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The Tech Humanist Show
Why Human Experience? (vs Customer, Consumer, User, etc)

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 32:25


This week, we're exploring why it behooves businesses and business leaders to look at their users, consumers, customers, etc., as humans first. Slightly shifting perspective to consider the humanity behind purchasing decisions can lead to greater loyalty, more frequent use, and genuinely happier users, all of which add up to more business success and better outcomes for the world. Together with my guests, we discuss how human-centric decisions apply to various industries and how you can build better relationships that lead to success for all of humanity. Guests this week include Charlie Cole, Neil Redding, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Ana Milicevic, Cathy Hackl, Marcus Whitney, and David Ryan Polgar. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. Produced and edited by Chloe Skye, with research by Ashley Robinson and Erin Daugherty at Interrobang and input from Elizabeth Marshall. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube, or head to KOInsights.com. Full Transcript Kate O'Neill: When you buy something, you're a customer. But — to paraphrase a line from the movie Notting Hill — you're also just a person, standing in front of a business, asking it to treat you like a human being. Over the last two decades plus working in technology, I've often held job titles that were centered on the experience of the user, the consumer, or the customer. In fact, the term ‘customer experience' has been in use since at least the 1960s, and has become so common that a recent survey of nearly 2,000 business professionals showed that customer experience was the top priority over the next five years. And while generally speaking this emphasis is a good thing, my own focus over the past decade or so has shifted. I've realized that the more macro consideration of human experience was a subtle but vital piece missing from the discussion at large. Because when we talk about experience design and strategy, no matter what word we use to qualify it—customer, user, patient, guest, student, or otherwise—we are always talking about humans, and the roles humans are in relative to that experience. In order to refocus on human experience instead of customer, you have to change the way you think about your buyers. You owe it to yourself to think not just about how people can have a better experience purchasing from your company, but also what it means to be fully human within the journey that brings them to that moment, and the uniquely human factors that drive us to make decisions leading to purchase or loyalty. A recent piece by Deloitte shared in the Wall Street Journal echoes this idea and offers five ways to be more human-centric in business: 1) be obsessed by all things human, 2) proactively identify & understand human needs before they are expressed, 3) execute with humanity, 4) be authentic, and 5) change the world. That's what today's episode is about: using empathy and strategic business-savvy to understand what it means to be human, and how that intersects with the worlds of technology and business. Neil Redding: “When you look at everything that has to do with buying and selling of things, it's so closely tied with what we care about, what we value most, value enough as humans to spend our hard-earned money on. And so, the realm of retail reflects something really deeply human, and profoundly human.” Kate: That was Neil Redding, brand strategist and self-described “Near Futurist” focused on the retail space. He's right—buying and selling things has become deeply entwined with humanity. But when we purchase something, it's not because we think of ourselves as “customers” or “end users.” We buy because we have a need or desire to fulfill, and sometimes that need is purely emotional. A ‘customer' buys your product—a human buys your product for a reason. 84% of consumers say that being treated like a person instead of a number is an important element to winning their business. It does seem like business professionals are catching on, as 79% say it's impossible to provide great service without full context of the client and their needs. But understanding something isn't the same as putting it into practice—only 34% of people say they feel like companies actually treat them as individuals. One major difference is the question of framing. Customer experience frames the motivator as, ‘how effectively the business operates the events related to a purchase decision.' It drives companies to focus on improving their own metrics, like bringing down call center wait times. These may yield worthwhile outcomes, but they're inherently skewed to the business perspective and aligned to the purchase transaction. Focusing instead on human experience shifts the perspective to the person outside the business, and what they want or need. It allows consideration of the emotional state they may be bringing to the interaction, which leaves greater room for empathy and context. A human experience mindset suggests that each individual's unique circumstances are more important than aggregate business metrics, because the reason why that person is interacting with your company probably can't be captured by measuring, say, how long they might have to wait on the phone. You could bring that wait time to zero and it still may not have any impact on whether the person feels heard, respected, or satisfied with the outcome — or whether they want to engage with you again. But as fuzzy as it is to talk about human experience, we know that measurement is fundamental to business success, so we have to find a way to define useful metrics somehow. For each business, that number is likely a bit different. So how do you know whether your customers feel like they're being treated as humans instead of just numbers? Charlie Cole, CEO of the flower delivery website ftd.com, believes one answer is obsessing over customer satisfaction metrics. Charlie Cole: “The best way to win this industry is just kick ass with the customer. We obsess over NPS scores, uh, as kind of leading indicators of LTV scores.” Kate: If you're not familiar with the acronyms, allow me to decipher: NPS stands for Net Promoter Score, which measures how likely the customer is to recommend the business, and LTV in this context means ‘lifetime value,' or the amount a customer may spend at your business over the course of their lifetime. Charlie Cole: “But remember, it's not the receiver's lifetime, it's the sender's lifetime. I mean, think about it. My stepmom is—just had a birthday April 9th, and I sent her a plant. If I went on a website and picked out a Roselia, and she received an Azelia, she's gonna be like, ‘thank you so much, that was so thoughtful of you,' and I'm gonna be pissed, right? And so like, we have to make sure we optimize that sender NPS score. It was shocking to us when we looked into the NPS, when we first got to FTD, our NPS, Kate, was in like the teens! My CTO looked at it and he goes, ‘how is this possible? We send gifts, who doesn't like receiving gifts?' And so we were looking at this stuff and we realized like, this is how you win. And I think when people look at the world of online delivery, there's very few companies that are extremely customer-centric… and in our world it matters. It's births, it's deaths, it's birthdays, it's Mother's Days… it's the most emotional moments of your life that you're relying on us for, so I think that gravitas just goes up to the next level.” Kate: Net Promoter Score offers directional insight about the customer experience, but it still isn't quite measurement of the broader human experience. The typical NPS question is phrased, “How likely is it that you would recommend [company X] to a friend or colleague?”, which forces customers to predict future actions and place themselves into hypothetical or idealistic scenarios. It is also measured on a 1-10 scale, which is pretty arbitrary and subjective — one person's 9 would not be another person's 9. A clearer way to ask this and gain more useful human-centric data would be with simple yes/no questions, asking people about actual past behaviors. For instance, “in the past 6 weeks, have you recommended [company X] to a friend or colleague?” Other alternative measures include PES, or Product Engagement Score, which measures growth, adoption, and stickiness of a given product or service, and doesn't require directly asking customers questions about their past or future habits. Instead, data comes in in real-time and allows for a clear measurement of success relative to a product's usage. While these metrics are useful in various ways, one thing missing from them is emotion. As humans, we are animals deeply driven by our emotions: research from MIT Sloan finds that before humans decide to take an action—any action, including buying something—the decision must first go through a filtering process that incorporates both reason and feelings. Reason leads to conclusions, but emotion leads to action. And if a customer feels frustrated by the customer service they're experiencing—perhaps they feel like they are being treated like a number, and not a person—they'll file a complaint, share on social media, and tell their friends and family to avoid the business. These actions can be quite time-consuming, but people will give up their time to right a wrong they feel they've experienced. All this is to say that if you want to retain human loyalty or attract new people to your business, you have to create a positive emotional response in your customers, which means understanding more about who they are than simply what product they might want. Many businesses have discovered that one of the best ways to create an emotional connection with people is through branding. A great brand image can forge a permanent bond with someone who feels strongly that the company shares their values and practices what they preach. Once someone has connected a brand to their own identity, it becomes much more difficult to convince them to switch to another company—even if that company provides the same product at lower cost—because switching companies feels like losing a part of them. Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Director of the Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency, and Accountability team at Twitter, explored the concept of branding with me when she came on my show last year. Rumman Chowdhury: “Human flourishing is not at odds with good business. Some of what you build, especially if you're a B2C company, it's about brand. It's about how people feel when they interact with your technology or your product. You are trying to spark an emotion. Why do you buy Coke vs Pepsi? Why do you go to McDonald's vs Burger King? Some of this is an emotional decision. It's also this notion of value. People can get overly narrowly focused on value as revenue generation—value comes from many, many different things. People often choose less ‘efficient' outcomes or less economically sound outcomes because of how it makes them feel. A frivolous example but an extreme example of it would be luxury brands. Apple spends so much money on design. Opening every Apple product is designed to feel like you're opening a present. That was intentional. They fully understand the experience of an individual, in interacting with technology like a phone or a computer, is also an emotional experience.” Kate: If you're able to understand what people connect to about your brand, you can invest into magnifying that image. If your customer loves that you invest into clean energies, it becomes less important how much time they spend on the phone waiting for a service rep. Operational metrics can't show you this emotional resonance, so instead you have to think about what makes you stand out, and why people are attracted to you. Sometimes, however, human emotion has nothing to do with the product or brand in question, and more to do with the circumstances surrounding it. There's perhaps no better example of this than flowers, which can be given for myriad reasons, and usually at the extreme ends of the emotional spectrum. I'll let Charlie Cole explain. Charlie Cole: “For us, it's buyer journey by occasion. So, you are sending flowers for the birth of a newborn. You are sending flowers for the tragic death of a teenager. You are sending flowers for the death of your 96 year old great grandfather. You are sending flowers for your wife's birthday. I would argue that even though the end of all those buyer journeys is ‘flowers,' they are fundamentally different. And you have to understand the idiosyncrasies within those buyer journeys from an emotional component. You have to start with the emotions in mind. You're buying running shoes. The buying journey for like a runner, for like a marathoner, a guy who runs all the time, is emotionally different than someone who just got told they need to lose weight at the doctor. Someone who travels for business all the time versus someone who's taking their first ever international…travel. Like, my wife retold a story the other day to my aunt about how her first European trip was when she won a raffle to go to Austria when she was 17. And her, like, single mom was taking her to Europe, and neither of them had ever been to Europe. That's a different luggage journey than me, who used to fly 300,000 miles a year. And I think that if you take the time to really appreciate the emotional nuance of those journeys, yes there's data challenges, and yes there's customer recognition challenges, so you can personalize it. But I would urge every brand to start with like the emotional amino-acid level of why that journey starts, and then reverse-engineer it from there. Because I think you'll be able to answer the data challenges and the attribution challenges, but I think that's a place where we sometimes get too tech-y and too tactical, as opposed to human.” Kate: Another challenge unique to flowers and other products usually given as gifts is that there are two completely different humans involved in the transaction, each with different expectations and emotions riding on it. Charlie Cole: “There's two people involved in every one of our journeys, or about 92% of them: the buyer, and the receiver. So how do I message to you, I don't want to ruin the surprise! But I need to educate you, and oh yeah, I'm a really really nervous boyfriend, right? I wanna make sure everybody's doing it right, and it's gonna be there on time, and I need to make sure it's going to the right place… So the messaging pathways to the sender and receiver are fundamentally different. If you kind of forget about your buying journey, and imagine everything as a gifting buyer journey, it just changes the messaging component. Not in a nuanced way, but darn near in a reciprocal way.” And while some businesses struggle to connect emotionally with the humans that make up their customer base, the tech industry—and specifically social media companies—seem to fundamentally understand what it is that humans crave, in a way that allows them to use it against us. They thrive because they take something that is quintessentially human—connecting with people and sharing our lives—and turn it into a means for data collection that can then be used to sell us products that feel specifically designed for us. Like most of us, Neil Redding has experienced this phenomenon firsthand. Neil Redding: “We spend more and more of our time in contexts that we are apparently willing to have commercialized, right? Instagram is kind of my go-to example, where almost all of us have experienced this uncanny presentation to us of something that we can buy that's like so closely tied to… I mean, it's like how did you know that this is what I wanted? So myself and people close to me have just said, ‘wow, I just keep buying this stuff that gets presented to me on Instagram that I never heard of before but gets pushed to me as like, yeah it's so easy, and it's so aligned with what I already want. So there's this suffusion of commercial transaction—or at least discovery—of goods that can be bought and sold, y'know, in these moments of our daily lives, y'know, so that increasingly deep integration of commerce and buying and selling of things into our self-expression, into our communication, works because what we care about and what we are willing to buy or what we are interested in buying are so intertwined, right? They're kind of the same thing at some deep level.” Kate: Part of the reason this works is that humans crave convenience. Lack of convenience adds friction to any process, and friction can quickly lead to frustration, which isn't a mind state that leads to more business. The internet and social media has made keeping up with friends and gathering information incredibly convenient, so an advertisement here or there—especially one that looks and feels the same as everything else on our feed—doesn't bother us like it might in other contexts. And when those advertisements have been tailored specifically to our interests, they're even less likely to spark a negative emotion, and may in fact encourage us to buy something that we feel is very “us.” The big question for business leaders and marketers then is how do you digitize your business so that it emphasizes the richness of the human experience? How do you know which technologies to bring into your business, and which to leave aside? There are plenty of established and emerging technologies to choose from: Interactive email helps marketers drive engagement and also provides an avenue for additional data collection. Loyalty marketing strategies help brands identify their best customers and customize experiences for them. Salesforce introduced new features to help humanize the customer service experience with AI-powered conversational chatbots that feel pretty darn close to speaking with an actual human. Virtual and Augmented Reality website options allow customers to interact with products and see them in their hands or living rooms before they buy. With all the choice out there, it can be overwhelming. And t oo often, businesses and governments lean into the “just buy as much tech as possible!” approach without thinking integratively about the applications of said technology. Many companies are using that technology to leverage more data than ever before, hoping to customize and personalize experiences. David Ryan Polgar, a tech ethicist and founder of All Tech Is Human, explains why this method may not yield the results you think—because humans aren't just a collection of data points. David Ryan Polgar: “Are we an algorithm, or are we unique? I always joke, like, my mom always said I'm a, a snowflake! I'm unique! Because, when you think about Amazon and recommendations, it's thinking that your past is predicting your future. And that, with enough data, we can accurately determine where your next step is. Or even with auto-suggestion, and things like that. What's getting tricky is, is that true? Or is it subtly going to be off? With a lot of these auto-suggestions, let's say like text. Well the question I always like to think about is, how often am I influenced by what they said I should say? So if I wanna write, like, ‘have a…' and then it says ‘great day,' well, maybe I was gonna say great day, but maybe I was gonna say good day. And it's subtly different, but it's also influencing kinda, my volition. Now we're being influenced by the very technology that's pushing us is a certain direction. And we like to think of it, ‘well, it's already based on you,' but then that has a sort of cyclical nature to actually extending—” Kate: “Quantum human consciousness or something.” David: “Exactly! Exactly.” Kate: “Like, the moment you observe it, it's changed.” Kate: It's so easy, especially when you work with data, to view humans as output generators. But we're living in an age where people are growing increasingly wary of data collection, which means you may not know as much about the people whose data you've collected as you think you do. Becoming dependent on an entirely data-driven model for customer acquisition may lead to faulty decisions — and may even be seen as a huge mistake five years from now. Instead, I always talk about “human-centric digital transformation,” which means the data and tech-driven changes you make should start from a human frame. Even if you're already adopting intelligent automation to accelerate your operations, in some cases, very simple technologies may belong at the heart of your model. Here's Neil Redding again. Neil Redding: “Using Zoom or FaceTime or Skype is the only technology needed to do what a lot of stores have done during COVID, where their customers expect the store associate interaction when they come to the stores, they just create a one-on-one video call, and the shopper just has this interaction over videochat, or video call, and kind of does that associate-assisted shopping, right? And so you have that human connection, and again, it's nowhere near as great as sitting across a table and having coffee, but it's better than, y'know, a 2-dimensional e-commerce style shopping experience.” Kate: As a parallel to video conferencing, Virtual Reality has opened up avenues for new human experiences of business as well. Cathy Hackl, a metaverse strategist and tech futurist, explained a new human experience she was able to have during COVID that wouldn't have been possible without VR. Cathy Hackl: “I'll give you an example, like with the Wall Street Journal, they had the WSJ Tech Live, which is their big tech conference, and certain parts of it were in VR, and that was a lot of fun! I mean, I was in Spatial, which is one of the platforms, hanging out with Joanna Stern, and with Jason Mims, and like, in this kind of experience, where like I actually got to spend some 1-on-1 time with them, and I don't know if I would have gotten that if I was in a Zoom call, and I don't know if I would have gotten that in person, either.” Kate: Virtual Reality and video technologies have also opened up new avenues for healthcare, allowing patients to conference with doctors from home and only travel to a hospital if absolutely necessary. Marcus Whitney is a healthcare investor and founder of the first venture fund in America to invest exclusively in Black founded and led healthcare innovation companies; he explains that these virtual experiences allow for better happiness, healing, and comfort. Marcus Whitney: “Going forward, telehealth will be a thing. We were already on the path to doing more and more healthcare in the home. It was something that they were trying to stop because, is the home an appropriate place for healthcare to take place? Lo and behold, it's just fine. Patients feel more secure in the home, and it's a better environment for healing, so you're gonna see a lot more of that. I think we're finally gonna start seeing some real breakthroughs and innovation in healthcare. Most of the lack of innovation has not been because we didn't have great thinkers, it has largely been regulatory barriers. Remote patient monitoring was a huge one that came up in the last year, so now we have doctors caring about it. What moves in healthcare is what's reimbursable. They were always trying to regulate to protect people, but then they realized, well, we removed the regulatory barriers and people were fine, so that regulation makes actually no sense, and people should have more choice, and they should be able to do telehealth if they want to.” Kate: And that's just it: humans want choice. We want to feel seen, and heard, and like our opinions are being considered. There's another technology on the horizon that could give people more power over their technology, and therefore freedom and choice, that will likely cause massive change in the marketplace when it is more widely available: Brain-computer interface. Cathy Hackl explains. Cathy Hackl: “So I'm very keen right now on brain-computer interface. The way I'm gonna explain it is, if you've been following Elon Musk, you've probably heard of neuro-link—he's working on BCI that's more internal, the ones I've been trying are all external devices. So I'm able to put a device on that reads my brainwaves, it reads my intent, and it knows that I wanna scroll an iPad, or I've been able to turn on lights using just my thoughts, or play a video game, or input a code… I've been able to do all these things. And I'm very keen on it, very interested to see what's going on… I think the biggest thing that's stuck with me from studying all these technologies and trying them out from an external perspective, is that my brain actually really likes it. Loves the workout. Like, I'm thinking about it, and I'm like, the receptors here, pleasure receptors are like lighting up, I'm like ‘ohmygosh!' So I'm still sitting with that. Is that a good thing? Or a bad thing? I don't know, but I think these technologies can allow us to do a lot of things, especially people with disabilities. If they don't have a hand, being able to use a virtual hand to do things in a virtual space. I think that's powerful.” Kate: That story also illuminates the fact that there are many different types of people, each with different needs. Digital transformation has given people with disabilities a new way to claim more agency over their lives, which creates a brand new potential customer-base, filled with humans who desire freedom and choice as much as the next person. Now, let's talk about some companies who are doing at least a few q things right when it comes to the digital transformation of human experience. Starbucks, for instance. One of the worst parts of shopping in-store was waiting in line, and then the social pressure from the people behind you wishing you would order faster. If you weren't a regular customer, the experience could be overwhelming. When they launched their mobile order app, it tapped into a number of things that made the experience of buying coffee faster and easier, with all sorts of fun customization options that I never knew existed when I only ordered in-store. Now, even brand new customers could order complex coffee drinks — meaning in that one move the company may have brought in new customers and allowed the cost per coffee to increase — all without people feeling pressure from other shoppers, and without the inconvenience of waiting in line. Then there's Wal-Mart, who during the pandemic instituted ‘Wal-Mart pickup,' a service where people can shop online and pick up their goods without ever having to step into the store. The service is technically operating at a financial loss, but Wal-Mart understands that solid branding and convenience are worth more to their company's bottom-line in the long run than the amount of money they're losing by investing into this particular service. Of course, some businesses are better suited for the online-only world than others. As more companies attempt to digitize their businesses, it's incredibly important to tap into the human reasons that people wanted to engage with your business in the first place. In some cases, businesses have failed to make this connection, assuming that “if people liked us as a physical product, then they'll continue using us when we're digital,” or worse, “if we simply make people aware of us, they will become customers!” This assumption ignores human nature, as Ana Milicevic, a longtime digital media executive who is principal and co-founder of Sparrow Digital Holdings, explains. Ana Milicevic: “To be relevant in this direct to consumer world, you also have to approach awareness and customer acquisition differently. And this is the #1 mistake we see a lot of traditional companies make, and not really understand how to pitch to a digital-first, mobile-first consumer or a direct subscriber. They're just not wired to do it that way, and often times the technology stacks that they have in place just aren't the types of tools that can facilitate this type of direct interaction as well. So they're stuck in this very strange limbo where they are committed to continuing to acquire customers in traditional ways, but that's just not how you would go about acquiring a direct customer.” Kate: Acquiring those direct customers requires an understanding of what humans want—a large part of which is meaning. And how people create meaning in their lives is changing as well. Long before the pandemic, trends were already pointing toward a future where we live more of our lives online, but those trends have also been accelerated. So beyond digitizing your business, it may also be useful to invest time, money, and energy into discovering how the humans of the future will create meaning in their lives. Cathy Hackl discussed some of the trends she's seen in her own kids that show how today's children will consume and make purchasing decisions in a very different way than most modern businesses are used to. Cathy Hackl: “Something else that I'm noticing… y'know we're going to brick and mortar, but we're going to brick and mortar less. So you start to see this need for that virtual try-on to buy your makeup, or to buy clothes, and it's also transitioning not only from the virtual try-on into what I'm calling the direct-to-avatar economy. Everything from virtual dresses that you're buying, or custom avatars, y'know you're starting to create this virtualized economy. And this is the reason I always talk about this now, is my son recently did his first communion, and when we said, ‘hey, what do you want as a gift?' he said, ‘I don't want money, I want a Roblox gift card that I can turn into Robucks,'—which is the currency they use inside Roblox—'so that I can buy—whichever gamer's skin.' And, y'know, when I was growing up, my brother was saving up to buy AirJordans. My son doesn't want that, y'know, he wants Robucks, to buy something new for his avatar. This is direct-to-avatar; is direct-to-avatar the next direct-to-consumer?” Kate: Our online avatars represent us. We can customize them to directly express who we feel we are. Part of the reason this idea is so attractive is that many people—increasingly so in the context of online interaction—seek out meaningful experiences as our ‘aspirational' selves. We gravitate to the communities that align with facets of who we wish we were. And perhaps less productively, we may also choose to present the idealized version of ourselves to the world, omitting anything we're embarrassed by or that we feel may paint us in a negative light. But honestly, all of this makes sense in the context of making meaning, because humans are generally the most emotionally fulfilled when we feel empowered to control which ‘self' we present in any given interaction. With this much freedom of choice and expression, and with the complications of the modern supply chain—which I will talk about more in depth in our next episode—it's important to acknowledge that creating convenience and improving human satisfaction aren't going to be easy tasks. Behind the scenes, there is a tremendous amount of work that goes into providing a satisfying customer experience. Let's go back to the example of flowers and see what Charlie Cole has to say. Charlie Cole: “If it's too cold they freeze, if it's too hot they wilt, if UPS is a day late they die. And then, the real interesting aspect—and this isn't unique to flowers—the source is remarkably centralized. So the New York Times estimated that 90-92% of roses that are bought in America for Valentine's Day come from Columbia and Ecuador. And so, if anything goes wrong there, then you really don't have a chance. Imagine the quintessential Valentine's Day order: A dozen long-stem roses, New York City. Easy, right? I used to live on 28th and 6th, so let's say Chelsea. Okay, I've got 7 florists who could do it. Who has delivery capacity? Roses capacity? The freshest roses? The closest to proximity? The closest to the picture in the order? Who has the vase that's in the order? Did they buy roses from us? Because I like to be able to incentivize people based on margins they already have. And so without exaggeration, Kate, we have about 11-12 ranking factors that educate a quality score for a florist, and that's how it starts the process. But then there's all the other things, like how do we know somebody didn't walk into that florist that morning and buy all the roses, right? And so there's this real-time ebb-and-flow of demand because our demand is not ours! They have their own store, they have their own B2B business, they might take orders from some of our competitors. They might have their own website. We have no idea what any given florist happens in real time because they are not captive to us. What we've learned is the place we have to get really really really really good is technology on the forecasting side, on the florist communication side, and the customer communication side. Because I can't control the seeds on the ground in Columbia, but I can really control the communication across the entire network as far as we go, as well as the amounts the we need in various places.” Kate: Creating that small-scale, emotional human moment where someone receives flowers requires immense computing power and collaboration between multiple businesses and workers. Which is part of why Charlie Cole also believes that in some cases, the best way to help your business succeed is to invest in helping other businesses that yours interacts with. Charlie Cole: “Small businesses… I think it's our secret sauce. And I think COVID has shined a light on this: small businesses are the core of our communities. Right? They are the absolute core, and I think it was always nice to say that, but now we know it. And so here's what I think we do better than anybody else: we've invested more in helping our florists run their own small business independently of us than we have about optimizing our marketplace. We launched new POS software. We launched a new local website product where we're like the first person ever to become a reseller for Shopify because we made a custom platform for florists. We're just their website provider. They're actually competing with FTD.com in a lot of ways—but I think that's where we're gonna differentiate ourselves from all the other people that are perceived as, by small businesses, (their words not mine) leeches. Right? I think to actually effectively run a marketplace which is fulfilled by small businesses, you need to invest as much in helping them win their local market independent of you.” Kate: You could make the case that there is no more evolved human experience than choosing to help others. So if your business is engaged in activities that allow other businesses—and therefore humans—to thrive, you may also be building your brand in a direction that creates more customer loyalty than any exit survey or great service interaction ever could. Beyond understanding human emotions and needs, you can help your business by leaning into understanding how we create meaning. At our core, we are compelled to make meaning. Whether we realize it or not, meaningful experiences and interactions are the driving force behind many of our decisions, financial or otherwise. Meaning is different for everyone, but having it is vital to our happiness. If you are able to engage with potential customers in a way that helps them create meaning, or allows them to use your product to make meaning on their own, you are aligning your success with your customers' success, and that bodes well for the long term. At the end of the day, making any of these changes starts at the very top of your business. Leadership needs to set the tone, creating a culture that allows room for workers at every level to engage more meaningfully with customers, and with each other. (By the way, for more discussion on creating or changing work culture, you can check out our last episode, “Does the Future of Work Mean More Agency For Workers?”) Your effort will benefit not only your business, but society as a whole. Remember the Deloitte piece in the Wall Street Journal I mentioned at the start of the episode, with ways to be more human-centric in business? Number 5 on that list was “change the world,” and research from Frontiers suggests that the well-being of any society is directly linked to how the people living within it feel about their lives and purpose. How we do that may be as simple — and as complicated — as helping people to experience meaning at any level. While the technologies around us keep changing, the opportunity becomes increasingly clear for people who work around creating customer experiences and user experiences to open up the aperture to see humanity through a fuller lens. This way, as you set your business up for longterm success, you also advocate for making human experiences as meaningful as possible — and you just might be changing the world for the better. Thanks for joining me as I explored what it means to think of customers as human. Next time, I'll be exploring the supply chain and how, despite the vast technology involved, the closer you look the more you realize: the economy is people.

Konglomerat Podcastowy
Yellowjackets – sezon 1

Konglomerat Podcastowy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 109:06


Już jutro na antenie Canal+, a 30 czerwca również w Canal+ Online, zadebiutuje niepostrzeżenie pierwszy sezon serialu „Yellowjackets”. Choć produkcja Showtime cały czas utrzymuje 100% świeżości na Rotten Tomatoes, u nas słychać o niej niewiele. I czas najwyższy, aby to zmienić! W tym celu w wirtualnym studio spotkali się Szymas, Mando oraz Jerry, którzy postarają się Was przekonać, że nie chcecie ominąć tej produkcji. Akcja „Yellowjackets” rozgrywa się w dwóch planach czasowych. W przeszłości śledzimy losy dziewczęcej drużyny piłkarskiej, która w wyniku katastrofy lotniczej spędziła dziewiętnaście miesięcy w dzikich lasach Kanady. W teraźniejszości obserwujemy kilka uczestniczek tamtych wydarzeń, które próbują funkcjonować „normalnie”, jednak cały czas noszą w sobie traumę i tajemnicę sprzed lat. Dlaczego zachwyciła nas ta historia? Jak scenarzyści radzą sobie z rozpisaniem wydarzeń na dwóch płaszczyznach czasowych? Czy porównania do „Zagubionych” i „Władcy much” są zasadne, czy może bliżej „Yellowjackets” do pierwszej odsłony „True detective”? Jak całość wypada pod kątem aktorskim i na ile warstwa audiowizualna robi tutaj robotę? I w końcu, czy czekamy na drugi sezon? O tym wszystkim i wielu innych kwestiach posłuchacie w dzisiejszym podcaście. Uwaga: Pierwsza część jest bez spoilerów, ale nie mogliśmy sobie odmówić przyjemności, aby pozachwycać się niektórymi pomysłami twórców w części spoilerowej, która rozpoczyna się: 01:11:14 Oficjalnej playlistę serialu, o której wspominamy w odcinku możecie posłuchać tutaj. Przesłuchaj w Konglomeracie: https://konglomeratpodcastowy.pl/konglomerat-podcastowy/yellowjackets-sezon-1/ Posłuchaj nas na YouTube: https://youtu.be/Tk1Piim2hGo Nasz Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/konglomeratpodcastowy/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/konglomeratpodcastowy/

Focus economia
Pos obbligatorio, arrivano le sanzioni per le violazioni

Focus economia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


Dal 30 giugno 2022, all'obbligo di dotarsi di un Pos per i professionisti sono state associate sanzioni prima non previste. L'obbligo di accettarli è stato fissato nel 2012 e in teoria è valido dal 2014. Il decreto Pnrr2 (Dl 36) attua la norma, ma senza allargare il campo agli altri strumenti alternativi. La sanzione, per chi si rifiuta di accettare un pagamento tramite carta di credito, prepagata, bancomat e simili, è pari a 30 euro, aumentata del 4% del valore della transazione per la quale sia stato rifiutato il pagamento elettronico. Ne parliamo con Giovanni Parente, Il Sole 24 Ore, e con Ernesto Ghidinelli, Responsabile credito di Confcommercio. Industria: fatturato sale del 2,7% a aprile, è al top dal 2000 Continua ad aprile la crescita congiunturale del fatturato dell'industria che segna un record. Con un aumento del 2,7% rispetto a marzo, l'indice destagionalizzato "tocca il livello più elevato dall'inizio della serie storica" a gennaio 2000, osserva l'Istat. Rispetto all'anno precedente, corretto per gli effetti di calendario, il fatturato totale cresce in termini tendenziali del 22%, con incrementi del 21,8% sul mercato interno e del 22,5% su quello estero. La crescita rispetto al trimestre precedente è invece del 6,6%. Approfondiamo il tema con Andrea Prete, presidente di Unioncamere. G7, Draghi: speriamo risultato sul tetto al prezzo del gas prima di ottobre Il presidente del Consiglio Mario Draghi in conferenza stampa a Elmau alla fine del G7 ha detto che «tutti i leader concordano sulla necessità di limitare i finanziamenti a Putin, ma anche di rimuovere la cause dell'inflazione». «Questo G7 - ha aggiunto - è stato veramente un successo, i nostri Paesi hanno riaffermato piena e grande coesione, grande unità di vedute in particolare per quanto riguarda la guerra in Ucraina e le sue conseguenze». Tiriamo le somme del summit con Sergio Nava di Radio24.

Hospitality Hangout
Technology Is the Key to Survival | Season 7, Vol. 8: Slim Chickens Restaurants

Hospitality Hangout

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 42:57


In the latest episode of Hospitality Hangout, Michael Schatzberg “The Restaurant Guy'' and Jimmy Frischling “The Finance Guy'' chat with Tom Gordon, President and CEO of Slim Chickens Restaurants, to discuss, launching a fast-casual chicken concept, robotics, and why technology is key to survival.Gordon talks about the early days of his career. He shares that after college, armed with a finance and real estate degree, he was on the stockbroker track, but he quickly learned that he loathed the path. He decided to leave the world of Wallstreet for the restaurant industry, where he started waiting on tables and bartending. Gordon tells the guys that in 2001, he and his business partner, Greg Smart, began conceptualizing Slim Chickens, a fast-casual chicken tender restaurant. He shares memories of developing recipes in Smart's garage, along with their friends, who provided feedback on everything from breading, sauces, and sides. Gordon says, “You know we really are still tracking with the majority of stuff we put together back then in the garage. From the garage, we found our first spot, and the rest is, you know, 19 years of history.” Gordon shares some growth metrics around Slim Chickens, which officially launched in 2003. He says the brand currently has 170 units, including 23 International locations, and has plans to scale to 600 units by 2026.Frischling asks Gordon about the company's early adoption of technology and why it is a key to survival. Gordon talks about recognizing the importance of technology early on and embracing it. He says, “We were early adopters of better POS systems, digital menu boards, and being able to change products and LTOs on a quick pace and a quick run.” He adds, “I think the most consequential investment we made, and the thing we did was, we invested in a really robust app and loyalty system about a year before Covid showed up.” He talks about technology being table stakes for the future and shares how tech helped the brand sell, maintain comps, and communicate with their guests through Covid. He admits that without the technology being implemented early on, Slim Chickens would have been in a much different position today. He adds “That embracing of technology, app-based ordering, online ordering, curbside delivery through the app and then all the ancillary parts and pieces, I mean made the year 2020 for us, and made sure 2021 stayed on track and here we are in 2022.”Schatzberg talks about tech and innovation and asks Gordon to share more about the reactions employees are having to the food-running robots popping up in some of the Slim Chickens locations. Gordon shares that some franchises are testing the food-running robots and that they have been very open to embracing this type of technology. He says that while it's been fun for everyone to see the new robots, there were concerns from some team members who worried about the robots making mistakes, such as delivering food to the wrong table. However, once they saw the robot in action, working successfully over and over again, they realized the usefulness of such technology. Gordon is quick to point out that while robots are helpful, they aren't currently a complete replacement for people. He says, “Hospitality is hospitality. You got to take care of the guests, you got to seat people, and look them in the eyes and make sure they're happy. But I think this is an adaptable technology with the right footprint in a restaurant.” He adds, “It's a useful piece of the puzzle.”To hear Gordon's thoughts on automation, robotics, and more from his chat with Schatzberg and Frischling, check out this episode of The Hospitality Hangout on iTunes!This syndicated content is brought to you by Branded Strategic Hospitality.

Kwadrans z KangÄ…
Co dalej z KNG? | Kwadrans z Kangą #103

Kwadrans z KangÄ…

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 41:05


Jesteśmy na bieżąco! Zapraszamy i Was na kolejną, cotygodniową dawkę rozmów o ostatnich newsach ze świata krypto.

Rozmowy Saunowe
45. Zmienna rola managera w rosnącej organizacji

Rozmowy Saunowe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 12:50


Jak zmienia się to kim jest manager w szybko rosnącej firmie? Nagle przestaje być specjalistą, nie 'ogarnia' już wszystkiego tak dokładnie i dogłębnie, prawie cały czas spędza na spotkaniach... jakby nic nie robił... brzmi znajomo? Posłuchaj tego odcinka, a dowiesz się co z tym robić. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/saunagrow/message

Alarm
Soundsystém #6: Hudba, která tě ochrání před démony. Proč stará píseň Kate Bush uhranula generaci Z?

Alarm

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 61:47


Čtvrtá řada seriálu Stranger Things vrátila do hitparád osmdesátkový hit Running Up That Hill. Je za tím přetrvávající kouzlo zpěvačky Kate Bush? Našli dnešní posluchači v téměř čtyřicet let staré písni něco, co jim v popu chybí? Posádka podcastu Soundsystém rozebírala téma s hudební publicistikou Michaelou Peštovou, která vybrala desku měsíce a vysvětlila nám, proč americká písničkářka Angel Olsen na novém albu Big Time čerpá z country a americany. https://twitter.com/miloshroch https://twitter.com/jirispicak https://twitter.com/karlvesely https://twitter.com/MichaelaPest Líbil se vám nový díl podcastu Soundsystém? Podpořte nás v aktuální kampani na Darujme.cz. Nové díly oblíbených podcastů můžeme vytvářet jen díky podpoře našich čtenářů a čtenářek. www.darujme.cz/projekt/1206304

Konglomerat Podcastowy
Moje seriale cz. 98

Konglomerat Podcastowy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 44:22


Zapraszam na kolejny odcinek cyklu podcastów, w których całkowicie na żywca, bez przygotowania, pobieżnie i bez głębszej analizy omawiam seriale, które oglądam. Co polecam, czego nie polecam, a co definitywnie odradzam? Z założenia krótko i przekrojowo. W dzisiejszej audycji kontynuuję zaburzenie chronologii i choć nie zamknąłem jeszcze wcześniejszego sezonu, omawiam nadal serialowy sezon 2021/2022. Dzisiaj na warsztat bierzemy trzy tytuły: 0:01:00 – The Walking Dead, sezon 11B 0:16:35 – Stay Close, sezon 1 0:30:00 – Disney Gallery: Star Wars. The Mandalorian. Season 2: Finale Przesłuchaj w Konglomeracie: https://konglomeratpodcastowy.pl/konglomerat-podcastowy/moje-seriale-cz-98/ Posłuchaj nas na YouTube: https://youtu.be/2bgPFt-XfGE Nasz Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/konglomeratpodcastowy/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/konglomeratpodcastowy/

BCNランキング総合
今売れてるホームシアターシステムTOP5、デノン「DHT-S217(K)」が5週連続首位 2022/6/28

BCNランキング総合

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


「今売れてるホームシアターシステムTOP5、デノン「DHT-S217(K)」が5週連続首位 2022/6/28」  「BCNランキング」2022年6月13日から19日の日次集計データによると、ホームシアターシステムのじつばい台数ランキングは以下の通りとなった。5位は、サウンドバーHT-X8500(ソニー)4位は、DENON DTS Virtual:X & Bluetooth 対応サブウーハー内蔵サウンドバDHT-S216(K)(ディーアンドエムホールディングス)3位は、サウンドバーSR-B20A(ヤマハ)2位は、ホームシアターシステムHT-S100F(ソニー)1位は、DENON デュアルサブウーハー内蔵Dolby AtmosサウンドバーDHT-S217(K)(ディーアンドエムホールディングス)「BCNランキング」は、全国の主要家電量販店・ネットショップからパソコン本体、デジタル家電などのじつばいデータを毎日収集・集計しているPOSデータベースで、日本の店頭市場の約4割(パソコンの場合)をカバーしています。

BCNランキング総合
今売れてるワイヤレスキーボードTOP5、ロジクールが1位・2位独占 2022/6/28

BCNランキング総合

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


「今売れてるワイヤレスキーボードTOP5、ロジクールが1位・2位独占 2022/6/28」 「BCNランキング」2022年6月13日から19日の日次集計データによると、ワイヤレスキーボードのじつばい台数ランキングは以下の通りとなった。5位は、無線2.4GHz フルキーボード ブラックBSKBW120BK(バッファロー)4位は、無線薄型コンパクトキーボード ブラックTK-FDP099TBK(エレコム)3位は、無線薄型フルキーボードTK-FDM110TXBK(エレコム)2位は、MK295 Silent Wireless Combo グラファイトMK295GP(ロジクール)1位は、Silent Wireless Keyboard K295 グラファイトK295GP(ロジクール)「BCNランキング」は、全国の主要家電量販店・ネットショップからパソコン本体、デジタル家電などのじつばいデータを毎日収集・集計しているPOSデータベースで、日本の店頭市場の約4割(パソコンの場合)をカバーしています。

Podcast Nowoczesny Inwestor - Daniel Siwiec
Jak bez pieniędzy inwestować w nieruchomości

Podcast Nowoczesny Inwestor - Daniel Siwiec

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 11:11


To jak? Da się inwestować nie mając dużego kapitału na start? Czy koniecznie potrzebujesz zgromadzić środki na sfinansowanie swojego mieszkania na flipa? Wiem, że to przekonanie mega często was blokuje, dlatego dziś odcinek właśnie o tym: skąd wziąć pieniądze na flipa, jeśli nie dysponujemy takim kapitałem? Posłuchaj dzisiejszego odcinka!

Paliwo z Roślin
#79 Bike TransAlp - Jedzenie, Suplementacja, Leki

Paliwo z Roślin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 51:07


Treningi do siedmiodniowej etapówki MTB są bardzo trudne i wymagające. Siła, szybkość, wytrzymałość, technika i dobra motywacja w głowie. Huh, sporo tego!Dodajmy kolejne rzeczy, bez których wyprawa na Bike TransAlp bez dokładnego planowania może okazać się jeszcze trudniejsza.Żywienie, Suplementacja i Leki. Czyli co będziemy jeść każdego dnia wyścigu, od śniadania przed startem, żywienie podczas wyścigu, a także po jego zakończeniu?Jakie suplementy są niezbędne by uzupełnić potrzebne witaminy, minerały, energię i usprawnić proces regeneracji?Które leki mogą okazać się pomocne w razie wystąpienia chorób, zakażeń, poparzeń, ugryzień i innych dolegliwości?Mam wrażenie, że odpowiednia strategia przygotowania i logistyka przed wyjazdem są jeszcze trudniejsze niż same treningi i przygotowanie fizycznie, które mamy już za sobą.Czy jest tak rzeczywiście?Posłuchaj #79 odcinka podcastu Paliwo z Roślin i dowiedz się jak przygotować się żywieniowo i suplementacyjnie do wymagającej etapówki po Alpejskich szlakach.Dziś nie występuję w roli prowadzącego, taka niespodzianka! Dziś jestem gościem własnego podcastu, ależ to miła zamiana ról.Miłego odsłuchu!Pamiętaj by śledzić nasze poczytania na Bike TransAlp 2022!Rozpoczynamy wyścig 3 lipca. Przed nami 7 dni i w tym około 500 km i 19.000 metrów w górę!Zapraszamy na Instagram i Facebook, gdzie będziemy wstawiać codziennie nasze relacje.Radek i SylwiaRadek:IG: https://www.instagram.com/nie_hamuj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NieHamujStrona: https://niehamuj.pl/SylwiaIG: https://www.instagram.com/sylwia.maksym/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/paliwozroslinStrona: https://sylwiamaksym.pl/Bądź z nami i kibicuj, ogromnie potrzebujemy Twojego wsparcia :)

Aegis Comics of Alaska's Podcast
Episode 39 Origin Stories "My Buddy Ed"

Aegis Comics of Alaska's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 38:49


Lu's origin story of what motivated him to get into law enforcement and subsequently open a comic book shop.

BCNランキング総合
今売れてる完全ワイヤレスイヤホンTOP5、「AirPods Pro(2021)」が16週連続首位 2022/6/27  

BCNランキング総合

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


「今売れてる完全ワイヤレスイヤホンTOP5、「AirPods Pro(2021)」が16週連続首位 2022/6/27  」 「BCNランキング」2022年6月13日から19日の日次集計データによると、完全ワイヤレスイヤホンのじつばい台数ランキングは以下の通りとなった。5位は、ワイヤレスノイズキャンセリングステレオヘッドセット ブラックWF-1000XM3(B)(ソニー)4位は、ワイヤレスノイズキャンセリングステレオヘッドセット ブラックWF-1000XM4(B)(ソニー)3位は、AirPods with Charging CaseMV7N2J/A(アップル)2位は、AirPods(第3世代)MME73J/A(アップル)1位は、AirPods ProMLWK3J/A(アップル)「BCNランキング」は、全国の主要家電量販店・ネットショップからパソコン本体、デジタル家電などのじつばいデータを毎日収集・集計しているPOSデータベースで、日本の店頭市場の約4割(パソコンの場合)をカバーしています。

Real Vision Crypto
What To Expect From the Ethereum Merge

Real Vision Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 15:19


Ethereum is nearing the end of a multi-year initiative to overhaul its consensus mechanism. But seamlessly migrating an operating protocol from proof-of-work (PoW) to proof-of-stake (PoS) is not a simple task. Galaxy Digital's Christine Kim joins Real Vision's Ash Bennington to explain how developers plan to bring PoS to Ethereum via a “merge” of Ethereum's Mainnet and the Beacon Chain. Challenges and risks attend this kind of transition. But there are also many advantages, such as improved scalability and less centralization. What's next for Ethereum as we enter into a new era? Christine and Ash also talk about the bear market's impact on the crypto ecosystem and Lido's staked ETH tokens (stETH). Recorded on June 17, 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Powiększenie
Czy LGBT+ to „moda, która napłynęła z Zachodu”?

Powiększenie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 34:48


Czy rację mają ci, którzy twierdzą, że LGBT+ nie jest z Polski? Że sam skrót, ale i osoby, społeczność, queerowość, homoseksualność, transpłciowość są napływowe? I że napłynęły z Zachodu? Polską tęczową tradycję i historię odkrywamy w podcaście "Powiększenie". Posłuchaj!

K3 – podcast o dobrym życiu
#110 – Niewiedzenie (rozmowa z profesorem Bogdanem Barbaro)

K3 – podcast o dobrym życiu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 58:01


Bogdan de Barbaro był już raz gościem K3 (odcinek #53 „Dobre życie” – zapraszam Państwa!) Tym razem rozmawiamy o niewiedzeniu. Ciekawe słowo, prawda? Coś między niewiedzą a wiedzą. Niewiedza: wiadomo, nic dobrego. A wiedza? Samo dobro? Niekoniecznie: często zamyka się w doktrynerstwie, arogancji i przemocy. Niewiedzenie zaś jest bardzo ciekawe, w obu znaczeniach tego słowa. Jest ono wręcz warunkiem dobrej rozmowy: i w procesie psychoterapii, której mistrzem jest profesor de Barbaro, i chyba każdej.. Posłuchajmy! Foto: Rafał Masłow

Start - Le notizie del Sole 24 Ore
Che cosa c'è nel decreto Pnrr2

Start - Le notizie del Sole 24 Ore

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 9:10


Dalle sanzioni sul Pos alla carriera degli insegnanti fino alle partite Iva, guardiamo dentro al maxi emendamento per l'attuazione del PNRR. Inoltre, ci occupiamo del monitoraggio sul Covid e dell'anniversario della pubblicazione del primo libro della saga di Harry Potter.

Rozmawiamy o Twoim zdrowiu!
Łysienie plackowate - przyczyny, objawy, możliwości i metody leczenia

Rozmawiamy o Twoim zdrowiu!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 23:05


Łysienie plackowate to ciężka choroba, która objawia się patologicznym wypadaniem włosów. Jej przebieg nie jest jednorodny, przez co leczenie bardzo często trwa przez bardzo długi czas i wymaga dużej cierpliwości. Jakie są objawy i przyczyny tej choroby, co robić, gdy zauważymy pierwsze ogniska łysienia plackowatego i jak leczyć łysienie plackowate? Gościem Radiokliniki jest dr n. med. Tomasz Wasyłyszyn - dermatolog. Zapraszamy do wysłuchania rozmowy! Posłuchaj a potem przeczytaj >> https://radioklinika.pl/lysienie-plackowate-rozpoznanie-leczenie/

Urzeczywistnij swoje JA! Podcast Marty Iwanowskiej - Polkowskiej
JA.Kobieta#25 O Islandii, zmianach, szczęściu i odwadze do akceptacji swojego ciała. Rozmowa z Olą Kozimalą.

Urzeczywistnij swoje JA! Podcast Marty Iwanowskiej - Polkowskiej

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 64:23


Z moją gościnią poznałyśmy się na Islandii, gdzie prowadziłam warsztaty dla Kobiet z nażywania się, a Ola była jedną z Uczestniczek. Z odwagą i spokojem rzuciła wszystko w Polsce i przeprowadziła się na Islandię. By….? Tego dowiecie się słuchając. Ola Kozimala mówi o sobie “Kobieta szukająca”. Szuka swojego szczęścia i bardzo o nie dba. Ola to Mama trzech dziewczynek i żona wspaniałego męża… Posłuchajcie!Nasza rozmowa w kilku punktach: ⚡Co sprawiło, że Ola czuje się na Islandii, jak w domu?⚡Za czym tęskni?⚡Czy na Islandii można urzeczywistniać swoje JA?⚡Jak Islandia wpłynęła na postrzeganie swojej kobiecości?⚡Akceptacja własnego ciała… czyli o kulturze basenowej.⚡Czy Islandczycy się nażywają?⚡Relacje - czy są z nami zawsze?Zachęcamy do słuchania!To kobieca i mądra rozmowa. Daj znać, jak posłuchasz tego odcinka - napisz komentarz, udostępnij ten odcinek w sieci.Ola w sieci: https://www.instagram.com/kozimalove/ A jeżeli chcesz jechać ze mną na kolejne warsztaty na Islandię to zapraszam tu :: https://moonandback.pl/destination/odetchnij-islandia-mums-only/Pamiętaj, że możesz słuchać mojego podcastu nie tylko tutaj na stronie, ale też w aplikacjach takich jak, wystarczy wpisać #urzeczywistnijswojeJA:

Nauka To LubiÄ™
Zakazana broń na stanie rosyjskiej armii

Nauka To LubiÄ™

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 9:59


Sprawia wrażenie nieziemskiego efektu, ale jest śmiertelnie groźne. Wygląda jak śnieg, tyle że płatki śniegu nie świecą. To fosfor - bardzo aktywny chemicznie pierwiastek. Fosfor pali się bardzo jasnym płomieniem, a temperatura jego spalania jest bardzo wysoka i wynosi około 1300 st C. W efekcie podpala i niszczy absolutnie wszystko na co spadnie. Co gorsza, nie można go gasić… Dlaczego broń fosforowa jest zakazana? Czego jeszcze używa rosyjska armia, łamiąc Konwencje Genewskie? Posłuchajcie

Magdalena Hajkiewicz Podcast
#96 Wszystko, co słyszałaś o zdrowym stylu życia jest kłamstwem | Viola Urban i Justyna Świetlicka

Magdalena Hajkiewicz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 43:21


W 96. odcinku mojego podcastu rozmawiam z Violą Urban i Justyną Świetlicką o tym, jakie mają sposoby na budowanie nawyków i zdrowy styl życia. Chociaż różnimy się w podejściu do ćwiczeń i diety, to łączy nas jedno: dopasowałyśmy do siebie swoją aktywność i dietę, aby czuć się dobrze. Posłuchaj nagrania, aby dowiedzieć się:- Czy nawyki i rutyny każdemu będą służyć?- Co jest najważniejsze w dopasowywaniu do siebie zdrowego stylu życia?- Jak skupić się na procesie, a nie tylko na efekcie?- W jaki sposób polubić aktywność fizyczną?- Czy cele sylwetkowe są skuteczne i motywują?- W jaki sposób mieć więcej czasu na to, co dla nas ważne?- Jak żyć bardziej intencjonalnie?- W jaki sposób przestać dopasowywać się do innych i żyć w zgodzie ze sobą?- Jak podejmować decyzje, które będą dla nas dobre?- W jaki sposób znaleźć prawdziwą motywację?- Jak ułatwić sobie podejmowanie dobrych decyzji żywieniowych i skończyć z restrykcjami? Dzielimy się tym, jak dopasowałyśmy do siebie zdrowy styl życia i w jaki sposób podejmujemy codzienne wybory żywieniowe w zgodzie ze sobą. Mamy nadzieję, że wyciągniesz dużo dla siebie z tego odcinka!Test Via Character: https://www.viacharacter.org/survey/account/Register

Zaprojektuj Swoje Życie
Ludzka strona funduszy venture capital - Maciej Małysz - Inovo Venture Partners

Zaprojektuj Swoje Życie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 63:28


Trzeci muszkieter Inovo Venture Partners zawitał do audycji Zaprojektuj Swoje Życie. Macie Małysz zrobił w ramach Inovo już 40 inwestycji. W dzisiejszym odcinku nasz gość demistyfikuje fundusze VC, opowiada o największych wyzwaniach branży i dzieli się osobistymi doświadczeniami z pracy ze startupami.Posłuchaj rozmów z Partnerami Inovo:

Polski Daily
PD132 Gdzie spędzić latem weekend w Polsce? 3 miasteczka warte wizyty!

Polski Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 26:59


Będziesz w Polsce tego lata, ale tylko na kilka dni? Mieszkasz w dużym mieście i chcesz zrobić sobie weekendową przerwę poza miastem? Chcesz poznać Polskę bardziej prowincjonalną? Posłuchaj tego odcinka podkastu, a może zainteresuje Cię jedno z tych uroczych polskich miasteczek! No i koniecznie mi napisz, jeśli znasz inne ukryte perełki polskiej turystyki!Have you discovered the Polski Daily Club yet? If not go to https://www.polskidaily.eu/signup and join the club!

WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation
WBSP338: Grow Your Business by Learning the Pros and Cons of Blanket Orders Business Processes, a Live Interview w/ a Panel of Experts

WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 60:39


When it comes to blanket orders, the business community has mixed feelings about whether they add real value to the business. But their implementation could be all over the place as well. The legacy systems that didn't support the blanket order functionality natively had to come up with creative ways of handling them. These creative ways might include canceling the lines and adding new ones as the quantity gets released. Or they could be as dramatic as creating a completely new order. Irrespective of whether you like it or not. You will end up dealing with blanket orders as they might be driven by factors such as commodity pricing or securing critical components needed for your supply chain. So, where do blanket orders make the most sense?In today's episode, we invited a panel of cross-functional experts for a live interview on LinkedIn who brings significant expertise to discuss the pros and cons of blanket orders business processes best practices. We covered many grounds, including the difference between contracts, regular orders, and blanket orders and whether the blanket POs should be used. Finally, we discussed several other concepts related to blanket POs such as blanket orders for commoditized products such as MRO inventory and for the critical items and for the items where price fluctuates significantly. For more information on growth strategies for SMBs using ERP and digital transformation, visit our community at wbs.rocks or elevatiq.com. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the WBS podcast, subscribe on your favorite podcasting platform.

Kwadrans na angielski
KNA: Lekcja 210 (która jest godzina)

Kwadrans na angielski

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 19:49


W lekcji 210. wracamy do spraw podstawowych i uczymy się podawać godzinę jak i o nią pytać. Wszystko wyjaśnione powoli i dokładnie przećwiczone. O której godzinie słuchasz tego podcastu?-----------------------Jeżeli doceniasz moją pracę nad podcastem, to zostań Patronem KNA dzięki stronie www.patronite.pl/kwadrans. Nie wiesz czym jest Patronite? Posłuchaj specjalnego odcinka: https://kwadransnaangielski.pl/wsparcieDołącz do naszej społeczności na stronie www.KwadransNaAngielski.plLekcji możesz słuchać na Spotify albo oglądać na YouTube.Wszystkie nowe wyrażenia z tej lekcji w formie pisemnej są dostępne na stronie www.kwadransnaangielski.pl/210#polskipodcast

Merchant Sales Podcast
How to Compete with Toast (And Win!)

Merchant Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 13:40


Toast has 48K+ restaurant clients as of the fall of 2021 when they filed for their IPO. This is a huge number, but only represents about 5% of the total restaurant segment. In this week's edition of the Merchant Sales Insight, I worked with one of my favorite, truly processor agnostic POS systems, Quantic to provide a road map of what you need to offer in order to compete with Toast and win in the restaurant space.

Don Cheto Al Aire
Show de Martes 21 de Junio 2022

Don Cheto Al Aire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 44:04


Familiaaaa, Alguna vez se ha preguntado usted cual es el verdadero nombre del Chino? Si la Gissellona y Erazno realmente son pareja? Si Said es pasivo, activo o agresivo? O, si Don Cheto realmente es Michoacano??? Chan-cha-cha-chaaaaaaa…..Pos el dia de hoy hicimos nuestro primer “Ask Me Anything” AKA “Conozca un poco mas de su Estrella” donde usted nos pudo preguntar LO KE QUISIERA y mosotros se lo contestamos. Fue tan ePsitoso el sePmento que toy seguro que habra segunda y tercera parte pa' que se vaya preparando usted con su pregunta. Nomas haganos un favor y escuche el de esta mañana pa' que se de una idea de las preguntas que ya se hicieron. Gracias a todos los que participaron y gracias tambien a mis compañeros quienes fueron muy honestos al responder. Pa' que vea que aqui taen mosotros nos habrimos de capa y que no es nomas de “alla pa' aca”. De nuevo muchisimas GRACIAS

Powiększenie
Dlaczego Jarosław Kaczyński odszedł z rządu?

Powiększenie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 22:35


„Nie jestem już w rządzie; premier Mateusz Morawiecki oraz - z tego co wiem - prezydent Andrzej Duda przyjęli moją rezygnację" - ogłosił Kaczyński w swoim niepowtarzalnym stylu. O co chodzi? Dlaczego odszedł teraz? Posłuchaj w podcaście „Powiększenie"!

La Radio de la República

Señora bonita. Amigo amo de casa. ¡YA ES MARTES! El día más MEH de la semana. Pero usted no muera de aburrimiento que hoy también se desinforma. Es momento y es lugar. Pare la oreja, súbale a su radito porque estas son las noticias:-ESAS SON PURAS MENTIRAS… Falso de toda verdad lo del baño masivo en Nuevo León… Siguen sin bañarse, los muy petochos.-¡CANTATE UNA QUE SE SEPAN TODOS!… Claudia Sheinbaum responde al favorito Ebrard y debuta tocando su lira en Facebook… Que Viva El Rock.-YA NI LOS DEL TODOPODEROSO SE SALVAN… Asesinan a dos sacerdotes jesuitas en templo de Urique, Chihuahua. Ay Chihuahua.-Y EN LA MAÑANERA… ¡EL CASI 100!… AMLI asegura que de sus 100 Compromisos con la nación, ya cumplió 98… Ah, chirrión. Pos no nos salen las cuentas.Completamente en vivo y en directo. De Grupo Fórmula, transmitiendo a todo México y de aquí hasta donde llegue. Abriendo la conversación. Suspirando con nostalgia. Ya llegó el comentario incómodo, el análisis en corto, la nota gritada… Chumel Torres.

Dr. Tommy Show
Biden's Shadow Presidency, Trump vs. DeSantis, The War on Oil, Uvalde Fail, Return of the Fauc

Dr. Tommy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 43:07


Broadcasting from the Free State of Florida, home of the Stanley Cup Champion Tampa Bay Lightning who have pulled within 1 game of the Colorado Avalanche in the NHL Finals. Who is running the Biden Presidency. Biden? Harris? Buttigieg? We review a likely list and come to the conclusion that it's probably the Real Big Guy B.O. through Susan Rice and others. Biden's War on oil is for your own good. That's what the Left Elite tells us. They have the brains and power that you don't and know that high gas prices will bring about ______ and then Electric Vehicle Utopia. The Underpants Gnomes Plan comes to life in the Biden Presidency. New surveillance footage shows Uvalde police were on site with ballistic shield and rifles within 19 minutes, yet they still waited for an evil POS to continue shooting up children because.....no firepower. Simply awful. Trump vs. DeSantis for GOP nomination in 2022 ? Who would win? What is the best case scenario? Trump as consigliere? The Fauc is back (via his isolation room camera crew) with some Covid advice. Has some news for you. we're not getting to covid zero! Wow, and some more advice that you never thought of, wear a mask, get a vaccine. This guy is unbelievable. DoctorTommy.com/podcast

Mała Wielka Firma
404: Czy człowieka można rozwijać jak… aplikację? | Joanna Toboła-Pieńczak

Mała Wielka Firma

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 55:32


Czego można się nauczyć o rozwoju osobistym, pracując w branży IT? Jak w prosty sposób można się uchronić przed zaniżaniem własnych cen? Jakie trzy pytania pomagają żyć bardziej świadomie? Jak przygotować się do wyjazdu w nieznane i pracy na swoim? Posłuchaj rozmowy z cyfrową nomadką. Gość: Joanna Toboła-Pieńczak. Pełny opis odcinka MWF 404: https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-404 W tym odcinku: 2:11 P. Franckh „Prawo rezonansu” (recenzja) 6:05 Dlaczego Joanna zdecydowała się rzucić wszystko i zacząć pracować na własny rachunek, podróżując po świecie? 11:18 Jak przygotować się do dużej zmiany w życiu i zabezpieczyć się pod względem finansowym? 17:39 Jakie trudności napotkała Joanna na swojej drodze do realizacji planów? 24:27 Czego można się nauczyć o rozwoju osobistym, pracując w branży IT? 33:29 Na czym Joanna zarabia i skąd czerpie pomysły na swoje produkty? 45:32 Jakimi kanałami Joanna pozyskuje klientów zainteresowanych jej produktami? Posłuchaj też: 303: Jak każdy bez wyjątku może budować dobre nawyki | Michał Stawicki https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-303 311: Dlaczego potrzebujesz czegoś więcej oprócz usług? | Monika Serek https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-311 317: Rzuciła korpo dla własnej firmy – czy było warto? | Lidia Krawczyk https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-317 Bądźmy w kontakcie: Instagram: https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-instagram Facebook: https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-facebook YouTube: https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-youtube Zdobądź dostęp do dodatkowych materiałów! Dołącz bezpłatnie do Klubu MWF: https://l.malawielkafirma.pl/p-klub

Aegis Comics of Alaska's Podcast
Episode 38 How To Start a Comic Book Shop 2022 Part 2

Aegis Comics of Alaska's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 98:08


The conclusion of our 2 part series on how to open a comic book shop in 2022. Amie Jo and Lu discuss Inventory, Suppliers, Selecting Staff, Social Media, and Pull Lists. Owning a small business explained by the owners of a comic book shop in Alaska.

Tax Talks
351 | Point of Sale Systems

Tax Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 27:39


Inventory management and point of sale systems go hand in hand, but the focus is different. The systems we will discuss in this episode start with point of sale (POS) and then added inventory management (IM). The systems we discussed in the last episode started with IM and then added POS.

Powiększenie
Czy w mieście da się żyć wygodnie bez samochodu?

Powiększenie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 41:34


Oczywiście, że w mieście da się żyć bez samochodu - brzmiałaby najkrótsza odpowiedź. Większość z nas obywa się przecież bez auta. Ale czy da się żyć wygodnie? Sprawdziliśmy to "Powiększeniu"! Posłuchaj!

K3 – podcast o dobrym życiu
#109 – Granica (rozmowa z Pauliną Bownik)

K3 – podcast o dobrym życiu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 54:54


Doktor Paulina Bownik jest lekarką i aktywistką. To między innymi ona ratuje – także przed śmiercią - uchodźców, którzy błąkają się po lasach pod białoruską granicą i często są za nią wypychani. Paulina Bownik została właśnie nagrodzona Nagrodą im. Marka Edelmana, która powstała z inicjatywy Jego przyjaciół. To nagroda za „ratowanie człowieczeństwa”… W podcaście wystąpił także syn p. Pauliny, Nataniel oraz… … Posłuchajcie! I jeszcze wyznanie: to dla mnie jedna z najbardziej poruszających rozmów… Zapraszam Państwa. Foto: Rafał Masłow

O Zmierzchu
Diagnozy onkologiczne - Zdrowie Kobiety

O Zmierzchu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 57:59


Podcast Zdrowie Kobiety przybliża część z najbardziej powszechnych trudności w obszarze psychiki i zdrowia, na które są narażone kobiety. Przygotowany we współpracy z grupą FB Dla Każdej z Nas: https://www.facebook.com/groups/973094133447061. Diagnoza onkologiczna przynosi nam jedną z najcięższych informacji, jakie możemy poznać na swój temat. Jest zapowiedzią zagrożenia, którego się obawiamy. Jednak nie jest ani wyrokiem, ani nie definiuje tego, jak będzie wyglądało nasze życie. Moje dwie rozmówczynie przeszły nowotwory piersi i związane z nimi leczenie, pracują z kobietami chorymi onkologicznie i wyjaśniają, oswajają cały proces dla innych osób. Posłuchajcie Małgorzaty Ciszewskiej- Korona, psychoonkolożki z Fundacji Rak'n'roll oraz Joanny Górskiej, dziennikarki, prezeski Fundacji Silni Sobą.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Inventory is Everything with Jeff Flowers

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 67:46


Jeff Flowers and Joe Lynch discuss why inventory is everything. Jeff Flowers is the Chief Operating Officer of OneRail, a final mile delivery orchestration platform providing real-time visibility, actionable data, and data-driven optimization capabilities for its enterprise clients. About Jeff Flowers Jeff Flowers is the Chief Operating Officer for OneRail. Jeff's professional career began in accounting and finance roles within the Cable Television, High Speed Data and IPTV industry. Quickly moving towards his true passion of operations, Jeff spent 2006-2016 in various roles with the nation's largest building products Distributor, BlueLinx. In his last role at Bluelinx, Jeff was the General Manager of Metal Products Business Unit which generated $250M in revenue sourcing products from 17 different countries serving 18,000 SKUs to national, regional and local building products retailers. In 2016, Jeff partnered with Franklin Young to purchase PTI Security, a leader in Physical Access Control and with support from Source Capital, an Atlanta based Private Equity firm. While there, Jeff was the Chief Operating Officer of PTI where he served the teams that helped grow PTI to 72% market share and transform legacy diskette based software to a cloud based architecture with a leading electronic locking solution. When PTI was sold to HID Global in 2019, Jeff was fortunate to be offered the position of COO and CFO by Bill and Lisa Catania with OneRail where he serves the teams that work to implement, onboard service our customers as they leverage OneRail to productize end-to-end delivery fulfillment in order to create a leading competitive advantage. About OneRail Headquartered in Orlando, Florida, OneRail was founded in 2018 by Bill Catania, a serial entrepreneur from the FinTech world, and his wife, Lisa Catania. OneRail is a final mile delivery orchestration platform providing real-time visibility, actionable data, and data-driven optimization capabilities for its enterprise clients. OneRail's cloud-based “delivery switch” simplifies same-day and on-demand delivery execution by connecting the demand signal (POS, eCommerce, ERP) with an ecosystem of delivery networks and internal fleets, in real-time. The result of OneRail's centralized view of disparate final mile data enables data-driven optimization, positively impacting the dependability, speed, and cost of final mile fulfillment. Key Takeaways: Inventory is Everything Jeff Flowers is the Chief Operating Officer of OneRail, a last mile delivery solution that reduces delivery times and costs, while providing 100% visibility and a responsive customer experience. In the podcast interview, Jeff explains the importance of effective inventory management to supply chains. Inventory is tricky – buy too little and miss out on potential sales, but buy too much and your carrying costs rise. Managing inventory is very difficult and even the best firms have stumbled recently and it impacted their quarterly earnings. Below are some threats to successful inventory management that Jeff and Joe discussed: The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) contract expires on July 1. The ILWU is a labor union which primarily represents dock workers on the West Coast of the United States, Hawaii, and in British Columbia, Canada. The ILWU represents more than 22,000 workers at 29 ports and a strike would be a huge disruption to already brittle supply chains. With supply and demand becoming very unpredictable during Covid, many companies, particularly retailers, found themselves with too much of the wrong inventory and not enough of the right inventory. Jeff and his team at OneRail partner with many brands and retailers to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. Inventory placement and excess inventory are big problems that omni-channel retailers face. Companies can meet these challenges by partnering with OneRail. OneRail use technology, data, and a marketplace of transportation options to greatly reduce costs, while improving the delivery experience. OneRail's comprehensive 4-in-1 delivery fulfillment solution combines leading technology with a coast-to-coast courier network, a skilled 24/7 Exceptions team and a micro fulfillment labor force to solve last mile logistics more comprehensively than any other solution in the space. OneRail provides 100% visibility into the delivery flow, but it's way more than a visibility platform. With the right mix of leading technology, dependable couriers, and a vigilant customer experience (CX) team, customers get the ability to change delivery outcomes in real time. OneRail has the largest integrated courier network in the last mile space – a managed marketplace with instant access to 9 million drivers, 292 courier entities and more than 65 logistics companies across 220 major U.S. cities. Learn More About Inventory is Everything Jeff's LinkedIn OneRail LinkedIn OneRail The OneRail Story with Bill Cantania Delivering The Brand Promise With Eric Green The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

La Radio de la República

Señora bonita. Amigo amo de casa. ¡POR FIN ES VIERNES Y LOS CALZONES SOBRAN! Que comience la fiesta. Todos a la pista. Súbele, DJ. Pero momento… ¿Ya se desinformó? Pues primero, lo primero. Pare la oreja, súbale a su radito que estas son las noticias:-TOQUE Y ROL… 38 alumnos y la maestra se ponen bien chachalacos en una primaria en EdoMex. El que se mueve no sale.-CITIUS, ALTIUS, FORTIUS… Marcelo Ebrard propone que México sea sede de los Juegos Olímpicos 2036… El canciller propone y el presi dispone.-ESA MANO, ALBITROOOOO… Le juegan chueco a la Selección Mexicana y aterrizan de sorpresa en el Felipe Ángeles… Esa falta merece tarjeta.-Y EN LA MAÑANERA: AMLO asegura que la gasolina y la luz no aumentarán pese a inflación mundial… Pos ya le estamos, vimos, viendo porque se me hace muy gorda Antonia.Completamente en vivo y en directo. De Grupo Fórmula, transmitiendo sin escatimar en hertz a todo México y pueblos mágicos. Abriendo la conversación. Desamarrando el mixiote. Ya llegó la voz de una generación, el héroe sin capa, la más bichota… Chumel Torres.

The History of Computing
Research In Motion and the Blackberry

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 25:45


Lars Magnus Ericsson was working for the Swedish government that made telegraph equipment in the 1870s when he started a little telegraph repair shop in 1976. That was the same year the telephone was invented. After fixing other people's telegraphs and then telephones he started a company making his own telephone equipment. He started making his own equipment and by the 1890s was shipping gear to the UK. As the roaring 20s came, they sold stock to buy other companies and expanded quickly. Early mobile devices used radios to connect mobile phones to wired phone networks and following projects like ALOHANET in the 1970s they expanded to digitize communications, allowing for sending early forms of text messages, the way people might have sent those telegraphs when old Lars was still alive and kicking. At the time, the Swedish state-owned Televerket Radio was dabbling in this space and partnered with Ericsson to take first those messages then as email became a thing, email, to people wirelessly using the 400 to 450 MHz range in Europe and 900 MHz in the US. That standard went to the OSI and became a 1G wireless packet switching network we call Mobitex. Mike Lazaridis was born in Istanbul and moved to Canada in 1966 when he was five, attending the University of Waterloo in 1979. He dropped out of school to take a contract with General Motors to build a networked computer display in 1984. He took out a loan from his parents, got a grant from the Canadian government, and recruited another electrical engineering student, Doug Fregin from the University of Windsor, who designed the first circuit boards. to join him starting a company they called Research in Motion. Mike Barnstijn joined them and they were off to do research.  After a few years doing research projects, they managed to build up a dozen employees and a million in revenues. They became the first Mobitex provider in America and by 1991 shipped the first Mobitex device. They brought in James Balsillie as co-CEO, to handle corporate finance and business development in 1992, a partnership between co-CEOs that would prove fruitful for 20 years.  Some of those work-for-hire projects they'd done involved reading bar codes so they started with point-of-sale, enabling mobile payments and by 1993 shipped RIMGate, a gateway for Mobitex. Then a Mobitex point-of-sale terminal and finally with the establishment of the PCMCIA standard, a  PCMCIP Mobitex modem they called Freedom. Two-way paging had already become a thing and they were ready to venture out of PoS systems. So  in 1995, they took a $5 million investment to develop the RIM 900 OEM radio modem. They also developed a pager they called the Inter@ctive Pager 900 that was capable of  two-way messaging the next year. Then they went public on the Toronto Stock Exchange in 1997. The next year, they sold a licensing deal to IBM for the 900 for $10M dollars. That IBM mark of approval is always a sign that a company is ready to play in an enterprise market. And enterprises increasingly wanted to keep executives just a quick two-way page away. But everyone knew there was a technology convergence on the way. They worked with Ericsson to further the technology and over the next few years competed with SkyTel in the interactive pager market. Enter The Blackberry They knew there was something new coming. Just as the founders know something is coming in Quantum Computing and run a fund for that now. They hired a marketing firm called Lexicon Branding to come up with a name and after they saw the keys on the now-iconic keyboard, the marketing firm suggested BlackBerry. They'd done the research and development and they thought they had a product that was special. So they released the first BlackBerry 850 in Munich in 1999. But those were still using radio networks and more specifically the DataTAC network. The age of mobility was imminent, although we didn't call it that yet. Handspring and Palm each went public in 2000.  In 2000, Research In Motion brought its first cellular phone product in the BlackBerry 957, with push email and internet capability. But then came the dot com bubble. Some thought the Internet might have been a fad and in fact might disappear. But instead the world was actually ready for that mobile convergence. Part of that was developing a great operating system for the time when they released the BlackBerry OS the year before. And in 2000 the BlackBerry was named Product of the Year by InfoWorld.  The new devices took the market by storm and shattered the previous personal information manager market, with shares of that Palm company dropping by over 90% and Palm OS being setup as it's own corporation within a couple of years. People were increasingly glued to their email. While the BlackBerry could do web browsing and faxing over the internet, it was really the integrated email access, phone, and text messaging platform that companies like General Magic had been working on as far back as the early 1990s. The Rise of the BlackBerry The BlackBerry was finally the breakthrough mobile product everyone had been expecting and waiting for. Enterprise-level security, integration with business email like Microsoft's Exchange Server, a QWERTY keyboard that most had grown accustomed to, the option to use a stylus, and a simple menu made the product an instant smash success. And by instant we mean after five years of research and development and a massive financial investment. The Palm owned the PDA market. But the VII cost $599 and the BlackBerry cost $399 at the time (which was far less than the $675 Inter@ctive Pager had cost in the 1990s). The Palm also let us know when we had new messages using the emerging concept of push notifications. 2000 had seen the second version of the BlackBerry OS and their AOL Mobile Communicator had helped them spread the message that the wealthy could have access to their data any time. But by 2001 other carriers were signing on to support devices and BlackBerry was selling bigger and bigger contracts. 5,000 devices, 50,000 devices, 100,000 devices. And a company called Kasten Chase stepped in to develop a secure wireless interface to the Defense Messaging System in the US, which opened up another potential two million people in the defense industry They expanded the service to cover more and more geographies in 2001 and revenues doubled, jumping to 164,000 subscribers by the end of the year. That's when they added wireless downloads so could access all those MIME attachments in email and display them. Finally, reading PDFs on a phone with the help of GoAmerica Communications! And somehow they won a patent for the idea that a single email address could be used on both a mobile device and a desktop. I guess the patent office didn't understand why IMAP  was invented by Mark Crispin at Stanford in the 80s, or why Exchange allowed multiple devices access to the same mailbox. They kept inking contracts with other companies. AT&T added the BlackBerry in 2002 in the era of GSM. The 5810 was the first truly convergent BlackBerry that offered email and a phone in one device with seamless SMS communications. It shipped in the US and the 5820 in Europe and Cingular Wireless jumped on board in the US and Deutsche Telekom in Germany, as well as Vivendi in France, Telecom Italia in Italy, etc. The devices had inched back up to around $500 with service fees ranging from $40 to $100 plus pretty limited data plans. The Tree came out that year but while it was cool and provided a familiar interface to the legions of Palm users, it was clunky and had less options for securing communications. The NSA signed on and by the end of the year they were a truly global operation, raking in revenues of nearly $300 million.  The Buying Torndado They added web-based application in 2003, as well as network printing. They moved to a Java-based interface and added the 6500 series, adding a walkie-talkie function. But that 6200 series at around $200 turned out to be huge. This is when they went into that thing a lot of companies do - they started suing companies like Good and Handspring for infringing on patents they probably never should have been awarded. They eventually lost the cases and paid out tens of millions of dollars in damages. More importantly they took their eyes off innovating, a common mistake in the history of computing companies. Yet there were innovations. They released Blackberry Enterprise Server in 2004 then bolted on connectors to Exchange, Lotus Domino, and allowed for interfacing with XML-based APIs in popular enterprise toolchains of the day. They also later added support for GroupWise. That was one of the last solutions that worked with symmetric key cryptography I can remember using and initially required the devices be cradled to get the necessary keys to secure communications, which then worked over Triple-DES, common at the time. One thing we never liked was that messages did end up living at Research in Motion, even if encrypted at the time. This is one aspect that future types of push communications would resolve. And Microsoft Exchange's ActiveSync.  By 2005 there were CVEs filed for BlackBerry Enterprise Server, racking up 17 in the six years that product shipped up to 5.0 in 2010 before becoming BES 10 and much later Blackberry Enterprise Mobility Management, a cross-platform mobile device management solution. Those BES 4 and 5 support contracts, or T-Support, could cost hundreds of dollars per incident. Microsoft had Windows Mobile clients out that integrated pretty seamlessly with Exchange. But people loved their Blackberries. Other device manufacturers experimented with different modes of interactivity. Microsoft made APIs for pens and keyboards that flipped open. BlackBerry added a trackball in 2006, that was always kind of clunky. Nokia, Ericsson, Motorola, and others were experimenting with new ways to navigate devices, but people were used to menus and even styluses. And they seemed to prefer a look and feel that seemed like what they used for the menuing control systems on HVAC controls, video games, and even the iPod.  The Eye Of The Storm A new paradigm was on the way. Apple's iPhone was released in 2007 and Google's Android OS in 2008. By then the BlackBerry Pearl was shipping and it was clear which devices were better. No one saw the two biggest threats coming. Apple was a consumer company. They were slow to add ActiveSync policies, which many thought would be the corporate answer to mobile management as group policies in Active Directory had become for desktops. Apple  and Google were slow to take the market, as BlackBerry continued to dominate the smartphone industry well into 2010, especially once then-president Barack Obama strong-armed the NSA into allowing him to use a special version of the BlackBerry 8830 World Edition for official communiques. Other world leaders followed suit, as did the leaders of global companies that had previously been luddites when it came to constantly being online. Even Eric Schmidt, then chairman of google loved his Crackberry in 2013, 5 years after the arrival of Android. Looking back, we can see a steady rise in iPhone sales up to the iPhone 4, released in 2010. Many still said they loved the keyboard on their BlackBerries. Organizations had built BES into their networks and had policies dating back to NIST STIGs. Research in Motion owned the enterprise and held over half the US market and a fifth of the global market. That peaked in 2011. BlackBerry put mobility on the map. But companies like AirWatch, founded in 2003 and  MobileIron, founded in 2007, had risen to take a cross-platform approach to the device management aspect of mobile devices. We call them Unified Endpoint Protection products today and companies could suddenly support BlackBerry, Windows Mobile, and iPhones from a single console. Over 50 million Blackberries were being sold a year and the stock was soaring at over $230 a share.  Today, they hold no market share and their stock performance shows it. Even though they've pivoted to more of a device management company, given their decades of experience working with some of the biggest and most secure companies and governments in the world. The Fall Of The BlackBerry The iPhone was beautiful. It had amazing graphics and a full touch screen. It was the very symbol of innovation. The rising tide of the App Store also made it a developers playground (no pun intended). It was more expensive than the Blackberry, but while they didn't cater to the enterprise, they wedged their way in there with first executives and then anyone. Initially because of ActiveSync, which had come along in 1996 mostly to support Windows Mobile, but by Exchange Server 2003 SP 2 could do almost anything Outlook could do - provided software developers like Apple could make the clients work. So by 2011, Exchange clients could automatically locate a server based on an email address (or more to the point based on DNS records for the domain) and work just as webmail, which was open in almost every IIS implementation that worked with Exchange. And Office365 was released in 2011, paving the way to move from on-prem Exchange to what we now call “the cloud.” And Google Mail had been around for 7 years by then and people were putting it on the BlackBerry as well, blending home and office accounts on the same devices at times. In fact, Google licensed Exchange ActiveSync, or EAS in 2009 so support for Gmail was showing up on a variety of devices. BlackBerry had everything companies wanted. But people slowly moved to that new iPhone. Or Androids when decent models of phones started shipping with the OS on them. BlackBerry stuck by that keyboard, even though it was clear that people wanted full touchscreens. The BlackBerry Bold came out in 2009. BlackBerry had not just doubled down with the keyboard instead of full touchscreen, but they tripled down on it. They had released the Storm in 2008 and then the Storm in 2009 but they just had a different kind of customer. Albeit one that was slowly starting to retire. This is the hard thing about being in the buying tornado. We're so busy transacting that we can't think ahead to staying in the eye that we don't see how the world is changing outside of it.  As we saw with companies like Amdahl and Control Data, when we only focus on big customers and ignore the mass market we leave room for entrants in our industries who have more mass appeal. Since the rise of the independent software market following the IBM anti-trust cases, app developers have been a bellwether of successful platforms. And the iPhone revenue split was appealing to say the least.  Sales fell off fast. By 2012, the BlackBerry represented less than 6 percent of smartphones sold and by the start of 2013 that number dropped in half, falling to less than 1 percent in 2014. That's when the White House tested replacements for the Blackberry. There was a small bump in sales when they finally released a product that had competitive specs to the iPhone, but it was shortly lived. The Crackberry craze was officially over.  BlackBerry shot into the mainstream and brought the smartphone with them. They made the devices secure and work seamlessly in corporate environments and for those who could pay money to run BES or BIS. They proved the market and then got stuck in the Innovator's Dilemna. They became all about features that big customers wanted and needed. And so they missed the personal part of personal computing. Apple, as they did with the PC and then graphical user interfaces saw a successful technology and made people salivate over it. They saw how Windows had built a better sandbox for developers and built the best app delivery mechanism the world has seen to date. Google followed suit and managed to take a much larger piece of the market with more competitive pricing.  There is so much we didn't discuss, like the short-lived Playbook tablet from BlackBerry. Or the Priv. Because for the most part, they a device management solution today. The founders are long gone, investing in the next wave of technology: Quantum Computing. The new face of BlackBerry is chasing device management, following adjacencies into security and dabbling in IoT for healthcare and finance. Big ticket types of buys that include red teaming to automotive management to XDR. Maybe their future is in the convergence of post-quantum security, or maybe we'll see their $5.5B market cap get tasty enough for one of those billionaires who really, really, really wants their chicklet keyboard back. Who knows but part of the fun of this is it's a living history.    

Get Judged!
Episode #87 - Mourning Would

Get Judged!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 69:16


Guess who's favourite bear stops by for a pajama podcast?  John is back and he wants to talk poetry.  The boys all talk about what's the worst thing we've all said and why and why we such dicks?  You said dicks!!! This isn't an annual visit from John.  You said Anal! There is a come count in effect on this episode and Shakey and John therapyize each other!!Confused yet?If you like to  judge us just by listening - you should really go over to the Tick Tock and watch us make a fool of our selves. @getjudgedpodcast on all platforms. Dust off those gavels and get judging.  Comment, subscribe, DM, wave, poke, like, send nudes - whatever you want to do - just do something you lazy POS

Powiększenie
DPS w Jordanowie: dlaczego przez tyle lat znęcano się tam nad dziećmi?

Powiększenie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 37:03


"One widziały, że kontrole kończą się na kawie i ciastkach w gabinecie pani dyrektor” - opowiada Szymon Jadczak współautor reportażu „Piekło u zakonnic". Jak zmieniła się sytuacja mieszkanek DPS w Jordanowie po publikacji Wirtualnej Polski? Posłuchaj w podcaście "Powiększenie"

TEConnect Podcast
Retail POS Survey Deep Dive

TEConnect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 58:21


Selling point-of-sale technology is probably one of the hardest asks in the reseller channel. While there are thousands of businesses that need it, there are also a LOT of options on the market. So what moves the needle? What do retailers like or dislike about their current system? What would they change? What would make them switch? In connection with our recently published findings on BlueStar Nation, we're doing a deep dive into the survey results from over 80 retail owners about the technology their business uses every day. The answers were often surprising, but they tell an important story about what VARs can actually do to win more business and conquer POS inertia.   #VARValue - What would you do as a VAR with this information?   Subscribe to BlueStar Nation: https://nation.bluestarinc.com/   TEConnecting with us: Dean - Uber Eats Autonomous Delivery John - But really, what are the odds a malicious alien race could attack Earth?   Talk to us! Twitter - @TEConnectPod Email - TEConnect@bluestarinc.com Submit your ideas for topics, surveys, or guests: https://www.bluestarinc.com/us-en/landing-pages/podcast-topics.html   Sponsored by: Zebra Intelligent Cabinets Elo 3203L Interactive Display

Kwadrans na angielski
KNA: Lekcja 209 (4. urodziny podcastu)

Kwadrans na angielski

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 51:26


Jest to nasz specjalny odcinek urodzinowy, w którym przeprowadzimy ze sobą wywiady, podamy statystyki odsłuchań i odpowiemy na Wasze pytania.-----------------------------------------------Części tego odcinka:00:55 Statystki podcastu07:59 Wywiad z Anią12:55 Wywiad z Szymonem21:06 Pytania o podcast do Ani31: 12 Pytania o podcast do Szymona35:58 Pytania od słuchaczy-------------------------------Jeżeli doceniasz moją pracę nad podcastem, to zostań Patronem KNA dzięki stronie www.patronite.pl/kwadrans. Nie wiesz czym jest Patronite? Posłuchaj specjalnego odcinka: https://kwadransnaangielski.pl/wsparcieDołącz do naszej społeczności na stronie www.KwadransNaAngielski.plLekcji możesz słuchać na Spotify albo oglądać na YouTube.Wszystkie nowe wyrażenia z tej lekcji w formie pisemnej są dostępne na stronie www.kwadransnaangielski.pl/209#polskipodcast

The Bitcoin Podcast
The Bitcoin Podcast #393- Nothing To See Here, Move Along Now

The Bitcoin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 63:23


The change to POS on Ethereum is moving a long at a quick pace now. ### The Bitcoin Podcast Social Media ### Join-Slack: https://launchpass.com/thebitcoinpodcast Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/TheBitcoinPod... Website: http://thebitcoinpodcast.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebtcpodcast DADDAO: https://daddao.org/

Creative Shop Talk with Wendy Batten
CST 111. Recession Proof Your Shop - How Should We Prepare

Creative Shop Talk with Wendy Batten

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 23:29


There's no need to panic. The sky is not falling.  If a downturn in the economy is on your mind, let's talk about the things you need in place to go into it prepared if it happens... What can you do to be the best prepared and thrive?     I'm here to tell you, folks, it's not the end of your business or your self employed life. Many businesses THRIVE during tough times and I want you to be in the best possible position and be prepared for anything.   Get proactive. Not reactive. All with the right attitude and mindset.   Get intentional & efficient - with money, staff, inventory, etc. New customer acquisition - do you have a strategic marketing plan in place? Loyal customers - create that emotional attachment. Wow and delight them! Business Foundations - get really good at understanding inventory, POS systems, profit & loss + more. Positive Mindset - believe that your business is going to THRIVE!   “The biggest risk is not in what we're building. The biggest risk is not supporting what we're building.” Jeffrey Shaw, The Self Employed Life     Full show notes at https://wendybatten.com/111/    

RESTAURANT STRATEGY
Talking Entrepreneurship and Social Change with T2D Founder, Tom Foley

RESTAURANT STRATEGY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 73:27


#170 - Talking Entrepreneurship and Social Change with T2D Founder, Tom Foley ***** This week's episode is brought to you by: MARGIN EDGE Take control of your costs with using MarginEdge. Best of all? Listeners of this show get to try MarginEdge FREE for 30 days. No contract. No setup fee. Free and unlimited training and support. VISIT: marginedge.com/chip ***** This week's episode is brought to you by: 7SHIFTS 7shifts is a modern team management platform, designed by restaurateurs, for restaurateurs. It integrates seamlessly with the POS and Payroll systems you already use to give your team a competitive advantage. And guess what? Listeners of the show get their first 3 months FREE! VISIT: https://www.7shifts.com/restaurantstrategy ***** Tom Foley has a winding background that eventually led him to the restaurant industry. Now he's changing things up from the inside out. IMPORTANT LINKS: T2D - https://www.t2dconcepts.com Roots Southern Kitchen - https://www.rootssoutherntable.com Roots Chicken Shak - https://www.rootschickenshak.com Curious to see if you'd be a good fit for any of my coaching programs? Click the link to schedule a FREE 45-minute Strategy Session: https://www.restaurantstrategypodcast.com/schedule

Aegis Comics of Alaska's Podcast
Episode 37 How To Start a Comic Book Shop 2022 Part 1

Aegis Comics of Alaska's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 52:48


Part 1 of 2 part series. Want to open your own comic book shop in 2022? Check out this latest episode with Amie Jo and Lu as they discuss the pros and cons along with all the critical information you need to decide on whether to take the next step.

Hashr8 Podcast
The State of Public Markets | Joshua Lim | Compass Podcast

Hashr8 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 36:02


In a market downturn Bitcoin miners look to hedge their risk exposure with financial derivatives. In this episode of the Compass Podcast, Joshua Lim from Genesis Trading walks through the ways miners are positioning themselves financially to get through this bear market. Joshua Lim: https://twitter.com/joshua_j_lim Will Foxley: https://twitter.com/wsfoxley

Sickboy
The Mental Health Anguish of Escaping & Destroying the NXIVM Cult w/ Sarah Edmonson & Anthony Ames

Sickboy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 64:45


Sarah Edmonson and Anthony "Nippy" Ames are cult escapees and were the whistleblowers featured in the CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM and The Vow, the critically acclaimed HBO documentary series on NXIVM. If you are still somehow unfamiliar, NXIVM was an American cult that dabbled in sexual slavery among a handful of other evil crimes. Sarah and Nippy played a major role in locking up NXIVM's creepy weirdo POS founder for 120 years. This week Sarah and Nippy sit down with the fellas to dive deep into their experience with escaping a cult, how it affected their mental health and relationship, along with tips for communicating with friends or family that might find themselves dealing with abusive power dynamics in their own life. Be sure to check out their podcast A Little Bit Culty where Sarah and Nippy aim to help people understand, heal from, and avoid abusive situations, one little red flag at a time. Join the post-episode conversation over on Discord! https://discord.gg/expeUDN