Podcasts about Skippy

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Best podcasts about Skippy

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Latest podcast episodes about Skippy

BetQL Picking Fatties
No Man's Land

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 36:10


Skippy and Bish look ahead to this week's NFL slate and do their best to their to pick through what is a gauntlet of games this weekend. They also look ahead to Championship Weekend in College Football to see who punches their ticket to the CFP. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Ron Rivera wants more offense, Tiger pulls out of Hero, Butt doctor hates toilet paper

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 41:27


11/29 Hour 3   3:00 Ron Rivera wants more offense 19:15 Tiger Woods pulls out of Hero Challenge 25:30 Skippy's survivor pool 32:45 Butt doctor hates toilet paper

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
You Gotta Spend Money to Spend Money

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 60:53


It's Episode 100! To celebrate, for 2 weeks take 60% off premium subscriptions to the show — thank you for supporting!Skippy rants about the "buy more to save more" ethos. Doogles covers Howard Marks' recent memo, What Really Matters. The UN says that India's population is now greater than China's (and China is fading quickly). Doogles runs through some graphs from a recent Animal Spirits podcast episode on the 10-year treasury, savings vs. debt, Netflix vs. Disney, and Bird Global stock. The episode wraps with a conversation about high yield convertible notes.Join the Skippy and Doogles fan club. You can also get more details about the show at skippydoogles.com, show notes on our Substack, and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

BetQL Picking Fatties
Disaster in Denver

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 26:50


Skippy and Bish recap Sunday's NFL action and try to wrap their heads around how awful Russell Wilson and the Broncos have been this season. The guys also do their best to make sense of the Ravens blowing lead after lead in this bizarre NFL season. More survivor plays as well as Monday Night Football picks for Steelers vs. Colts. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
Rivalry Week Recap & NFL Week 12 Fatties

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 29:36


Skippy and Bish recap yesterday's college football action including a brutal loss in their college survivor pool thanks to Boston College collapsing in the fourth quarter. The guys turn their attention to Skippy's NFL survivor pool to see if he lasts another week before dishing out their plays for today. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
NFL Survivor Plays & Rivalry Week Fatties

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 30:26


Skippy and Bish search for value remaining on the board in Skips survivor pool. The guys then turn their attention to today's slate of college football games like Michigan at Ohio State, South Carolina at Clemson and Notre Dame at USC plus more. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Alex P. Keaton is My Friend
Alex P. Keaton Is My Friend- Season 4, Episode 24- Paper Chase

Alex P. Keaton is My Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 56:49


In this very special episode, Phil and Keith talk about Season 4, Episode 24 of Family Ties. They discuss graduation, the red scare, basketball, oral tests, Skippy, 80s hair, IMDB, guest stars, hoarding, midnight milk, and more.

The Sports Junkies
Junkies Survivor Pool, Jonathan Allen jersey, Hit the Skins

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 43:20


11/23 Hour 1   3:00 Junks should do a Survivor pool like Skippy's 10:00 Suadi Arabia bought their win over Argentina 18:00 Jonathan Allen's signed jersey 35:00 Hit the Skins

The Sports Junkies
Skippy's survivor pool, Jonathan Allen in studio

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 42:21


11/22 Hour 4   4:00 Skippy is freaking out about his survivor pool 16:30 Jonathan Allen in studio 34:50 More with Commanders DL Jonathan Allen

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
The SEC Doesn't Regulate Poop Emojis

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 47:28


Doogles covers recent happenings in the South Korean bond market caused by a fiasco at Legoland. Skippy heads back to FTX coverage, including its assets/liabilities and bankruptcy filing. Speaking of fraud, Elizabeth Holmes gets sentenced. Doogles highlights Elon Musk's ultimatum and the Twitter exodus. The episode wraps with some soapbox dialogue on Cathie Wood.Join the Skippy and Doogles fan club. You can also get more details about the show at skippydoogles.com, show notes on our Substack, and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

BetQL Picking Fatties
Who's In?: College Football Playoff

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 22:28


Skippy and Bish take a look at the current playoff picture in college football and discuss the different scenarios that can still play out late in the season ahead of the final standings. The guys then turn their attention to today's slate of NFL games in search of value. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Statement Saturday in College Football | BetQL Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 29:50


Skippy and Bish gear you up for the biggest Saturday of the college football season To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
Statement Saturday in College Football

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 32:49


Skippy and Bish gear you up for the biggest Saturday of the college football season before dishing out their plays for Thursday Night Football. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Skippy survivor pool update, Ron hasn't decided QB, Cakes loves an under

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 42:09


11/16 Hour 1   4:30 Commanders fever 10:30 Skippy survivor pool update 17:30 Ron says he hasn't made a decision at QB 33:20 Cakes loves Bills/Browns under

Cyber Rants - The Refreshingly Real Cybersecurity Podcast
Episode #84 - Conversations at the Executive and Board Level with guest Caren Shiozaki

Cyber Rants - The Refreshingly Real Cybersecurity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 38:26


This week the guys (and "Skippy the Intern") are joined by special guest, Caren Shiozaki, to discuss cybersecurity considerations among executive teams and boards of directors. Caren shares her experience as a technology executive, insights at the leadership level, and emerging trends that are changing the thought process around cybersecurity and compliance. Pick up your copy of Cyber Rants on Amazon.Looking to take your Cyber Security to the next level? Visit us at www.silentsector.com. Be sure to rate the podcast, leave us a review, and subscribe!

Screaming in the Cloud
The Non-Magical Approach to Cloud-Based Development with Chen Goldberg

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 40:13


About ChenChen Goldberg is GM and Vice President of Engineering at Google Cloud, where she leads the Cloud Runtimes (CR) product area, helping customers deliver greater value, effortlessly. The CR  portfolio includes both Serverless and Kubernetes based platforms on Google Cloud, private cloud and other public clouds. Chen is a strong advocate for customer empathy, building products and solutions that matter. Chen has been core to Google Cloud's open core vision since she joined the company six years ago. During that time, she has led her team to focus on helping development teams increase their agility and modernize workloads. Prior to joining Google, Chen wore different hats in the tech industry including leadership positions in IT organizations, SI teams and SW product development, contributing to Chen's broad enterprise perspective. She enjoys mentoring IT talent both in and outside of Google. Chen lives in Mountain View, California, with her husband and three kids. Outside of work she enjoys hiking and baking.Links Referenced: Twitter: https://twitter.com/GoldbergChen LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/goldbergchen/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Forget everything you know about SSH and try Tailscale. Imagine if you didn't need to manage PKI or rotate SSH keys every time someone leaves. That'd be pretty sweet, wouldn't it? With Tailscale SSH, you can do exactly that. Tailscale gives each server and user device a node key to connect to its VPN, and it uses the same node key to authorize and authenticate SSH.Basically you're SSHing the same way you manage access to your app. What's the benefit here? Built-in key rotation, permissions as code, connectivity between any two devices, reduce latency, and there's a lot more, but there's a time limit here. You can also ask users to reauthenticate for that extra bit of security. Sounds expensive?Nope, I wish it were. Tailscale is completely free for personal use on up to 20 devices. To learn more, visit snark.cloud/tailscale. Again, that's snark.cloud/tailscaleCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. When I get bored and the power goes out, I find myself staring at the ceiling, figuring out how best to pick fights with people on the internet about Kubernetes. Because, well, I'm basically sad and have a growing collection of personality issues. My guest today is probably one of the best people to have those arguments with. Chen Goldberg is the General Manager of Cloud Runtimes and VP of Engineering at Google Cloud. Chen, Thank you for joining me today.Chen: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me.Corey: So, Google has been doing a lot of very interesting things in the cloud, and the more astute listener will realize that interesting is not always necessarily a compliment. But from where I sit, I am deeply vested in the idea of a future where we do not have a cloud monoculture. As I've often said, I want, “What cloud should I build something on in five to ten years?” To be a hard question to answer, and not just because everything is terrible. I think that Google Cloud is absolutely a bright light in the cloud ecosystem and has been for a while, particularly with this emphasis around developer experience. All of that said, Google Cloud is sort of a big, unknowable place, at least from the outside. What is your area of responsibility? Where do you start? Where do you stop? In other words, what can I blame you for?Chen: Oh, you can blame me for a lot of things if you want to. I [laugh] might not agree with that, but that's—Corey: We strive for accuracy in these things, though.Chen: But that's fine. Well, first of all, I've joined Google about seven years ago to lead the Kubernetes and GKE team, and ever since, continued at the same area. So evolved, of course, Kubernetes, and Google Kubernetes Engine, and leading our hybrid and multi-cloud strategy as well with technologies like Anthos. And now I'm responsible for the entire container runtime, which includes Kubernetes and the serverless solutions.Corey: A while back, I, in fairly typical sarcastic form, wound up doing a whole inadvertent start of a meme where I joked about there being 17 ways to run containers on AWS. And then as that caught on, I wound up listing out 17 services you could use to do that. A few months went past and then I published a sequel of 17 more services you can use to run Kubernetes. And while that was admittedly tongue-in-cheek, it does lead to an interesting question that's ecosystem-wide. If I look at Google Cloud, I have Cloud Run, I have GKE, I have GCE if I want to do some work myself.It feels like more and more services are supporting Docker in a variety of different ways. How should customers and/or people like me—though, I am sort of a customer as well since I do pay you folks every month—how should we think about containers and services in which to run them?Chen: First of all, I think there's a lot of credit that needs to go to Docker that made containers approachable. And so, Google has been running containers forever. Everything within Google is running on containers, even our VMs, even our cloud is running on containers, but what Docker did was creating a packaging mechanism to improve developer velocity. So, that's on its own, it's great. And one of the things, by the way, that I love about Google Cloud approach to containers and Docker that yes, you can take your Docker container and run it anywhere.And it's actually really important to ensure what we call interoperability, or low barrier to entry to a new technology. So, I can take my Docker container, I can move it from one platform to another, and so on. So, that's just to start with on a containers. Between the different solutions, so first of all, I'm all about managed services. You are right, there are many ways to run a Kubernetes. I'm taking a lot of pride—Corey: The best way is always to have someone else run it for you. Problem solved. Great, the best kind of problems are always someone else's.Chen: Yes. And I'm taking a lot of pride of what our team is doing with Kubernetes. I mean, we've been working on that for so long. And it's something that you know, we've coined that term, I think back in 2016, so there is a success disaster, but there's also what we call sustainable success. So, thinking about how to set ourselves up for success and scale. Very proud of that service.Saying that, not everybody and not all your workloads you need the flexibility that Kubernetes gives you in all the ecosystem. So, if you start with containers your first time, you should start with Cloud Run. It's the easiest way to run your containers. That's one. If you are already in love with Kubernetes, we won't take it away from you. Start with GKE. Okay [laugh]? Go all-in. Okay, we are all in loving Kubernetes as well. But what my team and I are working on is to make sure that those will work really well together. And we actually see a lot of customers do that.Corey: I'd like to go back a little bit in history to the rise of Docker. I agree with you it was transformative, but containers had been around in various forms—depending upon how you want to define it—dating back to the '70s with logical partitions on mainframes. Well, is that a container? Is it not? Well, sort of. We'll assume yes for the sake of argument.The revelation that I found from Docker was the developer experience, start to finish. Suddenly, it was a couple commands and you were just working, where previously it had taken tremendous amounts of time and energy to get containers working in that same context. And I don't even know today whether or not the right way to contextualize containers is as sort of a lite version of a VM, as a packaging format, as a number of other things that you could reasonably call it. How do you think about containers?Chen: So, I'm going to do, first of all, a small [unintelligible 00:06:31]. I actually started my career as a system mainframe engineer—Corey: Hmm.Chen: And I will share that when you know, I've learned Kubernetes, I'm like, “Huh, we already have done all of that, in orchestration, in workload management on mainframe,” just to the side. The way I think about containers is as a—two things: one, it is a packaging of an application, but the other thing which is also critical is the decoupling between your application and the OS. So, having that kind of abstraction and allowing you to portable and move it between environments. So, those are the two things that are when I think about containers. And what technologies like Kubernetes and serverless gives on top of that is that manageability and making sure that we take care of everything else that is needed for you to run your application.Corey: I've been, how do I put this, getting some grief over the past few years, in the best ways possible, around a almost off-the-cuff prediction that I made, which was that in five years, which is now a lot closer to two, basically, nobody is going to care about Kubernetes. And I could have phrased that slightly more directly because people think I was trying to say, “Oh, Kubernetes is just hype. It's going to go away. Nobody's going to worry about it anymore.” And I think that is a wildly inaccurate prediction.My argument is that people are not going to have to think about it in the same way that they are today. Today, if I go out and want to go back to my days of running production services in anger—and by ‘anger,' I of course mean in production—then it would be difficult for me to find a role that did not at least touch upon Kubernetes. But people who can work with that technology effectively are in high demand and they tend to be expensive, not to mention then thinking about all of the intricacies and complexities that Kubernetes brings to the foreground, that is what doesn't feel sustainable to me. The idea that it's going to have to collapse down into something else is, by necessity, going to have to emerge. How are you seeing that play out? And also, feel free to disagree with the prediction. I am thrilled to wind up being told that I'm wrong it's how I learn the most.Chen: I don't know if I agree with the time horizon of when that will happen, but I will actually think it's a failure on us if that won't be the truth, that the majority of people will not need to know about Kubernetes and its internals. And you know, we keep saying that, like, hey, we need to make it more, like, boring, and easy, and I've just said like, “Hey, you should use managed.” And we have lots of customers that says that they're just using GKE and it scales on their behalf and they don't need to do anything for that and it's just like magic. But from a technology perspective, there is still a way to go until we can make that disappear.And there will be two things that will push us into that direction. One is—you mentioned that is as well—the talent shortage is real. All the customers that I speak with, even if they can find those great people that are experts, they're actually more interesting things for them to work on, okay? You don't need to take, like, all the people in your organization and put them on building the infrastructure. You don't care about that. You want to build innovation and promote your business.So, that's one. The second thing is that I do expect that the technology will continue to evolve and are managed solutions will be better and better. So hopefully, with these two things happening together, people will not care that what's under the hood is Kubernetes. Or maybe not even, right? I don't know exactly how things will evolve.Corey: From where I sit, what are the early criticisms I had about Docker, which I guess translates pretty well to Kubernetes, are that they solve a few extraordinarily painful problems. In the case of Docker, it was, “Well, it works on my machine,” as a grumpy sysadmin, the way I used to be, the only real response we had to that was, “Well. Time to backup your email, Skippy, because your laptop is going into production, then.” Now, you can effectively have a high-fidelity copy of production, basically anywhere, and we've solved the problem of making your Mac laptop look like a Linux server. Great, okay, awesome.With Kubernetes, it also feels, on some level, like it solves for very large-scale Google-type of problems where you want to run things across at least a certain point of scale. It feels like even today, it suffers from having an easy Hello World-style application to deploy on top of it. Using it for WordPress, or some other form of blogging software, for example, is stupendous overkill as far as the Hello World story tends to go. Increasingly as a result, it feels like it's great for the large-scale enterprise-y applications, but the getting started story of how do I have a service I could reasonably run in production? How do I contextualize that, in the world of Kubernetes? How do you respond to that type of perspective?Chen: We'll start with maybe a short story. I started my career in the Israeli army. I was head of the department and one of the lead technology units and I was responsible for building a PAS. In essence, it was 20-plus years ago, so we didn't really call it a PAS but that's what it was. And then at some point, it was amazing, developers were very productive, we got innovation again, again. And then there was some new innovation just at the beginning of web [laugh] at some point.And it was actually—so two things I've noticed back then. One, it was really hard to evolve the platform to allow new technologies and innovation, and second thing, from a developer perspective, it was like a black box. So, the developers team that people were—the other development teams couldn't really troubleshoot environment; they were not empowered to make decisions or [unintelligible 00:12:29] in the platform. And you know, when it was just started with Kubernetes—by the way, beginning, it only supported 100 nodes, and then 1000 nodes. Okay, it was actually not for scale; it actually solved those two problems, which I'm—this is where I spend most of my time.So, the first one, we don't want magic, okay? To be clear on, like, what's happening, I want to make sure that things are consistent and I can get the right observability. So, that's one. The second thing is that we invested so much in the extensibility an environment that it's, I wouldn't say it's easy, but it's doable to evolve Kubernetes. You can change the models, you can extend it you can—there is an ecosystem.And you know, when we were building it, I remember I used to tell my team, there won't be a Kubernetes 2.0. Which is for a developer, it's [laugh] frightening. But if you think about it and you prepare for that, you're like, “Huh. Okay, what does that mean with how I build my APIs? What does that mean of how we build a system?” So, that was one. The second thing I keep telling my team, “Please don't get too attached to your code because if it will still be there in 5, 10 years, we did something wrong.”And you can see areas within Kubernetes, again, all the extensions. I'm very proud of all the interfaces that we've built, but let's take networking. This keeps to evolve all the time on the API and the surface area that allows us to introduce new technologies. I love it. So, those are the two things that have nothing to do with scale, are unique to Kubernetes, and I think are very empowering, and are critical for the success.Corey: One thing that you said that resonates most deeply with me is the idea that you don't want there to be magic, where I just hand it to this thing and it runs it as if by magic. Because, again, we've all run things in anger in production, and what happens when the magic breaks? When you're sitting around scratching your head with no idea how it starts or how it stops, that is scary. I mean, I recently wound up re-implementing Google Cloud Distinguished Engineer Kelsey Hightower's “Kubernetes the Hard Way” because he gave a terrific tutorial that I ran through in about 45 minutes on top of Google Cloud. It's like, “All right, how do I make this harder?”And the answer is to do it on AWS, re-implement it there. And my experiment there can be found at kubernetesthemuchharderway.com because I have a vanity domain problem. And it taught me he an awful lot, but one of the challenges I had as I went through that process was, at one point, the nodes were not registering with the controller.And I ran out of time that day and turned everything off—because surprise bills are kind of what I spend my time worrying about—turn it on the next morning to continue and then it just worked. And that was sort of the spidey sense tingling moment of, “Okay, something wasn't working and now it is, and I don't understand why. But I just rebooted it and it started working.” Which is terrifying in the context of a production service. It was understandable—kind of—and I think that's the sort of thing that you understand a lot better, the more you work with it in production, but a counterargument to that is—and I've talked about it on this show before—for this podcast, I wind up having sponsors from time to time, who want to give me fairly complicated links to go check them out, so I have the snark.cloud URL redirector.That's running as a production service on top of Google Cloud Run. It took me half an hour to get that thing up and running; I haven't had to think about it since, aside from a three-second latency that was driving me nuts and turned out to be a sleep hidden in the code, which I can't really fault Google Cloud Run for so much as my crappy nonsense. But it just works. It's clearly running atop Kubernetes, but I don't have to think about it. That feels like the future. It feels like it's a glimpse of a world to come, we're just starting to dip our toes into. That, at least to me, feels like a lot more of the abstractions being collapsed into something easily understandable.Chen: [unintelligible 00:16:30], I'm happy you say that. When talking with customers and we're showing, like, you know, yes, they're all in Kubernetes and talking about Cloud Run and serverless, I feel there is that confidence level that they need to overcome. And that's why it's really important for us in Google Cloud is to make sure that you can mix and match. Because sometimes, you know, a big retail customer of ours, some of their teams, it's really important for them to use a Kubernetes-based platform because they have their workloads also running on-prem and they want to serve the same playbooks, for example, right? How do I address issues, how do I troubleshoot, and so on?So, that's one set of things. But some cloud only as simple as possible. So, can I use both of them and still have a similar developer experience, and so on? So, I do think that we'll see more of that in the coming years. And as the technology evolves, then we'll have more and more, of course, serverless solutions.By the way, it doesn't end there. Like, we see also, you know, databases and machine learning, and like, there are so many more managed services that are making things easy. And that's what excites me. I mean, that's what's awesome about what we're doing in cloud. We are building platforms that enable innovation.Corey: I think that there's an awful lot of power behind unlocking innovation from a customer perspective. The idea that I can use a cloud provider to wind up doing an experiment to build something in the course of an evening, and if it works, great, I can continue to scale up without having to replace, you know, the crappy Raspberry Pi-level hardware in my spare room with serious enterprise servers in a data center somewhere. The on-ramp and the capability and the lack of long-term commitments is absolutely magical. What I'm also seeing that is contributing to that is the de facto standard that's emerged of most things these days support Docker, for better or worse. There are many open-source tools that I see where, “Oh, how do I get this up and running?”“Well, you can go over the river and through the woods and way past grandmother's house to build this from source or run this Docker file.” I feel like that is the direction the rest of the world is going. And as much fun as it is to sit on the sidelines and snark, I'm finding a lot more capability stories emerging across the board. Does that resonate with what you're seeing, given that you are inherently working at very large scale, given the [laugh] nature of where you work?Chen: I do see that. And I actually want to double down on the open standards, which I think this is also something that is happening. At the beginning, we talked about I want it to be very hard when I choose the cloud provider. But innovation doesn't only come from cloud providers; there's a lot of companies and a lot of innovation happening that are building new technologies on top of those cloud providers, and I don't think this is going to stop. Innovation is going to come from many places, and it's going to be very exciting.And by the way, things are moving super fast in our space. So, the investment in open standard is critical for our industry. So, Docker is one example. Google is in [unintelligible 00:19:46] speaking, it's investing a lot in building those open standards. So, we have Docker, we have things like of course Kubernetes, but we are also investing in open standards of security, so we are working with other partners around [unintelligible 00:19:58], defining how you can secure the software supply chain, which is also critical for innovation. So, all of those things that reduce the barrier to entry is something that I'm personally passionate about.Corey: Scaling containers and scaling Kubernetes is hard, but a whole ‘nother level of difficulty is scaling humans. You've been at Google for, as you said, seven years and you did not start as a VP there. Getting promoted from Senior Director to VP at Google is a, shall we say, heavy lift. You also mentioned that you previously started with, I believe, it was a seven-person team at one point. How have you been able to do that? Because I can see a world in which, “Oh, we just write some code and we can scale the computers pretty easily,” I've never found a way to do that for people.Chen: So yes, I started actually—well not 7, but the team was 30 people [laugh]. And you can imagine how surprised I was when I joining Google Cloud with Kubernetes and GKE and it was a pretty small team, to the beginning of those days. But the team was already actually on the edge of burning out. You know, pings on Slack, the GitHub issues, there was so many things happening 24/7.And the thing was just doing everything. Everybody were doing everything. And one of the things I've done on my second month on the team—I did an off-site, right, all managers; that's what we do; we do off-sites—and I brought the team in to talk about—the leadership team—to talk about our team values. And in the beginning, they were a little bit pissed, I would say, “Okay, Chen. What's going on? You're wasting two days of our lives to talk about those things. Why we are not doing other things?”And I was like, “You know guys, this is really important. Let's talk about what's important for us.” It was an amazing it worked. By the way, that work is still the foundation of the culture in the team. We talked about the three values that we care about and how that will look like.And the reason it's important is that when you scale teams, the key thing is actually to scale decision-making. So, how do you scale decision-making? I think there are two things there. One is what you're trying to achieve. So, people should know and understand the vision and know where we want to get to.But the second thing is, how do we work? What's important for us? How do we prioritize? How do we make trade-offs? And when you have both the what we're trying to do and the how, you build that team culture. And when you have that, I find that you're set up more for success for scaling the team.Because then the storyteller is not just the leader or the manager. The entire team is a storyteller of how things are working in this team, how do we work, what you're trying to achieve, and so on. So, that's something that had been a critical. So, that's just, you know, from methodology of how I think it's the right thing to scale teams. Specifically, with a Kubernetes, there were more issues that we needed to work on.For example, building or [recoding 00:23:05] different functions. It cannot be just engineering doing everything. So, hiring the first product managers and information engineers and marketing people, oh my God. Yes, you have to have marketing people because there are so many events. And so, that was one thing, just you know, from people and skills.And the second thing is that it was an open-source project and a product, but what I was personally doing, I was—with the team—is bringing some product engineering practices into the open-source. So, can we say, for example, that we are going to focus on user experience this next release? And we're not going to do all the rest. And I remember, my team was like worried about, like, “Hey, what about that, and what about this, and we have—” you know, they were juggling everything together. And I remember telling them, “Imagine that everything is on the floor. All the balls are on the floor. I know they're on the floor, you know they're on the floor. It's okay. Let's just make sure that every time we pick something up, it never falls again.” And that idea is a principle that then evolved to ‘No Heroics,' and it evolved to ‘Sustainable Success.' But building things towards sustainable success is a principle which has been very helpful for us.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend at Uptycs. Attackers don't think in silos, so why would you have siloed solutions protecting cloud, containers, and laptops distinctly? Meet Uptycs - the first unified solution that prioritizes risk across your modern attack surface—all from a single platform, UI, and data model. Stop by booth 3352 at AWS re:Invent in Las Vegas to see for yourself and visit uptycs.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S.com. My thanks to them for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: When I take a look back, it's very odd to me to see the current reality that is Google, where you're talking about empathy, and the No Heroics, and the rest of that is not the reputation that Google enjoyed back when a lot of this stuff got started. It was always oh, engineers should be extraordinarily bright and gifted, and therefore it felt at the time like our customers should be as well. There was almost an arrogance built into, well, if you wrote your code more like Google will, then maybe your code wouldn't be so terrible in the cloud. And somewhat cynically I thought for a while that oh Kubernetes is Google's attempt to wind up making the rest of the world write software in a way that's more Google-y. I don't think that observation has aged very well. I think it's solved a tremendous number of problems for folks.But the complexity has absolutely been high throughout most of Kubernetes life. I would argue, on some level, that it feels like it's become successful almost in spite of that, rather than because of it. But I'm curious to get your take. Why do you believe that Kubernetes has been as successful as it clearly has?Chen: [unintelligible 00:25:34] two things. One about empathy. So yes, Google engineers are brilliant and are amazing and all great. And our customers are amazing, and brilliant, as well. And going back to the point before is, everyone has their job and where they need to be successful and we, as you say, we need to make things simpler and enable innovation. And our customers are driving innovation on top of our platform.So, that's the way I think about it. And yes, it's not as simple as it can be—probably—yet, but in studying the early days of Kubernetes, we have been investing a lot in what we call empathy, and the customer empathy workshop, for example. So, I partnered with Kelsey Hightower—and you mentioned yourself trying to start a cluster. The first time we did a workshop with my entire team, so then it was like 50 people [laugh], their task was to spin off a cluster without using any scripts that we had internally.And unfortunately, not many folks succeeded in this task. And out of that came the—what you you call it—a OKR, which was our goal for that quarter, is that you are able to spin off a cluster in three commands and troubleshoot if something goes wrong. Okay, that came out of that workshop. So, I do think that there is a lot of foundation on that empathetic engineering and the open-source of the community helped our Google teams to be more empathetic and understand what are the different use cases that they are trying to solve.And that actually bring me to why I think Kubernetes is so successful. People might be surprised, but the amount of investment we're making on orchestration or placement of containers within Kubernetes is actually pretty small. And it's been very small for the last seven years. Where do we invest time? One is, as I mentioned before, is on the what we call the API machinery.So, Kubernetes has introduced a way that is really suitable for a cloud-native technologies, the idea of reconciliation loop, meaning that the way Kubernetes is—Kubernetes is, like, a powerful automation machine, which can automate, of course, workload placement, but can automate other things. Think about it as a way of the Kubernetes API machinery is observing what is the current state, comparing it to the desired state, and working towards it. Think about, like, a thermostat, which is a different automation versus the ‘if this, then that,' where you need to anticipate different events. So, this idea about the API machinery and the way that you can extend it made it possible for different teams to use that mechanism to automate other things in that space.So, that has been one very powerful mechanism of Kubernetes. And that enabled all of innovation, even if you think about things like Istio, as an example, that's how it started, by leveraging that kind of mechanism to separate storage and so on. So, there are a lot of operators, the way people are managing their databases, or stateful workloads on top of Kubernetes, they're extending this mechanism. So, that's one thing that I think is key and built that ecosystem. The second thing, I am very proud of the community of Kubernetes.Corey: Oh, it's a phenomenal community success story.Chen: It's not easy to build a community, definitely not in open-source. I feel that the idea of values, you know, that I was talking about within my team was actually a big deal for us as we were building the community: how we treat each other, how do we help people start? You know, and we were talking before, like, am I going to talk about DEI and inclusivity, and so on. One of the things that I love about Kubernetes is that it's a new technology. There is actually—[unintelligible 00:29:39] no, even today, there is no one with ten years experience in Kubernetes. And if anyone says they have that, then they are lying.Corey: Time machine. Yes.Chen: That creates an opportunity for a lot of people to become experts in this technology. And by having it in open-source and making everything available, you can actually do it from your living room sofa. That excites me, you know, the idea that you can become an expert in this new technology and you can get involved, and you'll get people that will mentor you and help you through your first PR. And there are some roles within the community that you can start, you know, dipping your toes in the water. It's exciting. So, that makes me really happy, and I know that this community has changed the trajectory of many people's careers, which I love.Corey: I think that's probably one of the most impressive things that it's done. One last question I have for you is that we've talked a fair bit about the history and how we see it progressing through the view toward the somewhat recent past. What do you see coming in the future? What does the future of Kubernetes look like to you?Chen: Continue to be more and more boring. There is the promise of hybrid and multi-cloud, for example, is only possible by technologies like Kubernetes. So, I do think that, as a technology, it will continue to be important by ensuring portability and interoperability of workloads. I see a lot of edge use cases. If you think about it, it's like just lagging a bit around, like, innovation that we've seen in the cloud, can we bring that innovation to the edge, this will require more development within Kubernetes community as well.And that's really actually excites me. I think there's a lot of things that we're going to see there. And by the way, you've seen it also in KubeCon. I mean, there were some announcements in that space. In Google Cloud, we just announced before, like, with customers like Wendy's and Rite Aid as well. So, taking advantage of this technology to allow innovation everywhere.But beyond that, my hope is that we'll continue and hide the complexity. And our challenge will be to not make it a black box. Because that will be, in my opinion, a failure pattern, doesn't help those kinds of platforms. So, that will be the challenge. Can we scope the project, ensure that we have the right observability, and from a use case perspective, I do think edge is super interesting.Corey: I would agree. There are a lot of workloads out there that are simply never going to be hosted in the cloud provider region, for a variety of reasons of varying validity, but it is the truth. I think that the focus on addressing customers where they are has been an emerging best practice for cloud providers and I'm thrilled to see Google leading the charge on that.Chen: Yeah. And you just reminded me, the other thing that we see also more and more is definitely AI and ML workloads running on Kubernetes, which is part of that, right? So, Google Cloud is investing a lot in making an AI/ML easy. And I don't know if many people know, but, like, even Vertex AI, our own platform, is running on GKE. So, that's part of seeing how do we make sure that platform is suitable for these kinds of workloads and really help customers do the heavy lifting.So, that's another set of workloads that are very relevant at the edge. And one of our customers—MLB, for example—two things are interesting there. The first one, I think a lot of people sometimes say, “Okay, I'm going to move to the cloud and I want to know everything right now, how that will evolve.” And one of the things that's been really exciting with working with MLB for the last four years is the journey and the iterations. So, they started somewhat, like, at one phase and then they saw what's possible, and then moved to the next one, and so on. So, that's one. The other thing is that, really, they have so much ML running at the stadium with Google Cloud technology, which is very exciting.Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing how this continues to evolve and progress, particularly in light of the recent correction we're seeing in the market where a lot of hype-driven ideas are being stress test, maybe not in the way we might have hoped that they would, but it'll be really interesting to see what shakes out as far as things that deliver business value and are clear wins for customers versus a lot of the speculative stories that we've been hearing for a while now. Maybe I'm totally wrong on this. And this is going to be a temporary bump in the road, and we'll see no abatement in the ongoing excitement around so many of these emerging technologies, but I'm curious to see how it plays out. But that's the beautiful part about getting to be a pundit—or whatever it is people call me these days that's at least polite enough to say on a podcast—is that when I'm right, people think I'm a visionary, and when I'm wrong, people don't generally hold that against you. It seems like futurist is the easiest job in the world because if you predict and get it wrong, no one remembers. Predict and get it right, you look like a genius.Chen: So, first of all, I'm optimistic. So usually, my predictions are positive. I will say that, you know, what we are seeing, also what I'm hearing from our customers, technology is not for the sake of technology. Actually, nobody cares [laugh]. Even today.Okay, so nothing needs to change for, like, nobody would c—even today, nobody cares about Kubernetes. They need to care, unfortunately, but what I'm hearing from our customers is, “How do we create new experiences? How we make things easy?” Talent shortage is not just with tech people. It's also with people working in the warehouse or working in the store.Can we use technology to help inventory management? There's so many amazing things. So, when there is a real business opportunity, things are so much simpler. People have the right incentives to make it work. Because one thing we didn't talk about—right, we talked about all these new technologies and we talked about scaling team and so on—a lot of time, the challenge is not the technology.A lot of time, the challenge is the process. A lot of time, the challenge is the skills, is the culture, there's so many things. But when you have something—going back to what I said before—how you unite teams, when there's something a clear goal, a clear vision that everybody's excited about, they will make it work. So, I think this is where having a purpose for the innovation is critical for any successful project.Corey: I think and I hope that you're right. I really want to thank you for spending as much time with me as you have. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Chen: So, first of all, on Twitter. I'm there or on LinkedIn. I will say that I'm happy to connect with folks. Generally speaking, at some point in my career, I recognized that I have a voice that can help people, and I've experienced that can also help people build their careers. I'm happy to share that and [unintelligible 00:36:54] folks both in the company and outside of it.Corey: I think that's one of the obligations on a lot of us, once we wanted to get into a certain position or careers to send the ladder back down, for lack of a better term. It's I've never appreciated the perspective, “Well, screw everyone else. I got mine.” The whole point the next generation should have it easier than we did.Chen: Yeah, definitely.Corey: Chen Goldberg, General Manager of Cloud Runtimes and VP of Engineering at Google. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry rant of a comment talking about how LPARs on mainframes are absolutely not containers, making sure it's at least far too big to fit in a reasonably-sized Docker container.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

BetQL Picking Fatties
Can the Commanders Hang with the Eagles?

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 25:49


Skippy and Bish recap this Sunday's action and some unbelievable melt downs by Buffalo and Dallas before turning their attention to potential survivor options for next week along with tonight's plays for Eagles and Commanders. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
Angela Lansbury Would Be Disappointed

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 54:17


Elon Musk unleashed the blue check mark and the internet goes wild. The crypto exchange, FTX, shows its true colors...and they don't look good. Elon Musk sends his first email to Twitter employees, and no one is happy. Doogles gets up in arms about a blog post about stock based compensation. The episode wraps with Mattress Mack winning big, and WeWork continuing to be WeWork. Join the Skippy and Doogles fan club. You can also get more details about the show at skippydoogles.com, show notes on our Substack, and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

BetQL Picking Fatties
How Can You Love the Packers?

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 22:32


Skippy and Bish recap yesterday's college football action and take a look forward at some potential survivor picks for next week. The guys then turn their attention to today's slate of NFL action and try to make sense of why people love the Packers today? To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
11 College Football Plays (11/12)

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 24:03


Skippy and Bish give out a ton of plays in college football with a close eye on TCU and Oregon for seeding purposes. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WBUR News
Lost-then-found vintage 45s tell story of record store legend Skippy White's role in Boston soul music

WBUR News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 7:31


Songs by Guitar Nubbit and Sammy and the Del-Lards join more than a dozen rediscovered tunes on a new compilation called "The Skippy White Story: Boston Soul 1961-1967."

BetQL Picking Fatties
College Football Contenders & Pretenders

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 21:22


Skippy and Bish look ahead to upcoming games with major conference title implications along with how one loss could completely derail some top dogs chances at making the College Football Playoff. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
Welcome to the Janet Jackson Market

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 53:17


Skippy learns that if you win the lottery, don't tell your family. Skippy and Doogles debate the Alibaba investment thesis. Doogles is way too excited about earnings season, starring Twilio and Meta. Consumer debt and CEO sentiment perpetuate negativity. The episode wraps with a discussion on the Freakonomics episode about personal finance gurus and the current state of worker productivity.Join the Skippy and Doogles fan club. You can also get more details about the show at skippydoogles.com, show notes on our Substack, and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

BetQL Picking Fatties
Betting Vols, Dawgs, Bama & LSU

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 27:39


Skippy and Bish dive into the biggest day of the year for college football with Tennessee vs. Georgia and Alabama vs. LSU only hours away. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
What Would You Do for the Powerball?

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 36:11


Skippy and Bish get started on their break down of Tennessee vs. Georgia and also get into some huge games outside of the power 5 conferences. Stick around to hear about the lengths the guys will go to win the Powerball. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
What Would You Do for the Powerball? | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 34:12


Skippy and Bish get started on their break down of Tennessee vs. Georgia and also get into some huge games outside of the power 5 conferences. Stick around to hear about the lengths the guys will go to win the Powerball. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

#liveandcreate
098 Music By Skippy (Performer, Artist)

#liveandcreate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 54:14


Musicbyskippy is the entertainment project of Luke "Skippy" Harbur. Dubbed "the meeting point of multi-instrumentalism, hip hop, and Broadway," the project has two albums of original music, collaborates with 20+ organizations, shares stages with 30+ individual performing artists, and is for all ages. Harbur's passion for musicbyskippy roots in receiving a life-saving liver transplant at the age of 11 months, giving him a second chance to live life to the fullest.We talk about practical tools for a more centered and calm life. And Luke also shares his passion for connecting with his audience in an authentic way. We also dive into the power of creating unique experiences and much more. Check out what Luke is up to here:musicbyskippy.com_____Listen to the latest single from Miguel's band Run With It's release called At Least You Tried here:https://open.spotify.com/track/4EMI0BjyBecX0qydREiWkE?si=113152a6e7ab4c7f______To contact Miguel Antonio for feedback or inquiries about the show - email booking@JustTheMiguel.comCheck out Miguel's band Run With ItRunwithitband.net#liveandcreate podcast is where the host Miguel Antonio (Singer Song-Writer and Entrepreneur) talks to artists and entrepreneurs about what it means to live a great life and create great things. Live and Create Conversations dive into guests' personal stories and inspiration. They often touch on the practicalities of either business or creation and then build into a philosophical discussion about life and creating art, music, and a better world. Miguel Antonio is the frontman for the band Run With It, and the host of #liveandcreate podcast.

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
It's Cool to Be Kind w/ W. David Marx (author of Status and Culture)

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 66:28


Skippy and Doogles chat with W. David Marx, author of https://www.amazon.com/Status-Culture-Creates-Identity-Constant/dp/0593296702 (Status and Culture). David discusses what creates status in society, the economics of status, the impact of status on culture, and more. It's a fun and interesting conversation about society. Join the https://skippydoogles.supercast.com/ (Skippy and Doogles fan club). You can also get more details about the show at http://skippydoogles.com/ (skippydoogles.com), show notes on https://skippydoogles.substack.com/ (our Substack), and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

Dropped Culture
Trick or Treat Reversed

Dropped Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 94:06


Today we are playing our episode about Trick or Treat from last Halloween completely backwards!!

The Sports Junkies
How to Bet Bengals vs. Browns | BetQL Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 21:16


Skippy and Bish quickly recap Sunday's NFL action before discussing the highly anticipated upcoming weekend of college football. The guys wrap it up by sharing their favorite plays for tonight's Thursday Night Football game. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
How to Bet Bengals vs. Browns

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 22:25


Skippy and Bish quickly recap Sunday's NFL action before discussing the highly anticipated upcoming weekend of college football. The guys wrap it up by sharing their favorite plays for tonight's Thursday Night Football game. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
College Football Playoff Elimination Weekend

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 32:14


Before taking a look at a few NFL games going on this afternoon Skippy and Bish talk college football with the biggest weekend of the year from eliminations from the playoff coming up. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
College Football Playoff Elimination Weekend | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 29:15


Before taking a look at a few NFL games going on this afternoon Skippy and Bish talk college football with the biggest weekend of the year from eliminations from the playoff coming up. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
Double Banging USC & Penn State

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 37:50


Skippy and Bish give out a ton of college football picks to get ready for today's slate of action. The guys are double banging Penn State and USC with a close eye on Oklahoma State as they climb the rankings. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Double Banging USC & Penn State | BetQL Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 34:51


Skippy and Bish give out a ton of college football picks to get ready for today's slate of action. The guys are double banging Penn State and USC with a close eye on Oklahoma State as they climb the rankings. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

InObscuria Podcast
Ep. 149: Covers From Beyond!!! - HALLOWEEN

InObscuria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 100:08


In our final week of Gothtober, your fiendish-yet-friendly ghouls bring you an episode all about bands playing other bands' songs! These happen to be familiar songs that you hear at every HALLOWEEN party this time of year! Most of these are in the mainstream pop world… scary!!! However, what vile and twisted interpretations can be made by our rock n' punk n' metal ambassadors??? Listen if you dare…What is it we do here at InObscuria? Every show Kevin opens the crypt to exhume and dissect from his personal collection; an artist, album, or collection of tunes from the broad spectrum of rock, punk, and metal. Robert is forced to test his endurance and provide feedback, as he has no idea what he will be subjected to every week. Our hope is that we turn you on to something that was lost on your ears, or something you've simply forgotten about, or that (in our opinion) should have been the next big thing.Songs this week include:Pulley – “Grim Grinning Ghosts (Disney's Haunted Mansion)” from Punk Rock Halloween, Vol. 2: Louder, Faster & Scarier(2019)Doctor Smoke – “Trick Or Treat (Fastway)” from Trick Or Treat - Single (2021) Punchline – “Ghostbusters (Ray Parker Jr.)” from Punk Rock Halloween, Vol. 2: Louder, Faster & Scarier(2019)Strung Out – “Bark At The Moon (Ozzy Osbourne)” from Punk Goes Metal (2000)Linger – “Zombie (The Cranberries)” from Linger EP (2005)Tsunami Bomb – “Dead Man's Party (Oingo Boingo)” fromPunk Rock Halloween, Vol. 2: Louder, Faster & Scarier(2019)Chuck Billy – “Thriller (Michael Jackson)” from Metal Thriller (2013)Dash Rip Rock – “Man Of Constant Sorrow (The Soggy Bottom Boys)” from Hee Haw Hell (2007)Visit us: https://inobscuria.com/https://www.facebook.com/InObscuriahttps://twitter.com/inobscuriahttps://www.instagram.com/inobscuria/Buy cool stuff with our logo on it!: https://www.redbubble.com/people/InObscuria?asc=uCheck out Robert's amazing fire sculptures and metal workings here: http://flamewerx.com/If you'd like to check out Kevin's band THE SWEAR, take a listen on all streaming services or pick up a digital copy of their latest release here: https://theswear.bandcamp.com/If you want to hear Robert and Kevin's band from the late 90s – early 00s BIG JACK PNEUMATIC, check it out here: https://bigjackpnuematic.bandcamp.com/

BetQL Picking Fatties
Lamar vs. Brady & Tonight's College Football Picks

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 30:08


Skippy and Bish break down tonight's Thursday Night Football matchup in the NFL along with a few games at the college level that they have their eyes on. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Lamar vs. Brady & Tonight's College Football Picks | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 27:08


Skippy and Bish break down tonight's Thursday Night Football matchup in the NFL along with a few games at the college level that they have their eyes on. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

2 Skippys
2 Skippy Tuesdays #12: Horoscopes

2 Skippys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 18:03


In this Tuesday edition we read each other's horoscopes. We here at the 2 Skippys program take Astrology very seriously. There were some shocking revelations. Tune in. As always DM us on Instagram @2Skippyspodcast with any questions or topics that you'd like us to discuss on our next episode. 

Recipe Club
Peanut Butter

Recipe Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:15


Creamy? Crunchy? Ground fresh at the co-op, or by the good people at Skippy? These questions and more are explored by three PB devotees, on the way to appraising an all-but-painless party trick of a dessert recipe (featuring an entirely different legume-based secret ingredient). Find the recipes for this and every Recipe Club on The Ringer's website, watch the video version of this episode on Spotify, and join the conversation (and cook along with us!) on Discord and Instagram. Host: Chris Ying Guests: John deBary and Priya Krishna Producer: Sasha Ashall Additional Production: Jordan Bass and Lala Rasor Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Mediocrity Plaguing the NFL | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 40:34


Skippy and Bish are back together to break down the landscape of college football, which teams outside of the power 5 conferences have areal shot at the College Football Playoff. The guys turn their attention to the NFL and try to make sense of the cluster of average to below average teams in the league right now. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
Mediocrity Plaguing the NFL (10/24)

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 43:33


Skippy and Bish are back together to break down the landscape of college football, which teams outside of the power 5 conferences have areal shot at the College Football Playoff. The guys turn their attention to the NFL and try to make sense of the cluster of average to below average teams in the league right now. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
Sideways Markets From Wayside School

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 56:49


Skippy and Doogles cover some bear market history to give a sense for how long this thing could last. They review JP Morgan's most recent Guide to the Markets. Skippy highlights the relationship between mental health and toxic work. The episode wraps with a brief rant on Peloton's former CEO's margin calls and a review of Open AI. Join the https://skippydoogles.supercast.com/ (Skippy and Doogles fan club). You can also get more details about the show at http://skippydoogles.com/ (skippydoogles.com), show notes on https://skippydoogles.substack.com/ (our Substack), and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

BetQL Picking Fatties
Sides & Totals for Every NFL Game (10/23)

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 32:24


Skippy and DB share a side or total for every single NFL game on this week's card. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
Biker Gangs & Fading 4th String QB's (10/22)

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 35:03


Skippy, Bish and DB kickoff their weekend with some golf and a run in with a lunatic member of a biker gang. Skip and Bish give out their college football plays for today and target a team down to their 4th string quarterback. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
Colorado Living & Football Fatties | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 25:31


Skippy break down their favorite plays for tonight's Thursday Night Football game and a few college football matchups they think have value. Skippy Boy is bitter about the weather changes in Colorado Springs this time of year and tells us how he really feels about it. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BetQL Picking Fatties
Colorado Living & Football Fatties (10/20)

BetQL Picking Fatties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 28:00


Skippy break down their favorite plays for tonight's Thursday Night Football game and a few college football matchups they think have value. Skippy Boy is bitter about the weather changes in Colorado Springs this time of year and tells us how he really feels about it. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
Wood You Mind Slowing Down?

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 43:38


Even Taco Bell can't escape this bout of inflation. Doogles can't comprehend how the Wall Street Journal let a recent stock diversification article go to print. Skippy calls out Cathie Wood's open letter to the Fed. Doogles highlights the indirect rebuttal to Cathie Wood by the investment research firm Strategas. The episode wraps with Mark Zuckerberg's failing persistence to be the face of Meta, and two pieces of listener mail. Join the https://skippydoogles.supercast.com/ (Skippy and Doogles fan club). You can also get more details about the show at http://skippydoogles.com/ (skippydoogles.com), show notes on https://skippydoogles.substack.com/ (our Substack), and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

The Sports Junkies
Week 7 College Football Fatties | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 30:43


Skippy and Bish go in depth on this week's college football slate of games before turning their attention to tonight's horrific Thursday Night Football matchup between Chicago and Washington. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sports Junkies
QB Guru's & Week 4 Recap | BetQL: Picking Fatties

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 36:35


Skippy and Bish examine top heavy QB position in today's game compared to the QB's in the 90's where the talent was more evenly distributed. The guys then turn their attention to tonight's Monday Night Football matchup with Los Angeles and San Francisco. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices