Podcasts about Santa Fe

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  • 2,448PODCASTS
  • 7,146EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
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  • Aug 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Santa Fe

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Latest podcast episodes about Santa Fe

improv4humans with Matt Besser
LIVE in Santa Fe

improv4humans with Matt Besser

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 64:39


Eric Weiss, Michael Lovato, Rachel Michaela, and Danielle Schneider join Matt Besser for a LIVE improv4humans in Sante Fe! They take audience suggestions that inspire scenes about religious cars, shoe-shopping mermaids, cooking with a praying mantis, putting a fist through the wall, and more!

Get Legit Law & Sh!t
Alec Baldwin, The FBI and the Rust Shooting.

Get Legit Law & Sh!t

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 53:54 Very Popular


Check out our sponsors! Go to https://www.greenchef.com/EmilyBaker135 (https://www.GreenChef.com/EmilyBaker135) for $135 Off, plus free shipping! Use code LawNerd to get 20% off and Free Shipping. https://www.manscaped.com (https://www.manscaped.com) Visit https://thrivecausemetics.com/LAWNERD (https://thrivecausemetics.com/LAWNERD) for 15% off your first order. Alec Baldwin has continued to talk about the Rust shooting, the FBI has seemingly determined that the gun in question could not be fired without pulling the trigger, and the Medical Examiner has made their manner of death determination. A lot has happened in the Rust cases in the last week, and the District Attorney in Santa Fe hasn't made a charging decision yet.  Resources Alec Baldwin Interview Breakdown https://youtu.be/e6JN2j2aWYQ (https://youtu.be/e6JN2j2aWYQ)  Rust YouTube Playlist https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsbUyvZas7gJRVvIIF9jT5PfqCzlSMiib (https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsbUyvZas7gJRVvIIF9jT5PfqCzlSMiib)  Rust Podcast Playlist https://player.captivate.fm/collection/9300dfc2-7cd5-4c71-ac28-15c0b39cd2e0 (https://player.captivate.fm/collection/9300dfc2-7cd5-4c71-ac28-15c0b39cd2e0) 

Best Horse Practices Podcast
On the Fence: Adult Learning

Best Horse Practices Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 25:23


In this episode, we talk about adult learning. It's a topic suggested by Natalie in Montana and we got help bouncing it around with Liz and Chris in California. Natalie is working on a ranch and taking riding lessons. She sees roping calves and doctored and asks: Can I ever succeed at that level? As it happens, co-host Maddy Butcher was doing some adult learning with a few lessons with Katrin Silva in Santa Fe. Katrin's book, Ride with Feel: A Guide for the Rest of Us will be out soon! Our title sponsor is Lucerne Farms, producers of quality forage feeds.  I talked with Hannah James the other day. She helps run Lucerne and was up in Aroostock County, near their fields. Aroostock County is better known as “the county” in Maine. At over six thousand square miles, it is by far the biggest county east of the Mississippi. It is a very busy time of year for a forage company and Hannah had to keep it short because there was so much to do. But she let me know that Lucerne continues to be super supportive of what we're doing here AND of what we're doing at the Best Horse Practices Summit, the non profit education conference in Kentucky this October. So thank you, Lucerne Farms. We also thank Skratch Labs. If you're sweating, you should be staying hydrated with Skratch labs powdered drinks. So much healthier than gatorade or the shady rainbow collection of colored, sweet sports drinks out there. Oh and they have drinks for after a big workout, too. Like chocolate milk, but better. Enter "besthorse25" and get 25 percent off your order. Also, check out our BOGO offer at Cayuse Communications. Buy any book and get a FREE copy of A Rider's Reader: Exploring Sense, Science, & Sentiment. Here is a great article on adult learning. Top points to keep in mind, as mentioned by Liz: Find a great mentor and stay away from yahoos. Trust your instincts around safety, money spending, etc. Realize it's going to take time. Be patient. Build your toolbox for every situation. Also, she said: keep your beginner's mind. Chris Ellsworth's suggestions: Over time you're going to gain a bit of natural ease with what you do. It's important not to worry about it. Worrying tends to get in the way. Get past thinking that there is only one way. Think critically. A good mentor is someone who would be happy to see you surpass their ability someday. Reg Flags: Disrespect from a trainer or having him/her teaching something that does not improve you. We thank Kate's Real Food and Patagonia WorkWear for their continued support. Did you know? All ya gotta do is comment or suggest a podcast topic or send us a training question here and you'll be automatically qualified for our monthly Patagonia WorkWear giveaway.

Talk Tennis
Attn: Tennis Fashionistas! Brad Singer, founder of Lucky in Love, previews the Santa Fe Glow Collection! He also gives us styling tips & we are giving away a tennis outfit!

Talk Tennis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 36:57 Very Popular


In this episode we find ourselves LUCKY IN LOVE! Brad Singer, Founder & Creative Director of Lucky in Love joins us today to debut their newest collection! He has taken women's tennis fashion and style to new heights with fashion forward pieces featuring bright colors, vibrant patterns, and energetic prints that compliment women's figures on and off the court!  We get to hear all about what it's like designing endless collections of tennis gear and what sets Lucky in Love apart from everyone else. Learn about where Brad finds his inspiration and what he does if he ever burns out (spoiler alert: he loves what he does and it's quite apparent as you listen!). Take a listen to what the Santa Fe Glow collection has to offer and you might even win an outfit from this collection! And if you are looking for a closer look, be sure to watch this episode on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/tenniswarehouse/featured  To win or lose in style. To feel on top of the world. To be…Lucky in Love.  Shop the Santa Fe Glow Collection: https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Lucky_in_Love_Santa_Fe_Glow_Tennis_Collection/catpage-WALIL18.html  And let us know where you would wear your Lucky in Love outfit to enter to win a bit of the Santa Fe Glow collection!  If you have any further questions or want to continue the conversation?! Email us at podcast@tennis-warehouse.com   Shop with us for all your TENNIS needs all over the WORLD:

Back to the Future: The Podcast
Do I Know Your Mother? (Stella Baines) with Frances Lee McCain

Back to the Future: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 47:42


July 3rd, 1985 - a day that a little time travel movie produced by Steven Spielberg and directed by Robert Zemeckis called Back to the Future was released to the public. This podcast will dive into the world of BTTF, and discuss the movies, characters, and behind-the-scenes details on one of the greatest trilogies of all time. So buckle in, make sure your flux capacitor is fluxing, and enjoy the 88 mile per hour adventure of the Back to the Future trilogy. FRANCES LEE MCCAIN returned to New York where she appeared on Broadway in Woody Allen's Play it Again Sam, and off-Broadway in Lanford Wilson's Lemon Sky, creating the role of Carol. She joined the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco under William Ball and played a variety of roles in repertory. Apple's Way TV show (1974-75) and other 1970s work She began her career in film and television after appearing opposite Jon Voight and Faye Dunaway in A Streetcar Named Desire, eventually co-starring with Ronny Cox as the female lead in her own television series, CBS-TV's Apple's Way in 1974. She appeared in a variety of television series and miniseries throughout the 1970s, including the Quincy ME episode Eye Of The Needle playing a Holistic practitioner. In 1978 she played Charles Grodin's wife in Albert Brooks' debut feature film, Real Life. 1980s acting work In the 1980s, she was cast in several major films, usually always playing the mother of a main character. In 1984, she co-starred in the blockbuster film Gremlins as Lynn Peltzer, the mother of main character, Billy Peltzer (played by Zach Galligan). Also that year, she played Ethel McCormack, mother to Kevin Bacon's character, in Footloose. In 1985 she appeared in the hit film Back to the Future as Stella Baines, the mother to the character played by Lea Thompson. In 1986, she played the role of Mrs. Lachance, the mother of Gordie Lachance (played by Wil Wheaton), in the hit drama film Stand by Me. Later work McCain continued to work in television after relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1980s and also appeared in Scream (1996) as the mother of Rose McGowan's character, and Patch Adams (1998). She received a Master's Degree in Psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies in 2000, and continues to work in Theater extensively in the San Francisco Area. In 2004 McCain initiated a theater project based on oral histories of the blue collar workers responsible for the building and maintaining of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico which received workshop readings at the Lensic Center for Performing Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, most recently at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McCain is an Associate Artist of the ZSpace Studio in San Francisco, and is an ensemble member of the AlterTheater Ensemble in San Rafael, California. Order the "Back from the Future" paperback with expanded material! Amazon- https://bit.ly/BackFromTheFutureBook Bookshop- https://bit.ly/BackFromTheFuturebook Barnes and Noble- https://bit.ly/BackFromtheFutureBook Mango- https://bit.ly/BackfromTheFutureBook Chapters indigo- https://bit.ly/BackFromThefutureBook Buy the BACK FROM THE FUTURE Book. ORDER: BOND, James Bond now! CLICK HERE. Back to the Future: The Podcast is produced and presented by Brad Gilmore, and is not affiliated with the Back to the Future franchise. This show is meant for entertainment and documentary purposes only, and does not intend to infringe on any copyrights of Universal Pictures, Back to the Future, or any of its characters, clips or music. Brad Gilmore expresses views and statements which represent that of the hosts and the guests of the program alone. The statements made on this program are in no way intended to represent views of any other organization affiliated with the hosts or guests and in no way represent the views of the sponsors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Opperman Report
THE KIDS OF SANTA FE - THE LARGEST UNKNOWN MASS SHOOTING

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 57:32


On May 18th, 2018 a student at Santa Fe High School executed 10 people and wounded 13 others. Amongst the 10 people murdered were two educators and eight students. The shooting took roughly half an hour before the killer was arrested. Acclaimed filmmaker Charlie Minn explores all facets of this unknown mass shooting. The movie closely examines the students that were directly affected and what they are doing today. Three years later, the lack of transparency surrounding this tragedy remains intact. ​"The only way to get to the bottom of this thing is to do your own independent research and talk to as many people as possible." said Minn, who once worked as a producer for the hit television crime show "America's Most Wanted." Minn has also sold movies to LionsGate, Investigation Discovery and Gravitas Ventures. ​ "My movies represent innocent people who have been murdered. The Santa Fe mass shooting would certainly fall under that." said Minn.

The Opperman Report'
THE KIDS OF SANTA FE - THE LARGEST UNKNOWN MASS SHOOTING

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 57:32


On May 18th, 2018 a student at Santa Fe High School executed 10 people and wounded 13 others.Amongst the 10 people murdered were two educators and eight students. The shooting took roughly half an hour before the killer was arrested. Acclaimed filmmaker Charlie Minn explores all facets of this unknown mass shooting. The movie closely examines the students that were directly affected and what they are doing today. Three years later, the lack of transparency surrounding this tragedy remains intact.​"The only way to get to the bottom of this thing is to do your own independent research and talk to as many people as possible." said Minn, who once worked as a producer for the hit television crime show "America's Most Wanted." Minn has also sold movies to LionsGate, Investigation Discovery and Gravitas Ventures.​"My movies represent innocent people who have been murdered. The Santa Fe mass shooting would certainly fall under that." said Minn.

CinemaScope's podcast
August 12th, 2022 with Native Cinema Showcase's Cindy Benitez & Filmmaker & Actor Morningstar Angeline

CinemaScope's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 27:00


In this episode, we're chatting with Native Cinema Showcase Program Manager Cindy Benitez and filmmaker and actor Morningstar Angeline about this year's showcase.   In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the Santa Fe Indian Market, the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian presents the annual Native Cinema Showcase, which takes place in Santa Fe from August 18 to 21. Native Cinema Showcase is an official program of the 2022 Santa Fe Indian Market, which is sponsored by the Southwest Association for Indian Arts.   About Morningstar, whose film Seeds is in the showcase: Born in Santa Fe and raised in Gallup and Los Angeles, Morningstar is a queer Navajo, Chippewa, Blackfeet, Shoshone and Latinx actor and filmmaker. Morningstar was just announced as the second-ever participant in NBCU's director's initiative and is a 2018 Sundance Indigenous Lab, 2020 Native American Feature Writers Lab and 2021 imagineNATIVE Directors' Lab Fellow and serves on the board of directors for the mixed-media company Tse'Nato'. As an actor, Morningstar recently had recurring roles in Outer Range and Westworld.   About Cindy: Cindy lives in NYC and has worked with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian for the past 12 years. Ten of those years have been with Native Cinema Showcase, of which she said this: "One of my favorite memories at Native Cinema Showcase is not necessarily the films or even the filmmakers. It's the incredible subjects that are in these films."   Attendance is FREE, and you can find info and the full program here (35 films, 30 Native nations, 10 Indigenous languages, eight countries): https://nmai.brandlive.com/native-cinema-showcase-santa-fe-2022/en/home.

Leyendas Legendarias
Historias del Más Acá 75 - Spiderman Fumigado (con Stephanie Cayo)

Leyendas Legendarias

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 41:14


Hoy en Historias del Más Acá:   Notas Macabrosas Joven es despedido tras ponerle lsd al agua de sus compañeros (Montse Espejo) La señora católica debuta como DJ en antro LGBT+ Perrito es abandonado con instrucciones de cuidado en un taxi Hombre secuestra a su esposa e hijos por 17 años (Pedro Escamilla) Niña mexicana de 11 años descubre un asteroide Aparece socavón de 25 metros de diámetro en Chile Muere ladrón “spiderman” de Santa Fe, Argentina   Encuentros cercanos Platicamos con Stephanie Cayo sobre algunos rumores conspiranoicos del mundo del espectáculo y su nuevo podcast “Ciudad Mágica”   ¿Tienes una noticia / suceso que te gustaría que comentemos? Escríbenos a sucesos@sincontexto.com con el asunto "Historias del Más Acá"   También puedes escucharnos en Youtube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts o tu app de podcasts favorita.   Apóyanos en Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/leyendaspodcast​   Apóyanos en YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/leyendaslegendarias/join   Síguenos: https://instagram.com/leyendaspodcast​ https://twitter.com/leyendaspodcast​ https://facebook.com/leyendaspodcast​   #Podcast​ #LeyendasLegendarias​ #HistoriasDelMasAcaPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/leyendaspodcast

Leyendas Legendarias
Historias del Más Acá 75 - Spiderman Fumigado (con Stephanie Cayo)

Leyendas Legendarias

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 41:14


Hoy en Historias del Más Acá:   Notas Macabrosas Joven es despedido tras ponerle lsd al agua de sus compañeros (Montse Espejo) La señora católica debuta como DJ en antro LGBT+ Perrito es abandonado con instrucciones de cuidado en un taxi Hombre secuestra a su esposa e hijos por 17 años (Pedro Escamilla) Niña mexicana de 11 años descubre un asteroide Aparece socavón de 25 metros de diámetro en Chile Muere ladrón “spiderman” de Santa Fe, Argentina   Encuentros cercanos Platicamos con Stephanie Cayo sobre algunos rumores conspiranoicos del mundo del espectáculo y su nuevo podcast “Ciudad Mágica”   ¿Tienes una noticia / suceso que te gustaría que comentemos? Escríbenos a sucesos@sincontexto.com con el asunto "Historias del Más Acá"   También puedes escucharnos en Youtube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts o tu app de podcasts favorita.   Apóyanos en Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/leyendaspodcast​   Apóyanos en YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/leyendaslegendarias/join   Síguenos: https://instagram.com/leyendaspodcast​ https://twitter.com/leyendaspodcast​ https://facebook.com/leyendaspodcast​   #Podcast​ #LeyendasLegendarias​ #HistoriasDelMasAcaPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/leyendaspodcast

Big Blend Radio
Innkeepers Steve Hiatt and Dan Clark - Fall Adventures in New Mexico

Big Blend Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 47:00


From bird watching and train rides to cultural festivals and flavors, this episode of Big Blend Radio's 2nd Thursday "New Mexico Bed & Breakfast Association" Show focuses on fall events and activities in New Mexico, "The Land of Enchantment." Featured Guests: - Steve Hiatt - Bottger Mansion of Old Town in Albuquerque - https://bottger.com/ - Dan Clark - Inn of the Turquoise Bear in Santa Fe - https://www.turquoisebear.com/ Stay New Mexico True and Visit: https://www.nmbba.org/ 

Windowsill Chats
Sparking Curiosity Through Visual Narrative, Unique Forms of Inspiration, and the Power of Storytelling with Deborah Stein

Windowsill Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 87:33 Very Popular


Margo chats with Deborah Stein who lives, paints and writes in NYC and the Embudo Valley in New Mexico. Deborah is a fine artist who teaches visual narrative workshops, runs (usually) twice a year artist residencies and is one of the proud hosts of folktale week along with illustrator-friends she admires. She ran her first creative live retreat at the lovely Highlights Foundation in rural PA this past Spring and is working on book projects (and possibilities for projects) and getting ready to show her work in August at The LDBA Studio in Santa Fe who she also designed a watercolor palette for called “Imagined Landscapes".   Margo and Deborah discuss:  Following your own skills and ideas The power of art, music, and storytelling Having your work copied and how to come out on top How she encourages people to be themselves and follow their passions Ways to spark your own curiosity Experiencing sorrow and grief and how it in a way inspires her StoryCamp Disco: what it is and how she came up with it   When she's not drawing, painting, writing or leading workshops and live art classes for kids and adults on and off-line, she can be found writing down her thoughts, looking closely at the complexities of nature and/or imagining the curious interplay between talking animals and observant children, looking at art, hiding in bookshops, poking in gardens and in apricot trees, walking down to rivers, hiking up hills and through museums, and watching not-scary movies and well-made documentaries, and being with folks and animals she loves. She is working on writing and making art and books that express new ways of seeing the world and our roles in it and loves projects that challenge her imagination and skills!   Connect with Deborah: www.deborahjstein.com www.Instagram.com/Deborah.j.Stein/ www.instagram.com/storycamp_disco Storycamp Disco Fall 2022 Art + Workshop Shop   Sign up for August Windowsill Workshops -  Pie Making Class with Tom Conway

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Eveli Sabatie: Renowned Jewelry Artist - Epi. 206, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 94:52


Eveli Sabatie... this podcast is one of my favorites that I've done in the last 5 years. She's just a unique human being that has a story like no other so strap in and enjoy this one.It's a rollercoaster ride in a way. You're talking about this individual that was born in Algeria, grew up in Morocco, goes to Paris, has a moment where she knows she needs to come to America and she ends up in Hopi working with Charles Loloma. She lived at the Pueblo for 3 years and becomes this amazing silversmith/jewelry artist whose work is now in major museums.In fact, she had an amazing show several years ago at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe. She hasn't made jewelry for 20 years, but her legacy of over 40 years of master silver work with these incredible, intricate pieces are still there for viewing.Eveli has a book coming out and that's the main reason we had her on the podcast, but really, I wanted to get deep into how she became this amazing silversmith and of course, working and having a relationship with Charles Loloma for three years is just icing on the cake. So she's a very important artist and a wonderful, sweet human being and I think it comes out in this podcast.I believe this is one of those that you really should be watching on YouTube vs. listening to because she is so animated and it adds a great deal to the experience. That's what this is really. It's an experience. It's the reason that I do this podcast. Eveli Sabatie on episode 206 of the Art Dealer Diaries Podcast.

Best Horse Practices Podcast
Ali Kermeen and Working Equitation

Best Horse Practices Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 24:35


In this is episode, Jec chats with Ali Kermeen about working equitation. It's a relatively new discipline that's open to riders of all disciplines and Ali has a new book about it. Find her Working Equitation book here.  If you're thinking that working equitation sounds a bit like ranch versatility, you are correct although we're not diving into the details in this episode. I hope you're curious about it. In fact, I hope you're curious in general! Jec and I have been talking about adult learning a lot lately and you might have noticed a slight tweak in our intro, about embracing a beginner's mind. Yep. As it happens, I'm broadcasting this week from Santa Fe, New Mexico, where I'm taking a few lessons from Katrin Silva (who has an upcoming book coming out: Ride with Feel: A Guide for the Rest of Us). I'm excited and nervous as it's been a long time since I've had lessons. We have a question specifically about adult learning from Natalie, a listener who was raised on the East Coast but now works on a ranch in Montana. So stay tuned for that. Our title sponsor is Lucerne Farms, producers of quality forage feeds.  And Lucerne is this fantastic company in northern Maine. We'll be talking more about Lucerne in upcoming episodes. We also thank Skratch Labs. If you're sweating, you should be staying hydrated with Skratch labs powdered drinks. So much healthier than gatorade or the shady rainbow collection of colored, sweet sports drinks out there. Oh and they have drinks for after a big workout, too. Like chocolate milk, but better. We thank Kate's Real Food and Patagonia WorkWear for their continued support. Did you know? All ya gotta do is comment or suggest a podcast topic or send us a training question here and you'll be automatically qualified for our monthly Patagonia WorkWear giveaway.    

Urbana Play 104.3 FM
#DeAcáEnMás - Incendios en el Delta | Roberto Rioja, secretario de Protección Civil de Santa Fe

Urbana Play 104.3 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 3:47


Santa Fe hizo una nueva presentación ante la Justicia Federal por los incendios en el Delta. Hablamos con Roberto Rioja, secretario de Protección Civil de Santa Fe. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/urbanaplayfm/message

Su Presencia Radio
Santa Fe y Millonarios ganaron sus partidos y están dentro de los ocho en el FPC

Su Presencia Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 58:09


Que Ruede la Pelota - Lunes 08 Agosto 2022 Disfruta del mundo del deporte con Que Ruede la Pelota, una producción de Su Presencia Radio.

Whiskey Bros Around The Table
We are your Steak Gods: A Religious Experience

Whiskey Bros Around The Table

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 80:29


The Bros are all back from a mountain vacation. Lots of food to discuss, scenic vistas cold rainy weather. A "religious" experience might've taken place in Santa Fe, NM. ATVs and off-roading and oh- did we mention we talk about food?

Peláez y De Francisco en La W
Alfredo Arias, tranquilo con los avances en el juego de Santa Fe

Peláez y De Francisco en La W

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 86:52


Hernán Peláez y Martín De Francisco entrevistaron al técnico de Independiente Santa Fe para conocer cómo va el proceso de consolidación del equipo.

Mindrolling with Raghu Markus
Ep. 451 – All Paths Are One with Ram Dev

Mindrolling with Raghu Markus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 57:07


Ram Dev returns with Raghu to discuss Maharaj-ji as a Satguru, disagreeing with Ram Dass, honesty, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, and if sake can be spiritual.Ram Dev founded and directed the Hanuman Foundation Dying Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the first residential facility in the United States to support conscious dying. He has been the Executive Director of the Living/Dying Project in Santa Fe and since 1986 in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the co­author with Ram Dass, Daniel Goleman and Dwarka Bonner of Journey of Awakening: A Meditator's Guidebook, Bantam Books and has taught meditation since 1974. Dale lectures and gives workshops on the topics of meditation, healing, spiritual support for those with life ­threatening illness, and on caregiving as spiritual practice. Learn more about Ram Dev's work via the Living/Dying Project, tune into his Thursdays with Ram Dev on Instagram, and subscribe to Dale's Healing at the Edge"Maharaj-ji didn't have one path – he was all paths." – Ram Dev (Dale Borglum)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Su Presencia Radio
Santa Fe y América empataron en el Campín

Su Presencia Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 56:42


Que Ruede la Pelota - Miércoles 03 Agosto 2022 Disfruta del mundo del deporte con Que Ruede la Pelota, una producción de Su Presencia Radio.

99% Invisible
502- 99% Vernacular: Volume 3

99% Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 34:52 Very Popular


In the final episode of our vernacular spectacular anniversary series, 99pi producers and friends of the show will be sharing more stories of regional architecture–some close to home, some on remote islands– that capture our imagination and inspire us to look deeper.  Stories of Bermuda roofs, Queen Anne Cottages, and what exactly counts as an "earth tone."99% Vernacular: Volume 3  

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Nick Marzano - 2022 Tour Divide Finisher

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 56:38 Very Popular


This week we sit down with Nick Marzano to explore his experience during the 2022 Tour Divide.  The 2022 Tour Divide began with over 200 riders following the 2,745-mile Great Divide Mountain Bike Route from north to south starting in Banff, Alberta, Canada and finishing at the US/Mexico border in Antelope Wells, New Mexico. Episode Sponsor: Trek Travel - come join The Gravel Ride Podcast crew on the November 6th trip. Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Nick Marzano [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the show, we've got Nick Marzano from Philadelphia. Here to talk to us about the tour divide. Nick recently finished the tour divide routes during the grand depart from Banff, Canada, and made it all the way to the edge of the border of Mexico. If you don't know about the tour divide, it's roughly follows a route called the great divide mountain bike route, and it's recognized as one of the most important off pavement cycling routes in the United States of America. If not the world, the root criss crosses the continental divide from north to south, starting in Banff, Alberta, Canada, and finishing at the U S Mexico border in antelope Wells, New Mexico. I've been following the tour divide for many years. In fact, in some small part, I credit it with getting me excited. About making the transition from mountain bike, riding to gravel riding. It's an amazing accomplishment. To have achieved this event. It's 2,745 miles, and God knows how much climbing along the way. When Nick picked his head up in the ridership forum and mentioned to the community that he was doing it, I was super stoked to not only follow along. is.as he completed the route, but hear his stories along the way. It's amazing to get a firsthand account of what the tour divide experience looks like. . It varies every year, as you can imagine, with 2,745 miles. Across the United States. You've got all kinds of things to contend with. This year, there were some late season snow up in Canada. Which wreaked havoc. On the race and ended a lot of people's tour divides efforts before they even began. As you'll hear Nick persevered and had an amazing experience out there. It was a real pleasure talking to them. Before we jump into that conversation i need to thank this week sponsor trek travel You may recall last year when we had Trek on talking about the Jarana gravel bike tour, I was super excited. What you don't know is I've been talking about going on this trip since that moment in time. I'm super excited to go to Jarana this year in November, and I'm inviting you to join me. I'm going on the November 6th trip. From Trek travel just you're on a bike tour. You know, Jarana is a cycling gym. There's a reason why all the pros call it home with butter, smooth, tarmac, and perfect weather. But the road riding is just the beginning. And after that conversation with you, and I've looked at a number of routes out of Jarana and I'm super excited to get over there and experience the amazing gravel, the quiet mountain passes and the little villages of Spain. I feel like I've had this trip in my mind for. The entirety of the pandemic, and we're finally pulling it off. Trek wanted me to invite you to join me on this trip. Any of our listeners are going to get a free handlebar bag and a free pair of socks when they joined the trip. You simply head on over to Trek, travel.com and search for the Jerone gravel bike tour. It's a five day four night trip. The team over a, truck's going to handle all the logistics from the hotel to the routes. They're going to have guides on hand. It's actually one of the Trek travel service course locations. So they're gonna have a lot of beautiful track. Demani SL disc brake bikes available for us. As well as the option to bring your own, I'm super excited to get over there myself. We've got a small crew that's already signed up for this trip, but I want to invite you the listener. How amazing would it be for us to finally get together? And in Jarana of all places. I'm certainly looking forward to finally getting some dirt under my wheels in Europe, on a gravel bike. Simply visit truck travel.com. Find that you're on a gravel bike tour and make sure during booking that you mentioned, you're a gravel ride podcast listener, or a member of the ridership to get that free handlebar bag. With that said let's dive right into my conversation with nick Nick welcome to the show. [00:04:42] Nick Marzano: Hey, thanks for having me, Craig. [00:04:44] Craig Dalton: You look surprisingly refreshed considering it's not too long ago, you just completed a 2,700 mile off-road bike ride. [00:04:52] Nick Marzano: Yeah. I mean, I'm gonna rack that up to the, the food monster has been strong. The sleep monster has been strong. I've been, you know, you can indulge in both of those for, for about a solid week. I've been trying to get back to. The sleep has, has rectified itself, the, the nutrition and the food monster. I'm working on getting back to a, a normal diet. But I, yeah, I'm feeling back to a hundred percent for [00:05:15] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I gotta imagine. After an event like the tour divide, you're you just want to eat, eat, eat all day long. [00:05:22] Nick Marzano: You look sort of longingly, like whenever you pass a gas station, like, should I stop and get. 10 Snickers. Should I stop and get some little debes? But, and I typically eat pretty healthy. So it, it is kind of like no holds barred when you're, , when you're only resupplies gas stations for a few days. But yeah, trying to get back to, to some greens in my diet, some fruit [00:05:45] Craig Dalton: Nice. I've given a little bit of preamble in the intro about what the tour divide is, but it's such, it's something I've been following for, gosh, I feel like a decade and it's such an event that if the listener hasn't heard of it, you're going from Canada to Mexico. On gravel effectively, except it's pretty extreme gravel along the way. [00:06:06] Nick Marzano: Yeah, that's, that's pretty much, it, it is mostly dirt. There's some paved sections and this year. I think more than prior years, there were more paved sections because of the initially we were all looking at the, at the black fire in, in New Mexico and, and a couple of other fires that cropped up that forced some some reroutes on pavement. But we made up, we more than made up for that in difficulty with late season snow on the mountain paths in Canada, and then early season monsoons when we hit New Mexico. So it, the route looked a little different this year than it has in years past. Once you hit around New Mexico. But it was still very challenging and a lot of fun. It was very beautiful. [00:06:43] Craig Dalton: With a 2,700 mile plus route, we've got a lot of ground to cover, but as you know, I always like to start off by just learning a little bit more about your background. As a cyclist. And when you discovered gravel cycling and then let's get into, like, when did the tour divide creep into your mind as something you wanted to do? [00:07:01] Nick Marzano: Yeah, it was kind of a rapid progression. So I was a, I'm a, I'm a COVID gravel bike baby around July, 2020. I had, I had wanted to get some kind of, you know, I didn't know the terminology for it until I started researching. I wanted to get something that would, that would allow me to get offroad. I had a hybrid single speed that I had used to try to keep up with people who were doing road rides every now and then if I was on vacation, I used it for commuting almost daily. It was just like a red line, 20 Niner hybrid kicking around Philadelphia. It was great. Did you know, I would, I did like one alley cat race with it. At some point in Philly just used it for ridiculous purposes, but mostly, mostly commuting. And then around 2020, I wanted to transition into something with maybe a little, a little bit of gearing and got my first gravel bike really started listening to, you know, in the research came, wanted to, to find community and, and find some advice and came across the gravel ride podcast. Pretty soon after that. And immediately started signing up for, you know, signed up for like a 60 mile race nearby here to see if, if racing was, was something that was into, I don't remember when the concept of bike packing got a hold of me, but it was pretty quick because by the fall of that of 2020. I was, I, I, I definitely roped a couple of buddies into a 60 mile bike pack trip out to just like an overnight or out to French Creek, state park, which I know you're, I think you're familiar with, from your time out [00:08:31] Craig Dalton: absolutely. [00:08:33] Nick Marzano: Yeah. So it ramped up from there. The following year. I, we had a vacation my partner and I had a vacation planned for the finger lakes. And I said, well, why don't I try to take the long route? I've been reading a lot about bike packing. Let me meet you up at the finger lakes. And I'm gonna take a four day trip and try to link together forest roads and some rail trails that will kind of take me from near Philly up to the New York finger lakes and had fun building that route. Learned a lot, you know, about gear learned a lot about you know, how to plan resupply, how to plan, how long could I make it? I had, I had not done a, I don't believe a, a century ride at that point or had only done one century ride. So figuring out that I could link together, you know, a hundred mile days was kind of a revelation I had planned for six days. I did it in three and change. [00:09:28] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's kind of hard, like, you know, two things there, one, like it's unusual that you have all day to ride, right? So who knows how long they can ride when they have all day to ride. And two, when you're loaded down on the bike, it's a totally different factor, right? You don't know how long can I ride with a fully loaded bike? [00:09:48] Nick Marzano: totally. Yeah. So , you know, and I, and I had sort of under I conservatively booked each of those days I had put out a sort of an itinerary for myself for six days and was really conservative and realized the other, the other concept with solo bike packing is you get to camp at the end of A long day. And if you're not worn out, you really, you don't wanna get to camp at, at six o'clock seven o'clock, there's nothing to do. You know, I'm fine with solo time. But I think I got into one campsite around like four o'clock and was just sort of twiddling my thumbs for the rest of the night. So I knew, you know, I was capable of, of pushing a little bigger and I can go, I can go further, but I kind of went down, you know, from there. Every couple of months, I would pick an event or design something where I would like add one new challenge to that. And so quickly from 2020, I kind of ramped up in that way. Let me, let me pick a new challenge to sort of add complexity to what I've been doing. Add racing into the mix, add cold weather, camping into the mix. Add, you know, you add rain and, and riding in the elements pretty quickly when you're linking big days. Yeah. And that, you know, Where are we at two years later? I feel like I've got a, a pretty good amount of experience under my belt and at least, you know, 2,600 more miles from the, the tour of divide, [00:11:05] Craig Dalton: And had you, had you had an a background with endurance athletics prior to coming to cycling? [00:11:10] Nick Marzano: Your, you know, your normal running events around Philly, do the broad street run and the Philadelphia marathon a couple of times. But it, it kills my knees. And so I knew. While I still run for just bone health and, and a little cross training that was part of the reason, you know, I wanted to get a bike in 2020 cuz I was I'm. I was pushing 40 at that point. I'm I'm now over 40 and, and wanted something that I could do much longer than I think I'll be able to do running event. [00:11:37] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Do you recall when the tour divide first came into your, your head? [00:11:43] Nick Marzano: Yeah. Yeah, so things ramped up after that finger lakes trip pretty quickly. I reached out to, I reached out to Nelson trees who, who runs the silk road, mountain race and the Atlas mountain race and asked him if I could get a last minute sign up for the Atlas mountain race that. Which is ridiculous and was probably not the right next challenge. If I'm, you know, I've talked about adding sort of stepwise challenges that would've been probably a little out of my wheelhouse, but he accepted my application and I was set to go and it got, it got canceled at the last minute, which worked out perfectly. Because I ended up going to Virginia for something called the trans Virginia five 50. Where I met this great community of bike Packers. It was a much more it's about the same length. It's a little shorter than Atlas mountain. The, the elevation really, and the, the difficulty is, you know, we'll see, I'm going to Atlas next February. We'll see if, if this checks out, but it it's a pretty difficult race. And the elevation is. Not exactly comparable, but it's, it's pretty hefty. So it was a great challenge, nonetheless, and I, you know, more importantly, I met this great community, which gets to, you know, the answer to your question is around December the organizer of the trans Virginia, five 50 Dave Landis reached out to a bunch of us and said, Hey, I'm setting aside the time I'm doing tour divide. Does anybody want to get a little training group together? Anybody who might wanna put this on their, on their calendar? And I think it was like a week after that I talked to my boss at work and said, I've been here 10 years. Can I link together PTO and, and take a month off. This is really important to me. And, and he's great. You know, my company's great. They, they said we support you completely take the time. And, and then I was, I was in, [00:13:31] Craig Dalton: That's amazing. Yeah, I think it's one of the things that as the listener does some research about tour divide and realizes like you really need to have a month long block of time available unless you're one of the elite elite athletes that might be able to do it in half a month. But that that in and of itself is a huge challenge. Let alone just the logistics of planning, your equipment, your nutrition, your pacing, everything else that goes into it. So you, you sign up for the event you graciously get the time off from your employer. You're ready to go in your mind. What type of preparation did you need to do? Obviously you've been doing some of these bike packing races at that point. You'd kind of presumably ironed out a lot of the equipment questions you might have had of what works for you. What type of bags, et cetera, but with a 2,700 mile race over the tour divide based out of Philly, what did you feel like you needed to do to prepare for that start? [00:14:29] Nick Marzano: The one of the very first things I did was get Kurt re Schneider had a, had a sale on his, just like PDF six month training guide. And a lot of people use that for the tour of divide. If you're looking for a place to start, I totally recommend it. I didn't work directly with Kurt, although I got a chance to meet him briefly at, at a. A training ride in, in April and thank him for, for putting that guide together. It was just great to have a framework. So that training framework started in January. It very quickly and. You know, I got a full swift set up because Philly winters are, are really rough and I couldn't get out early enough to not have ice on the road or, or tons of salt on the road. So I, and I was also recovering. I was nursing an injury that I, we can gloss over for now, but a, an injury from a fall on a, on a November bike packing trip that I took with the, the Virginia crew. So, yeah, it was, it was trainer straight through February. I, I started researching gear the Virginia crew and actually another guy out of, out of Philly who, who had also done that trans Virginia race. So I consider him part of that Virginia crew, but we were able to ride together once you know, once we got into late February, March. And that was it. I mean, I, I planned the schedule. I, I did. You know, picking up new equipment. I picked up a, a salsa cutthroat. My first gravel bike was a GT grade and it didn't really have the tire clearance for the sort of mud I knew we would get into or, or for the comfort that I knew I would need. So, it wasn't cheap and there are a lot of barriers to entry that, you know, I, I feel very privileged to have been able to get a second bike that quickly and and get the time off work. But at that point, nothing was really gonna stop me. It was it, you know, that once we all got very dialed on that goal and, [00:16:12] Craig Dalton: do feel like that cutthroat it's if, if you don't want to think about it, there's just so many people who have used that bike that it's kind of a no brainer to go down that road route. If you have the option of getting a new bike for it. [00:16:24] Nick Marzano: totally, [00:16:26] Craig Dalton: I don't wanna get too much into the specific training plan, but I'm just curious, like, were you encouraged to do a bunch of overnights, a bunch of big back to back days? How were you fitting this into your normal work life? [00:16:41] Nick Marzano: Yeah, a lot of it was waking up, you know, 5:00 AM jump on the trainer and it was typically one to two hour rides. Throughout the week, there would be a couple of two hour like high intensity efforts. But it was really just getting that time on the bike and, and doing the base level plan that, that Kurt provides. Then yeah, he does build in, he starts to build in, you know, back to backs. I looked for events like the one in, in April that I mentioned where I met, you know, I got to meet Kurt himself there which was another Virginia part of the Virginia endurance series, like a 250 mile overnighter called rockstar gravel. Which is great, but they, yeah. Other than that, you know, worked with my buddy, Tim, who was the, the gentleman in, in Philly, who I was training with and lined up some more overnights to French Creek and just did our best to find as much elevation and as much gravel as we could around here. That was, that was about it. I mean, the, the timing lined up in life where I, I was able to put a lot of time in the saddle Re it was the, the, the dur during the week rides were really it was really just about jumping on the bike as soon as, as soon as I got up. And, and as long as I did that, it was pretty easy to fit to, to my schedule. [00:17:55] Craig Dalton: When you were riding outdoors, were you always riding fully loaded? [00:18:00] Nick Marzano: No there, that really came closer to the like a month before, maybe a month and a half before there were a bunch of fully loaded ride. [00:18:08] Craig Dalton: Yeah, so to give the listener some perspective and it doesn't have to be precise, but when your bike is not loaded, how much did it weigh? And when you had your full tour divide kit on it, how much did it weigh? [00:18:21] Nick Marzano: So I know it's it's about 21 pounds with nothing else on it. No water, just dry weight with everything on it. I'm estimating also dry weight. No, not counting water. Based on I use air table to kind of just roll up the extra gear that I'm I'm putting on there. I think it was somewhere in the 45 pound range. Dry. Yeah. [00:18:41] Craig Dalton: got it. And as you're thinking about the tour divide, and you're starting on the start line in Canada, what type of mentality did you have with respect to sleep? Obviously, like there's all different ways of going about this and, and it may have very well evolved and changed along the way, but I'm curious as you mapped out, like what your experience was gonna look like I imagine you had a number of days goal in mind. How did that play out? And what was your thought process around. How much you were gonna sleep. [00:19:12] Nick Marzano: Yeah, I knew early on. So I had, I, I wanted to experience one of the, the, the big things I hadn't done, I'd ridden through the night, I'd ridden into like midnight 1:00 AM on the trans Virginia, five 50, but I'd never gotten through the night to see if I was capable of that. What does that feel like? And I used that training ride that rockstar gravel two 50, you know, one of my goals was I may not be competitive in this sort of way, but I'm gonna ride through the night. And I, I did it in, you know, a full push. In like a day and a half, which felt, you know, rough. But I it also didn't feel that bad. I knew, I knew that weapon was there if I wanted to use it. But the tort divide, you know, is a very different race than a 250 mile race. So I knew I wouldn't pull that out unless I was feeling awesome in the third week. And my goal was somewhere between. December before I started training, it was 23 days is what I put in the, the initial sign up. And by the end of that training, I, I was getting a little cocky and had, had posted 19 days as my goal on track leaders. I never, the like the sleep, the sleep thing was always going to be somewhere in the four to six hour mark for the majority of the race. [00:20:21] Craig Dalton: Okay. [00:20:22] Nick Marzano: And I can talk, I'm glad to talk about sleep system. I think that's kind of a lesson learned on that if you want, but yeah, that was the expectation was I wasn't going to crush myself on sleep deprivation and then you know, blow up early on and, and not be, I mean, finishing the race was so much more important than finishing the race in 19. [00:20:40] Craig Dalton: Yep. And so with that mindset around six hours of sleep a day or an evening were you riding that whole time other than resupply and things like that? Or is that sort of saying like, I'm gonna ride, I'm gonna stop and have a lunch. I'm gonna maybe take a nap. I'm gonna ride some more. How did, how did you kind of think about it? [00:20:58] Nick Marzano: it. So the way that I thought about it, oh, well, see, like there were days where this, this thinking didn't play out, but the way I thought of it was I'm gonna ride when I'm not resupplying and when I'm not sleeping. And it was when I looked back at my my data, it, it was more in the like four to five hours a night sort of range. Where that sort of, where that changed is I had a, we, I took a knee for a day as a lot of rider did just before getting into seal lake, there was a big peak Richmond peak that already had one to two feet of snow pack on it. And a, as some of your listeners may have read if they were keeping up with the tour divide, the first few days in Canada, they got hit with another major snowstorm. A lot of riders were airlifted. I came into, into the other side of Richmond peak, a little town called con Montana, soaking wet, and most of my kit was wet. So I took a day because I didn't feel comfortable going up in a snowstorm. So that was a complete day off the bike. Fill out rest. And then there was another day, right around Pinedale, which is about halfway through the race famously where you dump your bear spray, where you're out of grizzly country. Just before Pinedale, I had kind of, I hit a low point and I talked about that a little bit with that was right around the time I talked to Patrick at bikes or death and considered taking an entire other day off the bike and basically taking myself out of race mode entirely. I didn't, but I took some shorter days. and then the closer I got to, you know, once I hit Colorado got into New Mexico, I really found my stride again and was hitting some like 1 50, 200 mile days, which was kind of my expectation going in that I was gonna try to pound like one 50 to 200 a day resupply real quick and then, and then head to bed. So I deviated from that for sure. And it was, it, it was rejuvenating. And I, you know, if I, if I needed to take that time, I needed to take. but that, that was certainly not the plan going into it. [00:22:52] Craig Dalton: Yeah. So impressive. Stepping back for a second. I mean, we think about registering for an event, you know, like an SBT, gravel, or an Unbound, and there's a lottery and you pay an entrance fee. Why don't you talk about what it's like to, to enter toward divide and what it actually means? [00:23:10] Nick Marzano: Yeah. It's so, it's if you've never done a grand apart before The concept is, and, and this is how the trans Virginia five 50 is as well. The concept is that there is a course director and they're going to define the rules and they'll give you more or less information. David with the trans Virginia does an incredible job of outlining what a six day, nine day, 12 day touring pace looks like and what resupply looks like. He's just, he, he, you know, reviews the course each year. He's extremely involved in that the tort divide Is similar in that it's a grand depart where they provide the course, they provide the track leaders link. Matt and Scott I think founded track leaders. And, and so they, they provide the, the tracking, but really, I think I read in the New York times article that Matt Lee calls himself, the chief disorganize or something like that as opposed to the course director they. They're not there to monitor folks along the route. They're not there's, you know, there's obviously no resupply, it's self supported. And you don't really get any information until we got the course maybe a week before. So you sign up on a Google form you, which is your letter of intent basically. And then it's radio silence until, until that GPX file drops. In this case a week before, because they had a lot of detouring to, to figure out with those fires. [00:24:31] Craig Dalton: And is that, is that why you're given the GPS file? Obviously like the root in general is known from. What was it? The the, the mountain bike divide route is the general scope of the route. But that GPX file is, Hey, here's the current up to date thing on what passes are passable, where there's fires, where there's detours. [00:24:51] Nick Marzano: Yeah. So there is the, and there's a lot of confusion on this, by the way, too. There were some riders who didn't have the, the GPX file that you need to from. It's it's posted on, on a very old forum on bike packing.net. It gets reposted into Facebook and linked. There's not, there's not necessarily an email that goes out to all of the folks who signed up on that Google forum. So you really have to be engaged in the community on Facebook and the conversation to even find the file. But it's based on the great divide mountain bike. Which was established by the adventure cycling association, you know, decades ago as a touring route and adapted for racing, you know, in the, in the early odds, late nineties. So even without the Rero for the fires there are a couple of changes that Matt Lee who's the primary course director that he's made over the years to add more challenge. There's. Infamous section early on called Coco claims, which you hit on day one, which is like a six mile section where you are just pushing your bike up boulders at what feels like a 45 degree angle for six miles five miles that is not anywhere on the ACA map. And there are a couple of changes like that here and there. So it is it's distinct, but certainly inspired by and matches up with a large portion of the GD. [00:26:15] Craig Dalton: Yeah, and I know there's a lot of information out there on the internet and people have published guides and whatnot. How researched were you in advance about how you were gonna structure your days and is it confusing on where you're gonna resupply? Are there a lot of challenges there? How much of it do you think you had a handle on versus not when you showed. [00:26:36] Nick Marzano: Man. So there. There are so many more. I can't imagine racing this back when Matt, Matt Lee and, and others were, you know, if you, if you watch the old ride the divide documentary, which I think is on Amazon prime, I, I just, I bought the DVD cuz I, I want to have a hard copy. I can't imagine what that was like these days there are. Some really good resources online. There's a good community of people who have of veterans who are sharing resupply. So you can start to piece things together. What was still overwhelming. I was knowing what it looks like when, when boots hit the ground. Every time I've tried to put together an itinerary, it falls apart on day one because I either feel stronger or I run into. You know, I didn't know how long it would take to make it through some of these snowy sections. You can look at the snow pack layer and try to estimate that and set a target for where you want to get to. But when you put boots on the ground all of that can change. So my approach, which I, I would adapt a little bit if I did this again and, and maybe do a little bit more planning and research was to plan in the morning, set a target in the morning, using the tools that I had and, and. Try to piece together where resupply was going to be day to day, rather than it just felt too overwhelming to try to map the map out. A plan early on that I had had a good feeling I would diverge from immediately. [00:27:58] Craig Dalton: What were some of those tools at your disposal? Obviously you're looking at a map. What kind of apps were you using and were, were other writers sharing information back saying, oh, it took me eight hours to get up this pass. [00:28:10] Nick Marzano: Yeah, that, I mean, that's where it gets tricky because you're, you really shouldn't be. But I think it, it happens for sure. And you can watch track one of the, the tools that is sort of available to everyone. So within the rules is you can look at track leaders and see. Oh, this person was moving at 15 miles an hour, and then they were moving at two miles an hour for about three hours over this pass. So that probably means hike a bike. [00:28:33] Craig Dalton: So are you looking at that in real time? So say you're approaching a pass. Obviously you're aware that it's a 3000 foot climb or whatever. Are you then taking a moment and saying, gosh, well, I should do a little research to see are people crawling up this thing or are people riding? [00:28:46] Nick Marzano: yeah, in some cases for sure. Yeah. And that's kind of the, the benefit, one of the benefits of being. Mid pack or, you know, a little bit behind the, the leaders is if, if so Sahi is, is struggling at three miles an hour going across something, you know, it's pretty gnarly and, and probably hike a bike. And so you can zoom in on track leaders to their history and see those dots get closer together. And that was one tool, the other tools. So the ACA does have a great map. An app that has the map with a lot of resupply information on it. And that was super useful. You just need to be really aware of where that actually lines up with the official race route and not some folks navigated with that app and were relegated because they, they missed some of the, the unique turnoffs that Matthew Lee is built in. The other tools there's, there's a number of guides from a website called one of. Where they, they list resupply. He actually provided some updates to us like a week before, or a couple of days before, once he got the the updated course from from Matthew Lee. So those resources were great. And then there, there were some things that writers share on the Facebook community ahead of time, where people have built out elevation profiles that are really useful. You can kind of get a sense Chris Ellison showed up. I think that was his name showed up at the, at, at the Y w C a in BAMF with these laminated elevation profile maps that also had the terrain type, which you, I couldn't find anywhere else. So you could see when Jeep track was coming up, because that's always going to take you longer than you think it's always gonna be mud or snow. That was really helpful in kind of planning. How fast miles would go? Nothing, nothing really in one place. If this sounds like a hodgepodge, it really was like, let me take a look at the, [00:30:30] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:30:30] Nick Marzano: The surface type. Let me take a look at the elevation. Let me take a look at the, you know, whatever the Gaia snow layer looks like. and let me take a look at track leaders and then piecing all of that together. You get a sense for where you could potentially make it that day. [00:30:43] Craig Dalton: It's unquestionable that you just need to continue to be adaptable along the way. And, and, and read the tea leaves, honestly, as to what's going on, you experience so many dramatic bits of weather in the north part of the country, along the way that you couldn't have expected going in, [00:30:58] Nick Marzano: Yeah, it was intense. [00:31:00] Craig Dalton: were you using then sort of a, an iPhone or a mobile phone plus a GPS computer on your bike? [00:31:06] Nick Marzano: yeah, I was following the purple line on my ere, so just, I used like really simple ere 22 X. For most of the navigation and then I had it loaded on ride with GPS as well. If I just needed more detail or, or wanted to make sure I didn't miss turns that were coming up, I [00:31:21] Craig Dalton: I've always read that the tour divide riders tend to favor that eTrex battery powered, old style GPS device versus the bike computer kind of style. [00:31:31] Nick Marzano: Yeah. Some people seemed to get along with the bike computer. No problem. I didn't have. A dynamo hub that it lit my my headlamp really well, but I didn't really trust it to charge anything. It was a little older and had a lot of miles on it and just seemed to I didn't rely on it for, for too much battery management. So I was glad to have the, even though it's it's wasteful, but I was glad to have a, you know, a bunch of spare double A's that I could just throw in the etre. [00:31:57] Craig Dalton: Yeah. For those of you who don't know, dynamo hub actually generates. And stores electricity. Right. And can power something like your headlamp? [00:32:06] Nick Marzano: Yeah, it generates it. I don't think too many of them store it, but it will you know, you can throw power to a headlamp and then, or a a transformer is probably the wrong word converter and use it to charge up a, a cash battery as well. A, a battery bank, power bank. As you go, so during the day you could be charging the bank and then you could flip a switch and have your light on as long as you're going fast enough for that light to be, to be powered. [00:32:28] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I've heard sometimes going uphill. It doesn't actually generate enough to really shine the way. [00:32:34] Nick Marzano: Yeah. I have a sine wave beacon, which I love because it has the, the converter right in it. So. On on another bike where I also have a, a dynamo in my gravel bike, it does charge my cash battery really well during the day. And then I can plug the cash battery into the, to the beacon and power it from that. And it, it SAPs so little energy that I can charge my phone on it as well. So, but yeah, if you're going less than like five miles an hour or so, you're gonna have kind of a strobe light effect until you, until you build up a little. [00:33:06] Craig Dalton: So let's jump over to that grand depart moment. Where is that? And what was the feeling like at that point? Sounds like you had a couple buddies that were there at the start line with you. [00:33:17] Nick Marzano: Yeah, that was really beautiful. It was, it was really cool to be there with, I mean, first of all, bam is, you know, you bike packing is a, is a niche sport. And to be in a place where so many people who, you know, are ready to talk gear who have been investing as much time and energy into this Are are all lining up together and you're running into them at dinner was really exciting. But then to have a group of five, five of us from the east coast who had trained together, been on rides together was really cool. We lined up at the w or Y WCA in BMF, which is the traditional starting point and it was really subdued. There was not. Presentation like Matt Lee doesn't show up. There's not a course director sendoff. We had instructions to go off in waves of about 15, I think which is different than past years where it's just, it's a grand apart. Everybody heads out at the same time. And the reason for that was that Canada parks was a little, they, they were getting a little They were advising Matt Lee that something needed to happen because of the number of people who were showing up 170 people were, were signed up and, and they were a little nervous about 170 people departing. So I think we're doing waves for the foreseeable future with tour divide. And it seemed to work really well. Nobody was there flagging us off. It was just sort of, you know, we would check and say, is it, is it time? Is it seven 20? All right. We're going everybody. And everybody. Left and, and that was it. It was the start and finish are. So anti-climatic that it's, it's you know, it kind of underscores what bike packing is all about. We're all out there to ride our own race and have, you know, an experience that's inevitably gonna be really personal. And I love that about the sort of subdued start and finish of Tor divide, especially, but a lot of, a lot of races you'll finish in the middle of the night and nobody will, nobody will be around to to welcome you in. And there's something special about that. As fun as, you know, finish lines of at parties at big gravel races can be a lot of fun too. [00:35:14] Craig Dalton: Did you have an expectation of riding with some of the members of your crew? Or was it clear that you guys were gonna be on different paces? [00:35:20] Nick Marzano: Yeah, this is where I don't, I don't know if not that I was in any sort of contention. I don't know if I'll relegate myself for this, cuz this rule is kind of unclear you can't draft for sure. And there was no drafting. But you know, we come from the east coast. We don't have Grizzlies out here and none of us were scared out of our, out of our you know, mountain bike shoes. But we. We're gonna ride. I was gonna ride together with one or two of them through grizzly country and ended up riding with, with David Landis for a large portion of it. And riding together, didn't always look like riding side by side. We would end up at the same place. Often start from the same place. He, he, for a couple of days was on a middle of the day nap schedule and I I'm not a napper, so he would. Roll off to the side of the road and then catch up with me a little bit later. But yeah, grizzly country, it was nice to have just that conversation prevents you from having to yell hay, bear all the time as you're going through those areas. [00:36:16] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that makes sense. I gotta imagine it's. Yeah, it's next to impossible to imagine that over that distance, you're gonna feel the same. Throughout the day and nights and wanna ride at the same pace. Even there, like you said, you may end up in the same places. [00:36:31] Nick Marzano: Yeah. Having like I had explicit conversations with Tim who we started. We, we did sort of our pre ride together and we were we're supposedly, we were like on the same pace we had 19 day, 20 day goals and he, he changed up his pace pretty soon wanted to ride sort of a different race, but we had had an explicit conversation early on. We're each gonna ride our own race and if it works to ride together, great, if not, we'll yell hay, bear a lot, and we'll, we'll figure it out. David, who is just an incredibly strong rider. And I, I didn't think I was gonna be able to keep up with, I was able to keep up with him. And so that was really cool for me. It was, it was, it worked out, but we also had an explicit conversation. At breakfast one morning, we were like, Hey, you know, if you need to take off or, or if you're worried about what it looks like for us to be riding next to each other it's probably more of a concern. If you're at the front, it might look like you're drafting on track leaders. But more importantly for each of our own races, like, you know, I get it. If you need to take off, if you're feeling really good and you need to take off, or you're gonna, you're gonna do an overnight push an overnight. And I can't do that. You ride your race and it just worked out. [00:37:37] Craig Dalton: Let's paint the picture of what, what happens at night when it's time to lay your head down? [00:37:43] Nick Marzano: Yeah, well, so it, it involved more motels this year than I than I had planned for, for sure. [00:37:50] Craig Dalton: I, I mean, I, I can't blame you and a couple long bike trips that I've done, like having a night in a hotel in the middle just meant all the difference in the world. It just felt so refreshed. [00:38:00] Nick Marzano: Yeah, I knew it would be somewhere on like maybe 40% it's in bear country. If you don't find a pit toilet and there's, you know, some of the motels are pretty affordable. It's refreshing after a 200 mile day to just get four hours in a bed. And I think it did help with saddle sores were not, were not a huge issue. They, you know, But yeah, I mean the, the night basically looked like rolling in at 11, 12, sometimes two or 3:00 AM to a motel or rolling out my B and. Quick. I mean, it's, it's resupply. It is prep your stuff, and I got better at this. As we went along, hit a resupply cram as many calories as you can try to cram some protein in there as well. Try to drink as much as you can, so you don't go to bed dehydrated or wake up even more dehydrated. Figure out what your sleep situation is. If it's Bing down or if it's grabbing a motel, do that very quickly and then make a plan for tomorrow. And fall asleep as quickly as you can, so you can maximize that time. So that is really the tiring part of, I like the riding certainly physically exhausts you and, and makes that part harder. But the time management of making sure, as soon as you're off the bike, you do those sort of things. Is that wears on you after three weeks? For sure. I can't imagine. I mean, it gives me such a greater appreciation for Sophie on and Actually a member of our Virginia sort of crew Abe Kaufman finished fourth overall first American, like these are folks who are doing that at a much higher level than I was even doing that for sure. And, and it's still exhausting. Like just, you need to be on as soon as you get off the bike and make sure that you're maximizing that time. And then you wake up and throw your stuff on. Try not to Dole too much and, and get right back out. [00:39:47] Craig Dalton: How concerned were you about your busy situation and in terms of warmth when you're in the Northern part of the country? [00:39:54] Nick Marzano: Warmth, not at all. It was more about the wet. I would take a tent if I went again and oddly, you know, David had sort of the opposite reflection. He brought a tent and, and would've preferred prefer to bivy. But I think I would've been a little bit bolder camping out in some of the wetter areas. If I had had something a little more substantial but my B would let water in if it was more than a little sprinkle and then my down sleeping bag would be wet and then I would be cold and, and wet. And that's not a good recipe. [00:40:23] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Did you have days where you were concerned about where you were gonna lay your head that night? [00:40:31] Nick Marzano: Not not completely. I mean, the nice, the nice thing about the root is that there are a lot of, there are a couple of, of, of tricky sections, but really if you, if you have a B, I didn't get into a bad spot where I was, I was really worried. And I had an emergency plan. I mean, I had a ground cloth wi with me that if, if I was really caught out in a storm, I could cover myself with that, get into some dry clothes, try to get under a tree. Or at the very least find, find some sort of awning or overhang. So I never got into a, a tricky situation with that. I think I just think a tent would've been more comfortable. [00:41:09] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Gotcha. Yeah, it sounds like, I mean, there's so many unknowns yet, so much information out there that you just try to, I imagine you just try to fill your head with as much information as possible. So as we were talking about before each morning, you can say, okay, I'm in this location, kind of think I can get to here. I kind of know there's a resupply there. I kind of know there's a place where I can get some shelter and then just keep plowing forward. [00:41:35] Nick Marzano: Right. Yeah. And, and you'll make mistakes on that. I, I certainly did. We picked We both got into Del Norte, Colorado around the same time and David was like, I'm gonna get a motel. And I'm like, all right, well, I heard that there's free camping in the park. And I feel like I'm doing too many motels, so I'm gonna go camp in the park. He's like, all right, let's go camp in the park. So he was, we were, we were gonna set up a camp there together. He's got a tent so he could have broken the tent out. But I was, I was like, look at, I'm gonna go sleep under this band shell up here. It was threatening to rain. So it was like that, that looks like, you know, we could have slept, I could have rolled out my B in the toilet nearby and probably been fine. But the band shell looked like plush digs. So we went for it and around one 30 apparently this is like, well known to veterans and we are not the first to get literally hosed by, by this thought process. We the park sprinklers go off at, at one 30 in the morning. And completely. So we were protected from rain from above, but we were not protected from these fire hose, industrial sprinklers that went off at one 30 in the morning, soaking us with what felt like just heavy water I mean, it was, I don't know if there was fertilizer in it or what it was, but it was not pleasant and we spent a lot of time drying out after that. So yeah, things didn't always, didn't always work out as planned, but they. Most of the time, if you have the right info going in and you've, you've prepared enough and you know, what your, what your limits are, which I think I do. And also how, you know, how far I can push them. You can get yourself to a, you know, to a good spot to sleep almost every night. [00:43:10] Craig Dalton: That's an amazing story. How concerning is water supply along the. [00:43:15] Nick Marzano: There are a couple of sections where it's you should bring more than two liters. Most, most of the root I would be fine with two liters on my fork. Two, one liters on my fork. And then a filter along the way. And a lot of the mountain passes. You would just, it, it would be flush with water. Couple of sections towards. Especially in New Mexico where resupply and running water are a little rough. The basin is famously the, the Wyoming, the great basin in Wyoming is a nice I forget how long the stretch is, but it's over a hundred miles where you're not gonna find resupply and there's no running water in a, a big geographic basin. And. So I just had a, I had a bladder, a three liter bladder that I would fill maybe halfway and have a couple of extra liters for those sections. [00:44:02] Craig Dalton: Is that a bladder that you're going into your frame bag, that, that massive bladder. [00:44:06] Nick Marzano: Yep. I just threw, just threw it in my frame bag and then would take it out and use it to refill the, the liters on the fork. [00:44:12] Craig Dalton: Were you generally avoiding carrying anything on your back? [00:44:17] Nick Marzano: Yeah. Yeah. Some people do the hydration thing. I've just. I wasn't sure how my back would react over three weeks with a couple of extra pounds on it. So, I've avoided it, but I also haven't tried it before, so it's, you know, certainly a solution. I saw a lot of writers using [00:44:33] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. I think it would be concerning just putting any extra weight on your back, given how much torture I'll put it, your back may take along the way. [00:44:41] Nick Marzano: Yeah, for sure. [00:44:43] Craig Dalton: What are some of the highlights along the way? I don't know what the best way to organize. This is such a long event, but maybe state by state, some of the things you enjoyed and loved about the. [00:44:53] Nick Marzano: Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah. Thinking about some of the highlights was a lot of fun earlier today where you, you told me you might might throw that one at me. And it was nice going, going back through those memories. I think the snow snowy passes were really challenging. But it was also beautiful. And there were two in particular red Meadows pass. I hit midday where a couple of the passes early on. I had hit, I mean, I went over the pass just before the American border at, at 1:30 AM. And so that was kind of, that was kind of scary. I was sort of falling asleep on my bars as I was hiking through it. Didn't wanna fall asleep in, in the middle of a, a snowy mountain. Red Meadows. My breaks had been cashed early that morning. I didn't have replacement breaks. I had to make it, you know, a hundred miles to white fish to get a, get to a bike shop. And so walking over a mountain pass was like, I, I no breaks, no problem. Right. I, nobody needs breaks when you're hiking your bike over. Six miles of, of snow. And it was midday. It was warm. I was by myself at this point, David was, was behind or ahead I think, and I threw, I threw some like eighties music on and, and just some, some like dance music. And had a party just sort of dancing myself down, down the mountain to music probably expending like way too much energy, but sort of just shuffling my bike down and, and having a blast. Then Kirsten ended up. So are you, are you familiar with Kirsten at, at brush mountain lodge? And so she is She is famous within the Tor of divide and, and her brush mountain lodge is like the place that you hit after the basin, where you can get, you know, she has a pizza oven, it sort of, pay as you wish. You can stay there if, if you want. But it becomes sort of this VOR. She calls it the vortex where people it's just so nice to. To hang out and it, it it's sort of like the Bermuda triangle, like racers struggle to get out of it. And she had said a few months before the race started, Hey, you know, we're taking some time. I'm not gonna be there this year. Really sorry. But my family needs to, we're gonna do some strategic planning and reset where we're at. So I'll have, you know, maybe vending machines there I'll have, I'll have water for you, but you're not gonna get the full treatment this year. And that was kind of a. You know, a bummer for everyone understanding that she's gotta take time for herself, but is such a you know, she's such a piece of, of, of the tour divide lore, and, and she's a legend. So I showed up there and a bunch of racers were hanging out. It looked like they were eating pizza. I was like, what is happening here? This looks, if I step back in time and Kirsten was there because. For whatever. There, there was a a rainbow family gathering nearby that sort of forced her hand, somebody needed to staff this, this lodge just outside of Steamboat. So it was great. I got to chat with her. It was a bit of a vortex. I hung out for three hours there with a couple of other riders who I hadn't had a chance to catch up with. And then so that was, that was beautiful. The other, do you have time for, for two more highlights? How's [00:47:49] Craig Dalton: more highlights. Let's do it. [00:47:51] Nick Marzano: So the, before we hit the, we got, we got doused with those sprinklers in Del Norte. I had had this is a lowlight highlight. I had had a great day trying to, to breeze into Del Norte after I think 153 miles was the full. And right around right around the one 40 mark it always seemed like the last 10 to 14 miles of the day would be the hardest and they would sneak up on you. I hit Jeep track. That was Sandy. It was dark. And I didn't think I was gonna make the gas station resupply and was like outta food. I was outta water. I was done. There was nothing else open in Del Norte apart from this gas station. Pushed through all of that you know, slogged through that hit gravel was just burning at 17, 18 miles an hour down this, this gravel path to get into Del Norte in the last couple of miles, look at at Google maps and it's closed early. It, you know, according to the resupply, it should be open an hour later. Google says it's closed. So I kind of, you know, the wind goes outta my sales. That was gonna make it with like half an hour spare. But I keep pushing and come to find it's the lights are still on. It was, the Google was wrong. It was still open. So that was, that was beautiful. The, the last one I had my first major mechanical right out of, outside of lake abike, which is about 30 miles outside of Santa Fe and the route doesn't go through Santa Fe. Hub froze up and I just couldn't get my hub to grab. It was, it was grabbing every, you know, three or four pedal strokes, but I was just spinning out other than that. And so I could either try to like limp 150 miles to the next to silver city, which was probably more than 150 at that point. Or I could go off route and take time that I I would just lose trying to get down to Santa Fe. And I, I picked getting down to Santa Fe hitch hiked, which is allowed once you're off route, you can, for a mechanical, you can, you can take motorized support. Got picked up almost immediately by two incredibly kind, like one after the other hitch hitchhiker or drivers had great conversations with them. Got dropped off at the bike shop bike shop, fixed me up in two hours. I'm usually not this bold, but I went up, I had had, I'd been having good conversation with all of the guys down at mellow Velo bikes in Santa Fe and, and went up to the owner was like, Hey, I have to ask. I, you know, I wouldn't be this forward usually, but any, any chance you could gimme a ride back an hour north of here to where I left off so I can get some more miles in today. And he looked at me and he was. I was already thinking about it. Let me, you know, he gave one of his employees his, his keys and got me back up there. And the whole episode start to finish lost me five and a half hours, which is just mind blowing and these, these races. And I'll, I know I can, I can go on for a while, but the, these races can be Self supported. I don't think means self isolating and there can be kind of this mentality that we're all sort of Jeremiah Johnson's out there, but meeting people and having experiences like that along the route which I hope to pay forward in my life after that is just, that is one of the most meaningful parts of it. And that was probably, you know, went from a mechanical. That was a huge bummer and, and kind of put me into problem solving mode. When I wanted to just be in ride mode. But it turned into one of the best days of the whole trip. Because you know, the, there were, there were five people out there between the, the, the hitchhiker folks and, and mellow Velo who were absolutely like, didn't hesitate to help someone out. And that was, that was, that was really cool. [00:51:34] Craig Dalton: Yeah, such a special memory. And it's funny, I I've heard a couple other people mention that just. Leaving the tour divide with that notion that paying it forward in life is important because as you've just described, you had this moment, which could have been really shitty. Like it's not life ending or life threatening, but you could have spent 24 hours trying to get your stuff sorted out. And the fact that strangers helped you got you to a bike shop. The bike shop realized what you were doing realized, Hey, two hours out of their day out and back to get you back on. It's gonna mean the world to you and, and not much to them. And I'm sure they have the similar alternative side of that memory. Like I just did someone a solid and it probably felt good to them as well. [00:52:19] Nick Marzano: For sure. [00:52:20] Craig Dalton: Yeah. So, I mean, we could go on and on it's it's the tour divide has always been fascinating to me for all the reasons you've described along the way. It just sounds like this epic life adventure. That is gonna unfold as it unfolds. It's gonna be different every year. I know you guys experienced a lot of rough weather up in the early parts of the race in the north, getting outta Canada and to persevere through that and know that, Hey, you're gonna be on your bike for 21 days or whatever it amounted to, and you're gonna have good days and bad days. But the important thing is to just keep forward. [00:52:55] Nick Marzano: Yeah, that is, you know, JP to very repeats that a lot. If you, if you follow him on, on Instagram or Facebook, that's his, his motto. And I don't know if he coined this or it's or got it elsewhere, but yeah, riding forward, just whatever, however, you're feeling, jump on your bike. I think I, it wasn't so much life changing as, as affirming in a lot of ways. And one of them is, is that, that there is, there is so much mutability in. The weather in your attitude in, and if you can make as a principle that you just jump on your bike and don't wait for the good times to happen, but know that they will be there, deal with, if the train is tough right now, it's tough right now. It will be good. Later if it's good right now, don't set up an expectation that it will be good at mile at the, you know, the last 14 miles of the day, because oddly, those are always the hardest. It will be tough later. And if you can still jump on your bike and just ride forward regardless. And I didn't, you know, I wasn't perfect at that. I, like I said, in Pinedale, I took a day where I had to really think whether I wanted to keep riding forward. , but I hope that what you get out of this, what I get out of it hopefully is that I can reflect on that. And in moments where I'm struggling to ride forward in life in, in certain ways that I can, you know, return back from this super selfish, selfish endeavor, right. Where I'm spending a lot of money and time on myself and come back ready to like ride forward for others, pay it forward for others. And, and. You hope that all that time reflecting over three weeks on, on how you responded to those challenges can translate into something for for your return to society, to normal society. [00:54:41] Craig Dalton: Nick, I can't think of a better sentiment to end on. Amazing. I appreciate so much you sharing the story with me. As I said, opening up in this conversation offline. I hope this serves as a little archive of your experience and I, I know you got a little bit of joy outta reflecting on what some of those high points were. So thanks again. It means a lot that you shared their story with me. [00:55:02] Nick Marzano: Yeah, thank you for the opportunity, Craig. It's been great, great meeting you and getting to talk to you. [00:55:06] Craig Dalton: Cheers. Yeah. So that's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast, chapeau to Nick for that amazing accomplishment on the tour divide. I have to say every time I talked to someone about that route, I get more and more excited about dreaming to do it someday and myself. Huge. Thanks to our friends attract travel. I really hope you can join me in Gerona in November on the November six. Departure of the Jarana gravel bike tour. Simply visit Trek, travel.com. And search for a drone, a gravel bike tour. And remember to mention the podcast as you'll get a free handlebar bag. With your registration. If you're looking to connect with me or have any questions. Feel free to join the ridership. That's www.theridership.com. Nick is actually an active member of the ridership. So I'm sure if you have any follow-up questions for him on the tour divide, he'd be happy to respond. And if you have any questions about this gravel bike tour that we're doing in November with track, feel free to hit me up directly. I'm really looking forward to meeting some of you guys and girls out there this year has been far too long since we've gotten together. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels  

Blue Rain Gallery Podcast
Leroy Garcia: Owner/President of Blue Rain Gallery - Epi. 205, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Blue Rain Gallery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 60:12


Blue Rain Gallery Owner/President Leroy Garcia is featured on the Art Dealer Diaries Podcast with Dr. Mark Sublette ... " I've known Leroy Garcia of Blue Rain Gallery for 30+ years and his trajectory and my trajectory are very similar. He opened his gallery in Taos and then moved to Santa Fe, having had another location in Scottsdale at one point as well. My gallery is in Tucson and was also in Santa Fe for a time. We share some of the same artists in our stable, as well as the way we do business. Leroy and I are both pro-artist, pro-Native American, and pro-Hispanic art. You see, Leroy is a mover and shaker in the field and I've always felt that he's one of the best marketers out there. He has a great sense of what needs to be explored as far as how you go about showing and selling art, as well as who you represent in your gallery and the ecosystem a varied array or artists can create. He also has his own podcast, the Blue Rain Gallery Podcast, which I listen to and is a very interesting, unique, artist-centric podcast. I think if you want to learn about the art world from the viewpoint of the established art dealer, this is a really great podcast to listen to. It's different than most of the other podcasts I've recorded because we talk about what it is to be a gallerist, the things that have to, do and the problems that you encounter, especially in the modern day and age of social media and the rising frequency of direct artist to client relationships. So I think you'll really enjoy this. I know I did. Leroy Garcia of Blue Rain Gallery." ... Find more episodes of the Art Dealer Diaries here: YouTube

Palabras Mayores
América y Santa Fe en construcción… y con buenos cimientos

Palabras Mayores

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 24:33


Lo que hay que saber
3 de agosto de 2022 2da edición

Lo que hay que saber

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 2:08


Resumen de noticias de la tarde de LA NACION del 3 de agosto de 2022: Expectativa por los anuncios de Sergio Massa; la mujer y el hijo de Carlos Kirchner fueron procesador por enriquecimiento ilícito; paran los docentes de Santa Fe; España activa planes de ahorro de electricidad, y Vélez y Talleres juegan el partido de ida de los cuartos de final de la Libertadores

Palabras Mayores - Carlos Antonio Vélez
América y Santa Fe en construcción… y con buenos cimientos

Palabras Mayores - Carlos Antonio Vélez

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 24:32


En Palabras Mayores del 3 de agosto de 2022, Carlos Antonio Vélez se refirió a la posibilidad de haber un mundial con cuatro sedes en el 2030; también analizó lo que dejó el partido Independiente Santa Fe-América por la quinta fecha de la Liga Betplay.

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Leroy Garcia: Owner/President of Blue Rain Gallery - Epi. 205, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 60:12


I've known Leroy Garcia of Blue Rain Gallery for 30+ years and his trajectory and my trajectory are very similar. He opened his gallery in Taos and then moved to Santa Fe, having had another location in Scottsdale at one point as well. My gallery is in Tucson and was also in Santa Fe for a time. We share some of the same artists in our stable, as well as the way we do business. Leroy and I are both pro-artist, pro-Native American, and pro-Hispanic art.You see, Leroy is a mover and shaker in the field and I've always felt that he's one of the best marketers out there. He has a great sense of what needs to be explored as far as how you go about showing and selling art, as well as who you represent in your gallery and the ecosystem a varied array or artists can create. He also has his own podcast, the Blue Rain Gallery Podcast, which I listen to and is a very interesting, unique, artist-centric podcast.I think if you want to learn about the art world from the viewpoint of the established art dealer, this is a really great podcast to listen to. It's different than most of the other podcasts I've recorded because we talk about what it is to be a gallerist, the things that have to, do and the problems that you encounter, especially in the modern day and age of social media and the rising frequency of direct artist to client relationships.So I think you'll really enjoy this. I know I did. Leroy Garcia of Blue Rain Gallery.

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 91: Reimagine Training

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:54


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In episode 3 of the podcast, the topic is: Re-imagining workforce training. Our guest is Sarah Boisvert, Founder and CEO Fab Lab Hub, LLC and the non-profit New Collar Network.In this conversation, we talk about re-imagining workforce training, industry 4.0., what do you mean by “New Collar” jobs? We discuss the mushrooming of Fab Labs. What skills are needed? How can they be taught? How can the credentials be recognized? .What has the impact been? Where do we go from here.After listening to this episode, check out Sarah Boisvert's online profile as well as the New Collar Network: Sarah Boisvert https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-boisvert-3a965031/ The New Collar Network (@NewCollarNetwrk): http://newcollarnetwork.com/Fab Lab Hub (@FabLabHub): http://fablabhub.org/Augmented is a podcast for leaders in the manufacturing industry hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim, presented by Tulip.co, the manufacturing app platform, and associated with MFG.works, the open learning community launched at the World Economic Forum. Our intro and outro music is The Arrival by Evgeny Bardyuzha (@evgenybardyuzha), licensed by @Art_list_io. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars on Apple Podcasts. To nominate guests, to suggest exciting episode topics or give feedback, follow us on LinkedIn, looking out for live episodes, message us on Twitter @augmentedpod or our website's contact form. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 3: How to Train Augmented Workers. Augmented--the industry 4.0 podcast. Transcript: TROND: Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. Technology is changing rapidly. What's next in the digital factory? Who's leading the change, and what are the key skills to learn? How to stay up to date on manufacturing and industry 4.0. Augmented is a podcast for leaders in the manufacturing industry, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim, presented by Tulip.co, the manufacturing app platform, and associated with MFG.works, that is M-F-G.works, the open learning community launched at the World Economic Forum. Each episode dives deep into a contemporary topic of concern across the industry and airs at 9:00 a.m. U.S. Eastern, every Wednesday. Augmented — the industry 4.0 podcast. In episode 3 of the podcast, the topic is Reimagining Workforce Training. Our guest is Sarah Boisvert, Founder and CEO of Fab Lab Hub and the non-profit New Collar Network. In this conversation, we talk about reimagining workforce training, industry 4.0, and what do you mean by new collar jobs? Fab Labs, what skills are needed? How can they be taught? How can the credentials be recognized? What has the impact been, and where do we go from here? Sarah, how are you doing today? SARAH: I'm doing well. How are you? TROND: I'm doing fine. I'm excited to talk about reimagining workforce training, which seems to be an issue on your mind, Sarah. You are a founder yourself. You have been actively involved in advanced manufacturing. I understand part of your story is that your company manufactured and sold the Lasik eye surgery back in 1999. So you've been involved in manufacturing for a while. We're here to talk about something very exciting. You say new-collar jobs is the big focus. I know you didn't invent the term. Can you give me a sense of what new-collar jobs refers to, first of all? SARAH: Sure. It is a term that was coined by Ginni Rometty, who was then the CEO of IBM. She's now the executive chair. And it refers to blue-collar jobs that have now become digital. And so many of our jobs...if you just think about your UPS man who now everything's not on paper, it's all in a handheld tool that he takes around on his deliveries. And all jobs are becoming digital. And so I thought that Ginny's term encapsulated exactly what's happening, and the technologies that we used to use just in manufacturing are now ubiquitous across industries. TROND: You have also been instrumental in the MIT spinout project called Fab Labs. Just give us a quick sense, Sarah; what are Fab Labs? Not everybody is aware of this. SARAH: Fab Labs are workshops and studios that incorporate many different kinds of digital fabrication. So we are taking the ones and zeros, the bits of CAD designs, and turning them into things that you can hold in your hand. And it covers topics like 3D printing, and laser cutting, and CNC machining. But Neil Gershenfeld, who founded the international Fab Lab Network, likes to say the power of digital fabrication is social, not technical. TROND: You know, this brings me to my next question, what skills are needed? So when we talk about new-collar jobs and the skills and the workforce training, what exact skills is it that we need to now be more aware of? So you talked about some of them. I guess digital fabrication, broadly, is another. Can you go a little bit more into what kind of skills you have been involved in training people for? SARAH: Well, when I first started this project, I had always been interested in workforce training, obviously, because I had a manufacturing company, and I needed to hire people. And we had worked with the community college near our factory to develop a two-year curriculum for digital manufacturing. But I had in mind exactly what I needed for my own company and the kinds of skills that I was looking for. And so a lot of Fab Labs, because we have about 2,000 Fab Labs around the world, heard about this program and started asking me, "Could you make a curriculum for us?" And there were so many of them that I thought I needed to come up with something that is going to fit most of the Fab Labs. And so I interviewed 200 manufacturers in all kinds of industries and from startups to Fortune 10 and so companies like GE, and Boeing, and Apple, and Ford, as well as companies in the medical device space. What they all told me they wanted was...the number one skill they were looking for was problem-solving. And that's even more important today because we're getting all these new technologies, and you haven't got some guy in the back of the machine shop who has done this before. And we're getting machines that are being built that have never been built before. And it's a whole new space. And the second thing they were looking for was hands-on skills. And I was particularly looking at operators and technicians. They were also looking for technical skills like CAD design, AI. Predictive analytics was probably the number one skill that the international manufacturers' CEOs were looking for. And I got done, and I thought, well, this is all the stuff we do in Fab Labs. This is exactly what we do. We teach people how to solve problems. And so many of our labs, particularly in places like Asia or Africa where there was tremendous need and not enough resources, necessity is the mother of invention. And so many of our Fab Labs invent amazing things to help their communities. And I thought, well, we don't need a two-year curriculum because the need for the employers was so extreme. I thought we need something more like what we do in Fab Labs. TROND: And how can these skills be taught? What are the methodologies that you're using to teach these skills that aren't necessarily, you know, you don't need to go to university, as you pointed out, for them? But they have to be taught somehow. What are the methods you're using? SARAH: Well, I did a lot of research trying to nail that down when I got done figuring out what it was people needed in the factories. And it seemed like digital badges were the fastest, easiest, most affordable way to certify the ability of a badge earner to work with a particular skill set. And they were developed by IBM and Mozilla probably decades ago now and are used by many organizations to verify skills. And it's a credential that is portable and that you can put on your digital resume and verify. There is an underlying standard that you have to adhere to; an international standards body monitors it. And there's a certain level of certainty that the person who says they have the skill actually has it. TROND: That's a good point because, in this modern day and age, a lot of people can say that they have gone through some sort of training, and it's hard to verify. So these things are also called micro certifications. How recent is this idea to certify a skill in that digital way? SARAH: I think that these particular badges have been around for decades, and people like Cisco, and IBM, and Autodesk have been using them for quite a long time, as well as many colleges, including Michigan State, is one that comes to mind that has a big program. And they can be stacked into a credential or into a higher-level course. So we stack our badges, for example, into a master badge. And that combines a number of skills into something that allows someone to have a job description kind of certification. So, for example, our badges will combine into a master badge for an operator. And so it's not just someone who knows CAD. They know CAD. They know how to run a machine. They know how to troubleshoot a machine. TROND: So we touched a little bit on how these things can be taught. But is this a very practical type of teaching that you are engaged in? I mean, Fab Labs, so they are physically present, or was that kind of in the old, pre-COVID era? SARAH: Well, yes, we were typically physically present with COVID. This past summer, I spent a lot of time piloting more online programs. And so, for our design classes, we can still have people online. And our interns 3D-print their designs, and then they can look at them via photography or video, if it's a functional design, and see how the design needs to be iterated to the next step. Because, as you know, it never comes out right the first time; it takes a number of iterations before it works. And we just recently, this week, actually completed an agreement with MatterHackers, who are a distributor of tabletop 3D printers, to bundle their 3D printers with our badges. And so someone can then have a printer at home. And so, if you have a family and you're trying to educate a number of children, it's actually a pretty economical proposition. And they offer two printers that are under $1,000 for people who are, for example, wanting to upskill and change careers. They also offer the Ultimaker 3D printer that we use pretty heavily in our lab. And it's a higher level with added expense. But if you're looking at a career change, it's certainly cheaper than going back to college [laughs] instead. TROND: So I'm curious about the impact. I know that you started out this endeavor interviewing some 200 U.S. manufacturers to see that there was...I think you told me there was like a paradigm shift needed really to bring back well-paying, engaging manufacturing careers back to middle-class Americans. And that's again, I guess, pointing to this new-collar workforce. What has the impact been? I mean, I'm sitting here, and I see you have the book, too, but you generously gave me this. So I've been browsing some of the impacts and some of the description of what you have been achieving over the past few years. What has the impact been? How many people have you been able to train? And what happened to the people who were trained? SARAH: We've only been doing it a couple of years. And in our pilot, we probably have trained 2,3,400 people, something on that. And it's been a mix of people who come to us. Because we teach project-based learning, we can have classes that have varying levels of experience. So we have people who are PhDs from the Los Alamos National Lab who drive the 45 minutes over to us, and they're typically upskilling. They're typically engineers who went to school before 3D printing was in the curriculum. And they are adding that to their existing work. But we get such a wide range of people from artists. We're an artist colony here. And we get jewelers, and sculptors, and a wide range of people who have never done anything technical but are looking to automate their processes. And so my necklace is the Taos Pueblo. And it was designed by a woman...and her story is in the book. So I should add that the book you're referring to has augmented reality links to the stories of people. And she just was determined. She, I think, has never graduated from high school and is an immigrant to the United States. And she just was determined to learn this. And she worked with us, and now she designs in CAD, and we 3D-print the molds. And her husband has a casting company, and then he has it cast in sterling. TROND: I find that fascinating, Sarah because you said...so it goes from people who haven't completed high school to kind of not so recent PhDs. That is a fascinating range. And it brings, I guess, this idea of the difficulty level of contemporary technologies isn't necessarily what it was years ago. It's not like these technologies take years to learn, necessarily at the level where you can actually apply them in your hobbies or in the workplace. Why is that, do you think? Have we gotten better at developing technologies? Or have companies gotten better to tweak them, or have we gotten faster at learning them? Or is the discrepancy...like, this could be surprising for a lot of people that it's not that hard to take a course and apply it right afterwards. SARAH: Learning anything comes down to are you interested? It comes down to your level of motivation and determination. A couple of things, I think the programs, the technical programs, and the machines have become much easier. When I started in the laser business, every time that I wanted to make a hole, I would have to redesign the optical train. And so I'd have to do all the math, so I'd have to do all the advanced math. I would have to put it together on my bench, and hopefully, it worked, and tweak it until I got the size hole I needed in the material I needed. Today, there's autofocus. It's just like your camera. You press a button; you dial in the size hole you want, and away you go. And it's interesting because many of the newer employees at our company Potomac Photonics really don't have the technical understanding that I developed because they just press the button. But it moves much faster, and we have more throughput; we have a greater consistency. So the machines have definitely improved tremendously in recent years. But I also think that people are more used to dealing with technology. It's very rare to run into somebody who doesn't have email or somebody who isn't surfing the web to find information. And for the young people, they're digital natives. So they don't even know what it's like not to have a digital option. I think that a number of things have come together to make that feasible. TROND: Sarah, let me ask you then this hard question. I mean, it's a big promise to say that you can save the middle class essentially. Is it that easy? Is it just taking one or two courses with this kind of Fab Lab-type approach, and you're all set? Can you literally take someone who feels...or maybe are laid off or feels at least not skilled really for the jobs they had, the jobs they want, and you can really turn them into highly employable in a matter of one course? Has that really happened? SARAH: In one course or one digital badge, it is possible to get some jobs, but it probably takes a combination of courses in order to have the right skill set because it's typically not one skill you need. It's typically a combination of skills. So to run the 3D printers, for example, you need CAD design. You need to understand design for 3D printing. And then you have to understand how to run the machines and fix them when they break. So it's probably still a more focused and condensed process. So you could do our master badge, which comprises five or six badges, and get a job in six months for about $2,000. With one class, you could get a job part-time and continue the other badges and be paying for school while you're working in a field that is paying a substantial increase over working at McDonald's. TROND: So give me a sense. So this is happening, in your case, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Where do we go from here? Is this going on anywhere else? What are the numbers? How many people are being trained this way? How many people could be trained this way? How easy is the approach you're taking to integrate and scale up? And is it happening anywhere else? SARAH: Our non-profit, which is the organization that issues the badges, has, right now, I think, 12 or 13 members, and they were part of our pilot, and they are all over the country. So in my team, Lemelson, the Fab Lab in El Paso, the Fab Lab in Tulsa, MakerspaceCT in Hartford, Connecticut. And so we have a group that just started this year was when I started the scaling after, I was really pretty confident that it was going to work. If it worked in Santa Fe, which is a small town and in a very rural, very poor state, I really thought if I could make it work here, we could make it work anywhere because there are a lot of challenges in our state. So we started scaling this year, and each of our pilot sites is probably putting through their first cohort of 4, 5, or 6 badges, and they each have about 10 in that first cohort. We have a lot of requests for people to join our group and start issuing the badges. I've really come to see the success of our online program. And so, our online program is instructor-led at this point. And I'm working to create a self-directed program that people could do online with a tabletop printer at home. But we will still continue to scale the New Collar Network that actually disseminates the badges. And I really see enormous interest. As you know, college enrollment has been declining for the last ten years. There has been an 11% decline in college enrollment. And people are looking for alternatives. And I think that I've had requests from school systems. I had a request from a school system back East that has 45,000 students that they want to get badges. We have had a request from a school system in the Midwest where they get a lot of teachers who are getting 3D printers, and they don't know what to do with them. And they'd like for us to train the teachers. So I really see a huge opportunity. And these tools that we're using are not just being used in manufacturing. One of the people that we worked with on the HR side in research was Walmart. And their big worry is now they're putting in these janitorial robots. And their big dilemma is who's going to program them, and who is going to fix the robots when they're not working? And it's everywhere. It's not just am I going to get a job at that manufacturing company? It's also your local retail store. TROND: Fantastic. This is very inspiring. I thank you so much for sharing this with us. And I hope that others are listening to this and either join a course like that or get engaged in the Fab Lab type Network and start training others. So thanks again for sharing this. SARAH: Oh, it's a pleasure. It's a real mission, I think. [laughs] TROND: Sounds like it. Have a wonderful rest of your day. SARAH: Thank you. TROND: You have just listened to Episode 3 of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Reimagining Workforce Training. Our guest was Sarah Boisvert, Founder, and CEO of Fab Lab Hub and the non-profit New Collar Network. In this conversation, we talked about reimagining workforce training, industry 4.0, and what you mean by new-collar jobs and Fab Labs; what skills are needed? How can they be taught, and how can the credentials be recognized? What has the impact been, and where do we go from here? My takeaway is that reimagining workforce training is more needed than ever before. The good news is that training new generations of workers might be simpler than it seems. Practical skills in robotics, 3D scanning, digital fabrication, even AR and VR can be taught through experiential learning in weeks and months, not in years. Micro certifications can be given out electronically, and the impact on workers' lives can be profound. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. Augmented — the industry 4.0 podcast. Special Guest: Sarah Boisvert.

Live Greatly
How to Boost Creativity & Well-Being Using Silence with Leigh Marz & Justin Zorn, Authors of Golden: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise

Live Greatly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 32:52


The world is noisier today than it ever has been before, and we're left trying to process this excess of information! Kristel Bauer sat down with Leigh Marz & Justin Zorn on this Live Greatly podcast episode to chat about the power of silence. Leigh & Justin are the authors of their new book, Golden: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise. The same techniques that Justin and Leigh have taught to US Congress, NASA, Harvard and Google can help you reclaim the presence of silence in your life. Tune in to learn about why silence is important, how you can find silence in the busyness of life, how to navigate information overload and so much more! Key Takeaways from This Episode What are the benefits of silence How to find silence in the midst of hectic days Why is all of this excess noise potentially harmful How to get comfortable with silence Insights from the book GOLDEN: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise In their book GOLDEN: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise (HarperWave; on sale: May 17, 2022), Justin Zorn and Leigh Marz invite us to rethink our definition of silence—not just as the absence of noise, but as a presence that can bring us energy, clarity, and deeper connection. The world is louder than ever. It's not just the noise in our ears, but the noise on our screens and in our heads. With the average person sending/receiving 125 emails a day and with the WHO ranking noise pollution as second only to air pollution in its impact on human wellbeing, it's clear that modern society has lost its connection to silence. While mindfulness can help us cope with the onslaught of noise, research shows that few people maintain a meditation practice over time. We need more accessible and enduring ways of finding clarity and renewal. Now, the same techniques Zorn and Marz have taught to the U.S. Congress, NASA, Harvard, and Google can help us reclaim the presence of silence in our lives. In GOLDEN, the authors illuminate how through their wide-ranging expertise and moving storytelling, including: • The economics and psychology of why our world is so noisy • The science of why silence is essential for our bodies and minds • Why virtually all the world's spiritual traditions honor silence as a path to truth • Practical approaches to finding “little moments” of silence as well as deeper immersion • How to find renewing silence in families, among friends, and in workplaces • Building a society that honors silence—including the values of rest and deep listening About Justin Talbot Zorn: Justin has served as both a strategist and a meditation teacher in the US Congress. A Harvard-andOxford-trained specialist in the economics and psychology of human thriving, he has written for the Washington Post, The Atlantic, Harvard Business Review, Foreign Policy, and other publications. Justin is the coauthor of Golden: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise, published by HarperCollins in the US, Penguin/Random House in the UK, and globally in 11 other languages. He is cofounder of Astrea Strategies, a consultancy that bridges contemplation and action, helping leaders and teams envision and communicate solutions to complex challenges. Justin lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with his wife and three children. About Leigh Marz: Leigh is a collaboration and leadership coach for major universities, corporations, and federal agencies as well as a longtime student of pioneering researchers and practitioners of the ritualized use of psychedelic medicines in the West. She has led training programs to promote an experimental mindset among teams at NASA and a decade-long crosssector collaboration to reduce toxic chemicals in products, in partnership with Green Science Policy Institute, Harvard University, IKEA, Google, and Kaiser Permanente. Leigh is the coauthor of Golden: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise, published by HarperCollins in the US, Penguin/Random House in the UK, and globally in 11 other languages. She is the cofounder of Astrea Strategies. Leigh lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband and daughter. Buy the book! Golden: The Power of Silence in a World of Noise LinkedIn: Justin Talbot Zorn LinkedIn: Leigh Marz Justin Zorn's website Leigh Marz's website About the Host of the Live Greatly podcast, Kristel Bauer: Kristel, the Founder of Live Greatly, is on a mission to help people thrive personally and professionally. Kristel is a corporate wellness expert, Integrative Medicine Fellow, Top Keynote Speaker, TEDx speaker & contributing writer for Entrepreneur.  Kristel brings her expertise & extensive experience in Corporate Wellness, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership, Mindset, Resilience, Self-Care, and Stress Management to in-person and virtual events as Professional Keynote Speaker.  If you are looking for a female motivational speaker to inspire and empower your audience to reclaim their well-being, inner motivation and happiness, Kristel's message will leave a lasting impression. Kristel would be happy to discuss partnering with you to make your next event one to remember! Speaking Topics can be tailored to fit the needs of your group. To Book Kristel as a speaker for your next event, click here. Follow Kristel Bauer on: Instagram: @livegreatly_co LinkedIn: Kristel Bauer Twitter: @livegreatly_co Facebook: @livegreatly.co Youtube: Live Greatly, Kristel Bauer To Watch Kristel Bauer's TEDx talk of Redefining Work/Life Balance in a COVID-19 World click here. Disclaimer: The contents of this podcast are intended for informational and educational purposes only. Always seek the guidance of your physician for any recommendations specific to you or for any questions regarding your specific health, your sleep patterns changes to diet and exercise, or any medical conditions.  Always consult your physician before starting any supplements or new lifestyle programs. All information, views and statements shared on the Live Greatly podcast are purely the opinions of the authors, and are not medical advice or treatment recommendations.  They have not been evaluated by the food and drug administration.  Opinions of guests are their own and Kristel Bauer & this podcast does not endorse or accept responsibility for statments made by guests.  Neither Kristel Bauer nor this podcast takes responsibility for possible health consequences of a person or persons following the information in this educational content.  Always consult your physician for recommendations specific to you.  

Notorious Mass Effect
"SPOTIFY EXCLUSIVE GAMEPLAY WALKTHROUGH: ELDEN RING PT 9 (1 OF 2)"

Notorious Mass Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 91:35


Elden Ring RISE, TARNISHED Be guided by grace to brandish the power of the Elden Ring and become an Elden Lord in the Lands Between. A new fantasy world Unravel the mysteries of the Elden Ring's power. Encounter adversaries with profound backgrounds, characters with their own unique motivations for helping or hindering your progress, and fearsome creatures. The Lands Between Traverse the breathtaking world on foot or on horseback, alone or online with other players, and fully immerse yourself in the grassy plains, swamps, mountains, castles and other sites of grandeur on a scale never seen before in a FromSoftware title. Genre-defining gameplay Create your character and define your playstyle by experimenting with a wide variety of weapons, magical abilities, and skills found throughout the world. Many options are at your disposal as you decide how to approach exploration and combat. Game details ELDEN RING developed by FromSoftware, Inc. and BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc., is a fantasy action-RPG adventure set within a world created by Hidetaka Miyazaki and George R.R. Martin. Danger and discovery lurk around every corner in FromSoftware's largest game to-date. Hidetaka Miyazaki - President and Game Director of FromSoftware Inc. Known for directing critically-acclaimed games in beloved franchises including Armored Core and Dark Souls. George R.R. Martin is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many novels, including the acclaimed series A Song of Ice and Fire - A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, A Feast For Crows, and A Dance with Dragons. As a writer-producer, he has worked on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and pilots that were never made. He lives with the lovely Parris in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Additional information Mature 17+Blood and Gore Suggestive Themes Violence Language Publisher BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Developer FromSoftware Genre Action RPG Platforms Xbox Series X|S Xbox One Release date February 25, 2022 source description: ELDEN RING | Official Website (EN) (bandainamcoent.eu) What's going on Internet, Analytic here aka Dreamz and I would like to welcome you to mine, which I call the Notorious Mass Effect Podcast! I am your Hip-Hop / Gaming News source with a little bit of R&B mixed in. ENJOY MY BRAND NEW SPOTIFY EXCLUSIVE VIDEO VERSION OF NME! But before that make sure to Click my Linktree in my bio to access my social medias and follow, to keep up with my latest activities, if you want to financially support the show click my cash app link located towards the top of my linktree as it helps the show overall, also make sure to share this podcast rating the show 5 stars as this helps the show reach more people so we can grow together and effect the masses! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/masseffect/support

Notorious Mass Effect
"SPOTIFY EXCLUSIVE GAMEPLAY WALKTHROUGH: ELDEN RING PT 9 (2 OF 2)"

Notorious Mass Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 90:53


Elden Ring RISE, TARNISHED Be guided by grace to brandish the power of the Elden Ring and become an Elden Lord in the Lands Between. A new fantasy world Unravel the mysteries of the Elden Ring's power. Encounter adversaries with profound backgrounds, characters with their own unique motivations for helping or hindering your progress, and fearsome creatures. The Lands Between Traverse the breathtaking world on foot or on horseback, alone or online with other players, and fully immerse yourself in the grassy plains, swamps, mountains, castles and other sites of grandeur on a scale never seen before in a FromSoftware title. Genre-defining gameplay Create your character and define your playstyle by experimenting with a wide variety of weapons, magical abilities, and skills found throughout the world. Many options are at your disposal as you decide how to approach exploration and combat. Game details ELDEN RING developed by FromSoftware, Inc. and BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc., is a fantasy action-RPG adventure set within a world created by Hidetaka Miyazaki and George R.R. Martin. Danger and discovery lurk around every corner in FromSoftware's largest game to-date. Hidetaka Miyazaki - President and Game Director of FromSoftware Inc. Known for directing critically-acclaimed games in beloved franchises including Armored Core and Dark Souls. George R.R. Martin is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many novels, including the acclaimed series A Song of Ice and Fire - A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, A Feast For Crows, and A Dance with Dragons. As a writer-producer, he has worked on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and pilots that were never made. He lives with the lovely Parris in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Additional information Mature 17+Blood and Gore Suggestive Themes Violence Language Publisher BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Developer FromSoftware Genre Action RPG Platforms Xbox Series X|S Xbox One Release date February 25, 2022 source description: ELDEN RING | Official Website (EN) (bandainamcoent.eu) What's going on Internet, Analytic here aka Dreamz and I would like to welcome you to mine, which I call the Notorious Mass Effect Podcast! I am your Hip-Hop / Gaming News source with a little bit of R&B mixed in. ENJOY MY BRAND NEW SPOTIFY EXCLUSIVE VIDEO VERSION OF NME! But before that make sure to Click my Linktree in my bio to access my social medias and follow, to keep up with my latest activities, if you want to financially support the show click my cash app link located towards the top of my linktree as it helps the show overall, also make sure to share this podcast rating the show 5 stars as this helps the show reach more people so we can grow together and effect the masses! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/masseffect/support

The Shift (on life after 40) with Sam Baker
Julia Cameron on alcoholism, creativity and emotional sobriety

The Shift (on life after 40) with Sam Baker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 37:26


My guest today is the author of the cult bestseller The Artist's Way, Julia Cameron. Part book, part tool-kit, part spiritual guide, The Artists Way has sold over 4 million copies globally and has inspired countless artists, writers, and creatives including Elizabeth Gilbert, Alicia Keyes, Pete Townshend and many more.In the 30 years since that was published, Julia has written a movie, 7 plays and 23 books, including her memoir Floor Sample. Written in her late 50s she looked back over the first half(ish) of her life: her catholic education, alcoholism and drug abuse, her brief marriage to director Martin Scorsese, and her subsequent search for meaning, for herself, for home, ultimately for a way to be comfortably sober.Speaking from her home in Santa Fe, Julia shared her incredible journey from “just a girl” at Catholic school to The Artists Way by way of leaving Washington a writer and landing in Hollywood a wife. She spoke candidly about losing the love of her life, getting and staying sober, how the nuns were her introduction to women with power and how the morning pages transformed her life. Now 74 and 45 years dry, she says, she's braver than ever.* You can buy all the books mentioned in this podcast at Bookshop.org, including The Artists Way by Julia Cameron and the book that inspired this podcast, The Shift: how I lost and found myself after 40 - and you can too, by me! Julia's recommendation, Creative Ideas by Ernest Holmes is out of print, but you can buy it here.* And if you'd like to support the work that goes into making this podcast and get a weekly newsletter plus loads more content including transcripts of the podcast, please join The Shift community. Find out more at https://steadyhq.com/en/theshift/• The Shift (on life after 40) with Sam Baker is created and hosted by Sam Baker and edited by Emily Sandford. If you enjoyed this podcast, please rate/review/follow as it really does help other people find us. And let me know what you think on twitter @sambaker or instagram @theothersambaker. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved
TERRIFYING TRUE CASES OF MUNCHAUSEN BY PROXY” and more! #WeirdDarkness

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:07


Find Weird Darkness on the free Spreaker app: https://www.spreaker.com/show/weirddarkness, or look for it wherever you listen to podcasts: https://linktr.ee/weirddarkness IN THIS EPISODE: We'll look at the disturbing case of Dee Dee Blanchard who suffered from a horrible mental condition that caused her to torture her daughter – and we'll look at similar, terrifying cases of other people doing the same to those under their care and supervision. It's the sinister truth of Munchausen by proxy. (The Disturbing Truth Behind ‘Mommy Dead and Dearest') (Other True Cases of Munchausen by Proxy) *** It was 1909, and Bud and Temple Abernathy rode their horses, just the two of them, from Oklahoma to Santa Fe… and then made the return trip home. A 1,300-mile horseback trip. Big deal you say? That's what life was like back then, you say? What if I told you that Bud was only 9 years old, and Temple was only five? (The Astounding Adventures of the Abernathy Boys)SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“The Disturbing Truth Behind ‘Mommy Dead and Dearest'” by Stefanie Hammond for Graveyard Shift: https://tinyurl.com/yxhgf866 “Other True Cases of Munchausen by Proxy” by Carly Carano for Unspeakable Times: https://tinyurl.com/y485ykp5 “The Astounding Adventures of the Abernathy Boys” by M.J. Alexander for 405 Magazine: https://tinyurl.com/y5c8grn9 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =Weird Darkness Publishing: https://weirddarkness.com/publishingVisit the Church of the Undead: http://undead.church/ Find out how to escape eternal darkness at https://weirddarkness.com/eternaldarkness = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =Weird Darkness theme by Alibi Music Library. Background music provided by Alibi Music, EpidemicSound and/or AudioBlocks with paid license. Music from Shadows Symphony (https://tinyurl.com/yyrv987t), Midnight Syndicate (http://amzn.to/2BYCoXZ), Kevin MacLeod (https://tinyurl.com/y2v7fgbu), Tony Longworth (https://tinyurl.com/y2nhnbt7), and/or Nicolas Gasparini/Myuu (https://tinyurl.com/lnqpfs8) is used with permission. 

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =(Over time links seen above may become invalid, disappear, or have different content. I always make sure to give authors credit for the material I use whenever possible. If I somehow overlooked doing so for a story, or if a credit is incorrect, please let me know and I will rectify it in these show notes immediately. Some links included above may benefit me financially through qualifying purchases.)= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ="I have come into the world as a light, so that no one who believes in me should stay in darkness." — John 12:46Trademark, Weird Darkness®, 2022. Copyright Weird Darkness©, 2022.

Retire With Purpose: The Retirement Podcast
306: Sharing Your Wisdom in Your Second Act with Chip Conley

Retire With Purpose: The Retirement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 58:07


Today, I'm talking to Chip Conley. Chip founded Joie de Vivre Hospitality at the age of 26, turned it into the second largest boutique hotel brand in America, and sold the business 24 years later. Soon after, the founders of Airbnb came to him for advice, and he joined them as their Head of Global Hospitality and Strategy before settling into a role as their Strategic Advisor for Hospitality and Leadership. He's also the founder of Modern Elder Academy, the world's first “midlife wisdom school,” with a campus in Baja California Sur and one soon to open in Santa Fe. In his most recent book, Wisdom at Work: The Making of a Modern Elder, Chip writes about the value of humility, emotional intelligence, and wisdom–and how companies like Airbnb benefit from skills that can only come with age. In this conversation, Chip and I discuss the identity crises that come with exits of all sizes and the lessons he learned by joining Airbnb, how our calling evolves over the course of our lives, and how to find (and take advantage of) the incredible opportunities that life transitions give us. GET A FREE COPY OF CHIP'S BOOK, WISDOM AT WORK! Here's all you have to do... Step 1.) Subscribe to the podcast and leave an honest rating & review over on iTunes. Step 2.) Text BOOK, that's B-O-O-K to 866-482-9559 for a link to our book request page, complete the form and we will ship you the book for free. It's that simple! In this podcast interview, you'll learn: What it means to be a modern elder. The difference between calling, purpose, and meaning. How Chip is working to teach wisdom at Modern Elder Academy. What midlife is and isn't–and why Chip believes “midlife crisis” to be a misnomer. The equations that can help us identify (and learn from) our emotions. Chip's advice for anyone over the age of 50 who's thinking about taking a big leap. Show Notes: RetireWithPurpose.com/306 Rate & Review the Podcast: RetireWithPurpose.com/review Weekly Retirement Newsletter: RetireWithPurpose.com/weekend-reading

Leland Live
08-01 Leland Live Seg 2 - Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Leland Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 40:48


Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New MexicoSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Leland Live
08-01 Leland Live Seg 1 - Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Leland Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:24


Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New MexicoSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Leland Live
08-01 Leland Live Seg 4 - Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Leland Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:46


Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New MexicoSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Learning Unboxed
152. Creating Immersive Art Experiences that Spark Creativity with Allyson Lupovich

Learning Unboxed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 31:40


Art is such a powerful way to expand our creativity and explore unique ways of thinking, but the traditional art world can be uninspiring to outsiders and limiting to the artists themselves. Thankfully, people like Allyson Lupovich mean to change that. Allyson is the Director of Brand Content for Meow Wolf, an immersive art experience company in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Their goal is to inspire creativity through their art and to remind people of the power of play. We talk about all sorts of things, from how Meow Wolf approaches creating their maximalist, impressive art installations to collaborating on creative projects and more. We also discuss how to bring some of this sense of art and inspiration into your own backyard. To learn more, visit: http://pastfoundation.org (pastfoundation.org) We unbox: What Meow Wolf is and how it got started How these experiences are designed Giving everyone a voice in creating What Omega Mart is and how it was designed Bringing creativity to your neighborhood Resources: https://meowwolf.com/ (meowwolf.com) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/meow__wolf/ (@meow__wolf) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/allyson-lupovich-b8190488/ (linkedin.com/in/allyson-lupovich-b8190488)

Leland Live
08-01 Leland Live Seg 3 - Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Leland Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 32:32


Leland Travels out West makes a stop in Santa Fe, New MexicoSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Squaring the Strange
Episode 180 - Burn Baby Burn . . . Effigies!

Squaring the Strange

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 70:59


This episode is special because all three of us have personal experience -- in Santa Fe, the Black Rock Desert, or Lewes, England -- watching giant effigies burn down in a symbolic cleansing ritual reputed to have dark, murderous roots. Yet this ubiquitous form of expression is also clever, satirical, and a way to showcase public art and bring a community together. From Wicker Man to Zozobra, what kind of strangeness have humans conjured up, only to burn down?

Coaching Call
S3 Ep #34 Tracey Whittet is a gifted energy facilitator

Coaching Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 74:02


On today's episode I had the pleasure of speaking with Tracey Whittet, Tracey is a gifted energy facilitator, author, and intuitive guide based in Santa Fe, NM. She's trained in many energy healing modalities including Reiki, Divine Healing Hands, Theta Healing, Access Consciousness, Yuen Method, and Healing Touch. Over the years, these and other training courses have evolved leading her to implement an integrated method called Transmosis Healing. Transmosis Healing clears energies that make us sick or hold us back. It is a multidimensional body balancing session that clears non-beneficial energies on all levels, layers, timelines, and dimensions. Clients feel better, are happier, lighter, and uplifted by the 100% pure divine light clearing. This unique energy clearing connects us to the healing power of our true divine nature. To learn more about Transmosis Healing please visit her website TraceyWhittet.com. Tracey offers her free eBook called The Magi Within: Unlocking the Gifts of the Inner Self as a gift for those listeners who wish to dive deeper into their own empowering intuitive gifts. Follow her on Facebook.com/TransmosisHealing for inspirational quatrains, divine musings from spirit. If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a short review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really helps. If you enjoyed this episode buy me a cup of coffee, make it a large: I'm trying to keep this episode free of advertisements and could use your help with the cost of bringing your this fun and entertaining podcast. Anything you can donate to the cause is greatly appreciated. To donate go to: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/sifuRafael Subscribe: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coaching-call/id1546026323 Please leave a star rating and a review here Follow Coaching Call: Facebook: facebook.com/coachingcall Instagram: instagram.com/coachingcall Email: maxfitness@optonline.net LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maxfitness Youtube: https://bit.ly/coachingcallYoutube to watch the full interview. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coachingcall/message

Soul Searching
Soul Searching Episode 99: Tarrie Burnett, Executive Director of 'Tomorrow's Women'

Soul Searching

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 28:35


Tarrie Burnett, the Executive Director of 'Tomorrow's Women.' discusses her work with Rabbi Neil Amswych of Temple Beth Shalom. Formerly known as 'Creativity for Peace,' this is a Santa Fe -based non-profit organization that empowers young Israeli women and young Palestinian women to be generational leaders/builders of peace. This episode features two of the young women who are currently (July 2022) participating in the program.

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
366. TEST PREP PROFILE: Rob Margolis

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 16:45


Ready to learn the history, philosophy, and practice of an experienced professional in the test prep industry? MEET OUR GUEST Rob Margolis is the founder and president of Stumptown Test Prep, LLC. He has been a professional tutor since 1997, beginning in the Washington, DC, area, then in Manhattan, and, since 2004, in Portland, Oregon. He has dedicated approximately 25,000 hours specifically to one-on-one standardized test preparation and has been featured in U.S. News and World Report's America's Best Colleges, Newsweek, and Education Week. In addition, he has taught mathematics, history, and English to grades six through nine at public and private schools in Washington, DC; Santa Fe, NM; and Portland, OR. Rob graduated from Yale University with a BA in History, and subsequently earned an MA in Liberal Arts from the Graduate Institute of St. John's College. He is an avid Crossfitter and wishes he had more time to read Cormac McCarthy. Find Rob at rob@stumptowntestprep.com. ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page. ABOUT YOUR HOSTS Mike Bergin is the president of Chariot Learning and founder of TestBright. Amy Seeley is the president of Seeley Test Pros. If you're interested in working with Mike and/or Amy for test preparation, training, or consulting, feel free to get in touch through our contact page.