS: Bruce: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BruceAUlrich?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=942512486 Drew: https://www.etsy.com/shop/FishersShopOnline?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=893150766 Mark: https://www.etsy.com/shop/GunflintDesigns?ref=search_shop_redirect Bruce's most recent video: https://youtu.be/mXdTJsoS1Xc Drew's most recent video: https://youtu.be/m7SVAuQhevg Mark's most recent video: https://youtu.be/nsd-oYq9FDE We are all makers, full-time dads and all have YouTube channels we are trying to grow and share information with others. Throughout this podcast, we talk about making things, making videos to share on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, etc...and all of the life that happens in between.  CONNECT WITH US: WE BUILT A THING: www.instagram.com/webuiltathingWE BUILT A THING EMAIL: webuiltathing@gmail.com FISHER'S SHOP: www.instagram.com/fishersshop/ BRUDADDY: www.instagram.com/brudaddy/ GUNFLINT DESIGNS: https://www.instagram.com/gunflintdesigns Music by: Jay Fisher (Thanks, Jay!)

Talkin Shop with ShopSabre
Ep. 73: Empowering Employees

Talkin Shop with ShopSabre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 47:06


The official Talkin Shop podcast hosted by Brandon and Jesse from ShopSabre covers all things CNC and business. In this episode we talk about empowering your employees in business. Learn More and Follow Us: https://www.instagram.com/shopsabre/ https://www.facebook.com/Shopsabre

Church on the North Coast
Pastor Troy Thompson - Becoming A Dangerous Christian

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


September 14, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Becoming A Dangerous Christian | cnclove.org 

Strong Mama's Mind-body Nutrition & Fitness
Radical Self-Trust with Daria Tavana- Ep 110

Strong Mama's Mind-body Nutrition & Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 51:46


Holy WOW. What a BOMB of an episode! Today we're chatting with Daria Tavana covering intuitive eating, self-trust, body confidence and so much more! This one is worth a couple of listens! Daria Tavana, NASM-CPT, CNC is an activist, certified trainer, nutrition coach, and creator of Trailblazing Strength, the only mentorship program for plant-based athletes committed to practicing radical self-trust by eating and training without rules or restrictions. Tune into Daria's Plant-Based Athletes Anonymous Podcast to learn how to navigate failure, explore success more deeply, and continue to move in the direction of your performance goals without fear of judgment or shame: https://powerbydaria.click/podcast Join Daria on Facebook for more training and nutrition tips for plant-based athletes: https://www.facebook.com/groups/greenathletes Connect with Daria on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/powerbydaria/ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Learn more about The STRONG Method, my signature nutrition and lifestyle coaching program for women living with hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's and PCOS- www.updogwellnessandfitness.com >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Connect with me on Instagram @NatalieBrookeGuevara and on TikTok

Single Jungle
Ep.43

Single Jungle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 29:41


J'emprunte les mots de la chanson des Nèg' Marrons pour faire le point. J'ai lancé Single Jungle en janvier 2020, il y a 2 ans et 9 mois, il était temps, non ? C'est un épisode interactif, je vous pose des questions, hâte d'avoir vos réponses (via les réseaux sociaux). Bonne écoute et merci de votre fidélité ! Références citées dans l'épisode (ou en bonus)Podcasts Single Suspect, de Julia Faure, collectif Transmission https://podcast.ausha.co/transmission/single-suspect Sologamie, de Marie Albert https://anchor.fm/sologamie Célibataire, de Isis Latorre https://open.spotify.com/show/6fRm6J5u4DukosbE5AaAhW Un podcast à soi, de Charlotte Bienaimé (Arte Radio), épisode "trouble dans le couple" https://www.arteradio.com/son/61673642/trouble_dans_le_couple Vivons heureux avant la fin du monde, de Delphine Saltel (Arte Radio), épisode "Qu'est-ce qui pourrait sauver le couple ?" https://www.arteradio.com/son/61664867/qu_est_ce_qui_pourrait_sauver_le_couple Comment tu dates ? de Marie de Brauer (studio Trois jours de marche, avec le soutien du CNC) https://open.spotify.com/show/3p4s3zc4zbJVBhlVS8yZbJ?si=QGwLZL2ZSpGTucAcFNjTSw&nd=1 "Le célibat, pourquoi pas ?" sur France Inter, avec Marianne James, Marie Kock, autrice du livre "Vieille fille" (éd. La Découverte) https://www.radiofrance.fr/franceinter/podcasts/l-ete-comme-jamais/l-ete-comme-jamais-du-mardi-23-aout-2022-6117352 ép.34 de Single Jungle avec Lucile Quillet, autrice du livre "Le prix à payer, ce que le couple hétéro coûte aux femmes" (éd. Les liens qui libèrent). Je vous recommande aussi la newsletter et le compte Instagram "Plan cash" de Léa Lejeune et Morgane Dion https://www.instagram.com/plancash_media/ Episodes de Single Jungle cités (sans spoiler/divulgacher/déflorer l'ordre du classement Top 10) :Episodes avec des invitées femmes ép 25, Rosa Bursztein, comédienne, créatrice du podcast "Les mecs que je veux ken". Et bientôt sur Téva, dans sa propre émission "Orgasmiq". ép 29, Lydie, bisexuelle

Colored Radio
CR: The Since2008 interview

Colored Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 92:23


Friend of the show Since2008 producer/songwriter stops by the show to talk about his new album " Drowning the Sun" and how he creates the content in his music. Another great episode, check out CNC clothing and stream " Drowning the Sun" on all platforms.

On The Brink
Episode 56: Simon Yu

On The Brink

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 51:29


Nearly 50 years ago, Simon Yu immigrated to Prince George from Hong Kong carrying only two suitcases. As a young high school student speaking very little English, he attended Prince George College, a local residential boarding school. As one of only a handful of immigrants in his school, Simon discovered and embraced the cultural diversity of this community. Simon has since built a legacy and family of six successful children in Prince George. The Yu family name is entrenched in the fabric of this community that touch all areas of the city through their work in teaching, coaching, medicine, business, engineering, and music. Simon is also a proud grandfather of 8 grandchildren, who all live in Prince George. As a long-time active citizen and volunteer in Prince George, Simon is inspired by the history and aspirations of the people of the great city. Simon arrived in Prince George with nothing, and believes he owes this community everything. Simon Yu keeps a promise of integrity and dedicated public service in every moment. He is a community leader and business owner. Through his four decades of experience as an instructor at CNC, board of directors of UNBC, Prince George Airport Authority, the Downtown Business Association, and many other community organizations, Simon has forged a strong community vision for Prince George. Simon's over 30 years of consulting engineering service in Northern B.C. and his instrumental leadership in the 2003 Aceh Post Tsunami housing relief effort have provided him with deep insights and practical solutions to help solve many challenges currently facing Prince George. Through these experiences and his time as the municipal manager for Rankin Inlet, Nunavut in the late 1980's Simon gained deep knowledge of municipal administration practices and how to work with senior governments to get things done.

F*ck Buddies: A Dating and Sex Advice Podcast
Episode 206 - Cbat Outta Hell

F*ck Buddies: A Dating and Sex Advice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:29


Cbat has official graduated from best boner jam to my new warlord anthem so that I can achieve my true potential.  Topics include the origin and mystery of Cbat by Hudson Mohawke, a perfect guide how to not approach kinks, the importance of the first "C" in "CNC", covering up your 4 inch lie, using outing someone as blackmail, parsing very easy to understand messages.

Church on the North Coast
September 11, 2022 - Pastor Ron Brittian - The Inner Man

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


Church on the North Coast
September 11, 2022 - Pastor Lou Kayatin II - Enjoying the Life You Were Meant to Live

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


September 11, 2022 - Pastor Lou Kayatin II - Enjoying the Life You Were Meant to Live | cnclove.org

Church on the North Coast
September 11, 2022 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - Home for You

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


September 11, 2022 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - Home for You | cnclove.org

Church on the North Coast
Pastor Troy Thompson - Spiritual Authority

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


ShopNotes Podcast
ShopNotes Podcast E129: Call Chunk-a-Trunk's Corporate Number

ShopNotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 22:11 Very Popular


On this week's episode of the ShopNotes Podcast, John, Logan, and Phil are talking about post-Labor Day woodworking goals, jointing edges, joining panels, and more. This episode is brought to you by Shaper Tools, makers of Shaper Origin, the handheld CNC router that brings digital precision to the craft of woodworking. Tackle joinery, cabinetry, hardware installation and more with speed and precision. Try it risk-free in your shop for 30 days. Visit www.Shapertools.com to learn more.

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E50 - This Month In The Apocalypse

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 74:57


Episode Notes Episode Summary For this This Month in the Apocalypse episode Brooke, Margaret, and Casandra all researched different topics and discuss them. Margaret talks about climate collapse, droughts, floods, wildfires, the cost of wheat, and the dangers of rising humidity for wet bulb temperatures. Casandra talks about Monkey Pox, rises in other viral and vector borne illness, and discovers why rain might actually be a bad thing for your food. Brooke talks about student loan forgiveness and things you, brave listener, might not be aware you are forgiven for. Everyone attempts to get us sponsored by 'Big' Rain Barrel. If you're out there 'Big' Rain Barrel. Please sponsor us. Host Info Casandra can be found on Twitter @hey_casandra or Instagram @House.Of.Hands. Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Brooke is just great and can be found at Strangers helping up keep our finances intact and on Twitter @ogemakweBrooke Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Come out Friday, September 23rd, and every two weeks there after. Might be about thru-hiking, Parenting, or Archiving. Transript An easier to read version is available on our website TangledWilderness.org. Margaret 00:16 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World Is Dying, your podcasts for what feels like the end times. I'm one of your hosts, Margaret killjoy. I have Brooke and Casandra with me as well as cohosts today, because today, you will be very excited to know that the world's still ending...that we are doing our second monthly This Month in the Apocalypse and we're going to be talking about basically the last month and the I guess that's in the name. Okay. So, Brooke, Casandra, do you want to introduce yourselves? Possibly with Brooke going first. Casandra 00:52 Your name was first. Brooke 00:53 Yeah. Okay, alphabetically. Hi, everybody, it's Brooke Jackson again, coming to you live? Oh, wait, no, this will be recorded by the time you hear it. From the sunny lands of the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Casandra Johns 01:11 We're all in the Willamette Valley right now. Margaret 01:14 It's true. Casandra 01:15 It's true. This is Casandra. That's me. Margaret 01:19 Okay, and so this will be a very short episode, because actually, nothing bad has happened in the world, certainly not nything that feels end times ish, nothing out of the ordinary. I'm under the impression we have reversed most of the major...I mean, I think Biden passed a bill. So, I'm pretty sure climate change is over. And COVID is over. I learned that just the other day walking into a place where I thought everyone would be wearing masks, but it's over. So that's cool. Or, alternatively, let's talk about how China's in the worst heatwave in human history...in recorded history. We're gonna cut it up into segments. And I'm gonna go first with my segment. Casandra Johns 02:06 Do we need to say "Du duh duh duhh, Channel Zero? As part of the intro? Brooke 02:13 Do a Jingle? Margaret 02:16 Yes. Okay. You want to do it? Brooke 02:20 She just did. Casandra 02:21 Oh, yeah, I did. Duh duh duh duh! Margaret 03:19 Okay, and we're back. Okay, so, China...70 Day heatwave as of several days ago, now. And by the time you all are hearing this, I believe we're recording this about five days before this episode comes out. So, who knows what will have happened? There has been a lot of heat waves and floods all over the world this summer. And so China's in the middle of a 70 day heatwave. The drought has reduced hydroelectric output, which huge areas were reliant on the electricity because the water levels are so far down. And of course the electricity is what powers the AC. So no air conditioning is really fun as things get really hot. AC has been turned off in a lot of office buildings. It's cut power to tons of industry, including a bunch of car manufacturers where I'm a little bit like "Eh, whatever. Cars are bad." I mean, I drive cars so I'm kind of an asshole and hypocrite. Anyway. But also solar panel output and EV battery plants and like lots of stuff that's like being pitched as the alternative to things...y'all can feel free to cut me off too as I talk about these things. I'm just like going through my notes. And I don't know, it's breaking records all over the place by like four degrees in a lot of places. It's four degrees Fahrenheit. Brooke 04:44 What is heatwave in this context? Like are they having like, you know, 115 degree temperatures, are they just? Margaret 04:53 I mean, so. I mean, I believe in localized places. It's getting like crazy hot but what's interesting about this is that it's it's more the length of it and the abnormality to its usual that is, like, it's a lot of this stuff is like 106 degrees Fahrenheit and things like that. You know, things that are very not nice, but are...well, human survivable. Although we should probably at some point talk about wet bulb temperatures and how dry places are survivable at substantially higher temperatures than humid places. But yeah, so it's it's, it's an it's an abnormality causing problems as far as I understand, rather than like, just specifically, if you step outside, you will be scorched by the heatray that is the sun. It's affecting over a billion people, which is a lot of people. The area of the heatwave is 530,000 square miles, which for context is Texas, Colorado and California combined. Casandra Johns 05:57 Does that overlap with the area...like, isn't there like a massive wildfire happening in China right now? Margaret 06:04 I think you know, more about the wildfires than I do. Casandra Johns 06:07 I don't know what region it was in. Margaret 06:09 Okay. Casandra 06:09 I guess I'm curious. Of course, they're related because everything climate-y is related, ultimately. Margaret 06:16 Yeah. Casandra 06:19 Yeah, I'm curious how closely they're tied together. But, if you don't know, and I don't know, that's fine. Because there's also a massive wildfire. And that sucks. Margaret 06:27 Yeah. There's a massive wildfire. Brooke 06:31 Is that a continuous area, Margaret? That five? Whatever, something miles? Margaret 06:37 You all are exceeding my level of research that I did, because I did research about the entire world. So I don't know. Brooke 06:44 Okay, fair. Casandra 06:45 Oh, yeah. You have more. This is just like heat waves everywhere. Okay. Margaret 06:48 Yeah. Okay. And also joining us today on playing the squeaky toy in the background is Rintrah, the best dog in the world. Brooke 06:59 Can confirm. Margaret 07:00 The best dog in the world. No complaints? Okay. Yeah, I, you know, there's a lot more I don't know about this, right? But this was one that I haven't even seen really cropping up much in the media at all. And actually, one of the things that's sort of interesting and terrible and telling is that a lot of the information that I've been able to find about climate change disasters comes from the business media, like, a lot of this is about how it will affect stock prices, how it will affect, you know...300 Mines are shut down right now in China, or as of you know, two days ago when I did most of the research for this recording. And so it talks more about the 300 mines that have been shut down instead of the 119,000 people who have been evacuated from their homes. And it's just, it's a real problem. There's a lot of photos of like, low reservoirs that are like 20 meters below what they're supposed to be and things like that. And, of course, to tie everything into everything else, you know, things that happen in one place don't only effect that region. The drought is fucking up their harvest, and fertilizer for export has been affected, which will probably fuck up the world's food supply, which was otherwise very stable. So, I don't think that's gonna be a problem. Casandra Johns 08:16 The world's been chaos, but at least we know, food is cheap and available. Margaret 08:20 And will stay that way. Margaret 08:22 Okay, so then the one that I'm finally starting to see more get talked about in the media, thankfully, although it's annoying, because it's only been talked about because now there's like dramatic photos. But whatever. I mean, I'm not blaming people for not paying attention to everything that's happening in the world. Pakistan is having flooding, like just absolutely massive flooding. I've read reports saying that there's a half a million people living in refugee camps. It's taken at least 1000 lives, it's fucking up food production. Over a million homes have been destroyed. A third of the country is underwater. Have y'all seen the satellite image photos? Casandra 08:22 Yep Casandra Johns 08:59 Yeah, and they're referring to it as a 'lake.' Which makes me wonder like, are they anticipating at least some portion of it to remain? Like, "And look at our new lake!" Margaret 09:10 Yeah. Casandra 09:12 I heard I heard someone else I heard someone referred to it as a 'small ocean.' Margaret 09:18 Yeah. Margaret 09:19 Yeah. And, and Pakistan is the the fifth most populous country in the world after China, India, U.S., Indonesia, I think. Yeah. And so it's like, it's a big fucking deal and a big fucking problem. And one of the other problems because capitalism solves...makes everything worse. Pakistan has taken out a $1.1 billion dollar loan from the IMF, which for anyone following at home, the IMF is a predatory lending organization called the International Monetary Fund, that actually a lot of modern leftist politics, at least in the Western world and actually a lot of the developing world kind of cut its teeth in the...during the, the turn of the millennium fighting against the IMF and the World Bank, specifically because of the stuff that they do, which is that they loan predatory. It's like a payday loan. You know, it's like a paycheck loan place, but for entire countries, they loan you $1.1 billion, and then you're going to be paying off the interest for the rest of your life as a country. And of course, a lot of what's happening right now is that developing nations as they take out these loans are therefore forced to extract more fossil fuels from their own countries, in order to pay off the interest of their loan, not even touching the principal, trapping us further and further in the cycle of what's destroying everything. So that's all really fun. Okay, then, East Africa, particularly Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia, are also facing prolonged drought, rising food prices. A lot of this is because of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. This is projected to leave 20 million people hungry with an estimated 3 million potential deaths if aid isn't delivered, and these three countries represent 2% of the world's population, but 70% of the extreme food insecurity. And most of...about 90% of the wheat imported by East Africa comes from Russia and Ukraine, which are of course, having some issues right now. They're not famously friends. But you're thinking to yourself, "Well, I'm a wheat farmer in the US, and the high prices are good for me." They are not. Things are not good with domestic wheat production here in the United States, either, which, of course, affects large quantities of the world. Also, the US is a major grain exporter. And so this is things that affect the US do affect everyone else. And not just because we're the center of Empire. Drought is affecting wheat fields in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. Kansas is estimating a 30% drop in their harvest. Oklahoma is estimating a 50% drop, in its harvest. And so even though you have these, like record high prices for wheat, farmers are expecting to lose money, because they're not able to grow enough. You look like you have a question. Brooke 09:19 Oh wow. Casandra Johns 12:24 And yeah, so we talked about this a little bit the other day, I think, like I'm not sure if people realize what it means when the wheat crop is devastated. You know, it's not just like, "Maybe I can't eat bread." Brooke 12:43 There's more to it than that? Casandra Johns 12:45 Right! I mean, the next thing I think of is like, who eats the wheat? Not just humans. You know, like, I can't eat wheat, but like, I eat beef. Margaret 12:58 Yeah. Casandra 12:58 And chicken. Margaret 13:00 Yeah. Brooke 13:00 Was does that matter, Casandra? Casandra 13:03 Maybe they eat wheat. Just the like domino effect. Margaret 13:07 Yeah. Casandra 13:08 Yeah. When we talk about rising food prices and rising fuel prices, and how those are connected to like rising everything prices. Margaret 13:15 Yeah. And book prices most famously. Brooke 13:16 Okay, well, like, I have a solution. Casandra 13:19 Okay, what's your solution? Is it Communism? Brooke 13:19 Cause, we're all about solutions here. Well, you started talking about Pakistan being all flooded like the country's a giant lake. And then you said drought in the US and I'm like, "Let's just pick up some water over there and just put it over here." And then there won't be a drought or flood. Margaret 13:36 So what's so great and I'm gonna get to in a moment is that drought and flood are entirely related. I think you knew this, and we're just setting me up to say this, but they're absolutely related. The more drought you have, the worse flooding you have, which of course, like boggles my immediate science, right? My non science brain is like, "But water is the opposite of drought," you know, and we're gonna get to them second. Okay, so also in the US, Lake Mead is drying up. It's the largest reservoir in the United States, it provides water to 25 million people. It's possible that soon it won't have enough water to feed the Hoover Dam, which provides electricity to about a million people. And the one upside of all of this drought..this is really selfish. It's kind of like interesting the stuff they keep finding in the water. They keep find... Margaret 14:26 Yeah. They're like finding like some guys like "Oh, look a barrel," and he like pops open some barrel from the 1920s. And just like a dead guy with a bullet in his skull, and they're like, "Oh, the mafia really did just drop people off in barrels," which led me to the conclusion that apparently leaving dead bodies in large body in large bodies of water is more effective of a strategy than I've been led to believe. Casandra 14:27 Well, they haven't they also...hasn't also revealed like Nazi...like sunken Nazi ships and shit. And then they're like the.... Casandra 14:27 Crime? Margaret 15:01 Yeah, not in Lake Mead, though. Casandra Johns 15:04 Right. But then..No, but I'm just saying like everywhere it's revealing interesting things like in Europe the...what are the stones called? Margaret 15:12 The Hunger Stones. Casandra 15:13 Hunger Stones? Margaret 15:15 Yeah. Casandra 15:15 So apparently, what's the context for this? Previously, in history when there were massive droughts and like rivers dwindled down to nothing, people made carvings in the stones at particular water levels with these like really epic, maybe Margaret's looking at some examples, of these really epic miserable statements about like, "Fear ye, fear ye, if the water gets this low..." Margaret 15:40 You're dead. Casandra 15:40 Yeah, but people are seeing those now, which is terrifying and interesting. Margaret 15:47 Yeah. Terrified and interesting is a good way to describe the current epoch. Brooke 15:52 Cool. That's the silverling, the mud caked lining. Brooke 15:52 Yeah. There was. It's not happening right at this moment. But here locally, when the Detroit reservoir got real low a couple of years ago, there was a town that had been flooded when they built the dam there and it was low enough that like, remnants of this town were visible, including like an old wagon, like covered wagon base kind of wagon and other cool artifacts. Brooke 16:27 See some history before we all die. Margaret 16:30 Yeah, yeah, exactly. Brooke 16:31 Great. Margaret 16:32 So, in California, heat and drought are also combining as power usages reaches a five year high power use, because people are running more and more air conditions. I didn't quite realize exactly how...I don't I don't have a percentage in front of me...But like, air conditioning is a really, really big use of electricity. And so in California, the grid is estimated...is expected to become unstable, although that might have already happened. It was supposed to happen like this week. So that might happen by the time y'all hear this. Or maybe it didn't happen. And I'm here I am chicken littling, all day long. And, of course, Jackson, Mississippi flooding. The capital of Mississippi, which is primarily black city has left 150,000 people without drinking water. Sooo... Brooke 17:18 I haven't heard about this at all? Margaret 17:20 Oh, yeah. And there's some mutual aid groups on the ground. Cooperation. Jackson is a long standing organization that works to sort of build dual power and do all kinds of awesome stuff in terms of cooperative economics and things like that. And they are doing a lot of mutual aid work. I believe there's also a group and maybe this is actually not maybe they're not directly related. I'm not sure there's a group called Hillbillies Helping Hillbillies that I've at least seen talk a lot about this issue. I don't know if they do most of their work down there or if they've been more focused on the Tennessee floods. Casandra Johns 17:54 I know Mutual Aid Disaster Relief is also doing work there. Margaret 17:59 Yeah. So "Why does all this stuff happen, Margaret?" you might ask. Brooke 18:07 Why does all this stuff happen, Margaret? Margaret 18:09 Well, I am an expert named Jennifer Francis, a senior scientist at the Woodward Climate Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts, and my quote, that is definitely me is, "As the air and oceans warm under a thicker blanket of greenhouse gases, more water vapor evaporates into the air providing more moisture to fuel thunderstorms, hurricanes, nor'easters and monsoons." Basically, as the temperature rise of the Earth, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor, every degree of...every increase of one degree Celsius can boost the capacity for holding water vapor by about 7%. So that's fun. And also as things get more humid, you're like, "Okay, well, that's cool. It's like more tropical and stuff, right?" Higher humidity is substantially more dangerous, like heat and humidity is what kills people, because of the way that our bodies thermo regulate basically, like, if you're at 100% humidity, and the temperature goes above your body temperature, you die. Not like instantly, right? But your body loses its ability to thermo regulate. And so that is the wet bulb temperature is the temperature at 100% humidity, and that can be calculated out from there. So, for example, 105 degrees Fahrenheit at 5%. humidity is not that bad. It's like 61 degrees wet bulb, right? You're not in danger, I mean, you can be in danger zone from other parts of it, you need to get in shade, right? But like, whereas 105 degrees at 95% humidity is 103 degrees wet bulb. So, and for context, you know, it's like I used to never really think about the level of humidity that I lived in until I moved to the South and I had to worry about mold and all kinds of other shit. But, much of the South, and San Francisco and also I believe much of Alaska sit at around 80 to 90% humidity, whereas the Southwest might be at around 30% humidity. So, when you hear about temperatures at different levels in different parts of the country, the humidity that they're facing, like matters in terms of how catastrophic this type of thing is likely to be. And then the "What to do about it section!" Don't worry, we're almost done with the terrible climate shit part. Casandra Johns 20:20 I feel like earlier, you mentioned something about the relationship between flooding and drought. I was hoping you were gonna circle back to that. Margaret 20:28 Okay. Oh, yeah. So. So basically, the...some atmosphere shit I only half understand. But, as everything gets hotter, more of the air like sits...and more of the water sits in the air and that...it just fucks everything up. So, like, the rain falls off fucked up. I, I kind of like, wrap my head around it. And then I, it unraveled, you ever, like study things that are completely outside your thing? And then you like, you get your takeaway, and then the details like dissolve? That's what happened to me while I was researching this? Casandra Johns 21:00 No, that's I didn't realize it had I, I thought my assumption was it was going to be that, you know, you can look up videos of this where like, people put a cup of water upside down on like dry soil, you know, partially damp soil and like saturated wet soil. And the cup of water immediately, like seeps into the ground in the saturated soil, but it takes a really long time for the dry soil to absorb the water. Margaret 21:25 Yeah. Casandra 21:25 And so my assumption was like, "Oh, if there's a drought and the soil is bone dry, it can't absorb moisture very effectively." Margaret 21:33 Yeah. Casandra 21:33 Which is counterintuitive, maybe? But...then it floods. Margaret 21:36 I think that is a big part of it. Yeah. Casandra 21:38 Okay. Margaret 21:39 And then also, I was even just like...go ahead. Brooke 21:43 I was thinking about how matter can't be created or destroyed. And so the water still exist somewhere, even though it got sucked up from the dry places. And that might be why it ended up flooding in other places because the water still exists. Margaret 21:58 Well, a lot of places it's literally the same place will have droughts and floods. I think Texas was dealing with that I think it was Dallas, was having a record drought and might still be in a record drought and then had like, really fuck off flooding. I think it was about a week or two ago. That was like destroying everything. And, you know, because if the rain patterns are just completely different than Yeah, what the ground is used to absorbing and like, and which ties into what to do about it. A lot of what to do about it needs to happen at the scale that we're not necessarily going to talk about right now. But, rainwater catchment and drought areas is super important. And, you know, I was looking it up because there's this like. I'd always been sort of told that rainwater catchment like fucks up the water system of that area, you know, because Colorado has, they have re-legalized it a little bit in 2016. But it's been illegal for a very long time to catch rainwater in Colorado because they're like, "Oh, it's so dry here. We need all the groundwater." That was what I had always got told. The real reason's that Colorado made rainwater catchment illegal have a lot more to do with...capitalism, and the way that water rights are, you're basically stealing from people in entirely different areas if you catch the rainwater at the source or whatever. And, it it can affect things,right, if you like take water that could otherwise have ended up groundwater, but you're mostly it's mostly like shit that would have run off anyway. And so rainwater catchment increasingly in a lot of places, I believe Arizona has like new laws that like require new buildings to include rainwater catchment. There's entire countries who I didn't write down the names of that require rainwater catchment in all new buildings, especially island nations, I'm under the impression and so rainwater catchment is cool. And then, Arizona you can get rebates if you install rainwater catchment. In Colorado, it is now legal again for like home level and there's like all these like rules and shit. And you're, you're only allowed to store two barrels for a total of 110 gallons and you can only do it at like, home, or whatever. I'm sure there's ways that people could imagine catching rain water without getting caught. The CDC points out that rainwater is generally not safe to drink without treatment. You can use it to water non food plants without treatment. I say this, I showered with rainwater for the past three years and don't give a shit. But, maybe I shouldn't recommend that to other people. But, also filtering rainwater is like not the biggest deal in the world. And then... Casandra Johns 24:39 Also like, the idea of only using it on non food plants is really funny to me, because like it just rains on my plants, you know? And then I eat them. Margaret 24:51 Yeah. Brooke 24:52 You shouldn't let rain land of your plants. Margaret 24:54 You shouldn't be eating food from plants. Plants comes from stores, Casandra. Casandra Johns 24:59 Uh oh. Okay. And if they get rained on specifically then they're like poison. Margaret 25:06 Yeah, me, okay. Like, you walk out of a food store, the main place that people get food, like McDonald's, and you have your chicken nuggets, or... Casandra 25:14 And then they get rained on? Margaret 25:16 You wouldn't want to eat them now, would you? Casandra 25:18 Okay, I see what you mean. Margaret 25:20 Yeah, no, I like that part about the like non food plants or whatever is like to me is like that's what the CDC says. The CDC has lost a lot of...I don't trust it as much as I might have used to. Casandra 25:36 Interesting segue to... Margaret 25:39 Yeah. Well, there is one more part though that I believe one have you added to the notes about soil remediation and dry gardening? I'm wondering if you want to talk about some of that. Brooke 25:52 That has to be Casandra, cause it wasn't me. Casandra Johns 25:54 Oh, I mean, that was me thinking about like, how the what I was saying before how bone dry soil...the best place to store water is in the soil. Right? Margaret 26:04 Yeah. Casandra 26:06 Just like the best place to store nitrogen is in the soil. But, you know, if I lived in a super dry area, and this is only so effective for like the home gardener, this like ideally would happen on a large scale. But, if I lived in a really dry area, I'd be working really hard to like improve my soil health so that it can store more water. So that things like dry gardening are possible. So I can you know, have food even in a drought. Margaret 26:32 What is dry gardening? Casandra Johns 26:36 Dry gardening is gardening with little to no, like, manually added water. Margaret 26:43 Is that where you like mulch the shit out of it all to prevent evaporation? Casandra Johns 26:46 Yeah, you can do it that way. You can also...there. There's a...well, it's on my bookshelf, so I'm not gonna mention it because I can't remember the title right now. But yeah, mulching, spacing your plants a lot farther out, making sure that your soil can store water so that if you know we live, where I live, it rains a lot in the spring. And if the plants I plant have a room, and the soil is fluffy enough that they can send the roots really deep, then in the summer, when it's dry, they can still access the water that's stored in the soil. Does that make sense? Margaret 27:19 Cool, and then they grow chicken nuggets? Casandra 27:22 Yep. Margaret 27:23 Cool. Okay, so back to the clever segue that I broke about not trusting the CDC.... Casandra Johns 27:36 Yeah, yeah, I Okay. So, we realized we should probably say at least something about monkey pox. Because it's the thing that exists. My notes are titled monkey pox sucks. And... Brooke 27:52 Correct. Casandra Johns 27:53 Correct. Yeah. And I realized in researching this that I knew very little, I think I was just like, "We live in a time where there will be epidemic after epidemic," and I'm, you know, mentally overloaded on this topic. And had a lot of assumptions that were wrong. But, one interesting thing I found out is that the CDC is saying it's not transmitted....It's not airborne. Which, you know, they've kind of gone back and forth about whether masks are going to help...masks. I can't enunciate....whether masks are going to help prevent the spread. Brooke 28:37 If the mask prevents you from licking someone's open wounds, then then I say that would be helpful. Put your mask on. Casandra Johns 28:44 But, then there's there are other recommendations around like, avoiding close face to face contact with people. So that's all. I think I'm just affirming that I am also skeptical of CDC guidelines at this point, which is a bummer. Margaret 28:59 Yeah. Casandra 29:01 Anyway, do you want to hear all about monkeypox? Margaret 29:04 Yeah. Yay. Casandra 29:06 Yay. Margaret 29:06 What a fun show we make. Brooke 29:10 That's like a game, right? It's a children's game that you play. It's fun. Spread all over? Isn't it great? Casandra 29:18 No. Margaret 29:19 It's one of those games with a 1-3% death.... Okay, please continue. Brooke 29:24 That's pretty low. It's fine. Casandra Johns 29:26 Oh, my God, what a world that we live in. So apparently was discovered in 1958 in laboratory monkeys. So, you know, you can insert something here about blaming capitalism for everything. Because maybe it wouldn't have been a thing if monkeys were not in laboratories? Anyway, it's a cousin of smallpox in the first human case was recorded in 1970. When I first heard about monkey pox in May or whatever I was like, "Oh, cool and new disease." It's not new. It's been around for decades. So, it's really interesting that like, we don't have a vaccine that can quickly be rolled out. Do you want to guess why that is? Margaret 30:14 Is it Capitalsim? Brooke 30:14 I guess 'racism.' Casandra 30:15 Racism. Brooke wins with 'racism.' Brooke 30:23 Yay? Casandra 30:26 Yeah, so it was that to be uncommon in humans, but cases started increasing around 1980. And most of the cases have been documented in central and western Africa. That correct? In Africa. Margaret 30:41 Yeah, you said Nigeria is like one of the main spots of it? Casandra 30:45 For this outbreak. Margaret 30:46 Okay. Casandra 30:48 Yeah. So, and they think that one of the reasons....so there have been multiple outbreaks since it was first recorded in humans in 1970, which I didn't realize, because we don't hear about them, because mostly they've taken place in Africa. Which is just depressing. And I'll come back around to that in a minute. But, they think that that the increase in cases might be connected to the fact that it is related to smallpox. The smallpox vaccine, they think gives like, 85% that it is like, 85% effective against monkey pox. But most people don't get the smallpox vaccine anymore. Brooke 31:27 Yeah. Casandra 31:28 And I think that's related to the increase in monkey pox cases. Margaret 31:33 People don't get the smallpox vaccine anymore, because smallpox kind of went away because of vaccines? Casandra 31:40 Yeah, Brooke 31:41 No, it just stop being trendy. People were like, "That is not cool anymore. I'm not gonna take that one." Casandra Johns 31:48 Yeah, yeah. Which then is like, there's a whole tangent in here about who and how they decide a disease has been 'eradicated.' I'm doing air quotes that you can't see has been, 'eradicated.' Especially when something like monkey pox is trance was initially transmitted from animals to humans. And so, yeah, I don't know, is smallpox eradicated? I don't know. I'm not an epidemiologist. But I'm curious. So, let's see. Okay, so the current outbreak grew from one case in Massachusetts in the US, I'm talking about the US now, May 17. And at this point, you know, however many days it's been since May, there are almost 20,000 cases in the US, which is a lot of cases. Brooke 32:40 I mean, it sounds like a big number. But, also I know, there's a lot of people in the US, but also, I don't know how much cases of other things that we know about are common. So I don't have any frame of reference. Margaret 32:51 Yeah same. Casandra 32:53 Yeah. Brooke 32:54 Well, it's way smaller than Covid. Casandra Johns 32:57 Right. It is way smaller than Covid. But, you know, and it's, it's sort of like Covid, you're probably not going to die from it. But then there's the asterisk, 'unless you're immunocompromised already,' you know. So like, who are we? Who are we willing to throw under the bus for this? Brooke 33:13 So just Casandra. Casandra 33:13 Yeah, just me. Yeah. But then there's also public health experts are apparently warning that the virus is on the verge of becoming permanently entrenched here. Margaret 33:24 Cool. Casandra 33:25 So maybe 20,000 isn't, you know, a big chunk of the population, but in terms of like, a virus, it's bad news, because we don't really want it to become entrenched here, right? Brooke 33:38 Yeah, viruses, bad. Casandra 33:41 Virus equals bad. Okay. Okay, so, so there's been a lot of criticism about Biden's administration and their sluggish response to the outbreak. I read a really interesting report. I think WaPo [Washington Post] was the first place to report on this, but they said that, on August 4, US Health and Human Services officials plan to stretch the country's limited supply, or they announced, that they plan to stretch the country's limited supply of vaccines by splitting doses to cover five times as many people. This is after saying that they had plenty of doses. So, already sketchy. Yeah, cool, cool. And then the chief executive of Bavarian Nordic who's the vaccine manufacturer responded by accusing the Biden admin of breaching contract by planning to use them in this like inappropriate way by splitting the doses and then apparently threatened to cancel all future vaccine orders so that....Yeah, I'm not sure how that was resolved. Brooke 34:45 Capitalism. The other 'ism' now at play. Margaret 34:50 I was right. I was late. Casandra Johns 34:57 So the big concern for me in researching this was how it spreads, because I have a child who's about to go back to public school, so apparently animal to human transmission, it's spread by direct contact with blood, bodily fluids or cutaneous or mucosal lesions of infected animals. And then human to human transmission is close contact with respiratory secretions, which to me says airborne, right, right? Is that not what that means? Anyway, respiratory secretions, skin lesions of an infected person, or recently contaminated objects. So things like bedding, clothing, stuff like that. Um, but the CDC says it's not airborne. So, take that, as you will. I don't know. How are you gonna take that, Brooke? Brooke 35:41 Right. Well, I mean, respiratory secretions that does sound more significant than just like, you know, air droplets, like we talked about with covid, like, more moist, kind of things coming out of you, like sneezes and coughs and stuff that actually sprays more liquid matter? Casandra 36:07 So, use your imagination with that. Margaret 36:08 We could just go through and describe every act that could... Casandra 36:10 Don't spit in people's mouths. Brooke 36:14 Damn it, there goes half of my kink play. Margaret 36:18 I mean, it does seem like it's less contagious than like, because like, okay, right, like, because they said originally COVID wasn't airborne. And they weren't always wrong about that, right? But, the fact that it's been here for months, and is at 20,000 cases, is like, 'promising,' in that it seems less contagious than COVID? But that's, I guess I'm talking about like, the first or second most contagious virus that the world's ever faced. So, I guess it's a terrible benchmark to compare it to. Casandra Johns 36:49 Yeah, I think comparing everything to covid is probably not in our best interest, especially because a lot more people are comparing this to AIDS, in terms of the communities it's impacting, and how it's spreading. So it's, it's okay, let me go back to my list. Alright, so the incubation period is usually six to thirteen days, it's thought to be mainly spread through sexual activity, specifically, men who have sex with men and have multiple partners, though now they've sort of expanded that to include like queer and trans people, which is good. Not that it's spreading in queer and trans communities, but that they're changing language. So then I was like, "Well, is it an STI, right?" And I Googled "Is Monkey pox and STI? And the first two articles that came up, were: Number one, "Monkey pox is an STI and knowing that can help." And then number two is, "Monkey pox is spreading through sex, but it's not an STI." So you know, I'm not a doctor. Casandra Johns 37:02 It's not an STI. Casandra 37:29 Okay. Brooke 37:31 Because it's not it's, yeah, go ahead. Casandra Johns 37:52 But it seems to mainly be spreading through sex, probably because of the close contact involved. Margaret 38:02 Yeah, I mean, like, like, scabies is... Brooke 38:04 Yeah, like not through the sex itself. Casandra 38:06 Right. Brooke 38:07 But through the close physical contact of you know, that happens during sex. Casandra Johns 38:12 I think. I also saw a list. I think it's LA County. I was reading their like, list of eligibility criteria, and maybe risky behavior to avoid...'in void.' Would that even? Yeah, thank you. I was just trying to figure out what my made up word means. Risky behavior to avoid and they listed that, like, we're still learning about how it's transmitted, right, which is wild for a disease that's been around since the 70s. But, they listed that it could possibly be transmitted through semen. Like not solely but that could be another way that it's transmitted. Brooke 38:53 Sure, transmitted through bodily fluids, but the distinction when it when it's an STI is something that's sort of limited to being transmissible through kind of the genital region. Casandra Johns 39:10 Is that why one type of herpes is considered an STI, and the other isn't? Brooke 39:14 Yeah, so you can like can get both of them in both places because of oral sex. Casandra 39:21 Huh, that's interesting. Brooke 39:23 But yeah, technically. That's why. Casandra Johns 39:25 Thanks for knowing more about STI classification than me. I appreciate it. Brooke 39:29 Well, I fuck a lot. So I got to know these kinds of things. Casandra 39:35 All right, moving on with my notes. My next... Brooke 39:40 I just made everyone turn a scarlet blushing red color because I have non prude among this collective. Casandra Johns 39:48 I'm not blushing. I'm not prudish. I'm just Demi. Okay, so my next section is titled "Racism," which, yeah, so the virus isn't spreading in this specific outbreak of monkey pox is been spreading in Nigeria since 2017. Yet, somehow there are no clinical...there's no clinical trial data of the effectiveness of the vaccine or T pox, which is the antiviral they've developed. No human studies. I wonder why. Um, well, I as I said it's understudied because up until now, it's been isolated to central and west Africa. Yeah. What would have happened if we were vaccinating on a large scale in Nigeria? Would it have spread? Margaret 40:31 Yeah, I mean, that's like such a thing that I keep thinking about all this shit, where it's like, it's just seemed so obvious to me that, like the solutions to all the major things that we're dealing with right now, like don't make any sense in a world full of borders. You know? Being like, like, "We got ours. Fuck you," doesn't make any fucking it never made any fucking sense. But, it really doesn't make any fucking sense now, or it's like, yeah, if we had, like, I don't understand, even if I'm like a self interested, rich white American. I don't understand how I can be like, "Oh, new new disease just dropped and it's in another country." Let's go get rid of it in another country. That makes sense from...it's cheaper than building spaceships to Mars. Brooke 41:16 I think it's people still just not fundamentally understanding how deeply integrated we are now as a global society. Yeah. I mean, we shouldn't have figured especially in the last couple of years, if you haven't figured it out before, then like, you should understand that now. I feel like... Margaret 41:32 Yeah, acids been around for a long time. Casandra 41:39 Don't understand the reference? Margaret 41:43 Just like, oh, no, like, we're all one consciousness? Whatever. Casandra 41:52 Okay, my next subsection of notes is titled "Homophobia." Margaret 41:55 Hurray. Casandra 41:56 This is...I'm announcing these by way of a content warning. So yeah, so I read a few different, you know, I've seen like on Twitter and stuff, people talking about how homophobia relates to the way the language the government has been using and media outlets have been using around monkeypox, and also the government response to it and didn't fully understand that other than that it's mainly spreading in queer networks right now. But, I read an article that talked about how the homophobia they were seeing was mainly around the language that gay sex is quote, unquote, 'driving' the epidemic. Yeah, and just like really sex negative advice around how to keep from getting monkey pox. But, in reality, the drivers of the epidemic are the structures globally that have led to like vaccines and tests and treatments all existing for this virus, but not being accessible. Margaret 42:57 Yeah. Casandra 42:58 Yeah, I don't know if y'all have read any of the first person accounts of people trying to find access even to a test. Like I read an account of someone who went to their doctor was like, "I think a monkey pox." and the doctor, like, had to jump through all of these hoops just to access a test Margaret 43:14 Fucking hell. Margaret 43:16 So that's cool. Let's see, before I talk about the 'What we can do,' I want to circle back to climate change really quickly. Because, I think that in my brain, I know that epidemics and climate change are related, but I hadn't thought much about how in the particular mechanisms, but I read an interview that, that interested in me a lot. And they talked about how climate change is driving the risk of infectious diseases. I saw a report that 58% of the 375 infectious diseases they examined, have...this is a quote, "have been at some point aggravated by 'climatic hazards.'" So that's cool. Brooke 44:03 I...but how? I don't understand the connection. Casandra 44:06 Yeah. So. So one way is that climate change, they were talking about how it brings humans closer to animals, not in the sense that like "We are closer to nature," but just like, as we encroach on... Brooke 44:17 oh, sure. Casandra 44:20 And so, animal to human transmission is a thing. But, also if we're talking about like climate change and natural disasters, people get very sick of diseases and die after natural disasters. So, I'm sure that's part of what they mean by 'aggravated,' being 'aggravated by climatic hazards.' Warmer temperatures also attract insects and carriers of disease to parts of the world that they didn't used to exist in. Margaret. I feel like you were talking about...we were talking the other night and you mentioned like...no was it you? Maybe I was reading something? I've been reading too much lately. I was reading about a type of mosquito that is like, more likely to carry things like Dengue fever, and is now in the US, is now in the northern hemisphere. And. Margaret 45:08 Oh, that's exciting. Casandra 45:10 Yeah, and it has to do with warmer water temperatures where they can hatch their eggs and also with capitalism, because apparently they were transported here in 'tires.' Margaret 45:22 Huh? Casandra 45:23 Like when tires sit, you know outside in a wash, tje water pools? Yeah. Wild. Margaret 45:33 Which ties back to rain catchment and how don't do lazy rain catchment where you just put your downspout into the barrel, you should filter it, and you should prevent mosquitoes from breeding in there. Also algae, and all kinds of other stuff. Casandra 45:47 Yeah, it's true. Brooke 45:49 So today's episode is brought to you by capitalism and racism. Margaret 45:54 And I was thinking rain barrels. But Sure. Brooke 45:59 Well, the reason we have to talk about these horrible things is the 'isms.' Margaret 46:04 Right? Where as I was thinking about sponsors, Big Rain Barrel. The big sponsor of the show. Brooke 46:11 That'd be a great sponsor. I hope we get a free barrel. Casandra 46:14 Yeah. Brooke 46:14 Free barrel with every Ep [episode] Margaret 46:16 Yeah. I want to be able to talk about them personally. So, please contact us through the site. The advertisers. I want the I want Big Rain Barrel to...I just want a rain barrel. That's all. Please continue. Casandra 46:31 So in 2022, we're still experiencing the COVID outbreak, right? And now my monkey pox. And also polio. Margaret 46:40 Cool. Casandra 46:42 Yeah. Yeah, yes. Polio. Someone Someone got polio. For the second time since they declared polio like a...they don't use the word eradicated. But they were basically like, "Humans don't get this anymore." But two have since then. One was this summer. So that's...okay. Brooke 47:06 That's neat. Casandra 47:07 Yeah, what can we do about it? We can wash our hands a lot. I'm still gonna wear a mask, even though the CDC says it's not airborne, because I don't understand the difference. And also Covid's still a thing. We can research testing and vaccination in our areas, because it seems to be vastly different in different cities and counties and really confusing. So you can do the research ahead of time and share it through your network so people know where to access information and help. You can also get vaccinated if you qualify. However, I let's see, I looked at a few different counties and their eligibility criteria. And they all seem to have a few things in common. You have to be gay or bisexual men, or a transgender person who has had either 1) Multiple or anonymous sex partners in the last 14 days or 2) Skin to skin, skin to skin or intimate contact with people at large venues or events in the last 14 days. And then they're also starting to include people of any gender or sexual orientation who have engaged in commercial or [cuts out], so sex workers in the last 14 days. So yeah, if any of those are you, and you have a vaccination place near you, why not get it? Margaret 48:32 Because Bill Gates will be able to track all the sex you have? Brooke 48:38 Yeah, Casandra 48:39 The reason I agreed to research monkey pox for this episode is because, like I said, my kids about to go back to school. And I was really nervous. And I'm feeling a little bit less nervous for the moment about school because of the cases documented in children so far areextremely low. So, that's some good news for all of the other parents out there. Margaret 49:02 And the children listening Casandra 49:05 For any of the children listening. Margaret 49:06 It just occurred to me that children might listen to this podcast. I'm so sorry, children, about the world. Not about the cussing. I'm sorry about the world. Casandra 49:18 Speaking of school, Brooke 49:20 Hey, yo, student loan forgiveness that's been in the news. Right? And as the person with the background in economics, I feel like I have to talk about that. So, student loans, I'm fairly certain that of the two of you one of you has student loans and one of you does not. And I'm I'm curious how each of you feel about student loan forgiveness without...you can go ahead and not reveal which one of you it is and isn't for the moment. Just tell me if you like it? Is it good? Or bad? Casandra 49:56 Fucking-tastic I mean, not this version, this version is just like so. So, but like, should they forgive all of our student loans? Fuck yes, they should. Margaret 50:04 I agree. Brooke 50:05 Casandra says yes. Oh, and Margaret agrees Wait, but only one of you has student loans? Margaret 50:11 So, I don't have student loans. And...I can't imagine, I can't imagine anyone who doesn't have student loans giving a shit. Like I just like, I struggle so hard. Like, every time someone's like, "They did this with our taxpayer money," and I'm like, "Motherfucker, they invaded half the world with our tax money." Like... Casandra 50:35 There there other things you should be frustrated about being done with your tax dollars. Casandra 50:40 And this is not one of them. Margaret 50:40 Yeah! Margaret 50:42 Yeah. And then even with my like, even if I was like a self interest capitalist shit, it's like, I don't know, healthy economy is not one built on fucking debt. And I don't know, whatever. I'm just like... Brooke 51:00 Don't spoil my ending, Margaret. Margaret 51:02 Oh, sorry. Right. Casandra 51:04 But capitalism means that there have to be people who are suffering and poor so that I can feel superior and be stable and have more money. Margaret 51:13 Oh, that's a good point. Casandra 51:14 Yeah. Margaret 51:15 No, I take it back actually, Brooke. I'd like to change my answer. No one should. Casandra 51:21 Fuck Casandra. Margaret 51:26 No one should have the right to have debt forgiven. It should probably be transmitted to children and children's children. Oh, wait, that already happens. Just okay. Anyway. Casandra 51:36 What about corporations? Shouldn't they be able to get their debt forgiven, Margaret? Margaret 51:40 Oh, yeah. I mean, corporations, obviously should have their debt forgiven. I mean, otherwise, we wouldn't have an economy. Brooke 51:46 Like, God. Okay. You two know everything. My work is done here. Throw the topic and walk away. Excellent. Casandra 51:55 Sorry, Brooke. Brooke 51:56 No, I'm loving it. Casandra 51:58 This is how we cope with talking about money. Margaret 52:01 Yeah. Brooke 52:04 Oh, it's so good. No, I have you know, I have a couple of, of friends and or relations that are both on the against it side. Well, neither of whom went to college or have any students debt. Casandra 52:21 Why are they still your friends? Brooke 52:22 Well, Facebook friends, let's say that. Casandra 52:25 That's fair. Brooke 52:25 I think it's important to listen to what people say on the other side. So, I try and understand the arguments and can have a conversation back and hopefully bring them into the light. Margaret 52:34 Yeah, that's legit. But wait, what if we instead created an increasingly more insular and pure subculture? Brooke 52:44 It seems problematic I'm gonna say, but... Margaret 52:47 What? Brooke 52:47 That's probably for another episode. Okay. Margaret 52:50 Okay, I'll stop derailing you, Casandra Johns 52:52 it would only be the three of us. Everyone else is wrong in some way. Margaret 52:56 I think that that's probably true. I'm sorry Bursts, who's doing our editing, I'm sorry Inmn, who produce the podcast. Brooke 53:06 You better apologize to all the patrons right now too. Margaret 53:10 Yeah, if you want to be pure and join our pure culture. A $20 a month level. Brooke 53:19 No. No cults. No cults. Margaret 53:22 Everyone keeps saying that to me. Okay. Brooke 53:26 That's why I took away that book on cults that I showed you the other day, you don't need the help. Margaret 53:32 Please continue. Brooke 53:33 Oh, God. Right. So so the arguments against it. Like you were saying, you know, one of them's about the, "I don't want my tax dollars going to that," which, like you said, is a pretty wild argument, because we don't get to decide directly where our tax dollars go. There's plenty of things that I'm in...None of us like taxes...And amongst us, especially like, abolish the government abolish the taxes, but even people who are okay with taxes as a functioning society, we still, you know, you don't get to decide where each dollar goes. What's your question face? Casandra 54:10 You mean when I vote, it doesn't directly change things? Brooke 54:14 Oh, God, another topic for another whole podcast episode about how about how it actually works out there in the world. Yeah, so that argument is kind of wild. And then the other one that I that I have seen is the, you know, "Why should anyone else pay for their choices?" especially if it's their...other people's bad choices or whatever. Which again, is wild to me. Margaret 54:42 You mean the bad choice to loan $60,000 to a 17 year old? Brooke 54:47 Yeah, seems like maybe that should be not a not a thing. Margaret 54:51 Well, I just but it's a bad financial like, like come on. That's that's a that's part of loaning money is you take into account like, there's risk involved. It is a risky loan to loan a 17 year old money. Anyway, yep. Sorry. Brooke 55:07 Yeah, I saw one of my, you know, probably Gen X or Boomer aged relatives saying, "Hey, I signed up for the loans at 18. And I read the document, and I knew what I was getting myself into. And it was a choice. And it's everybody's choice." And it's so many bad takes so many bad takes... Casandra 55:24 I wonder how much their loan was compared to mine? Brooke 55:27 Yeah, and there's that. Casandra 55:28 I'm gonna guess significantly less. Brooke 55:30 Yeah, so let me get into a little bit of data here, because I love data. Let's talk also about what the loans are and aren't, because if you're only looking at the headlines there's a lot that's not captured in there. The number we see tossed around is the $10,000 of forgiveness. And that's up to $10,000 of forgiveness. So there's caveats on that, because there's a income limitation as to when you can get it. And it decreases a little bit based on what your income is. But also, if you were awarded a Pell Grant, at any point in your college education, you can actually get up to $20,000 in forgiveness, and Pell Grants are a federal grant, not a loan, but a grant, i.e. a gift, basically, that only go out to the lowest income kind of folks. So, if you qualified for a Pell Grant at the time that you also took out loans, then you can get a higher amount of loan forgiveness. And then it also only is it takes effect for people who had taken out a loan prior to June 30th of this year 2020. So if you're in school, right now, if you're just starting this fall, it doesn't apply to you. You had to have taken out a loan prior to that to qualify. Some of the cool things about it, though, are that it helps kind of all kinds of federal loans, which 95% of student loan debt is a federal loan. Only about 5% is private loans. So that's most people with loans, although it's only again, those income requirements, but that's still a large portion of folks. Where's the other one I was looking at? Oh, there's a type of loans that parents can take out to help their kids. So most of the federal loans that folks sign up for, they are signing up themselves, right, you're putting yourself in debt for it, even though you're only 18, or whatever. But parents can also get a loan, there's a federal loan called Parent PLUS, that you can take out to help your kids and those loans also qualify for forgiveness. And that is different than the student's loan. So if you're a parent who took out one of those loans for your kid, and your kid also took out loans, you both separately qualify for forgiveness. Casandra 57:48 Is this...Sorry, is this...I hadn't heard of those parent loans. Is the thought that they're taking out a loan to help pay for their kids college? Brooke 57:56 Yeah. Casandra 57:57 Okay. So, just like, "Look, another loan we can give to someone." Brooke 58:02 Yeah. And it's a federal federal one again, and you know, federal loans overall are, at least compared with like private student loans you can get they're way more reasonable, super low interest rates, longer repayment periods, you can get restructuring, if you're having financial issues or get a pause on it, there's more ways to get them forgiven, like working for a nonprofit or in the private sector, stuff like that. So, these are sort of nicer loans, which is one of the faults that people point out with it is that the the private loans that are the more of the predatory style loans, like we talked about with the IMF earlier, you know, higher interest rates, they don't care about how much you are or aren't making necessarily, they just say you have to start paying it at this point, and you have to pay this much and they'll come after your car or your dog or your firstborn child or whatever in order to get their repayments. And this federal forgiveness doesn't affect those folks. Margaret 58:59 Would you say that our listeners should take out predatory loans from payday loan places in order to buy rain barrels? Brooke 59:08 No. Because you should never support predatory loan places. You can steall from those places. Margaret 59:16 What if we, what if we start a rain barrel loan fund that offers predatory rates? Brooke 59:28 Then I would no longer call you an anarchist. You'd be an An-Cap [Anarcho-capitalist] and out of the club. Casandra 59:33 Is this you? Is this you segwaying into an ad break for our sponsors? Margaret 59:41 No, i was my brain's poisoned by how the fact that my other podcast is...has actual ad breaks. Casandra 59:48 Duh Duh duh duuuuh! I'm rain barrels! Brooke 59:49 Hey, if rain barrels would give away some, loan some rain barrels, I would let them plug a little ad on this ad-free anarchist podcast network. Yeah. Margaret 1:00:01 Yeah. Although, I'm holding out for big IBC tote. Brooke 1:00:05 Yes. Margaret 1:00:05 Cause IBC totes are 275 gallons, sort of 55 gallons. And that's what I showered with for the past three years, an IBC tote available from wherever you're willing to go get a really cheap thing that used to be full of detergent and wash it out vaguely. Margaret 1:00:11 Half an hour's drive, we can go grab some. Casandra 1:00:25 Wait, really? Margaret 1:00:26 Yeah, yeah. Casandra 1:00:28 We should talk about that after we're done doing a podcast which we are in fact doing right now. Margaret 1:00:32 Oh right, okay. Brooke 1:00:33 Okay, one of the other things that comes up when folks talk about student loans is you get like the the Boomer types that will say, you know, "I worked a part time job when I was in school and paid off my...paid for my school while I was going to school." And I think we all know that that's just not possible to do anymore. And that's because of the cost of education and how it has skyrocketed. So, if you look at the difference from 70s, 80s, or so, of like median income in the US with the average household makes, versus the average cost of college, the average income has gone up like half again as much since the 80s or so, whereas the cost of college is four times more expensive than it was. And then the other argument that comes up that people make is, well, "Everybody thinks they have to go to college. Now, you know, everybody's trying to enroll in college, not everyone needs to go to college. But everyone tries to." And when you look at the numbers of like, the portion of the population that has that's going to college and how that's changed in the last like 50 years, it's been pretty much steady for the last 25 years. It rose in the 60s, late 60s was kind of flat in the 70s then started to rise again through the 80s and the mid 90s. Probably because of the series of recessions that we had that were really severe in some places, like Oregon had a really severe recession. And when there was a recession, more people go back to school, but it hit a peak in the mid 90s And then dropped for a while and then has kind of been staying around that peak, on average, over the last 25 years. That and that's the number of people has gone up, but the portion of the population, right, so as a percent of the total population has actually been quite stable for a while now. Margaret 1:02:30 And like, I'm a big fan of having not gotten a degree, right? But, I even had a dream again last night where I like dropped out of school again. And I was like, "Fuck you, I quit." And it was really, but, but it's something that I think that a lot of people don't talk about when they talk about being like, "Oh, well, not everyone needs a college degree," or whatever it is they they don't understand that like how important upper higher education is to upward mobility and upward class mobility, especially for like people who are like, marginalized among other identities besides class, like specifically around race, you know, like, there's...so I think that...I think it's something that we can accidentally get a little to like, "Yeah!" like, you know, people get very, like "I'm so blue collar, everyone should drive forklifts," instead of going and studying gender studies or whatever, right? And just like not fucking getting how important class mobility can be for people and how that functions most of the time. And so I get really annoyed when people are like, "No one should ever go to college," or whatever, because I'm like, that is a really that is a position that comes from a specific place for some people, you know? Casandra 1:03:44 Yeah. Brooke 1:03:46 I think people also forget in that the fact that college classes can include courses for some of those types of jobs. So,talking about like the other four year degree, an apprenticeship. You know, if you're an electrician or a sheetmetal worker, you're probably you're going to take some classes and probably through a community college as part of your education to get those kinds of jobs. If you're doing a forklift or CNC, you have to take a course and they can be three months, six months, twelve months courses, and often again, through community college. So even though you're not getting a degree, you're still doing some post secondary education. Margaret 1:04:29 Yeah. Casandra 1:04:30 Do you want to know how much debt I have for my community college? Brooke 1:04:34 Oh, this is gonna hurt. Casandra 1:04:36 Forty Grand. Brooke 1:04:38 Shut the front door. Casandra 1:04:41 And that's like with grants and shit because like I good grades and all that. I was on the 'President's list.' Brooke 1:04:45 For a frame of reference, listeners, Casandra graduated more recently, like last couple years, or three or whatever it was, but fairly recently. Yeah. When I was looking at the numbers, here's my personal anecdote. The cost have the four year degree that I got 15 years ago. I'm taking some community college classes now. And if I did an associate's degree, it would cost me as much for two years of community college today as it did for a four year degree with two majors 15 years ago. Yeah, the cost has has exponentially risen again. Four times. It's it's four times higher than it was like 40 years ago. It's risen more than anything, any other good or commodity. The cost of college has increased. Margaret 1:05:40 I will say, my, like optimistic, putting on my optimism hat. I don't like hats. That's probably why I'm not great. Okay. When I think about like some of the most...the strongest that leftist movements, anarchist movements, I know more about anarchist movements, I do other movements. The strongest they've been is like often, while popular education, or the existing educational infrastructure is failing everyone. And, you know, like a lot of work around reframing education in both France and Spain was coming out of anarchists in the late 19th and early 20th century in the modern school movement, all this stuff, and people were getting, like, literally murdered for advocating for things like "What if boys and girls are taught in the same classrooms and shit," and it's like awild idea that anarchists came up with. And like not talking about God in the classroom. Oh, my god, we're actually losing on all of these. Okay, anyway. It's like, "Remember the fight for an eight hour workday?" And I'm like, "Man, I wish I had eight hour workday right now." Okay, and but, but so that's like, my like, my, like, optimism is that like, in a burned for us new weeds grow? You know, I think that there's a lot of opportunity for alternative educational systems, but not in a way where they could like, immediately step in and be like an accredited university that allows the sort of class mobility that we're talking about, or whatever, right, but like, it does seem like mutual aid schooling and education are like, probably in a better position to take a foothold than they used to be. I hadn't really...I'd only previously thought about this more for like, grade school type stuff, especially for the whole, like how public school is like also kind of like low key just like childcare. And like, hadn't quite thought about this in terms of like, how it ties into, you know, continuing education, but it could, we could have Anarchy University, and then everyone could have degrees and okay, I don't know where I'm going with this. Brooke 1:07:45 Anarcho-U. Casandra 1:07:45 You need another project, Margaret. So... Margaret 1:07:51 No, dear listener, you need a project. At Projects-R-Us, we will give you a project. Brooke 1:08:00 Wrong podcast. Wrong, wrong podcast. Margaret 1:08:02 Replace the continuing education system!. Brooke 1:08:04 Nope, wrong podcast. Margaret 1:08:04 Okay, fine. Brooke 1:08:06 Yeah, so, Casandra 1:08:07 That'd be like your ideal job, I think. Margaret 1:08:09 it really would be, yes, I have way better at coming up with things that I can dedicate my entire life to than dedicating my entire life to any of the individual things. Brooke 1:08:22 Oh, maybe, maybe you didn't need to start the cult just to find leaders fo

We Built A Thing
164 - Bangladesh Escorts

We Built A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 64:18 Very Popular


In this one, Mark unknowingly has some interesting links on his website. Bruce cuts out some lanterns on the CNC. Drew published a video about improving his miter saw. Plus, a ton more! This episode is sponsored by OneFinity CNC! We have partnered with them and would love it if you would go to their website and check them out: https://www.onefinitycnc.com/ (we don't have a coupon code at this time, but if you're able to mention that we sent you, it helps!) Become a patron of the show! http://patreon.com/webuiltathing OUR TOP PATREON SUPPORTERS: -YouCanMakeThisToo YT: http://bit.ly/38sqq7v -Tom's Woodwork-Tim Morrill-Brent Jarvis IG: https://bit.ly/2OJL7EV -Scott @ Dad It Yourself DIY YT: http://bit.ly/3vcuqmv-Broken Lead Woodworks IG: https://bit.ly/38vQij8 -Chris Simonton-Maddux Woodworks YT: http://bit.ly/3chHe2p-Ray Jolliff  -Ryder Clark-Wilker's Woodcraft -Deo Gloria Woodworks: https://www.instagram.com/deogloriawoodworks/ -Kris -Wayne's Woodshed -Brad Hoff Support our sponsors: MagSwitch: https://mag-tools.com -use code "WBAT" for 10% off SurfPrep: https://www.surfprepsanding.com/?aff=48  -use code "FISHER10" for 10% off RZmask: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Bits & Bits: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Starbond: use code "BRUCEAULRICH" Rotoboss: "GUNFLINT" We Built A Thing T-shirts! We have two designs to choose from! (You can get one of these as a reward at certain levels of support) https://amzn.to/2GP04jf  https://amzn.to/2TUrCr2 ETSY SHOPS: Bruce: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BruceAUlrich?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=942512486 Drew: https://www.etsy.com/shop/FishersShopOnline?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=893150766 Mark: https://www.etsy.com/shop/GunflintDesigns?ref=search_shop_redirect Bruce's most recent video: https://youtu.be/mXdTJsoS1Xc Drew's most recent video: https://youtu.be/m7SVAuQhevg Mark's most recent video: https://youtu.be/hza4Y3Kd2B8 We are all makers, full-time dads and all have YouTube channels we are trying to grow and share information with others. Throughout this podcast, we talk about making things, making videos to share on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, etc...and all of the life that happens in between.  CONNECT WITH US: WE BUILT A THING: www.instagram.com/webuiltathingWE BUILT A THING EMAIL: webuiltathing@gmail.com FISHER'S SHOP: www.instagram.com/fishersshop/ BRUDADDY: www.instagram.com/brudaddy/ GUNFLINT DESIGNS: https://www.instagram.com/gunflintdesigns Music by: Jay Fisher (Thanks, Jay!)

Total Wellness Radio: Enjoy Great Health Naturally

In this LIVE recording, Dan Young, BCN, CNC and Craig Morrison, CNC discuss “Immune System Support”. In this episode we discuss practical natural approaches and resources which will make a big difference. We record Total Wellness Radio LIVE from our practice in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Country Doctor Nutritional Center serves Wyoming and surrounding states since 1998! Pick up your copy of “Your Personal Guide to The Ultimate Healing System” from our office by calling

Church on the North Coast
September 7, 2022 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - Who is the True King?

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022


September 7, 2022 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - Who is the True King? | cnclove.org

Talkin Shop with ShopSabre
Ep. 72: Changing Seasons

Talkin Shop with ShopSabre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 45:09


The official Talkin Shop podcast hosted by Brandon and Jesse from ShopSabre covers all things CNC and business. In this episode we talk about the changing seasons and how it translates to business as we enter the 4th quarter. Learn More and Follow Us: https://www.instagram.com/shopsabre/ https://www.facebook.com/Shopsabre

Notícia no Seu Tempo
Alvos da PF por ações extremistas organizam atos no 7 de Setembro

Notícia no Seu Tempo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 10:41


No podcast ‘Notícia No Seu Tempo', confira em áudio as principais notícias da edição impressa do jornal ‘O Estado de S. Paulo' desta terça-feira (06/09/22): Pelo menos 25 militantes e canais fichados pela Polícia Federal por ações extremistas e notícias falsas fazem mobilização para o 7 de Setembro. Os principais alvos são o STF e o ministro Alexandre de Moraes. Há um mês, o Estadão monitora os influenciadores radicais – apoiadores do presidente Jair Bolsonaro em canais com cerca de 30 milhões de seguidores. Parte diz usar apenas “figuras de linguagem”, mas tem histórico de ações reais como a invasão do plenário da Câmara, em 2016.  E mais: Política: Fachin alega ‘perigo' e veta trechos de decretos sobre armas Economia: Endividamento atinge novo recorde Internacional: Nova premiê britânica herda crise mais aguda entre potências do G-7 Caderno 2: Holambra retoma a tradição da Expoflora Especial Mobilidade: A revolução do 5G na mobilidade urbanaSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Manufacturing Insights
What is MBD? -- Christopher Da Rosa | Mechanical Design Engineer, PDM/CAD Manager, Application Engineer, aPriori

Manufacturing Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 8:17


If manufacturers want to reap the benefits of digital transformation, they need to have a single source of data accepted by everyone in the organization. MBD, or Model-Based Definition, creates that single source of truth. What is MBD? And how can it help you?

Church on the North Coast
September 4, 2022 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - The One

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022


September 4, 2022 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - The One | cnclove.org

Church on the North Coast
September 4, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Spiritual Authority

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022


September 4, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Spiritual Authority | cnclove.org

Church on the North Coast
September 4, 2022 - Pastors Mary & Adrian White - Men and Women of Transformation

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022


3D Printing Projects
Layer by Layer – Kumiko Inspired CNC Engraving

3D Printing Projects

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 25:41


Learn how to sketch the asanoha kumiko pattern in Fusion 360 and create toolpaths for CNC engraving. Also take a quick look at using the emboss feature to wrap the pattern around cylinders. Fusion 360 Shared Designs: Kumiko Vase https://a360.co/3qcu8Lb Kumiko CNC Tile https://a360.co/3QadCWp Layer by Layer on the Emboss feature https://youtu.be/aAjhTFxi2_w Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVsMp6nKnpjsXSQ45nxfORb Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

Adafruit Industries
Layer by Layer – Kumiko Inspired CNC Engraving

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 25:41


Learn how to sketch the asanoha kumiko pattern in Fusion 360 and create toolpaths for CNC engraving. Also take a quick look at using the emboss feature to wrap the pattern around cylinders. Fusion 360 Shared Designs: Kumiko Vase https://a360.co/3qcu8Lb Kumiko CNC Tile https://a360.co/3QadCWp Layer by Layer on the Emboss feature https://youtu.be/aAjhTFxi2_w Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVsMp6nKnpjsXSQ45nxfORb Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

ShopNotes Podcast
ShopNotes Podcast E128: If I'm Self-Aware, It's Not a Problem

ShopNotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 43:37 Very Popular


On this week's episode of the ShopNotes Podcast, Phil and John catch up with Logan after he returns from the International Woodworking Fair in at Atlanta and more. This episode is brought to you by Shaper Tools, makers of Shaper Origin, the handheld CNC router that brings digital precision to the craft of woodworking. Tackle joinery, cabinetry, hardware installation and more with speed and precision. Try it risk-free in your shop for 30 days. Visit www.Shapertools.com to learn more.

Bikerumor Podcast
062 - No22 Cycles explains 3D-printed titanium parts

Bikerumor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 38:51


No22 Cycles recently unveiled their gorgeous new 3D printed titanium dropouts, made for them by Silca, and they're just the beginning of what they can do with this manufacturing process. Besides being gorgeous, there are a lot of functional and economical reasons to use additive manufacturing. In this episode, they explain: how the parts are made how they're made strong enough why they're a better solution than CNC'ing ...and a whole lot more! Check them out at 22bicycles.com, and our full story about the dropouts for more details. WANT MORE? Find the Bikerumor Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, and through RSS, or wherever you listen to podcasts! Hit like, hit subscribe, and hit play! Can't find it? Let us know which players you use so we can get them up to speed! And let us know who you want us to interview, just use this form to send us your suggestions! FOLLOW BIKERUMOR Keep tabs on all the latest bikes, wheels, components, gear and tech on The World's Largest Cycling Tech Blog by following us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. FOLLOW TYLER Like us? Love us? Follow your host, Tyler Benedict, on Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn

Total Wellness Radio: Enjoy Great Health Naturally

In this LIVE recording, Dan Young, BCN, CNC and Craig Morrison, CNC discuss “The Dirty Half Dozen”. In this episode we discuss practical natural approaches and resources which will make a big difference. We record Total Wellness Radio LIVE from our practice in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Country Doctor Nutritional Center serves Wyoming and surrounding states since 1998! Pick up your copy of “Your Personal Guide to The Ultimate Healing System” from our office by calling

Church on the North Coast
August 31, 2022 - Pastor Marlon Sadler - No Exceptions

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022


Church on the North Coast
August 31, 2022 - Pastor Kyle Lott - The Way of Wisdom

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022


Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 95: Smart Manufacturing for All

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 46:21


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In episode 17 of the podcast (@AugmentedPod), the topic is: Smart Manufacturing for All. Our guest is John Dyck, CEO at CESMII, the Smart Manufacturing Institute.After listening to this episode, check out CESMII as well as John Dyck's social profile:CESMII: (@CESMII_SM) https://www.cesmii.org/ John Dyck: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnsdyck/ In this conversation, we talked about  democratizing smart manufacturing, the history and ambition of CESMII (2016-), bridging the skills gap in small and medium enterprises which constitute 98% of manufacturing. We discuss how the integration of advanced sensors, data, platforms and controls to radically impact manufacturing performance. We then have the hard discussion of why the US is (arguably) a laggard? John shares the 7 characteristics of future-proofing (interoperability, openness, sustainability, security, etc.). We hear about two coming initiatives: Smart Manufacturing Executive Council & Smart Manufacturing Innovation Platform. We then turn to the future outlook over the next decade.Trond's takeaway: US manufacturing is a bit of a conundrum. How can it both be the driver of the international economy and a laggard in terms of productivity and innovation, all at the same time? Can it all be explained by scale--both scale in multinationals and scale in SMEs? Whatever the case may be, future proofing manufacturing, which CESMII is up to, seems like a great idea. The influx of smart manufacturing technologies will, over time, transform industry as a whole, but it will not happen automatically.Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 8 on Work of the Future, episode 5 Plug-and-play Industrial Tech, or episode 9 The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19. Augmented--the industry 4.0 podcast. Transcript: TROND: Augmented reveals the stories behind a new era of industrial operations where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In Episode 17 of the podcast, the topic is Smart Manufacturing for All. Our guest is John Dyck, CEO at CESMII, the Smart Manufacturing Institute. In this conversation, we talked about democratizing smart manufacturing, the history, and ambition of CESMII, bridging the skills gap in small and medium enterprises, which constitute 98% of manufacturing. We discuss how the integration of advanced sensors, data, platforms, and controls radically impact manufacturing performance. We then have the hard discussion of why the U.S. is, arguably, a laggard. John shares the seven characteristics of future-proofing. And we hear about two coming initiatives: Smart Manufacturing Executive Council & Smart Manufacturing Innovation Platform. We then turn to the future outlook over the next decade. Augmented is a podcast for leaders hosted by futurist, Trond Arne Undheim, presented by Tulip.co, the manufacturing app platform and associated with MFG.works, the manufacturing upskilling community launched at the World Economic Forum. Each episode dives deep into a contemporary topic of concern across the industry and airs at 9:00 a.m. U.S. Eastern Time, every Wednesday. Augmented — the Industry 4.0 podcast. John, how are you today? JOHN: I'm well, Trond. How are you? TROND: I'm doing well. I'm looking forward to talking about smart manufacturing. What brought you to this topic, John? We'll get into your background. But I'm just curious. JOHN: This is my favorite topic, as you probably know. So I appreciate the chance to pontificate a little. I've been at this nexus between IT and OT for the last two decades of my career or more and found over these past two decades that this is one of the most complex pieces of manufacturing period, this sort of unique challenge between the world of operations and the world of IT. And the work I did at MESA (Manufacturing Enterprise Solutions Association) on the board and as the chairman of the board exposed me to a lot of the great vendors in this ecosystem. And through that work, I found that most of them struggle with the same things. We're all struggling in different ways. And so the opportunity to take one step back and look at this from a national and a global perspective and try to find ways to address these challenges became a very unique opportunity for me and one that I've enjoyed immensely. And so just the prospect of making a real difference in addressing these challenges as a nation and as an ecosystem has been just a privilege and one that I get really excited about. TROND: So, John, you mentioned your background. So you've worked in both startups...I think you were raising money for a startup called Activplant, but also, you have worked in large manufacturing for GE and Rockwell, so the big guys, I guess, in a U.S. context for sure. When this institution, C-E-S-M-I-I, CESMII, got started, what was its main objective, and what was the reason why this institution got launched? I guess back in 2016, which is not an enormous amount of time back. Give us a little sense of who took this initiative. And what is the core mission of this organization right now? JOHN: So Manufacturing USA is the umbrella organization under which these institutes, CESMII being one of them, were created. There are a total of 15 of these institutes, all funded with the exact same business model and funding model, and each of them having a different lens on the specific manufacturing problem that they're addressing. And ours, as the Smart Manufacturing Institute, is directly focused on creating a more competitive manufacturing environment by addressing innovation and research challenges that inhibit manufacturers from doing what they need to do in this fourth industrial revolution. So our mandate is to cut the cost of implementing smart manufacturing by 50%. Our mandate is to drive energy productivity, energy efficiency. Fundamentally, the agency that funds CESMII is the Department of Energy, which means that our overarching objective is to drive energy productivity as a basic metric. But we also believe that whether that's a direct challenge meaning addressing energy, performance energy efficiency directly, or an indirect outcome from a more efficient process, or a more effective supply chain, whatever that manufacturing initiative is, that we'll create a better product, a better process that will have direct and indirect impact on energy productivity, which is the connection back to our agency and the source of the funding that we have to accomplish these really important goals. TROND: And one of the really big identified gaps, also it seems, is this discrepancy between the big and the small industry players. So small and medium enterprises famously in every country is basically...the most of industry is consisting of these smaller players. They're not necessarily startups. They're not necessarily on this growth track to become unicorns. But they are smaller entities, and they have these resource constraints. Give me a sense of what you're doing to tackle that, to help them out, and to equip them for this new era. And maybe you could also just address...you called smart manufacturing industry 4.0, but I've noticed that that's not a term that one uses much. Smart manufacturing is kind of what you've opted for. So maybe just address that and then get to the small and medium-sized. JOHN: This is, I think, one of the really important observations that we try to make and the connections that we try to make to say that the status quo, the state of the industry today, Trond, is the result of three or four decades of what we did during the third industrial revolution. We began talking about the fourth industrial revolution many years ago. But we can't just turn that light switch on and assume that overnight everything we do now, despite the cultures we've created, the technologies we've created, the ways of doing things we've created, is now all of a sudden just new and exciting and different, and it's going to create that next wave of productivity. So when I talk about smart manufacturing and equating it with the fourth industrial revolution, it's truly the characteristics and the behaviors that we anticipate more so than what we're seeing. Because the critical mass of vendors and systems integrators, application and software products in this marketplace still resemble more of industry 3.0 than they do industry 4.0. And it's part of our vision to characterize those two only in the context of trying to accelerate the movement towards industry 4.0 or the fourth industrial revolution. Because it's that that holds out the promise of the value creation that we've been promised for ten decades but really aren't seeing. So that's the way we see the industry 4.0 versus the other concepts that we talk about. Digital transformation is another important term. All of that happens in the context of some initiative in a manufacturing operation to improve. We've been improving for three or four decades. What's different today? Well, it's not just relabeling [laughs] your portfolio to be industry 4.0 compliant. So anyway, that's a pet topic of ours just to help as a national conversation, as a set of thinking and thought leader organizations and individuals to put the spotlight on that and ensure that we're doing the things that we can to accelerate the adoption, and the behaviors, and the characterizations of what it really means to be industry 4.0. So to your point -- TROND: Yeah, I was just curious. The term revolution anyway is interesting in a U.S. context [laughter] and in any society. So it implies a lot of things, but it also certainly implies a speed that perhaps isn't necessarily happening. So there's all this talk now about how things are speeding up. But as you point out, even if they have some revolutionary characteristics, at the edge, there are some other things that need to happen that aren't necessarily going to happen at the speed of what you might imagine when you use the word revolution. It's not going to turn over like a switch. JOHN: That's exactly right. Well said, Trond. Manufacturing and bleeding edge never come together in the same sentence, and so it takes time for...and more so on the OT side than the IT side. Right out of the IT world, we have industrial IoT platforms. We have augmented reality. We have powerful AI machine learning tools. But what is the true adoption on the plant floor? Well, that's where the behaviors, and the cultures, and the characteristics of how we've always done things and the reluctance to adopt new things really comes in. And it's as much a part of the vendor and systems integration ecosystem as it is on the manufacturing side. And that's, again, this whole thing becomes...to drive (I really don't think it's a revolution to your point.) an evolution or accelerate the evolution towards Industry 4.0 requires the ecosystem to get engaged and to recognize these really important things have to change. Does that make sense? TROND: Yes. A lot of them have to change. And then to these small and medium enterprises, so I've seen a statistic that even in the U.S., it's around 98% of manufacturing. That is an enormous challenge, even for an association like yours. How do you reach that many? JOHN: Here's an interesting epiphany I had shortly after I came to CESMII and was working through exactly this challenge: how does an organization like ours access and understand the challenges they face and then look at the ecosystem that's there and available to serve them? The epiphany I had was that in my entire career with both big global corporations like Rockwell Automation and General Electric and specifically even the startup organization that I helped raise VC for and venture capital funding for and build and ultimately see acquired; I had never been in a small and medium manufacturing plant environment. The entire ecosystem is focused on large brands, recognized brands, and enterprises that have the potential for multisite rollouts, multisite implementation. And so the business models, the marketing models, the sales, the go-to-market, the cost of sales, everything in this ecosystem is designed towards the large enterprises called the Fortune 1000 that represent the types of characteristics that any startup, any Global Fortune 500 organization is going to go pursue. Which then says or leaves us with a really important conversation to say, how can the small and medium manufacturing organizations become part of this dialogue? How can we engage them? What does an ecosystem look like that's there to serve these organizations? And where an implementation organization like a good systems integrator can actually make money engaging in this way. And so that's where the needs of that ecosystem and our specific capabilities come together. The notion that democratization which is going to help the big manufacturers, and the big vendors, and the big integrators, and the big machine builders, the same things that we can do to cut the cost of deploying smart manufacturing for them, will enormously increase the accessibility of smart manufacturing capabilities for the small and medium manufacturers. And so that's where typically -- TROND: John, let's talk specifics. Let's talk specifics. So smart manufacturing, you said, and I'm assuming it's not just a community effort. You're intervening at the level also of providing a certain set of tools also. So if we talk about sensors, and data, and platforms, and control systems, these are all impacting manufacturing performance. To what extent can an association like yours actually get involved at that level? Is it purely on the standardization front, sort of recommending different approaches? Or is it even going deeper into layers of technology and providing more than just recommendations? JOHN: So the short answer is it depends on the domain, and the area of networking, and sensors and controls. Those are areas where longer-term research and investment to drive innovation to reduce the cost of connecting things becomes really important. And that's one of the threads or one of the investment paths that we pursue through what we call roadmap projects where there are longer, larger in terms of financial scope and further out impacts. We're hoping we'll have a dramatic impact on the cost of connecting machines and sensors and variable-frequency drives and motion systems or whatever sort of data source you have in an operation. So that's one track. The other piece which gets to the actual creation of technologies is more on the data contextualization, data collection, data ingestion side. And you mentioned the word standards. Well, standards are important, and where there are standards that we can embrace and advocate for, we're absolutely doing that. Part of the OPC Foundation and the standards that they're driving, MQTT and Sparkplug, becomes a really important area as well. And the work that MTConnect is doing to solve many of the same challenges that we believe we need to solve more broadly for a subset of machine classes more in a CNC machine tool side. But this effort, smart manufacturing, is happening today, and it's accelerating today. And we can't wait for standards to be agreed on, created, and achieve critical mass. So we are investing in a thin but vital layer of technologies that we can drill into if you'd like as a not-for-profit, not to compete in the marketplace but to create a de facto standard for how some of these really important challenges can be addressed, and how as a standard develops and we fund the deployment of these innovations in the marketplace and kind of an innovation environment versus a production environment. Not that they don't turn into production environments, but they start as an innovation project to start and prove out and either fail quickly or scale up into a production environment. So this idea of a de facto standard is a really important idea for us. That's our objective. And that's what we believe we can build and are building is critical mass adoption for really important ideas. And we're getting support from a lot of the great thought leaders in the space but also from a lot of the great organizations and bodies like, as I mentioned, the OPC Foundation, The Industrial Internet Consortium, the German platform industry 4.0 group responsible in Germany for industry 4.0. We're working towards and aligning around the same principles and ideas, again, to help create a harmonized view of these foundational technologies that will allow us to accomplish the dramatic reduction of the cost of connecting and extracting information from and contextualizing that information. And then making it available in ways that are far more consistent and compelling for the application vendor. The bar or the threshold at which an application developer can actually step into the space and do something is in a pretty high space. If you kind of look back, and I know this analogy is probably a little overused, but what it took to build applications for devices and phones, smart devices, and smartphones before Apple and Android became commonplace meant that you had to build the entire stack every single time. And that's where the industry is today. When you sit down in front of a product, you're starting from scratch every time, regardless of the fact that you've created an information model for that paper-converting machine 100 times in 20 different technology stacks. When I start this project, it's a blank slate. It's a blank sheet of paper every single time. Is that value-add? Is that going to help? No. And yet it requires a tremendous amount of domain expertise to build that. So the notion of standardizing these things, abstracting them from any individual to technology stack, standardizing on them, making them available in the marketplace for others to use that's where democratization begins to happen. TROND: So what you are about to create is an innovation platform for smart manufacturing. Will that be available then to everybody in the U.S. marketplace? Or is it actually completely open for all of the industry, wherever they reside? And what are the practical steps that you would have to take as a manufacturer if you even just wanted to look into some of the things you were building and maybe plug in with it? JOHN: So we're not about to build, just a minor detail there. We've been working on this for a couple of years. And we have a growing set of these implementations in the marketplace through the funded projects that we were proud to be able to bring to the marketplace. So the funding, and right now within the scope of what we're doing here as an institute, the funds that we deploy as projects, these grants, essentially mean that we spend these grants, these funds in the U.S. only. So in the context of what we do here, the smart manufacturing innovation platform, the creation of these profiles, the creation of the apps on top of the platform by our vendor ecosystem and domain experts in this ecosystem those are largely here and exclusively here in the U.S, I should say. So from that perspective, deployments that we have control over in terms of funding are uniquely here in the U.S. What happens beyond that in terms of where they're deployed and how they're deployed, we know we live in a global manufacturing environment. And as our members who want to deploy these capabilities outside of the U.S., those are all absolutely acceptable deployments of these technologies. TROND: But, John, so all of these deployments are they funded projects so that they're always within involvement of grant money, or is some part of this platform actually literally plug and play? JOHN: So there are several threads. The projects that we fund are obviously one thread. There's another thread that says any member of ours can use any implementation of our platform or can use our platform and any of the vendors that are here as a proof of concept or pilot, typically lasting 3,4,5,6 months for free of charge. What happens then that leads to the third component is after your pilot, there's one of two things that's going to happen. The system will be decommissioned, and you ideally, well, I shouldn't say ideally...you fail fast, the system is decommissioned, and folks move on. Ideally, the pilot was a success. And that generates a financial transaction for the parties involved in that. And that organization moves towards a production rollout of these capabilities. So CESMII's role then diminishes and steps away. But this notion of a pilot actually came from a conversation with one of our great members here at Procter & Gamble. They talk about innovation triage and the complexity of just innovating within a large corporate environment like Procter & Gamble. The fact that just to stand up the infrastructure to invite a vendor, several vendors in to stand up their systems costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and takes months and months and months just to get started. This notion that we can provision this platform in minutes, bring our vendor partner technologies to bear in minutes allows them to execute what they call innovation triage. And it really accelerates the rate at which they can innovate within their corporation, but it's that same idea that we translate back down to small and medium manufacturing, right? The notion that you don't have to have a server. You don't have to sustain a server. You don't have to buy a server to try smart manufacturing in a small and medium manufacturing environment. If you've got five sensors from amazon.com and lightly industrialized Raspberry Pi, you have the means to begin the smart manufacturing journey. What do you do with that data? Well, there are great partner organizations like Tulip, like Microsoft Excel, even Microsoft Power BI that represent compelling democratized contemporary low-cost solutions that they can actually sustain. Because this isn't just about the cost of acquiring and implementing these systems, as you know. This is also about sustaining them. Do I have the staff, the domain expertise as a small and medium manufacturer to sustain the stuff that somebody else may have given me or implemented here for me? And so that's just as an important requirement for these organizations as the original acquisition and implementation challenges. TROND: It's so important what you're talking about here, John, because there's an additional concept which is not so pleasant called pilot purgatory. And this has been identified in factories worldwide. It's identified in any software development. But with OT, as you pointed out, with more operational technologies, with additional complications, it is so easy to just get started with something and then get stuck and then decide or maybe not decide just sort of it just happens that it never scales up to production value and production operations. And it seems like some of the approaches you're putting on the table here really help that situation. Because, as you mentioned, hundreds of thousands of dollars, that's not a great investment for a smaller company if it leads to a never-ending kind of stop and start experimenting but never really can be implemented on the true production line. JOHN: Yeah. Spot on, Trond. The numbers that we're seeing now...I think McKenzie released a report a couple of months ago talking about, I think, somewhere between 70% and 80% of all projects in this domain not succeeding, which means they either failed or only moderately succeeded. And I think that's where the term pilot purgatory comes in. I talk almost every chance I get about the notion that the first couple of decades of the third industrial revolution resulted in islands of automation. And we began building islands of information as software became a little more commonplace in the late '80s and '90s. And then the OTs here in the last decade, we've been building islands of innovation, this pilot purgatory. The assumption was...and I get back to the journey between where we thought industry 3.0 or the third industrial revolution became the fourth industrial revolution. The idea was that, man, we're just going to implement some of these great new capabilities and prove them out and scale them up. Well, it gets back to the fact that even these pilots, these great innovative tools, were implemented with these old ideas in these closed data siloed ways and characterizations. And so yeah, everybody's excited. The CEO has visibility to this new digital transformation pilot that he just authorized or she just authorized. And a lot of smart people are involved, and a lot of domain experts involved. The vendors throw cash at this thing, and the systems integrators, implementers, throw cash at this thing. And even if they're successful, and broadly, as an individual proof of concept, there are points of light that say, we accomplished some really important things. The success is not there, or the success isn't seeing that scaled out, and those are the really nuanced pieces that we're trying to address through this notion of the innovation platform and profiles. The notion that interoperability and openness is what's going to drive scale, the notion that you don't have the same stovepipe legacy application getting at the same set of data from the same data sources on the shop floor for every unique application, and that there are much more contemporary ways of building standardized data structures that every application can build on and drive interoperability through. TROND: Yeah, you talk about this as the characteristics of future-proofing. So you mentioned interoperability, and I guess openness which is a far wider concept. Like openness can mean several things. And then sustainability and security were some other of your future-proofing characteristics. Can you line up some of those for us just to give some context to what can be done? If you are a factory owner, if you're a small and medium-sized enterprise, and you want to take this advice right now and implement. JOHN: Yeah, we've tried as an association, as a consortia, Trond, it's not just CESMII staff like myself who are paid full-time to be here that are focused on identifying and developing strategies for the challenges that we believe will help manufacturing in the U.S. It's organizations that are members here and thought leaders from across the industry that help us identify these really fundamental challenges and opportunities. And so, as an institute, we've landed on what we call the smart manufacturing first principles. There are seven first principles that we believe characterize the modern contemporary industry 4.0 compliant, if you will, strategy. And just to list them off quickly, because we have definitions and we have content that flushes out these ideas, sort of in order of solve and order of importance for us, interoperability and openness is the first one. Sustainable and energy efficient is the second one, security, scalability, resilient and orchestrated, flat and real-time, and proactive and semi-autonomous. And so these we believe are the characteristics of solutions, technologies, capabilities that will move us from this world of pilot purgatory and where we've come from as an ecosystem in this third industrial revolution and prepare us for a future-proof strategy whether I'm a small and medium manufacturer that just cares about this one instance of this problem I need to solve, or whether I'm a Fortune 10 manufacturing organization that understands that the mess that we've created over the last 25 years has got to make way for a better future. That I'm not going to reinvest in a future...not that I can rip and replace anything I've got, but I've got to invest in capabilities moving forward that represent a better, more sustainable, more interoperable future for my organization. That's the only way we're going to create this next wave of productivity that is held out for us as a promise of this new era. TROND: John, you have alluded to this, and you call it the mess that we've created over the last 25 years. We have talked about the problems of lack of interoperability and other issues. This is not an easy discussion and certainly not in your official capacity. But why is the U.S. a laggard? Because, to be honest, these are not problems that every country has, to a degree, they are but specifically, the U.S. and its manufacturing sector has been lagging. And there is data there, and I think you agree with this. Why is this happening? And are any of these initiatives going to be able to address that short term? JOHN: So this is probably the most important question that we as a nation need to address, and it's a multifaceted, complex question. And I think the answer is a multifaceted, complex response as well. And we probably don't have time to drill into this in detail, but I'll respond at least at a 30,000 foot-level. Even this morning, I saw a friend of mine sent me a link about China being called out today officially as being a leader in this digital transformation initiative globally, as you've just alluded to. So, from our perspective, there are a couple of important...and like I said, really understanding why this is the case is the only way we're going to be able to move forward and accelerate the adoption of this initiative. But there are a number of reasons. The reason I think China is ahead is in part cultural, but it's also in part the fact that they don't have much of the legacy that we've built. Most of their manufacturing operations as they've scaled up over the last decade, two decades, really since the World Trade Organization accepted China's entry in this domain, their growth into manufacturing systems has been much, much more recent than ours. And so they don't have this complex legacy that we do. There are other cultural implications for how the Chinese manufacturing environment adopts technologies. And there's much more of a top-down culture there. Certain leaders drive these activities and invest in these ways. Much of the ecosystem follows. So that's, I'll say, one perspective on how China becomes the leader in this domain very quickly. Europe is also ahead of the U.S. And I think there are some important reasons why that's the case as well. And a part of it is that they have a very strong cultural connection to the way government funds and is integrated with both the learning and academic ecosystem there in most of Europe as well as with the manufacturing companies themselves. It seems to have become part of their DNA to accept that the federal government can bring these initiatives to the marketplace and then funds the education of every part of their ecosystem to drive these capabilities into their manufacturing marketplace. We, on the other hand, are a much more American society. We are individualistic. The notion that the government should tell manufacturers what to do is not a well-accepted, [laughs] well-adopted idea here in the U.S. And that's been a strength for many manufacturers, and for many, many years. The best analogy that I can come up with right now in terms of where we are and where we need to go and CESMII's role in all of this, and the federal government's role in all of this, which I think brings a healthy blend of who we are as a nation and how we work and how we do things here together with a future that's a little more also compatible with these notions of adopting and driving technology forward at scale, is the reality that in 1956, President Eisenhower convinced Congress to fund the U.S. Interstate Highways and Defense Act to build a network of interstate highways, a highway network across this country to facilitate much more efficient flow of people and goods across this country. Apparently, as a soldier, many decades before, he had to travel from San Diego to Virginia in a military convoy that took him 31 days to cross the country [laughs], which is a slight aside. It was apparently the catalyst that drove the passion he had to solve this problem. And that's the role that I think we can play today, creating a digital highway, if you will, a digital catalyst to bring our supply chains together in a much more contemporary and real-time way and to bring our information systems into a modern industry 4.0 compliant environment. And that's setting those, creating those definitions, defining those characteristics, and then providing the means whereby we can accelerate this ecosystem to move forward. I think that's the right balance between our sense of individualism and how we do things here in the U.S. versus adopting these capabilities at scale. TROND: That's such a thoughtful answer to my question, which I was a little afraid of asking because it is a painful question. And it goes to the heart, I guess, of what it means to be an American, to be industrial, and to make changes. And there is something here that is very admirable. But I also do feel that the psychology of this nation also really doesn't deeply recognize that many of the greatest accomplishments that have been happening on U.S. soil have had an infrastructure component and a heavy investment from the government when you think about the creation of the internet, the creation of the highway system. You can go even further back, the railways. All of those things they had components, at least a regulation, where they had massive infrastructure elements to them whether they were privately financed or publicly financed, which is sort of that's sort of not the point. But the point is there were massive investments that couldn't really be justified in an annual budget. JOHN: That's right. TROND: You would have to think much, much wider. So instead of enclosing on that end then, John, if you look to the future, and we have said manufacturing is, of course, a global industry also, what are you seeing over this next decade is going to happen to smart manufacturing? So on U.S. soil, presumably, some amount of infrastructure investment will be made, and part of it will be digital, part of it will be actually equipment or a hybrid thereof that is somewhat smartly connected together. But where's that going to lead us? Is manufacturing now going to pull us into the future? Or will it remain an industry that historically pulls us into the future but will take a backseat to other industries as we move into the next decade? JOHN: Yeah, that's another big question. We've been talking about smart manufacturing 2030, the idea that smart manufacturing is manufacturing by 2030. And a decade seems like a long time, and for most functions, for most areas of innovation, it is, but manufacturing does kind of run at its own pace. And there is a timeline around which both standardization and technologies and cultures move on the plant floor. And so that's a certain reality. And we were on a trajectory to get there. But ironically, it took a pandemic to truly underscore the value of digital transformation, digital operations, and digital workers, I can certainly say in the U.S. but even more broadly. So a couple of important data points to back that up. Gartner just recently announced the outcome of an important survey of, I think, close to 500 manufacturing executives here in the U.S. in terms of their strategic perception of digital transformation, smart manufacturing. And I think they specifically called it smart manufacturing. And it was as close to unanimous as anything they've ever seen; 86% or 87% of manufacturing executives said that now digital transformation, smart manufacturing is the most strategic thing they can invest in. What was it a year ago? It was probably less than half of that. So that speaks to the experience these organizations have gone through. And the reality that as we talk about resilience, some people talk about reshoring, and some of that will happen. As we talk about a future environment, that's...I shouldn't say disruption-proof but much more capable of dealing with disruption not just within the four walls of the plant or an enterprise but in the supply chain. These capabilities are the things that will separate those that can withstand these types of disruptions from those that can't. And that has been recognized. And so, as much as these executives are the same ones that are frustrated by pilot purgatory, it's these executives that are saying, "That's the future. We've got to go there." And we're seeing through this pandemic...we hear CESMII are saying the manufacturing thought leaders understand this and are rallying around these ideas more now than ever before to ensure that what we do in the future is consistent with a more thoughtful, more contemporary, future-proof way of investing in digital transformation or smart manufacturing. TROND: John, these are fascinating times, and you have a very important role. I thank you so much for taking time to appear on my show here today. JOHN: Trond, I appreciate that. I appreciate the privilege of sharing these thoughts with you. These are profound questions, and answering the easy ones is fun. Answering the hard questions is important. And I appreciate the chance to have this conversation with you today. TROND: Thanks. Have a great day. JOHN: You too. TROND: You have just listened to Episode 17 of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Smart Manufacturing for All. Our guest is John Dyck, CEO at CESMII, the Smart Manufacturing Institute. In this conversation, we talked about democratizing smart manufacturing and the history and ambition of CESMII, bridging the skills gap in small and medium enterprises, which constitute 98% of manufacturing. We discuss how the integration of advanced sensors, data, platforms, and controls radically impact manufacturing performance. We then have the hard discussion of why the U.S. arguably is a laggard. We heard about two coming initiatives: the Smart Manufacturing Executive Council & the Smart Manufacturing Innovation Platform. We then turned to the future outlook over the next decade. My takeaway is that U.S. manufacturing is a bit of a conundrum. How can it both be the driver of the international economy and a laggard in terms of productivity and innovation, all at the same time? Can it all be explained by scale, both scale in multinationals and scale in SMEs? Whatever the case may be, future-proofing manufacturing, which CESMII is up to, seems like a great idea. The influx of smart manufacturing technologies will, over time, transform industry as a whole, but it will not happen automatically. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 8 on Work of the Future, Episode 5 on Plug-and-play Industrial Tech, or Episode 9 on The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19. Augmented — the Industry 4.0 podcast. Special Guest: John Dyck.

Church on the North Coast
August 28, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Don't Give Up

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022


August 28, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Don't Give Up| cnclove.org