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Mother of Jesus, according to the Christian New Testament

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Midnight Train Podcast
The Bedlam Asylum... um...Bethlem Royal Hospital. OLD AF.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 152:38


Today we are taking the train to a wonderful little building… Actually scratch that… This place was once so crazy( no pun intended) that its nickname became a common word.  The definition of the word is "A place or situation of chaotic uproar, and where confusion prevails. " The word is Bedlam. The place is Bethlehem Royal Hospital. The hospital is considered the first lunatic asylum. The word "bedlam" is derived from the hospital's nickname. Bedlam is a bastardization of the word bethlem, which in turn was a corruption of the name Bethlehem. Although the hospital became a modern psychiatric facility, historically it was representative of the worst excesses of asylums in the era of lunacy reform. We're gonna get into all that craziness tonight and see what kind of "Bedlam" actually went on there.    Bethlem Royal Hospital's origins are unlike any other psychiatric hospital in the western world. As a formal organization, it can be traced to its foundation in 1247, during the reign of King Henry III, as a Roman Catholic Monastery for the Priory of the 'New Order of St Mary of Bethlem' in the city of London proper. It was established by the Italian Bishop of Bethlehem, Goffredo de Prefetti, following a donation of personal property by the London Alderman and former City-Sheriff, the Norman, Simon FitzMary. It bears its name after its primary patron and original overseer. The initial location of the priory was in the parish of Saint Botolph, in Bishopsgate's ward, just beyond London's wall and where the south-east corner of Liverpool Street station now stands. Bethlem was not initially intended as a hospital, much less as a specialist institution for the mentally ill. Rather, its purpose was tied to the function of the English Church; the ostensible purpose of the priory was to function as a centre for the collection of alms to support the Crusaders, and to link England to the Holy Land. Bishop De Prefetti's need to generate income for the Crusaders, and restore the financial fortunes of his apostolic see was occasioned by two misfortunes: his bishopric had suffered significant losses following the destructive conquest of the town of Bethlehem by the Khwarazmian Turks in 1244; and the immediate predecessor to his post had further impoverished his cathedral chapter through the alienation of a considerable amount of its property. The new London priory, obedient to the Church of Bethlehem, would also house the poor, disabled and abandoned; and, if visited, provide hospitality to the Bishop, canons and brothers of Bethlehem. The subordination of the priory's religious order to the bishops of Bethlehem was further underlined in the foundational charter which stipulated that Bethlems's prior, canons and male and female inmates were to wear a star upon their cloaks and capes to symbolize their obedience to the church of Bethlehem.   During the 13th and 14th centuries, with its activities underwritten by episcopal and papal indulgences, Bethlem's role as a center for the collection of alms for the poor continued. However, over time, its link to the mendicant Order of Bethlehem increasingly devolved, putting its purpose and patronage in severe doubt. In 1346 the Prior of Bethlem, a position at that time granted to the most senior of London's monastic brethren, applied to the city authorities seeking protection; thereafter metropolitan office-holders claimed power to oversee the appointment of prios, and demanded in return an annual payment of 40 shillings from the coffers of the order. It is doubtful whether the City of London ever provided substantial protection, and much less that the priorship fell within their patronage, but dating from the 1346 petition, it played a role in the management of Bethlem's organization and finances.   By this time the crusader bishops of Bethlehem had relocated to Clamecy, France under the surety of the Avignon papacy. This was significant as, throughout the reign of King Edward III (1327–77), the English monarchy had extended its patronage over ecclesiastical positions through the seizure of alien priories, mainly French. These were religious institutions that were under the control of non-English religious houses. As a dependent house of the Order of Saint Bethlehem in Clamecy, Bethlem was vulnerable to seizure by the English crown, and this occurred in the 1370s when Edward III took control of all English hospitals. The purpose of this appropriation was to prevent funds raised by the hospital from enriching the French monarchy, via the papal court, and thus supporting the French war effort. After this event, the Head Masters of the hospital, semi-autonomous figures in charge of its day-to-day management, were crown appointees, and Bethlem became an increasingly secularized institution. The memory of Bethlem's foundation became muddled. In 1381 the royal candidate for the post of master claimed that from its beginnings the hospital had been superintended by an order of knights, and he confused the identity of its founder, Goffredo de Prefetti, with that of the Frankish crusader, Godfrey de Bouillon, the King of Jerusalem. The removal of the last symbolic link to the mendicant order was confirmed in 1403 when it was reported that master and inmates no longer wore the symbol of their order, the star of Bethlehem. This was exclusively a political move on the part of the hospital administrators, as the insane were perceived as unclean or possessed by daemons, and not permitted to reside on consecrated soil.   From 1330 Bethlehm was routinely referred to as a "hospital" does not necessarily indicate a change in its primary role from alms collection – the word hospital could as likely have been used to denote a lodging for travellers, equivalent to a hostel, and would have been a perfectly apt term to describe an institution acting as a centre and providing accommodation for Bethlem's peregrinating alms-seekers or questores. It is unknown from what exact date it began to specialise in the care and control of the insane. Despite this fact it has been frequently asserted that Bethlem was first used for the insane from 1377. This rather precise date is derived from the unsubstantiated conjecture of the Reverend Edward Geoffrey O'Donoghue, chaplain to the hospital, who published a monograph on its history in 1914. While it is possible that Bethlem was receiving the insane during the late fourteenth-century, the first definitive record of their presence in the hospital is provided from the details of a visitation of the Charity Commissioners in 1403. This recorded that amongst other patients then in the hospital there were six male inmates who were "mente capti", a Latin term indicating insanity. The report of the 1403 visitation also noted the presence of four pairs of manacles, eleven chains, six locks and two pairs of stocks although it is not clear if any or all of these items were for the restraint of the inmates. Thus, while mechanical restraint and solitary confinement are likely to have been used for those regarded as dangerous, little else is known of the actual treatment of the insane in Bethlem for much of the medieval period. The presence of a small number of insane patients in 1403 marks Bethlem's gradual transition from a diminutive general hospital into a specialist institution for the confinement of the insane; this process was largely completed by 1460. In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.    In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.   The position of master was a sinecure largely regarded by its occupants as means of profiting at the expense of the poor in their charge. The appointment of the early masters of the hospital, later known as keepers, had lain within the patronage of the crown until 1547. Thereafter, the city, through the Court of Aldermen, took control of these appointments where, as with the King's appointees, the office was used to reward loyal servants and friends. However, compared to the masters placed by the monarch, those who gained the position through the city were of much more modest status. Thus in 1561, the Lord Mayor succeeded in having his former porter, Richard Munnes, a draper by trade, appointed to the position. The sole qualifications of his successor in 1565 appears to have been his occupation as a grocer. The Bridewell Governors largely interpreted the role of keeper as that of a house-manager and this is clearly reflected in the occupations of most appointees during this period as they tended to be inn-keepers, victualers or brewers and the like. When patients were sent to Bethlem by the Governors of the Bridewell the keeper was paid from hospital funds. For the remainder, keepers were paid either by the families and friends of inmates or by the parish authorities. It is possible that keepers negotiated their fees for these latter categories of patients.   In 1598 the long-term keeper, Roland Sleford, a London cloth-maker, left his post, apparently of his own volition, after a nineteen-year tenure. Two months later, the Bridewell Governors, who had until then shown little interest in the management of Bethlem beyond the appointment of keepers, conducted an inspection of the hospital and a census of its inhabitants for the first time in over forty years. Their express purpose was to "to view and p[er]use the defaultes and want of rep[ar]ac[i]ons". They found that during the period of Sleford's keepership the hospital buildings had fallen into a deplorable condition with the roof caving in, the kitchen sink blocked up and reported that: "...it is not fitt for anye man to dwell in wch was left by the Keeper for that it is so loathsomly filthely kept not fitt for anye man to come into the sayd howse".   The 1598 committee of inspection found twenty-one inmates then resident with only two of these having been admitted during the previous twelve months. Of the remainder, six, at least, had been resident for a minimum of eight years and one inmate had been there for around twenty-five years. Three were from outside London, six were charitable cases paid for out of the hospital's resources, one was supported by a parochial authority, while the rest were provided for by family, friends, benefactors or, in one instance, out of their funds. The precise reason for the Governors' new-found interest in Bethlem is unknown but it may have been connected to the increased scrutiny the hospital was coming under with the passing of poor law legislation in 1598 and to the decision by the Governors to increase hospital revenues by opening it up to general visitors as a spectacle. After this inspection, the Bridewell Governors initiated some repairs and visited the hospital at more frequent intervals. During one such visit in 1607 they ordered the purchase of clothing and eating vessels for the inmates, presumably indicating the lack of such basic items.    The year 1634 is typically interpreted as denoting the divide between the mediaeval and early modern administration of Bethlem.    Although Bethlem had been enlarged by 1667 to accommodate 59 patients, the Court of Governors of Bethlem and Bridewell observed at the start of 1674 that "the Hospital House of Bethlem is very olde, weake & ruinous and to[o] small and straight for keeping the greater numb[e]r of lunaticks therein att p[re]sent". With the increasing demand for admission and the inadequate and dilapidated state of the building it was decided to rebuild the hospital in Moorfields, just north of the city proper and one of the largest open spaces in London. The architect chosen for the new hospital, which was built rapidly and at great expense between 1675 and 1676, was the natural philosopher and City Surveyor Robert Hooke. He constructed an edifice that was monumental in scale at over 500 feet (150 m) wide and some 40 feet (12 m) deep. The surrounding walls were some 680 feet (210 m) long and 70 feet (21 m) deep while the south face at the rear was effectively screened by a 714-foot (218 m) stretch of London's ancient wall projecting westward from nearby Moorgate. At the rear and containing the courtyards where patients exercised and took the air, the walls rose to 14 feet (4.3 m) high. The front walls were only 8 feet (2.4 m) high but this was deemed sufficient as it was determined that "Lunatikes... are not to [be] permitted to walk in the yard to be situate[d] betweene the said intended new Building and the Wall aforesaid." It was also hoped that by keeping these walls relatively low the splendour of the new building would not be overly obscured. This concern to maximise the building's visibility led to the addition of six gated openings 10 feet (3.0 m) wide which punctuated the front wall at regular intervals, enabling views of the facade. Functioning as both advertisement and warning of what lay within, the stone pillars enclosing the entrance gates were capped by the figures of "Melancholy" and "Raving Madness" carved in Portland stone by the Danish-born sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber.   At the instigation of the Bridewell Governors and to make a grander architectural statement of "charitable munificence", the hospital was designed as a single- rather than double-pile building,  accommodating initially 120 patients. Having cells and chambers on only one side of the building facilitated the dimensions of the great galleries, essentially long and capacious corridors, 13 feet (4.0 m) high and 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, which ran the length of both floors to a total span of 1,179 feet (359 m). Such was their scale that Roger L'Estrange remarked in a 1676 text eulogising the new Bethlem that their "Vast Length ... wearies the travelling eyes' of Strangers". The galleries were constructed more for public display than for the care of patients as, at least initially, inmates were prohibited from them lest "such persons that come to see the said Lunatickes may goe in Danger of their Lives"   The architectural design of the new Bethlem was primarily intended to project an image of the hospital and its governors consonant with contemporary notions of charity and benevolence.    By the end of the 18th century the hospital was in severe disrepair. At this point it was rebuilt again on another site.  As the new facility was being built attempts were made to rehouse patients at local hospitals and admissions to Bethlem, sections of which were deemed uninhabitable, were significantly curtailed such that the patient population fell from 266 in 1800 to 119 in 1814. The Governors engaged in protracted negotiations with the City  for another municipally owned location at St. George's Fields in Southwark, south of the Thames.   The deal was concluded in 1810 and provided the Governors with a 12 acres site in a swamp-like, impoverished, highly populated, and industrialised area where the Dog and Duck tavern and St George's Spa had been.   A competition was held to design the new hospital at Southwark in which the noted Bethlem patient James Tilly Matthews was an unsuccessful entrant. Completed after three years in 1815, it was constructed during the first wave of county asylum building in England under the County Asylum Act ("Wynn's Act") of 1808. Female patients occupied the west wing and males the east, the cells were located off galleries that traversed each wing. Each gallery contained only one toilet, a sink and cold baths. Incontinent patients were kept on beds of straw in cells in the basement gallery; this space also contained rooms with fireplaces for attendants. A wing for the criminally insane – a legal category newly minted in the wake of the trial of a delusional James Hadfield for attempted regicide – was completed in 1816. Problems with the building were soon noted as the steam heating did not function properly, the basement galleries were damp and the windows of the upper storeys were unglazed "so that the sleeping cells were either exposed to the full blast of cold air or were completely darkened". Faced with increased admissions and overcrowding, new buildings, designed by the architect Sydney Smirke, were added from the 1830s. The wing for criminal lunatics was increased to accommodate a further 30 men while additions to the east and west wings, extending the building's facade, provided space for an additional 166 inmates and a dome was added to the hospital chapel. At the end of this period of expansion Bethlem had a capacity for 364 patients. In 1930, the hospital moved to the suburbs of Croydon,[211] on the site of Monks Orchard House between Eden Park, Beckenham, West Wickham and Shirley. The old hospital and its grounds were bought by Lord Rothermere and presented to the London County Council for use as a park; the central part of the building was retained and became home to the Imperial War Museum in 1936. The hospital was absorbed into the National Health Service in 1948. 1997 the hospital started planning celebrations of its 750th anniversary. The service user's perspective was not to be included, however, and members of the psychiatric survivors movement saw nothing to celebrate in either the original Bedlam or in the current practices of mental health professionals towards those in Mneed of care. A campaign called "Reclaim Bedlam" was launched by Pete Shaughnessy, supported by hundreds of patients and ex-patients and widely reported in the media. A sit-in was held outside the earlier Bedlam site at the Imperial War Museum. The historian Roy Porter called the Bethlem Hospital "a symbol for man's inhumanity to man, for callousness and cruelty."  The hospital continues to operate to this day in this location.    Ok so with that history out of the way let's drive into what really transpired to give this hospital it reputation and that drove Bedlam to strain it's current meaning in our lexicon.    Early on Sanitation was poor and the patients were malnourished. Most of the patients were able to move about freely, but those who were considered dangerous were kept chained to the walls. Patients' families often dumped unwell family members in the asylum and disowned them. We've discussed other asylums and things dealing with them so we won't get into the fact that most of the patients were horribly misdiagnosed due to little to no understanding of mental health until relatively recently. Some of the treatments used ranged from barbaric and esoteric to just plain crazy.    One of those crazy ass ones was called rotational therapy. Charles Darwin's grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, began using “rotational therapy”, which involved spinning a patient around and around on a chair or swing for up to an hour. They would sometimes be spun over 100 times per minute. Obviously this would create issues for the patient. Many would get sick and vomit. Most would become very upset and distraught while becoming severely disoriented. The vomiting was seen as a good thing and progress in the treatment. Doctor Joseph Mason Cox was a doctor who actually picked up this type of treatment later on. The time spent spinning, and the speed of the spin, were to be determined by the good doctor. Considering the fact that the common side effect was fear, extreme pallor, vomiting, and voiding the bowels and bladder, the doctor evidently commonly overdid it. Of course he didn't think so at the time. He wrote happily that, “after a few circumvolutions, I have witnessed the soothing lulling effects, when the mind has become tranquillized and the body quiescent.” It's true that after being spun until fluid leaves the body via every available orifice, most people have had the fight taken out of them and are ready for a nap. There is one positive side effect of this kind of rampant torture of the insane. Scientists started noticing that vertigo has visual effects, and used the chairs to study them. These rotating chairs mark the beginning of a lot of visual and mental experiments done on perception. The early 1800s were a particularly grim time, and many patients were chained to the walls naked or almost naked, as the medical director felt that it was necessary to break each person's will.    Some of the more barbaric and esoteric treatments included bloodletting, leeches and good old fashioned starvation and beatings.  Ice baths would often be used to try and calm down hysterical patients.    At the time, bloodletting was believed to be a completely acceptable and normal way to cure a patient of a variety of mental and physical ailments. Doctors thought that they could literally bleed a sickness out of a patient, which not only doesn't work, it extra-double doesn't work on mental illnesses. Many of the patients were forced to undergo treatment with leeches and the induction of blisters, which mostly just sounds unpleasant, but it often proved fatal. Reportedly, the physicians at the time at least understood that everyone needs blood, so only patients who were deemed strong enough to undergo treatment were allowed to have this "cure."    Here's another fun one. A doctor named William Black wrote that patients were placed in straitjackets and given laxatives, which was seen at Bethlem as one of the "principal remedies." Hearing voices? Some explosive diarrhea oughta clear that up. Seizures? One diarrhea for you. Diarrhea for everyone!   We all know the best thing for someone who may not be in their right mind is to be left alone… in the dark… for long periods of time… Like really long periods of time. Well we may know that's probably NOT the best, but Bedlam never got the message. Some patients were left alone in solitary for days, weeks, even months at a time. Seems very counterproductive.    One of the worst ones was the example of the inhumane conditions was that of James Norris. Norris, an American Marine, had been sent to Bethlem on the 1st of February 1800. Her was kept in Bethlem's “incurable wing,” Norris' arms were pinned to his sides by iron bars. He was also kept chained to the wall by his neck. This fifty-five-year-old man had been continuously kept in this position for “more than twelve years.”   The apathy of families abandoning their relatives to a hellish existence in Bethlem led to a new form of exploitation. From the 1700s to the 1800s, there was a marked increase in the dissection of bodies to learn more about human anatomy. In the 1790s, Bethlem's chief surgeon was Bryan Crowther, a man who saw opportunity in the search for corpses to study. Crowther would dissect Bethlem's dead patients in the name of medical science, believing that he would be able to find a difference in the brains of his mentally ill patients, compared to “normal” people. Of course, he did these operations without any kind of consent or legal right.   One of the best ways to sum up the reasoning behind this torture is to let you know from the man who was behind the worst of it. John Haslam was one of the most sinister figures in the history of Bethlem, and it was while he was the head of management that the institution sunk to a new low in depravity. While Bryan Crowther was conducting illegal dissections as chief surgeon, Haslam used various tortures against the patients. He was adamant that the first step to curing the patients was breaking their wills first. So ya… They figured fuck em… Break their will and they'll be fine… Wow. Oftentimes patients would lack even basic amenities for living. That includes proper clothing and food.    To make things even worse for the patients, from approximately the early 1600s until 1770, the public was able to go for a wander through Bedlam. Money was collected as entrance fees, and it was hoped that seeing the crazy people would make people feel sufficiently compassionate that they would donate funds to the hospital. Another reason for this is that they hoped it would attract the families of these patients and that they would bring those patients food and clothing and other things they needed so the hospital would not have to provide them.    Oh if that's not bad enough, how about the mass graves. Modern-day construction of the London Underground unearthed mass graves on the grounds of Bethlem, created specifically to get rid of the corpses of those who didn't survive the hospital's care. Discovered in 2013, the mass graves dating back to 1569, and there are somewhere close to 20,000 people buried in them. Amazingly, authorities have managed to identify some of the deceased, but many others will likely never get a face and name.   Anything about any of these areas being haunted? Yup we got that too. Although the first few sites have long been transformed into other things, the girls that happened there could have left tons of negative juju. We found this cool story.            "The Liverpool Street Underground Station was opened in February of 1874 on the site of the original Bedlem Hospital. Former patients haunt this busy section of the London Underground.    One compelling sighting happened in the summer of 2000. A Line Controller spotted something strange on the CCTV camera that he was monitoring that showed the Liverpool Station. It was 2:00 am in the morning and the station was closed for the night. This witness saw a figure wearing white overalls in an eastbound tunnel. He became concerned since he knew no contractors worked the station this late at night. He called his Station Supervisor to report what he was seeing on the screen.   The Supervisor went to investigate. The Line Controller watched as his Supervisor stood nearby the mysterious figure. So he was confused when his Supervisor called to say he had not seen any figure. The Line Controller told his boss that the figure had stood so close to him that he could have reached out and touched it. Hearing this the Supervisor continued to search for the figure.   Again the Line Controller saw the figure walk right passed his boss on his screen, but again his boss did not see the figure. The Supervisor finally giving up went to leave the station but as he did so he spotted white overalls placed on a bench that he had passed before. He stated that they could not have been placed there without him seeing who did it.   Even before the Liverpool Station was built the area where the hospital stood was considered haunted. Between 1750 and 1812 many witnesses reported hearing a female voice crying and screaming. It is believed that this is a former patient from Bedlam.    Rebecca Griffins was buried in the area. While alive she always frantically clutched a coin in her hand. Witnesses state they hear her asking where her ha' penny is."   Fun stuff!   The following comes from the old building that was turned into the imperial war museum.    It is said that  to this day  the spectres of those who suffered in Bedlam still roam the hallways and rattle their chains in remembered anguish.   During the Second World War, a detachment of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force was stationed inside the Imperial War Museum with barrage balloons. Much of the museum has parts that date back to Bedlam and it isn't hard to imagine them as cells full of the damned inmates. Many of the young girls who were garrisoned inside had never heard of the buildings sordid past, so had no reason to fear it. Yet soon complaints began to flood in as during the night many found they couldn't sleep, kept up by strange moaning and the rattling of chains. The long passed inmates of Bedlam made their displeasure well known. Eventually the complaints became so bad the entire detachment had to be rehoused nearby.   Possibly the most famous ghost of Bedlam is the sad spectre of poor Rebecca. At a merchant's house by London Bridge lived a lovely young girl by the name of Rebecca. She fell head over heels in love with a handsome young Indian man who had come to lodge with the family. So besotted was she that when he packed up his bags to return to India she was shocked that he hadn't loved her quite nearly as much as she'd loved him. She helped him to pack his things, hoping all the while that he would change his mind and agree to stay. But all she received was a gold sovereign that he slipped into her hand before leaving forever.   The grief of her spurning was too much for her mind to handle and she snapped, soon being admitted to Bedlam Hospital. The golden sovereign he had given her was gripped firmly in her fist for the remainder of her short life, the final token from her lost love, never to be given up. When she finally wasted away into death it didn't go unnoticed by one of the guards who prised the coin from her hand and then buried her without her most prized possession. It was after that the guards, inmates and visitors all began to report a strange sight indeed. A wan and ghostly figure began to roam the halls of Bedlam, searching for her lost love token, her spirit refusing to be put to rest until she had it back in her hand. It is said that she still wanders the halls to this day, looking for that stolen coin to make her whole once more.   Well… There you have it, the history and craziness of Bedlam Asylum!    British horror movies https://screenrant.com/best-british-horror-movies/   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

Irish History Podcast
The Fernside Raid & the Execution of Kevin Barry (The War of Independence XVIII)

Irish History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 36:53


This is the first of three back-to-back episodes that will take us through one of the most critical periods of the war. The Autumn of 1920 witnessed an intensification of the conflict as British Crown forces began to get the upper hand on the IRA. This lead to two key events in Dublin - the Fernside Raid & the Execution of Kevin Barry. While these set the stage for the pivotal events of Bloody Sunday, the Fernside Raid and the bloody gun battles that followed were a key moment in the war.Additional Research - Sam McGrathSound - Jason LooneyAdditional Narrations - Therese Murray & Aidan CroweYou can get tickets to my live event (featuring Aidan Crowe) in the 800 Year old St Mary's Church, Kilkenny on November 6th now at https://historyshow.eventbrite.com Tickets for my show at the Liverpool Irish Festival at Grand Central, Liverpool on October 24th are available here https://www.liverpoolirishfestival.com/events/the-irish-history-podcast/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.

The Square Ball: Leeds United Podcast
The Match Ball: Southampton 1-0 Leeds United | Premier League | 16th Oct 2021

The Square Ball: Leeds United Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 29:38


A single goal put paid to Leeds United's hopes at St Mary's. Here we pick over the bones of a game in which the Whites had zero shots on target. With levisolicitors.co.uk/thesquareball See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In Good Faith
Father Angelo Te, from St. Mary by the Sea in Rockaway, OR.

In Good Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 31:14


Father Angelo Te, from St. Mary by the Sea in Rockaway, OR, talks about discerning your calling in life. In Good Faith is the place to hear stories and accounts from believers, told in their own words. Our hope is to listen with an open heart, celebrating the power of faith and belief, and what those stories mean to the ones who tell them. Host Steven Kapp Perry talks with believers from all walks of faith--Catholic and Episcopalian, Buddhist and Baptist, Jewish and Hindu, Presbyterian and Seventh Day Adventist, Muslim and Mormon--in other words, human beings and believers, sharing their personal experience with the sacred and the divine. Sundays on BYU radio--and be sure you subscribe to the podcast!

The Phil Hay Show - A show about Leeds United
He disliked me - the feeling was mutual!

The Phil Hay Show - A show about Leeds United

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:08


The Athletic's Phil Hay tackles your questions, including his most disliked Leeds manager.  Phil is joined by Dan Moylan and Michael Normanton to chat about the calmer air around Elland Road during the international break, and to look back at that crazy seven goal game at St Mary's in 2005. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Super Saints Podcast
Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos American Miracle Worker

Super Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 16:56


Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos American Miracle WorkerWe go to the Church of St Mary in New Orleans, Louisiana to chronicle one of the most powerful Healing Saints we have ever researched.See the Shrine to Blessed Seelos.Visit the Seelos Walk of Life at the Shrine which follows the history of his life in America, his missions during the Civil War, and his meeting with President Lincoln.See the Tomb and Reliquary of Blessed Seelos.See a first class relic of his hair, cut on the day he died in 1867.Take part in the Healing Mass, held three times a year, with 3000 faithful.Hear the testimonies of people who have been healed through his intercession.Meet Fr. Byron Miller and Joyce Bourgeois who have witnessed many of these miracles.More about Blessed SeelosJourneys of Faith Bob and Penny Lord's StoreJourneys of Faith Blog Subscribe to our Free Blog Easy PeasyBob and Penny Lord TV Channel Miracles of the Eucharist, Apparitions of Mary, and lives of the Saints videos on demand.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bobandpennylord?fan_landing=true)

Inside Tri Show
Endurance athletes and iron deficiency anaemia with Dr Richard Burden

Inside Tri Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 53:11


We discuss iron deficiency in endurance athletes with Dr Rich Burden who works for the English Institute of Sport and has academic affiliations with St Mary's University and Loughborough University. He's an expert when it comes to iron and iron deficiency anaemia - he did his PhD in iron deficiency and iron repletion in elite endurance athletes. You'll hear: 05:20 Helen explains some of her symptoms in the lead up to being diagnosed with iron deficiency anaemia including feeling lethargic, shortness of breath, struggling to do easy runs, lacking energy, unable to hit certain intensities on the bike and struggling with heavy legs. 10:30 Why iron deficiency anaemia doesn't present overnight and can take some time to present itself. 'if iron deficiency occurred overnight, that would instantly cause you to start asking questions, but it creeps up on you, so it is not noticable over short periods of time. It's not until you're at the top of peak training that it can being obvious.' 13:40 If finger prick blood tests at home would pick up iron deficiency 'for Haemoglobin, yes, but as long as you know what you are looking for and what your normal is. For a lot of people when iron deficiency is slowly deteriorating over time, you could take a blood test which is in the 'normal range' but it might not be in the normal range for you. 16:00 Why iron is crucial for health. 'if at any point your iron status is compromised, it will compromise the number size and health of red blood cells which means the ability of the red blood cells to transport oxygen around the body is compromised. ' 17:53 Ferritin is your iron store. If your iron store is depleted then your ability to make healthy new blood cells is reduced and therefore you find exercise harder. Iron is key to transport oxygen around the body and for your muscles to take that oxygen out of the blood and turn it into energy. If those systems are depleted, your ability to exercise is compromised. 19:20 What is the difference being iron deficient and having iron deficiency anaemia? Iron deficiency anaemia is the last stage of iron deficiency. 23:30 How iron deficiency can also occur in men, even though it is more prevalent in women because menstruating women loose iron through their periods. 23:40 Why endurance athletes are more susceptible to iron deficiency, including muscular micro traumas, intravascular hemolysis (the destruction of red blood cells). Endurance runners have a greater rate of red blood cell destruction because of the impact forces and striking the ground so often. 26:00 The role of diet and nutrition in relation to iron deficiency. Vegetarians are more at risk of iron deficiency but it doesn't always have to be red meat. There are iron fortified cereals, pasta, bread, nuts. For vegans and for vegetarians it's a bit more complicated but there are expert nutritionists out there who have dietary restrictions 30:00 Iron supplementation - is it worth it? There is no evidence to show that if you are not iron deficient then taking a supplement would do anything positive. There are risks of being iron deficient but there are also risks of having too much iron in your system. 33:00 The role of iron infusions. "The problem with oral supplements is that they have to go through the gut and so you lose a lot of iron that way, so it can take months for someone to have their iron deficiency corrected." 34:38 Why taking iron supplements is not a form of doping or performance enhancing. "There is no evidence to suggest that giving someone iron if they don't need it will enhance performance, unless it is in combination with other things that we know will improve performance, like EPO." 37:40 The role of hepcidin in iron absorption. 41:10 Why timing is important to support absorption of iron. 44:15 Are there any differences between pre and post menopausal women and iron deficiency and any particular factors to take into account? Find out more Support this podcast

Always Wolves SquadCast
SOUTHAMPTON 0-1 WOLVES — FAN PHONE IN SHOW EXTRA TIME

Always Wolves SquadCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 62:10


LIVE Phone in show with Wolves fans discussing the match against Southampton at St Mary's.  Wolves fans give us the low down and tell it as they see it! With your hosts Dazzling Dave & Amy Thanks to our partners Spider VPN https://spidervpn.org/​​​​   Always Wolves! To get live on air with us for the next game just message to our Facebook page and we will send you the details on how to get on to the YouTube LIVE show. https://www.facebook.com/DDAlwaysWolves​    

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast
Episode 247: Art Historian Nora Hamerman Presents a Journey through Dante's Paradise

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 99:20


On September 21, 2021, as part of the Basilica of Saint Mary's 2021 Fall Faith and Culture Series, art historian Nora Hamerman shares a deep dive into Dante's masterpiece, the Divine Comedy, focusing specifically on the third and final part, Paradise. She presented a slide show depicting various great artists illustrating Dante's work. To see the slides that Mrs. Hamerman refers to, please click on the PowerPoint links below: https://stmaryoldtown.org/wp-content/uploads/PAradise-Part-1-St.-Mary.pdf https://stmaryoldtown.org/wp-content/uploads/Paradiso-Part-2-St-Mary.pdf

St Paul's Cathedral
Stories from St Paul's: Billy Fiske

St Paul's Cathedral

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 4:51


Stories from St Paul's - Season 2 In this first episode of Season 2 of 'Stories from St Paul's', discover more about American pilot Billy Fiske, who died in the Battle of Britain and is memorialised at St Paul's. Billy Fiske was an American solider and Olympic gold medallist for the American bobsleigh team. He claimed to be Canadian so he could join the Royal Air Force, and became one of the first American pilots killed in action during World War II during the Battle of Britain. He is buried in the churchyard of St Mary and St Blaise in Boxgrove, Sussex, and remembered with a memorial in the Crypt, unveiled in 1941, which reads "An American citizen who died that England might live." His RAF flying wings are located below this plaque. Produced and presented by Douglas Anderson

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast
Episode 241: The Basilica of St. Mary's Society of St. Vincent de Paul Serves Our Neighbors in Need

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:40


Our Lord reminds us that whatever we do for the poor among us we do for Him. We hear Him with our hearts and minds, but the daily demands of life can leave us without the opportunity to respond in a most personal way. Becoming a volunteer and/or making a sacrificial donation to our parish's St. Vincent de Paul (SVdP) Society is that opportunity. On the podcast, two of SVdP leaders, Jim Larocco and Pete Bautz, share amazing stories about how the society helps those in need and why the needs lately have been so great.   What makes SVdP unique among all charity providers in Alexandria is that we go to the people who call for help, visiting them in their homes, confirming their need, listening to their challenges, and showing them in the most real way that they are not alone and not forgotten by Our Lord. It is an extraordinary gift to be able to touch someone's life in this way.  Please join us for our upcoming open house at 314 Duke Street in Alexandria, VA, on September 27, 2021, at 7:30 p.m. to learn more. 

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA
NCTV45 CATHOLIC MASS SUNDAY HOLY SPIRIT PARISH (ST MARY'S) 8 AM SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 12 2021

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 66:20


With Me Now's podcast
With Naughty Fruit and Vegetables Now - squishy rubber banana

With Me Now's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 65:27


In this week's pod we pay our respects to, and say goodbye to, a much loved parkrun ambassador, we see how the Octogenarian meetup went, celebrate 500 Club capers and Danny profiles a sunny St Mary's parkrun in Bridport, Dorset.

Ohio Folklore
Bloody Bridge of St. Mary's

Ohio Folklore

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 38:41


Bridges represent so much to us.  They make the impassable, passable.  They connect us to the wider world.  Yet in folklore terms, bridges are magnets for ghosts.  Countless “crybaby bridges” dot the landscape of our great state.  We share and reshare tales of disembodied voices and misty shapes rising over the water.   So you might think this episode is just another trite tale of a haunted bridge.  Thank again.   Come hear the tale of the Bloody Bridge near St. Mary's.  This legendary story has been published in local newspapers for more than 160 years.  It's been written into a high school musical.  This wrenching narrative, a love triangle turned lethal, has captured the imaginations of Ohioans for generations.   Locals believe the tortured spirits of those lost, remain.  They erected a plaque, set in stone, to proclaim a history still very much alive.  Special thanks to Ms. Alysia Hatfield and Mr. Warren Bowery for their personal insights on the subject. If you enjoy this episode, please rate, review and subscribe to Ohio Folklore on your chosen podcast platform.  You can find Ohio Folklore at  Ohiofolklore.comFacebook.com/ohiofolklore And as always, keep wondering… Covert Affair - Film Noire by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100795 Artist: http://incompetech.com/

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA
NCTV45 CATHOLIC MASS SUNDAY HOLY SPIRIT PARISH (ST MARY'S) 8 AM SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 5 2021

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 76:26


Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive
Salvaging Pugin's Brasswork from St. Mary's Cathedral, Killarney

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 30:21


In the 1960s, Vatican 11 resulted in the introduction of great change in the Catholic Church, which included the dismantling and disappearance of many fine eclesiastical artifacts.Major structural work was carried out on the interior of St. Mary's Cathedral, Killarney in order to adapt the building for the renewal liturgy, and decorative brass work designed by the cathedral architect Agustus Pugin specifically for the building, was removed and sold.   Happily, the twelve brass electroliers have been repaired by the original manufacturers in Birmingham, and have been rehung in the cathedral.In this podcast you will hear the voices of the following people:Christa Link, daughter in law of German church architect, the late Clements Link who salvaged the brass work from St. Mary's Cathedral in 1972.Bishop Eamon Casey, Bishop of Kerry in 1972.Harry Wallace, Killarney architectJeanne Meldon, descendant of Agustus PuginNeil Phillips of Hardman & Co. Birmingham.Fr. Brian Doolan, author and Dean at St. Jad's Cathedral, BirminghamSean O'Grady,  member of Killarney CouncilAlex White, church architectDavid Cowan, stained glass artist and metal worker.

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA
NCTV45 CATHOLIC MASS SUNDAY HOLY SPIRIT PARISH (ST MARY'S) 8 AM SUNDAY AUGUST 29 2021

NCTV45 - The Train - New Castle, PA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 67:56


The Big 550 KTRS
St. Mary's High School: Celebrating 90 years!

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 8:41


Mike England, president of SMHS, on the school being open in the same location since 1931, getting back to school, expecting big crowds for the football games beginning tonight, seeing plenty of alumni still involved, plus much more! Check out their site: https://www.stmaryshs.com/

That's The Way The Cookie Crumbles
#114 | Luk Who's Back

That's The Way The Cookie Crumbles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 48:44


Romelu Lukaku scored his first Chelsea goal on his second debut, as they solidify that London is indeed blue! Manchester City beat Norwich 5-0 at the Etihad, in a game that was more one sided than a Lana Rhodes gang bang scene! Everton were left with one point instead of 3, as Leeds fought back to earn a point in Yorkshire! Manchester United were self sinners at St Mary's, with Southampton earning a well deserved point on the south coast!

Talk of the Devils - A show about Manchester United
Sobered by Saints: Reality Check?

Talk of the Devils - A show about Manchester United

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 44:26


Ian Irving hosts another Monday-debrief for The Athletic's Manchester United podcast, accompanied this time by Carl Anka and Andy Mitten. After the season started with a bang, United travelled to St Mary's in high spirits. Unfortunately, ninety minutes later they left with a solitary point and some thinking to do. Midfield reinforcements are the obvious answer, but is there anyone who fits the bill, and can a deal be done without selling any of the current squad? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Jimbo welcomes Daniel Storey, Matt Davies-Adams and Colin Millar into the pod after another pulsating Premier League weekend. Chelsea breeze past Arsenal at the Emirates with Lukaku scoring and immediately looking like the reference point for this side. The performance – and his personality – could be daunting for the rest of the Premier League. And how did Arsenal become so mediocre? It's a 100% record for Graham Potter's side too. But Bissouma still being at Brighton is baffling our panel. Should Solskjaer have started Sancho and Varane at Southampton? And are the margins so tight that United will rue the points dropped at St Mary's? Nick Miller fills us in on Nuno's winning return to Molineux. And Colin offers up an impassioned defence of the Europa Conference League Plus Livramento, Coventry and Savage's son. RUNNING ORDER:    • PART 1a: Arsenal 0-2 Chelsea (05m 00s) • PART 1b: Routine wins for City & Liverpool (17m 00s) • PART 2a: Brighton 2-0 Watford (24m 00s) • PART 2b: Southampton 1-1 Man Utd (28m 00s) • PART 3: Wolves 0-1 Spurs with Nick Miller (37m 00s) • PART 4: The rest of the Premier League weekend (47m 00s) • PART 5: The odds with Paddy Power (56m 30s) • PART 6: Tammy's terrific debut (58m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR 33% OFF THE PRICE OF AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   PARISH NOTICES: • we're sponsored by Paddy Power - home of the Money Back Special   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

100% United - A Manchester United Podcast
Disappointing Points Dropped - Southampton 1-1 Manchester United

100% United - A Manchester United Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 48:34


On today's 100% United Postgame Show we give our instant reaction to Manchester United's one all draw at Southampton. A defensive lineup and tepid display from the Reds sees us drop our first points of the season in just the second game. A Mason Greenwood equaliser looked to have sparked Solskjaer's team into life but United's resurgence at St Mary's fizzled out and left us all massively disappointed. Become a 100% United Member - patreon.com/united100 Get 10% off at vintageunitedshirts.com with Promo Code UNITED100

Southampton FC: The Final Whistle
THE FINAL WHISTLE: Southampton 1-1 Manchester United

Southampton FC: The Final Whistle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 26:46


Kenzie Benali and Steve Forbes are joined by Dean Hammond and Adam Leitch to talk about Southampton's first game back at St Mary's this season, as the Saints got their first point of the campaign against Manchester United.

Tokyo Alumni Podcast
Tokyo Alumni Podcast Episode 72: Harald Gjerde, MD, FRCSC (St. Mary's 2006) - Doctor - Pediatric Ophthalmologist

Tokyo Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 28:58


Harald Gjerde, MD, FRCSC (St. Mary's 2006) Physician – Pediatric Ophthalmologist ​ Harald is a Canadian national who is ethnically Norwegian and Chinese, who was born and raised in Tokyo. He attended the now-closed Santa Maria International School, later transferring and graduating from St. Mary's International School as Valedictorian for the class of 2006. ​He earned an Honors degree in Microbiology and Immunology from McGill University and completed medical school at the University of Manitoba. He completed a residency in Ophthalmology at Dalhousie University, and finished a fellowship in Pediatric Ophthalmology at Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School. He was the Clinical Director of the Special Olympics Canada Opening Eyes eye-screening program for Atlantic Canada. He has worked as a professional narrator and voice actor, to authoring scientific papers, as well as being a published poet and writer. He will be moving to Vancouver this winter to work for the BC Children's Hospital as a Pediatric Ophthalmologist, and work as a Clinical Instructor at the University of British Columbia. TIMESTAMPS 1:05 - Introduction 4:45 - When did you want to become a doctor? 7:58 - How has growing up overseas affected your practice as a doctor? 14:04 - Choosing Canada or the US for school for someone who wants to go to med school 21:04 - Santa Maria and St. Marys 25:00 - What is to come

His Grace Bishop Youssef
St. Mary and the Virtue of Forbearance (Arabic - عربي)

His Grace Bishop Youssef

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 52:16


Vespers Sermon @ St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church, Colleyville - TX ~ August 21, 2021

Saint Mary Houston, TX
2021-08-20 "St Mary and the life of purity" - Arabic

Saint Mary Houston, TX

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 44:35


العذراء وحياة النقاوة

Celticunderground:The Celtic Football Fan Podcast
The Game Ep 7 Barca 125 - 21082021 00

Celticunderground:The Celtic Football Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 67:17


The Game Episode 7 - Barca 125   November 7th 2012.  The night before a Mass was held in St Mary's to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the forming of Celtic Football Club and that week illustrated that Big Billy's words about there being a fairytale about this club were never more true.   We has invited the board of Barca to share in our commemoration mass and the following night they visited the Cathedral of noise that was Celtic Park as 60,000 fans and 13 players put on a show that had the whole world talking.   On this weeks podcast Antony Murray and I discuss The Game with Ewan McLean (@_ewanmclean).  We talk about what he was doing at the time and the marvel of that evening.  Paul Hayward of The Telegraph wrote “ Somehwere between madness and love, this fanaticism did for Barcelona on a night when the Celtic team and their disciples were indivisible.  Money can't buy you that”   What a night! The world's greatest team beaten by the world's greatest club….

St. John's Episcopal Cathedral Podcast
Feast of St. Mary the Virgin Sister Greta Ronningen & Brother Dennis Gibbs

St. John's Episcopal Cathedral Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 14:42


Feast of St. Mary the Virgin Sister Greta Ronningen & Brother Dennis Gibbs by St. John's Episcopal Cathedral Los Angeles

PDPodcast
Homily for St. Mary, Mother of Our Lord

PDPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 8:56


Text: Luke 1:44-56

His Grace Bishop Youssef
St Mary & The Virtue of Tolerance (Arabic - عربي)

His Grace Bishop Youssef

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 47:05


Lecture @ St. Mary & St. Moses Coptic Orthodox Abbey, Sandia, TX ~ August 19, 2021

Saints Prime Podcast
Ep.121- Everton Loss & Man United next (VoiceFM 103.9 Saturday Show)

Saints Prime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 53:28


In this week's episode of the Saints Score, Harry, Ollie, Jamie, and Mikey come together for the first time this season to discuss Southampton's defeat to Everton. Analysing the match and where it was lost, the foursome look ahead to Manchester United at St Mary's. The Saints Score is also available on VoiceFM 103.9 every Friday at 2PM and every Saturday at 12PM. Make sure you're subscribed to never miss an episode, share with your friends who would enjoy it and leave a review as well. Find all our info here

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast
Southampton v Man Utd | C.O.T.C. with @CS_Wipeout & @ismyCAPplaying | Planet #FPL

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 45:23


On the first Clash of the Correspondents of the new season James is joined by Matt Samuel and Gary Robinson to preview Sunday's GW2 clash at St Mary's between Southampton & Man Utd. Can the Saints stop leaking goals? Defensive issues remain a concern and it only adds to the appeal of United's Bruno Fernandes who is buzzing following an opening weekend hat-trick against Leeds. Is Bruno now the best captaincy option this weekend...? Plus, there's a deeper dig into the squads... Is 4.0 Valentino Livramento now the first choice Southampton right-back? Can Adam Armstrong score enough goals to help push Saints up the table? Are there rotation concerns ahead for the likes of Mason Greenwood? And what now for Paul Pogba? Is he likely to stay part of an attacking front four for United? Follow Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CS_Wipeout Follow Gary on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ismyCAPplaying Join our Planet FPL mini league, the winner will be invited on to a Planet FPL Podcast next summer! The code is d7mmxw or you can auto join at the link below https://fantasy.premierleague.com/leagues/auto-join/d7mmxw Coming Up on Friday on Planet FPL - Ask James returns, streaming live on YouTube at 3pm (UK) with an audio version to follow shortly afterwards ____________________________________________ Want to become a member of our FPL community? Join us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/planetfpl Follow James on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlanetFPLPod Follow Suj on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sujanshah Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/planetfpl Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/planetfpl Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8043oOKTB4uP8Nq15Kz6bg

Saint Mary Houston, TX
2021-08-17 "St Mary as a model of intercessions and prayers" - English

Saint Mary Houston, TX

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 42:59


Seeing Red A UK True Crime Podcast
10: The Torture and Murder of Victoria Climbié - PLEASE READ SHOW NOTES BEFORE LISTENING

Seeing Red A UK True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 88:11


This week, I'm joined by my sister, Laura, who is a child protection expert, to discuss the torture and murder of eight-year-old Victoria Climbié. This is the story of an impoverished girl who was plucked from the volatile planes of the Ivory Coast with the promise of a new life in Europe. A life filled with luxury and opportunity. What followed, however, was a living nightmare. Just fifteen months after being rescued from her homeland, Victoria would lie dead in her bed in the intensive care unit of St Mary's Hospital in London – the victim of one of the worst cases of child abuse in this country's history. **Please note, despite spending an hour doing sound checks, we still managed to mess up the recording a bit! If you listen through headphones, when Laura speaks, the sound levels will appear distorted and you will only hear her in your left headphone (if you listen through your device's speaker(s), it will be fine, you'll barely notice). When I speak, which is the vast majority of the episode, it's fine, there's no distortion.** www.patreon.com/seeingredpodcast Show Sponsors: www.beer52.com/RED www.issuu.com/podcast - use code RED at checkout for 50% off Theme music arranged and composed by Holly-Jane Shears - check out her work at www.soundcloud.com/DeadDogInBlackBag

Lakewood Anglican
St. Mary the Virgin

Lakewood Anglican

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 25:36


Sermon delivered by: The Rev. Sean Templeton

An Evening at Prayer - an Episcopal Evening Prayer Podcast
Feast of St. Mary the Virgin (Transferred)

An Evening at Prayer - an Episcopal Evening Prayer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 12:08


Led by: Officiant: Fr. Wiley Ammons, Psalm(s): Fr. Wiley Ammons, Old Testament: Fr. Wiley Ammons, Gospel: Mtr. Lisa Meirow, logo image by Laura Ammons, used by permission.

Zion Lutheran Church LCMS - Anchorage AK
St. Mary, Mother of Our Lord 2021

Zion Lutheran Church LCMS - Anchorage AK

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


READ THIS SERMON

Canadian History Ehx
The History Of St. Mary's

Canadian History Ehx

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 25:39


A community with a history that goes back over 200 years, it was where Timothy Eaton got his first real taste of success and the community itself has several stone buildings that still stand from its earliest years, earning it the name of The Stonetown. Support: www.patreon.com/canadaehx Donate: www.canadaehx.com E-mail: craig@canadaehx.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/craigbaird Instagram: @Bairdo37 YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx

A Morning at the Office - an Episcopal Morning Prayer Podcast
Feast of St. Mary the Virgin (Transferred)

A Morning at the Office - an Episcopal Morning Prayer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 14:09


Led by: Officiant: Mtr. Lisa Meirow, Psalm(s): Laura Ammons, Old Testament: Fr. Wiley Ammons, Gospel: Mtr. Lisa Meirow, logo image by Antonio Allegretti, used by permission.

Lutheran Preaching and Teaching from St. John Random Lake, Wisconsin
"He who is mighty has done great things for me!" St. Mary, Mother of God - August 15, 2021

Lutheran Preaching and Teaching from St. John Random Lake, Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 17:37


The child of St. Mary is the Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God. We call Mary blessed because the Father blessed her with the Son who would save her. It is said that women will be saved through childbirth (1 Timothy 2:15). The bearing of children is a blessing, one to be received in faith and devotion. St. Mary exemplifies such receptivity despite the scandal of her virgin birth. Even more so, this child is both blessing to her and a blessing to everyone who calls on his holy name.

Holy Trinity Lutheran
8.15.21 - The Feast of St. Mary Sermon

Holy Trinity Lutheran

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 29:29


"One Father, One Brothet, One Mother"; Luke 1:39-55

Pastor Scamman
St. Mary, Mother of God

Pastor Scamman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 11:34


Today, as the Christian church gathers to receive the gifts of Christ, we remember St. Mary, who was chosen from all women to become the mother of God. This is the highest honor ever bestowed upon any member of the human race, and every generation since has rightly called her the blessed virgin Mary.…

Any Questions? and Any Answers?
This week's Any Questions? comes from the St Mary the Virgin Parish Church in Leigh, Greater Manchester.

Any Questions? and Any Answers?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 46:42


Topical debate with Chris Mason and guests. Listeners' responses with Anita Anand.

Inside Health
The vulva & your GP medical records

Inside Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 27:54


Do you know your mons pubis from your labia majora? Few of us can identify the parts of the vulva - that's the external female genitals. So I go exploring with Dr Fiona Reid from St Mary's Hospital in Manchester and find out why we all need to be better informed. Also, who should be able to look at your medical records? There are grand plans afoot to collect the data your GP holds on you and make it available to researchers. We discuss the pros and the cons with Prof Martin Landray from Oxford University and GP Dr Margaret McCartney. PRESENTER: James Gallagher PRODUCER: Beth Eastwood

Morning Air
Bishop Edward Scharfenberger, feast of the Transfiguration/Fr. James Kubicki, feast of the dedication of the Basilica of St. Mary Major

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 47:32


Tomorrow is the feast of the Transfiguration. Bishop Edward Scharfenberger joins us to talk about this great feast!   Fr. James Kubicki is with us to talk about about the feast of the dedication of the Basilica of St. Mary Major where the Pope visits before and after every trip. All show notes at Bishop Edward Scharfenberger, feast of the Transfiguration/Fr. James Kubicki, feast of the dedication of the Basilica of St. Mary Major - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Divine Office Liturgy of the Hours  The Maine Catholic Guide
Aug 5, 2021 Liturgy of the Hours - Dedication of St. Mary Major- Morning Prayer

Divine Office Liturgy of the Hours The Maine Catholic Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 11:35


Voices of Montana
If Infrastructure Dollars are Headed St. Mary’s Way, Where Will It Go?

Voices of Montana

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021


The federal government is working on an infrastructure funding package that has tentatively earmarked $100 million to repair the critical, but aging St. Mary’s diversion system. Would this funding lead to true rehabilitation or would it be a series of temporary fixes? Could it increase its overall efficiency? Click the podcast to hear Phillips County ... Read more

Christ Anglican
Evensong for the Feast of St. Mary of Magdala, Apostle to the Apostles

Christ Anglican

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 31:13


Psalms 58 & 60; Ezra 10; John 1:1-28 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christanglican-hotsprings/support

Woman's Hour
Female truckers; Dealing with disappointment; Caitlin Moran; Maternity failings

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 57:32


There is currently a huge shortage of road hauliers in the UK. According to the Road Haulage Association, up to 100,000 more lorry drivers are needed to transport the food, medicines and equipment vital to the UK economy. It's estimated that 95% of all the products we consume are at some point moved around by road freight. And with Brexit, the Suez Canal blockage, and coronavirus restrictions causing big logistical issues, more people are urgently needed…. But of the half a million licensed lorry drivers, only 5% are women. Why is this? And what would encourage more women to get behind the wheel? Emma speaks to driver Suzy Mackenzie and Kate Lester, the Chief Executive of Diamond Logistics. Disappointment is a fact of life, but that doesn't make it any easier when it comes. At last night's Wimbledon, 18 year old British wildcard Emma Raducanu had to retire from her last-16 match after suffering apparent breathing difficulties. Although we're still not sure exactly what happened, it's not a huge leap of imagination to say that she'll be disappointed to see the end of her dream debut. But what can us mere mortals take from it? Annabel Croft, BBC tennis commentator and former British number one, and Julia Samuels, psychotherapist and author of 'This Too Will Pass: Stories of Crisis, Change and Hopeful Beginnings', talk about the nature of disappointment and the strategies we can use to pick ourselves up again. Caitlin Moran is a journalist and columnist at The Times. Her first book ‘How to Be a Woman” came out in 2011 and has sold more than a million copies in 28 countries. The sequel ‘More than a Woman' came out last year and is out in paperback today. She is currently on a live UK tour and joins Emma to talk about motherhood, daughters, female friendship and coming to terms with getting older. Maternity services in England are failing mothers and babies leading to hundreds of avoidable deaths each year, according to a damning report by the Health and Social Care committee on maternity safety in England. It also describes a "debilitating culture of blame" preventing lessons being learned from previous tragedies. Jeremy Hunt, the former health secretary and chair of the committee pointed out that 1,000 more babies a year would survive if England's maternity services were as safe as Sweden's. The committee's report found although maternity safety had improved, the deaths of a number of newborn babies at several hospitals in recent years were a reminder that much more needs to be done. Emma is joined by Dame Professor Lesley Regan, Head of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at St Mary's, Imperial College and past President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

Everyday Fitness w/ Coach Marc
037: What is WHOLE BODY Training w/ Dan John

Everyday Fitness w/ Coach Marc

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 34:55


About Dan John: Dan John has spent his life with one foot in the world of lifting and throwing, and the other foot in academia. An All-American discus thrower, Dan has also competed at the highest levels of Olympic lifting, Highland Games and the Weight Pentathlon, an event in which he holds the American record. Dan spends his work life blending weekly workshops and lectures with full-time writing, and is also an online religious studies instructor for Columbia College of Missouri. As a Fulbright Scholar, he toured the Middle East exploring the foundations of religious education systems. Dan is also a Senior Lecturer for St Mary's University, Twickenham, London. His books, on weightlifting, include Intervention, Never Let Go, Mass Made Simple and Easy Strength, written with Pavel Tsatsouline as well as From Dad, To Grad. He and Josh Hillis co-authored “Fat Loss Happens on Monday.” In 2015, Dan wrote Can You Go? on his approach to assessments and basic training. In addition, Before We Go, another compilation akin to Never Let Go became an Amazon Bestseller. In early 2017, Dan's book, Now What?, his approach to Performance and dealing with “life,” became a Bestseller on Amazon. Hardstyle Kettlebell Challenge, published also in 2017, focused on the keys to the kettlebell. His most recent book, Attempts, is a collection of short essays for both the professional coach and trainer and the “rest of us.” He is currently working on a new edition of “Easy Strength” with Pavel. Subscribe to the Workout Generator https://danjohnuniversity.com/ (HERE) Make a Difference. Live. Love. Laugh. Balance work, rest, play and pray (enjoy beauty and solitude) Sleep soundly. Drink Water. Eat veggies and protein. Walk. Wear your seat belt. Don't smoke. Floss your teeth. Put weights overhead. Pick weights off the floor. Carry weights. Reread great books. Say thank you. http://danjohn.net/wandering-weights/ (Join HERE for my weekly Newsletter, "Wandering Weights") http://www.otpbooks.com/product-category/dan-john/?ref=2 (My Movement Lectures are available here) http://www.amazon.com/Dan-John/e/B0026DJ2AI/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1 (My Amazon Page has links to both my books and my blog) http://danjohn.net/ (My website). Most questions have been answered already http://www.davedraper.com/fusionbb/showforum.php?fid/73/ (HERE at my Q and A Forum).