Podcasts about Berkshire

County of England

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Latest podcast episodes about Berkshire

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
TIP517: Mohnish Pabrai's Dhandho Investment Framework

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 51:38


On today's episode, Clay reviews Mohnish Pabrai's book, The Dhandho Investor. Mohnish is one of our very favorite investors to study here at TIP as we've interviewed him for the podcast multiple times in the past. Since its inception in 2000, Mohnish's flagship fund has achieved a return of 781% to his investors net of fees versus 378% for the S&P 500. IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN:00:00 - Intro05:19 -The story of the Patels, who went from owning nothing in the US, to owning over 50% of the motel industry.11:33 - The 9 Dhandho investment principles.14:24 - How Dhandho investors are able to earn outsized returns with minimal risk.25:09 - How to identify bargains in the market.32:17 - The relationship between investing and gambling.39:17 - Clay's analysis on Mohnish's largest US equity holding today.49:46 - Mohnish's investing checklist he uses prior to purchasing a company.Disclaimer: Slight discrepancies in the timestamps may occur due to podcast platform differences.BOOKS AND RESOURCESTune into the recent We Study Billionaires' episode covering The Little Book of Valuation by Aswath Damodaran or watch the video.Listen to the episode on Warren Buffett's Money Mind or watch the video.Related Episode: Listen to Investing in Stocks w/ Mohnish Pabrai - TIP442, or watch the video.Related Episode: Listen to Berkshire's Purchase of TSM & Meta "Doomsday" Analysis - TIP508, or watch the video.Mohnish Pabrai's book: The Dhandho Investor.Follow Clay on Twitter.NEW TO THE SHOW?Check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Try our tool for picking stock winners and managing our portfolios: TIP Finance Tool.Enjoy exclusive perks from our favorite Apps and Services.Stay up-to-date on financial markets and investing strategies through our daily newsletter, We Study Markets.P.S The Investor's Podcast Network is excited to launch a subreddit devoted to our fans in discussing financial markets, stock picks, questions for our hosts, and much more! Join our subreddit r/TheInvestorsPodcast today!SPONSORSGet position and investment info for nearly 6,000 Asset Management Companies with Moomoo, Australia's first A.I. powered trading platform. Sign up and fund your moomoo account before October 31 and get $10 for every $100 you deposit. All investment carries risk. AFSL 224 663. T&Cs apply.Get personalized, expert advice that helps you see things clearly with ATB.Help companies protect customer privacy in the face of endlessly growing data breaches by investing in Atakama today.Talk to your clients about Desjardins Responsible Investment today and support what's right for society and what's good for business.Take stock of your finances and investing strategy with Betterment.Guess less and sell more with the Number 1 email marketing and automation brand, Intuit Mailchimp.Let an expert do your taxes from start to finish so you can relax with TurboTax.If your business has five or more employees and managed to survive Covid you could be eligible to receive a payroll tax rebate of up to twenty-six thousand dollars per employee. Find out if your business qualifies with Innovation Refunds.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.HELP US OUT!Help us reach new listeners by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! It takes less than 30 seconds, and really helps our show grow, which allows us to bring on even better guests for you all! Thank you – we really appreciate it!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Founders
#286 Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger speaking directly to you

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 78:38


What I learned from reading All I Want To Know Is Where I'm Going To Die So I'll Never Go There: Buffett & Munger – A Study in Simplicity and Uncommon, Common Sense by Peter Bevelin. This episode is brought to you by: Tiny: Tiny is the easiest way to sell your business. Quick and straightforward exits for Founders.----Follow one of my favorite podcasts Invest Like The Best and listen to episode Mitch Lasky—The Business of GamingFollow the podcast Gamecraft to learn more about the history of the video game industry. ----[2:01] Buffett and Munger have a remarkable ability to eliminate folly, simplify things, boil down issues to their essence, get right to the point, and focus on simple and timeless truths.[3:00] The Almanack of Naval Ravikant: A Guide to Wealth and Happiness by Naval Ravikant and Eric Jorgenson.  (Founders #191)[4:00] Warren Buffet or Charlie Munger are the very wise grandfather figure that I never had.[5:00] To try to live your life totally free of mistakes is a life of inaction. —Warren Buffett[5:00] The sign above the players' entrance to the field at Notre Dame reads ´Play Like a Champion Today.' I sometimes joke that the sign at Nebraska reads 'Remember Your Helmet.' Charlie and I are 'Remember Your Helmet' kind of guys.' We like to keep it simple. (You must structure your life and business to be able to survive the inevitable bad decisions you're going to make.)[5:00] Wisdom is prevention. —Charlie Munger[6:00] We make actual decisions very rapidly, but that's because we've spent so much time preparing ourselves by quietly sitting and reading and thinking. —Charlie Munger[7:00] If you get into the mental habit of relating what you're reading to the basic underlying ideas being demonstrated, you gradually accumulate some wisdom. —Charlie Munger[7:00] At Berkshire, we don't have any meetings or committees, and I can think of no better way to become more intelligent than sit down and read. I hate meetings, frankly. I have created something that I enjoy: I happen to enjoy reading a lot, and I happen to enjoy thinking about things. —Warren Buffett[7:00] We both hate to have too many forward commitments in our schedules. We both insist on a lot of time being available to just sit and think. —Charlie Munger[8:00] I need eight hours of sleep. I think better. I have more energy. My mood is better. And think about it: As a senior executive, what do you really get paid to do? You get paid to make a small number of high-quality decisions. — Invent and Wander: The Collected Writings of Jeff Bezos, With an Introduction by Walter Isaacson. (Founders #155)[9:00] I think people that multitask pay a huge price. When you multitask so much, you don't have time to think about anything deeply. You're giving the world an advantage you shouldn't do. Practically everybody is drifting into that mistake. I did not succeed in life by intelligence. I succeeded because I have a long attention span. —Charlie Munger[9:00] Jony Ive on Steve Jobs: Steve was the most remarkably focused person I've ever met. (Video)[11:00] It is just that simple. We've had enough good sense when something was working well, keep doing it. The fundamental algorithm of life: repeat what works. —Charlie Munger[13:00] ALL THE BUFFETT AND MUNGER EPISODES:Berkshire Hathaway Letters to Shareholders 1965-2018 by Warren Buffett. (Founders #88) The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder. (Founders #100)The Tao of Warren Buffett by Mary Buffett & David Clark. (Founders #101) Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist by Roger Lowenstein. (Founders #182) A Few Lessons for Investors and Managers From Warren Buffett by Warren Buffett and Peter Bevelin. (Founders #202) The Essays of Warren Buffett by Warren Buffett and Lawrence Cunningham. (Founders #227)  Tao of Charlie Munger by David Clark (Founders #78) Charlie Munger: The Complete Investor by Tren Griffin. (Founders #79) Poor Charlie's Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger. (Founders #90) Damn Right: Behind the Scenes with Berkshire Hathaway Billionaire Charlie Munger by Janet Lowe. (Founders #221) [14:00] Buffett: It's an inversion process. Start out with failure, and then engineer its removal.[15:00] Munger: I figure out what I don't like instead of figuring out what I like in order to get what I like.[15:00] Repetition is the mother of learning.[17:00] Munger: You can see the results of not learning from others' mistakes by simply looking about you. How little originality there is in the common disasters of mankind. (Business failures through repetition of obvious mistakes made by predecessors and so on.)[18:00] Munger: History allows you to keep things in perspective.[18:00] Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was listening, everything must be said again.[19:00] Berkshire was a small business at one time. It just takes time. It is the nature of compound interest. You cannot build it in one day or one week.[20:00] Pretend that every single person you meet has a sign around his or her neck that says, “Make me feel important.”[22:00] Buffett: In almost 60 years of investing we found it practically useless to give advice to anyone.[23:00] Munger: One of my favorite stories is about the little boy in Texas. The teacher asked the class, If there are nine sheep in the pen and one jumps out, how many are left? And everybody got the answer right except this little boy, who said, None of them are left. And the teacher said, You don't understand arithmetic. And he said No, teacher. You don't understand sheep.[25:00] Quite often Henry simply talked about his philosophy of running a corporation and the various financial strategies that he came up with as he sat in his corner office each day, often working at his Apple computer. He was a brilliant business strategist, just as he was a brilliant chess strategist and he came up with many creative ideas, ideas that were sometimes contrary to the currently accepted methods of managing a large corporation that prevailed in those days.“He always tries to work out the best moves," Shannon said, "and maybe he doesn't like to talk too much, because when you are playing a game you don't tell anyone else what your strategy is." — Distant Force: A Memoir of the Teledyne Corporation and the Man Who Created It by Dr. George Roberts. (Founders #110)[28:00] Buffett: The difference between successful people and very successful people is that very successful people say no to almost everything.[29:00] If you want to know whether you are destined to be a success or a failure in life, you can easily find out. The test is simple and it is infallible: Are you able to save money? If not, drop out. You will lose. You may think not, but you will lose as sure as you live. The seed of success is not in you. — James J. Hill: Empire Builder of the Northwest by Michael P. Malone. (Founders #96)[31:00] Buffett: Life tends to snap you at your weakest link.[35:00] Sol Price: Retail Revolutionary & Social Innovator by Robert E. Price (Founders #107)[38:00] Paul Graham's essays (Founders #275-277)[39:00] I'm very suspect of the person who is very good at one business, who starts thinking they should tell the world how to behave on everything. —Warren Buffett[42:00] The Essays of Warren Buffett by Warren Buffett and Lawrence Cunningham. (Founders #227)[44:00] This life isn't a greenroom for something else. He went for it. —Bourdain: The Definitive Oral Biography by Laurie Woolever.[44:00] Buffett: We're here on the earth only one time so you ought to be doing something that you enjoy as you go along and you can be enthusiastic about.[48:00] Personal History by Katherine Graham. (Founders #152)[49:00] The problem is not getting rich, it is staying sane. —Charlie Munger[54:00] Learning is not memorizing information. Learning is changing your behavior. Most people can't learn from the experiences of other people: Charlie and I don't expect to win you over to our way of thinking—we've observed enough human behavior to know the futility of that, but we do want you to be aware of our personal calculus.[57:00] We are individual opportunity driven. Our acquisition technique at Berkshire is simplicity itself: We answer the phone.[1:00:00] A brand is a promise. —Warren Buffett[1:01:00] Obsess over customers. Buffett said this about Amazon in 2012: Amazon could affect a lot of businesses who don't think they will be affected. For Amazon, it is very hard to find unhappy customers. A business that has millions and millions of happy customers can introduce them to new items, it will be a powerhouse and could affect a lot of businesses.[1:03:00] Munger: We should make a list of everything that irritates a customer, and then we should eliminate those defects one by one.[1:04:00] Most companies, when they get rich, get sloppy.[1:05:00] Munger: One of the models in my head is the 'Northern Pike Model. You have a lake full of trout. But if you throw in a few northern pike, pretty soon there aren't many trout left but a lot of northern pike. Wal-Mart in its early days was the northern pike. It figured out how the customer could be better served and just galloped through the world like Genghis Kahn.[1:09:00] Practice! Michael Jordan: The Life by Roland Lazenby. (Founders #212)[1:10:00] Market forecasters will fill your ear, but they will never fill your wallet.[1:11:00] We don't have any new tricks. We just know the old tricks better.----Subscribe to listen to Founders Premium — Subscribers can ask me questions directly which I will answer in Ask Me Anything (AMA) episodes ----“I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested so my poor wallet suffers. ” — GarethBe like Gareth. Buy a book: All the books featured on Founders Podcast

Gadget Detective - A selection of free tech advice & tech news broadcasts by Fevzi Turkalp on the BBC & elsewhere

Fevzi Turkalp, the Gadget Detective, joins Kirsten O'Brien to review a couple of excellent products on this week's show, with; First Gadget of the Week, the Jabra Evolve 2 85 headset. This over the head Bluetooth wireless headset is ideal for those working in noisy environments features a fold out microphone which offers excellent call and audio quality thanks to variable Active Noise Cancellation through 10 microphones, and with up to 37 hours' use from a single charge, 4cm speakers in each cup, and even a red light to warn others you're busy, this is a headset to consider. Scoring 4 out of 5, full details in the show. Second Gadget of the Week are the Jabra Elite 7 Pro earbuds. These true wireless earbuds feature adjustable Active Noise Cancellation, Bluetooth 5.2 for better range and battery life, and great call quality thanks to 4 microphones and 2 advanced voice pickup sensors which use bone conduction using bone vibration to augment the ANC. Scoring 4 out of 5, more details in the show. You can hear the Gadget Detective on BBC Berkshire just after midday every Saturday and can follow and contact him on Twitter @gadgetdetective. If you enjoy these shows please consider subscribing and leaving a review, thanks! #Fevzi #Turkalp #Gadget #Detective #Tech #Technology #News #Reviews #Help #Advice #Kirsten #OBrien #BBC #Radio #Berkshire #GadgetoftheWeek #Jabra #Evolve #2 #85 #Wireless #Bluetooth #Headset #Variable #Active #Noise #Cancellation #Audio #Quality #Boom #Mic #Foldout #Business #Gaming #Home #Noisy #Environment #Padded #Cups #Comfort #Voice #Ten #Microphones #10 #Jabra #Elite #Pro #7 #Earbuds #Bone #Conduction #Pickups

Beauty and the Biz
What Happens if Something Happens to You? — with Lawrence B. Keller, CFP (Ep.187)

Beauty and the Biz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 35:42


Hello, and welcome to Beauty and the Biz where we talk about the business and marketing side of plastic surgery, and what happens if something happens to you. I'm your host, Catherine Maley, author of Your Aesthetic Practice – What your patients are saying, as well as consultant to plastic surgeons, to get them more patients and more profits. Now, today's episode is called "What Happens if Something Happens to You? — with Lawrence B. Keller, CFP". Life happens. Your house can burn down. You can tear your ACS in a skiing accident. You can fall off a ladder and be off your feet for 6 weeks (those are just a few things that have happened to other surgeons I know). So, to get you clearer answers for how to protect yourself when you're not able to generate revenues like you used to, I interviewed an expert. In this week's Beauty and the Biz Podcast, Larry Keller, founder of Physician Financial Services, offered straight forward advice for you to set yourself to win no matter what happens. For the past 31 years, he has worked with surgeons and physicians on income protection, wealth accumulation and asset protection. He offered great pearls for covering yourself if/when life goes sideways. I think you'll find this helpful on what happens if something happens to you. Visit Larry Keller's Website P.S. Get my hard copy book for free when you leave a review at Beauty and the Biz Podcast. Just follow the instructions below:

Ingenuity
Not a Run of the Mill Billionaire featuring Samer Hakoura

Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 52:17


Please welcome our special guest, Samer Hakoura, who is an equity investor focused on the concept of using synthetic leverage to compound returns faster than competitors. He started his career as a classically-trained Chemist at Oxford, then became an investment banker, and subsequently moved into the family business running an international real estate portfolio and high-growth food business. This is where he witnessed the fantastical compounding effects of low competition plus free cash flow reinvested into the business. A fellow student of the Berkshire philosophies, we delve into investing, hobbies, and philosophical shop. A fun one you won't want to miss.

Life's Best Medicine Podcast
Episode 127: Dr. Suneel Dhand

Life's Best Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 76:13


Thank you for tuning in for another episode of Life's Best Medicine. Dr. Suneel Dhand is a medical doctor specializing in Internal & Lifestyle Medicine with a focus on Metabolic Health. He was born in London, grew up in Berkshire, England, and went to medical school at Cardiff University. He then crossed the ocean to do his medical residency in Baltimore, Maryland. Along the way, he also started a popular healthcare blog, YouTube Channel, and wrote 3 well-being books. Dr. Dhand's main clinical interest is lifestyle medicine and metabolic health, and he is the Founder of Real Public Health US/UK. He is also passionate about educating people about metabolic health, and believes strongly in anti-Censorship in Medicine, Science, and Society. In their conversation, Brian and Suneel talk about Dr. Suneel's experience treating COVID patients during the pandemic, why Dr. Suneel decided to become a doctor, vaccine requirements and governmental over-reach, financial corruption in big Pharma and the American medical system, the importance of speaking out about what you observe in science and medicine, the systemic factors that contribute to the worsening of physical and mental health in the United States, the programming of the population to believe and behave in an irrational way, why Dr. Suneel decided to take a stand against the irrational rules and protocols he was seeing. Life's Best Medicine According to Suneel: “I think the number one rule of life—before you even focus on anything else—is to try your best to stay healthy. The pillars of a healthy lifestyle: a fresh, whole food diet very low in processed foods, low in sugars, with minimal carbohydrates. Basically eat as healthy as you can. Exercise as much as you can—my rule is one hour a day wether it is cardio, weights, etc. one hour per day. While you do that you should be completely detached—so no looking at emails, answering messages. That hour of exercise is going to have enormous spill-over benefits: improved concentration, more energy, it will help you sleep better, and it is a mood boost. Do everything you can to de-stress your life. Having chronically elevated adrenalin and cortisol levels is extremely detrimental to your health. Sleep! Too many people chronically under-sleep. In terms of keeping going, having a mission, having principles is extremely important. Nuclearly, what you want to do in life—what your goals are, what you believe strongly in—do something you are absolutely passionate about. All of those things are much more likely to lead to happiness in your life. Now, happiness is a very subjective term. I am a big believer in Stoicism. Stoicism is a excellent philosophy to live life by that ancient Greece-Roman philosophy. It has helped me a lot over the last three years to combat the madness of the world and to distinguish between what is in your control and what is not in your control.” Thank you for listening. Have a blessed day and stay healthy!   Links:   Dr. Suneel Dhand:  Website Real Public Health US/UK Med Stoic YouTube Instagram Twitter   Dr. Brian Lenzkes:  Website Low Carb MD Podcast

BERKSHIRE STYLE
This Week In Berkshire Style Thursday January 5, 2023

BERKSHIRE STYLE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 6:00


Berkshire Style is an online magazine that celebrates this richness and vitality of its architects, designers, artists and businesses who have made their mark preserving the Berkshire aesthetic

berkshire berkshire style
ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO
This Week In Berkshire Style Thursday January 5, 2023

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 6:00


Berkshire Style is an online magazine that celebrates this richness and vitality of its architects, designers, artists and businesses who have made their mark preserving the Berkshire aesthetic

berkshire berkshire style
Gadget Detective - A selection of free tech advice & tech news broadcasts by Fevzi Turkalp on the BBC & elsewhere
31st December 2022 - News, Reviews, and a look back at '22 on BBC Berkshire

Gadget Detective - A selection of free tech advice & tech news broadcasts by Fevzi Turkalp on the BBC & elsewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 18:14


Fevzi Turkalp, the Gadget Detective, joins Bill Buckley on BBC Berkshire to discuss the latest tech news and reviews. On this week's show a look at some of the news that broke in the last few months, scientists in the US announce a breakthrough in Nuclear Fusion, opening the way to cleaner energy. AI is back in the news with ChatGTP, an artificial intelligence taking the internet by storm as it demonstrates its abilities and raises questions about humanity's future. Finally, NASA manages to change the trajectory of an asteroid, raising the possibility of diverting any that would otherwise hit the Earth, or of mining them for minerals. Plus a look at three of the best gadgets of the year with; The ARLO Go 2 Wireless Security Camera. This security camera features Wi-Fi but also has a sim-card slot, allowing it to connect over a mobile data network so it can be placed outside of a Wi-Fi coverage area or as a backup should Wi-Fi fail, it features a rechargeable battery and is ideal for securing your property. Scoring 4.5 out of 5, it's one to consider. The Jabra Elite 85T Wireless Earbuds. These earbuds feature stunning quality audio, 5 1/2 hours' playback, extendable to 20 hours with the charging base, and even an app which tailors the audio to the listener's specific hearing ability. Scoring 4 out of 5, more details in the show. The Roland Zenbeats mobile app. This mobile music creation suite runs on iOS or Android and features a full music production suite, including samplers, synths, drum machine and much more. There's even a free version if you just want to check it out before considering one of the subscriptions offered. Excellent for musicians on the move and scored 4 out of 5 You can hear the Gadget Detective on BBC Berkshire just after Midday every Saturday and can follow and contact him on Twitter @gadgetdetective. If you enjoy these shows please consider subscribing and leaving a review, thanks! #Fevzi #Turkalp #Gadget #Detective #Tech #News #Reviews #Help #Advice #BBC #Berkshire #Bill #Buckley #Radio #Nuclear #Fission #US #United #States #America #Energy #Radioactive #Clean #Future #Breakthrough #Power #Nuclear #ChatGTP #Artificial #Intelligence #AI #Online #Augmentation #Network #NASA #Rocket #Asteroid #Divert #Protection #Earth #Planet #Roland #Zenbeats #Music #Creation #Composing #Editing #Sampler #Loops #Synth #iOS #Android #Tablet #Drum #Machine #Free #Subscription

Subconscious Realms
S2 EP 165 - Janus & Pope Benedict XVI - Troublemaker Jonah.

Subconscious Realms

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 117:43


Subconscious Realms Episode 165 - Janus & Pope Benedict XVI - Troublemaker Jonah. Ladies & Gentlemen on this Episode of Subconscious Realms we welcome back Jonah! Brace yourself for a wild journey into many Realms...Among the Celtiberians, horned or antlered figures of the Cernunnos type include a "Janus-like" god from Candelario (Salamanca) with two faces and two small horns; a horned god from the hills of Ríotinto (Huelva); and a possible representation of the deity Vestius Aloniecus near his altars in Lourizán (Pontevedra). The horns are taken to represent "aggressive power, genetic vigor and fecundity. The Horned God goes by many names. Cernunnos, The Celtic God of fertility, Animals and the Underworld. Herne The Hunter, a spectre associated with Windsor Forest & Great Park, Berkshire, UK. Pan the Greek God of the Woodlands, Janus the Roman God of Good Beings. Tammuz and Damuzi, the Son, Lover and Consorts to Ishtar and Inanna. Osiris, the Egyptian Lord of the Underworld. Dionysus, the Greek God of Vegetation and the Vine. The Green Man, the Lord of Vegetation and the…Julius Caesar gave us the Julian calendar and made Janus the god of new years. Constantine converted to Christianity and gave us the Roman Catholic Church and Pope. Or did he convert. The janus symbolism can found all throughout with his statue in the Vatican and papal bull commemorative coins that can be considered tribute. The substitute sitting in the office which has a roman numeral value of 666.

One More Thing Before You Go
The Art of Decluttering to Improve Your Lifestyle

One More Thing Before You Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 71:40


In this episode: We're going to talk about the best tips to declutter your life. From organizing your home to getting rid of old belongings, we'll cover a lot of different tips to help you clear out your life and improve your lifestyle.Decluttering is one of the best ways to improve your lifestyle and reduce stress. In this video, we'll share with you some tips on how to declutter your life in 2023. from organizing your home to cleaning out your closet, we've got you covered! After watching this video, you'll be on your way to a decluttered life!My guest in this episode is Jessica Barclay, a lifestyle and organization coach based in the UK. She is a public speaker on decluttering and time management, a mental health and environmental advocate, as well as the founder of A Happy Lifestyle Club private membership. Her MEMBER'S CLUB is a community-focused safe space where you can work on a number of areas, including decluttering, goal setting and self-care, to help you build a strong foundational lifestyle for the life you want. The club is founded on the basis that happiness, in all its shapes and sizes, should be the priority. Jess lives in Berkshire, in the UK, with her daughter and other half. Jess loves lifting heavy things in the gym as well as in clients' houses. She started her career as a wedding and event planner, as well as starting her own guest houses and before her daughter had her own health & fitness studio in London. Find out more and how to contact Jessica https://beforeyougopodcast.comThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacyPodcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO
The Berkshire Edge On-Air – Wednesday December 28, 2022

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 22:31


Guided by respected journalistic standards, the principle of fairness, the quest for truth, a commitment to social, economic and environmental justice, and an abiding admiration for the independent spirit of the Berkshires, The Berkshire Edge offers in-depth local news reports... Read More ›

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
TIP508: Berkshire's Purchase of TSM & Meta "Doomsday" Analysis

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 46:44 Very Popular


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:03:36 - TSM's business model and competitive advantages.07:13 - All about the critical role semiconductors play in our overall economy.17:15 - Potential risks of investing in TSM.18:11 - The geopolitical tensions that are brewing with the US restricting China's access to the global semiconductor market.31:00 - What drives the stock's return in the long run.31:42 - The highlights from the Graham and Dodd Annual Breakfast.37:01 - Why Intel and Meta's stock might be undervalued.Disclaimer: Slight discrepancies in the timestamps may occur due to podcast platform differences.BOOKS AND RESOURCESTune into the recent We Study Billionaire's episode covering How Jeff Bezos Built Amazon.Learn about the Story of Airbnb.Jordan Schneider's Article: Choking Off China's AI Access.ValueStockGeek's writeup on Intel.Aswath Damodaran's analysis on Meta.Write-up on the Graham and Dodd Annual Breakfast.NEW TO THE SHOW?Check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Try our tool for picking stock winners and managing our portfolios: TIP Finance Tool.Enjoy exclusive perks from our favorite Apps and Services.Stay up-to-date on financial markets and investing strategies through our daily newsletter, We Study Markets.Learn how to better start, manage, and grow your business with the best business podcasts. P.S The Investor's Podcast Network is excited to launch a subreddit devoted to our fans in discussing financial markets, stock picks, questions for our hosts, and much more! Join our subreddit r/TheInvestorsPodcast today!SPONSORSInvest in high-quality, cash-flowing real estate without all of the hassle with Passive Investing.Have gold and silver shipped directly to your door for you to hold at your home. Get BullionMax's Gold Investor Kit today – 3 ounces of the world's most desirable gold coins, including the Gold American Eagle and Canadian Maple Leaf.Get position and investment info for nearly 6,000 Asset Management Companies with Moomoo, Australia's first A.I. powered trading platform. Sign up and fund your moomoo account before October 31 and get $10 for every $100 you deposit. All investment carries risk. AFSL 224 663. T&Cs apply.Enjoy 10% off your first booking in Viator's world of over 300,000 experiences you'll remember. Download the Viator app now and use code VIATOR10.In a world of probabilities, trade the possibilities with Pepperstone.Start building a portfolio of alternative farm and timberland assets with AcreTrader.If you're aware you need to improve your bitcoin security but have been putting it off, Unchained Capital‘s Concierge Onboarding is a simple way to get started—sooner rather than later. Book your onboarding today and at checkout, get $50 off with the promo code FUNDAMENTALS.Guess less and sell more with the Number 1 email marketing and automation brand, Intuit Mailchimp.Thanks to rising interest rates artificially driving down the prices of even the best assets, Fundrise expects 2023 to be one of the most opportune real estate investing environments of the last decade. Take advantage of this unique investing environment.Send, spend, and receive money around the world easily with Wise.Ship with FedEx and be ready for this holiday season with picture proof of delivery.Monitor your recovery, sleep, training, and health, with personalized recommendations and coaching feedback with WHOOP. Use code WSB to save 10% off your order today.Give your family and friends Omaha Steaks, a gift that will be remembered with every unforgettable bite. Use promo code WSB at checkout to get that EXTRA $30 OFF your order.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.HELP US OUT!Help us reach new listeners by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! It takes less than 30 seconds, and really helps our show grow, which allows us to bring on even better guests for you all! Thank you – we really appreciate it!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tiny Voice Talks
School Improvement with Nick Hart (identify the problem and then find the right solution)

Tiny Voice Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 37:37


In this episode Toria chats to Nick about how leading a school isn't easy and that what works for one setting won't necessarily work for another. Nick is an ardent believer that leaders need to know their school well and the problems that they are trying to address. He talks to Toria about the perils of fads on social media and how this can direct leaders away from what their setting needs. Nick is the Executive Headteacher of the Alwyn and Courthouse Federation in Berkshire. He is a visiting fellow with Ambition Institute, facilitating on the NPQH and is one of the organisers of ResearchED Berkshire. He blogs at www.mrnickhart.wordpress.com and tweets @mrnickhart. Support the showIf you enjoyed this episode please share it with others and I would love it if you would leave a review on Apple, Spotify or anywhere else. The Tiny Voices Talk book is out now . Use the code ITL25 to get 25% off it until the end of 2022. https://www.independentthinkingpress.com/books/teachingskills/tiny-voices-talk/

The John Krol Podcast
#69 - Aimee Marshall, MS, BS, NASM, Berkshire Fitness and Wellness Center

The John Krol Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 39:08


Five years ago, Aimee Marshall signed and lease on a single space in Crawford Square and remarkably opened for business three days later. True to form, she's continued the brisk pace and grown to now four spaces where she and her team teach 54 classes per week. Part of her secret sauce is staying ahead of the curve to benefit her clientele. This is particularly important in the world of health and fitness where people are often looking to switch it up and try a new discipline or new program. From RUMBLE to Kick Zumba, Yogalates, FUSION, R.I.P.P.E.D. and more, Aimee is gaining new certifications as quickly as new programs are rolled out. The business is so busy that Aimee's husband, Tim, has taken on a role also teaching early morning classes before going to work. And every bit helps, as Berkshire Fitness and Wellness Center runs classes from 5:30a until after 6p. It's a labor of love and business success story in downtown Pittsfield. We also cover: the desire to stay healthy throughout the holiday season and not waiting until New Year's, the healing arts, reiki, infusing energy work and rest into a weekly regimen, dietary constitution, lobbying the governor to open fitness centers during the lockdown, the value of working out in groups, doing business in downtown, Aimee's early athletic life and success in cross country running and her entry into the work of fitness in college. I hope you'll enjoy my conversation with Aimee Marshall. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-krol/support

Secret 2 My Success
Secret 2 My Success Episode 56 -- Thom Reed, Eyewitness to the 1960 Berkshire UFO Incident

Secret 2 My Success

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 58:06


Labor Day, 1969: Then 9-year old Thom and his family were driving through the Sheffield Covered Bridge, in Sheffield Massachusetts. They saw a sphere that rose from the Housatonic River, then another one, then a large disc-shaped object that looked a lot like a turtle shell... It had a reddish tint. Then there seemed to be a pressure change, some sounds, our car lit up, and there was what seemed like a "vacuum of silence," and that was the last that he remembered. The state of Massachusetts has recognized this as an actual historic incident. Interested? Listen in! This is Part I. Support the show

The New Warehouse Podcast
EP 341: Berkshire Grey at MODEX 2022

The New Warehouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 14:31


Live from the booth at MODEX, Berkshire Grey joins this episode of The New Warehouse to discuss some of their new products. Berkshire Gray provides robotic automation for supply chain and warehouse applications, including e-commerce fulfillment, store replenishment, and back-of-store tasks. The company designs solutions to help customers solve labor challenges by increasing efficiency and reducing the need for manual labor.Get on demand labor from Veryable with zero fees for the first month by signing up here: https://veryable.grsm.io/znj79m4huqsb

QAV Podcast
QAV #549 – Windy and Wet

QAV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 32:23


RBA and rates, Coal, Iron Ore and Gold are all buys, Portfolio update, bank dividends, Clough collapse and BPT, Pulled pork AGG, trailing stop losses, inflationary pressures, how TK comes up with hurdle rates, C6C selling it's Australian assets, IRR v CAGR, share buybacks, how to get to Berkshire's 2023 AGM. Blackstone to limit redemption requests, the impact of the gas price cap.

Golf Club Talk UK
Richard Weeks, Alwoodley GC and Lee Strutt, Cabot Cape Breton - GCTUK 72

Golf Club Talk UK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 67:42


Two interviews on this episode and firstly - Richard Weeks.  Richard is the Managing Secretary, Alwoodley Golf Club - Richard joins Golf Club Talk UK and shares his successful career trajectory - starting from his development as a PGA member - having position experiences at Fulford Golf Cub, The Berkshire, Roehampton Club then into the commercial golf operational sector at Hunley Hotel & Golf Club to his current role at Alwoodley Golf Club.  There's some great advice and insights. In another of our interviews with people from the UK who have moved their careers overseas, Leighton is joined by Lee Strutt, Director of Agronomy at Cabot Cape Breton in Nova Scotia, Canada.  This is a fantastic destination that has two outstanding courses and Lee talks us through his journey to get there.  This also included a stop in Les Bordes, France.  There's some great tips on moving abroad but also some inspiring thoughts on chasing your goals. https://alwoodleygolfclub.com/ https://cabotcapebreton.com/golf Lee Strutt - https://www.linkedin.com/in/lee-strutt-b406b134/   Thanks as always to our sponsors BRS Golf - www.brsgolf.com    

Hear Me Now Podcast
Surgery: Saying so long to the Old Boys' Club

Hear Me Now Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 49:08


A transcript is available online Women outnumber men in American medical schools, but in the operating room it's still an Old Boys' Club. Surgery remains a bastion of male privilege, prerogative, and power in American healthcare. But that is changing. On today's program, Seán talks with three surgeons who understand firsthand the challenges faced by the women who routinely suffer insults and aggressions in an antiquated system. .Julie Ann Sosa, M.D., MA, FACS, FSSO Chair, Department of Surgery  (bio video)Leon Goldman, M.D. Distinguished Professor of SurgeryProfessor, Department of MedicineAffiliated faculty, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy StudiesUniversity of California, San FranciscoEditor-in-ChiefWorld Journal of SurgerySociété Internationale de Chirurgie  .Dr. Sosa on Twitter • Mastodon..Shenia Theodore, M.D.Trauma & Acute Care SurgeonBoston Medical CenterBoston University School of Medicine.Dr. Theodore on Twitter..M Cristy Smith, M.D., FACSCardiothoracic & Heart Transplant SurgeonSurgical Director, Heart Transplant/Mechanical Circulatory SupportProvidence Sacred Heart Medical CenterSpokane, Wash..Dr. Smith on LinkedIn.,.The episode includes this piece by Brooklyn- and Berkshire mountains-based poet, Alexandra Beers, MS Ed., MFA:.Recoveryfor Seán Collins.They open your heart the way dentists open your mouth, as if they can just peek inside, and then they start with the loud drills and suction and all manner of vocabulary is tossed about and picking and pulling until they have cleaned you up, and afterward you are supposed to just spit and go on living the way you did, your teeth or your chest or your whole self sore for a bit, and you avoid hard candies and proceed with caution. Then you almost forget and you just bite and swallow and breathe easily again. Only if you are alive, really alive to this you are never the same. You are deeply in love with the people who fixed you and you want to stay in their care forever. Yet you must rise, rise each day to the blessing of blue true nothing of all knowingness that they bestowed on you as they sewed you up with the twine of science and grace and sent you out to join the rest of us. Be brave, and share.—Alexandra Beers...   

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO
The Berkshire Edge On-Air – Wednesday December 7, 2022

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 22:06


Guided by respected journalistic standards, the principle of fairness, the quest for truth, a commitment to social, economic and environmental justice, and an abiding admiration for the independent spirit of the Berkshires, The Berkshire Edge offers in-depth local news reports... Read More ›

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO
This Week in Berkshire Style – Thursday December 8, 2022

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 7:27


Berkshire Style is an online magazine that celebrates this richness and vitality of its architects, designers, artists and businesses who have made their mark preserving the Berkshire aesthetic

berkshire berkshire style
A Bird's-Eye View of the Bond Market
Multi-Family Real Estate Update and CMBS Performance Implications

A Bird's-Eye View of the Bond Market

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 15:01


In this episode, David Fishman, Merganser Deputy CIO and CMBS analyst, interviews Eric Draeger, CIO of Berkshire Residential Investments (“Berkshire”) on the state of the multi-family residential real estate market. Among other topics, they discuss multifamily housing fundamentals, rising rates and the health of the US consumer, as we brace for a potential economic recession in 2023.Berkshire has over 55 years of experience, managing approximately $22.2 billion in real estate assets on behalf of global institutional clients. In his role as CIO, Eric Draeger oversees multifamily acquisitions, dispositions, and debt capital markets teams. 

Full Reptile Radio
The War Room #239 | Jan Bachowicz vs Magaomed Ankalaev | The Dan Hardy Breakdown Show

Full Reptile Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 26:02


On this episode of The War Room Dan Hardy breaks down the UFC 282 Main Event, for the Light Heavyweight Title, Jan Błachowicz vs Magaomed Ankalaev. For the full effect check out the video version of this show here INSTAGRAM TWITTER This episode is brought to you by: RYGOR: Whether you're looking for a new or used van or truck, or for somewhere to maintain your current vehicle, Rygor is your local Mercedes-Benz commercial vehicle Dealership. Rygor Commercials is the UK's largest Mercedes-Benz van and truck Dealer. They have 11 dedicated Mercedes-Benz sales and after sales sites across Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Somerset, West London, Wiltshire and Worcestershire. Their award-winning team are on hand to help with all your purchase, servicing and maintenance requirements. Go to https://www.rygor.co.uk to check them out. FULL REPTILE: For Outlaws, Full Reptile offers a wide range of Training and Lifestyle clothing that provides quality and comfort for ninja acrobatics or everyday wear. Head on over to https://fullreptile.co.uk/ and check out the range now.

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
TIP500: Berkshire Hathaway Shareholder's Meeting and Intrinsic Value w/ Stig Brodersen and Clay Finck

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 67:02


IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN:02:36 - What is the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder's meeting30:19 - How do you attend the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder's meeting39:16 - What is the Intrinsic Value of Berkshire Hathaway, and how do you value the company59:54 - What is the Intrinsic Value of Apple, and how do you value the companyDisclaimer: Slight discrepancies in the timestamps may occur due to podcast platform differences.BOOKS AND RESOURCESSign up for the free events with The Investor's Podcast Network.Read more about how to Attend the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder's Meeting and the free events hosted by The Investor's Podcast Network.Access TIP's itinerary for the Berkshire meeting here.Register for the TIP events here.Contact Clay about the WhatsApp Group at clay@theinvestorspodcast.com.Stig Brodersen and Preston Pysh's book, The Warren Buffett Accounting Book – Read reviews of this book. Chris Bloomstran's valuation of Berkshire Hathaway with Stig Brodersen.Adam Mead's valuation of Berkshire Hathaway with Stig Brodersen. Listen to Clay's episode to learn more about how to value Apple.NEW TO THE SHOW?Check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Try our tool for picking stock winners and managing our portfolios: TIP Finance Tool.Enjoy exclusive perks from our favorite Apps and Services.Stay up-to-date on financial markets and investing strategies through our daily newsletter, We Study Markets.P.S The Investor's Podcast Network is excited to launch a subreddit devoted to our fans in discussing financial markets, stock picks, questions for our hosts, and much more! Join our subreddit r/TheInvestorsPodcast today!SPONSORSGet position and investment info for nearly 6,000 Asset Management Companies with Moomoo, Australia's first A.I. powered trading platform. Sign up and fund your moomoo account before October 31 and get $10 for every $100 you deposit. All investment carries risk. AFSL 224 663. T&Cs apply.Monitor your recovery, sleep, training, and health, with personalized recommendations and coaching feedback with WHOOP. Use code WSB to save 10% off your order today.If your business has five or more employees and managed to survive Covid you could be eligible to receive a payroll tax rebate of up to twenty-six thousand dollars per employee. Find out if your business qualifies with Innovation Refunds.Invest in high-quality, cash-flowing real estate without all of the hassle with Passive Investing.Have gold and silver shipped directly to your door for you to hold at your home. Get BullionMax's Gold Investor Kit today - 3 ounces of the world's most desirable gold coins, including the Gold American Eagle and Canadian Maple Leaf.If you're a sales professional, get every real time advantage you can get with Sales Navigator. Enjoy 60 days of free trial today.In a world of probabilities, trade the possibilities with Pepperstone.Ship with FedEx and be ready for this holiday season with picture proof of delivery.If you're aware you need to improve your bitcoin security but have been putting it off, Unchained Capital's Concierge Onboarding is a simple way to get started—sooner rather than later. Book your onboarding today and at checkout, get $50 off with the promo code FUNDAMENTALS.Get personalized, expert advice that helps you see things clearly with ATB.Enjoy 10% off your first booking in Viator's world of over 300,000 experiences you'll remember. Download the Viator app now and use code VIATOR10.More wealth, more purpose, or making more of a difference? Commonwealth Private helps you create more of yours - with exceptional service and experts who meticulously tailor opportunities for you.Find an advisor who's invested in you with iA Financial Services Inc.Find people with the right experience and invite them to apply to your job. Try ZipRecruiter for FREE today.Ship with FedEx and be ready for this holiday season with picture proof of delivery.Take a position daily on potential price movements, and gain exposure while limiting risk with Interactive Brokers.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.HELP US OUT!Help us reach new listeners by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! It takes less than 30 seconds, and really helps our show grow, which allows us to bring on even better guests for you all! Thank you – we really appreciate it!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Investing Insights
Should You Buy Dividend Stocks in a Recession?

Investing Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 19:48


Will dividends continue to do well in a rising interest-rate environment? Plus, Bob Iger is CEO of Disney again, and Visa has a new CEO, too. And speaking of executives, Warren Buffett's Berkshire has finally started spending some of the cash in its kitty. Find out how in this week's episode.      Timestamps00:38 Berkshire Hathaway Deserves More Credit 01:40 Dick's Sporting Goods Rallied Big in Q302:35 Visa's CEO is Stepping Down03:26 What happened at Disney, and more importantly, why?05:06. Bob Iger has delayed his retirement multiple times, and now is back. Will he likely stick to his two year contract, do you think?05:46 What does this mean for Disney shareholders – and your expectation for the stock?06:56 Are Dividend Stocks a Good Investment Today?  Read about topics from this episode.  5 Takeaways From Berkshire Hathaway's 2021 Shareholder LetterWhich Retail Stocks Are Well-Positioned for 2022 Holiday Sales?The Best- and Worst-Performing Stocks: Q3 2022Visa Earnings Show Continued Strong Growth; Stock Slightly UndervaluedEnergy Stocks Power Ahead on Earnings Gushers Utilities Brighten Under Cloud of Recession, but Future Dim at Lofty Valuations  What to watch from Morningstar.Retiring Soon? Make Sure to Check Your Asset AllocationCheap Stocks For You to ConsiderWhat to Buy or Skip: I Bonds, Apple, Amazon, or MetaWhere to Park Your Cash and Find Recession-Resistant StocksMarkets are Undervalued, and We Highlight Some Cheap Stocks!We Examine Tesla's Stock and the Risks of a Strong Dollar Read what our team is writing:Ruth SaldanhaSusan DziubinskiDavid Harrell Follow us on social media.Ruth Saldanha on Twitter: @karishmaruthDavid Harrell on Twitter: @davidharrellFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/MorningstarInc/Twitter: https://twitter.com/MorningstarIncInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/morningstar... LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/5161/ 

OUTCAST UK
HIV - CHARITY AND COMMUNITY: WORLD AIDS DAY 2022 SPECIAL

OUTCAST UK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 31:30


This World AIDS Day we're getting together with people from leading UK regional HIV organisations looking at charity and community and the role they have played in the response to the HIV pandemic. With the absence of support from society generally, a hostile media and the initial medical outlook so bleak, it became the job of the community to provide hope and emotional support at first. But some of the initial groups are still with us and going strong pushing back on stigma and providing upto date education to a world that seems to have its view of HIV firmly set in a different age. Graeme Smith chats to the people in charge at Thames Valley Positive Support in Berkshire and George House Trust in Manchester. Both vital lifelines for people living with HIV since 1985. We're talking about how U+U and prep have changed the game and how a huge number of HIV positive people have lived in fear of being criminalised even until recently. We're also talking about the rights of people living with HIV when it comes to getting tattoos. In an episode packed with queer history, old news reports, first hand accounts and some exceptionally raw and personal reflection. We're also hearing how Manchester Pride this year took a moment to reflect at the annual HIV vigil with the reading of poem This Quilted History, written and read at the event by Jay Mitra leading the candlelit reflection. It sounds even more poignant this world aids day. With thanks to Sarah Macadam the Chief Executive of Thames Valley Positive Support, Jessica Harding, deputy CEO at TVPS, The HIV Podcast, Darren Knight, the CEO of George House trust and to Jay Mitra. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/outcastuk/message

Pat Miller Program
Pat Miller & Cathy Berkshire

Pat Miller Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 14:15


Pat Miller speaks with Honor Flight President Cathy Berkshire about up coming Penny Pitch events and Honor Flight.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Full Reptile Radio
The War Room #235 | Jack Hermansson vs Derek Brunson [Cancelled] | The Dan Hardy Breakdown Show

Full Reptile Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 37:52


On this episode of The War Room Dan Hardy breaks down the UFC Fight Night bout between Jack Hermansson and Derek Brunson. We thought you may want to see this despite the fight being cancelled For the full effect check out the video version of this show here INSTAGRAM TWITTER This episode is brought to you by: RYGOR: Whether you're looking for a new or used van or truck, or for somewhere to maintain your current vehicle, Rygor is your local Mercedes-Benz commercial vehicle Dealership. Rygor Commercials is the UK's largest Mercedes-Benz van and truck Dealer. They have 11 dedicated Mercedes-Benz sales and after sales sites across Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Somerset, West London, Wiltshire and Worcestershire. Their award-winning team are on hand to help with all your purchase, servicing and maintenance requirements. Check out their website today. FULL REPTILE: For Outlaws, Full Reptile offers a wide range of Training and Lifestyle clothing that provides quality and comfort for ninja acrobatics or everyday wear. Check out the CYBER MONDAY SALE for 25% off Everything site-wide, don't miss out!

BAST Training podcast
Ep.87 How to Manage Allergies and Upper Respiratory Infections with Laryngologist Declan Costello

BAST Training podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 26:55


Today we talk to laryngologist Declan Costello who, during the Covid-19 pandemic, helped coordinate research on the perceived dangers of aerosols and singing. A singer himself, Mr Costello is stationed at Wexham Park Hospital in Berkshire as a consultant ear, nose and throat surgeon specialising in voice disorders. KEY TAKEAWAYS Pollen allergies have been quite rife this year and many have experienced symptoms for longer. The issue is that when you have an allergy you develop a reaction that causes the lining of the nose and the lining of the throat to swell. If somebody comes into the studio with an allergy and they sound a little bit nasal, by and large, it's okay to carry on singing – if the problem is isolated to the nose and irritation. The concern is if somebody's got an audible difference in their voice. If their voice is husky or if they've got difficulty with their range, then that makes you worry that maybe the vocal cords themselves are swollen. If you are keen to know precisely what you're allergic to, then there are various blood tests and other kinds of tests that you can do to know exactly what it is you should be avoiding. Most people who have hay fever are allergic to a whole number of things. So it's not just a single allergen. BEST MOMENTS ‘General hay fever and stuffiness wouldn't necessarily mean I would suggest stopping singing' ‘Colds are viral. They will do what they're gonna do' ‘We didn't go into it in order to open up singing again. We had to go into it completely dispassionately and saying, we don't know what the dangers are' EPISODE RESOURCES Guest Website: voicedoctor.co.uk Social Media: Twitter: @Voicedoctor_uk Relevant Links & Mentions: Neil Med Nasal Rinse: https://www.neilmed.com/unk/ Sterimar: https://www.sterimarnasal.co.uk/ Advised Nasal Spray: Dymista   ABOUT THE GUEST Declan Costello is a consultant ear, nose and throat surgeon specialising in voice disorders (a laryngologist).  He studied music at St John's College,Cambridge, where he was a choral scholar, and went on to study medicine at Imperial College. As a singer himself, he has a particular interest in treating voice disorders in performers. Having worked for ten years in Birmingham as a consultant, he moved to Wexham Park Hospital in Berkshire in 2018. He has published a number of books and has written many chapters, including the chapter on "Larynx" for the 42nd edition of "Gray's Anatomy”. In the middle of 2020, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, he helped to coordinate research on the perceived dangers of singing and aerosols. This research led to the UK government opening up performing after a prolonged period of enforced silence.  ABOUT THE PODCAST BAST Training is here to help singers gain the knowledge, skills and understanding required to be a great singing teacher. We can help you whether you are getting started or just have some knowledge gaps to fill through our courses and educational events. Website: basttraining.com Get updates to your inbox: Click here for updates from BAST Training Link to presenter's bios: basttraining.com/singing-teachers-talk-podcast-biosSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Investing Flavor
Wall Street Chat - Buffet's New Stocks, Tom Ford is a Billionaire, Target & Walmart Earning Reports

The Investing Flavor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 37:16


Every Monday Kevin Matthews II from Building Bread and I talk about what is happening on Wall Street!  Buffett-led Berkshire picked up roughly 60 million shares of Taiwan Semiconductor worth more than $4.1 billion. The largest in the luxury industry this year is done by Estee Lauder & Tom Ford. Target & Walmart have mixed earning reports that we need to discuss. 

Zacks Market Edge
Value Investors: Buy BRKB or Berkshire's Stocks?

Zacks Market Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 27:54


Warren Buffett continues to add new stocks to Berkshire's equity portfolio as stocks remain on sale. (0:30) - Value Investing On The Rise: Is It Warren Buffett's Time To Shine? (6:45) - Breaking Down Berkshire Hathaway's Current Performance: What Are They Buying? (24:00) - Episode Roundup: BRK-B, TSM, LPX, CVX, CE, RH, ALLY, SHW, UNP Podcast@Zacks.com

The John Krol Podcast
#66 - Brian Berkel, Berkshire Coalition for Suicide Prevention, Detective Lieutenant Massachusetts State Trooper (retired)

The John Krol Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 72:56


As an investigator as a member of the State Police, Brian Berkel saw firsthand the devastation of suicide in our community. Today, he's a part of a concerted effort to continue to remove the stigma that remains on this sensitive issue, open up the conversation, and save lives. Today, Brian is the president of the board of trustees for the Berkshire Coalition for Suicide Prevention. Our conversation comes as the coalition has teamed up with the Berkshire International Film Festival and the Austen Riggs Center on this weekend's "Shine the Light" event with a screening and conversation about youth mental illness and suicide prevention at the Mawaiwe Performing Arts Center. In my conversation with Brian, we cover a great deal of ground on particular warning signs, risk factors and opening the conversation to help someone (or yourself) considering suicide, as well as: finding a space for the conversation, not putting off the conversation, removing the means for suicide, emotional and other changes as a red flag, veterans disproportionately impacted, Officer Doug Kingsley's walk across Massachusetts to raise suicide awareness, Kevin Hines and regretting a suicide attempt, what not to say to someone who may be at risk, and more. I hope you'll enjoy my conversation with Brian Berkel. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-krol/support

Value Investor
Value Investors: Buy BRKB or Berkshire's Stocks?

Value Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 27:54


Warren Buffett continues to add new stocks to Berkshire's equity portfolio as stocks remain on sale. (0:30) - Value Investing On The Rise: Is It Warren Buffett's Time To Shine? (6:45) - Breaking Down Berkshire Hathaway's Current Performance: What Are They Buying? (24:00) - Episode Roundup: BRK-B, TSM, LPX, CVX, CE, RH, ALLY, SHW, UNP Podcast@Zacks.com

Daily Stock Picks
If I had 1 stock to buy now, what would it be? - Market update - 11-15-22

Daily Stock Picks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 47:47


Trendspider's sale ends 11/18 - CLICK HERE I was asked after the podcast ended which stocks I would trade today - there are 2 - $BABA for a potential earnings pop (gambling IMO) or $TGT for their earnings and gap fill. You won't mind holding $TGT if they don't report something outstanding. Berkshire dumping Bancorp and took tsm stake along with paramount holdings $para Sold 5% of $gm shares $ZM for Thomas - earnings Monday Jackson from insta Did you see the Chaos with Eli Lily & Lockhead Martin last week with the fake twitter accounts effecting the stocks? Interesting those ones haven't really recovered after that… anonymous Hey just a little insight, on Saturday I bartended at US C for professors that they brought around from all over the world that teach social entrepreneurship. I was speaking to one guy in particular who used to trade derivatives for a living, particularly futures. He's now a professor teaching in Boulder. Anyways I've asked for his opinion on the CPI data and how long he thinks this rally will be lasing. I said that I believe it'll last for a couple weeks he believes the CPI data will have this rally lasting a couple months. Anyways, I thought that information you might find useful or at least insightful. Least I can do for the tips and help you have given me $Shls huge move on earnings $Nflx booming on $bac upgrade $Hd missed based on customer transactions down 4.3% even though revs beat but didn't increase guidance - $LOW is the buy $Nvda earnings from weekly stock pick $WMT big beat and $20b share repurchase - crazy good quarter - inventory levels under control - they are seeing consumers having less to spend on ancillary items but they are seeing people buying on holiday sales $TGT and $COST Much higher sales from people with salaries over $100k which indicates even rich folk like me are moving to shopping at Walmart $Hd recovered after Walmart earnings From Tom $Imgn-- successful treatment ovarian cancer very good results in trial released after hours yesterday. It will explode todwy $SOXL $BABA $aapl looking to get in to the metaverse based on job postings Shoutout ups man on Instagram - he listens while he drives and I made the joke “what brown can do for you” SCANS $QS $CEG $TSLA - under $200 - CHRIS - brought up $TSLL Support the podcast - https://anchor.fm/dailystockpick/support Social Links and more - https://linktr.ee/dailystockpick --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dailystockpick/support

Squawk Pod
Charlie Munger: Berkshire, Billionaires, & the Blockchain 11/15/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 25:58


Berkshire Hathaway Vice Chairman Charlie Munger, at 98, weighs in on the market's latest hyped asset–and its collapse: crypto. As exchange FTX crumbles and its CEO faces regulatory and social scrutiny, Charlie Munger, a longtime partner and friend of Warren Buffett, compares this stock market story to all the ones he's seen before. In an extended interview with Becky Quick, Munger considers the real value in the blockchain, examining the claim that bitcoin is the “new gold.” Plus, he might not tweet, but the seasoned billionaire has thoughts on Elon Musk and on Tesla, his “minor miracle.” In this episode:Joe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinBecky Quick @BeckyQuickKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Squawk on the Street
Inflation Data and Walmart Spark a Market Rally, Tech Surges and Berkshire's Munger Blasts Crypto ... Again. 11/15/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 43:01


Carl Quintanilla, David Faber and Mike Santoli began the show with wholesale inflation data that helped to spark a market rally: The Producer Price Index for October came in tamer than expected, unchanged from the previous month when you strip out food and energy. As for retail earnings, Walmart shares surged on better-than-expected quarterly results, raised guidance and a $20 billion share buyback program. Home Depot also posted a quarterly beat. Jim Cramer joined the anchors shortly before the opening bell and weighed in on retail earnings and the movers of the morning. Also in focus: Berkshire Hathaway Vice Chairman Charlie Munger's new message blasting crypto in a CNBC interview, the latest on the FTX collapse, Warren Buffett's bet on Taiwan Semiconductor boosts the chip sector, and Netflix jumps on a double upgrade.

Scandales
Kate et William 1/4 : L'improbable rencontre

Scandales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 20:06


Il a grandi scruté sous les ors de Buckingham Palace ; elle, en toute liberté dans la campagne du comté de Berkshire. Il est né avec une cuillère en or dans la bouche, et elle n'avait pas de sang bleu. Le prince William et de Kate Middleton sont le couple royal le plus épié de la planète, mais aussi, le plus inattendu. Ils auraient pu ne jamais se rencontrer : William aurait épousé une baronne galloise, et Kate, un banquier d'affaires. Mais le chemin de la roturière a croisé celui du prince, et ils en ont fait une autoroute, en direction le trône d'Angleterre. Dans cette mini-série consacrée à Kate et William, Pascaline Potdevin, cheffe de service à Madame Figaro, revient sur l'histoire d'amour de ce couple aussi sensationnel que révolutionnaire. Comment Kate Middleton, à 15 ans, a-t-elle pu intégrer le cercle proche du futur roi d'Angleterre ? Comment se sont-ils retrouvés colocataires en Écosse, à l'ombre des radars médiatiques ? Et dans quel contexte se sont-ils séparés, après 5 ans de relation ?   Un épisode de Scandales consacré au nouveau «power couple» de la famille royale dans lequel interviennent des experts :   -Katie Nicholl, chroniqueuse royale, spécialiste des Windsor. Elle vient de publier un nouveau livre, The New Royals : Queen Elizabeth's Legacy and the Future of the Crown (Hachette Books) -Marc Roche, ancien journaliste du Monde spécialiste de la royauté britannique. Il est l'auteur de nombreux ouvrages sur cette dernière, dont Les Borgia à Buckingham (Albin Michel).  -Sophie Janinet, journaliste spécialiste de la culture anglo-saxonne.   Cette mini-série de Scandales est un podcast de Madame Figaro, écrite par Pascaline Potdevin, présenté par Marion Galy-Ramounot. Astrid Verdun a apporté son aide à la production. Juliette Médevielle en a fait le montage et la réalisation. Le studio La Fugitive s'est occupé du mix. Les musiques ont été composées par Jean Thévenin et Thomas Rozès. Lucile Rousseau-Garcia est la productrice de Scandales. Et Océane Ciuni en est la responsable éditoriale.  Cet épisode intitulé «Kate et William, l'improbable rencontre» est à écouter gratuitement sur les toutes les plateformes, dont Apple Podcasts, Deezer, Spotify à partir du 14 novembre 2022. 

Print Life
Interview with Harriet Ruscoe

Print Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 41:24


Harriet Ruscoe is a print designer, illustrator & graphic designer based in the UK nestled between the British countryside and London in Berkshire. Working as a fashion print and graphic designer with ready-to-wear brands, high street retailers and suppliers for the past 7 years as well designing graphics and illustrations for a variety of businesses marketing and social media needs. Harriet has worked with White Buffalo Studio in the past and is now a contributing trend editor for the Trend Portal from White Buffalo Studio. Links below to learn more about Harriet Ruscoe and how to follow along her journey in print design and beyond. https://www.harrietruscoedesign.co.uk/ https://www.instagram.com/harrietruscoe/

Pastured Pig Podcast
Episode 94 - Talking Berkshire Breed with the American Berkshire Association

Pastured Pig Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 66:40


In this episode, I have a great conversation with Cory Edge, the Executive Director of the American Berkshire Association. We discuss the details of the breed as well as the benefits and tons of educational resources provided by the association and their website. Be sure to check out the website at https://americanberkshire.com/   Check out the NEW Pastured Pig website that is live!  https://thepasturedpig.com/ Also, join us for discussion of all things pastured pig on our new facebook group, The Pastured Pig. https://www.facebook.com/groups/thepasturedpig We made it to 20 patrons on Patreon which allows us to expand the Pasture Pig Podcast to include a website and other digital presence.  Help us reach our next benchmark at 40 patrons. To learn more visit: https://www.patreon.com/thepasturedpig If you would like to know more about us here at Red Tool House Farm or would like to suggest topics for future episodes, visit us at: https://thepasturedpig.com/podcast/

The Outlines Podcast: UK True Crime
Berkshire- The Murder of Stacey Queripel

The Outlines Podcast: UK True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 55:05


On the evening of Sunday the 24th of January 1993, 7 year old Stacey Queripel reportedly slipped out of the home she shared with her mother and young sister in the town of Bracknell in Berkshire. Three hours later she was discovered in nearby woodland where she had been strangled with her own necklace. Almost 30 years later, what happened to Stacey that night remains a mystery.    Patreon www.patreon.com/theoutlinespodcast Buy Me A Coffee buymeacoffee.com/outlinespodcast iTunes itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-o…ast/id1325180386 Website www.theoutlinespodcast.com Twitter @outlinespodcast Instagram @theoutlinespodcast

The Investing Podcast
November 7, 2022 - Daily Market Briefing

The Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 18:55


Ben and Tom discuss China's "Zero-Covid" Policy and its impact on the global market, primarily the slowing of Apple's production of new iPhones. Meta plans large-scale layoffs, and Apple released a short, somewhat odd press release blaming the city of Zhangzhou, and their Covid policy, on the slowing iPhone production. Berkshire Hathway saw negative EPS, and Buffet released a somewhat odd statement - essentially he claimed that anyone nervous about negative earnings for Berkshire didn't understand accounting. Elections on Tuesday and CPI on Thursday.For information on how to join the Zoom calls live each morning at 8:30 EST, visit https://www.narwhalcapital.com/blog/daily-market-briefingsPlease see disclosures:https://www.narwhalcapital.com/disclosure

Spaced Out Radio Show
Nov. 2/22 - Discovering Sasquatch with Chris Reinhardt

Spaced Out Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 173:03


Chris Reinhardt is a former 'nuts and bolt's type of sasquatch investigator until starting to see the 'woo' involved with his investigations. His investigations with the Mt. Berkshire area of New York and into Connecticut, gives him a large area to look for the elusive creature.

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Emceeing a memorial serviceLet Me Run This By You: Fear and the paranormalInterview: We talk to Tina Parker aka Francesca Liddy about SMU, Blake Hackler, Andre DeShields, Maria Irene Fornes' Mud, Kitchen Dog Theatre, Breaking Bad, Better Call Saul, Robert Altman's Dr. T & the Women, Birdbath play, Perpetual Grace. FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth Ramirez2 (10s):This, and I'm Gina Pulice1 (11s):We went to theater3 (12s):School together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.4 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of3 (20s):It all. We survive theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (34s):So what does mean, What does it mean to mc a memorial?1 (40s):Yeah. I mean, I don't know what to call it. I I people keep it host. I'm not hosting cuz the family's hosting. So what it means is that I'm trusted, I think to not, Well one, I've done this twice, you know, I've lost both my parents. So I like know the drill about how memorials go, but also I think I'm kind of a safe person in that I will step in if someone goes kaka cuckoo at the memorial and I also have some, you know, able like, presenting skills. Yes. Right. And I'm entrusted to like guide the ship if it, and if it goes off kilter, I will say to somebody, Hey, why don't you have a seat?1 (1m 23s):This is like, we'll have time for this later if you really wanna get crazy or whatever. But that's, and I think it's just sort of steering, steering the grief ship maybe. I don't know. Yeah, look, I don't know. I like that. It's gonna be2 (1m 34s):Interesting, dude, people, Oh, honestly, they should have that for, you know, in other cultures where they have like professional grievers and professional mourners, it, it sounds a little silly, but at the same time it's like, no, this is right. Because no, we don't, we never know how to do it. Unless you've lived in a really communal environment where you, you, you, you know, you attend the rights, the ceremonies or rituals of everybody in your village, then you really don't know until, usually until it's thrust upon you. And then it's like, well, you're supposed to be grieving and then like hosting a memorial service. It's such a weird thing. So this could be another career path for you. You could be a professional, you know, funeral mc, I actually, honestly, I hate, I don't hate it.2 (2m 21s):I love it. Well,1 (2m 22s):And also could be my thank you, my rap name funeral Mc instead of like young mc funeral mc, but no. Yeah, I, I have no, and it's so interesting when it's not my own family, right? Like these are family friends, but they're not, it's not my mother who died. I don't have the attachment to I people doing and saying certain things. I don't feel triggered. Like being, I grew up a lot in this house that I'm sitting in right now, but it's not my, it was not my house. So I don't have any attachment emotionally like appendages to the items in the house where the girls do.1 (3m 2s):So I'm able to be here and, and, and be like, this is, this is, I'm okay here. I don't feel overwhelmed. And I think that is a sign that I'm doing the right thing in terms of helping out in this way if I got here and I was like, Oh my God, it's too much. But I don't feel that. And I also think that like, one of the things that I did with Nancy and Dave over the last couple years is like, they were literally the only adults. Well, I'm an adult, only older adults my parents age who are like, Yes, go to California, you need to get out of here, get away from this. They were the, so I that made me trust them. And then we stayed, we had like weekly phone conversations, just like they would each be on a line.1 (3m 46s):It was hilarious. And we would talk for hours like maybe once every two weeks, a couple hours. And it was really like a parenting experience. So I feel very close to them and I, what I'm learning is that like, even if other people have different relationships with people, you can have your own. So I know that no one's perfect, but these were allowed, like, you're allowed Gina to have your own relationship with your mom and with your even dead people than other people have.2 (4m 17s):Yeah. Yeah. I agree with that. Back to the plane for a minute. In these situations, what do the flight attendants do, if anything?1 (4m 28s):Oh, well I always talked to them before because I, so what I say, I always like to, because Dave, who's, who's a hypnotherapist and a psychologist, he said, Listen, you know, he used to be afraid. And he said his thing was talking to the flight attendants before and just saying like, Hey, I have a phobia. I'm a therapist. I'm working through it. Like just to make contact, right. I don't, I didn't say that exactly, but what I said was, Listen, I say, Hi, how are you? We struck up a strike up, a teeny conversation in that moment where I'm going to my seat and I say, Listen, I'm going to Chicago to like mc a memorial for like someone who's like my mom. So if you see me, so if you see me crying like it's normal. And they're like, Oh, thanks for telling me. And they're, they usually don't get freaked out.1 (5m 11s):I'm also not like intense about it. They do nothing. And you know what they, I think and, and she said, Thanks for telling me. I really appreciate it. Because I think they'd rather know what the fuck is going on with someone than thinking someone's about to hijack the goddamn plane.2 (5m 29s):Exactly. I was thinking that exact same thing. I was thinking like, especially right now, all they know is it's heightened emotion or it's not, you know, like they, they, they have no, they would have no way of differentiating, you know, what's, what's safe and what's dangerous. So I can't believe nobody's ever done this before. But we, another project that we could do is like airplane stories. I mean there is such, this is one of the few points of connection that humanity still has people that is who can afford to you fly a plane anywhere. But this thing of like, it sucks and it's dirty and it's growth and people, people's, you know, hygiene comes into question and if they're sitting next to you and it's uncomfortable and it's not the glamorous thing that it used to be even when we were kids.2 (6m 21s):So it's, it's one of those moments unless you have a private plane where you're sort of forced to reckon with like the same thing that everybody else in humanity has to reckon with. But even on a private plane, and I would argue even especially on a private plane, there is the fear of your imminent death. Like the, the, it doesn't matter if you're afraid of flying or not, it crosses your mind.1 (6m 42s):Well, yeah. And I, my whole thing is like, I, I don't know what would happen if we all started talking about that on a plane. So like what would that be like? So, okay, when I was traveling last with home from San Francisco with Miles, I sat next to this woman, Miles was in the middle and the woman on the aisle was this woman. We were both afraid. And we had this idea for a fricking television show, right? Which was two, it's called the Fearful Flyers and then two people on each side and a famous person in the middle seat. And we would interview them as we, we flew to one, take our mind off it, but two really delve into our own fear and did the person of any fear and get to know a celebrity at the same time.1 (7m 27s):Now she never texted me back. So she's clear, clearly she's not that interested. Cause I was like into it. I was like, what if we get, I know, I know. And she's not even in the industry. She's like, so, but I was like, hey fearful flyer friend, I think we should talk about our idea. Crickets radio silence. So whatever. She's moved on. Like she just used me for the, for the Yeah. No entertainment, which is fine,2 (7m 53s):Heightened emotional space. She, she bonded with you, but now she's back to like all of her armor and all of her gear and she doesn't wanna think about flying until she has1 (7m 60s):To. No. Right, right. Exactly. It's not something that she wants to delve into on her free time, you know, So, which I don't blame her. But anyway, so yeah, it's an interesting thing. Like I literally ha I sit out the window, I sit by the window and I have to look out the window. And this guy next to me who I met, who's like a vet and who is like, was self-medicating with alcohol and who is a gay vet was really interesting. But he, everyone copes differently. But it was in, at one point I thought, oh, I actually don't wanna be distracted by him because I'm really doing some deep work with myself as I look out the window and also your version of like getting through this experience, I, it does not feel safe to me, which is drinking and like just, I cannot distract myself.1 (8m 52s):People are like, Oh, read a book. I'm like, are you fucking kidding me? That's like telling someone I don't know who's having a seizure to read a book. Like you, you, it's not gonna work. Right. I look out the window and, and do therapy with myself. That is what I2 (9m 7s):Do. I love it. That's great. I think everybody who is listening to this, who has any kind of fear or intimidation around flying should, should do that. I don't know if you were getting to this, but I thought you were gonna say something about like how, Oh, you said, you said what if we all talked about it now? Every positive communal experience with the exception of theater that I've ever had, I've gone into unwillingly at the beginning and you know, sort of rejecting it and then come out the other side. Like that was amazing. You know, the thing that you experience, the communal thing, the thing of like, we're all in this together, which we are all like so actually parched for, but we, people like me would never really kind of actively sort of approach.2 (9m 48s):It has to be thrust upon me these like healing group experiences, but amen. In fact, they could make a whole airline that is sort of about that. Like this is, you know, this is the emotional express. Like this is where we're gonna talk about our fear of flying. Cuz everybody's crying in airplanes too. Being in the actual airplane does something to you that makes everybody much more vulnerable than there are otherwise.1 (10m 13s):It's so crazy. I agree. It could be emotional express and you could deal with it, but you would know getting on this plane, like people are gonna talk about their feelings and you shouldn't get on it. So the guy on the aisle2 (10m 26s):Yesterday, No,1 (10m 28s):No alcohol. Oh yeah, no alcohol. The guy on the aisle like hated everything about the flight, Right? He was like shaking his head. He was annoyed. But then he had a Harvard sweatshirt on. I was like, oh my god. But he was like middle aged guy, like coating or I don't know what he was doing, but he like hated everything. He shook his head when they told him to like put his bag under the seat. I'm like, listen, you know what's going on here. This is not your first time in an airplane, Why are you shaking your head? But okay. But then he said something that was hilarious and I said, I'm gonna put that in a script. Which, which was, I don't even know what he was responding to. It was probably my seat mate saying something. But he said, Listen, it's not ideal, but nobody asked me.2 (11m 13s):And1 (11m 13s):I, I'm gonna, and I said to him, I said, Listen, I am gonna put that in a script. Like the mother-in-law is meeting her future daughter-in-law and, and says, Listen, she's not ideal, but nobody asked me. And he laughed and then he said, it's true. And I said, Yeah, I know it's true. That's why. And so then he was like, then he was like free to talk about his disgruntledness, which was fine cuz then it was like he was more human. But at, he was hilarious. He was like the, like he's one of those people that like during and it was really turbulent at one point. And I was like, Okay, here we go. It's turbulence part of the deal. It's okay, fine. And he was like, just like angry at the turbulence.2 (11m 57s):I love1 (11m 58s):It. Which I thought was brilliant. Yeah, I'm like, but like, who are you angry at? Just like the turbulence. And he was like, ugh. And like angry at air flow. I don't know if2 (12m 7s):At air current1 (12m 8s):He was like pissed off. I was laughing. I was like, this guy's awesome. He just hates everything. It's, it is not ideal, but nobody asks me.2 (12m 17s):So what's so great about that? And so what's so great about you is like, you enga that's how you always engage people from this perspective of like, yeah, whatever is going on with you that you think is like nobody else wants to hear about, I want to hear about it. Because that's because that's what you spend your time doing. You know, bravely engaging with yourself. They, we need a person like you in all of these sort of like high stress situations that people have to do. Usually at some point in your life you have to get on an airplane. Usually at some point in your life you you have to speak, you know, in front of a group of people. You have to have the funeral. We need these sherpa's, these guides to kind of give us, basically just give us permission to have our own human experience that we have somehow talked ourselves out of having, even though it's completely unavoidable.1 (13m 3s):Yeah. And I also really respect people who now who have to just, I mean I, it's not my way, but like, shut down and they're like, Nope, I'm just gonna, they can do it. They're like, either it's drinking or whatever it is to distract themselves. They're like in it, whether it's the disgruntledness or other people, they like just go to sleep immediately. They like sit down and they're like out. And I don't think it's relaxation. I think they're just like checked. They're like,2 (13m 30s):I have, Oh yeah, no, they're, I cannot be conscious right now. I wonder what makes the difference between people who are afraid of flying and not, I have never once felt afraid of flying, even during turbulence. I've never once had the thought like, this plane is going down. I mean, maybe that changed a little bit when I had kids and I was always the one in the aisle, like holding, I had to hold my babies the entire flight because, because it must be a natural thing to be freaked the fuck out to be on an airplane. Even a baby freaks out to be on an airplane. So there's something to it. But what makes a difference between people who just, I've never had that fear.1 (14m 8s):I I know it is a foreign, it is like it is. I don't know either. And I, I I, there's other people like that have, What was the fear someone was talking about the other day? Oh, I have a friend who like literally cannot have their blood drawn. They have to go under almost. Wow. They almost have to be sedated to have their blood drawn. Me. I I stick out my arm. I don't give a, it's just not my thing. Yeah. I don't have any charge at it at all.2 (14m 37s):Well,1 (14m 38s):You could take my blood right now.2 (14m 40s):I used to have this theory that you grew up afraid of the things that your parents basically were afraid of so that they therefore communicated to be afraid of. But that I now think that that's completely untrue. My daughter is scared to death of spiders. She, she's haunted by this fear that when she goes into the bathroom at night, there's gonna be a spider. If there's the tiniest and we live in the woods, there's sp there's all kinds of insects that make that their way into our house. I have, there's not a spider I've ever encountered that I've been afraid of now. Mice and rats. That's what I'm afraid of. My mom was afraid of snakes. She did not transfer when I was younger.2 (15m 20s):I felt afraid of them too. And then one day I was like, eh, it's fine. Yeah. I don't think I have any coral with these snakes actually. I think it's completely fine. Right. So I, I don't, So it's something inherent in us that identifies an ob I think it's maybe like we've, I for whatever reason, this becomes the object of all of your fears. And it could be a spider, it could be a plane, it could be, you know, clowns. Like it's for a lot, for a lot of people. It's1 (15m 47s):Fun. Oh remember, Okay, Larry Bates, who we went to school with, and he's open, I think about this. Yeah, he is cuz he's, he's talked about it. I, he had a fear of muppets, like an intense Muppet fear. And I was like, Wait, are you, I thought it was a joke. I was like, Wait, Muppets, Like, okay, they're a little weird, but like, but like a phobia of a Muppet. And I was like, what the actual fuck. I couldn't like,2 (16m 14s):I just, that's it's not, dude, my version of that is I was afraid of mariachi bands.1 (16m 22s):Wait, mariachi bands?2 (16m 24s):Yes.1 (16m 25s):Like bands. Yeah.2 (16m 26s):Well, so growing up, growing up in, well, we love Mexican boots, so we were always going out for Mexican food. And back then, I don't know why every time you went to have Mexican food, you know, dinner, there was a mariachi band. Like, I, I, it doesn't, I haven't seen a mariachi band in such a long time, but it used to be that you could not go out for a Mexican restaurant dinner without a mariachi band. And I, it got to a point where they couldn't, first it was like, we can't go to have Mexican food anymore. It was like, we can't go to a restaurant. I just, I didn't want these mariachis and, and it must have just, I think it was the bigness of the hat and the loudness of the music right next to your table when you think about it, it's actually, so it's strange, right?2 (17m 9s):Yeah. That you're sitting at your table, like with your family looking, you know, whether you're gonna order the chalupa or the enchilada. And then it's just like, extremely loud, very good, but extremely loud and, and in huge presence. People sitting, you know, right next to your table.1 (17m 24s):Yeah. I mean it doesn't really make a lot of sense as a business move either. Like what, why it would like, it would like make people, unless you're drunk again, if there's alcohol involved, it changes everything. But you can't really drink as a toddler. So, but I think that like, maybe there's something, I wonder if there's something about that of like all the attention being on you. Like, listen, when there's, like, there are kids I know at restaurants when they, when it's their birthday and they come over to sing that they fucking hate it. It's too much attention on them. And adults too. And I can kinda understand that. It's like too much pressure, right? There's like a2 (17m 59s):Pressure. Well, you just unlocked it for me now I know exactly what it is. You said something about being drunk and I think at that age, I have always equated loud and raucous with drunk. You know, as a kid, I knew when anybody in my family was being loud raus. And, and actually, I'm sorry to say even especially when they were having fun. When I'm in a room, when I'm in a house and everybody's laughing, you know, my, it's like, I I I I just get that fear. I just get that fear sort of rise up. It's different now that I'm older and I've, you know, been in more situations where that hasn't been scary to me. But that's what it was with the mariachis, The loud and the festive and the music meant like, somebody's going to say something that they really regret.2 (18m 44s):Somebody's gonna get a dui, somebody's going to jail.1 (18m 50s):Hey, let me run this by you.2 (18m 58s):So imperfectly into the thing I wanted to run by you today, given that it is Halloween season and this episode will air the day after Halloween. But so I, you know, Well, actually no. Okay, I'll, I'll start with this. I am one of those people that desperately seeks paranormal experiences. And I'm almost always disappointed when I'm, when I'm actively seeking it, going to a psychic, going to a medium, going to, it's, oh, you know, it's, I'm never the one in the crowd where the medium goes. Like, I've got a message for you.2 (19m 40s):And I've, I've gotten to the point where I'm like, my family's like just not that into me. They don't wanna, you know, the people have passed over, like, don't wanna, don't wanna come talk to me, don't wanna give me messages. But I I, if you're out there, if you're listening, ancestors drop a line. I'd love to know what the deal is. I'd love to know what messages you might have from me because I actually really do believe that that can happen. Maybe it just needs to happen with people who are on a higher spiritual plane than any of,1 (20m 9s):I mean, I don't, I don't believe that for a sec. I mean, it could be true. What do I know? But I think, look, I do believe right, that most shit happens when you're not expecting it paranormal or not. Like all this shit that has happened to me, most of it has been not at all when I would've planned or thought or, and so I have one ghost story. I don't know if you know, it happened in Great Barrington, Do you know this story?2 (20m 42s):Yes. But tell it again. It's a great story.1 (20m 44s):Okay. Okay. I could care. I was like 21. All I wanted was to be skinny and have boys like me. I didn't give a fuck about ghosts, I didn't care about anything. So I'm in Great Barrington in edits, Wharton's the old Lady author's house, and I'm the stage manager. And this guy I was in love with was in this play that took place. The monkeys paw took place in the, they were doing an adaptation of the Monkeys Paw in Edith Wharton's parlor on Halloween. It was like the creepiest thing, but I didn't give a fuck because I was in love with the guy who was seriously haunted. Yes, yes, yes. Super, super Berkshire's, whatever. I didn't care.1 (21m 24s):I was like, ah, I wanna, I want this guy to like me. I don't give a fuck about any of that. Okay. So I, my job was to literally move the furniture after the rehearsal to the storage room. Okay. In this big mansion. Okay, fine. They're getting notes and I'm just probably daydreaming about how I can make this guy like me. And I'm moving furniture and I go into this little storage room and of course people talk about the house is so big and haunted, I could care less. So I'm in there and down the road from the house is a barn where they're doing the play Ethan from and Okay, Ethan from, there's like a sledding accident in the play. So he's on a sled and they start screaming and the guy is hurt.1 (22m 4s):So another show was going on at the, in the barn. And I'm like, ah, okay. So I'm moving the furniture and I hear this sled yelling and okay, I'm like, Oh, should they, I wish they would shut up. I was like, this is loud yelling. So then I, we finish our rehearsal and we're walking up back, me and the cute guy and some other people, and all I'm thinking about is how can I get this guy like me? And like, literally, and also now I see pictures of him and I'm like, Dear God. Anyway, so, so, oh my God, why didn't someone, I mean, you should, someone should have just slapped me like 10 times and been like, No. But anyway, but that's what I was, I was all about him. I had a thing for Canadians. Anyway, so, so like, I just loved the guys that was like international to me, Canadians.1 (22m 48s):Anyway, okay. So it was like all the Canadians. So we're walking in the dark to our cars and, and I say, and we walk by the barn and I'm like, Oh my gosh, you guys, they were so loud tonight when I was moving the furniture. Like they should shut up. Like, I, I wonder how it's gonna be when we're doing the Monkeys Past show. We're gonna hear Ethan from, and like every, there's like four of us. Everyone stopped and I'm like, What, what's wrong with you? Two or three or whatever. And they were like, like turned white. I've never seen this happen in human beings. And I was like, What is happening? I thought I said something wrong or like, of course, like I was bad. And I'm like, What?1 (23m 28s):And they're like, Oh God. And I was like, What? What are you punk me? What's happening? And they're like, There was no show tonight.2 (23m 37s):Ooh. Even though I knew that was coming the story, it still gave me a chill. Today on the podcast we are talking to Tina Parker. Yes. Tina Parker, the one and only Francesca Litty from the Smash Hit series, critically acclaimed and me acclaimed Better Call Saul and Breaking Bad Tina's a delight. She's a director, she directs for theater. She's got a theater company in Dallas, Texas called Kitchen Dog. And she was so much fun to talk to and I just know you are going to love our conversation with Tina Parker.2 (24m 33s):Oh, nice. Okay. Well I wanna get all into Kitchen Dog, but I've gotta start first by saying congratulations Tina Parker. You survived theater school5 (24m 44s):So long ago. My Lord, so2 (24m 46s):Long ago. Yeah. I I have no doubt that, you know, the ripple we, we've learned, it doesn't matter how long ago you graduated, the, the feeling of survival persists and the ripple effects of it persists.5 (24m 59s):Absolutely.1 (25m 1s):When I had longer hair, people used to always ask if I played Bob Oden Kirk's assistant on better. And I would say no. But I adore the human that plays her. It's brilliant performance and I love it. So2 (25m 17s):There you go. It really is. And I, and I wanna talk a lot about Better Call Saul, but you went to smu, which I did. You interviewed the current dean, I think he's the dean. Blake Hackler.5 (25m 30s):Yeah. Chair of Acting I think.2 (25m 31s):Chair of Acting. Okay, fantastic. I'm I'm assuming you guys weren't there. No, you never crossed5 (25m 36s):Path. But we've actually, he and I have crossed paths a bit professionally nowadays. Yes. Because we've, we, Kitchen Dog has done a few of his new play readings cuz he's a playwright also. So he's, he had at least two or three plays read in our New Works festival and he's always helped me out when I need recommendations for young people to come in and read. Cause you know, we're all old at Kitchen Dog.2 (25m 56s):Fantastic. Shout out to Blake. So SMU is a fantastic school. Did you always wanna go there? Did you apply to a bunch of different places? How did you pick smu?5 (26m 9s):Well, it's kind of a ridiculous story. I, my senior year of high school, you know, of course like a lot of people went to theater school. You're all like, I'm the superstar. My high school. Like, all right, I get all the leads. I'm Auntie Mame and Mame. You know what? Ridiculous.1 (26m 25s):I just have to say I was Agnes Gooch and I, I was the Gooch. Were you5 (26m 30s):Agnes? I was ma I was anti Mame in the stage play version. Oh yes.1 (26m 35s):I wa yeah, yeah, me too. I was Agnes Gooch. I wanted to be anti Mame, but so anyway, always a goo, always a Gooch. Never a Mame over here. But anyway, So tell us, So you were the start.5 (26m 46s):Yeah, you know, like everybody who went to theater school, everybody was the start at their high school. But I, my dad unfortunately had a stroke when I was a, and he was only, my parents are super young and so he was 40, I don't know. So it was very unusual. It happened like at the beginning of my senior year. And so my family was, it was all kind of chaotic. My senior year was very chaotic and I was also like the president of the drama club and, and we, you know, and all the people, you know, all the competitions every weekend. And so it was just a, there was a lot going on and my family stuff got into disarray because my dad ended up losing his job because he was sick for so long. And, and it was so I screwed up.5 (27m 28s):Like I missed a lot of applications. I never, I didn't really, it was one of those where it just kind of snuck up on me and I didn't really know the places I wanted to go. I had missed like certain deadlines because of the fall. And so I, SME was still one of the ones that was open. And so I did, was able to schedule an audition cuz you had to get into the school, but also, you know, get into the theater program. Like you could get into the school, not get into the theater program, you know, it is what it is. Luckily I still had time to do the audition, so I did that and then my grandmother literally walked my application through the admin, through the academic part because something I had missed, I think.5 (28m 13s):And my grandmother is very like, I don't know, it's hard to say no to my grandmother. So she went and they took this great care of her and she just kind of walked through and she's like, told the whole situation. And I mean, I had good grades. Like it wasn't, you know, like I did get in, I got scholarships and all this shit. Like I had, I had good grades, so it wasn't like I was like, my grandmother did it, you know, But she did walk it through. She's a thousand percent charmer. And then the, as far as the audition goes, I was an hour late because I got lost. And then there's this weird horseshoe at SMU cuz you know, go ponies or whatever bullshit that is, there was no parking.5 (28m 55s):And so I was like, got, was super late and I was just like, just like so sweaty and like, you know, you, everything's high drama when you're in high school, right? So you're like, this is is my last chance to be a doctor. I'm gonna have to work at the, you know, fucking shoe store that I was working at or whatever. It was forever. And so1 (29m 15s):I would, I, after I became an actor, I was still working at the cheese store after I went to, But the other thing I wanna say is like, also your grandma sounds like charming, but also like, she might be in the mob.5 (29m 25s):Well, yeah, she's totally like, yeah, I mean, I don't know. She's, she's she, she can get it done. She's the wife of a Methodist minister too. So she, she, she knows how she can, she can read a person and figure out like, this is what you need, you know, And she's just sweet, like, you know, she's charmer. But I ran into someone else's audition, like that's what I, I ran and they then the school, the school is all built, the school is all built crazy. So if you don't know the school, you get lost. And I was like, went and I going in the wrong places and I was an hour late and I was like, and like, I literally like, this is it not open the door. And they're like, somebody's in there like, like doing the thing. And I'm like, oh my god. And they're like, you know, and I was like that.5 (30m 7s):And I was just like, Oh God. And so I go and sit in the room and I just remember them coming in. I was like, I'm really sorry, you know, like the kid was like, whoever, I don't think they got in. And they, I just remember them looking at me like, you know, and they left and I was like, great, this is awesome. And then I go into my audition, which I chose the worst pieces, like the worst of course. Like, I think it was like, I can't even remember the name of the playwright, but it's like a really, really dramatic monologue from like bird bath, you know, My head is not a hammer, like something ridiculous. And then I also chose to sing, which I'm not the greatest. I mean, I can sing, I can sing karaoke, but not like seeing like I'm a musical theater actor. I, I, that's not me.5 (30m 47s):I think I chose seeing like the something that Nights on Broadway or some bullshit, like, you know, the Neon Lights On? No, No. On Broadway. Like ridiculous. Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. And they were like, luckily, luckily I did get in the interview part and then they're like, turn your, they're like, turn your monologue into standup comedy.2 (31m 6s):Oh wow. I never heard of that in audition. What a cool tactic.5 (31m 10s):Well, and it was also, I think they could tell that I was so freaked out and so nervous, but then that like, the interview portion went great. And so they're like, you know, then they were like, Hey, try like play around with this. And then like, the bad song that I had selected that I had practiced with my cousin who could play guitar or something, they're like, do some dance moves with it. So I was just like, I don't dance, but I started doing these ridiculous things and they're like, Yeah, good. They laughed and you know, I, I think it also let me relax. They're2 (31m 38s):Like, you are crazy enough to be in theater school. Wait, you guys, should we have a documentary series about people who are auditioning for theater school? Because honestly like the stakes are so high for so many people. I bet there's 1 billion stories. Yeah, I mean, some of which we've heard on, on, on the podcast, right? Boz? Yeah,1 (31m 58s):I think we do. I think we do. And all the, I just remembered that in my monologue was from the play about the woman who traps the rapist in her house and puts him in a fireplace.5 (32m 10s):Oh, the burning bed or whatever. Not the burning bed, but the, Yeah,1 (32m 14s):Yeah. And it's, it's, it's William Masterson.5 (32m 17s):Yes,1 (32m 18s):Yes, yes. And, and she has a fire poker and she's poking the rapist and I am 16 at the time. Oh, and I what? And a virgin, not that that really matters, but like the whole thing is not good. And why, why did I do that? But yet I got, But5 (32m 35s):That's what this piece was the same thing. It was so dark. And so like, this person is mentally ill and she's like, I get, there's not a hammer.1 (32m 41s):Don't hit me bear.5 (32m 42s):And you're just like, What?1 (32m 44s):I'm like it would've been, I mean I know this is terrible to say, but what if they told me to turn that into standup? Like that would be dark, dark, dark humor. But any, Okay, so you, you clearly like, what I love is that smu like knew how to take a teenagers anxiety and like shift it and so good on them, those auditioners like good on them. So you did that, you did you walk out of there feeling like, okay, like it started off really wonky, like me being late, but like I have a chance. Or did they tell you, when did they tell you5 (33m 15s):I felt good like that? When I, after I left I was like, okay, you know, like I wasn't sure like, cuz I was like, it was weird that they told me to change it to comedy, but I think it was good, you know, And like I felt like the interview part went good and they were, at the time, my class, this was the first year that they, they eliminated the cuts program. So what happened is they instead they had the BFA acting track and then they had, well what was proposed anyways, they changed our, what our degree was, but it was supposed to be ba in theater studies. And so if you were interested in directing, you know, playwriting, whatever, stage management, tech, whatever, and then acting you could also have, so you kind of chose focuses, but that was it.5 (34m 2s):And it had more of a little more academic focus. And so cuz before me, the classes, everybody went in as an actor. You did first two years and then they kind of just cut you basically. And were like, you're in this free fall of like a program that wasn't really planned.1 (34m 18s):Yeah. I mean like, that's how our school was too. And like half the people didn't end up graduating and it was a racket and now they don't do it anymore. But that5 (34m 27s):Was a huge, yeah, they stopped my year.1 (34m 30s):Okay. So, so was it that the people that maybe weren't get getting into the acting program went to theater studies? Is that how it was proposed?5 (34m 37s):I think that's what they were trying to do. I think they were also trying to figure out a way, or they were try some people left. I think they were also trying to keep their numbers up. And I think they also had people who were like, Hey we're, I'm an actor but I'm also a director. Why can't you make, get me some classes here? You know, like, I wanna have the class. If you're gonna cut me, that's fine. But like, I'm interested in these things too. Can there be a program? And so they kind of were building that program, like they had it out there, you know, and that when they took our class, we had very set paths of like, and we had the same two years together as a group. So freshman and sophomore year. And then we split into our kind of disciplines and they kind of still, like when I was, when we were juniors, kind of like, here's some things and we're like, okay, but our class was kind of a hard ass and we're like, where's our, where's our, where's this class?5 (35m 24s):Where's that? So we were always in the office saying, no, this, this like afterthought of a class, this should then fly and you know, I'm gonna direct a main stage or I wanna direct a studio. And they're like, Oh. And they're like, No, this is how it's gonna work or whatever. So like, yeah, me and Tim and Tim, who actually is one of my coworkers, a kitchen dog and then a couple other folks were pr I think we turned the, the chair at the Times hair white because we would go in there and be like, No, this isn't gonna work.2 (35m 53s):You just, you just made me realize that our, this, all the schools who had cut programs who didn't have another track to go into after were missing out on such a revenue stream. Right? Like our, at our school. Yeah. All the people who got cut like went to this other college and I'm thinking, what, what, When was the meeting where somebody goes, Oh my god, you guys, we should just have something here for them to do instead of sending them to another school. That's hilarious. Well,5 (36m 17s):And I think too, they find like, you know, like that there's kids that truly have talent for, you know, like a playwright or director, but then they're also really good actors. Which I think, you know, I think it's really good for people who are like, I am primarily like, I'm a mix Tim I would say who my coworker is is primarily a director, but, but it's great for both of us to go through acting, you know, like that's been, that's, but1 (36m 38s):I'm noticing is there's no, like our school had no foresight into anything, so it was like they didn't, So that's a problem in a, in a university.5 (36m 49s):Yeah. It, here's problem. Right.1 (36m 50s):So okay, so at your school, what was your experience like on stage the star? Were you And then, Oh, okay. And then, and then my other follow up question is, man, the follow up question is you're launching into the professional world. What did your school do or not do to prepare you? And what was your departure like into like, okay, now you're 22, live your life.5 (37m 11s):Bye. I would say for, I was kind of a mix. Like I had a lot of opportunities while I was there and some self created as far as directing opportunities. And we had an interesting system of like, there was a studio theater and we were able to have, we had this studio system, which a lot of non-majors would come and see plays because they were required, blah, blah blah. But so we got to direct a lot, you know, And, and Tim really fought and he got directed main stage and I was, I was, my senior year I was a lead in a play, you know, like just all sorts of things. Like I had a lot of great opportunities at smu. I think I had some also, I had some good teachers and directors while I was there.5 (37m 53s):So when I was a junior, you know, they had Andre De Shields in to, to as a guest artist, which really stirred the pot because he was not about like, let's talk about your objectives, let's talk, let's really do some table work. Like, he was like, Why aren't you funny? I don't get that shit. Like, go, go out. Why aren't you funny like this? Or come up with some, some dancing or whatever, you know. He was awesome. Like, I loved it. Like cuz we were doing funny thing happen on the way to the forum. I was one of the, you know, concubines or whatever the dance, I was Tinton Nebula, the bell, the supposed to be a, like a bell ringer, you know, like sexy dancer. And he said, I reminded him of some lady he lived with in Amsterdam. So instead I was a clogger and had bells and had giant hair that went out to here.5 (38m 37s):And yeah. And so he was like, he was great. Like, and but it really gave you the experience, it makes a lot of people crazy because he was like not interested in their process. What he was interested in was like results and like hitting your marks and like, you know, like he had sent me away and he was like, come up with 16 beats to that end I'm gonna see something funny. And so I came back in and did it and he was like, yes. You know, like it was, it was awesome. Like he would, he would really was a real collaborator.2 (39m 3s):That's fantastic. And, and actually I'm so glad you told that story because, and I, I won't, I wanted you to get back to launching and everything, but the thing about the Andre Des Shield story that you just told, I can see why you like that because that seems like you a person who has the training and the gravitas and whatever to like take their craft very seriously, but at the end of the day, you're there to entertain and get the job done, right? Like you don't, you're not so precious about your own self. Yeah. Which is really interesting.5 (39m 30s):No, and I mean it was, it was so important I think just because, you know, like everywhere you, everywhere you go like, you know, you don't always work at the same place and everybody's process and everybody's way of rehearsal or whatever's wildly, wildly different. And so I thought it was great because you know, you're not going to go always walk into some place where they're gonna coddle you or, or, or take the time or whatever, you know, like it's different.1 (39m 56s):The other thing is that like we, what I just hit me is that we've interviewed a ton of people and I'm trying to like think about like what does a conservatory do wrong is I think they forget that it's about entertainment. Like there becomes such a focus on process and inner work. What about the fucking entertainment value of like entertaining the audience? Like that goes out the window, which is why the shit is not funny most of the time. Cause it's like so serious, you're like, no, this is a fucking farse. Like make people laugh. Yeah. And it's like, I love that, that you're, you remind me of like an entertainer and I, I feel like I needed entertainment Conservatory.5 (40m 35s):Not, well I would say that, I mean I still use a lot of the training that I used at SMU like, like at Kitchen Dog. I mean this was founded by SMU grads. So you know, a lot of the doing table work and talking about what you want and all that kinda stuff like that is definitely part of what we do. But what was cool about Andre and I love and Des Shields with all my heart like was that you found a way to make your process work in his framework and, and he got results. Like the, our show was funny as hell, like in the singing was great, the dancing was great and it looked great cuz the Eckhart's did the costumes and all the sets and it felt like we were in a professional show.5 (41m 15s):Like it was, it was exciting and fun to do. So I thought it was a great way to kind of get ready for what it was gonna be like. Cuz I remember auditioning for the show and he was like, Where's your headshot? And we're like, nobody told us. And he's like, This is an audition, why don't you have, I don't understand why you don't have a headshot. And you're just, just like, oh God. Like, and it was embarrassing, you know? And then he was like, All right, I wanna do the, he's doing some improvy things in that in the thing and people couldn't get like, people were like, and he is like, just jump in man. And he was like fantastic. And you know, you get a call back and you're like, okay, I see how this works. So that was great. And we also had a lady named Eve Roberts, same thing. She was pretty brutal too in that, you know, if you weren't ready to go, she wasn't gonna baby you.5 (42m 1s):So she would just basically like you're oh, so you don't know your lines. Sit the fuck down, Sit down, who's ready to work? Cuz it was an audition class and she was a film actor with a lot of experience and it was auditions for both film and and stage. But she, if you weren't ready, but if you were ready, she would work you out. Like you would get a great workout, you'd leave with a great monologue. And so I was like, always be prepared for that, you know, cuz she will, she will, she will get you if you're not,2 (42m 27s):Honestly it really sounds like SMU did a much better job than most, most of what we hear about in terms of like getting real working actors and, and it's a tough thing. I I, you know, I don't really blame any school that doesn't, It's a tough thing if it's a working actor, then they're working, they don't have time to like commit to the, the, the school teaching schedule. But at the same time, like if you don't have any of that, then you are really, you're experiencing all that on the job. Which, you know, which is fine too. But it sounds like SMU did a better job of preparing for you, preparing you for a career.5 (42m 57s):I would say somewhat. Yeah. I mean there are things that I, you know, as, as I entered life because I was of the mind when I, when I graduated, I was really torn about whether or not to go to grad school or not. And I really didn't know cuz I really, I, and I still to this day have a split focus. Like I act and direct both in the, you know, in the theater. Like I do both. So I wasn't sure which way I wanted to go and you really had to decide to go to grad school. So I was like, you know, I'm gonna take a year off is what I decided. And I waited tables, lived life, you know, whatever, didn't even really do any theater or stuff.5 (43m 39s):But I tended to like work back at smu. So like they would have me come back and like I would sub in and cover like Del Moffitt who was the man who was the auditioner who auditioned me originally and his improv class. Like I'd come in and do cover him for a month if he went on sabbatical, you know, stuff like that. Or like, and I directed a couple main stages there. That was it. So I just decided end up, I started working more in Dallas and ended up just staying in Dallas. Dallas was not what I plan where I planned to stay. Like I kept in my mind, you know, thinking like I'm gonna move to Chicago. Like that was my dream was living in Chicago and because I guess I'm a tourist and stubborn and lazy, I don't know, sometimes you just start working and you're like, nah, just stay here.5 (44m 26s):I'm working and I can kind of do what I want. And then I got an agent and I was like, oh there's this part of the, you know, like I think in 95 or whatever, you know, cause I graduated in 91, so you just start working and then it's like, why do I want to go and start over? And it was just kind of a hard thing to do. Do I have regrets sometime about not doing Absolutely. Like sometimes I look back and I'm like, oh man. But as far as just preparing, I think it's just hard to get prepared. Cuz I think, like, I wish I left with like, and they're doing this now, which is great, but like left with more of like what's, you know, good, what's a good headshot? What's what, what, you know, how do you walking into a room, how do you handle it?5 (45m 7s):You know, like there's certain things that I feel like they could train and give you a little bit more experience, life experience in it. But I think they have some new, I know they have, I know they have film acting now, a little bit of film acting stuff there, which is always good just cuz that's how a lot of people make money.2 (45m 26s):I, I am, I'm happy to say because we've had, we've had this conversation so many times with people about the way that schools didn't prepare you. Somebody's been getting the message about this. My son is in high school and he goes to this like auxiliary performing arts program. It's like half day his regular high school and half day this and he does a seminar once a week on the business of music. And you know, what, what kind of jobs you're gonna have to do to keep, you know, to pay the rent while you're waiting between gigs, like is very brass tack. So, so the message has gotten through, thankfully.5 (45m 58s):Yeah, the business is important, man. That's how you survive. I mean, let's be real. I mean like that's, and it's not easy. Like if you're, like, if you're going to, I mean there's, sure there's two or three unicorns every so often, but for the most part you're gonna have to wait tables or cobble together bunch of odd jobs or cobble you know, like all these little, like, I'm a, I'm gonna do the Asop Fs in the, in the elementary schools for three weeks or whatever, you know, like, and how do you make rent? You know, like that's, it's not glamorous for sure.2 (46m 27s):So what was the journey from graduating to founding Kitchen Dog with your classmates?5 (46m 33s):I actually am not a founder. So Kitchen Dog was founded by five SMU MFA students who were in the MFA program when I was an undergrad. So I, so I ate that old, thank God, but they founded it in 90, did their first show in 91, which I saw it was above a, it was above a pawn shop in deep with no air conditioner in May. It was very hot and fantastic, you know, Maria Ford has his mud, it was great. And so I did my first show with them in 93. So a few years after I graduated, which Tim, my classmate directed, he had come back, he was in Minnesota at the time and then I've just worked with Kitchen Dog ever since.5 (47m 15s):So I became a company member in 96, started working for the company as like an admin producer type person in 99 and then became co-artistic director when the founding ad left in 2005. So I've been here forever. I do not have children. I say that Kitchen dog is my grown mean child. You're1 (47m 36s):Grown mean, did you say mean?5 (47m 38s):Yeah, I did say mean sometimes. Yeah, sometimes it's very, you know, temperamental.1 (47m 42s):Yeah, that's fine. That's, I mean, yeah, it's probably still better than kids, I'm just saying. Anyway. I mean, I don't have any, so, but okay, so what do you, this is what I always wanna ask people who have longstanding careers in theater and especially when they are co-artistic director or artistic director, why do you do it and why do you love it?5 (48m 6s):That's a really good question. I mean, it varies from time to time. I mean, I think that I, you know, Kitchen Dog has one of its tenants has always been about asking, you know, we do, we do, I hate the word edgy, but we do edgier plays, we do plays that are very much talking about the world around us. Challenging, you know, and we're in Texas, it's, you know, sort of purple state now, kind of exciting purple parts. At least Dallas is hopefully this election goes that way. So, you know, it's, we, I feel like our place in the Dallas Zeki is important because, you know, we're not doing, there are a lot of people that do traditional plays and do them well, you know, like straight ahead, you know, musicals or you know, the odd couple or whatever.5 (48m 53s):Notice this gesture, the odd couple and doing great. But we do new, we do newer plays. We're a founding member of the National New Play Network. And so that's kind of kept it relevant and kept it exciting. The work exciting to me. I love working with new plays and new ideas and we have a company of artists, some of which went to smu and I, I think I've stayed here this long because, you know, I feel like I can, I, I do, I am able to do the kind of work I wanna do. I'm able to choose the plays I wanna be in or direct and I feel like they're important for my community. And when it becomes that, it's not that then I need to leave or step downs is my feeling.5 (49m 37s):I mean, you know. Yeah, yeah. I dunno.2 (49m 40s):Yeah. So many people say that, that they, that they, they keep their allegiances to theater companies because it's, it's often the work that they really, you know, f feel moves them is very, you know, is very inspiring. But then you also got the opportunity to do a very good part in something that was commercial, which is breaking bad. So could you tell us anything about your, how you were born into that project?5 (50m 8s):Sure, sure. The, I, you know, I got an agent, did you know, I had no experience, no resume. So you did the couple of walk on, you know, like, I'm in the back of a bank commercial, fantastic. Or whatever, $50. I love it. Did that and Lucked into Robert Altman. Came to town and did a very terrible movie called Dr. T and the Women. But it was a fantastic experience and I was one of the nurses and I was on set every day pretty much. So he's told me, he told us, he's like, I'll make you a lot of money. You're not gonna be seen a lot. You'll be here every day. And we got out by five and I was able to do plays at night. Like it was, it was Chef's kiss the best, like you just kind of learned from the master.5 (50m 52s):Like he is a, he truly was a master god rest his soul. Anyway, so I started auditioning more, did some walkers cuz everybody does did Walker back in the time Walker, Texas Ranger. It's like1 (51m 2s):The er we'd all did the ER and the early ion in Chicago. That was my so walker, same thing. I love a good walker by the way, Texas Ranger.5 (51m 13s):So ridiculous. Yeah, I think one of my lines in one of the episodes I was in was like, you won't put this on your lighty friends tabs. Like it was so country. Anyway, it terrible. But so with the breaking bad thing, I, I read the sides. It actually was the, the person who was casting locals or whatever, not locals cuz it was shooting in New Mexico, but it was a woman in Tony Cobb Brock who was casting in Dallas. And so we got the sides, I got the call to come in and audition for it. I read it and I was like, you know, and this is the story I've told a lot, but it's the truth, which is I read it and I was like, It's gonna be a blonde, big boobs woman. Like that's what I thought when I read it, I was like, it's gonna be this.5 (51m 54s):That's what it's gonna be. Cuz there were a lot of jokes about boobs and you're killing me with that booty. Like there was a lot more to that scene. My first scene there was a lot more. So I was like, whatever. I was like, it's not, I'm, you know, I'm a plus size lady, I have brown hair, I have a, you know, deep voice. Like, oh well. So I was like, why do I feel good in, So I just wore, I remember I wore this Betsy Johnson dress that, cause I was kind of into Rocky Billy Swing at the time. This Betsy Johnson little dress with apples was real sexy and this little shrug and had my hair kind of fancy. And I was like, I'm wearing this. I don't give a shit. So I, I was like, I feel good in this, Who cares? So I walked in and there were a bunch of ladies that were blonde and had professional lady outfits on and I was like, Oh shit, I should have dressed like a secretary.5 (52m 38s):Why did I dress like this? Oh damn. And I was like, Okay, well whatever. It's, you're not, you're not gonna book this so who cares? Went in, I had a great audition, made Tony laugh and you know, it was what it was. And so I went away and I didn't hear anything for a while. So I was like, oh, I didn't book that. Oh well. And I was sitting in an audition for some commercial and I never booked commercials. I just don't, cuz I look one way and then my voice comes out and they're like, Oh, you can't play the young mom because you seem like Jeanine Garofalo or something. So your bite and smile is scary, ma'am. So I was waiting in the, waiting in the waiting room and my agent calls, or I got paged or, you know, cause it was that so long ago.5 (53m 23s):And she was like, Can you be on a plane in three hours? And luckily I wasn't doing a play at the time. And I said, Yeah, I can. And she's like, Well you booked it. You, you should go and so you should go home and pack and go to Southwests. And that was the story. And so I get there and you know, whatever found out that, you know, it's Bob and Kirk and start losing my mind and all this stuff. But what's crazy is, it's a crazy story. And then on when in season four finale, breaking bad spoiler alert, if you haven't watched it, but you're,2 (53m 52s):You're late if you haven't watched it. Like5 (53m 54s):It's, that's2 (53m 55s):On you.5 (53m 56s):Please watch it cuz I need, Mama needs to keep getting residuals. Cause she's, you know, not Yeah. But that final episode where I have a great scene with Brian Cranston. There's a, there was a podcast, Insider podcast, which I wasn't aware of, but they talked to Vince about, you know, Oh, who's she and how did you cast her? You know, cause this was my first like, actual scene, you know, like, boy, I don't, I have more than two lines. And he tells the story of like, and this, I just love this story, which is like, basically he had seen a lot of people that he didn't think was right. He wanted something. They kept showing him the same type and he was like, no, I I it needs to be something different. He's a different kind of guy. I wanted somebody who'd challenge him, you know, different looking. And the casting woman who had Kira, I can't remember her last name, but she had, you know, I'd auditioned for her a few times, been put on tape.5 (54m 43s):I don't know that it necessarily booked anything. She's like, Well there is this one girl, I think she's great. She's probably not right. I physically, she's prob I don't think she's right, but do you wanna see? And so he showed her and he was like, That's exactly what I want. And then I booked it. And so it's crazy. So you just never know. I mean I think that's the, I think that's the walkaway.1 (55m 2s):Okay. This is the,5 (55m 3s):This1 (55m 4s):Is the craziest thing. This is crazy. So I booked a show in New Mexico called Perpetual Grace. Kira cast it and Kira showed me to Steve Conrad, who's the showrunner in James Whitaker who was directing the episode. I looked nothing like the other people. My agent Casey called me and said, Can you get on a plane in three hours? You5 (55m 29s):Gonna1 (55m 29s):New Mexico? Same casting director, St. Kira,2 (55m 34s):The Kira, all these people, Kira,1 (55m 38s):Kira talk5 (55m 39s):Me. Well, and it's like that thing, you know, like you, you know, I think that's always the big takeaway, right? Is, is, and you know, and I, I think I read this not to feel like I'm fucking namedropping I'm not. But like, I read this I think in Brian's book too. But like, the thing is, is like all you can do is just like, just, they're calling you in for a reason. So you just have to say like, what is it in me? What's unique about me? That's this role? And lean into it and go for it in that regard because that's all you got. Like as soon as you start and I find myself doing this, I have to keep reminding myself, you know, to do this. Which is I'll read something like, oh it's this and try to play to what I think it is. Versus like, no, what is it in me?5 (56m 19s):That's this. And that's the thing I book when I do that, when I try to do the other other thing, you know? Totally. And start getting your own head.2 (56m 28s):The time5 (56m 28s):On here, God,2 (56m 30s):By the way, regarding name dropping, I never understand why anybody gets upset about that. I, it's like, well they're people that, you know, the people that you work with, they're people in your life. I mean, you're just saying their name. It's, it's not like you're cloud chasing. But anyway, that, that's insight. Girl. Walk me back to this day where you take three hours to get on the airplane. I wanna know how fast did you have to rush home to pack? What did you do? Did you have enough stuff? What was it like when you were on the airplane? Did you order a drink because you felt so fancy? Tell us everything.5 (56m 57s):Well, all I know is I had a bag and I got, I ran home, I had a roommate at the time, thank God. And I just said, Can you feed my cat? Cause I, I had a cat at the time. I was like, Please feed Loretta. And so I got this bag and just threw, it was really like, just stuff thrown in and I was like, do I need to bring the dress and shoes that I wore that, So I brought the whole outfit cuz I was like, cuz the jobs, some of the jobs I'd been on, I had to bring my own shit or whatever, you know, you have to bring your whole wardrobe and be like, Oh you want none of this? Great, I'll put it all back in my car. So I just threw that in there and then I just threw some random, I don't even know what I packed and, you know, ran to the airport, got on the plane, I think I did have a jack and coat cuz I was just like, I'm so freaked out in the plane.5 (57m 43s):Of course you know, you're going to New Mexico, so you're going over those mountains and you're just like, okay, I'm gonna die also great, but I don't wanna die. I just booked a big job or whatever. And then I remember the landing and getting in the van thing and they took me straight to the hotel and I, I remember opening cuz they, back then they, you know, you would get like your sides in an envelope like that in the, in the later years. That shit never, you never got printed stuff ever because people would steal it and whatever else. So I remember pulling it out and seeing Bob's name and freaking, oh, cause I was a huge Mr.5 (58m 23s):Show fan and I was just like, oh my god, oh my god. And I just remember calling my fr I have a friend Aaron Ginsburg, who's kind of an LA Hollywood dude or whatever. And I was like, Oh my god, oh my god. And he was like, Thanks for this spoiler. And I was like, Oh shit, I'm not supposed to tell people. And I was like, but I'm freaking out. And he was like, No, no, it's okay. I will tell no one. I was like, don't tell anyone I don't wanna get fired. But yeah, so I just remember sitting there and freaking out and trying to look at my lines and, you know, what am I, oh God. And then going there with my clo my little bag of dresses or whatever and they're like, we don't want any of this crap.2 (58m 57s):They're like, this is a high budget show. We got, we got costumes covered5 (59m 1s):Back then. I don't, I know back then, I don't know if they were that high budget, but it was interesting to me. The one thing is, is just how involved the showrunners of that show Peter and or Vince at the time, and then later Peter and Vince. But like, they have a color palette they have where they want the characters to go. Like I had, you know, that it got really paired down. I ended up having like, you know, just a few lines. But they took so many pictures, different outfits, different setups and like different color tones, like just setting what they wanted for my character. And I was like, holy shit or whatever. And they were, everybody was so, and everybody was so nice and friendly.5 (59m 43s):It's really remember your name to hear1 (59m 45s):And I'm glad you talked about it. Oh, I'm gonna, I'm, I'm in the rainstorm. So sorry. But like, it's so weird to be, I'm in the Midwest right now and I live in la so coming back here, I'm like, what is that noise? It's fucking fucked up and it's the fucking rain. Anyway, so what is so beautiful about this story to me is that even if we feel small, right? Like whatever, these people who are creating these iconic shows have such vision. There is literally no small character. Like these are their children and they have arcs they have. So it just makes me appreciate as creators, as artists, how much time love, energy goes into characters and storylines.1 (1h 0m 31s):And then we see maybe, maybe if we're lucky one eighth of it, but just know like the shit matters. Right? Like a5 (1h 0m 39s):Thousand percent. And that's the same thing with like, the same thing with Robert Altman. I mean like we were, you know, he, you know, I got to be part of one of those ma his signature long tracking shots, right? He, he would walk in the room and be like, Okay, what's going on in here? So what are you guys doing? What are you, what's happening? And I was like, Well where this, that? And he's like, Great, keep that. And when I come across I want you to be in this moment. You know? So like, and he's like, Teen are things like where he's following on my shoulder and Tina, I need you to do this and this is what's happening. And I've tried, I want, I'm just gonna think about some lines, just throw these out. You know? It was just, I don't know. And that's the same thing with Vince and with Peter. Like, they were really like, what is she wearing? Why is she wearing this? Where are you? Like, you know, what's going on?5 (1h 1m 19s):And like they were like, the scripts were so good. It was like you had to be letter perfect. Barry's like, oh it's a lot of improv. And I'm like, no,1 (1h 1m 26s):No. But2 (1h 1m 26s):Also it sounded like theater, the attention to, to detail and the, and the sort of like the vision and the way that, and you, that just comes through in the best series. The A tours you, you know, that they've thought about and5 (1h 1m 38s):They all love2 (1h 1m 38s):Theater, right? Yeah, right.5 (1h 1m 39s):They all love theater. They all do.2 (1h 1m 41s):So a bit ago you said something about how the, like lustiness that Saul, you know, Jimmy feels for Francesca didn't, you know, necessarily a lot of that didn't necessarily make it into at least your first episode, but it got revisited and Better Call Saul. And I really appreciated that because I was like, Oh yeah, I, I would've wanted to see more of that. You know, I, I wanted to see more of that like lush stage dynamic. But you had,5

Seriously…
Music to Scream to - The Hammer Horror Soundtracks

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 29:00


Curse of the Werewolf, The Brides of Dracula, Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell – films from the height of Hammer Films' prolific output in the late 1950s and 1960s. Many of the horrific music soundtracks, carefully calibrated to set the pulse racing, were composed by leading British modernists of the late 20th century. Hammer's music supervisor Philip Martell hired the brightest young avant-garde composers of the day – the likes of Malcolm Williamson (later Master of the Queen's Music), Elisabeth Lutyens, Benjamin Frankel and Richard Rodney Bennett made a living scoring music to chill the bones to supplement their concert hall work. Prising open Dracula's coffin to unearth the story of Hammer's modernist soundtracks, composer and pianist Neil Brand explores the nuts and bolts of scary music – how it is designed to psychologically unsettle us – and explores why avant-garde music is such a good fit for horror. On his journey into the abyss, Neil visits the haunted mansion where many of the Hammer classics were made, at Bray Studios in Berkshire, and gets the low-down from Hammer aficionado Wayne Kinsey, film music historian David Huckvale, composer Richard Rodney Bennett, and one of Hammer's on-screen scream queens, actress Madeline Smith. Producer: Graham Rogers

Undaunted.Life: A Man's Podcast
377 - YouTube Censoring Us, Banning Pit Bulls, Tears from Jordan Peterson, & More

Undaunted.Life: A Man's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 95:18


In this episode, we detail why our show has been censored by YouTube. We will then rapidly go through some of the biggest headlines and news stories from the last couple of months. Also, in our Quick Hitters segment, we'll discuss Jordan Peterson going viral for getting upset when asked by Piers Morgan if he is the intellectual hero to incels, California Governor Gavin Newsom putting the words of Jesus on billboards across the US to convince people to come to California to kill their children, Pastor John MacArthur writing an open letter to Governor Newsom calling him to repentance, and two pit bulls mauling a 2-year-old girl and a 5-month-old boy to death and almost killing their mother. Then, Kyle will provide his arguments for why pit bulls should be completely banned. Let's get into it… Go to the ORIGIN website to check out the full line of Origin and Jocko Fuel products: Gis, jeans, boots, protein, energy drinks, supplements, and much more. Use the promo code KYLE to get 10% off your order! Go to KC CATTLE COMPANY Wagyu steaks, wagyu roasts, pasture raised chicken, pasture raised Berkshire pork, wagyu bacon cheeseburger bratwurst, world famous wagyu gourmet hot dogs, and more. www.kccattlecompany.com Use the promo code KYLE to get 15% off your order! Episode notes and links HERE Donate to support our mission of equipping men to push back darkness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices