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Free and open-source software community, developer of Firefox and Thunderbird

  • 901PODCASTS
  • 1,989EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Mozilla

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Latest podcast episodes about Mozilla

Grumpy Old Geeks
536: The Rational Prepper

Grumpy Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 67:36


Web3, NFTs, cryptocurrencies & other grifts; Uber CEO admits they could afford labor protections; shoddy coding; why Tesla is good & why Tesla is bad; Mozilla backtracks; gamifying the law; The Matrix: Resurrections; Nic Cage's massive talent; Amazon's All or Nothing series; Canon's printer ink chip problem; Magic Leap is back; Wordle clones; voice-adjustable dumbbells; caught by Google Maps; open-source developer borks own files; Russian cyber-activity warning; looking for rational prepper advice; mid-life crisis Boba Fett.Show notes at https://gog.show/536/FOLLOW UPWinnie the Pooh Public DomainMy first impressions of web3 by Moxie MarlinspikeIN THE NEWSUber CEO Admits Company Can Afford Labor Protections for DriversLAPD fired two officers who ignored robbers to play 'Pokémon Go'Shoddy coding has some Honda cars stuck in the year 2002Why Tesla Soared as Other Automakers Struggled to Make CarsTesla's ‘Full Self-Driving' beta has an ‘assertive' driving mode that ‘may perform rolling stops'DMV ‘revisiting' its approach to regulating Tesla's public self-driving testMozilla pauses crypto donations following criticism over climate impactKim Kardashian Sued for Promoting Alleged Cryptocurrency 'Pump and Dump' ScamThe Associated Press is starting its own NFT marketplace for photojournalismTech Startup Wants To Gamify Suing People Using Crypto TokensHere's the truth about the crypto miner that comes with Norton AntivirusJack Dorsey proposes a legal defense fund for Bitcoin developersMEDIA CANDYThe Matrix ResurrectionsNic Cage plays 'Nick Cage' in first look at comedy-thriller The Unbearable Weight of Massive TalentAll or Nothing: Manchester CityAll or Nothing: JuventesAPPS & DOODADSMagnet AppMagic Leap grants healthcare startups access to its new AR headset ahead of mid-2022 releaseIt fills me with glee that Canon printers now think Canon's own toner is fakeWordle' clones are taking over the App StoreAlexa can change the weight on NordicTrack's adjustable dumbbellsSECURITY HAH!Italian mafia boss caught after Google Maps sighting in SpainOpen source developer corrupts his own files, impacting millionsWarnings of Russian cyber activity as Moscow continues preparations to invade Ukraine.Understanding and Mitigating Russian State-Sponsored Cyber Threats to U.S. Critical Infrastructure'Huge, huge numbers:' insurance group sees death rates up 40 percent over pre-pandemic levelsCLOSING SHOUT-OUTSThomas J Indge - Musician - composer | performer | producerThomas J Indge - InstagramSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Menos mal que es reversible

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 16:31


La justicia decidirá si hay que romper Facebook / Impuestos a los pagos por móvil / PCIe 6.0 aprobado / 4,8 horas uso móvil diario / Corea tendrá pagos alternativos en iPhone / Alemania avisa a Telegram

The Unhashed Podcast
"85 TB is Fine!"

The Unhashed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 92:49


On this episode of the Unhashed Podcast, Korean exchange Coinone restricts withdrawals to KYC'd addresses, Moxie Marlinspike of Signal App isn't impressed by web3.0, mikeinspace cries wolf on Satoshi's identity, Vitalik says 85 terabytes a year is just fine, and Mozilla's fans don't like crypto.

Surveillance Report
Swiss Army Banned All Messengers But One - SR70

Surveillance Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 35:26


This week we cover the Swiss army's new top messenger choice Threema, a new iOS fake reboot exploit, Norton's cryptominer, and Mozilla's recent decision to stop cryptocurrency donations. Welcome to the Surveillance Report - featuring Techlore & The New Oil to keep you updated on the newest security & privacy news. Support The Podcast The New Oil Matrix: https://matrix.to/#/#TheNewOil:matrix.org Techlore Matrix: https://matrix.to/#/#techlore:matrix.org Techlore Discord: https://discord.gg/Xd7baMSpqS The New Oil Support Methods: https://thenewoil.org/links.html Techlore Support Methods: https://techlore.tech/support.html Timestamps SR70 Sources: https://github.com/techlore/channel-content/blob/master/Surveillance%20Report%20Sources/SR70.md 00:00 Introduction00:28 Our Self-Promo!01:05 Data Breaches09:09 Company News & Beginning of Swiss Army Story13:00 Research18:03 Politics22:14 FOSS News31:29 Misfits34:50 Our Self-Promo! Main Sites Techlore Website: https://techlore.tech The New Oil Website: https://thenewoil.org/ Surveillance Report Podcast: https://www.surveillancereport.tech/

Loop Matinal
Segunda-feira, 10/1/2022

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 9:28


Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- E3 2022 será virtual: https://venturebeat.com/2022/01/06/e3-shifts-to-online-only-event-because-of-omicron-concerns/ Loop Infinito: TVs QD-LED da Sony: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5t4Oyk2Mo4 Samsung divulga previsão de resultados financeiros: https://www.wsj.com/articles/samsung-electronics-expects-52-rise-in-quarterly-operating-profit-11641514094?mod=djemalertNEWS MPF cobra satisfação do Twitter: https://www1.folha.uol.com.br/colunas/monicabergamo/2022/01/mpf-oficia-twitter-para-esclarecer-ausencia-de-canal-de-denuncias-de-fake-news-sobre-covid.shtml Procon-SP deve multar a Claro: https://tecnoblog.net/noticias/2022/01/06/exclusivo-procon-sp-considera-resposta-da-claro-insatisfatoria-e-deve-multar-empresa/ 99 lança mototáxi: https://tecnoblog.net/noticias/2022/01/07/99-lanca-servico-de-mototaxi-com-promessa-de-viagens-ate-30-mais-baratas/ França multa o Google e o Facebook: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/7/22871719/france-fines-google-facebook-cookies-tracking-dark-patterns-eprivacy App Oculus foi baixado 2M de vezes no Natal: https://techcrunch.com/2022/01/06/meta-had-a-good-holiday-as-its-oculus-vr-companion-app-gained-2m-downloads-since-christmas/ Mozilla pausa iniciativa de criptomoeda: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/6/22870787/mozilla-pauses-crypto-donations-backlash-jwz?scrolla=5eb6d68b7fedc32c19ef33b4 Queda de internet no Cazaquistão afeta mercado crypto: https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/06/kazakhstan-bitcoin-mining-shuts-down-amid-fatal-protests.html Clubhouse ganha versão web: https://www.engadget.com/clubhouse-web-listening-225259317.html
https://9to5mac.com/2022/01/06/clubhouse-finally-works-on-the-web-but-now-its-too-late/ Twitter ganha reações em vídeo: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/6/22870872/twitter-quote-tweet-with-reaction-tiktok-video-photo -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

TechLinked
Mozilla backlash, Sonos pwns Google, Norton crypto + more!

TechLinked

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 7:01


0:00 There are other types of news 0:11 Mozilla crypto backlash 1:17 Sonos wins Google lawsuit 2:23 Norton crypto confusion 3:33 Seasonic 4:11 QUICK BITS 4:16 Ryzen 5000 on 300 mobos? 4:53 Samsung foldable prototypes 5:23 Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 phones 5:44 E3 goes virtual again 6:14 Brooks Nader stalked with AirTag News Sources: https://lmg.gg/7cUA7

#ScottsThoughts
Mozilla Stops Taking Crypto Donations After Facing a Backlash ❌

#ScottsThoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 6:43


ROI Overload is a daily radio show/video podcast show focused on the latest in trending topics in business, tech, finance and startups hosted by Scott D. Clary (@scottdclary). Available in audio (roioverload.sounder.fm) or video (youtube.com/c/scottdclary).

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 158

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:16


Ubuntu might be taking gaming more seriously, more Mozilla missteps, why Her Majesty's demise might be really bad news, a brand new segment, KDE Korner, and more.   News/discussion Please don't use Discord for FOSS projects UK tech policy predictions for 2022: pennies dropping everywhere Firefox I Love You, But Can You Shut Up About... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 158

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:16


Ubuntu might be taking gaming more seriously, more Mozilla missteps, why Her Majesty's demise might be really bad news, a brand new segment, KDE Korner, and more.   News/discussion Please don't use Discord for FOSS projects UK tech policy predictions for 2022: pennies dropping everywhere Firefox I Love You, But Can You Shut Up About... Read More

Linux User Space
Episode 2:14: Carry on my Wayland Son

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 89:30


0:00 Cold Open 2:28 Banter: Void Linux Bits 4:46 Feedback: Kyle S 17:26 DuckDuckGo Desktop Browser 21:35 DuckDuckGo Search Up 46% 24:45 Brave Browser Protects Network-State 29:44 Hold On, Ghostery Dawn? 36:49 No Manifest v3 For Me! 51:57 Audacity 50x Faster 57:31 Krita Gets New Features 1:03:12 Wayland Uses Less Energy Than X 1:08:37 Wayland Games Better Than X, Too! 1:13:20 Housekeeping 1:19:13 App Focus: Kid3, EasyTag 1:25:48 Next Time: NixOS 1:28:03 Stinger Coming up in this episode 1. Browsers on Browsers 2. Manifest v3 is not for me 3. Audacity X50 speed 4. Krita sees a big release 5. So Far aWayland from me 6. Tag you're it Join: Discord (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord). Reddit (https://reddit.com/r/LinuxUserSpace/). Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram). Matrix (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix). Twitter (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace). Sub: Youtube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube). Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/linuxuserspace). Odysee (https://linuxuserspace.show/odysee). Fund: Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace). Banter - Feedback Void Linux bits (Thanks Duncaen) (https://www.reddit.com/user/Duncaen/) Vanilla Linux (https://www.reddit.com/r/voidlinux/comments/ga99ok/did_you_know_void_linuxs_previous_name_was_vanilla/) - That was Void's original name. xbps-src was originally called pkgfs (https://repo.or.cz/xbps.git/commit/5e52738f97edc0ff4a9e5de48a75834bf0916651) And Juan P (Xtraeme) had some early ramblings (http://xtraeme.blogspot.com/) on Void and its upbringing! Kyle's Email - Thanks for your feedback! Some gdebi info (https://itsfoss.com/gdebi-default-ubuntu-software-center/) If you are on a KDE plasma desktop, Discover can install .deb packages too. Like gdebi, just right click on the file and select Discover to open with. General Github software download techniques. Look for a releases section and download the binary release from there. If you don't see that look for the code button and download the zip file. You can also use git (If you know how and have it installed) and just copy the git url in the code button too. So you downloaded a shell script... I try to keep it organized and place them in ~/bin You can add that to your $PATH (perhaps a bit advanced) to make it easier to call. You can give it the executable flag, (most file managers have this option). Or change mode on the command line - chmod +x FILENAME To start your script: ./FILENAME.sh While you may not understand all of the code, it is a good idea to glance at it. $BROWSER Watch Duck Duck Go Browser (https://spreadprivacy.com/duckduckgo-2021-review/) DuckDuckGo Search Up by 46% (https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/technology/privacy-focused-search-engine-duckduckgo-grew-by-46-percent-in-2021/) Brave Browser Protects Network-State for Added Privacy (https://brave.com/privacy-updates/14-partitioning-network-state/) Hold On, Ghostery Dawn? (https://www.ghostery.com/dawn) And a search engine, too! Glow (https://www.ghostery.com/glow) Privacy Watch Manifest v3 (https://developer.chrome.com/docs/extensions/mv3/intro/) Mozilla 2019 announcement (https://blog.mozilla.org/addons/2019/09/03/mozillas-manifest-v3-faq/) Chrome Users Beware: Manifest V3 is Deceitful and Threatening (https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2021/12/chrome-users-beware-manifest-v3-deceitful-and-threatening) Mozilla doubles down (https://blog.mozilla.org/addons/2021/05/27/manifest-v3-update/) Audacity 3.1.3 is released. Audacity 3.1.3 (https://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Release_Notes_3.1.3) The bold claim - Improved performance. Loading in projects especially should now be up to 50x faster compared to 3.1.0 Many bugfixes too. Bigger question: Is Audacity still on everyone's no-install list? Krita 5.0 is released. Official release announcement (https://krita.org/en/item/krita-5-0-released/) Highlights: It has a revamped animation system A brand new storyboard editor A session recorder that'll let you make videos out of your work and tons more stuff How can we benefit from Wayland? Wayland uses less energy than X.org (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=KDE-Plasma-Wayland-Power) Wayland, more often than not, has better gaming performance (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=kde-gnome-wayland21&num=4) Housekeeping The Linux Experiment (https://www.youtube.com/c/TheLinuxExperiment/) Linux User Space subreddit (https://reddit.com/r/LinuxUserSpace/) Email us - contact@linuxuserspace.show Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) Our Matrix room (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) Support us at Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace) Join us on Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace) Watch us on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) Check out our website (https://linuxuserspace.show) App Focus kid3 and EasyTAG kid3 (https://kid3.kde.org) EasyTAG (https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/EasyTAG) Next Time We wrap up our thoughts on NixOS NixOS (https://nixos.org) Join us in two weeks when we return to the Linux User Space Stay tuned on Twitter, Telegram, Matrix, Discord whatever. Give us your suggestions on our new subreddit r/LinuxUserSpace Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Contributor Nicholas CubicleNate LiNuXsys666 Jill and Steve WalrusZ sleepyeyesvince Paul Curtis Co-Producer Donnie Johnny Producer Bruno John Josh

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaching the Coding Gates with Anil Dash

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:03


About AnilAnil Dash is the CEO of Glitch, the friendly developer community where coders collaborate to create and share millions of web apps. He is a recognized advocate for more ethical tech through his work as an entrepreneur and writer. He serves as a board member for organizations like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the leading nonprofit defending digital privacy and expression, Data & Society Research Institute, which researches the cutting edge of tech's impact on society, and The Markup, the nonprofit investigative newsroom that pushes for tech accountability. Dash was an advisor to the Obama White House's Office of Digital Strategy, served for a decade on the board of Stack Overflow, the world's largest community for coders, and today advises key startups and non-profits including the Lower East Side Girls Club, Medium, The Human Utility, DonorsChoose and Project Include.As a writer and artist, Dash has been a contributing editor and monthly columnist for Wired, written for publications like The Atlantic and Businessweek, co-created one of the first implementations of the blockchain technology now known as NFTs, had his works exhibited in the New Museum of Contemporary Art, and collaborated with Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda on one of the most popular Spotify playlists of 2018. Dash has also been a keynote speaker and guest in a broad range of media ranging from the Obama Foundation Summit to SXSW to Desus and Mero's late-night show.Links: Glitch: https://glitch.com Web.dev: https://web.dev Glitch Twitter: https://twitter.com/glitch Anil Dash Twitter: https://twitter.com/anildash TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is a little bit off the beaten path from the cloud infrastructure types I generally drag, kicking and screaming, onto the show. If we take a look at the ecosystem and where it's going, it's clear that in the future, not everyone who wants to build a business, or a tool, or even an application is going to necessarily spring fully-formed into the world from the forehead of some God, knowing how to code. And oh, “I'm going to go to a boot camp for four months to learn how to do it first,” is increasingly untenable. I don't know if you would call it low-code or not. But that's how it feels. My guest today is Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch. Anil, thank you for joining me.Anil: Thanks so much for having me.Corey: So, let's get the important stuff out of the way first, since I have a long-standing history of mispronouncing the company Twitch as ‘Twetch,' I should probably do the same thing here. So, what is Gletch? And what does it do?Anil: Glitch is, at its simplest, a tool that lets you build a full-stack app in your web browser in about 30 seconds. And, you know, for your community, your audience, it's also this ability to create and deploy code instantly on a full-stack server with no concern for deploy, or DevOps, or provisioning a container, or any of those sort of concerns. And what it is for the users is, honestly, a community. They're like, “I looked at this app that was on Glitch; I thought it was cool; I could do what we call [remixing 00:02:03].” Which is to kind of fork that app, a running app, make a couple edits, and all of a sudden live at a real URL on the web, my app is running with exactly what I built. And that's something that has been—I think, just captured a lot of people's imagination to now where they've built over 12 or 15 million apps on the platform.Corey: You describe it somewhat differently than I would, and given that I tend to assume that people who create and run successful businesses don't generally tend to do it without thought, I'm not quite, I guess, insufferable enough to figure out, “Oh, well, I thought about this for ten seconds, therefore I've solved a business problem that you have been needling at for years.” But when I look at Glitch, I would describe it as something different than the way that you describe it. I would call it a web-based IDE for low-code applications and whatnot, and you never talk about it that way. Everything I can see there describes it talks about friendly creators, and community tied to it. Why is that?Anil: You're not wrong from the conventional technologist's point of view. I—sufficient vintage; I was coding in Visual Basic back in the '90s and if you squint, you can see that influence on Glitch today. And so I don't reject that description, but part of it is about the audience we're speaking to, which is sort of a next generation of creators. And I think importantly, that's not just age, right, but that could be demographic, that can be just sort of culturally, wherever you're at. And what we look at is who's making the most interesting stuff on the internet and in the industry, and they tend to be grounded in broader culture, whether they're on, you know, Instagram, or TikTok, or, you know, whatever kind of influencer, you want to point at—YouTube.And those folks, they think of themselves as creators first and they think of themselves as participating in the community first and then the tool sort of follow. And I think one of the things that's really striking is, if you look at—we'll take YouTube as an example because everyone's pretty familiar with it—they have a YouTube Creator Studio. And it is a very rich and deep tool. It does more than, you know, you would have had iMovie, or Final Cut Pro doing, you know, 10 or 15 years ago, incredibly advanced stuff. And those [unintelligible 00:04:07] use it every day, but nobody goes to YouTube and says, “This is a cloud-based nonlinear editor for video production, and we target cinematographers.” And if they did, they would actually narrow their audience and they would limit what their impact is on the world.And so similarly, I think we look at that for Glitch where the social object, the central thing that people organize around a Glitch is an app, not code. And that's this really kind of deep and profound idea, which is that everybody can understand an app. Everybody has an idea for an app. You know, even the person who's, “Ah, I'm not technical,” or, “I'm not really into technology,” they're like, “But you know what? If I could make an app, I would make this.”And so we think a lot about that creative impulse. And the funny thing is, that is a common thread between somebody that literally just got on the internet for the first time and somebody who has been doing cloud deploys for as long as there's been a cloud to deploy to, or somebody has been coding for decades. No matter who you are, you have that place that is starting from what's the experience I want to build, the app I want to build? And so I think that's where there's that framing. But it's also been really useful, in that if you're trying to make a better IDE in the cloud and a better text editor, and there are multiple trillion-dollar companies that [laugh] are creating products in that category, I don't think you're going to win. On the other hand, if you say, “This is more fun, and cooler, and has a better design, and feels better,” I think we could absolutely win in a walk away compared to trillion-dollar companies trying to be cool.Corey: I think that this is an area that has a few players in it could definitely stand to benefit by having more there. My big fear is not that AWS is going to launch stuff in your space and drive you out of business; I think that is a somewhat naive approach. I'm more concerned that they're going to try to launch something in your space, give it a dumb name, fail that market and appropriately, not understand who it's for and set the entire idea back five years. That is, in some cases, it seems like their modus operandi for an awful lot of new markets.Anil: Yeah, I mean, that's not an uncommon problem in any category that's sort of community driven. So, you know, back in the day, I worked on building blogging tools at the beginning of this, sort of, social media era, and we worried about that a lot. We had built some of the first early tools, Movable Type, and TypePad, and these were what were used to launch, like, Gawker and Huffington Post and all the, sort of, big early sites. And we had been doing it a couple years—and then at that time, major player—AOL came in, and they launched their own AOL blog service, and we were, you know, quaking in our boots. I remember just being kind of like, pit in your stomach, “Oh, my gosh. This is going to devastate the category.”And as it turns out, people were smart, and they have taste, and they can tell. And the domain that we're in is not one that is about raw computing power or raw resources that you can bring to bear so much as it is about can you get people to connect together, collaborate together, and feel like they're in a place where they want to make something and they want to share it with other people? And I mean, we've never done a single bit of advertising for Glitch. There's never been any paid acquisition. There's never done any of those things. And we go up against, broadly in the space, people that have billboards and they buy out all the ads of the airport and, you know, all the other kind of things we see—Corey: And they do the typical enterprise thing where they spend untold millions in acquiring the real estate to advertise on, and then about 50 cents on the message, from the looks of it. It's, wow, you go to all this trouble and expense to get something in front of me, and after all of that to get my attention, you don't have anything interesting to say?Anil: Right.Corey: [crosstalk 00:07:40] inverse of that.Anil: [crosstalk 00:07:41] it doesn't work.Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's brand awareness. I love that game. Ugh.Anil: I was a CIO, and not once in my life did I ever make a purchasing decision based on who was sponsoring a golf tournament. It never happened, right? Like, I never made a call on a database platform because of a poster that was up at, you know, San Jose Airport. And so I think that's this thing that developers in particular, have really good BS filters, and you can sort of see through.Corey: What I have heard about the airport advertising space—and I but a humble cloud economist; I don't know if this is necessarily accurate or not—but if you have a company like Accenture, for example, that advertises on airport billboards, they don't even bother to list their website. If you go to their website, it turns out that there's no shopping cart function. I cannot add ‘one consulting' to my cart and make a purchase.Anil: “Ten pounds of consult, please.”Corey: Right? I feel like the primary purpose there might very well be that when someone presents to your board and says, “All right, we've had this conversation with Accenture.” The response is not, “Who?” It's a brand awareness play, on some level. That said, you say you don't do a bunch traditional advertising, but honestly, I feel like you advertise—more successfully—than I do at The Duckbill Group, just by virtue of having a personality running the company, in your case.Now, your platform is for the moment, slightly larger than mine, but that's okay,k I have ambition and a tenuous grasp of reality and I'm absolutely going to get there one of these days. But there is something to be said for someone who has a track record of doing interesting things and saying interesting things, pulling a, “This is what I do and this is how I do it.” It almost becomes a personality-led marketing effort to some degree, doesn't it?Anil: I'm a little mindful of that, right, where I think—so a little bit of context and history: Glitch as a company is actually 20 years old. The product is only a few years old, but we were formerly called Fog Creek Software, co-founded by Joel Spolsky who a lot of folks will know from back in the day as Joel on Software blog, was extremely influential. And that company, under leadership of Joel and his co-founder Michael Pryor spun out Stack Overflow, they spun out Trello. He had created, you know, countless products over the years so, like, their technical and business acumen is off the charts.And you know, I was on the board of Stack Overflow from, really, those first days and until just recently when they sold, and you know, you get this insight into not just how do you build a developer community that is incredibly valuable, but also has a place in the ecosystem that is unique and persists over time. And I think that's something that was very, very instructive. And so when it came in to lead Glitch I, we had already been a company with a, sort of, visible founder. Joel was as well known as a programmer as it got in the world?Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: And my public visibility is different, right? I, you know, I was a working coder for many years, but I don't think that's what people see me on social media has. And so I think, I've been very mindful where, like, I'm thrilled to use the platform I have to amplify what was created on a Glitch. But what I note is it's always, “This person made this thing. This person made this app and it had this impact, and it got these results, or made this difference for them.”And that's such a different thing than—I don't ever talk about, “We added syntax highlighting in the IDE and the editor in the browser.” It's just never it right. And I think there are people that—I love that work. I mean, I love having that conversation with our team, but I think that's sort of the difference is my enthusiasm is, like, people are making stuff and it's cool. And that sort of is my lens on the whole world.You know, somebody makes whatever a great song, a great film, like, these are all things that are exciting. And the Glitch community's creations sort of feel that way. And also, we have other visible people on the team. I think of our sort of Head of Community, Jenn Schiffer, who's a very well known developer and her right. And you know, tons of people have read her writing and seen her talks over the years.And she and I talk about this stuff; I think she sort of feels the same way, which is, she's like, “If I were, you know, being hired by some cloud platform to show the latest primitives that they've deployed behind an API,” she's like, “I'd be miserable. Like, I don't want to do that in the world.” And I sort of feel the same way. But if you say, “This person who never imagined they would make an app that would have this kind of impact.” And they're going to, I think of just, like, the last couple of weeks, some of the apps we've seen where people are—it could be [unintelligible 00:11:53]. It could be like, “We made a Slack bot that finally gets this reporting into the right channel [laugh] inside our company, but it was easy enough that I could do it myself without asking somebody to create it even though I'm not technically an engineer.” Like, that's incredible.The other extreme, we have people that are PhDs working on machine learning that are like, “At the end of the day, I don't want to be responsible for managing and deploying. [laugh]. I go home, and so the fact that I can do this in create is really great.” I think that energy, I mean, I feel the same way. I still build stuff all the time, and I think that's something where, like, you can't fake that and also, it's bigger than any one person or one public persona or social media profile, or whatever. I think there's this bigger idea. And I mean, to that point, there are millions of developers on Glitch and they've created well over ten million apps. I am not a humble person, but very clearly, that's not me, you know? [laugh].Corey: I have the same challenge to it's, effectively, I have now a 12 employee company and about that again contractors for various specialized functions, and the common perception, I think, is that mostly I do all the stuff that we talk about in public, and the other 11 folks sort of sit around and clap as I do it. Yeah, that is only four of those people's jobs as it turns out. There are more people doing work here. It's challenging, on some level, to get away from the myth of the founder who is the person who has the grand vision and does all the work and sees all these things.Anil: This industry loves the myth of the great man, or the solo legend, or the person in their bedroom is a genius, the lone genius, and it's a lie. It's a lie every time. And I think one of the things that we can do, especially in the work at Glitch, but I think just in my work overall with my whole career is to dismantle that myth. I think that would be incredibly valuable. It just would do a service for everybody.But I mean, that's why Glitch is the way it is. It's a collaboration platform. Our reference points are, you know, we look at Visual Studio and what have you, but we also look at Google Docs. Why is it that people love to just send a link to somebody and say, “Let's edit this thing together and knock out a, you know, a memo together or whatever.” I think that idea we're going to collaborate together, you know, we saw that—like, I think of Figma, which is a tool that I love. You know, I knew Dylan when he was a teenager and watching him build that company has been so inspiring, not least because design was always supposed to be collaborative.And then you think about we're all collaborating together in design every day. We're all collaborating together and writing in Google Docs—or whatever we use—every day. And then coding is still this kind of single-player game. Maybe at best, you throw something over the wall with a pull request, but for the most part, it doesn't feel like you're in there with somebody. Certainly doesn't feel like you're creating together in the same way that when you're jamming on these other creative tools does. And so I think that's what's been liberating for a lot of people is to feel like it's nice to have company when you're making something.Corey: Periodically, I'll talk to people in the AWS ecosystem who for some reason appear to believe that Jeff Barr builds a lot of these services himself then writes blog posts about them. And it's, Amazon does not break out how many of its 1.2 million or so employees work at AWS, but I'm guessing it's more than five people. So yeah, Jeff probably only wrote a dozen of those services himself; the rest are—Anil: That's right. Yeah.Corey: —done by service teams and the rest. It's easy to condense this stuff and I'm as guilty of it as anyone. To my mind, a big company is one that has 200 people in it. That is not apparently something the world agrees with.Anil: Yeah, it's impossible to fathom an organization of hundreds of thousands or a million-plus people, right? Like, our brains just aren't wired to do it. And I think so we reduce things to any given Jeff, whether that's Barr or Bezos, whoever you want to point to.Corey: At one point, I think they had something like more men named Jeff on their board than they did women, which—Anil: Yeah. Mm-hm.Corey: —all right, cool. They've fixed that and now they have a Dave problem.Anil: Yeah [unintelligible 00:15:37] say that my entire career has been trying to weave out of that dynamic, whether it was a Dave, a Mike, or a Jeff. But I think that broader sort of challenge is this—that is related to the idea of there being this lone genius. And I think if we can sort of say, well, creation always happens in community. It always happens influenced by other things. It is always—I mean, this is why we talk about it in Glitch.When you make an app, you don't start from a blank slate, you start from a working app that's already on the platform and you're remix it. And there was a little bit of a ego resistance by some devs years ago when they first encountered that because [unintelligible 00:16:14] like, “No, no, no, I need a blank page, you know, because I have this brilliant idea that nobody's ever thought of before.” And I'm like, “You know, the odds are you'll probably start from something pretty close to something that's built before.” And that enabler of, “There's nothing new under the sun, and you're probably remixing somebody else's thoughts,” I think that sort of changed the tenor of the community. And I think that's something where like, I just see that across the industry.When people are open, collaborative, like even today, a great example is web browsers. The folks making web browsers at Google, Apple, Mozilla are pretty collaborative. They actually do share ideas together. I mean, I get a window into that because they actually all use Glitch to do test cases on different bugs and stuff for them, but you see, one Glitch project will add in folks from Mozilla and folks from Apple and folks from the Chrome team and Google, and they're like working together and you're, like—you kind of let down the pretense of there being this secret genius that's only in this one organization, this one group of people, and you're able to make something great, and the web is greater than all of them. And the proof, you know, for us is that Glitch is not a new idea. Heroku wanted to do what we're doing, you know, a dozen years ago.Corey: Yeah, everyone wants to build Heroku except the company that acquired Heroku, and here we are. And now it's—I was waiting for the next step and it just seemed like it never happened.Anil: But you know when I talked to those folks, they were like, “Well, we didn't have Docker, and we didn't have containerization, and on the client side, we didn't have modern browsers that could do this kind of editing experience, all this kind of thing.” So, they let their editor go by the wayside and became mostly deploy platform. And—but people forget, for the first year or two Heroku had an in-browser editor, and an IDE and, you know, was constrained by the tech at the time. And I think that's something where I'm like, we look at that history, we look at, also, like I said, these browser manufacturers working together were able to get us to a point where we can make something better.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I do have a question for you about the nuts and bolts behind the scenes of Glitch and how it works. If I want to remix something on Glitch, I click the button, a couple seconds later it's there and ready for me to start kicking the tires on, which tells me a few things. One, it is certainly not using CloudFormation to provision it because I didn't have time to go and grab a quick snack and take a six hour nap. So, it apparently is running on computers somewhere. I have it on good authority that this is not just run by people who are very fast at assembling packets by hand. What does the infrastructure look like?Anil: It's on AWS. Our first year-plus of prototyping while we were sort of in beta and early stages of Glitch was getting that time to remix to be acceptable. We still wish it were faster; I mean, that's always the way but, you know, when we started, it was like, yeah, you did sit there for a minute and watch your cursor spin. I mean, what's happening behind the scenes, we're provisioning a new container, standing up a full stack, bringing over the code from the Git repo on the previous project, like, we're doing a lot of work, lift behind the scenes, and we went through every possible permutation of what could make that experience be good enough. So, when we start talking about prototyping, we're at five-plus, almost six years ago when we started building the early versions of what became Glitch, and at that time, we were fairly far along in maturity with Docker, but there was not a clear answer about the use case that we're building for.So, we experimented with Docker Swarm. We went pretty far down that road; we spent a good bit of time there, it failed in ways that were both painful and slow to fix. So, that was great. I don't recommend that. In fairness, we have a very unusual use case, right? So, Glitch now, if you talk about ten million containers on Glitch, no two of those apps are the same and nobody builds an orchestration infrastructure assuming that every single machine is a unique snowflake.Corey: Yeah, massively multi-tenant is not really a thing that people know.Anil: No. And also from a security posture Glitch—if you look at it as a security expert—it is a platform allowing anonymous users to execute arbitrary code at scale. That's what we do. That's our job. And so [laugh], you know, so your threat model is very different. It's very different.I mean, literally, like, you can go to Glitch and build an app, running a full-stack app, without even logging in. And the reason we enable that is because we see kids in classrooms, they're learning to code for the first time, they want to be able to remix a project and they don't even have an email address. And so that was about enabling something different, right? And then, similarly, you know, we explored Kubernetes—because of course you do; it's the default choice here—and some of the optimizations, again, if you go back several years ago, being able to suspend a project and then quickly sort of rehydrate it off disk into a running app was not a common use case, and so it was not optimized. And so we couldn't offer that experience because what we do with Glitch is, if you haven't used an app in five minutes, and you're not a paid member, who put that app to sleep. And that's just a reasonable—Corey: Uh, “Put the app to sleep,” as in toddler, or, “Put the app to sleep,” as an ill puppy.Anil: [laugh]. Hopefully, the former, but when we were at our worst and scaling the ladder. But that is that thing; it's like we had that moment that everybody does, which is that, “Oh, no. This worked.” That was a really scary moment where we started seeing app creation ramping up, and number of edits that people were making in those apps, you know, ramping up, which meant deploys for us ramping up because we automatically deploy as you edit on Glitch. And so, you know, we had that moment where just—well, as a startup, you always hope things go up into the right, and then they do and then you're not sleeping for a long time. And we've been able to get it back under control.Corey: Like, “Oh, no, I'm not succeeding.” Followed immediately by, “Oh, no, I'm succeeding.” And it's a good problem to have.Anil: Exactly. Right, right, right. The only thing worse than failing is succeeding sometimes, in terms of stress levels. And organizationally, you go through so much; technically, you go through so much. You know, we were very fortunate to have such thoughtful technical staff to navigate these things.But it was not obvious, and it was not a sort of this is what you do off the shelf. And our architecture was very different because people had looked at—like, I look at one of our inspirations was CodePen, which is a great platform and the community love them. And their front end developers are, you know, always showing off, “Here's this cool CSS thing I figured out, and it's there.” But for the most part, they're publishing static content, so architecturally, they look almost more like a content management system than an app-running platform. And so we couldn't learn anything from them about our scaling our architecture.We could learn from them on community, and they've been an inspiration there, but I think that's been very, very different. And then, conversely, if we looked at the Herokus of the world, or all those sort of easy deploy, I think Amazon has half a dozen different, like, “This will be easier,” kind of deploy tools. And we looked at those, and they were code-centric not app-centric. And that led to fundamentally different assumptions in user experience and optimization.And so, you know, we had to chart our own path and I think it was really only the last year or so that we were able to sort of turn the corner and have high degree of confidence about, we know what people build on Glitch and we know how to support and scale it. And that unlocked this, sort of, wave of creativity where there are things that people want to create on the internet but it had become too hard to do so. And the canonical example I think I was—those of us are old enough to remember FTPing up a website—Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: —right—to Geocities, or whatever your shared web host was, we remember how easy that was and how much creativity was enabled by that.Corey: Yes, “How easy it was,” quote-unquote, for those of us who spent years trying to figure out passive versus active versus ‘what is going on?' As far as FTP transfers. And it turns out that we found ways to solve for that, mostly, but it became something a bit different and a bit weird. But here we are.Anil: Yeah, there was definitely an adjustment period, but at some point, if you'd made an HTML page in notepad on your computer, and you could, you know, hurl it at a server somewhere, it would kind of run. And when you realize, you look at the coding boot camps, or even just to, like, teach kids to code efforts, and they're like, “Day three. Now, you've gotten VS Code and GitHub configured. We can start to make something.” And you're like, “The whole magic of this thing getting it to light up. You put it in your web browser, you're like, ‘That's me. I made this.'” you know, north star for us was almost, like, you go from zero to hello world in a minute. That's huge.Corey: I started participating one of those boot camps a while back to help. Like, the first thing I changed about the curriculum was, “Yeah, we're not spending time teaching people how to use VI in, at that point, the 2010s.” It was, that was a fun bit of hazing for those of us who were becoming Unix admins and knew that wherever we'd go, we'd find VI on a server, but here in the real world, there are better options for that.Anil: This is rank cruelty.Corey: Yeah, I mean, I still use it because 20 years of muscle memory doesn't go away overnight, but I don't inflict that on others.Anil: Yeah. Well, we saw the contrast. Like, we worked with, there's a group called Mouse here in New York City that creates the computer science curriculum for the public schools in the City of New York. And there's a million kids in public school in New York City, right, and they all go through at least some of this CS education. [unintelligible 00:24:49] saw a lot of work, a lot of folks in the tech community here did. It was fantastic.And yet they were still doing this sort of very conceptual, theoretical. Here's how a professional developer would set up their environment. Quote-unquote, “Professional.” And I'm like, you know what really sparks kids' interests? If you tell them, “You can make a page and it'll be live and you can send it to your friend. And you can do it right now.”And once you've sparked that creative impulse, you can't stop them from doing the rest. And I think what was wild was kids followed down that path. Some of the more advanced kids got to high school and realized they want to experiment with, like, AI and ML, right? And they started playing with TensorFlow. And, you know, there's collaboration features in Glitch where you can do real-time editing and a code with this. And they went in the forum and they were asking questions, that kind of stuff. And the people answering their questions were the TensorFlow team at Google. [laugh]. Right?Corey: I remember those days back when everything seemed smaller and more compact, [unintelligible 00:25:42] but almost felt like a balkanization of community—Anil: Yeah.Corey: —where now it's oh, have you joined that Slack team, and I'm looking at this and my machine is screaming for more RAM. It's, like, well, it has 128 gigs in it. Shouldn't that be enough? Not for Slack.Anil: Not for chat. No, no, no. Chat is demanding.Corey: Oh, yeah, that and Chrome are basically trying to out-ram each other. But if you remember the days of volunteering as network staff on Freenode when you could basically gather everyone for a given project in the entire stack on the same IRC network. And that doesn't happen anymore.Anil: And there's something magic about that, right? It's like now the conversations are closed off in a Slack or Discord or what have you, but to have a sort of open forum where people can talk about this stuff, what's wild about that is, for a beginner, a teenage creator who's learning this stuff, the idea that the people who made the AI, I can talk to, they're alive still, you know what I mean? Like, yeah, they're not even that old. But [laugh]. They think of this is something that's been carved in stone for 100 years.And so it's so inspiring to them. And then conversely, talking to the TensorFlow team, they made these JavaScript examples, like, tensorflow.js was so accessible, you know? And they're like, “This is the most heartwarming thing. Like, we think about all these enterprise use cases or whatever. But like, kids wanting to make stuff, like recognize their friends' photo, and all the vision stuff they're doing around [unintelligible 00:26:54] out there,” like, “We didn't know this is why we do it until we saw this is why we do it.”And that part about connecting the creative impulse from both, like, the most experienced, advanced coders at the most august tech companies that exist, as well as the most rank beginners in public schools, who might not even have a computer at home, saying that's there—if you put those two things together, and both of those are saying, “I'm a coder; I'm able to create; I can make something on the internet, and I can share it with somebody and be inspired by it,” like, that is… that's as good as it gets.Corey: There's something magic in being able to reach out to people who built this stuff. And honestly—you shouldn't feel this way, but you do—when I was talking to the folks who wrote the things I was working on, it really inspires you to ask better questions. Like when I'm talking to Dr. Venema, the author of Postfix and I'm trying to figure out how this thing works, well, I know for a fact that I will not be smarter than he is at basically anything in that entire universe, and maybe most beyond that, as well, however, I still want to ask a question in such a way that doesn't make me sound like a colossal dumbass. So, it really inspires you—Anil: It motivates you.Corey: Oh, yeah. It inspires you to raise your question bar up a bit, of, “I am trying to do x. I expect y to happen. Instead, z is happening as opposed to what I find the documentation that”—oh, as I read the documentation, discover exactly what I messed up, and then I delete the whole email. It's amazing how many of those things you never send because when constructing a question the right way, you can help yourself.Anil: Rubber ducking against your heroes.Corey: Exactly.Anil: I mean, early in my career, I'd gone through sort of licensing mishap on a project that later became open-source, and sort of stepped it in and as you do, and unprompted, I got an advice email from Dan Bricklin, who invented the spreadsheet, he invented VisiCalc, and he had advice and he was right. And it was… it was unreal. I was like, this guy's one of my heroes. I grew up reading about his work, and not only is he, like, a living, breathing person, he's somebody that can have the kindness to reach out and say, “Yeah, you know, have you tried this? This might work.”And it's, this isn't, like, a guy who made an app. This is the guy who made the app for which the phrase killer app was invented, right? And, you know, we've since become friends and I think a lot of his inspiration and his work. And I think it's one of the things it's like, again, if you tell somebody starting out, the people who invented the fundamental tools of the digital era, are still active, still building stuff, still have advice to share, and you can connect with them, it feels like a cheat code. It feels like a superpower, right? It feels like this impossible thing.And I think about like, even for me, the early days of the web, view source, which is still buried in our browser somewhere. And you can see the code that makes the page, it felt like getting away with something. “You mean, I can just look under the hood and see how they made this page and then I can do it too?” I think we forget how radical that is—[unintelligible 00:29:48] radical open-source in general is—and you see it when, like, you talk to young creators. I think—you know, I mean, Glitch obviously is used every day by, like, people at Microsoft and Google and the New York Timesor whatever, like, you know, the most down-the-road, enterprise developers, but I think a lot about the new creators and the people who are learning, and what they tell me a lot is the, like, “Oh, so I made this app, but what do I have to do to put it on the internet?”I'm like, “It already is.” Like, as soon as you create it, that URL was live, it all works. And their, like, “But isn't there, like, an app store I have to ask? Isn't there somebody I have to get permission to publish this from? Doesn't somebody have to approve it?”And you realize they've grown up with whether it was the app stores on their phones, or the cartridges in their Nintendo or, you know, whatever it was, they had always had this constraint on technology. It wasn't something you make; it's something that is given to you, you know, handed down from on high. And I think that's the part that animates me and the whole team, the community, is this idea of, like, I geek out about our infrastructure. I love that we're doing deploys constantly, so fast, all the time, and I love that we've taken the complexity away, but the end of the day, the reason why we do it, is you can have somebody just sort of saying, I didn't realize there was a place I could just make something put it in front of, maybe, millions of people all over the world and I don't have to ask anybody permission and my idea can matter as much as the thing that's made by the trillion-dollar company.Corey: It's really neat to see, I guess, the sense of spirit and soul that arises from a smaller, more, shall we say, soulful company. No disparagement meant toward my friends at AWS and other places. It's just, there's something that you lose when you get to a certain point of scale. Like, I don't ever have to have a meeting internally and discuss things, like, “Well, does this thing that we're toying with doing violate antitrust law?” That is never been on my roadmap of things I have to even give the slightest crap about.Anil: Right, right? You know, “What does the investor relations person at a retirement fund think about the feature that we shipped?” Is not a question that we have to answer. There's this joy in also having community that sort of has come along with us, right? So, we talk a lot internally about, like, how do we make sure Glitch stays weird? And, you know, the community sort of supports that.Like, there's no reason logically that our logo should be the emoji of two fish. But that kind of stuff of just, like, it just is. We don't question it anymore. I think that we're very lucky. But also that we are part of an ecosystem. I also am very grateful where, like… yeah, that folks at Google use Glitch as part of their daily work when they're explaining a new feature in Chrome.Like, if you go to web.dev and their dev portal teaches devs how to code, all the embedded examples go to these Glitch apps that are running, showing running code is incredible. When we see the Stripe team building examples of, like, “Do you want to use this new payment API that we made? Well, we have a Glitch for you.” And literally every day, they ship one that sort of goes and says, “Well, if you just want to use this new Stripe feature, you just remix this thing and it's instantly running on Glitch.”I mean, those things are incredible. So like, I'm very grateful that the biggest companies and most influential companies in the industry have embraced it. So, I don't—yeah, I don't disparage them at all, but I think that ability to connect to the person who'd be like, “I just want to do payments. I've never heard of Stripe.”Corey: Oh yeah.Anil: And we have this every day. They come into Glitch, and they're just like, I just wanted to take credit cards. I didn't know there's a tool to do that.Corey: “I was going to build it myself,” and everyone shrieks, “No, no. Don't do that. My God.” Yeah. Use one of their competitors, fine,k but building it yourself is something a lunatic would do.Anil: Exactly. Right, right. And I think we forget that there's only so much attention people can pay, there's only so much knowledge they have.Corey: Everything we say is new to someone. That's why I always go back to assuming no one's ever heard of me, and explain the basics of what I do and how I do it, periodically. It's, no one has done all the mandatory reading. Who knew?Anil: And it's such a healthy exercise to, right, because I think we always have that kind of beginner's mindset about what Glitch is. And in fairness, I understand why. Like, there have been very experienced developers that have said, “Well, Glitch looks too colorful. It looks like a toy.” And that we made a very intentional choice at masking—like, we're doing the work under the hood.And you can drop down into a terminal and you can do—you can run whatever build script you want. You can do all that stuff on Glitch, but that's not what we put up front and I think that's this philosophy about the role of the technology versus the people in the ecosystem.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to, I guess, explain what Glitch is and how you view it. If people want to learn more about it, about your opinions, et cetera. Where can they find you?Anil: Sure. glitch.com is easiest place, and hopefully that's a something you can go and a minute later, you'll have a new app that you built that you want to share. And, you know, we're pretty active on all social media, you know, Twitter especially with Glitch: @glitch. I'm on as @anildash.And one of the things I love is I get to talk to folks like you and learn from the community, and as often as not, that's where most of the inspiration comes from is just sort of being out in all the various channels, talking to people. It's wild to be 20-plus years into this and still never get tired of that.Corey: It's why I love this podcast. Every time I talk to someone, I learn something new. It's hard to remain too ignorant after you have enough people who've shared wisdom with you as long as you can retain it.Anil: That's right.Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Anil: So, glad to be here.Corey: Anil Dash, CEO of Gletch—or Glitch as he insists on calling it. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me how your small team at AWS is going to crush Glitch into the dirt just as soon as they find a name that's dumb enough for the service.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

#BTSPodcast
#48: Sierra Reed on Influencers, Strategy, & Managing Up

#BTSPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 77:46


This episode was recorded at the end of 2020. As of now, Sierra Reed is at Whalar as their Social Platform Partnerships Director. She was previously at Mozilla as their Marketing & Social Media Relations manager where she worked on both Firefox & Pocket & shares what she's learned about working across organizations and managing up. Books Sierra recommends: One Minute Manger: https://bookshop.org/a/9735/9780062367549 Executive Presence: https://bookshop.org/a/9735/9780062246899 Emotional Intelligence 2.0: https://bookshop.org/a/9735/9780974320625 Support this podcast at anchor.fm/btspodcast, or if this advice helped your career, VenMo me: @lynae-cook. Sign up for HotelTonight using LCOOK61 or Acorns: https://acorns.com/invite/L33KZP Follow BTSPodcast at @BTSthepodcast across social --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/btspodcast/support

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
Tech for Christmas: What's not keeping your data private?

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 7:09


As we approach Christmas we're being reminded to look into the privacy of the tech we buy. The company behind Firefox, Mozilla, has released its annual list of tech products which may put users' privacy at risk.Researchers have found the Omicron variant multiplies 70 times faster than the Delta Variant. The team in Hong Kong also found it replicates less well in human lung tissue which could indicate it causes a lower severity of disease. A ransomware attack on a payroll company could threaten the Christmas pay checks for workers at Tesla, Sainsbury's and Honda, plus how it could be linked to a major software flaw leaving millions of web servers vulnerable to the attack. Cyberpunk 2077 developer will pay less than $2million in proposed class-action settlement. Intel believes the Metaverse will need a thousand-fold increase in computing capability.Also - Ubisoft working on a remake of the stealth classic Splinter Cell, the mars rover makes important rock discovery, and the first ever SMS message goes up for sale. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

CHATS with GiGi
How Empowered Women Empower Women ft. Jane Finette

CHATS with GiGi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 42:59


Have you heard the saying, “Empowered Women, Empower Women?” The word “empower” is so powerful, isn't it? How can we empower each other?Jane Finette is a passionate advocate for women and girls, a non-profit leader, and author. In 2014 Jane founded The Coaching Fellowship (TCFS), a non-profit organization helping advance young women social change leaders, and their work throughout the world. Under her leadership as Executive Director, TCFS grew from helping a handful of women upon its inception to now serving more than 300+ young women of impact per year. More than 1,200 women have graduated from The Coaching Fellowship program to date from 70 countries, and now form the Women of Impact Alliance; the largest body of young women social change leaders.Some of her past work includes senior leadership roles building community at global organizations such as Mozilla, eBay, Sotheby's, and Gooru, reaching hundreds of millions of people. A leadership expert and Certified Professional Co-Active Coach (CPCC), Jane has dedicated her life to achieving equality for women — empowering them to create impact and build the world of tomorrow, today.Get in touch with Jane:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/janefinetteWebsite : https://janefinette.com/SHOW LINKS & RESOURCESReady to step into your power and start 2022 with Clarity, Confidence and Courage? Save your seat in my 90-day Coaching Program the 3Rs System. Use the code PODCAST to save $200!https://bit.ly/3rssystemGet the professional help and support you deserve for your business by hiring a pro from STAFI. Go to www.getstafi.com/gigi to get started with two free weeks today.If you loved today's episode, I have a favor to ask! Subscribe and drop us a review! It's how we can keep the podcast going and growing with your favorite content!

Application Security Weekly (Audio)
Vulnerability Phone - ASW #177

Application Security Weekly (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 70:15


This week, we welcome Francesco Cipollone - CEO & Founder - AppSec Phoenix Ltd, to discuss DevSecOps, Compliance GRC, and the Future of Application Security! In the AppSec News, Mike & John talk: All about Log4Shell, Mozilla's BigFix bug and new sandbox, Rust in the Linux kernel, path traversals, reflections on the security profession, & more!   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/asw177 Segment Resources: - AppSec Cali 19 Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cegMUjo25Zc - ADDO19: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1p3exzkTIY - Open Security Summit 20 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8myMG36gq4o , https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mh_P1C1a-CM   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/asw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

Application Security Weekly (Video)
Log4Shell, Mozilla's BigFix & New Sandbox, Rust in Linux Kernel, Path Traversal in Go - ASW #177

Application Security Weekly (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 35:34


This week in the AppSec News, Mike & John talk: All about Log4Shell, Mozilla's BigFix bug and new sandbox, Rust in the Linux kernel, path traversals, reflections on the security profession, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/asw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/asw177

Paul's Security Weekly TV
Log4Shell, Mozilla's BigFix & New Sandbox, Rust in Linux Kernel, Path Traversal in Go - ASW #177

Paul's Security Weekly TV

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 35:34


This week in the AppSec News, Mike & John talk: All about Log4Shell, Mozilla's BigFix bug and new sandbox, Rust in the Linux kernel, path traversals, reflections on the security profession, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/asw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/asw177

Paul's Security Weekly
Vulnerability Phone - ASW #177

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 70:15


This week, we welcome Francesco Cipollone - CEO & Founder - AppSec Phoenix Ltd, to discuss DevSecOps, Compliance GRC, and the Future of Application Security! In the AppSec News, Mike & John talk: All about Log4Shell, Mozilla's BigFix bug and new sandbox, Rust in the Linux kernel, path traversals, reflections on the security profession, & more!   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/asw177 Segment Resources: - AppSec Cali 19 Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cegMUjo25Zc - ADDO19: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1p3exzkTIY - Open Security Summit 20 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8myMG36gq4o , https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mh_P1C1a-CM   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/asw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

The Daily Crunch – Spoken Edition
Mozilla expects to generate more than $500M in revenue this year

The Daily Crunch – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 3:30


The Mozilla Foundation today released its financial report for 2020. As usual, this gives us a good picture of the organization's financial health from a year ago, but for the first time this year, Mozilla also provided us with more recent data.

Sophos Podcasts
S3 Ep62: The S in IoT stands for security (and much more)

Sophos Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 27:15


Mozilla's "BigSig" buffer overflow hole. UK to put IoT vendors on notice. The Mother of All Demos. Cryptocurrency company catastrophe. Firefox gets an extra sandbox. And an access point from outer space (OK, from home). https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/mozilla-patches-exploitable-bigsig https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/iot-devices-must-protect-consumers https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/cryptocurrency-startup-fails-to-subtract https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/firefox-update-brings-a-whole-new With Paul Ducklin and Doug Aamoth. Original music by Edith Mudge (https://www.edithmudge.com) Got questions/suggestions/stories to share? Email: tips@sophos.com Twitter: NakedSecurity (https://twitter.com/nakedsecurity) Instagram: NakedSecurity (https://instagram.com/nakedsecurity)

Cyber and Technology with Mike
02 December 2021 Cyber and Tech News

Cyber and Technology with Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:12


In today's podcast we cover four crucial cyber and technology topics, including:  1. Wordpress plugin exposes nearly 80 thousand commerce sites   2. Mozilla addresses security issue that could allow security bypass  3. Emotet using pdf and reply-chain tactics to abuse Microsoft installer  4. Planned Parenthood breach in Los Angeles impacts 400 thousand patients I'd love feedback, feel free to send your comments and feedback to  | cyberandtechwithmike@gmail.com

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Brendan Eich - CEO & Co-Founder, Brave Software Ep #54

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:49


Live from Breakpoint 2021, Brendan Eich sits down with Anatoly Yakovenko to discuss integrating Solana into the Brave Browser, the huge potential for a decentralized search engine and NFTs as entry point to the metaverse. 00:09 - Intro00:54 - Integrating Solana in Brave08:00 - Challenges with creating the browser09:23 - How to scale crypto to the general public11:57 - A Decentralized search engine14:46 - NFTs as entry point to the metaverse16:35 - Mobile vs. Desktop18:00 - Languages and smart contract development20:40 - How to grow crypto to mass adoption22:44 - Global Peer-to-Peer environment in Crypto Brendan (00:10):Great conference.Anatoly (00:11):I know. Thank you. I'm really excited to be on stage here with you. You're-Brendan (00:15):Same, [crosstalk 00:00:17].Anatoly (00:16):... One of my heroes. As a programmer, JavaScript is a language that really revolutionized how we do application development, how we build. It's the foundation of the web. And I often think of web 3.0 really just being the web, just part of the bigger web.Brendan (00:34):Yeah, me too. That's how the web grows, by evolution. So we think the web 3.0 browser should be the gateway to a billion crypto users. And we are therefore integrating Solana into Brave soon as we can. And here's the cool thing, this is an evolutionary path. We're going to make it so any dapp that is Solana enabled, wherever other chains, EVM compatible or Ethereum, whatever it supports, if it supports Solana as well, we'll make it use Solana by default. So dapp builders who build for Solana as well as other chains. In Brave it's going to use Solana. And that's going to just help, I think, pull all the dapps on the Solana.Anatoly (01:24):Super exciting.Brendan (01:25):You like?Anatoly (01:25):Yeah, it's wonderful. Yeah.Brendan (01:28):Let's see what else. What do we like about Solana? We like NFT games, we like DeFi a lot. We want to make it easy for users to earn and get yield without having to be super expert or do a lot of complex operations. So we're going to work on building that probably in the first half of next year into the wallet so that you can just robo-earn, robo-yield. And we want NFT galleries and NFT transactions to be super slick. I was inspired by the Jules Urbach talk earlier today, and the demo earlier here with NFTs, there were several of them actually, it's all good.Brendan (02:07):We want as many NFT marketplaces integrated as we can, so that's on the agenda. And yeah, [Radium 00:02:13] is there, of course. Radium's still earning, yielding good. The thing that we do now with basic attention token tends to have to settle on Ethereum and it's going to cost you gas. And our valued settlement partners like Gemini, Uphold bitFlyer in Japan, but once we're on Solana, I suspect that BAT, which is already reflected through Wormhole, proxied through Wormhole, might just find it's better to settle on Solana. What do you think?Anatoly (02:41):Yeah, for sure. Absolutely.Brendan (02:44):I'm giving you the softballs here. And we really do want to get this out to all users. We think, whether you're having a hard time in some part of the world where it's hard to get banks to let you save or borrow, or you're beyond banks like a lot of us are or want to be, Solana is the way to do it. And I mentioned auto earn already, got ahead of myself, but I think this is going to be huge. It takes some skill, you got to make sure if you get on the wrong side of yield farming, you go somewhere where the grass is greener, but we'll make it as automatic and easy as possible. And it's just so much better on Solana. I'm making you blush. And yeah, the dapp ecosystem is growing, but if we do this Solana default on multi chain dapps, I think we'll just pull every dapps that's really popular over that Brave users want, and I hope that's going to be every dapp.Brendan (03:37):So here's more NFT marketplaces. There are lots of cool projects in crypto, so we're not doing only Solana, we have obviously Ethereum, we're going to do Bitcoin in the new wallet. It's coming up fast, it's in the Brave nightly builds. And we might do other chains, but I think it's important to pick a chain as default. This is a lesson we learned the hard way with search engines, because when you make a search engine the default, first of all, you can get paid if you get a deal, not always true. And really the user expects to just type keywords into the address bar and search. We want the wallet to have a fast, good default and that's Solana. So enough said. And we're bringing it to mobile too. This is important. I think a lot of fragmentation has occurred due to how wallets are split across mobile and desktop. We're seeing some good mobile first or mobile also wallets. We want to do it mobile and desktop feature parody, evolve at the same time. And we're happy to do that with Solana's partner.Brendan (04:42):So the last bit of news is the BAT system is a triangular system that involves privacy preserving ads. And users opt into it to get 70% of the gross revenue. What we've built so far has a part of our BAT ad system requiring us to verify things, to be the trust third party, which is a security hole. And so we started a project called Themus and worked with several crypto projects to see if we could bring it to high speed chains that can do things, like you need smart contract systems for zero knowledge proofs, you need some part of it in the browser because you're measuring attention. You don't want to put your detailed attention log on any blockchain, however fast, because it'll fingerprint you. So we're using black box accumulators in the browser with Themus and we're then minting ZK proofs. And the cool thing about Solana is we can just put those on-chain, no aggregator, no trusted third party. So we're getting rid of ourselves, we're firing ourselves as a trusted third party. And that's something we're excited about.Anatoly (05:40):And that's awesome. That was, feels like two years of research. It took quite a while to get to that design.Brendan (05:47):And now it's going fast. I think now we've got good working relations with Solana and we can crank out the Rust Co, because we love Rust. Because I was executive sponsor of Rust at Mozilla, so I have a tear in my eye to see my little babies all grown up. And Amazon's hired a bunch of the Rust core team. It's okay, they need jobs. But yeah, we want BAT to be fast, low fee, DeFi base pair and for ads on Solana. So Brave and Solana are doing the new crypto and ad system and it's going to be awesome. Thanks.Anatoly (06:24):That's awesome. I'm a huge fan of the web, huge fan of all the work that you guys have done and Brave. And I remember pre-mobile days, I was working on Brew and I was trying to optimized the web and flip phones. And there was a brief moment where the iPhone came out, we had a browser, and it felt like the web has opened up. And then it just got away from us.Brendan (06:49):That's right. Jobs said when he did the iPhone one, he said, "The web finally works on a phone." And then the story I heard from somebody who would is that they had to port a bunch of games which were C++ or whatever, and they had to do native apps. And they never looked back after that. But I think the web can always catch up and should catch up. And web 3.0, if you have this evolutionary path with dapps and dapp triggers from webpages, then you just evolve into it.Anatoly (07:19):Yeah, that to me is the really exciting part, is there's now an opportunity to have cryptography power the next generation, how web is monetized. Whether it's through advertisement, like with zero knowledge proofs or through direct payments and micro payments. Do you feel like Apple's going to crush us?Brendan (07:41):People a few years ago were worried about this Facebook thing, Libra and now DM. And they got crushed because some politicians hate them. But Apple is very cautious, and if they're doing anything with blockchains, it's a ways out. And then when they arrive in, it's going to be the diva at the party at midnight, like, "Start the party now," and the booze has already run out. So we're going to drink all the booze first.Anatoly (08:06):All right. I'm down for that. What are some of the challenges with building a browser for general consumers, but also with cryptography?Brendan (08:17):This is the problem with browsers is they are universal apps. You spend a lot of your digital life or online life in them. And so if you make the crypto stuff be this expert only area, or it's scary. I use wallet apps, I use ledger hardware wallets, but it's a little bit scary because you feel like, "Did I forget my pin in or did I have to reset it and do the word list?" And there's some anxiety and fear of loss. We want to make crypto be a positive sum, that's why the robo-earn is important to us. Just like with BAT private ads, you could get 70% of the revenue.Brendan (08:53):So you're always building up your assets as well as spending or sending them. And it should be slick, it should be for e-commerce. You can even do things like dis intermediate Amazon. I won't give away all my secrets, but we think we can do that without having a bunch of JavaScript user scripts attack every merchant checkout flow. We think there's a way to get into the interchange charge and do it. And crypto everywhere. It should be slick, should be easy, should be comfortable, make you feel like you're going to win, not lose.Anatoly (09:23):What about custody and keys? How do I get my parents to understand this stuff?Brendan (09:28):Yeah, it's really a little different, but we're looking at Taurus, we're looking at various ideas for backing up your keys that don't just put it on paper and word list in the safe, which we've all been through. And in some ways, the old web went with username and password and had to add a second factor, which often had to be a temporary access number generator on your phone. So at that point you're almost as complex as self custody. I would say you just have this more conventional recovery path. You lose your phone, you know your email, you can try to prove that you're the same person to Coinbase or whatever. But I think self custody has a complimentary role and we want both. We want people to use self custody and be comfortable with it, so we're looking at all these usability challenges. And we think we can get it just almost as good. And then unfortunately the regulators insist, if you want to do Fiat on/off, you're going to go through a custodian.Anatoly (10:20):Of course. The challenges, that's the exciting part. No one has figured this out yet and we're going to dive right in and see, how can we actually scale crypto to the general public?Brendan (10:31):Make it easy for your parents.Anatoly (10:32):Yeah. Yeah, would love to see it. What do you guys see as the tension between the app store on the mobile device and the mobile web?Brendan (10:42):Discoverability is always a problem. And we don't want these brutal curators like Apple. So having lots of stores is good, but then you have the need for a search engine, which Brave now has, which is a private engine and also involve users opting into building the index incrementally, that's the web discovery project. So we're going to aim, because we're very crypto first and our ad sales teams, one of who's here, always looks at crypto options and NFT options, we're going to aim at making our search engine best for crypto. It already uses [inaudible 00:11:14] charting, and it's still in beta, but we're working out all the kinks, so I think search, the good old search we remember from 2004 when Google was great needs to come back and it needs to be the way you find stuff in marketplaces and crypto exchanges.Anatoly (11:29):That's awesome. What kind of information do you think users would want out of a crypto first search engine or curated environment that's different from the traditional web?Brendan (11:39):Search almost gets into, is somebody trying to SEO you and compete for keywords? We're aware of this problem and there's no silver bullet. But we think with crypto, you might actually have a better chance at mechanizing this and having a fair playing field, an automated system for finding the lowest fees and the best yields.Anatoly (11:57):Is there hope for a decentralized search engine?Brendan (12:01):Yeah. So I had a friend who was involved with pre-research, Rich Scrantom, and pre-research looks like it's running a bunch of nodes [inaudible 00:12:07] Google, which Google does not like. And if they're running on [inaudible 00:12:10] IPs, Google's going to shut them down or use their anti-bot team to take them out. We're building a legitimate search engine, but we can't decentralize the algorithm easily because search is sharing queries, looking for some kind of objective best results like page rank, the eigenvalues of the random walk. And decentralizing that is a research problem as far as I know. But we have an active team, we're evolving search and we need your help because we're trying to crowdsource the incremental indexing of the web, we're not trying to index everything from 1998 on. Only Google can do that. Hats off to them, but their time is passing.Anatoly (12:49):When I was growing up as an engineer, the web was just starting, I was really passionate about Linux. And I had this dream of a Microsoft-free personal computer. It feels like the web 3.0 is potentially a dream of ad exchange free, that parasitic Google free web. Is that possible?Brendan (13:13):If you don't collect the data you won't go wrong that way. There's still other ways that central powers can turn on their users and take advantage of them. But I think there is, and that means ultimately you might need hardware that's indie or that's user first. And Brave's not capitalized to do this yet, but I know people, including friends from Firefox OS, which actually after it folded at Mozilla, continued in [inaudible 00:13:37] OS. And there's an open source lineage that you can trace back. And people at Qualcomm, we both know-Anatoly (13:42):Of course, yeah.Brendan (13:42):... We are working on it at the time. So I think there's a chance for a new open source OS that has web 3.0 and none of this Java or swift native stuff. And JavaScript, web 3.0 All the way down.Anatoly (13:55):Are we going to end up building a phone?Brendan (13:57):Brave OS. I don't know, I'd have to raise some more capital.Anatoly (14:03):Yeah. Yeah, that's a way to nerd snipe me for a couple years.Brendan (14:07):But people need independent hardware that serves their interest first. Absolutely.Anatoly (14:10):For sure. It always feels like that's a really tough challenge. But every two it gets easier and easier, hardware gets cheaper and cheaper and the tools get better and better.Brendan (14:19):And then Apple has something new and shiny that the commodity hardware can't match for another year or two, but that's just the nature of the game. So I'm sure we'll have iPhones, but we can probably have BAT phones too. Solana phones.Anatoly (14:33):The BAT phone. I love that. The BAT phone sounds really cool. As you guys see the web 3.0 evolving, I think from your presentation, NFTs were such a huge focus as well. Do you think this is the entry point for the Metaverse as people call it or that really interactive rich environment with ownership of the stuff around you?Brendan (14:56):Yeah. I think you have to keep running at these problems. And usually if you're a startup and the timing isn't right, or something goes wrong, you run out of capital and then the investors reset, or maybe they try again. With crypto, we have this great ability to just keep leveling up. So we're seeing Bitcoin, now we're seeing smart contracts on Ethereum, now we're seeing Solana. And as you level up, you can start to do some of these things that seemed hard before. Like you want some kind of cryptographic proof of ownership.Brendan (15:26):I think one of the demos talked about this. You want to make sure that somebody doesn't copy the pixels. And if you get into VR, there's been interesting research on this. And my friends at [inaudible 00:15:36] have done some work on this. You can actually watermark in a way that's indelible. And if somebody copies your art and tries to remove the watermark, they degrade the quality, because it's been convolved with the luminance and the chrominance. So I have hopes for this being useful in games and connected verses. And to me, that's the Metaverse, it's not going to be something centrally planned at Menlo park by Lieutenant commander data.Anatoly (16:02):I hope not. What I see out of the gaming companies that we talk to is that, especially the ones that are crypto focused, is the one to build browser first games. Everyone that I talked to had this idea that as soon as you open the page, you jump right into the game. There's no sign up, there's no friction, your wallet is your identity. And you're just exactly where you left off.Brendan (16:24):That took a lot of work at Mozilla, by the way. We did [inaudible 00:16:27] JS and that led to web assembly. And you could show games, in the story, you can start playing them and then you just convert. I think it's a great model.Anatoly (16:34):Do you feel like mobile is expressive enough for that? Or is the difference between iOS and Android and desktop is too hard to actually make that work?Brendan (16:45):There's certainly a difference. Even with the latest chip sets, you're just not as fast, you have less bandwidth all around. But games can scale down because the view port's smaller, there's hope that you can use the kind of tricks that we see with the remote rendering, cloud rendering. So I think mobile is the future, but I heard this 12 years ago, people would say around Silicon valley, mobile's the future. And then they would say, "That means there's no desktop." And that is very false. Everybody with a laptop or any big enough screen and a keyboard is still very high value. And that means the economics there don't go away, it just doesn't grow as fast.Anatoly (17:19):That's true. If you look at the growth of the Solana ecosystem, a lot of the users are basically dust up only.Brendan (17:27):Yep.Anatoly (17:27):That to me says that a lot of folks, maybe there was a switch during COVID where we went from being so much immobile to where we're staring at screens again.Brendan (17:36):A bit of that. You go to India and a lot of people are mobile only, but you need both. And I think as mobile gets stronger, you're just going to see more parody, you won't see this need for apps, which is often artificial. It's like holding the browser back, sandbagging Safari a little bit. This is what my friends at Google, or one of them who went to Microsoft, always accuse Apple of, and it's not wrong. You got to give the browser it's due and then it can compete with native better.Anatoly (18:00):Got to ask you about languages.Brendan (18:03):Okay, [inaudible 00:18:04].Anatoly (18:03):How do you see smart contract development in the future as somebody that had incredible depth and understanding how application development happens on the web?Brendan (18:12):Yeah, I think the thing you're seeing with type script, especially with large teams, is more information that you need some kind of proof system or it could be just a warning system, but it's based on model checking. Often it could be based on higher level models than you can express in sound type system, which is something where there's just this timeless world of types that's potentially syntactically checked and prevents bad things from happening at runtime. You need dynamic systems, dynamic code, JavaScript, and the static checkers.Brendan (18:44):And you get the best of both worlds if you have really good ones. So I remember at Mozilla, we were investing in model checkers for C++ because it's memory unsafe. And you could build these higher level checks that knew about security properties you wanted to enforce. And I think this is what you're seeing with smart contracts. I was talking to somebody I met at the hotel bar about this, because it's still a very fruitful area that's had good research in computer science, programming language theory. And it hasn't always been brought to the programming masses like it should. There were companies like [inaudible 00:19:17] Covarity and others like that. The compilers themselves grew the ability to do plugins for static analysis. And now [LOVM 00:19:26] is there.Anatoly (19:27):Do you think that smart contract development needs to have a high level, easy to use language environment? Or can it be driver code?Brendan (19:37):Yeah, exactly. Driver code in the era of C was the worst code in the kernel.Anatoly (19:42):Driver code with Rust is a little bit less frightening.Brendan (19:45):In fact, a friend of mine who was at Microsoft at the time went to Mozilla and has his own startup now, did it at Microsoft, a checker for driver's C code. Which he could skirt the halting problem and kind of statically reason about it and say, "This is garbage driver code, send it back to the vendor." But yeah, I think you don't want to have happy, fun, JavaScript looseness if there's big money at stake. So I think it's important to have the right tools with the right static and dynamic checking.Anatoly (20:13):Do you think smart contract development is strictly financial or are we going to see things that are not financial that you can actually [crosstalk 00:20:21]?Brendan (20:20):You'll see things that are not obviously financial, but they'll turn into reputation in a game or gifting and those tend to matter too. So you still don't want too many dynamic errors.Anatoly (20:32):That's true.Brendan (20:33):So I talked about this in my chapter in coders org, I'm still a fan of static, even if it's unsound semi-static checking.Anatoly (20:40):What do you guys see as like the opportunity for us to grow crypto to a hundred million users, actual signers?Brendan (20:49):Yeah, I'd to get Brave to that scale in a year or two. It depends on everybody here and others. It also, I hate to say it, depends on the nation states of the world not doing something adversarial. But I think given the state of the world, not a great state, but there will always be options to do things with crypto. The internet routes around censorship, and that's true in the web 2.0 And the web 3.0 world. And it's true with blockchains. You still have concerns you have to fork to undo the censorship, but at least you have options. DoAnatoly (21:26):What kind of applications do you envision will actually drive that growth?Brendan (21:30):I think at first it's going to be people using crypto for payments and for DeFi. And some leading edge of that user base will be getting more sophisticated in doing other things. But just having things like gift cards, where we often find that they're useless points, even if we can use them or Congress passed the law to don't expire, we still just don't use them. We should have much more liquidity. We should have liquidity across all kinds of assets. And this is where you start talking about tokenized securities, and can you have primary and secondary liquidity for companies? I think if you're as old me, you all had a tiny piece of some startup that went sideways for 10 years and then sold. And you couldn't trade it easily. And you might have wanted to do that because you might have been squeezed out when it sold. So there's lots of room for blockchains to solve these problems. I think in general, connecting people more directly getting rid of these officious or censorious intermediaries. A lot of room for application.Anatoly (22:29):In this new evolution of the web, I often describe crypto as a fully connected network, as opposed to a social graph, like on Facebook.Brendan (22:40):Yes.Anatoly (22:40):Do you think that's true? Do you think we're going to enter a stage where I am effectively with my cryptographic signatures, I'm in this true global peer to peer environment?Brendan (22:50):I hope so. I showed at web summit last week, I showed the slide with the correct diagram, which is more like a mesh for decentralized, and the incorrect one, which sometimes is called decentralized, which is really distributed, but it's mostly tree structured. Or if it's a graph, it has a dominating spanning tree. That's Google, that's Amazon. So with projects like Helium, with web RTC making it so you can make connections into the endpoints instead of only out. In the old days in the nineties, we could only make TCP connections out from the browser. I think we're heading toward this world. We have to build it iteratively and collaboratively, we have to get around the concrete firewall problems that web RTC mostly got around, it's still a little dodgy. And I think that is the future. I think we should all have Helium nodes if we can. I'm a fan of the project.Anatoly (23:38):That's awesome. The idea of decentralized browsing on an open source phone connected via an open network.Brendan (23:49):Low raw radio.Anatoly (23:50):Yeah, run by the people. Accessing Solana, that would blow my mind.Brendan (23:55):It sounds too good to be true, but I think it could be true, especially if we build it carefully and quickly enough and get it out there and make it usable, which is why I've always wanted to make Brave be about crypto. Even when we started using Bitcoin for our prototype, it was clear once you shield the user by blocking all those trackers, you break all the economics that pays advertising money into the publishers after taking a big slice out for the middlemen like Google. And if you cut that out, how are you going to reconnect it? It's crypto, peer to peer.Anatoly (24:26):All right, let's do it.Brendan (24:28):Awesome.Anatoly (24:28):I'm excited. So thank you, Brendan. Thank you so much for doing here, for working with us.Brendan (24:34):Thanks.

Sustain
Episode 99: Matt Mankins and giving Kudos to OSS maintainers

Sustain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 34:19


Guest Matt Mankins Panelists Richard Littauer | Ben Nichols Show Notes Hello and welcome to Sustain! The podcast where we talk about sustaining open source for the long haul. Today, we are very excited to have as our guest, Matt Mankins, joining us from Barcelona. He is a Fellow at Mozilla, currently working on advancing open monetization strategies for the web. He previously worked at the publisher Condé Nast, where he led global monetization engineering efforts for the company's iconic brands and was the CTO of FastCo magazine. He's also the Founder of numerous companies such as Lorem Ipsum Books, SMTP.com, Vert, and Fair Tread. On this episode, Matt fills us in on his journey as a Fellow at Mozilla and his ideas about alternative ways to fund the web, which led him to the idea of Kudos, that came out of thinking about payments. We learn what his main goal is right now with Kudos, the hardest problem he's facing as he develops Kudos, and what he's trying to accomplish before his Fellowship ends. Also, find out what Matt means when he said, “Kudos are about the creation, not the creator.” Go ahead and download this episode now to find out much more! [00:02:20] Matt fills us in on the history of the Lorem Ipsum Bookstore. [00:03:57] We learn what Matt is doing at Mozilla and he explains Interledger. [00:07:00] Matt describes what Kudos is and how it works, since that is the main thing he is working on now. [00:12:50] Matt explains how Kudos is in the philosophy stage right now and the implementation is up to the various people that implement this. [00:15:22] Flattr is brought up in conversation, and Matt explains something he did called “in-a-moon.” [00:17:27] Richard wonders how Matt sells this to companies and how does he get them involved in wanting to invest in Kudos, and Matt shares a goal he has right now. [00:20:02] Matt shares what he thinks is the hardest problem he's facing right now as he develops Kudos. [00:21:52] Ben wonders if Matt is looking for particular communities that might be interested in experimenting and Matt shares a dream of his with us. [00:24:09] We find out how Matt is working with the Mozilla communities and how he's about to be in the “build it phase” and the “promote it a little bit more phase.” He also tells us something he's hoping to do in the implementation phase with Facebook and Kudos. [00:30:44] Find out where you can follow Matt and his work online. Quotes [00:11:31] “In my mind, this is not just supporting Babel or Henry, but you're supporting all of the contributors that could number in the thousands or tens of thousands.” [00:22:21] “One of my dreams is that, as a creator, I can just go do my creation and money will show up in my bank account as I do good work to society.” Spotlight [00:31:11] Ben's spotlight is Open PHD Guiding. [00:31:56] Richard's spotlight is the Scottish Rail System. [00:32:43] Matt's spotlight is a GitHub project called libfood. Links SustainOSS (https://sustainoss.org/) SustainOSS Twitter (https://twitter.com/SustainOSS?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) SustainOSS Discourse (https://discourse.sustainoss.org/) Matt Mankins Twitter (https://twitter.com/mankins?lang=en) Matt Mankins Blog (https://matt.mankins.net/) Matt Mankins Linkedin (https://uk.linkedin.com/in/mankins) Babel (https://babeljs.io/) JWT (https://jwt.io/) Interledger Foundation (https://interledger.org/) In-a-Moon Overview by Matt Mankins (https://www.slideshare.net/mankins/inamoon-overview) Flattr (https://flattr.com/) The Hacker Milieu as Gift Culture (http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/homesteading/ar01s06.html) Open PHD Guiding (https://openphdguiding.org/) ScotRail (Scotland's Railway) (https://www.scotrail.co.uk/) libfood-GitHub (https://github.com/noahlevenson/libfood) Flossbank (https://flossbank.com/) The Digital Infrastructure Fund Podcast Hosted By Richard Littauer (https://dif.fireside.fm/) The Faithful-The King, The Pope, The Princess- Laemmle Theatres (https://www.laemmle.com/film/faithful) Sustain Podcast-Episode 96-Chad Whitacre and how Sentry is giving $150k to their OSS Dependencies (https://podcast.sustainoss.org/96) Credits Produced by [Richard Littauer] (https://www.burntfen.com/) (https://www.burntfen.com/) Edited by Paul M. Bahr at [Peachtree Sound] (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Show notes by DeAnn Bahr [Peachtree Sound] (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Special Guest: Matt Mankins.

Loop Matinal
Quinta-feira, 25/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 10:06


Patrocínio: Podcast Startup Life O seu podcast sobre negócios, tecnologia e inovação. Em cada episódio, os anfitriões, Layon Lopes e Cristiane Serra, receberam importantes players do mercado brasileiro para debater ideias, projetos e tudo o que cerca as mais novas soluções do ecossistema de tecnologia e inovação. Acesse: https://link.chtbl.com/startup-loop. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Spotify ganha hub de trilhas da Netflix: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/23/spotify-and-netflix-look-to-rival-apple-music-and-tv-with-new-hub-dedicated-to-hit-shows/ Netflix ganha Asphalt Extreme: https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/23/netflixs-gaming-service-adds-two-more-titles-including-the-return-of-gamelofts-asphalt-xtreme/ Epic Games compra a Harmonix: http://www.harmonixmusic.com/blog/harmonix-is-joining-the-epic-games-family Rappi é multado no RJ: https://prefeitura.rio/noticias/aplicativo-rappi-e-multado-em-mais-de-13-milhao-por-cobrancas-indevidas-de-taxas/ MercadoLivre terá negociação de criptomoedas: https://tecnoblog.net/534481/mercado-livre-anuncia-negociacao-de-bitcoin-e-outras-criptomoedas-no-brasil/ Tencent terá que aprovar updates com o governo chinês: 
https://www.reuters.com/technology/tencent-says-its-apps-remain-functional-available-download-2021-11-24/ Russia exige presença local de empresas americanas: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/23/russia-demands-apple-and-other-tech-companies-open-local-offices-in-the-country/ Mozilla encerrará suporte ao Firefox Lockwise em dezembro: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/end-of-support-firefox-lockwise Reddit vai desativar o Dubsmash: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22796234/reddit-dubsmash-video-creation-tools?scrolla=5eb6d68b7fedc32c19ef33b4 Twitter elimina atualização automática do feed no iOS: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/24/22800151/twitter-disappearing-tweets-ios-app-update-fix WhatsApp Web ganha criação de stickers: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/24/whatsapp-adds-built-in-sticker-maker-on-the-web-may-expand-time-limit-to-delete-an-older-message/ 600 funcionários do Google reclamam de obrigatoriedade de vacina: 
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/23/google-employees-sign-manifesto-against-widened-vaccine-mandate.html Samsung confirma nova fábrica no Texas: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22245325/samsung-building-chipmaking-fab-texas-taylor?scrolla=5eb6d68b7fedc32c19ef33b4 França considerou usar Pegasus, mas desistiu: https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/11/23/1040509/france-macron-nso-in-crisis-sanctions/ Apple processa a NSO: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/23/apple-sues-pegasus-spyware-creator-nso-group-for-attacking-ios-users/ Apple avisará clientes que foram alvo de ataques de governos: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/24/targeted-by-nso-apple-alerts/ Apple desiste de vender na Turquia: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/23/apple-suspende-vendas-na-turquia-por-desvalorizacao-da-lira/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

The History of Computing
An Abridged History of Free And Open Source Software

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:34


In the previous episodes, we looked at the rise of patents and software and their impact on the nascent computer industry. But a copyright is a right. And that right can be given to others in whole or in part. We have all benefited from software where the right to copy was waved and it's shaped the computing industry as much, if not more, than proprietary software. The term Free and Open Source Software (FOSS for short) is a blanket term to describe software that's free and/or whose source code is distributed for varying degrees of tinkeration. It's a movement and a choice. Programmers can commercialize our software. But we can also distribute it free of copy protections. And there are about as many licenses as there are opinions about what is unique, types of software, underlying components, etc. But given that many choose to commercialize their work products, how did a movement arise that specifically didn't? The early computers were custom-built to perform various tasks. Then computers and software were bought as a bundle and organizations could edit the source code. But as operating systems and languages evolved and businesses wanted their own custom logic, a cottage industry for software started to emerge. We see this in every industry - as an innovation becomes more mainstream, the expectations and needs of customers progress at an accelerated rate. That evolution took about 20 years to happen following World War II and by 1969, the software industry had evolved to the point that IBM faced antitrust charges for bundling software with hardware. And after that, the world of software would never be the same. The knock-on effect was that in the 1970s, Bell Labs pushed away from MULTICS and developed Unix, which AT&T then gave away as compiled code to researchers. And so proprietary software was a growing industry, which AT&T began charging for commercial licenses as the bushy hair and sideburns of the 70s were traded for the yuppy culture of the 80s. In the meantime, software had become copyrightable due to the findings of CONTU and the codifying of the Copyright Act of 1976. Bill Gates sent his infamous “Open Letter to Hobbyists” in 1976 as well, defending the right to charge for software in an exploding hobbyist market. And then Apple v Franklin led to the ability to copyright compiled code in 1983. There was a growing divide between those who'd been accustomed to being able to copy software freely and edit source code and those who in an up-market sense just needed supported software that worked - and were willing to pay for it, seeing the benefits that automation was having on the capabilities to scale an organization. And yet there were plenty who considered copyright software immoral. One of the best remembered is Richard Stallman, or RMS for short. Steven Levy described Stallman as “The Last of the True Hackers” in his epic book “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution.” In the book, he describes the MIT Stallman joined where there weren't passwords and we didn't yet pay for software and then goes through the emergence of the LISP language and the divide that formed between Richard Greenblatt, who wanted to keep The Hacker Ethic alive and those who wanted to commercialize LISP. The Hacker Ethic was born from the young MIT students who freely shared information and ideas with one another and help push forward computing in an era they thought was purer in a way, as though it hadn't yet been commercialized. The schism saw the death of the hacker culture and two projects came out of Stallman's technical work: emacs, which is a text editor that is still included freely in most modern Unix variants and the GNU project. Here's the thing, MIT was sitting on patents for things like core memory and thrived in part due to the commercialization or weaponization of the technology they were producing. The industry was maturing and since the days when kings granted patents, maturing technology would be commercialized using that system. And so Stallman's nostalgia gave us the GNU project, born from an idea that the industry moved faster in the days when information was freely shared and that knowledge was meant to be set free. For example, he wanted the source code for a printer driver so he could fix it and was told it was protected by an NDAQ and so couldn't have it. A couple of years later he announced GNU, a recursive acronym for GNU's Not Unix. The next year he built a compiler called GCC and the next year released the GNU Manifesto, launching the Free Software Foundation, often considered the charter of the free and open source software movement. Over the next few years as he worked on GNU, he found emacs had a license, GCC had a license, and the rising tide of free software was all distributed with unique licenses. And so the GNU General Public License was born in 1989 - allowing organizations and individuals to copy, distribute, and modify software covered under the license but with a small change, that if someone modified the source, they had to release that with any binaries they distributed as well. The University of California, Berkley had benefited from a lot of research grants over the years and many of their works could be put into the public domain. They had brought Unix in from Bell Labs in the 70s and Sun cofounder and Java author Bill Joy worked under professor Fabry, who brought Unix in. After working on a Pascal compiler that Unix coauthor Ken Thompson left for Berkeley, Joy and others started working on what would become BSD, not exactly a clone of Unix but with interchangeable parts. They bolted on the OSI model to get networking and through the 80s as Joy left for Sun and DEC got ahold of that source code there were variants and derivatives like FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin, and others. The licensing was pretty permissive and simple to understand: Copyright (c) . All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by the . The name of the may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. By 1990 the Board of Regents at Berkley accepted a four clause BSD license that spawned a class of licenses. While it's matured into other formats like a 0 clause license it's one of my favorites as it is truest to the FOSS cause. And the 90s gave us the Apache License, from the Apache Group, loosely based on the BSD License and then in 2004 leaning away from that with the release of the Apache License 2 that was more compatible with the GPL license. Given the modding nature of Apache they didn't require derivative works to also be open sourced but did require leaving the license in place for unmodified parts of the original work. GNU never really caught on as an OS in the mainstream, although a collection of tools did. The main reason the OS didn't go far is probably because Linus Torvalds started releasing prototypes of his Linux operating system in 1991. Torvalds used The GNU General Public License v2, or GPLv2 to license his kernel, having been inspired by a talk given by Stallman. GPL 2 had been released in 1991 and something else was happening as we turned into the 1990s: the Internet. Suddenly the software projects being worked on weren't just distributed on paper tape or floppy disks; they could be downloaded. The rise of Linux and Apache coincided and so many a web server and site ran that LAMP stack with MySQL and PHP added in there. All open source in varying flavors of what open source was at the time. And collaboration in the industry was at an all-time high. We got the rise of teams of developers who would edit and contribute to projects. One of these was a tool for another aspect of the Internet, email. It was called popclient, Here Eric S Raymond, or ESR for short, picked it up and renamed it to fetchmail, releasing it as an open source project. Raymond presented on his work at the Linux Congress in 1997, expanded that work into an essay and then the essay into “The Cathedral and the Bazaar” where bazaar is meant to be like an open market. That inspired many to open source their own works, including the Netscape team, which resulted in Mozilla and so Firefox - and another book called “Freeing the Source: The Story of Mozilla” from O'Reilly. By then, Tim O'Reilly was a huge proponent of this free or source code available type of software as it was known. And companies like VA Linux were growing fast. And many wanted to congeal around some common themes. So in 1998, Christine Peterson came up with the term “open source” in a meeting with Raymond, Todd Anderson, Larry Augustin, Sam Ockman, and Jon “Maddog” Hall, author of the first book I read on Linux. Free software it may or may not be but open source as a term quickly proliferated throughout the lands. By 1998 there was this funny little company called Tivo that was doing a public beta of a little box with a Linux kernel running on it that bootstrapped a pretty GUI to record TV shows on a hard drive on the box and play them back. You remember when we had to wait for a TV show, right? Or back when some super-fancy VCRs could record a show at a specific time to VHS (but mostly failed for one reason or another)? Well, Tivo meant to fix that. We did an episode on them a couple of years ago but we skipped the term Tivoization and the impact they had on GPL. As the 90s came to a close, VA Linux and Red Hat went through great IPOs, bringing about an era where open source could mean big business. And true to the cause, they shared enough stock with Linus Torvalds to make him a millionaire as well. And IBM pumped a billion dollars into open source, with Sun moving to open source openoffice.org. Now, what really happened there might be that by then Microsoft had become too big for anyone to effectively compete with and so they all tried to pivot around to find a niche, but it still benefited the world and open source in general. By Y2K there was a rapidly growing number of vendors out there putting Linux kernels onto embedded devices. TiVo happened to be one of the most visible. Some in the Linux community felt like they were being taken advantage of because suddenly you had a vendor making changes to the kernel but their changes only worked on their hardware and they blocked users from modifying the software. So The Free Software Foundation updated GPL, bundling in some other minor changes and we got the GNU General Public License (Version 3) in 2006. There was a lot more in GPL 3, given that so many organizations were involved in open source software by then. Here, the full license text and original copyright notice had to be included along with a statement of significant changes and making source code available with binaries. And commercial Unix variants struggled with SGI going bankrupt in 2006 and use of AIX and HP-UX Many of these open source projects flourished because of version control systems and the web. SourceForge was created by VA Software in 1999 and is a free service that can be used to host open source projects. Concurrent Versions System, or CVS had been written by Dick Grune back in 1986 and quickly became a popular way to have multiple developers work on projects, merging diffs of code repositories. That gave way to git in the hearts of many a programmer after Linus Torvalds wrote a new versioning system called git in 2005. GitHub came along in 2008 and was bought by Microsoft in 2018 for 2018. Seeing a need for people to ask questions about coding, Stack Overflow was created by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky in 2008. Now, we could trade projects on one of the versioning tools, get help with projects or find smaller snippets of sample code on Stack Overflow, or even Google random things (and often find answers on Stack Overflow). And so social coding became a large part of many a programmers day. As did dependency management, given how many tools are used to compile a modern web app or app. I often wonder how much of the code in many of our favorite tools is actually original. Another thought is that in an industry dominated by white males, it's no surprise that we often gloss over previous contributions. It was actually Grace Hopper's A-2 compiler that was the first software that was released freely with source for all the world to adapt. Sure, you needed a UNIVAC to run it, and so it might fall into the mainframe era and with the emergence of minicomputers we got Digital Equipment's DECUS for sharing software, leading in part to the PDP-inspired need for source that Stallman was so adamant about. General Motors developed SHARE Operating System for the IBM 701 and made it available through the IBM user group called SHARE. The ARPAnet was free if you could get to it. TeX from Donald Knuth was free. The BASIC distribution from Dartmouth was academic and yet Microsoft sold it for up to $100,000 a license (see Commodore ). So it's no surprise that people avoided paying upstarts like Microsoft for their software or that it took until the late 70s to get copyright legislation and common law. But Hopper's contributions were kinda' like open source v1, the work from RMS to Linux was kinda' like open source v2, and once the term was coined and we got the rise of a name and more social coding platforms from SourceForge to git, we moved into a third version of the FOSS movement. Today, some tools are free, some are open source, some are free as in beer (as you find in many a gist), some are proprietary. All are valid. Today there are also about as many licenses as there are programmers putting software out there. And here's the thing, they're all valid. You see, every creator has the right to restrict the ability to copy their software. After all, it's their intellectual property. Anyone who chooses to charge for their software is well within their rights. Anyone choosing to eschew commercialization also has that right. And every derivative in between. I wouldn't judge anyone based on any model those choose. Just as those who distribute proprietary software shouldn't be judged for retaining their rights to do so. Why not just post things we want to make free? Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all a part of intellectual property - but as developers of tools we also need to limit our liability as we're probably not out there buying large errors and omissions insurance policies for every script or project we make freely available. Also, we might want to limit the abuse of our marks. For example, Linus Torvalds monitors the use of the Linux mark through the Linux Mark Institute. Apparently some William Dell Croce Jr tried to register the Linux trademark in 1995 and Torvalds had to sue to get it back. He provides use of the mark using a free and perpetual global sublicense. Given that his wife won the Finnish karate championship six times I wouldn't be messing with his trademarks. Thank you to all the creators out there. Thank you for your contributions. And thank you for tuning in to this episode of the History of Computing Podcast. Have a great day.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
The Cyber Christmas Shopping Guide. Which Gifts Are Naughty & Which Are Nice? Zack Hack, WCYB Radio.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:44


That robot vacuum seems like a helpful gift for your loved one, but is it watching you? Not to worry - we know that the holidays have arrived and Zack Hack is here with his cyber-related gift guide to help with your shopping, as well as some non-cyber gifts that everyone will love under the tree - even a gift for your dog! Happy Holidays and happy listening! To read the article from Mozilla, visit https://foundation.mozilla.org/en/blog/46-gadgets-slapped-with-privacy-not-included-warning-labels-in-mozillas-annual-holiday-shopping-guide/ • For more on cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com

In The Growth Space
Ep. 63 Debbie Cohen And Kate Roeske-Zummer - Practical Techniques To Achieve A Happy Work Culture At Your Organization

In The Growth Space

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:44


In today's episode, we have two guests. Kate Roeske Zummer, the co-founder of HumanityWorks, is a master coach and former faculty of the Co-Active Training Institute (CTI). She has developed leaders at organizations such as Mozilla, Pinterest, Adobe, DaVita, CBS Interactive, United Way of America, Intuit, Clever, Charge, and Articulate. She has a master's degree from Cambridge University, England. Kate is co-author of Humanity Works Better. Debbie Cohen, the co-founder of HumanityWorks, has held executive leadership roles in HR at Time Warner, Razorfish, Mozilla, and First Look LLC. Harvard Business Publishing released her case study, People Operations at Mozilla Corporation: Scaling a Peer-to-Peer Global Community, which received the 2013 Berkeley-Haas Case Award for the most important contribution to management education. Debbie is co-author of Humanity Works Better.   Join our host DAVID with our Guest KATE and DEBBIE as they discuss workplace culture, productivity, and leadership qualities.   Check out https://www.davidmcglennen.com/podcast for links, transcript, and more details  

AdExchanger
Searching For Privacy Online With Mozilla's CMO, Lindsey Shepard

AdExchanger

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:33


Online advertising and privacy aren't mutually exclusive – as long as the former is transparent and permission-based and the latter isn't completely ignored, says Mozilla's CMO, Lindsey “Shep” Shepard, on this week's episode.

The Shared Security Show
FBI Email System Compromised, Ransomware Negotiation, Privacy Crushing Gifts

The Shared Security Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:15


In milestone episode 200: The Federal Bureau of Investigation's external email system was compromised sending spam emails with a fake warning of a cyber-attack, new research released about ransomware negotiation and some helpful negotiation tips, and details on Mozilla's naughty list of privacy-crushing gifts. ** Links mentioned on the show ** FBI email system compromised […] The post FBI Email System Compromised, Ransomware Negotiation, Privacy Crushing Gifts appeared first on The Shared Security Show.

WSOU: Leadership with Darrell W. Gunter
Oliver Roup, former Founder and CEO, Viglink (acquired by Sovrn)

WSOU: Leadership with Darrell W. Gunter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:24


Invented and delivered a set of "supply-side" tools enabling mainstream web publishers to participate in commerce revenue for the first time. VigLink was the first company to apply display advertising techniques including realtime bidding and historical purchase behavior to in-content commerce links. At sale, VigLink was breakeven, delivered $1B in annual GMV spend, $50M in commissions, and $10M in net revenue. Established demand-side partnerships with 75,000 advertisers including Amazon, Walmart, eBay, Nike and many others. Targetted the needs of the publisher side half of the commerce relationship. Used that strategy to build a proprietary network of 2 million publishers including partnerships with Yahoo, Microsoft, Mozilla, Opera, Meredith and Vertical Scope. Elected board member of the Performance Marketing Association. Speaker at Advertising Week, Affiliate Summit and others. Personally led the product function of the business balancing the needs of advertisers and publishers (and by extension consumers) as well as regulators including navigating the launch of European GDPR regulations. Personally recruited and hired more than 100 candidates across every startup discipline. Acquired competitors: Driving Revenue, LinkSmart and Prosperent. Raised venture capital: First Round Capital (Josh Kopelman), Google Ventures (Rich Miner), Emergence Capital (Kevin Spain), RRE (Will Porteous) and others including Reid Hoffman and Deep Nishar investing personally.

ByteTrax
ByteTrax ▴ Tecnología y Música: Microsoft • Apple • Firefox Relay

ByteTrax

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 28:02


En la nueva emisión de ByteTrax:• Microsoft aumentará el ritmo de actualización de Windows.• Apple anunció un programa de reparación de autoservicio.• Mozilla lanzó una versión de pago de su servicio Firefox Relay. En la música:“Scooby Snacks” de The Fun Lovin' Criminals.“Feel You Now”– Alessia Cara.“The Only Heartbreaker” – Mitski. [...] El cargo ByteTrax ▴ Tecnología y Música: Microsoft • Apple • Firefox Relay apareció primero en Defrag.mx.

Loop Matinal
Sexta-feira, 19/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:32


Patrocínio: Alura Cursos Online de Tecnologia Aguarde! Na semana que vem, a Alura oferecerá o maior desconto até hoje para os ouvintes do Loop Matinal. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Spotify libera letras de música no mundo inteiro: https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/18/spotify-finally-rolls-out-real-time-lyrics-to-global-users/ Tidal anuncia plano gratuito: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/17/tidal-anuncia-novos-planos-de-streaming-incluindo-um-gratuito/ Ed Sheeran fará show no Pokémon Go: 
https://pokemongolive.com/post/ed-sheeran-collab/?hl=en Update do controle do Xbox reduz latência: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/18/22788956/xbox-november-update-controller-firmware-dli-features Xbox começa a ganhar o Cloud Gaming: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/17/22787396/xbox-cloud-gaming-consoles-series-x-s-one PS5 fica mais caro no Brasil: https://tecnoblog.net/532994/ps5-sofre-aumento-de-preco-do-nada-e-fica-r-100-mais-caro-no-brasil/ Nvidia anuncia resultados financeiros: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/nvidia-q-3-earnings-2022-203256956.html Mozilla lança serviço de privacidade: https://blog.mozilla.org/en/mozilla/firefox-relay-and-premium-service/ Chrome 96 tem bug em redes sociais: 
https://tecnoblog.net/533017/google-chrome-96-quebra-elementos-do-instagram-e-twitter-na-web/ Google libera o Chrome 96: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/17/chrome-96-chega-com-novo-sistema-de-cache-e-outras-melhorias/ Motorola anuncia o Moto G200: https://tecnoblog.net/533062/moto-g200-e-anunciado-com-camera-tripla-de-108-mp-e-tela-de-144-hz/ Motorola anuncia o Moto G Power: https://tecnoblog.net/532710/moto-g-power-2022-e-oficial-com-bateria-que-promete-durar-tres-dias/ Motorola anuncia outros quatro telefones: 
https://tecnoblog.net/533081/moto-g71-5g-g51-e-mais-confira-a-avalanche-de-novos-celulares-da-motorola/ Instagram Threads será descontinuado: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/17/instagram-discontinuing-its-threads-direct-messaging-app-next-month/ Instagram agora deixa apagar fotos de carrossel: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/17/instagram-agora-permite-apagar-fotos-de-carrosseis-ja-publicados/ TikTok publica pesquisa sobre segurança: 
https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/17/tiktok-updates-safety-center-resources-following-internal-research-on-harmful-challenges/ Apple libera o iOS 15.1.1: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/17/22787756/iphone-ios-update-15-1-1-call-dropping-issue?scrolla=5eb6d68b7fedc32c19ef33b4 -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

Afternoon T
Mike Potter of Rewind

Afternoon T

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 41:00


Mike Potter is the co-founder and CEO of Rewind, a leading cloud data backup provider trusted by over 30,000 businesses to protect their data on platforms such as BigCommerce, Shopify and QuickBooks. A veteran entrepreneur,  Mike has over 25 years of experience building solutions for the software, cloud and data analytics space, including tenures at Adobe and Mozilla. He earned his MBA from the University of Ottawa and his B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering from McMaster University. Mike currently resides in Ottawa, Canada. 

Daily Tech Headlines
Apple Announces Self Service Repair Program – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Apple announces a Self Service Repair program to sell repair parts directly to consumers, Meta shows off a haptic glove prototype to help you feel VR, and Mozilla launches a paid tier of its Firefox Relay service. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a monthContinue reading "Apple Announces Self Service Repair Program – DTH"

Apptivate
Lessons from the Loss of Third-Party Cookies on the Web - Sarah Polli (Hearts & Science)

Apptivate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 34:08


Sarah Polli is the Senior Director of Marketing Technology at Hearts & Science, a global marketing agency. Sarah began her career in digital media 10 years ago at the Washington Post.Questions Sarah Answered in this Episode:What's it been like to experience the growth at Heart & Science over the last 5-6 years firsthand and what would you attribute it to?What got you into marketing technology and what do you still find interesting about it?Tell us what's going on with Chrome.When these changes happened with Safari and Mozilla around 2018, did marketers shift their spend to Chrome or have you seen marketers actively working towards solutions since 2018 to present?Was it possible to measure the impact of those campaigns? Or were you using proxies to measure the effectiveness of your campaigns?How do you guide your partners through what's going to happen? What are smart marketers doing today?What does it mean to be open and agile to you?Timestamp:7:08 Sarah's background9:36 The growth of Hearts & Science11:30 What keeps MarTech interesting13:09 Changes with Google Chrome15:30 The loss of third-party cookies since 201818:55 First-party data: the new gold19:58 How Hearts & Science is preparing its partners28:11 On being open and agileQuotes:(14:30-14:53) “[Google] Chrome is actively building these APIs and we should start to see them being released toward the end of next year. So really 2023 for advertisers will be the big year of understanding these APIs--what do they look like, what are the ones for targeting, what is for retargeting, what is for measurement, and testing to see what they look like against what it is we have today, and determining how we want to proceed in the future.”(16:46-17:14) “The CPMs for Safari drastically went down. So smart advertisers, and we did this with our clients, you could take what was happening in Chrome, understand your audiences and use that to then go and target Safari by similar audiences, take advantage of that CPM decrease and still reach these users instead of just completely ignoring those people. Similar to what's happening today with iOS apps and Android.”(19:16-19:24) “It's really important for brands to focus on the data they collect on their site and on their apps because that is the new gold.”Mentioned in this Episode:Sarah Polli's LinkedInHearts & ScienceAgents of Change Blog 

Digital Planet
Distress of TikTok fake school accounts

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:25


TikTok School challenge It's November so school children in the US are being encouraged to “Kiss your friend's girlfriend at school”. In September the TikTok school challenge suggested they “Vandalize the restroom”. These are just two of the examples that schools in the US have been dealing with following a call on TikTok to pupils. Now in the UK teachers are facing an onslaught of online abuse via TikTok too. Headteacher Sarah Raffray, who is also the Chair of the Society of Heads in the UK, is live on the show. The fake account created at her school has been removed by TikTok as have hundreds of others, but is the social media platform doing enough to control this libellous behaviour? Disinformation campaign in Kenya The Pandora papers revealed that Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta and his family have offshore accounts containing $30m. Following the release of this information a collaborative disinformation campaign manipulating Twitter's algorithms was launched attempting to exonerate the President. Odanga Madung is a Mozilla fellow and is on the programme to discuss a report he's co-authored “How to Manipulate Twitter and Influence People: Propaganda and the Pandora Papers in Kenya”. So far 400 accounts have been deleted, but with elections next year this campaign could already be influencing the outcome. AI (lack of) diversity in the workforce Research from the Digital Planet team at Tuft's University has examined the world's top AI hubs and ranked them in terms of diversity. Bhaskar Chakravorti, who led the team behind the work, tells us that San Francisco has the lowest proportion of black AI talent in the US. When it comes to the proportion of women in the field, AI is much less diverse than the industry overall. 17 percent of the AI talent pool in the 50 hotspots in the world is female as compared to 27 percent in STEM overall. Tel Aviv comes out on top globally for employing women in AI. We discuss how this imbalance is impacting AI development. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington. Studio Manager: John Boland Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: TikTok logo displayed on a smart phone. Credit: Illustration by Nikolas Joao Kokovlis/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Dos nuevas viejas ideas

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 15:06


¿Prefieres un avión con motor de amoniaco o aluminio? / SSD de 26 GBps / 64 GB de RAM en móviles / Niantic presenta SDK AR / IMAX Enhanced en Disney+ / Firefox en la Windows Store / Timadores declaran muerto al fundador de Instagram Patrocinador: Pásate a TotalEnergies https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares y reduce tu factura de la luz y del gas. En su web https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares podrás ver directamente cuánto podrás ahorrar. Tienen un servicio de atención al cliente gratuito y con personas que te entienden. Si te apuntas estos días te ahorrarás un 10% extra en el precio de tu factura https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares. ¿Prefieres un avión con motor de amoniaco o aluminio? / SSD de 26 GBps / 64 GB de RAM en móviles / Niantic presenta SDK AR / IMAX Enhanced en Disney+ / Firefox en la Windows Store / Timadores declaran muerto al fundador de Instagram ⚛️ Dos nuevas-viejas ideas para hacer los vuelos más ecológicos. Un modelo interesante de almacenamiento de energía para aviones de largo recorrido propuesto por Reaction Engines que usaría tanques de amoniaco que es convertido a una mezcla de amoniaco e hidrógeno usando el calor de los propios motores https://newatlas.com/aircraft/reaction-engines-ammonia-aviation/.

Linux User Space
Episode 2:10: Watch_OUT!

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 84:24


0:00 Cold Open 1:34 Banter: IP Bloggin 12:04 Topic: Ubuntu's Flutter Installer 17:59 Topic: Fedora 35 21:15 Topic: Linux Kernel 5.15 24:51 Topic: Edge Watch! 29:48 Topic: TOK 32:43 Topic: Mozilla Watch! 54:47 Topic: Brave Watch! 1:02:35 Topic: Trojan Source 1:08:54 Housekeeping 1:14:04 App Focus: Fragments 1:19:29 Next Time 1:22:57 Stinger Coming up in this episode 1. Some ip peeking 2. Installing with Flutter 3. Edge Watch 4. Mozilla Watch 5. Brave Watch 6. And fragmented downloads Banter - Leo is working on a blog (https://leochavez.org) post about some basic ip commands. ip -c a ip -br -c a ip -br -c l ip -br -c n ip -c r resolvectl dns Ubuntu Flutter Installer It is in the daily test isos (https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/new-desktop-installer-preview-build/24765) Look for the Canary builds. Fedora 35 Release Party! (https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-fedora-35/) What's new (https://fedoramagazine.org/whats-new-fedora-35-workstation/) November 12–13 is the release party - registration required (https://hopin.com/events/fedora-linux-35-release-party/registration) Linux Kernel 5.15 released (https://9to5linux.com/linux-kernel-5-15-released-with-new-ntfs-file-system-in-kernel-smb-server-and-more) Edge Watch Microsoft Edge Now Stable on Linux (https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/edge#linux) Official announcement in there somewhere (https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2021/11/02/edge-ignite-nov-2021/) TOK, a KDE-Telegram Client Niccolò Ve's recent video (https://tube.kockatoo.org/w/kmsaS5tJTaB5AZNRujdRAd) TOK (https://invent.kde.org/network/tok) Mozilla Watch Firefox turns 94 (https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/94.0/releasenotes/) With EGL in tow (https://mastransky.wordpress.com/2021/10/30/firefox-94-comes-with-egl-on-x11/) more on EGL (https://mozillagfx.wordpress.com/2021/10/30/switching-the-linux-graphics-stack-from-glx-to-egl/) And Side Channel Attack Prevention (https://hacks.mozilla.org/2021/05/introducing-firefox-new-site-isolation-security-architecture/) configure which tabs are unloaded manually in about:unload (https://support.mozilla.org/kb/unload-inactive-tabs-save-system-memory-firefox) Mozilla kills malicious addons used by 455k Firefox users (https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/mozilla-blocks-malicious-add-ons-installed-by-455k-firefox-users/) Plasma Browser Integration Unavailable because of MFA Requirement (https://blog.broulik.de/2021/10/psa-plasma-browser-integration-currently-unavailable/) The delayed commit (https://invent.kde.org/plasma/plasma-browser-integration/-/commit/7f3bc46f90440dd6baccb3e2b9b29212338d2b00) More useful mobile Home page (https://blog.mozilla.org/en/mozilla/news/firefox-brings-you-a-new-homepage/) Brave Watch Brave Ditches Google, Qwant and DuckDuckGo by Default (https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/software/brave-ditches-google-for-its-own-privacy-centric-search-engine/) Unicode's Bidi Algorithm Breaks All Code Forever (https://www.trojansource.codes/) Rust is the first to patch (that Leo found) (https://blog.rust-lang.org/2021/11/01/cve-2021-42574.html) Housekeeping Ubuntu Security Podcast (https://ubuntusecuritypodcast.org) Reddit subreddit - https://reddit.com/r/LinuxUserSpace/ Email us - contact@linuxuserspace.show Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) Our Matrix room (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) Support us at Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace) Join us on Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace) Watch us on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) Or Watch us on Odysee (https://linuxuserspace.show/odysee) Check out our website https://linuxuserspace.show App Focus Gnome Fragments Gnome Fragments (https://gitlab.gnome.org/World/Fragments) Next Time We wrap up our thoughts on Zorin OS Zorin OS (https://zorin.com/os/) Join us in two weeks when we return to the Linux User Space Stay tuned on Twitter, Telegram, Matrix, Discord whatever. Give us your suggestions on our new subreddit r/LinuxUserSpace Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Contributor Nicholas CubicleNate LiNuXsys666 Jill and Steve WalrusZ sleepyeyesvince Co-Producer Donnie Johnny Producer Bruno John

Reading Envy
Reading Envy 232: Barkskins Readalong

Reading Envy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


I am joined by Nadine, Vinny, Laurie, and Bryn to discuss Barkskins by Annie Proulx. We bring in some of the discussion in Goodreads as well as some fresh eyes on this text.Download or listen via this link: Reading Envy 232: Barkskins Readalong Subscribe to the podcast via this link: FeedburnerOr subscribe via Apple Podcasts by clicking: SubscribeOr listen through TuneIn Or listen on Google Play Or listen via StitcherOr listen through Spotify Or listen through Google Podcasts Books discussed: Barkskins by Annie ProulxOther mentions:Love Medicine series by Louise ErdrichSarum by Edward RutherfurdLondon by Edward RutherfurdThe Overstory by Richard PowersBraiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall KimmererFirst Americans MuseumThirty Nine RestaurantMeridian by Alice WalkerSooner or Later Everything Falls into the Sea by Sarah PinskerThe Actual Star by Monica ByrneGreat Circle by Maggie ShipsteadThe Slynx by Tatyana Tolstaya, translated by Jamey GambrellRelated episodes: Episode 090 - Reading Envy Readalong: East of EdenEpisode 099 - Readalong: The Secret HistoryEpisode 118 - Reading Envy Readalong: To the Bright Edge of the World Episode 137 - Reading Envy Readalong: The Golden NotebookEpisode 157 - Joint Readalong of Gone with the Wind with Book CougarsEpisode 185 - The Loyal Swineherd (Odyssey readalong)Episode 193 - And I Feel Fine (Ducks, Newburyport READALONG)Episode 221 - Joint Poetry Readalong with the Book CougarsBook Cougars - Joint Readalong of Sapphira and the Slave GirlBook Cougars - Joint Readalong of Braiding SweetgrassBooks on the Go - Ep. 121 - American Sunrise with Jenny Colvin  Stalk us online:Jenny at GoodreadsJenny on TwitterJenny is @readingenvy on Instagram and Litsy Reading Envy Readers in GoodreadsAll links to books are through Bookshop.org, where I am an affiliate. I wanted more money to go to the actual publishers and authors. I link to Amazon when a book is not listed with Bookshop.

Interpreting India
The Encryption Debate with Matthew D. Green

Interpreting India

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 47:14


In this episode, Matthew D. Green joins Udbhav Tiwari to delve into the debate surrounding end-to-end encryption. In February, the Indian government issued new rules requiring companies like WhatsApp to implement traceability in their end-to-end encrypted communications platforms. The decision originated from the government's concerns about the proliferation of illegal activities on these services, including terrorism, child-abuse, and the spread of fake news. India's actions come amidst a growing global debate concerning government access to encrypted data. While advocates claim that state access to end-to-end encrypted messages benefits national security, opponents argue that it constitutes a dangerous breach of privacy, while worsening cybersecurity standards.  Is it possible to apply traceability without impacting the core benefits of end-to-end encryption? Could India's adoption of this requirement hamper the cybersecurity of the country? And finally, how will the growing concerns about this system impact the future of encryption technology?  Matthew Green is an associate professor of computer science at Johns Hopkins University. He is a nationally recognized expert on applied cryptography and cryptographic engineering. He is one of the creators of the Zerocash protocol, which is used by the Zcash cryptocurrency, and is also a founder of the encryption startup Zeutro. Twitter: @matthew_d_greenUdbhav Tiwari is  a public policy advisor for Mozilla and a  nonresident fellow at Carnegie India. Twitter: @udbhav_tiwariFurther Reading:A Few Thoughts on Cryptographic Engineering by Matthew Green (Blog)Carnegie Publications on the Encryption Debate Across the World:Understanding the Encryption Debate in India by Anirudh Burman and Prateek JhaThe Encryption Debate in India: 2021 Update by Trisha RayThe Encryption Debate in China: 2021 Update by Lorand Laskai,  Adam SegalThe Encryption Debate in Brazil: 2021 Update  by Priscilla Silva, Ana Lara Mangeth,  Christian PerroneThe Encryption Debate in Australia: 2021 Update by StilgherrianThe Encryption Debate in Germany: 2021 Update by Sven Herpif, Julia SchuetzeThe Encryption Debate in the European Union: 2021 Update by Maria Koomen--To Follow our Work: Website: www.carnegieindia.orgTwitter:  www.twitter.com/carnegieindiaFacebook: www.facebook.com/CarnegieIndia/Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/CarnegieIndia/videos  

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast
Rough Week for Facebook

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 69:57


Facebook had a horrible, no-good, very bad week. Not only did Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp go completely offline for about six hours, a whistleblower came forward to show the world what most of us already knew: Facebook values money over its users' well being. And I have another story that backs that up, as well - one that you almost surely did not hear about. In other news: the FTC tells app makers to fess up when users private data gets loose; the governor of Missouri wants to sue a newspaper for revealing a horrible security flaw that exposed teachers' social security numbers; Apple's attempts to prevent user tracking on iOS are being undermined by unscrupulous apps; a company that you've never heard of with access to almost all cellular text messages was hacked over the course of five years; the VPN maker and VPN review industries are awash in conflicts of interest; Windows 11 is finally out, but it's not clear if and whether you should upgrade to it; and Firefox is searching for more ways to make money and stay alive, including adding more sponsored search suggestions for you to consider. Article Links FTC says health apps must notify consumers about data breaches — or face fines https://techcrunch.com/2021/09/16/ftc-says-health-apps-must-notify-consumers-if-their-data-is-breached-or-face-fines/ Missouri Governor Vows to Prosecute St. Louis Post-Dispatch for Reporting Security Vulnerability https://krebsonsecurity.com/2021/10/missouri-governor-vows-to-prosecute-st-louis-post-dispatch-for-reporting-security-vulnerability/ Investigation Finds Apple App Tracking Rules May Be Ineffective; IDFA Blocked, but Apps Frequently Access Other Identifiers https://www.cpomagazine.com/data-privacy/investigation-finds-apple-app-tracking-rules-may-be-ineffective-idfa-blocked-but-apps-frequently-access-other-identifiers/ Company That Routes Billions of Text Messages Quietly Says It Was Hacked https://www.vice.com/en/article/z3xpm8/company-that-routes-billions-of-text-messages-quietly-says-it-was-hacked Consolidation of the VPN industry spells trouble for the consumer, https://blog.windscribe.com/consolidation-of-the-vpn-industry-spells-trouble-for-the-consumer-57e638634cf0/Facebook has finally given a reason for the six-hour outage Monday https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/4/22709806/facebook-says-the-six-hour-outage Understanding How Facebook Disappeared from the Internet: https://blog.cloudflare.com/october-2021-facebook-outage/ Facebook bans developer behind Unfollow Everything tool https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/8/22716044/facebook-unfollow-everything-tool-louis-barclay-banned-for-lifeFacebook whistleblower Frances Haugen tells lawmakers that meaningful reform is necessary ‘for our common good' https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/10/05/facebook-senate-hearing-frances-haugen/ Windows 11 compatibility: Check if your PC meets Microsoft's requirements https://www.cnet.com/tech/computing/windows-11-compatibility-check-if-your-pc-meets-microsofts-requirements/ Firefox Now Sends Your Address Bar Keystrokes to Mozilla https://www.howtogeek.com/760425/firefox-now-sends-your-address-bar-keystrokes-to-mozilla/ BONUS: Trust, but verify: An in-depth analysis of ExpressVPN's terrible, horrible, no good, very bad week https://www.zdnet.com/article/trust-but-verify-an-in-depth-analysis-of-expressvpns-terrible-horrible-no-good-very-bad-week/  Further Info National Cybersecurity Awareness Month resources: https://www.cisa.gov/cybersecurity-awareness-month-resources Only two weeks left to snag a challenge coin!! https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-challenge-coins-are-back/ Become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/FirewallsDontStopDragons Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 146

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:43


Mozilla disappoints again, a beacon of hope in the mobile world, whether the future of the Internet really is a dystopian nightmare, and the usual KDE goodness in the Korner.   News Fairphone 4 review 10 Year Smartphone Firefox's address bar has ads now, but you can disable them News from Firefox Focus and Firefox... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 146

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:43


Mozilla disappoints again, a beacon of hope in the mobile world, whether the future of the Internet really is a dystopian nightmare, and the usual KDE goodness in the Korner.   News Fairphone 4 review 10 Year Smartphone Firefox's address bar has ads now, but you can disable them News from Firefox Focus and Firefox... Read More

Destination Linux
247: Is Firefox Slowly Dying? Can Mozilla Save It?

Destination Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:10


This week's episode of Destination Linux, we're going to discuss the topic of Mozilla Firefox and whether we can stop it's continued decline. Then we're going to discuss the literal game changer, and the device that has everyone looking at Linux in a big way. Yes, its Steamy news about the Steam Deck, and there […]

Linux User Space
Episode 2:08: I'mma Snap on You

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:20


0:00 Cold Open 1:51 Preview 2:26 Beta Banter 16:00 Packaging Discussion 41:33 Snapzilla Watch 58:23 Firefox Suggest 1:01:28 Bing Me Up, Scotty 1:07:29 Housekeeping 1:11:24 Extension Focus 1:18:59 Next Time (Garuda!) 1:20:02 Thank you! 1:20:58 Stinger Coming up in this episode 1. Beta Banter 2. Hybrid Packaging Feedback 3. Snapzilla watch From the thumb California Games (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Games) Banter - Beta to the Max Ubuntu 21.10 Beta (Now RC) (https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/impish-indri-release-schedule/18540) edit doh! Dan gets dates wrong, 10/14 is the proposed release date. Fedora 35 Beta (https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-fedora-35-beta/) MX Linux RC (https://mxlinux.org/blog/mx-21-release-candidate-1-now-available-for-testing-purposes/) Distro Packaging vs Snap/Flatpak Drew Devault, Original post from 2019 (https://drewdevault.com/2019/12/09/Developers-shouldnt-distribute.html) New post in September (https://drewdevault.com/2021/09/27/Let-distros-do-their-job.html) Mozilla Watch, Snap Watch, Snapzilla Watch?! Ubuntu to switch to snap of Firefox (https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/feature-freeze-exception-seeding-the-official-firefox-snap-in-ubuntu-desktop/24210) Firefox Suggest (https://blog.mozilla.org/en/products/firefox/firefox-news/firefox-suggest/) Firefox Tests Bing on the 1% (https://www.ghacks.net/2021/09/17/firefox-experiment-is-testing-bing-as-the-default-search-engine/) Brave search (https://brave.com/search/) Firefox 93 Out, too! (https://www.zdnet.com/article/firefox-93-arrives-with-tab-unloading-insecure-download-blocks-and-enforced-referrer-trim/) Housekeeping Linux Cast podcast (https://anchor.fm/thelinuxcast) Linux Cast YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/c/TheLinuxCast) NEW Reddit subreddit - https://reddit.com/r/LinuxUserSpace/ Email us - contact@linuxuserspace.show Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) Our Matrix room (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) Support us at Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace) Join us on Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace) Watch us on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) Or Watch us on Odysee (https://linuxuserspace.show/odysee) Check out our website https://linuxuserspace.show App Focus Firefox Multi-Account Containers This episode's app: * Firefox Multi-Account Containers. (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/multi-account-containers/) Next Time We wrap up our thoughts on Garuda Linux. Garuda Linux (https://garudalinux.org) Join us in two weeks when we return to the Linux User Space Stay tuned on Twitter, Telegram, Matrix, Discord whatever. Give us your suggestions on our new subreddit r/LinuxUserSpace Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Contributor Nicholas CubicleNate LiNuXsys666 Jill and Steve Co-Producer Donnie Johnny Producer Bruno John

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations
Security Friday: Privacy Not Included

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 19:33


Andrew Orr joins host Kelly Guimont to discuss Security Friday news including Mozilla's product guide and an AirTag attack.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Una nueva guerra de privacidad

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:27


Idle Detection API en Chrome / YouTube anti-anti-vacunas / Los trabajadores IT solo quieren remoto / DeepMind se mete a la meteorología / Rolls Royce solo eléctricos / Paint nuevo en Windows 11 Patrocinador: La gala de premios Huawei Next Image son el mayor concurso de fotografía móvil https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ del mundo. Más de dos millones de personas de todo el mundo han participado, y este año viene con más premios que nunca. — Las inscripciones están abiertas https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ hasta el 30 de noviembre, y puedes participar en múltiples categorías. Si algún lector gana que lo comparta conmigo, ¿eh? Idle Detection API en Chrome / YouTube anti-anti-vacunas / Los trabajadores IT solo quieren remoto / DeepMind se mete a la meteorología / Rolls Royce solo eléctricos / Paint nuevo en Windows 11  Chrome abre un nuevo conflicto de privacidad con el API de detección de inactividad. En el nuevo Chrome 94 las páginas y aplicaciones web pueden solicitar al usuario https://www.theregister.com/2021/09/22/google_emits_chrome_94_with/ saber si está tecleando, moviendo el ratón, ha minimizado la pantalla, etc. Útil por ejemplo para ahorrar batería, pero peligroso como método para seguimiento y vigilancia.  Apple y Mozilla se oponen a convertirlo en estándar, pero el peso de Chrome lo convierte en uno de facto.  YouTube eliminará todo el contenido anti-vacunación más allá del Covid-19. Las políticas de moderación que hace unos meses prohibían cualquier vídeo de desinformación sobre las vacunas del coronavirus se expande ahora a las vacunas https://es.gizmodo.com/youtube-anuncia-que-prohibe-todos-los-videos-antivacuna-1847770938 de cualquier tipo de enfermedad.  Una excepción razonable: vídeos sobre "testimonios y experiencias personales".  Los trabajadores IT en España se plantan: buscan trabajo remoto o máxima flexibilidad. Una encuesta de más de 800 trabajadores revela que la capacidad para trabajar de forma flexible en horarios y ubicación (en el tiempo y el espacio) es la primera condición para el 85 y 83% https://drive.google.com/file/d/1e8qXQIEcsWoGV1bHUFfirOS66L552KaO/view a la hora de elegir un nuevo empleo.  El 80% de los empleados de IT dejarían su empresa por otra que ofreciese un puesto 100% remoto.  El teclado de copiar y pegar de StackOverflow ahora es real. Aunque hemos visto varios de estos "teclados de dos teclas" en el pasado, el de esta compañía es quizá el más memorable por el rol de SO en la vida de muchos programadores. — Solo son 30$ https://drop.com/buy/stack-overflow-the-key-macropad y no me queda claro si está agotado o no.  Apple publica sus propias apps en la App Store. 14 años tras la llegada de la App Store, los usuarios de iPhone ya pueden poner sus comentarios y valoraciones https://9to5mac.com/2021/09/29/rate-and-review-apple-iphone-built-in-apps/. La mejor, con 4 estrellas, para la aplicación del tiempo, y la peor: Apple Podcasts, con tan solo dos estrellas. — Cero sorpresas.  DeepMind busca pronosticar si lloverá o no en los próximos 90 minutos. Un nuevo proyecto de la empresa de IA consistente en entrenar sus algoritmos de aprendizaje profundo con los datos de radares meteorológicos para buscar pronósticos a corto plazo. — Según la agencia meteo de Reino Unido: el mejor pronóstico el 89% de ocasiones https://deepmind.com/blog/article/nowcasting. — Tenéis los modelos pre-entrenados y código en GitHub https://github.com/deepmind/deepmind-research/tree/master/nowcasting.  A pesar de las increíbles capacidades de sensores y computación, la meteorología sigue siendo muy caótica. Hace unos meses en Kernel nos adentrábamos en sus misterios https://mixx.io/2021/03/25/el-misterioso-mundo-de-la-meteorologia/ y por qué es tan difícil saber el tiempo de mañana.  Países Bajos multa a Samsung por inflar el precio de sus televisores. Presionaba a las tiendas para mantener unos precios mínimos y evitar que los consumidores pudieran conseguir mayores rebajas. Los reguladores incluso parecen haber vislumbrado técnicas de cartel con otros fabricantes. 40 millones de euros. https://www.reuters.com/business/samsung-fined-47-mln-price-fixing-netherlands-2021-09-29/?taid=61545ea2b22f05000156a3d9.  Rolls Royce solo fabricará coches eléctricos en 2030. Otro fabricante más https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/29/luxury-carmaker-rolls-royce-to-switch-to-all-electric-vehicles-by-2030.html que se adelanta a las leyes que prohibirán los coches de gasolina. Aunque Rolls no tiene aún ningún eléctrico, aunque justo ayer presentaron el esperado Spectre, que llegará en 2023 https://youtu.be/MOa7TLdHK8c?t=497. No planean híbridos ni hidrógeno, solo 100% eléctricos de batería.  China empieza a racionar la electricidad y el consumo energético. Los próximos meses parecen que van a ser duros a nivel mundial según los expertos. China está actuando, quizá, de canario en la mina con cortes eléctricos programados en la mitad del país https://www.lavanguardia.com/economia/20210929/7753918/sasss.html, parones de días en algunas industrias, y otras medidas de urgencia.  La falta de componentes dispara el precio de los paneles solares. Los polisilicios necesarios para cualquier panel fotovoltaico quintuplican su precio en el mercado https://twitter.com/solar_chase/status/1442764400771928067 en cuestión de semanas por la falta de producción. La gráfica es demoledora https://twitter.com/javierblas/status/1442872704219037698?s=28.  Las sondas marcianas entran en su siesta bienal. Cada año hay más robots en Marte, pero cada dos años el planeta rojo y el nuestro están en posiciones opuestas separados por el Sol, y las comunicaciones no son fáciles. Las agencias espaciales les han dejado deberes https://www.theregister.com/2021/09/29/nasa_mars_conjunction/ para estas dos semanas.  Microsoft publica la versión alfa del renovado Paint. Tras la extraña versión de hace unos años con elementos tridimensionales, Windows 11 renovará la mítica aplicación que ya está disponible dentro del canal de Insiders. Lamentablemente es bastante inestable de momento https://microsofters.com/179787/el-nuevo-diseno-de-microsoft-paint-ya-esta-disponible-en-el-canal-dev/ a pesar de ser un programa sencillo.

Loop Matinal
Quinta-feira, 23/9/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 10:48


Patrocínio: Podcast Startup Life O seu podcast sobre negócios, tecnologia e inovação. Em cada episódio, os anfitriões, Layon Lopes e Cristiane Serra, receberam importantes players do mercado brasileiro para debater ideias, projetos e tudo o que cerca as mais novas soluções do ecossistema de tecnologia e inovação. Acesse: https://link.chtbl.com/startup-loop. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Pokémon Unite é lançado para iOS e Android: 
https://tecnoblog.net/496238/pokemon-unite-mobile-chega-nesta-quarta-22-com-novos-personagens-e-skins/ Disney adia chegada de Shang-Chi ao Disney+: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/21/22686598/disney-plus-day-shang-chi-streaming-free Netflix compra o catálogo de Roald Dahl: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/21/22686472/netflix-rumor-roald-dahl-willy-wonka-bfg-matilda Compra da Five9 pela Zoom será revista pelo FCC: 
https://www.wsj.com/articles/zooms-nearly-15-billion-deal-for-five9-under-u-s-government-review-over-china-ties-11632247337?mod=djemalertNEWS Facebook negociou com FTC para deixar o Zuck sair pela tangente em caso da Cambridge Analytica: 
https://www.politico.com/news/2021/09/21/facebook-paid-billions-extra-to-the-ftc-to-spare-zuckerberg-in-data-suit-shareholders-allege-513456 Zuckerberg aprovou mudança no algoritmo do Facebook para privilegiar notícias positivas sobre o site: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/21/technology/zuckerberg-facebook-project-amplify.html Conselho do Facebook quer explicações sobre lista de celebridades que podem quebrar os termos de uso do site: 
https://www.engadget.com/facebook-oversight-board-cross-check-183544254.html Facebook se corrige sobre impacto do aumento de privacidade no iOS: 
https://www.axios.com/facebook-apples-ad-changes-impacting-business-8f40bb69-ec9c-42c9-8115-c6654dc20faf.html Facebook anuncia novos displays conectados: 
https://www.engadget.com/facebook-new-portals-go-170004952.html Microsoft anuncia o Surface Pro 8: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/22/22685923/microsoft-surface-pro-8-specs-price-release-date Microsoft anuncia a stylus Slim Pen 2: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/22/22686095/microsoft-surface-slim-pen-2-haptics-features-price-release-date Microsoft anuncia o Surface Duo 2: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/22/22684814/microsoft-surface-duo-2-price-specs-features-release-date Microsoft anuncia o Surface Laptop Studio: https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/22/22686010/microsoft-surface-laptop-studio-price-specs-release-date Microsoft atualiza o Surface Go 3: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/22/22684608/microsoft-surface-go-3-processor-specs-price-features Bing pode virar buscador padrão da Mozilla: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/09/21/mozilla-testa-bing-como-novo-buscador-padrao-do-firefox/ TSMC demite funcionários que vazaram informações da Apple: https://9to5mac.com/2021/09/22/tsmc-fired-seven-employees-leaking/ Beta do HomePod 15.1 traz Lossless e Dolby Atmos: https://9to5mac.com/2021/09/21/homepod-15-1-beta-1-brings-back-lossless-and-dolby-atmos-support/ Beta do iOS 15.1 traz o SharePlay: https://9to5mac.com/2021/09/21/ios-15-1-beta-1-re-enables-shareplay-feature-following-delay/ Fortnite não deve voltar tão cedo à App Store: https://9to5mac.com/2021/09/22/apple-tells-epic-it-wont-allow-fortnite-back-on-the-app-store-until-court-verdict-is-final/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito