Podcasts about Roscoe

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 469PODCASTS
  • 1,040EPISODES
  • 56mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Roscoe

Show all podcasts related to roscoe

Latest podcast episodes about Roscoe

Giving A Purpose Podcast
Councilmember Robert White

Giving A Purpose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 13:34


We had the opportunity to talk with  At Large Councilmember Robert White.  In October Councilmen Robert White Anounced he is running for Mayor of DC. Robert graduated from Archbishop Carroll High School in Washington DC and attended St. Mary's College of Maryland, earning degrees in Philosophy and Political Science and completing additional studies at Oxford University in England and in The Gambia, West Africa. Robert earned his law degree from the American University Washington College of Law.In 2008, Robert went to the United States Congress to serve as Legislative Counsel to Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton. He served as a lead staffer on congressional oversight hearings related to DC and helped draft legislation to loosen Congress' grip on the DC government and to give greater autonomy and independence to DC residents.In 2014, Robert was tapped by Attorney General Karl A. Racine to serve as the first Director of Community Outreach for the DC Office of the Attorney General. There, Robert worked to design and execute a blueprint for community engagement with a focus on improving services and supports for the city's most vulnerable residents.As Chair of the Board of Metropolitan Washington COG Board from 2018-2019, Robert was proud to be part of a historical COG Board – the first time having all African-American and all women Corporate Officers. He recalls a proud moment when a 2019 COG resolution passed, committing the region to produce at least 320,000 housing units between 2020 and 2030. The result was an additional 75,000 units beyond the units already forecast for this period. The Board worked with elected officials, housing directors, the private sector, and nonprofits to combat the region's housing shortfall.Robert and his wife, Christy, an attorney with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, reside in Ward 4 with their daughters, Madison and Monroe, and rescue pit bull, Roscoe. They attend St. Martin's Catholic Church. Robert loves spending time with his family, reading, and riding his motorcycle.

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #158: The Neurophysiology of Peak Performance w/ Dr. Leslie Sherlin

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 53:01


Leslie Sherlin, PhD is a licensed associate counselor and sport & performance psychology consultant to dozens of athletes, teams and individuals. Dr. Sherlin has had an extensive career in providing patient services, academic research and instruction, and entrepreneurial endeavors in mental health care. He is one of the world's leading experts and a leader in the research and use of neuroscience for improving human performance. He has led research partnerships with Red Bull North America's High-Performance Center, USA Track & Field, US military Special Operations Forces, local and federal level law enforcement agencies, Fortune 500 companies and professional teams in multiple sports in many countries.  He has published this work in the academic literature and has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, BBC, Sports Illustrated, CNN, ESPN, CBS, Popular Science, Outdoor Magazine and more.https://drsherlin.comListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com"Disclaimer: This podcast is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice. Content provided on this podcast is for informational purposes only. Please, consult with a healthcare professional regarding any individualized medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options."

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #157: Cultivating Self-Efficacy w/ Dr. James Maddux

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 39:55


James E. Maddux is University Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and Senior Scholar at the Center for the Advancement of Well-Being at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science.https://psychology.gmu.edu/people/jmadduxhttps://www.amazon.com/James-E.-Maddux/e/B073SB5WHZ%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_shareListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com"Disclaimer: This podcast is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice. Content provided on this podcast is for informational purposes only. Please, consult with a healthcare professional regarding any individualized medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options."

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #156: Mindfulness for Parents & Children w/ Shahin Najak

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 40:53


Shahin Najak is a Certified Mindfulness Meditation Coach for parents, teachers and caregivers.   Her passion lies in supporting adults and children, particularly parents and teenagers, in bringing back the joy and connection, building better relationships using mindfulness skills proven to increase self-esteem and self-acceptance.You don't need to sit on the floor to practice mindfulness….download Shahin's guide to three simple and effective mindfulness practices you can do anywhere: https://www.mindful-changes.com/how-to-practice-mindfulness-downloadListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com"Disclaimer: This podcast is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice. Content provided on this podcast is for informational purposes only. Please, consult with a healthcare professional regarding any individualized medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options."

Uncensored Advice For Men
Fixing Your Brain w/ Toby Pasman

Uncensored Advice For Men

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:17


Toby Pasman is a neurophysiology researcher who graduated from the University of Oregon in 2018 with a Bachelor's degree in Psychology and completed his Masters of Psychology through Lynn University in 2021. Toby has board certifications in neurofeedback along with QEEG brain mapping. Toby is the founder of Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro, an applied neuroscience company offering premium brain health coaching to clients globally, along with targeted neuromodulation services to clients interested in peak cognitive performance in the Miami-Ft. Lauderdale area. Toby is also the host of the applied neuroscience show Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast, which features unfiltered conversations with clinicians, researchers, and neuroscientists. Website: http://www.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com/uncensoredadviceformen Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736 Instagram: @RoscoesWetsuitNeuro, Twitter: @WetsuitPodcast, YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/roscoeswetsuitneuro

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #155: Neuroplasticity & Brain Retraining w/ Ben Ahrens

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 50:05


Ben Ahrens is passionate about healing, recovery, and human optimization - and how people can take control of their own mental/physical health in the simplest of ways by using the most sophisticated tool they already possess - the human brain. He's been a high-performance athlete as well as chronically ill & bed-bound for years on end.After his “miraculous recovery” he traveled the globe and worked for 8 years (as executive vice president at Innovative Medicine) seeking out and studying with the best medical, neuroscience, and human performance experts. He's spent every waking moment for the past two decades exploring the boundaries of our potential - and what he found is astonishing: When you learn to access the control panel of your mind, the potential for healing is limitless!Listen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com"Disclaimer: This podcast is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice. Content provided on this podcast is for informational purposes only. Please, consult with a healthcare professional regarding any individualized medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options."

The Steve Harvey Morning Show
White Jury Issues, Scottie Pippen, Astroworld Fallout, Roscoe VS Q and more.

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 104:44


Good morning and welcome to the ride! That "Big T" include everybody. The Chief Love Officer is trying to save a well educated thundercat's life because his thought process is emanating from the wrong side of the belt. Travis Scott has much to deal with from Astroworld's fallout. Unguarded is Scottie Pippen's new book that is out today. Steve breaks down the actualities of the jury selection process and how gamesmanship at a certain point may take precedence. The is a conspiracy against the pimp! Big thank you to Juicy B. from Charlotte for the sarcasm and colorful opinion on Steve's voicemail! Would You Rather got some residual anger in it today. The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree has been chosen! Today in Closing Remarks, Steve tells us "don't settle" and why. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Feedback with EarBuds
Podcast Recommendations on Love and Meaning

Feedback with EarBuds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 31:03


Welcome to Feedback with EarBuds, the podcast recommendation podcast. Our newsletter brings you five podcast recommendations each week according to a theme, and curated by a different person. Our podcast is an audio version of the newsletter.Subscribe to the newsletter: eepurl.com/cIcBuHThis week's theme is Love and Meaning. The curator is Naomi Kenrick.Why did Naomi choose this theme? She writes: As a mother of three small children living through an intensely challenging time, I have thought a lot about meaning and motherhood and identity and what it means to love and feel safe in a complex world.Thank you to our sponsors, The In Between Newsletter and the WTF To Listen To newsletter.In Between Newsletter: https://inbetweennewsletter.substack.com/p/coming-soon?showWelcome=trueWTF To Listen To: https://www.wtftolistento.com/Links mentioned in this episode:- Twitter Podcasting Community: https://twitter.com/i/communities/1453879399917375491- How To Do The Pot: https://dothepot.com/- SquadCast.fm: http://www.squadcast.fm/- The Midnight Bar: https://themidnightbar.buzzsprout.com/On Feedback with EarBuds, you'll hear an interview between our host, Arielle Nissenblatt, and someone doing something interesting in the podcast space. Then, you'll hear about this week's podcast picks being featured on our newsletter.Find this week's podcast recommendation list here: https://www.earbudspodcastcollective.org/love-and-meaning-podcast-recommendationsThis week, Arielle speaks with Ellen Scanlon, host of the podcast How To Do The Pot.About Ellen: Ellen Lee Scanlon is co-creator and host of How to Do the Pot. She comes to cannabis with experience in startups, women's health, and financial services. Ellen uses cannabis for stress, sleep, to treat symptoms of Endometriosis, and to relax. This week's podcast picks from Naomi on Love and Meaning:Modern LoveHeavyweightInvisibiliaGravityWe Can Do Hard ThingsThis week's spotlight: Molly Whiskers and the Blue Tentacle, a new podcast from friend of EarBuds Mark SteadmanPrivate detective Molly has an eye for detail and a strong moral compass. She's also a rabbit. Her newest case involves a number of disappearing hamsters, but hot on their trail are Roscoe and Bailey, two of Fogsworth's finest police detectives...who, it should be mentioned, are cats. Listen: https://twitter.us15.list-manage.com/track/click?u=23dcd7a2c6f1281f17223e7b9&id=0cd0318215&e=08cb7bdbd6Apply to have your podcast spotlit: https://www.earbudspodcastcollective.org/podcast-spotlightsEarBuds Blog: https://www.earbudspodcastcollective.org/blogCurate a list here: https://www.earbudspodcastcollective.org/earbuds-podcast-curators-formFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/EarbudsPodColFollow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/earbudspodcastcollectiveFollow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/earbudspodcastcollective/Learn more at our website: http://www.earbudspodcastcollective.orgTee Public: https://www.teepublic.com/user/earbuds-podcast-collective

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #154: Integrating Psychotherapy & Neurofeedback w/ Glenn Weiner, Ph.D.

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 47:28


Dr. Glenn Weiner is a licensed clinical psychologist who added neurofeedback to his practice in 1999. He's presented a number of times for ISNR and BCIA, as well as the Dead of Winter conferences on a variety of topics, including integrating psychotherapy and neurofeedback, introduction to QEEG, treatment protocol development, child neurotherapy, home neuromodulation, progress monitoring, and deep stage training. He wrote a chapter on Integrating Psychotherapy & Neurofeedback, which appeared in the Handbook of QEEG and Neurotherapy.https://www.biofeedbackforthebrain.comListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com"Disclaimer: This podcast is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice. Content provided on this podcast is for informational purposes only. Please, consult with a healthcare professional regarding any individualized medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options."

Lyric Lounge Podcast
Quality Control

Lyric Lounge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 79:43


The guys are back in the lounge and they start off by discussing Meek Mill's contract issues as he makes claims of not being paid from his music. They then speak on a number of artist doing extra things to promote music besides actually focusing on the music. Roscoe & Ralph give their thoughts on Wale's Folarin 2 album and more!!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Attendance Bias
8/16/96: The Clifford Ball, Day 1 @ Plattsburgh Air Force Base w/Scott Barsamian

Attendance Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 67:48


Hi everybody and welcome to this week's episode of Attendance Bias. I am your host, Brian Weinstein. This week's guest is fan and teacher, Scott Barsamian. Scott contacted me a while ago about discussing Phish's first large-scale festival, The Clifford Ball. Now, when an Attendance Bias guest chooses a festival, I always get hesitant. Phish festivals are so big, they loom so large in the imagination, and in reality, I am intimidated to take them on for an hour-long discussion. But once the guest and I talk for a bit, we narrow down the highlights and figure out the best way to approach the show. For today's episode, Scott chose to talk about the first day of the festival, August 16, 1996, and he picked one song from each of the three sets.Nowadays, we know exactly what to expect when Phish throws a festival. But in 1996, everything was brand new. My favorite part of this conversation was hearing about Scott's expectations as he traveled to the festival. Phish hadn't done anything on this scale before. What would they pull off? In 2021, we have the benefit of hindsight but in 1996, it was a surprise to all, probably including the band. Also, throughout today's conversation, you may hear from two special guests. That would be my dog, Duncan, and Scott's dog, Roscoe, who couldn't help but contribute.So let's join Scott Barsamian to hear about the drive to Plattsburgh, Trey's tone from 1996, and a confounding “Harpua” encore as we discuss Phish's performance on 8/16/96, day 1 of the Clifford Ball at the Plattsburgh Air Force Base in New York.

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #152: Food Sensitivities, External Pathogens & Shamanic Medicine w/ Dr. Emily Rowe

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:24


Dr. Emily Rowe graduated from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in 2004. After a brief time in the field of Internal Medicine, she became frustrated with the Western approach to illness. She realized that she was being trained to treat the symptoms of disease and its end-stage complications, while failing to address its root cause.Inspired to find a comprehensive and definitive way to heal her patients, she went back to school and completed her Master's Degree in Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture in 2009. Dr. Rowe's practice melds Chinese herbal medicine and therapies (acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping) with modern Western diagnostic evaluations, nutritional supplementation, dietary and lifestyle modifications. https://www.miamibeachcwc.comListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com"Disclaimer: This podcast is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice. Content provided on this podcast is for informational purposes only. Please, consult with a healthcare professional regarding any individualized medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options."

Juggling the Chaos of Recovery
All about the Brain: Toby Passman share about brain mapping and neurostimulation and how this helps those who struggle.

Juggling the Chaos of Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 44:27


Toby Passman joins me today at talk all about the brain. It's  pretty fascinating conversation about a non invasive way of helping the brain. We have a pretty great conversation about neuoplasticity  Toby Pasman is the founder of Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro and host of the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast. He is a neurophysiology researcher with a Master's of Psychology from Lynn University and is board-certified in QEEG Brain Mapping and EEG Neurofeedback. Toby enjoys paddle boarding along the intracoastal, biking through the surrounding islands of Miami, and engaging in deep, intellectual conversations. This is a fascinating and Toby does a really great job explaining how all this works. There are certain ways to change the brain activity.  You can learn more about Toby and how he helps here through his website.  I mentioned the episode with Cindy Shaw about Better brain health.  .......... The Journey to Joy Journal is available now.  My journal is available . Do you journal? Listen to the episode to hear how journaling helped me.  And order your today here. Thank you for listening today.  -------------------------------- Wondering what supplements might be best for you ? Take this FREE health QUIZ  --------------------------- Like this podcast ? Want to support it?  Buy me a cup of coffee here. https://www.buymeacoffee.com/juggling   Give it a 5 start review, subscribe and share . Thank you !  Join me on Facebook in my Juggling the Chaos of Recovery tribe  Like what you hear about Shaklee products?  Find it here on my website  Book some time on my calendar for a Discovery Call Here. Have a story to share?  I'd love to feature you as a guest on my podcast.  Click through this link and find the application and schedule  Let's keep sharing the great word of recovery and wellness  

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #151: The Rise of Holistic & Integrative Healthcare w/ Dr. Justin Newman

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:47


Dr. Justin Newman, noted author and holistic innovator, is a pre-med graduate of the University of Miami, and has been a licensed primary care physician specializing in traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, and holistic healthcare for over 25 years. He is the medical director and founder of the Banyan Holistic in Miami, Florida. Dr. Newman founded The Banyan Holistic to further enrich the community by developing a spa-integrated healthcare center that empowers its clientele. Its unique design promotes health and harmony on every level – physical, emotional, mental, social, and spiritual. It is a modernized, reimagined innovation based on time tested and proven systems. Dr. Newman has cultivated professional relationships with healthcare professionals in many fields, so that the vision of The Banyan can be truly integrated within the mainstream.http://thebanyanholistic.comListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Ubiquitous Growth
Ubiquitous Growth 131 "In Tune"

Ubiquitous Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 14:21


One hundred and thirty first Episode released on 10/22/2021. Happy Friday UG Fam! Been a little bit, but I was traveling and wanted to enjoy that time with my friends. I went to Boise, Idaho to see my brother from another mother Roscoe! He graduated from BSU so I went out there to see him and celebrate that since I couldn't attend the actual graduation ceremony later this year. The trip was fun and I touch on it some in this episode. I also talk about the season change which I've noticed immensely since I've returned to Oregon. It's like I'm seeing things in slow motion and staring at a magnificent piece of art as I see the leaves change to the plethora of burnt colors. It's allowed me to do great reflection and feel really in tune with the change going on around me. I talk about how when you're this in tune, it usually means big change is coming in your life because you're noticing the change around you more. Second, I chose to drive to Boise instead of fly and I talk about this being a hack for more solid reflection time and deep work if you want it to be. I've done this a few times on certain trips and gotten a lot out of it. Can be something you try if you are seeking more growth. The book I'm listening to (not reading) talks about going into isolation to really tap into that deep work that will put you in a state of flow. Last, I received a random phone call from a lady named Judy whom I told a story about on this pod a couple years ago. Unfortunately, I could tell the pain in her voice from the jump. Judy's husband's health is failing and failing quickly. This is a terrible situation that I think we all fear. Growing old with a person you love and watching them fade quicker than you. Please keep Judy in your thoughts and prayers. While this was hard to hear from Judy in such a negative light. I don't think for one second there isn't further meaning behind why I'm getting this phone call at this particular time in my own life. I'm pulling more from it because it correlates to the vision I have running in my head. So some out of the blue things, really aren't out of the blue. They are reminders. Keep pushing. Thank y'all for the continued support. Still thrilled to be bringing you more content and I appreciate any and all feedback. Continuing to use my voice to spread growth to the world in my own way. Today's episode touches on the following topics: 1. When you feel more in tune and in touch with your surroundings it's probably a sign that big change is coming 2. Don't always fly when traveling if it's a close enough trip 3. Some out of the blue things are not out of the blue, they are reminders Audio Book: Deep Work by Cal Newport on Audible #BlackLivesMatter #StopAsianHate --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-manns/support

Unprivileged Drinkers
Roscoe's Triple Hazy

Unprivileged Drinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:34


Join us this week episode as we gather and enjoy an exclusive Triple Hazy IPA from Attic Brewery that was dedicated to Rasheed Wallace.  Support the show (https://cash.app/$unprivilegeddrinkers)

Getting Smart Podcast
Dr. Kim Alexander and Alton Frailey on Rural Innovation

Getting Smart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:16


Be sure to sign up for our Smart Update newsletter to get a weekly round up of what's innovative in learning.  On this episode of the Getting Smart Podcast Nate McClennen is joined by Kim Alexander and Alton Frailey from Collegiate Edu Nation (CEN).  Kim is the CEO of Collegiate Edu Nation and has spent most of his career at Roscoe Independent School District where he served as superintendent from 2003 to 2019 before transitioning to lead CEN. Kim has done so much in Roscoe to promote early college and STEM to support disadvantaged rural students. Alton has been in the education world for 35 years, serving as a superintendent for two districts in Texas and one in Ohio. Alton is involved in numerous boards and community organizations both locally and nationally. and He is currently President of Alton L. Frailey & Associates, LLC, specializing in leadership development, community engagement, school board team building, and executive coaching. Let's listen in as they discuss rural innovation in Texas schools and more about CEN. 

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #150: QEEG Brain Mapping & EEG Neurofeedback w/ Dr. Joel Lubar

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 67:01


In the 150th episode of the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast, we have an interview recorded in 2019 with Dr. Joel Lubar, a pioneer in EEG Neurofeedback and QEEG Brain Mapping research.Dr. Lubar was responsible for developing the use of EEG Biofeedback (Neurofeedback) as a treatment modality for children, adolescents, and adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, starting with his controlled studies in the mid-1970's. This application of Neurofeedback is now becoming widespread in clinics and schools throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, Israel, Europe and Mexico. Currently, more than 1500 health care organizations are using the EEG biofeedback protocols that Dr. Lubar has developed.Dr. Lubar is currently developing databases for the assessment of individuals with ADD/ADHD, and is a consulting in several controlled studies evaluating the effectiveness of Neurofeedback. In a 1992 publication, in Pediatric Neurology, he and his colleagues showed, for the first time, that children with the inattentive form of ADD (without hyperactivity), differ significantly in terms of quantitative EEG patterns, from matched control non-ADD children.Listen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!
Episode 246: Hack your brain with neuromodulation with Toby Pasman

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 25:27


In this episode of Oh My Heath ... There's HOPE! Jana talks with Toby Pasman   Toby is a neurophysiology researcher who runs a neuroscience/biohacking show called Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast. Toby is board certified in neurofeedback and QEEG brain mapping and has trained the brains of Hollywood actors and high-profile CEOs.   He also runs an applied neuroscience company, Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro, which offers premium brain health coaching to clients globally, along with targeted neuromodulation services to clients in South Florida.   “You regularly workout your body at the gym to obtain optimal health; why not start taking your brain to the gym as well?”   Jana and Toby talk about: 1) Neuro Technology and the changes in your brain 2) What is EEG and QEEG and how does it relate to you 3) Retraining the brain through biofeedback in realtime 4) Improving and enhancing your brain at any stage of your life 5) Intermittent Fasting for brain health shows tremendous benefits to the brain 6) Exercise to improve your BDF in the brain   This 30-minute episode is on: In this Episode, Jana and Toby Discuss Neuro Technology and the changes in your brain; what exactly is an EEG and QEEG? How does it relate to you? Retraining the brain through biofeedback. Ways you can start supporting your brain health.   Meet Toby Pasman: https://roscoeswetsuitneuro.com/ https://www.instagram.com/roscoeswetsuitneuro/ https://www.facebook.com/roscoeswetsuitpodcast/?ref=pages_you_manage https://www.linkedin.com/in/tobypasman/   Discount code: Use code ROSCOES21 to receive 15% off your first brain health coaching call! https://roscoeswetsuitneuro.com/booking Get in touch with Jana and listen to more Podcasts: https://www.janashort.com/   Show Music ‘Hold On' by Amy Gerhartz https://www.amygerhartz.com/music.   Free Gift: Free Subscription to Best Holistic Life Magazine: https://www.bestholisticlife.com/  Connect with Jana Short: https://www.janashort.com/contact/

Cold Steel: Canadian Journal of Surgery Podcast
E97 Masterclass with Daryl Gray on Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs)

Cold Steel: Canadian Journal of Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 77:48


On this episode we had a masterclass on gastrointestinal neuroendorine tumors by endocrine and trauma surgeon Dr. Daryl Gray. Dr. Gray is an associate professor Western in London, Ontario, and is possibly one of the most interesting people in the world. We explore his life, his experience being the father of a teen TV star, and of course his passion, neuroendocrine tumors. Links: 1. The surgeons: https://www.amazon.com/The-Surgeons/dp/B01J2P4QEE 2. Max & shred: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3946016/ 3. ROSCOE magazine: https://cags-accg.ca/about/cags-magazine-roscoe/read-the-digital-issue-of-roscoe/ 4. Roscoe R. Graham: An enduring legacy in the 21st century. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27806000/

The Love Ark
The Love Ark, Ep. 5: "Clausgiving"

The Love Ark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:19


It's “The Love Boat” on Noah's Ark! “The Love Ark” is a scripted comedy podcast based on the Noah's Ark story, in the style of “The Love Boat.” Romance! Miracles! Murder! And two of each animal. Episode 5: “Clausgiving” It's Christmas!...in a few thousand years. But when Santa Claus lands on the Ark, holiday cheer turns ugly as Noah learns the true meaning of Santa's visit. Sparks fly between Ham and Rudolph, while Naameh and Japheth attempt to help Noah make better decisions. This week's special guest star is Ryan Hurst (The Walking Dead, Sons of Anarchy)! Cast LEON RUSSOM.....Noah ALICYN PACKARD.....Naameh DEREK MEHN.....Ham and Donner the Reindeer WILL MILES.....Japheth NICK TURNER.....Shem MOLLY HAWKEY.....Marilyn LAUREN VAN KURIN.....Babs the Chicken, Lisa the Gorilla, and Blitzen the Reindeer SCOTT GOLDEN.....Roscoe the Parrot, Rudolph the Reindeer, Frank the Unicorn, Drunk Panda, and Announcer With Special Guest RYAN HURST as Santa Claus Written, produced, directed, and edited by JONAS OPPENHEIM Music composed and performed by ZACHARY BERNSTEIN The Love Ark theme sung by MICHAEL LANAHAN Sound Designer JAIME ROBLEDO Foley Artist MONIQUE REYMOND Foley Mixer ROBERTO ALEGRIA Foley FX TRANSPARENT SOUND Additional material by ED GOODMAN, RAY OLSON, & NICK TURNER Recorded at the M1-5 West recording studio by RILEY GEARE Additional Engineering FRANCESCO CARROZZO Legal Services DAVID MAYES Graphic Design SHARON LEVY Special Thanks #1 BEST WRITERS GROUP BOB DEROSA COLIN MCGINN CHRIS NOLD CORA OLSON BEN ROCK LYRA SMITH ERIC WEN DIANE & COSIMO Headphones recommended! Instagram, Twitter, & TikTok: @lovearkpodcast For episode transcriptions or other questions, please email lovearkpodcast@gmail.com New episodes every Monday! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/love-ark-podcast/message

Death of the Reader
Murder on the Way! by Theodore Roscoe - Part Three

Death of the Reader

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 30:00


We discuss chapters 1-14 of Theodore Roscoe's Murder on the Way! Edited by Jim Noy of The Invisible Event and In GAD We Trust. An unfortunate adventure into the Haitian wilderness results in Cart buried alive, it seems our tale is over. Fortunately for Cart, it turns out Pete Dale was the detective all along, and we end up in a tempestuous confrontation with our killer in the mansion after her daring rescue. How petty will Jim Noy be with the points he was offered? Find out in this thrilling conclusion to a bewildering pulp tale.

Neurotic Nourishment
Neurotic Nourishment Patreon Episode 4: Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro: How to trick your brain into being better behaved

Neurotic Nourishment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 40:56


Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro: How to trick your brain into being better behaved Toby Pasman is a neurophysiology researcher and founder of Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro, an applied neuroscience that uses tech to improve the way your brain works its magical cognitive and emotional functions. Toby created a complimentary "Six Steps to Better Cognitive Performance '' PDF that our listeners can receive if they sign up for his newsletter list at roscoeswetsuitneuro.com. Toby also created the special promo code "NEUROTIC21" that listeners can use to get 15% off their first Neuro Health Coaching session if you decide to sign up! You can find more information at roscoeswetsuitneuro.com/neuroticnourishment. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/neuroticnourishment/support

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #149: NAD+ Therapy for Addictions, Wellness & Anti-Aging w/ Dr. Ken Starr

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:31


Dr. Ken Starr is an authority in the field of Addiction Medicine and Wellness. Since founding the Ken Starr MD Wellness Group in 2012 after the overdose death of his brother, he has been committed to helping patients achieve lasting sobriety and improve the quality of their lives. Dr. Starr utilizes medications, supplements, traditional and non-traditional therapies that help people overcome chemical dependency and live the lives they know are possible.Dr. Starr's passion about NAD therapy has enabled his clinic to become the most experienced provider of NAD treatments on the West Coast. He has introduced nutritional IV Infusions into the practice so all patients can affordably and comfortably work towards their wellness goals.Dr. Starr is board certified in both Addiction Medicine and Emergency Medicine. He takes a personal and compassionate interest in each of his patients and is easily available for patients and their families at all times.Listen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

SC Democrat Podcast
Episode 139 Headlines 10/4-10/8/21

SC Democrat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 5:59


Headlines from the pages of the Sullivan County Democrat for the week of 10/4-10/8/21 SUNY Sullivan discusses vaccine rates, enrollment March for reproductive rights comes to Narrowsburg Anne Hart elected chair of SCDC Mural to grace Environmental Education Centermmm District Attorney's office understaffed Thompson starts 2022 budget Fire Prevention Week kicks off in Roscoe

No Rain... No Rainbows
164: Build an Awesomely Fun Life! with Braden Wallake

No Rain... No Rainbows

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:24


"When you're in the moment, the serendipity of life happens so much more." -Braden    Braden Wallake went from being a college dropout to a B2B company CEO. How? He was not willing to sacrifice the fun of life to build his wealth. He held on to what ignited his passion despite a series of failures and disappointments. Eventually, he was able to craft a lifestyle that makes him happy and fulfilled. This week, Ted and Braden discuss why you should not allow a college degree to be the end of your learning, the value of commitment, and the importance of developing real-world skills. Braden also shares life lessons from their furry friend and Chief Fun Officer, Roscoe. Break the autopilot, live your life!  If your passion for something is lacking, you are definitely not made for that lifestyle. Tune in and discover the key to an amazingly fun life!  Connect with Ted:  Website Facebook  Twitter Instagram     LinkedIn YouTube Highlights:  02:55 From College Dropout to a B2B Company CEO 08:03 Enjoy the Journey NOW 13:42 The Value of Commitment 19:42 Live in the Moment 21:46 Specialist vs. Generalist 24:08 A Lesson from the Chief Fun Officer 31:01 Recap

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #148: Be FIERCE w/ Carolyn Colleen

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 44:10


Carolyn Colleen is a fierce mother of three children, author, international speaker, entrepreneur and business strategist focused on helping others achieve their goals. She is the founder of the FIERCE academy, an online program that helps women to create live strategies to help them create the life they dream of. She is also the author of F.I.E.R.C.E.: Transform Your Life in the Face of Adversity.https://www.carolyncolleen.comListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_whttps://roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Album ReBrews
Ep 29: Antisocialites - Alvvays (ft. Peter Balser)

Album ReBrews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 82:49


This is the first episode where we DON'T AWARD A REBREWSKI... This week, Peter Balser from the Guard The Bard podcast takes us through "Antisocialites" by Alvvays. We'll talk about the Blood Type Personality Theory, how the Lumineers ruined music, and resurrect Peter's spelling bee trauma. Zac's dog Roscoe is also in the room the entire time and is very good. Listen to Guard The Bard here.Stream Antisocialites by Alvvays here.Thank you to Cameron Bopp for editing our show and writing our theme song!You can find Album ReBrews on Instagram here and Twitter here. (@albumrebrews)TW/CW: Explicit language, brief sexual references, drug references, alcohol use and references.Fair Use Disclaimer: Under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education, and research.Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statutes that might otherwise be infringing.Logo Attribution: Thank you to Vecteezy for providing free vectors used as part of our podcast art. 

The Love Ark
The Love Ark, Ep. 4: "The Ark Monkey Trial"

The Love Ark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:43


It's “The Love Boat” on Noah's Ark! “The Love Ark” is a scripted comedy podcast based on the Noah's Ark story, in the style of “The Love Boat.” Romance! Miracles! Murder! And two of each animal. Episode 4: “The Ark Monkey Trial” As Noah imposes strict rules on the Ark, a couple of atheist stowaways surface. Soon Noah has them on trial for their beliefs, even as they tempt Naameh into an erotic adventure. Shem and Marilyn adjust to life as parents of a bouncing baby parrot. This week's special guest is Simon Helberg of "The Big Bang Theory"! Cast LEON RUSSOM.....Noah ALICYN PACKARD.....Naameh DEREK MEHN.....Ham WILL MILES.....Japheth NICK TURNER.....Shem MOLLY HAWKEY.....Marilyn LAUREN VAN KURIN.....Pat, Lisa the Gorilla, Adonis the Unicorn, Praying Mantis Susan, and Rabbit SCOTT GOLDEN.....Roscoe the Parrot, Elephant, Rabbit, and Announcer With Special Guest SIMON HELBERG as Bob And Introducing DAVID MAYES as Kangaroo Written, produced, directed, and edited by JONAS OPPENHEIM Music composed and performed by ZACHARY BERNSTEIN The Love Ark theme sung by MICHAEL LANAHAN Sound Designer JAIME ROBLEDO Foley Artist MONIQUE REYMOND Foley Mixer ROBERTO ALEGRIA Foley FX TRANSPARENT SOUND Additional material by ED GOODMAN, RAY OLSON, & NICK TURNER Recorded at the M1-5 West recording studio by RILEY GEARE Additional Engineering FRANCESCO CARROZZO Legal Services DAVID MAYES Graphic Design SHARON LEVY Special Thanks #1 BEST WRITERS GROUP BOB DEROSA COLIN MCGINN CHRIS NOLD CORA OLSON BEN ROCK LYRA SMITH ERIC WEN DIANE & COSIMO Headphones recommended! Instagram, Twitter, & TikTok: @lovearkpodcast For episode transcriptions or other questions, please email lovearkpodcast@gmail.com New episodes every Monday! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/love-ark-podcast/message

Death of the Reader
Murder on the Way! by Theodore Roscoe - Part Two

Death of the Reader

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 30:00


We discuss chapters 6-9 of Theodore Roscoe's Murder on the Way! Edited by Jim Noy of The Invisible Event and In GAD We Trust. Cart and Pete are caught in the middle of the tontine, with corpses dropping around them as the guests at the mansion vie for wealth. Meanwhile, in the storm outside, a zombie rallies the local population into an uprising that sweeps the safety net out from under the survivors. Can Flex and Herds settle on a solution, or will contest divide them?

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #147: The Intersection of Mindfulness, Writing & Neuroscience w/ April Dávila

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 36:29


April Dávila is an author and mindfulness instructor. Publisher's Weekly called her novel, 142 Ostriches, a “vivid, uplifting debut” and Writer's Digest listed her website (http://aprildavila.com) as one of the Best 101 Websites for Writers. After studying mindfulness with Tara Brach and Jack Kornfield, she was certified as a mindfulness meditation teacher by the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California at Berkeley. She is the co-founder of A Very Important Meeting (http://averyimportantmeeting.com), an online platform hosting over a dozen mindful writing groups every week. Listen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

All Things Therapy
How to have a Healthy Brain

All Things Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 46:44


Toby Pasman is a neurophysiology researcher who specializes in optimal brain health and functioning through methods including neurofeedback, neurostimulation, QEEG, nutrition (Omega 3 fatty acids/coconut oil for myelination), exercise (HIIT/sprinting), and is the host of Roscoe's Wetsuit podcast. Learn about sessions with him and take 15% a consultation at www.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com/nola www.roscoeswetsuit.com   * Solar saves money! Get $0 down solar energy from my sponsor at: https://powur.com/whysolar?amb=44265

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #146: Comprehensive Wellness w/ Dr. Christopher Estes

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 50:24


Christopher M. Estes is a dedicated and compassionate physician whose career has evolved from extensive experience with medically complicated patients. He became frustrated seeing people get passed from one specialist to the next without ever addressing the source cause of their medical problems.  He now works to discover those causes for a broad array of medical conditions, no matter how complex. His practice at Miami Beach Comprehensive Wellness Center involves an integrated array of therapies for women and men, including functional medicine evaluations, intravenous and ozone therapies, platelet rich plasma and stem cell therapies and bioenergetic feedback. His specialties include management of mold, Lyme and other environmentally acquired illnesses, gastrointestinal issues and dysbiosis, autoimmune diseases, natural approaches to fertility, hormonal management and comprehensive detoxification programs. Dr. Estes provides approachable and comprehensive education to his patients and seeks to empower them to be the decision makers in their health care.https://www.miamibeachcwc.comListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller
EP 221 - I DON'T WANT TO KNOW NO SECRETS: Making Examples of Some Pro Athletes, CaptainPicks Bookie Breakers, Bringing Back Thursday EPs & more

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 55:48


His name is Ben Baller, not Ben Humble & he's here to discuss: The Seahawks sucking this Sunday, Niners fandom being worse than The Cowboys, trolling on another level, Niners losing on SNF, CaptainPicks.com Bookie Breakers, IG Shadowbanned, Making TMZ twice last week, Ben Simmons & making examples of some professional athletes, teaching your kids at home, taking a family road trip to Palm Springs, BB Gold Cash Gun, owing the IRS, Omi In A Hellcat getting picked up by the Feds, Nicki Minaj being on some BS, this Roscoe's situation, What he's watching, wanting to bring back the Thursday episode & more. This episode is not to be missed! Please support our sponsors: www.Bambee.com/Baller www.BankNovo.com/Baller www.DameProducts.com/Baller If you are interested in MLB, NBA, NFL & UFC Picks daily, weekly or monthly subscribe at www.CaptainPicks.com & Follow @TheCaptainPicks on Instagram Produced by: DBPodcasts www.dbpodcasts.com Follow @dbpodcasts on Instagram & Twitter Music by @lakeyinspired Available on all Podcast Platforms, YouTube & BehindTheBallerPod.com Behind The Baller Theme Music  Artist: Illegal Kartel (@illegal_kartel_mikal_shakur) Produced by: Gene Crenshaw @yuyuthemaker

The Love Ark
The Love Ark, Ep. 3: “The Isle of GHRQ”

The Love Ark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 24:26


It's “The Love Boat” on Noah's Ark! “The Love Ark” is a scripted comedy podcast based on the Noah's Ark story, in the style of “The Love Boat.” Romance! Miracles! Murder! And two of each animal. Episode 3: “The Isle of GHRQ” The Ark encounters a tiny island inhabited by Noah's sister, Carol, and millions of roaches. As the siblings catch up, Noah explores the possibility of worshipping a different, more benevolent deity. Meanwhile, Naameh helps Shem and Marilyn find an animal that they can pretend to give birth to, and Ham makes a play for Noah's love. Cast LEON RUSSOM.....Noah ALICYN PACKARD.....Naameh DEREK MEHN.....Ham WILL MILES.....Japheth NICK TURNER.....Shem MOLLY HAWKEY.....Marilyn LAUREN VAN KURIN.....Aunt Carol, Lisa the Gorilla, and Adonis the Unicorn SCOTT GOLDEN.....Roscoe the Parrot, Frank the Unicorn, Rhino, and Announcer Written, produced, directed, and edited by JONAS OPPENHEIM Music composed and performed by ZACHARY BERNSTEIN The Love Ark theme sung by MICHAEL LANAHAN Sound Designer JAIME ROBLEDO Foley Artist MONIQUE REYMOND Foley Mixer ROBERTO ALEGRIA Foley FX TRANSPARENT SOUND Additional material by ED GOODMAN, RAY OLSON, & NICK TURNER Recorded at the M1-5 West recording studio by RILEY GEARE Additional Engineering FRANCESCO CARROZZO Legal Services DAVID MAYES Graphic Design SHARON LEVY Special Thanks #1 BEST WRITERS GROUP BOB DEROSA COLIN MCGINN CHRIS NOLD CORA OLSON BEN ROCK LYRA SMITH ERIC WEN DIANE & COSIMO Headphones recommended! Instagram, Twitter, & TikTok: @lovearkpodcast For episode transcriptions or other questions, please email lovearkpodcast@gmail.com New episodes every Monday! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/love-ark-podcast/message

The Activated Podcast
ANTI-MASKERS AT ROSCOE'S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES IN ANAHEIM FIND OUT THE HARD WAY

The Activated Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 57:58


Racist anti-maskers at Roscoe's in Anaheim f***ed around and found out: https://twitter.com/TheActivatedPod/status/1441932895627534342 https://twitter.com/VPS_Reports/status/1441901911079149569 https://www.dailydot.com/irl/karen-harasses-black-employees-mask-policy-racist-rant/ Border Patrol On Horseback Terrorize and Herd Haitin Refugees and Asylum Seekers: https://www.npr.org/2021/09/21/1039230310/u-s-border-agents-haiti-migrants-horses-photographer-del-rio Follow Us At: Website: https://www.theactivatedpodcast.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theactivatedpodcast Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/theactivatedpod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theactivatedpodcast/ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/theactivatedpodcast/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theactivatedpodcast/support

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #145: The Mental Health Benefits of Magnesium w/ Natalie Jurado

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 33:40


Natalie is the founder of RootedIn, a line of therapeutically infused magnesium moisturizers, which calm and relax your mood.She is a sought after thought leader, educator, and speaker, and has worked at the forefront of the wellness industry for over 8 years. She is considered an expert in all things magnesium and her mission is to spread awareness of this powerful mineral to all who struggle to live their most vibrant lives.https://berootedin.comMagnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean: https://www.amazon.com/Magnesium-Miracle-Revised-Updated/dp/034549458XListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

tv canada russian canadian oakland business roscoe california american fuck berlin ucla star wars man indiana colorado north god new york city war football baseball nfl mit new york times knoxville magic opportunity house super bowl hawaii hill house hell michael jordan research washington tennessee nba world series ladies league public wind greyhound nebraska indianapolis holy pirates captain nyu hunt mississippi spring buffalo pittsburgh titanic iowa fairfield microsoft sunset strip tom brady teacher bottom fivethirtyeight boston globe vic winning plug espn vanderbilt cuban angels ewing oracle march madness mutual john kennedy damn kentucky elvis presley new haven usa today yale makes jeopardy athletic wall street journal iu penn state kansas city throw louisville sports illustrated punching pc hells angels ev ymca excel bloomington ball state orlando magic hoops labor day fort wayne wilt necessity insider channel nine new york knicks berliner dunkel ncaa bcs correct tonya harding announcers unlv wilt chamberlain defensive romer red october willingness 10x my god lou gehrig references mark cuban georgetown chamberlain bye boston celtics redmond raptor gregorian nit ncaa tournament lsu nc state purdue pete rose princess diaries whoo new york yankees comet crap rpi los angeles dodgers dorchester jack ryan fortran walla walla physically magic johnson ramy los angeles lakers oregon state pro football fibonacci game theory pacers grade b mike vick chris lawson dallas mavericks loyola marymount scylla laettner michael vick x2 spry intuitively tony romo pittsburgh pirates nancy kerrigan patrick ewing nate silver bob knight william wallace kyler murray christian laettner dictate raw data magnavox sam white drew bledsoe frank deford louisville courier journal pauley pavilion glen grunwald andy glockner unitas valkenburg connie hawkins johnny unitas jerry tarkanian paul silas january 6th
Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #144: The Psychology of a Navy SEAL Turned Businessman w/ Marty Strong

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 48:17


Marty Strong has an accomplished leadership career spanning four decades. He worked his way from enlisted SEAL Team member to the SEAL Officer corps, retiring with twenty years' service in that highly-decorated and esteemed military unit. After retiring from service, Marty was a successful account vice president and investment advisor to high net worth individuals and institutions with the United Bank of Switzerland (UBS). Soon after the attacks of September 11, 2001, he left his seven years in portfolio management to seek a way to help in the war on terror. Almost immediately he became a highly sought-after expert in asymmetrical threats and counterterrorism from 2001 to 2004, logging hundreds of radio interviews and over 300 television appearances.Today he is a CEO, Chief Strategy Officer, board director, and business investor. Marty is also a sought after speaker and leadership consultant.Listen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #143: Mindfulness, Embodiment, and Coaching w/ Rod Francis

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 52:15


Rod Francis is faculty head and the creator of the Emergent Coach Training Program and a founding member of InterActualizer. Following a decade of designing and leading professional coaching programs in Europe and the USA, Rod is actively speaking, writing, teaching, and leading workshops throughout the globe, working with the central themes of the advancement of human, organizational, social development, and embodied leadership.https://www.rodfranciscoaching.comhttps://www.interactualizer.comLink to episode of Perspectives on Health Care with Toby:https://www.perspectivesonhealthcare.com/podcast/toby-pasman-a-neurotherapists-perspective-on-healthcare/Listen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Get Up in the Cool
Episode 264: Heidi Kristenson (Banjo Duets)

Get Up in the Cool

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 46:36


Welcome to Get Up in the Cool: Old Time Music with Cameron DeWhitt and Friends. This week's friend is Heidi Kristenson. We recorded this back in August at the Centralia Campout in Centralia, Washington. Tunes and songs in this episode: * Needlecase (0:50) * Spotted Pony (12:02) * Boys Them Buzzards are Flying (23:41) * Dull Chisel (34:18) * Roscoe (41:18) * Bonus track: Old Molly Hare Support Get Up in the Cool on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/getupinthecool Buy Get Up in the Cool merch like t-shirts, phone cases, and masks! https://teespring.com/new-get-up-in-the-cool-swag Sign up at https://www.pitchforkbanjo.com/ for my clawhammer instructional series! Check out Cameron's other podcast, Think Outside the Box Set: https://boxset.fireside.fm/

The Odyssey Storytelling Podcast
August 2021: Wasted

The Odyssey Storytelling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 64:31


Odyssey is back! In front of a fully vaccinated crowd in Roscoe's backyard, we gathered in person for the first time in almost two years for drinks, a pool party, and most importantly, local storytelling! Appropriately, the theme was "Wasted," and we had four incredible storytellers, including: Jonathan Grinder Mary Jo Pollack Molly McCloy Roscoe Mutz Two spontaneous storytellers, who normally don't make the final podcast, but we're celebrating, dammit We're incredibly excited to share that we have officially launched our Patreon site! As you know, we have not charged for shows the entire pandemic, and as I'm sure you can imagine, that has taken it's toll. As a nonprofit we rely on proceeds from the shows to stay financially sustainable. If you love Odyssey as much as I know you do, please purchase a membership to our shows and help Odyssey reach it's goal of financial stability. Simply go to https://www.patreon.com/odysseystorytelling. The Wasted show was recorded on August 21st, 2021, and was curated by Roscoe Mutz. For more information on Odyssey Storytelling, please visit www.odysseystorytelling.com

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #142: Ketamine: The Promising, Emerging Treatment for Depression w/ Dr. David Mahjoubi

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 36:06


Dr. David Mahjoubi, MD is a Diplomate of the American Board of Anesthesiology. He earned his Doctor of Medicine at The Chicago Medical School and completed his residencies at the UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center and USC / L.A. County Medical Center. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors throughout his academic years, and has been recognized as a “Top Doctor – Best Anesthesiologist” by Los Angeles Magazine multiple years in a row. Dr. Mahjoubi carries over 15 years of experience with intravenous Ketamine, and is the author of multiple publications in the medical field. He currently serves as the president of the American Board of Ketamine Physicians (ABKP.org). The ABKP is a non-profit organization dedicated to lifelong learning as well as advancing scientific literature with regards to ketamine treatments.https://www.ketaminehealing.comToby Pasman on True North Man Podcast with Paul Beamhttps://restorationofman.libsyn.com/ep-47-toby-pasman-optimize-your-brain-healthListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Gift of the Day
E309 9.6.21 Disengagement opens the door of opportunity for those who seek to take advantage. Just ask Roscoe P. Coltrane.

Gift of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 17:52


David and Michelle discuss a recent event where an employee of a company failed to do the one task they were assigned to do and how disengagement was to blame. Meanwhile, back at the boar's nest, the Duke boys were celebrating over a victory beer. Listen to find out what that all means. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/red-kite-movement/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/red-kite-movement/support

True North Man
Ep 47: Toby Pasman- Optimize Your Brain Health With Neurotherapy

True North Man

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 53:51


If your body needs a daily workout to function at its best, exercising your brain can produce the same effective results. Today in this episode you meet Toby, who can help you enhance your brain performance with his vast knowledge in Brain Science and various advanced technologies. Toby Pasman is a Neurophysiology Researcher, graduated from the University of Oregon. At present, he is a neurotechnician at FHE Health and a brilliant host of Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast, an applied Neuroscience show featuring raw, unfiltered conversations with researchers and clinicians. He also founded Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro, an applied Neuroscience company offering brain health coaching and Neuromodulation therapy to people who are interested in achieving that optimal cognitive functioning. In this episode of the True North Man podcast, Paul and Toby have an insightful conversation in regard to Neuroscience, the therapies, how they are beneficial for men, and a lot more to engage your thoughts. Paul rightly points out saying, “Should there be men experiencing any kind of grogginess, fogginess, depression, anxiety, PTSD or anything to do with the brain, I have no doubt that there is some good wisdom dropped here.” Tune in to collect all of them now.   What You Will Learn:   Why Toby pursued his career in Neuroscience.   What diseases and psychological issues can be treated with Neuromodulation techniques. How effective the treatment can be. How your brain performance can be maximized with the technologies. And much more!   Favorite Quote: “With these different Neuromodulation technologies, it can be super helpful to calm down the nervous system, allow the body and brain to get deep, restorative relaxation, which it really needs to repair itself and regenerate.” -Toby Pasman   How To Get Involved: Find Toby on LinkedIn or to get more information you can look for Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro where you can find his podcast episodes as well.   Discover all that Paul Beam has to offer through his Website here.   Enjoyed the episode? Hop over to Apple Podcasts for more! Like and share to help spread the word. We appreciate your support—and we hope to return the favor: Leave a review to let us know what you want to hear from Paul next.

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
RWN #141: Addressing The Root Cause of Disease w/ Dr. Greg Mongeon

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 51:46


Dr. Greg Mongeon is a father to 5 active kids, husband to the love of his life, innovator, functional medicine doctor, speaker and leader. His philosophy is the doctor of the future is YOU! And Dr. Greg is actively empowering his clients through mentoring education, self-care and optimizing mindset.Dr. Greg has started over 5 brick and mortar practices, primary functional medicine doctor for olympic gold medalist Jordan Burroughs and is the lead functional medicine doctor for Eat The Frog Fitness.Today, Dr. Greg and his family reside in Lakeville, MN where he operates a successful functional medicine practice. His passion for connecting with people, providing hope and understanding with autoimmune disease and uncovering the root cause, is what separates him from others in his field.https://www.drgreg.healthListen and subscribe to the Roscoe's Wetsuit Neuro Podcast:Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/roscoes-wetsuit-neuro-podcast/id1478352736Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0E8Ui8JNpkjA9LDqbfXnb5Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/roscoes-wetsuitYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDsVTNVrQztFeRMzIU72_wwww.roscoeswetsuitneuro.com

Kentucky Fried Homicide
The Death of Virginia Rappe, and the Skinny on Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle.

Kentucky Fried Homicide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 81:44


One hundred years ago, Labor Day 1921, silent movie star and comedian Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle is in San Francisco with his buddies for a weekend holiday. Partying ensued. Alcohol flowed. And women joined in the mayhem. But when the Labor Day holiday was over, a twenty-six-year-old starlet named Virginia Rappe is dead—seemingly suffering injuries while in Roscoe's room at the St. Francis Hotel. Regardless of his guilt or innocence, he would ultimately pay the price in scandal and cancel culture. This is the death of Virginia Rappe, and the Skinny on Hollywood Star, Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle. Join our Facebook Group: Kentucky Fried Cousins (Cause we're all family here!)For additional show notes, go to: kentuckyfriedhomicide.comStart Heather Sunseri's Books for Free! Supporters of Kentucky Fried Homicide can start one of Heather Sunseri's series for free.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/kyfriedhomicide)

The Love Ark
The Love Ark - Trailer

The Love Ark

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 1:54


It's “The Love Boat” on Noah's Ark! “The Love Ark” is a scripted comedy podcast based on the Noah's Ark story, told in the style of “The Love Boat.” Season 1 is packed with romance, miracles, murder, and two of every animal. When God commands Noah to build an Ark and fill it with beasts, Noah obeys. But it's not just a floating zoo—it's a full-service luxury cruise. Captain Noah has his hands full guessing at God's will, while managing his family of sinners. Noah's wife Naameh handles the guests, procuring udders of tingling ointment and performing the occasional chicken abortion. Eldest son Shem sneaks his alcoholic girlfriend Marilyn onboard by faking a pregnancy...which works until they have to produce a baby. Good son Japheth suffers a broken heart when his lover mysteriously disappears, while bad son Ham prowls the Ark for biblical knowledge of the animal guests. As the heavens open, Noah realizes that he and his family are bad. Extremely bad. As chaos, calamity, and sin consume the Ark, Noah grows desperate to please God...and avoid His wrath. All aboard for romance! All aboard for adventure! All aboard for GOD. Cast LEON RUSSOM.....Noah ALICYN PACKARD.....Naameh DEREK MEHN.....Ham WILL MILES.....Japheth NICK TURNER.....Shem MOLLY HAWKEY.....Marilyn LAUREN VAN KURIN.....Jessica Fletcher, Aunt Carol, Babs the Chicken & more SCOTT GOLDEN.....Roscoe the Parrot, Rudolph the Reindeer, Frank the Unicorn & more With Special Guests SIMON HELBERG (The Big Bang Theory, Annette) RYAN HURST (Sons of Anarchy, The Walking Dead) JOCELYN TOWNE (Lodge 49) and TROY GARITY (Ballers) Written, produced, directed, and edited by JONAS OPPENHEIM Music composed and performed by ZACHARY BERNSTEIN The Love Ark theme sung by MICHAEL LANAHAN Sound Designer JAIME ROBLEDO Foley Artist MONIQUE REYMOND Foley Mixer ROBERTO ALEGRIA Foley FX TRANSPARENT SOUND Additional Material by ED GOODMAN, RAY OLSON, & NICK TURNER Recorded at the M1-5 West Recording Studio by RILEY GEARE Additional Engineering FRANCESCO CARROZZO Legal Services DAVID MAYES Graphic Design SHARON LEVY Special Thanks #1 BEST WRITERS GROUP BOB DEROSA COLIN MCGINN CHRIS NOLD CORA OLSON BEN ROCK LYRA SMITH ERIC WEN DIANE & COSIMO Headphones recommended! Instagram, Twitter, & TikTok: @lovearkpodcast For episode transcripts or other questions, please email lovearkpodcast@gmail.com New episodes every Monday! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/love-ark-podcast/message

San Diego Magazine's Happy Half Hour
We're Talking Beer and Baseball from a Suite at Petco Park

San Diego Magazine's Happy Half Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 33:38


Welcome back to the Happy Half Hour! We're returning from a short break and taped this episode from a premier club suite at Petco Park, thanks to this week's sponsor, the San Diego Padres. We're here with Eddie Quinn, vice president of partnership services for the Padres and the park's resident beer expert, as they face off against the Miami Marlins. Eddie started his career with the Padres as a bat boy before he headed off to college, then he returned to San Diego and rejoined them as a sales representative. He's been with the team ever since (more than 15 years!) and worked his way up to his current title. He tells us about the craft beer program at the park and how many different breweries they partner with, and names his top three favorite brews that are available on site—listen in to get his recommendations! In Hot Plates, we have some big news to catch up on. Gordon Ramsay's Hell's Kitchen restaurant, named after the chef's popular TV show, is opening its fourth (and largest) location at Harrah's Resort in Valley Center next spring. La Puerta, a cantina that's been in the Gaslamp for over a decade, opened its second location in Mission Hills. After being on hold for a few years, LA icon Roscoe's House of Chicken N Waffles announced it is opening soon in Barrio Logan. Chef Bernard Guillas, who has been at The Marine Room for almost 30 years, recently retired. For Two People, $50, Eddie is a fan of the Beagle Burger at The Regal Beagle in Mission Hills. Troy's pick is the omakase with dry-aged bluefin tuna at Wrench and Rodent Seabasstropub in Oceanside. David recommends the chile verde at Cantina Mayahuel in North Park. My pick is the branzino and cheese cart at Seneca, Consortium Holdings' new restaurant at the InterContinental Hotel. Thank you for listening! As always, we want to hear from our listeners. Need a restaurant recommendation? Is there a guest you want us to book on the show? Let us know! You can call us at 619-744-0535 and leave a voicemail, or if you're too shy, you can email us at happyhalfhour@sdmag.com. See you next week!

The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Roscoe Wallace, Women VS Men, Black People in Pool, Text Blunders and more.

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 101:32


Good morning and welcome to the ride! PhD level stoopidity today on this Frity. The crew talk about the best and worst summer jobs. Are women nicer than men or nah? Junior does not do well hearing bad news. Today in Comedy Roulette, we get the excuses black people make to not get into the swimming pool. Our hero Roscoe is back and somebody hatin' right away. Ever text the wrong message to the wrong person? What foods are the best to slow down aging? Today in Closing Remarks, Steve suggests replacing complaining with gratitude and see what happens. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com