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4th-century Christian saint and martyr

  • 706PODCASTS
  • 1,140EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 7, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about st george

Real Business Owners
Start Up and Grind | Episode 132

Real Business Owners

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 44:05


This week, Kale was asked to speak to a local entrepreneurship group in St George. Listen up and hear what tips Kale has to share for those local in his community! Connect with John on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marketingsavage/?hl=en Video of this podcast is available at YouTube.com/RealBusinessOwners. Connect with us on Instagram and Facebook @RealBusinessOwners. Need bookkeeping or accounting services for your business? Reach out to Easier Accounting at 888-620-0770 or by visiting EasierAccounting.com. Interested in fixing your credit? Visit SixtyDayCreditRepair.com.

Saint of the Day
Our Father among the Saints Nicholas the Wonderworker, Archbishop of Myra (345)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 3:43


Our beloved holy Father Nicholas is, along with St George (and second to the All-holy Theotokos), probably the best-loved Saint of the Church. His numberless miracles through the ages, on behalf of the countless Christians who have called on him, cannot be told.   He was born in Lycia (in Asia Minor) around the end of the third century, to pious Christian parents. His love of virtue, and his zeal for observing the canons of the Church, were evident from his infancy, when he would abstain from his mother's breast every Wednesday and Friday until the evening. From early youth he was inclined to solitude and silence; in fact, not a single written or spoken word of the Saint has come down to us. Though ordained a priest by his uncle, Archbishop Nicholas, he attempted to withdraw to a hermit's life in the Holy Land; but he was told by revelation that he was to return home to serve the Church publicly and be the salvation of many souls.   When his parents died, he gave away all of his inheritance to the needy, and thereafter almsgiving was his greatest glory. He always took particular care that his charity be done in secret. Perhaps the most famous story of his open-handedness concerns a debt-ridden man who had no money to provide dowries for his daughters, or even to support them, and in despair had resolved to give them into prostitution. On three successive nights the Saint threw a bag of gold into the window of the man's house, saving him and his daughters from sin and hopelessness. The man searched relentlessly to find and thank his benefactor; when at last he discovered that it was Nicholas, the Saint made him promise not to reveal the good deed until after he had died. (This story may be the thin thread that connects the Saint with the modern-day Santa Claus).   God honored his faithfulness by granting him unparalleled gifts of healing and wonderworking. Several times he calmed storms by his prayers and saved the ship that he was sailing in. Through the centuries he has often done the same for sailors who call out to him, and is considered the patron of sailors and all who go to sea.   He was elected Bishop of Myra not long before the great persecutions under Diocletian and Maximian (c. 305), and was put in prison, from which he continued to encourage his flock in the Faith. When the Arian heresy wracked the Church not long after Constantine came to the throne, St Nicholas was one of the 318 Bishops who gathered in Nicea in 325. There he was so incensed at the blasphemies of Arius that he struck him on the face. This put the other bishops in a quandary, since the canons require that any hierarch who strikes anyone must be deposed. Sadly, they prepared to depose the holy Nicholas; but in the night the Lord Jesus and the most Holy Theotokos appeared to them, telling them that the Saint had acted solely out of love for Truth, not from hatred or passion, and that they should not act against him.   While still in the flesh, he sometimes miraculously appeared in distant places to save the lives of the faithful. He once saved the city of Myra from famine by appearing to the captain of a ship full of grain, telling him to take his cargo to the city. He appeared in a dream to Constantine to intercede for the lives of three Roman officers who had been falsely condemned; the three grateful soldiers later became monks.   The holy bishop reposed in peace around 345. His holy relics were placed in a church built in his honor in Myra, where they were venerated by throngs of pilgrims every year. In 1087, after Myra was conquered by the Saracens, the Saint's relics were translated to Bari in southern Italy, where they are venerated today. Every year, quantities of fragrant myrrh are gathered from the casket containing his holy relics

The Science Hour
Omicron, racism and trust

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 62:38


South Africa announced their discovery of the Omicron variant to the world as quickly as they could. The response from many nations was panic and the closure of transport links with southern Africa. Tulio de Oliveira who made the initial announcement and leads South Africa's Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation tells us this is now having a negative effect on the country, with cases rising but vital supplies needed to tackle the virus not arriving thanks to the blockade. Omicron contains many more mutations than previous variants. However scientists have produced models in the past which can help us understand what these mutations do. Rockefeller University virologist Theodora Hatziioannou produced one very similar to Omicron and she tells us why the similarities are cause for concern. Science sleuth Elisabeth Bik and Mohammad Razai, professor of Primary Care in St George's University in London have just been awarded the John Maddox Prize for their campaigning investigations in science. Elisabeth is particularly concerned with mistakes, deliberate or accidental in scientific publications, and Mohammad structural racism in approaches to healthcare. Laura Figueroa from University of Massachusetts in Amhert in the US, has been investigating bees' digestive systems. Though these are not conventional honey bees, they are Costa Rican vulture bees. They feed on rotting meat, but still produce honey. And, What makes things sticky? Listener Mitch from the USA began wondering while he was taking down some very sticky wallpaper. Our world would quite literally fall apart without adhesives. They are almost everywhere – in our buildings, in our cars and in our smartphones. But how do they hold things together? To find out, presenter Marnie Chesterton visits a luthier, Anette Fajardo, who uses animal glues every day in her job making violins. These glues have been used since the ancient Egyptians –but adhesives are much older than that. Marnie speaks to archaeologist Dr Geeske Langejans from Delft University of Technology about prehistoric glues made from birch bark, dated to 200,000 years ago. She goes to see a chemist, Prof Steven Abbott, who helps her understand why anything actually sticks to anything else. And she speaks to physicist Dr Ivan Vera-Marun at the University of Manchester, about the nanotechnologists using adhesion at tiny scales to make materials of the future. (Photo: Vaccination centre in South Africa administering Covid-19 vaccine after news of Omicron variant. Credit: Xabiso Mkhabela/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Science in Action
Omicron, racism and trust

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 29:59


South Africa announced their discovery of the Omicron variant to the world as quickly as they could. The response from many nations was panic and the closure of transport links with southern Africa. Tulio de Oliveira who made the initial announcement and leads South Africa's Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation tells us this is now having a negative effect on the country, with cases rising but vital supplies needed to tackle the virus not arriving thanks to the blockade. Omicron contains many more mutations than previous variants. However scientists have produced models in the past which can help us understand what these mutations do. Rockefeller University virologist Theodora Hatziioannou produced one very similar to Omicron and she tells us why the similarities are cause for concern. Science sleuth Elisabeth Bik and Mohammad Razai, professor of Primary Care in St George's University in London have just been awarded the John Maddox Prize for their campaigning investigations in science. Elisabeth is particularly concerned with mistakes, deliberate or accidental in scientific publications, and Mohammad structural racism in approaches to healthcare. Laura Figueroa from University of Massachusetts in Amhert in the US, has been investigating bees' digestive systems. Though these are not conventional honey bees, they are Costa Rican vulture bees. They feed on rotting meat, but still produce honey. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle (Photo: Vaccination centre in South Africa administering Covid-19 vaccine after news of Omicron variant. Credit: Xabiso Mkhabela/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Utah Golf Radio
Ep 695: Live Show on ESPN 700: Celebrating St. George Golf

Utah Golf Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 96:22


Sunbrook Head Pro Reed McArthur joins the live show on ESPN 700 to help us celebrate golf in St. George. Utah golf legend Jay Don Blake, Patrick Manning from Black Desert and the UGA's Cap'n Jake bring some southern sun. 

Oxygenaddict Triathlon Podcast, with Coach Rob Wilby and Helen Murray - Triathlon coaching by oxygenaddict.com
361 Kristian Blummenfelt: Ironman World Record breaker and Olympic Gold Medalist

Oxygenaddict Triathlon Podcast, with Coach Rob Wilby and Helen Murray - Triathlon coaching by oxygenaddict.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 1:16


Kristian Blummenfelt has just destroyed the World Record for Ironman, with his incredible 7.21 at Cozumel. He joins us the day after the race to tell us all about the race, the Olympic Gold medal, training at altitude in the solitude of the Sierra Nevada mountains. We also hear about his plans to be the first human to break the 7 hour barrier for Ironman, and how he plans to win both St George and Kona in 2022! Sponsorshttps://www.precisionhydration.com/ - Multi-strength electrolytes that match how you sweat, and Precision Fuel 30 Gel and Drink mix to ensure enough carbohydrate to perform at your best. Get 15% off your first order With the code OXYGENADDICT15· Take the Quick Carb Calculator· Take the Free online Sweat Test· Book a free 20-minute hydration and fueling strategy video consultationLike what you heard in this interview? Join hundreds of other age group triathletes making the most of their limited training time, training with Team OxygenAddict! http://team.oxygenaddict.com - The most comprehensive triathlon coaching program for busy age groupers. To find out more, You can book a zoom, phone or skype call with Rob or the Team here Join the Oxygenaddict Triathlon Community page on facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/666558563716897/Listen on Spotify: http://bit.ly/OATriPodSpotifyListen on iTunes: http://bit.ly/OATriPodiTunes

Sports Rehab Podcast
Episode 5 of

Sports Rehab Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:39


My 13 year old dd had ACL and Meniscus surgery on rt knee May 4th. She's been doing great but the last couple days she says it's painful on the inside of her knee just above her knee cap. Anyone else's child have pain?

Sports Rehab Podcast

My daughter is 3 months post-op ACL reconstruction (quad tendon) and small meniscus repair. She has been doing great and has full flexion/extension. Lately she notices that when she fully extends her leg, that she feels a shifting sensation in her knee when she bends it again. No pain, just a weird feeling. Anyone experience this?

Good Questions...with Cameron Dole
S2E151 - Brandon Lang, Gabrielle St. George, and John Schneider

Good Questions...with Cameron Dole

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 50:58


In this episode we talk about this weekend's NFL and NCAA football picks with Brandon Lang, discuss Gabrielle St. George's new book "How To Murder A Marriage: The Ex-Whisperer Files #1", and we talk about the new movie "Poker Run" with friend of the show John Schneider Brandon Lang - owner of brandonlang.com and host of "The Best Damn Sports Betting Pod Period" - shares his insight on this weekend's matchups in college and NFL football. Brandon also shares his thoughts on the current CFP rankings. He even gives his insight on who has the potential to be in the College Football Playoff. For more information please visit his website at https://www.brandonlang.com/ Author and screenwriter Gabrielle St. George tells us about her new mystery novel "How To Murder A Marriage: The Ex-Whisperer Files #1" - which is available now. Gabrielle talks about the writing process, especially the differences between screenwriting and novel techniques. We also discuss the inspiration behind the book, and what she learned about herself in the process. For more information about her book, socials and upcoming projects please visit https://www.gabriellestgeorge.com/ Actor, singer, director and friend of the show John Schneider talks about his new project "Poker Run" - which will be available November 26. John shares his inspiration to make the film, plus some great behind-the-scenes stories about the pandemic filming. For more information about his movies, music, social media and more visit https://johnschneiderstudios.com/ or get the John Schneider app for your mobile device. You can help support this podcast with a donation at www.BuyMeACoffee.com/GQwithCam For complete episode details, merch and more visit www.GQwithCam.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/camerondole/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/camerondole/support

C dans l'air
COMPLOT, TRUMP, WOKISME : QUAND L'AMÉRIQUE FAIT SÉCESSION – 12/11/21

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 64:39


COMPLOT, TRUMP, WOKISME : QUAND L'AMÉRIQUE FAIT SÉCESSION – 12/11/21 Invités NICOLE BACHARAN Historienne et politologue spécialiste des États-Unis Auteure de « Les grands jours qui ont changé l'Amérique » MARIE-CÉCILE NAVES Politiste spécialiste des États-Unis Directrice de l‘Observatoire « Genre et géopolitique » GALLAGHER FENWICK Directeur de la rédaction anglophone – « France 24 » PASCAL BONIFACE Directeur de l'IRIS Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques C'est le nouveau cri de ralliement antidémocrate aux Etats-Unis, un phénomène viral depuis quelques semaines : « Let's Go Brandon ». Un encouragement pour cacher une insulte au président américain. « Fuck Joe Biden ! », criaient à l'origine quelques spectateurs hostiles au chef de l'Etat, avant qu'une journaliste interviewant le pilote Brandon Brown ne traduise par « Let's Go Brandon ». La déformation est depuis reprise comme slogan et ce jusqu'au Sénat. Un engouement qui illustre toute l'ampleur d'un mouvement pro-Trump toujours vivace aux Etats-Unis, un an après l'élection de Biden. Et les complotistes de la mouvance QAnon eux aussi continuent d'exister. Des centaines se sont rassemblés il y a quelques jours à Dallas. Ils pensaient assister à la réapparition du fils de John.F.Kennedy, pourtant mort en 1999 dans un accident d'avion. Celui-ci devait selon eux mettre les points sur les « i » concernant Donald Trump : contester sa défaite de l'an dernier d'abord puis le rétablir président des Etats-Unis. Mais la résurrection n'a pas eu lieu. Et en attendant, les premières condamnations sont en cours pour l'invasion du Capitole en janvier dernier. 658 personnes au total ont été inculpées dans cette affaire. Pendant ce temps, à Bâton-Rouge en Lousiane, la communauté blanche pourtant minoritaire se crée un nouveau quartier coupé des afro-américains précaires. Avec cette nouvelle municipalité nommée St Georges, qui compte près de 90.000 habitants, c'est une tentative de ségrégation qui a lieu. Elle creuse encore plus le fossé racial entre les communautés dans la capitale de l'Etat du Pélican. Enfin, sur le plan international, l'heure est à l'effort de réconciliation entre les Etats-Unis et la France suite à la crise des sous-marins. La très discrète vice-présidente Kamala Harris a été reçue mercredi à l'Elysée. Le but est de relancer la coopération entre les deux pays. Et c'est dans un contexte plus global de difficultés pour la présidence Biden que s'effectue ce déplacement. En effet, le 46è président des Etats-Unis patine sur le plan intérieur comme à l'international. Après le retour au pouvoir des talibans et la brouille diplomatique avec la France, c'est à présent du côté de Taiwan que la situation s'envenime. L'île cristallise les tensions entre Washington et Pékin et le spectre d'une guerre apparaît. Alors, devons-nous nous inquiéter des mouvements pro-Trump et complotistes aux Etats-Unis ? De quels maux la volonté de ségrégation à Bâton-Rouge est il le symptôme ? Comment Joe Biden peut-il se relever de cette mauvaise passe ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

The Rugby League Digest
The Super League War - Chapter 30 - The Optus Cup (Part 4)

The Rugby League Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 107:16


In this concluding episode of Chapter 30: The Optus Cup, we discuss the semi-final runs of Manly and St George, the post mortems for their victims, a surprisingly entertaining grand final despite popular sentiment, the infamous Manson blunder, John Raper's memorabilia fiasco and much, much more! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Woman's Hour
Hollyoaks star Sarah Jayne Dunn, Russia advisor Fiona Hill, New induction guidelines

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:04


Fiona Hill was the top Russia advisor in the Trump administration, serving as Senior Director European and Russian Affairs on the National Security Council from 2017-2019. The daughter of a coal miner and midwife, she grew up in Bishop Auckland in the 60s, moving to the U.S. to escape the class and accent discrimination she faced in the UK. She served as a policy expert on Russia under three presidents but was catapulted to fame for her testimony at the first impeachment inquiry of President Trump. She has written about her experiences in a new memoir, There Is Nothing For You Here: Finding Opportunity In The 21st Century. Hollyoaks star Sarah Jayne Dunn is defending the OnlyFans pictures that led to her exit from the long-running soap. Sarah - who has played the character of Mandy Richardson on the show since 1996 - was reportedly axed after refusing to delete her OnlyFans social media account. The platform is often used as a means for people to sell pornographic photo and video content to paying subscribers. Sarah joins Emma. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence has published new guidelines on the induction of labour for pregnant women with what has been called a u-turn on their original proposals in the summer. Elizabeth Duff, senior policy advisor at the National Childbirth Trust (NCT) and Asma Khalil, Consultant Obstetrician at St George's Hospital in London and spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists explain what these changes mean. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Morning Prayer from Pasadena and Cormack NL
Morning Prayer for Sunday, November 7, 2021

Morning Prayer from Pasadena and Cormack NL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 22:58


Welcome to Morning Prayer! Today's service is led by the Rev.  Dr. Joseph Pagano, the Rev. Dr. Amy Richter, and parishioners Wanda Osmond (reading our first lesson), Charlotte and Benjamin Humber (leading the Lord's Prayer), and the Wildwood Singers of St George's Church leading our music ("Me Without You"). The sermon is by Rev. Amy. You can watch a video of the service here.Thank you for joining us today. God's blessings and joy to you.

Kate Dalley Radio
110421 UT Protest Monoclonal Ant Truth St George Get Military To Give This To You

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 46:09


110421 UT Protest Monoclonal Ant Truth St George Get Military To Give This To You by Kate Dalley

Our True Crime Podcast
144. A Family Shattered: Becky Watts, Bristol's Angel

Our True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 51:11


Cam and Jen are going to St George, Bristol, England in this listener-requested episode.Thursday, February 19, 2015, started like any other day. Dad, Darren, had left early for work. His wife, Anjie, was getting ready for a doctor's appointment when their 16-year-old daughter Becky knocked on the door. She was coming home from spending the night at a friend's house and her key didn't work. Becky went up to her room and was never seen again. Everyone is stunned when Becky's dismembered body is found close to home. Even more shocking was the person who confessed to her murder.Make sure you listen to the promo for DNA ID from AbJack EntertainmentThank you to OctoberpodVHS for our listener discretion. Please check out his YouTube channelfor amazing creepy stories. You may even hear Cam and Jen on a few.https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZQk-oAsjZNG18y8bX24c6wThank you to Nico for the toe-tapping theme music, plus sound and editing. wetalkofdreams.comSources:Evil WIthin by Darren Galsworthy. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Evil-Within-Murdered-stepbrother-heartbreaking-ebook/dp/B019MIKTJMhttps://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/murder-becky-watts-unseen-police-11492155https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x80r59shttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MtD5EjmKC0https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/becky-watts-killer-shauna-hoare-337https://tv.apple.com/us/episode/nathan-matthews--shauna-hoare/umc.cmc.a7gtaqbwyhhtlkyzy37y06z8?showId=umc.cmc.6fvpm4l8ub0mn5xgdlc5gs3shhttps://metro.co.uk/2018/11/30/schoolgirl-giggle-that-made-police-realise-she-had-killed-becky-watts-8194696/https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-51221854https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/nathan-matthews-killer-becky-watts-979https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Becky_Wattshttps://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/nov/11/nathan-matthews-shauna-hoare-becky-watts-dark-fantasies-realityhttps://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/becky-watts-murder-father-daughter-decapitated-morgue-nathan-matthews-a8032796.htmlhttps://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/reports/a13449692/what-happened-to-becky-watts-death-brother-nathan-matthews-shauna-hoare/https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/what-happened-becky-watts-killers-745839https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/mar/02/becky-watts-disappearance-timeline-16-year-old-bristolhttps://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/what-happened-becky-watts-killers-745839https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/becky-watts-murder-trial-schoolgirl-6597897https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1439988/dying-wish-of-murdered-becky-watts-stepmum-is-to-be-buried-with-teen-and-see-guilty-son-one-last-time/https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/becky-watts-s-body-was-cut-eight-parts-and-put-asda-carrier-bags-a6694656.htmlhttps://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/apr/17/becky-watts-funeral-bristolhttps://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/oct/08/becky-watts-was-happy-and-relaxed-in-days-before-she-was-killed-jury-toldhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hN4fYTXObcghttps://www.itv.com/news/westcountry/story/2015-10-19/becky-watts-trial-day-9/https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/932357/Becky-Watts-murder-told-social-worker-scared-abduction-reporthttps://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-34486247https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/becky-watts-murderer-nathan-matthews-645185https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/inside-squalid-house-horrors-murdered-6812008https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/becky-watts-grieving-family-murdered-5293816https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-32335353https://www.reddit.com/r/MakingaMurderer/comments/40h0mh/example_of_a_murder_where_the_killer_used_bleach/

Oxygenaddict Triathlon Podcast, with Coach Rob Wilby and Helen Murray - Triathlon coaching by oxygenaddict.com

Joe Skipper has had a fantastic season, winning both Ironman UK and Ironman Chattanooga, 2nd at Ironman Switzerland and 3rd at Ironman Lake Placid, as well as being picked to represent Team Europe at the Collins Cup. We catch up with Joe to hear about his races this season, his experience at the Collins Cup, his friendship with Lionel Sanders and Sam Long, his plans for the Ironman World Championships at St George, and why he's not afraid to take on Gustav and Kristian over the Ironman distance. Sponsorshttps://www.precisionhydration.com/ - Multi-strength electrolytes that match how you sweat, and Precision Fuel 30 Gel and Drink mix to ensure enough carbohydrate to perform at your best. Get 15% off your first order With the code OXYGENADDICT15· Take the Quick Carb Calculator· Take the Free online Sweat Test· Book a free 20-minute hydration and fueling strategy video consultationLike what you heard in this interview? Join hundreds of other age group triathletes making the most of their limited training time, training with Team OxygenAddict! http://team.oxygenaddict.com - The most comprehensive triathlon coaching program for busy age groupers. To find out more, You can book a zoom, phone or skype call with Rob or the Team here Join the Oxygenaddict Triathlon Community page on facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/666558563716897/Listen on Spotify: http://bit.ly/OATriPodSpotifyListen on iTunes: http://bit.ly/OATriPodiTunes

Culture Bytes
Exploring Paleontology and Museums with St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site

Culture Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 18:41


In this episode, we speak with Diana Call, Executive Director at the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm. Diana tells us about why the Discovery Site was founded in St. George, the various educational and research assets of the Site, and about an upcoming exhibit. Want to hear more? Head to our website today using the link below:https://www.utahculturalalliance.org/podcast_culture_bytes#UTCulture #UtahArts

Culture Bytes
Providing Public Art to St. George with the Art Around the Corner Foundation

Culture Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 24:05


In this episode, we speak to Marianne Hamilton of the Art Around the Corner Foundation. Marianne tells us about the history of the Foundation, how the Foundation supports artists through its "art on loan" program, and the Young CreatorsWant to hear more? Head to our website today using the link below:https://www.utahculturalalliance.org/podcast_culture_bytes#UTCulture #UtahArts

Culture Bytes
Showcasing Local Artists and Art Education with St. George Art Museum

Culture Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 24:40


In this episode, we speak with Natalie Gula, Administrator at the St. George Art Museum. Natalie tells us about the wide variety of educational programming offered at the museum, the newly launched ARTIE school bus, and how the gift shop serves to showcase local artists. Want to hear more? Head to our website today using the link below:https://www.utahculturalalliance.org/podcast_culture_bytes#UTCulture #UtahArts

Pre-Hospital Care
The evolution of Paramedic education with Lisa Burrell and Alan Rice

Pre-Hospital Care

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 48:44


In this episode we will examine the various ways in which paramedic education has evolved over the past 20 years both conceptually and the skills taught within the profession. Alan Rice and Lisa Burrell join me in this conversation, Alan is the lead for post-registration paramedic education at St Georges University, London. His role is predominately designing and organising the delivery of education for specialist and advanced paramedic roles in both urgent and critical care. He also oversee's the work force development of all qualified paramedics that are studying towards a higher education award. Alan also works as a consultant paramedic advising ambulance trusts. Lisa Burrell is both an Advanced Paramedic Practitioner in London and a senior lecturer at St Georges university. Lisa teaches on both the post and undergraduate cohorts and spends time teaching CCPs from different services. She has also spent over 8 years as a flight paramedic within London and has split her time between teaching and critical care. In the episode we talk about: · The concept of critical thinking & analysis - a central concept of education. · The diversity of care pathways and how this has changed over 20 years. · Non-technical skills taught and emphasised throughout the curriculum and course. · Mentoring - the importance of this. · Monitoring and the use of monitors within pre-hospital care. · Engagement with technology for current practitioners. · Skills that have evolved – USS, thrombolysis for VTE, prescribing, Abx, · Anecdotal thoughts on evolution of both the profession and the paramedic practice curriculum. The undergraduate Paramedic Science course at St Georges University London can be found here: https://www.sgul.ac.uk/study/courses/paramedic-science Please enjoy this conversation with two fantastic guests.

Endurance Planet
ATC 333: St. George Becomes World Champs, The “Sweet Spot” With Salt (And Why Too Little Isn't Good), Plus: A Quick Gut Health Protocol

Endurance Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 61:12


On this episode of Ask The Coaches with Tawnee and Lucho: Intro: Tawnee shares a few cute mis-pronunciations that Cora is saying these days. Lucho shares some innovative ideas and tweaks he’s making to his Ironman training. Sweet spot—how and why it’s useful, works and is ok for seasoned athletes but also making sure you […] The post ATC 333: St. George Becomes World Champs, The “Sweet Spot” With Salt (And Why Too Little Isn't Good), Plus: A Quick Gut Health Protocol first appeared on Endurance Planet.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Bedlam Asylum... um...Bethlem Royal Hospital. OLD AF.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 152:38


Today we are taking the train to a wonderful little building… Actually scratch that… This place was once so crazy( no pun intended) that its nickname became a common word.  The definition of the word is "A place or situation of chaotic uproar, and where confusion prevails. " The word is Bedlam. The place is Bethlehem Royal Hospital. The hospital is considered the first lunatic asylum. The word "bedlam" is derived from the hospital's nickname. Bedlam is a bastardization of the word bethlem, which in turn was a corruption of the name Bethlehem. Although the hospital became a modern psychiatric facility, historically it was representative of the worst excesses of asylums in the era of lunacy reform. We're gonna get into all that craziness tonight and see what kind of "Bedlam" actually went on there.    Bethlem Royal Hospital's origins are unlike any other psychiatric hospital in the western world. As a formal organization, it can be traced to its foundation in 1247, during the reign of King Henry III, as a Roman Catholic Monastery for the Priory of the 'New Order of St Mary of Bethlem' in the city of London proper. It was established by the Italian Bishop of Bethlehem, Goffredo de Prefetti, following a donation of personal property by the London Alderman and former City-Sheriff, the Norman, Simon FitzMary. It bears its name after its primary patron and original overseer. The initial location of the priory was in the parish of Saint Botolph, in Bishopsgate's ward, just beyond London's wall and where the south-east corner of Liverpool Street station now stands. Bethlem was not initially intended as a hospital, much less as a specialist institution for the mentally ill. Rather, its purpose was tied to the function of the English Church; the ostensible purpose of the priory was to function as a centre for the collection of alms to support the Crusaders, and to link England to the Holy Land. Bishop De Prefetti's need to generate income for the Crusaders, and restore the financial fortunes of his apostolic see was occasioned by two misfortunes: his bishopric had suffered significant losses following the destructive conquest of the town of Bethlehem by the Khwarazmian Turks in 1244; and the immediate predecessor to his post had further impoverished his cathedral chapter through the alienation of a considerable amount of its property. The new London priory, obedient to the Church of Bethlehem, would also house the poor, disabled and abandoned; and, if visited, provide hospitality to the Bishop, canons and brothers of Bethlehem. The subordination of the priory's religious order to the bishops of Bethlehem was further underlined in the foundational charter which stipulated that Bethlems's prior, canons and male and female inmates were to wear a star upon their cloaks and capes to symbolize their obedience to the church of Bethlehem.   During the 13th and 14th centuries, with its activities underwritten by episcopal and papal indulgences, Bethlem's role as a center for the collection of alms for the poor continued. However, over time, its link to the mendicant Order of Bethlehem increasingly devolved, putting its purpose and patronage in severe doubt. In 1346 the Prior of Bethlem, a position at that time granted to the most senior of London's monastic brethren, applied to the city authorities seeking protection; thereafter metropolitan office-holders claimed power to oversee the appointment of prios, and demanded in return an annual payment of 40 shillings from the coffers of the order. It is doubtful whether the City of London ever provided substantial protection, and much less that the priorship fell within their patronage, but dating from the 1346 petition, it played a role in the management of Bethlem's organization and finances.   By this time the crusader bishops of Bethlehem had relocated to Clamecy, France under the surety of the Avignon papacy. This was significant as, throughout the reign of King Edward III (1327–77), the English monarchy had extended its patronage over ecclesiastical positions through the seizure of alien priories, mainly French. These were religious institutions that were under the control of non-English religious houses. As a dependent house of the Order of Saint Bethlehem in Clamecy, Bethlem was vulnerable to seizure by the English crown, and this occurred in the 1370s when Edward III took control of all English hospitals. The purpose of this appropriation was to prevent funds raised by the hospital from enriching the French monarchy, via the papal court, and thus supporting the French war effort. After this event, the Head Masters of the hospital, semi-autonomous figures in charge of its day-to-day management, were crown appointees, and Bethlem became an increasingly secularized institution. The memory of Bethlem's foundation became muddled. In 1381 the royal candidate for the post of master claimed that from its beginnings the hospital had been superintended by an order of knights, and he confused the identity of its founder, Goffredo de Prefetti, with that of the Frankish crusader, Godfrey de Bouillon, the King of Jerusalem. The removal of the last symbolic link to the mendicant order was confirmed in 1403 when it was reported that master and inmates no longer wore the symbol of their order, the star of Bethlehem. This was exclusively a political move on the part of the hospital administrators, as the insane were perceived as unclean or possessed by daemons, and not permitted to reside on consecrated soil.   From 1330 Bethlehm was routinely referred to as a "hospital" does not necessarily indicate a change in its primary role from alms collection – the word hospital could as likely have been used to denote a lodging for travellers, equivalent to a hostel, and would have been a perfectly apt term to describe an institution acting as a centre and providing accommodation for Bethlem's peregrinating alms-seekers or questores. It is unknown from what exact date it began to specialise in the care and control of the insane. Despite this fact it has been frequently asserted that Bethlem was first used for the insane from 1377. This rather precise date is derived from the unsubstantiated conjecture of the Reverend Edward Geoffrey O'Donoghue, chaplain to the hospital, who published a monograph on its history in 1914. While it is possible that Bethlem was receiving the insane during the late fourteenth-century, the first definitive record of their presence in the hospital is provided from the details of a visitation of the Charity Commissioners in 1403. This recorded that amongst other patients then in the hospital there were six male inmates who were "mente capti", a Latin term indicating insanity. The report of the 1403 visitation also noted the presence of four pairs of manacles, eleven chains, six locks and two pairs of stocks although it is not clear if any or all of these items were for the restraint of the inmates. Thus, while mechanical restraint and solitary confinement are likely to have been used for those regarded as dangerous, little else is known of the actual treatment of the insane in Bethlem for much of the medieval period. The presence of a small number of insane patients in 1403 marks Bethlem's gradual transition from a diminutive general hospital into a specialist institution for the confinement of the insane; this process was largely completed by 1460. In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.    In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.   The position of master was a sinecure largely regarded by its occupants as means of profiting at the expense of the poor in their charge. The appointment of the early masters of the hospital, later known as keepers, had lain within the patronage of the crown until 1547. Thereafter, the city, through the Court of Aldermen, took control of these appointments where, as with the King's appointees, the office was used to reward loyal servants and friends. However, compared to the masters placed by the monarch, those who gained the position through the city were of much more modest status. Thus in 1561, the Lord Mayor succeeded in having his former porter, Richard Munnes, a draper by trade, appointed to the position. The sole qualifications of his successor in 1565 appears to have been his occupation as a grocer. The Bridewell Governors largely interpreted the role of keeper as that of a house-manager and this is clearly reflected in the occupations of most appointees during this period as they tended to be inn-keepers, victualers or brewers and the like. When patients were sent to Bethlem by the Governors of the Bridewell the keeper was paid from hospital funds. For the remainder, keepers were paid either by the families and friends of inmates or by the parish authorities. It is possible that keepers negotiated their fees for these latter categories of patients.   In 1598 the long-term keeper, Roland Sleford, a London cloth-maker, left his post, apparently of his own volition, after a nineteen-year tenure. Two months later, the Bridewell Governors, who had until then shown little interest in the management of Bethlem beyond the appointment of keepers, conducted an inspection of the hospital and a census of its inhabitants for the first time in over forty years. Their express purpose was to "to view and p[er]use the defaultes and want of rep[ar]ac[i]ons". They found that during the period of Sleford's keepership the hospital buildings had fallen into a deplorable condition with the roof caving in, the kitchen sink blocked up and reported that: "...it is not fitt for anye man to dwell in wch was left by the Keeper for that it is so loathsomly filthely kept not fitt for anye man to come into the sayd howse".   The 1598 committee of inspection found twenty-one inmates then resident with only two of these having been admitted during the previous twelve months. Of the remainder, six, at least, had been resident for a minimum of eight years and one inmate had been there for around twenty-five years. Three were from outside London, six were charitable cases paid for out of the hospital's resources, one was supported by a parochial authority, while the rest were provided for by family, friends, benefactors or, in one instance, out of their funds. The precise reason for the Governors' new-found interest in Bethlem is unknown but it may have been connected to the increased scrutiny the hospital was coming under with the passing of poor law legislation in 1598 and to the decision by the Governors to increase hospital revenues by opening it up to general visitors as a spectacle. After this inspection, the Bridewell Governors initiated some repairs and visited the hospital at more frequent intervals. During one such visit in 1607 they ordered the purchase of clothing and eating vessels for the inmates, presumably indicating the lack of such basic items.    The year 1634 is typically interpreted as denoting the divide between the mediaeval and early modern administration of Bethlem.    Although Bethlem had been enlarged by 1667 to accommodate 59 patients, the Court of Governors of Bethlem and Bridewell observed at the start of 1674 that "the Hospital House of Bethlem is very olde, weake & ruinous and to[o] small and straight for keeping the greater numb[e]r of lunaticks therein att p[re]sent". With the increasing demand for admission and the inadequate and dilapidated state of the building it was decided to rebuild the hospital in Moorfields, just north of the city proper and one of the largest open spaces in London. The architect chosen for the new hospital, which was built rapidly and at great expense between 1675 and 1676, was the natural philosopher and City Surveyor Robert Hooke. He constructed an edifice that was monumental in scale at over 500 feet (150 m) wide and some 40 feet (12 m) deep. The surrounding walls were some 680 feet (210 m) long and 70 feet (21 m) deep while the south face at the rear was effectively screened by a 714-foot (218 m) stretch of London's ancient wall projecting westward from nearby Moorgate. At the rear and containing the courtyards where patients exercised and took the air, the walls rose to 14 feet (4.3 m) high. The front walls were only 8 feet (2.4 m) high but this was deemed sufficient as it was determined that "Lunatikes... are not to [be] permitted to walk in the yard to be situate[d] betweene the said intended new Building and the Wall aforesaid." It was also hoped that by keeping these walls relatively low the splendour of the new building would not be overly obscured. This concern to maximise the building's visibility led to the addition of six gated openings 10 feet (3.0 m) wide which punctuated the front wall at regular intervals, enabling views of the facade. Functioning as both advertisement and warning of what lay within, the stone pillars enclosing the entrance gates were capped by the figures of "Melancholy" and "Raving Madness" carved in Portland stone by the Danish-born sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber.   At the instigation of the Bridewell Governors and to make a grander architectural statement of "charitable munificence", the hospital was designed as a single- rather than double-pile building,  accommodating initially 120 patients. Having cells and chambers on only one side of the building facilitated the dimensions of the great galleries, essentially long and capacious corridors, 13 feet (4.0 m) high and 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, which ran the length of both floors to a total span of 1,179 feet (359 m). Such was their scale that Roger L'Estrange remarked in a 1676 text eulogising the new Bethlem that their "Vast Length ... wearies the travelling eyes' of Strangers". The galleries were constructed more for public display than for the care of patients as, at least initially, inmates were prohibited from them lest "such persons that come to see the said Lunatickes may goe in Danger of their Lives"   The architectural design of the new Bethlem was primarily intended to project an image of the hospital and its governors consonant with contemporary notions of charity and benevolence.    By the end of the 18th century the hospital was in severe disrepair. At this point it was rebuilt again on another site.  As the new facility was being built attempts were made to rehouse patients at local hospitals and admissions to Bethlem, sections of which were deemed uninhabitable, were significantly curtailed such that the patient population fell from 266 in 1800 to 119 in 1814. The Governors engaged in protracted negotiations with the City  for another municipally owned location at St. George's Fields in Southwark, south of the Thames.   The deal was concluded in 1810 and provided the Governors with a 12 acres site in a swamp-like, impoverished, highly populated, and industrialised area where the Dog and Duck tavern and St George's Spa had been.   A competition was held to design the new hospital at Southwark in which the noted Bethlem patient James Tilly Matthews was an unsuccessful entrant. Completed after three years in 1815, it was constructed during the first wave of county asylum building in England under the County Asylum Act ("Wynn's Act") of 1808. Female patients occupied the west wing and males the east, the cells were located off galleries that traversed each wing. Each gallery contained only one toilet, a sink and cold baths. Incontinent patients were kept on beds of straw in cells in the basement gallery; this space also contained rooms with fireplaces for attendants. A wing for the criminally insane – a legal category newly minted in the wake of the trial of a delusional James Hadfield for attempted regicide – was completed in 1816. Problems with the building were soon noted as the steam heating did not function properly, the basement galleries were damp and the windows of the upper storeys were unglazed "so that the sleeping cells were either exposed to the full blast of cold air or were completely darkened". Faced with increased admissions and overcrowding, new buildings, designed by the architect Sydney Smirke, were added from the 1830s. The wing for criminal lunatics was increased to accommodate a further 30 men while additions to the east and west wings, extending the building's facade, provided space for an additional 166 inmates and a dome was added to the hospital chapel. At the end of this period of expansion Bethlem had a capacity for 364 patients. In 1930, the hospital moved to the suburbs of Croydon,[211] on the site of Monks Orchard House between Eden Park, Beckenham, West Wickham and Shirley. The old hospital and its grounds were bought by Lord Rothermere and presented to the London County Council for use as a park; the central part of the building was retained and became home to the Imperial War Museum in 1936. The hospital was absorbed into the National Health Service in 1948. 1997 the hospital started planning celebrations of its 750th anniversary. The service user's perspective was not to be included, however, and members of the psychiatric survivors movement saw nothing to celebrate in either the original Bedlam or in the current practices of mental health professionals towards those in Mneed of care. A campaign called "Reclaim Bedlam" was launched by Pete Shaughnessy, supported by hundreds of patients and ex-patients and widely reported in the media. A sit-in was held outside the earlier Bedlam site at the Imperial War Museum. The historian Roy Porter called the Bethlem Hospital "a symbol for man's inhumanity to man, for callousness and cruelty."  The hospital continues to operate to this day in this location.    Ok so with that history out of the way let's drive into what really transpired to give this hospital it reputation and that drove Bedlam to strain it's current meaning in our lexicon.    Early on Sanitation was poor and the patients were malnourished. Most of the patients were able to move about freely, but those who were considered dangerous were kept chained to the walls. Patients' families often dumped unwell family members in the asylum and disowned them. We've discussed other asylums and things dealing with them so we won't get into the fact that most of the patients were horribly misdiagnosed due to little to no understanding of mental health until relatively recently. Some of the treatments used ranged from barbaric and esoteric to just plain crazy.    One of those crazy ass ones was called rotational therapy. Charles Darwin's grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, began using “rotational therapy”, which involved spinning a patient around and around on a chair or swing for up to an hour. They would sometimes be spun over 100 times per minute. Obviously this would create issues for the patient. Many would get sick and vomit. Most would become very upset and distraught while becoming severely disoriented. The vomiting was seen as a good thing and progress in the treatment. Doctor Joseph Mason Cox was a doctor who actually picked up this type of treatment later on. The time spent spinning, and the speed of the spin, were to be determined by the good doctor. Considering the fact that the common side effect was fear, extreme pallor, vomiting, and voiding the bowels and bladder, the doctor evidently commonly overdid it. Of course he didn't think so at the time. He wrote happily that, “after a few circumvolutions, I have witnessed the soothing lulling effects, when the mind has become tranquillized and the body quiescent.” It's true that after being spun until fluid leaves the body via every available orifice, most people have had the fight taken out of them and are ready for a nap. There is one positive side effect of this kind of rampant torture of the insane. Scientists started noticing that vertigo has visual effects, and used the chairs to study them. These rotating chairs mark the beginning of a lot of visual and mental experiments done on perception. The early 1800s were a particularly grim time, and many patients were chained to the walls naked or almost naked, as the medical director felt that it was necessary to break each person's will.    Some of the more barbaric and esoteric treatments included bloodletting, leeches and good old fashioned starvation and beatings.  Ice baths would often be used to try and calm down hysterical patients.    At the time, bloodletting was believed to be a completely acceptable and normal way to cure a patient of a variety of mental and physical ailments. Doctors thought that they could literally bleed a sickness out of a patient, which not only doesn't work, it extra-double doesn't work on mental illnesses. Many of the patients were forced to undergo treatment with leeches and the induction of blisters, which mostly just sounds unpleasant, but it often proved fatal. Reportedly, the physicians at the time at least understood that everyone needs blood, so only patients who were deemed strong enough to undergo treatment were allowed to have this "cure."    Here's another fun one. A doctor named William Black wrote that patients were placed in straitjackets and given laxatives, which was seen at Bethlem as one of the "principal remedies." Hearing voices? Some explosive diarrhea oughta clear that up. Seizures? One diarrhea for you. Diarrhea for everyone!   We all know the best thing for someone who may not be in their right mind is to be left alone… in the dark… for long periods of time… Like really long periods of time. Well we may know that's probably NOT the best, but Bedlam never got the message. Some patients were left alone in solitary for days, weeks, even months at a time. Seems very counterproductive.    One of the worst ones was the example of the inhumane conditions was that of James Norris. Norris, an American Marine, had been sent to Bethlem on the 1st of February 1800. Her was kept in Bethlem's “incurable wing,” Norris' arms were pinned to his sides by iron bars. He was also kept chained to the wall by his neck. This fifty-five-year-old man had been continuously kept in this position for “more than twelve years.”   The apathy of families abandoning their relatives to a hellish existence in Bethlem led to a new form of exploitation. From the 1700s to the 1800s, there was a marked increase in the dissection of bodies to learn more about human anatomy. In the 1790s, Bethlem's chief surgeon was Bryan Crowther, a man who saw opportunity in the search for corpses to study. Crowther would dissect Bethlem's dead patients in the name of medical science, believing that he would be able to find a difference in the brains of his mentally ill patients, compared to “normal” people. Of course, he did these operations without any kind of consent or legal right.   One of the best ways to sum up the reasoning behind this torture is to let you know from the man who was behind the worst of it. John Haslam was one of the most sinister figures in the history of Bethlem, and it was while he was the head of management that the institution sunk to a new low in depravity. While Bryan Crowther was conducting illegal dissections as chief surgeon, Haslam used various tortures against the patients. He was adamant that the first step to curing the patients was breaking their wills first. So ya… They figured fuck em… Break their will and they'll be fine… Wow. Oftentimes patients would lack even basic amenities for living. That includes proper clothing and food.    To make things even worse for the patients, from approximately the early 1600s until 1770, the public was able to go for a wander through Bedlam. Money was collected as entrance fees, and it was hoped that seeing the crazy people would make people feel sufficiently compassionate that they would donate funds to the hospital. Another reason for this is that they hoped it would attract the families of these patients and that they would bring those patients food and clothing and other things they needed so the hospital would not have to provide them.    Oh if that's not bad enough, how about the mass graves. Modern-day construction of the London Underground unearthed mass graves on the grounds of Bethlem, created specifically to get rid of the corpses of those who didn't survive the hospital's care. Discovered in 2013, the mass graves dating back to 1569, and there are somewhere close to 20,000 people buried in them. Amazingly, authorities have managed to identify some of the deceased, but many others will likely never get a face and name.   Anything about any of these areas being haunted? Yup we got that too. Although the first few sites have long been transformed into other things, the girls that happened there could have left tons of negative juju. We found this cool story.            "The Liverpool Street Underground Station was opened in February of 1874 on the site of the original Bedlem Hospital. Former patients haunt this busy section of the London Underground.    One compelling sighting happened in the summer of 2000. A Line Controller spotted something strange on the CCTV camera that he was monitoring that showed the Liverpool Station. It was 2:00 am in the morning and the station was closed for the night. This witness saw a figure wearing white overalls in an eastbound tunnel. He became concerned since he knew no contractors worked the station this late at night. He called his Station Supervisor to report what he was seeing on the screen.   The Supervisor went to investigate. The Line Controller watched as his Supervisor stood nearby the mysterious figure. So he was confused when his Supervisor called to say he had not seen any figure. The Line Controller told his boss that the figure had stood so close to him that he could have reached out and touched it. Hearing this the Supervisor continued to search for the figure.   Again the Line Controller saw the figure walk right passed his boss on his screen, but again his boss did not see the figure. The Supervisor finally giving up went to leave the station but as he did so he spotted white overalls placed on a bench that he had passed before. He stated that they could not have been placed there without him seeing who did it.   Even before the Liverpool Station was built the area where the hospital stood was considered haunted. Between 1750 and 1812 many witnesses reported hearing a female voice crying and screaming. It is believed that this is a former patient from Bedlam.    Rebecca Griffins was buried in the area. While alive she always frantically clutched a coin in her hand. Witnesses state they hear her asking where her ha' penny is."   Fun stuff!   The following comes from the old building that was turned into the imperial war museum.    It is said that  to this day  the spectres of those who suffered in Bedlam still roam the hallways and rattle their chains in remembered anguish.   During the Second World War, a detachment of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force was stationed inside the Imperial War Museum with barrage balloons. Much of the museum has parts that date back to Bedlam and it isn't hard to imagine them as cells full of the damned inmates. Many of the young girls who were garrisoned inside had never heard of the buildings sordid past, so had no reason to fear it. Yet soon complaints began to flood in as during the night many found they couldn't sleep, kept up by strange moaning and the rattling of chains. The long passed inmates of Bedlam made their displeasure well known. Eventually the complaints became so bad the entire detachment had to be rehoused nearby.   Possibly the most famous ghost of Bedlam is the sad spectre of poor Rebecca. At a merchant's house by London Bridge lived a lovely young girl by the name of Rebecca. She fell head over heels in love with a handsome young Indian man who had come to lodge with the family. So besotted was she that when he packed up his bags to return to India she was shocked that he hadn't loved her quite nearly as much as she'd loved him. She helped him to pack his things, hoping all the while that he would change his mind and agree to stay. But all she received was a gold sovereign that he slipped into her hand before leaving forever.   The grief of her spurning was too much for her mind to handle and she snapped, soon being admitted to Bedlam Hospital. The golden sovereign he had given her was gripped firmly in her fist for the remainder of her short life, the final token from her lost love, never to be given up. When she finally wasted away into death it didn't go unnoticed by one of the guards who prised the coin from her hand and then buried her without her most prized possession. It was after that the guards, inmates and visitors all began to report a strange sight indeed. A wan and ghostly figure began to roam the halls of Bedlam, searching for her lost love token, her spirit refusing to be put to rest until she had it back in her hand. It is said that she still wanders the halls to this day, looking for that stolen coin to make her whole once more.   Well… There you have it, the history and craziness of Bedlam Asylum!    British horror movies https://screenrant.com/best-british-horror-movies/   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

The Cookie Jar Golf Podcast
108 - Zac Blair: The Tree Farm & an English Adventure

The Cookie Jar Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:14


Tom & Sam catch up with Zac to hear about his latest trip to the south of England playing some of the famous Surrey heathlands as well as the links of the South Coast. It was really interesting to hear about The Tree Farm and the work of Tom Doak & Kye Goalby as the project approaches the build phase. It was a heavyweight itinerary (including Sunningdale, The Addington, Woking, Worplesdon, St George's Hill, Walton Heath, as well as Rye, Royal St George's & Deal on the south coast) - made even tougher without a passport!

Kate Dalley Radio
102021 SHORT 13 Min St George Local Elections Candidates Talked About

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:18


102021 SHORT 13 Min St George Local Elections Candidates Talked About by Kate Dalley

Inside Tri Show
Joe Skipper and Sam Proctor in Conversation

Inside Tri Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 73:53


British professional triathletes and training partners Joe Skipper and Sam Proctor join us in conversation this week. There's plenty of banter and chat as we cover all things training, recovery, data, balance, teamwork, emotions and Michael Phelps. The banter starts right away. You'll hear: 19:35 How they met 20:37 What it's really like training with Joe "There's a lot of tempo isn't there?!" 'Joe's philosophy in life is how many people can I kill through training' Sam says. "But I enjoy it and because we are different, we compliment each other well. There are some laughs, some good coffee breaks. We have a really good time." 24:05 Self coached Vs Having a coach. Joe has been mainly self coached while Sam prefers to have a coach and has been working with Mark Pearce for over 5 years. 32:30 'I cant fault Joe, Joe is a really good friend and he has always helped me and supported me.' 34:40 We talk about Joe wearing his heart on his sleeve and he admits he probably is one of the most emotional athletes out there. 'When you cross the line, the mixture of fatigue that just wears you down gets me really emotional and it happens a lot, especially when I have had a big race and I have had to push so hard. It really grinds you down. I'm not an emotional person at all in normal every day life.'' Sam says: "People don't realise Joe can go into this place where others would pull the pin. He can push through that and I think that's why the emotion comes out." 52:22 Joe's mental strength and why it makes a huge difference across the Ironman distance. 'he is thinking so hard, and doing so well. He is in an 8 hour race and he is always on it and that's what makes him once of the best athletes. It's always your mind that gives up before your body.' Sam says. 54:40 Analysing data and why Joe doesn't spend much time on training peaks. 'I never look at my training on Training Peaks. It uploads onto there, but I don't do anything with it.' 57:00 Why Sam reckons Joe could be like Michael Phelps in the pool. 57:30 Joe's hopes to do some training with Lionel Sanders and Sam Long. 1:00:10 Joe's thoughts on why the Ironman World Championships should rotate away from Kona. "it's a massive boost for me in St George as it will be a lot cooler than Kona. I think the course for me is a lot better than Hawaii. I will have a lot better chance in St George. It will be my best chance so far. 1:02:15 I wouldn't care who I was beating to become World Champion. But Jan Frodeno would be one person I would love to beat to become World Champion, because of the reputation he has and it would give it a lot more credibility if you beat him to become World Champion. 1:06:10 Sam's hopes to get back on the start line of an Ironman soon Find out more about this week's guests Joe Skipper https://www.instagram.com/notanotheraveragejoe/?hl=en (Instagram) Sam Proctor https://www.instagram.com/samproctortri/?hl=en (Instagram) Like what you heard? Let me know! Connect with Inside Tri Show across Social Media, just search Inside Tri Show or click on the icons below https://www.patreon.com/insidetrishow (GET YOUR HANDS ON AN EXCLUSIVE EPISODE!) Sign up to be a vino buddy or a training buddy on Patreon and get your hands on the latest patrons-only exclusive episode, a brilliant behind the scenes audio diary of my recent Lands End-John O'Groats cycling adventure that you won't hear elsewhere. You can still support me and support the show by clicking https://www.patreon.com/insidetrishow (here) to buy me a coffee every so often by https://www.patreon.com/insidetrishow (becoming a Patron of the Inside Tri Show). Sponsors of the show https://resilientnutrition.com/discount/insidetri10 (Long Range Fuel) are phenomenally tasty nut butters from Resilient Nutrition, enhanced by cutting edge science, to boost your stamina, keep you calm and alert and bolster your resilience. Get 10% off by using the... Support this podcast

RTÉ - An Saol ó Dheas
An Saol ó Dheas: Dé Luain 18 Deireadh Fómhair 2021.

RTÉ - An Saol ó Dheas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 48:17


Ailbhe Ní Ghearbhuigh;Ómós do Mháire Mhac an tSaoí. Gabriel Mac Muiris;Ómós do Bhrendan Kennelly. Seán Ó Conail;Cor is déanaí ins na cúirteanna fe Bhealach Glas Uíbh Ráthaigh. Josie Feirtéar; Altra in ospidéal St George i Tooting Londain.

RTÉ - An Saol ó Dheas
Josie Feirtéar; Altra in ospidéal, St George i Tooting Londain.

RTÉ - An Saol ó Dheas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 9:46


Bliain ana dheacair curtha isteach aige foireann leighis in ospidéil ar fuaid an Domhain leis an víoras chorónach. Bhí St Georges i Tooting amhlaidh chomh maith.

CBC Newfoundland Morning
Bay St. George man says the area can't afford to lose another family doctor, Qalipu holds election online or by phone, workers at auto body shop surprise 18yo co-worker with the gift of a used car, and gymnastics club welcomes people with autism

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 31:26


(Starts at 0:54 mark) A man in Stephenville Crossing says his community cannot afford to lose another family doctor, (7:28) it's election time for Qalipu First Nation, and the voting will all be done online or by phone, (17:22) 18-year-old Logan LeDrew is loved so much by his co-workers at an auto body shop, they all worked overtime to fix up a used car to give him, and (25:12) a gymnastics club in Grand Falls-Windsor teams up with the local branch of the autism society, to make the sport more inclusive for everyone.

KSL Greenhouse
Knowing The Right Time For Planting Perennials

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 15:12


Adrian in St George calls in asking about black walnuts. Steve want to know the timeline for planting perennials. Listeners want to know if shavings from a chicken coup is good for the garden.   Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS World News Radio
NRL Legend Norm Provan has died aged 88

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:36


Provan was an integral part of one of the greatest dynasties in sport, playing in 10 of St George's 11 consecutive premiership triumphs.

Mi'kmaq Matters
Episode 196: Another Epidemic in Bay St. George—Opioid Addiction

Mi'kmaq Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:06


Highlights from our panel discussion in Stephenville on the troubled Bay St. George–Qalipu relationship. This week, finding an Indigenous response to the addictions/mental health crisis in the area, and Qalipu's privileging of Corner Brook in economic development, featuring Stephenville mayor Tom Rose; Kippens mayor Debbie Brake-Patten; candidate for Qalipu Western Vice-Chief Jenny Brake; and Peggy White, Chief of the Three Rivers Mi'kmaq Band and candidate for Qalipu Chief.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
How do you buy a new home without paying Lenders Mortgage Insurance? - Lender Mortgage Insurance காப்பீடு செலுத்தாமல் வீடு வாங்குவது எப்படி?

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 11:32


What is Lenders Mortgage Insurance LMI? Who are affected by LMI? Is it possible to buy a new home without paying LMI? Mr Victor St George from St George financial solution explains more - Lender Mortgage Insurance LMI என்றால் என்ன? LMI காப்பீடு எடுக்காமல் முதலாவது வீடு வாங்க முடியுமா? என பலக் கேள்விகளுக்கு பதில் அளிக்கிறார் St George financial solutionஇன் நிறுவனர், உரிமையாளர் Mortgage Broker விக்டர் சென்ட் ஜார்ஜ் அவர்கள். அவரோடு உரையாடுகிறார் செல்வி.

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Skye Moench Chattanooga Champ

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 64:38


When we last spoke to Skye Moench we had no idea that later this year she would race The Collin's Cup, finish 6th at 7.0 World Champs and then crush IM Chattanooga by more than 25 minutes.  Skye Moench's dominating win at IRONMAN Chattanooga with a greater than 25-minute lead just a week after St George.    Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD Thanks very much to Venga CBD for helping make the show possible. Venga CBD is not like most CBD companies who just post a bunch of products and hope you figure it out. Venga was started in Colorado by athletes like you who wanted a better way to use CBD to help fight pain, train longer, race harder and recover faster. That's why they created a SYSTEM of CBD products for athletes and only have 4 products that cover 100% of your CBD needs. I use it every day in one form or another! Each product is specifically made to support an area of your endurance life from training to racing to recovery. Combined together the Venga CBD system is designed to make you unstoppable! Save a whopping 30% off & get free shipping when you buy the Venga Endurance System versus buying the products separately  - seriously, this is the best deal on the market. Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Skye Moench (IM Chattanooga winner) Endurance News No, Running Doesn't Wear Down Your Cartilage. It Strengthens Your Joints. What's new in the 303 Small Town America at the Heart of Gravel Racing? The Rad Dirt in Trinidad Shows Us Why Video of the Week Ironman Chattanooga Highlights   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance! You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Skye Moench A little over two years ago Skye won the 2019 Ironman European Championship Frankfurt. In April of this year we interviewed Skye.  At this point in the season she was fresh off a 6th at Challenge Daytona and 5th at Challenge Miami.  Skye had already made an amazing comeback from her bike crash the kept her from racing at Kona back in 2019.  We came away from that interview with a headline of "Skye's Comeback".  We had no idea at that time that later this year she would be on the final list for The Collin's Cup, finish 6th at 7.0 World Champs and then crush IM Chattanooga by more than 25 minutes. Was that part of the plan?  Did that win gap come as a surprise? How cool is that new purple Trek bike?   All those questions and more coming up right now with Skye Moench! Results (ironman.com)   Post interview: Skye adding another voice to the pros who thinks that The Collins Cup is a "must do" race and opportunity to connect with other pros and make new friends. Focus on the long distance and Kona.  It sounded to me that she raced St George, but goal was Kona Ironman Florida vs Ironman Cozumel     Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News: No, Running Doesn't Wear Down Your Cartilage. It Strengthens Your Joints. Numerous studies have shown that, contrary to what your sedentary friends may sometimes argue, running does not cause arthritis. New research shows, in fact, that running may actually help strengthen your joints against future wear and tear, says Jean-Francois Esculier, leader of research and development for The Running Clinic (headquartered near Montreal, Canada) and a medical professor at the University of British Columbia.   In a Sept. 3 paper in Sports Medicine, Esculier's team examined 43 studies that had used MRI to measure the effect of running on cartilage. One major finding of these studies, he says, was that the impact from running squeezes water out of cartilage and into the underlying bone. That means that an MRI taken immediately after running will show a decrease in cartilage thickness. So, Esculier says, “If you want to say running is bad, you can show a study that shows it reduces the thickness of the cartilage.” But the effect is transient and harmless, he says, because the moment you finish your run, the cartilage begins to reabsorb water and expand back to normal. “It only takes an hour,” he says. In fact, he says, running may actually be beneficial. Historically, Esculier says, doctors, researchers, and runners were taught that cartilage simply is what it is, and won't respond to training. “But we now know that cartilage can adapt,” he says. “Even with novice runners, after only 10 weeks, you see changes in cartilage so that it can actually tolerate more load.” What's happening, he says, is a side-effect of having fluid squeezed out of the cartilage into the underlying bone. When it comes back, he says, it brings with it nutrients that feed the cartilage and make it stronger. “So not only is running not bad for your joints, it's actually good for your joints,” he says. It isn't just beginners whose joints can strengthen with use. Studies of more experienced runners, he says, suggest that they have developed cartilage that is more resistant to the type of impacts seen in running than that of non-runners. One of the more dramatic studies looked at competitors in the TransEurope FootRace, a 4,486-kilometer mountain run (2,787 miles) that went from Sicily to northern Scandinavia in 64 days. A team of scientists followed the runners, using a portable MRI to assess them every 900 kilometers or so. Amazingly, Esculier says, they found not only that the competitors didn't have cartilage damage, but that their cartilage adapted during the race. About Bill's friend London Marathon - Raphael Pacheco Deb Connelly - Monday Running   What's New in the 303: Small Town America at the Heart of Gravel Racing? The Rad Dirt in Trinidad Shows Us Why Posted on October 5, 2021 By Becky Furuta If the heart of gravel racing is the wild west of cycling – where the rules are few and weirdness is welcomed instead of scrutinized – small town America is its soul. The lure of gravel racing is in the long, off-road adventure. It's tricky trails and hellacious hills and mud so thick it's like riding through peanut butter and rolling roads with expansive views. It's dust and limestone chunks and pea gravel that bury your tires like quicksand. Due in part to its grassroots heritage, gravel remains the antidote to the technology-driven, aggressive and often super-competitive mentality of road cycling. Most of today's gravel grinders began as small-scale events, and often with no entry fees. Despite their growth, they're dripping with the same low-key attitude that attracted participants in the first place. Small towns and gravel are perfectly paired. A convergence of factors have fueled gravel's popularity, but all speak to quiet country roads with little traffic and natural scenery. The character of these towns shape the events and the way they unfold. Trinidad, Colorado is no exception. And the quirky town on the New Mexico border may well become one of gravel's new hotspots. The small city of 9000 residents was founded in 1862 after rich coal seams were discovered in the region. By 1910, Trinidad was a company town. Colorado Fuel and Iron operated the largest steel mills in the West, and dozens of mines, coke ovens and transportation lines cropped up to support local industry. CF&I created small communities for the workers they recruited to come from Europe, believing they were less likely to try and organize. To the contrary, this led to one of the darkest chapters in American labor history. Just a few miles north of Trinidad in the Spring of 1914, Union organizer Louis Tikas and 20 others were killed in a violent company crackdown known as the Ludlow Massacre. It was a bloody insurrection that occurred in protest of brutal working conditions. Three of the victims – a woman and her two children – suffocated in the dirt pit where they were hiding. By the 1920s, the coal industry was fading but Trinidad found a new, strange prosperity when mobster Al Capone and his family took the town during prohibition. They were able to easily blend in with local Italian families who continued to call the city home. Lavish hotels, a Carnegie library, an Opera House and the oldest synagogue in the state of Colorado cropped up in what would be called “the Victorian jewel of Southern Colorado.” Just having dirt alone isn't enough to make Trinidad a gravel success story. Part of an event's draw is the community itself, and how well they embrace the cyclists who come to visit. It's about the community and the culture, the adventure and the Instagram images of rolling hills and farmland. It's about getting people to drive hours in search of something different. Trinidad seems to understand all of that. City Council members greeted riders at the start and the finish. Restaurants enthusiastically marketed to gravel tourists. (Just ask me about the singing waiters at Rino Italian Restaurant downtown.) The route featured unique terrain you won't find at other gravel events. Only time will tell if Trinidad's next identity is built around bikes and outdoor tourism, but judging by the reactions of participants in The Rad Dirt Fest, it's right on track. Trinidad, like so many other rural communities, may well become a town transformed by bikes.     Video Of The Week: Ironman Chattanooga 2021 Highlights   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

303Endurance Podcast
Skye Moench Chattanooga Champ

303Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 64:38


When we last spoke to Skye Moench we had no idea that later this year she would race The Collin's Cup, finish 6th at 7.0 World Champs and then crush IM Chattanooga by more than 25 minutes.  Skye Moench's dominating win at IRONMAN Chattanooga with a greater than 25-minute lead just a week after St George.    Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD Thanks very much to Venga CBD for helping make the show possible. Venga CBD is not like most CBD companies who just post a bunch of products and hope you figure it out. Venga was started in Colorado by athletes like you who wanted a better way to use CBD to help fight pain, train longer, race harder and recover faster. That's why they created a SYSTEM of CBD products for athletes and only have 4 products that cover 100% of your CBD needs. I use it every day in one form or another! Each product is specifically made to support an area of your endurance life from training to racing to recovery. Combined together the Venga CBD system is designed to make you unstoppable! Save a whopping 30% off & get free shipping when you buy the Venga Endurance System versus buying the products separately  - seriously, this is the best deal on the market. Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Skye Moench (IM Chattanooga winner) Endurance News No, Running Doesn't Wear Down Your Cartilage. It Strengthens Your Joints. What's new in the 303 Small Town America at the Heart of Gravel Racing? The Rad Dirt in Trinidad Shows Us Why Video of the Week Ironman Chattanooga Highlights   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance! You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Skye Moench A little over two years ago Skye won the 2019 Ironman European Championship Frankfurt. In April of this year we interviewed Skye.  At this point in the season she was fresh off a 6th at Challenge Daytona and 5th at Challenge Miami.  Skye had already made an amazing comeback from her bike crash the kept her from racing at Kona back in 2019.  We came away from that interview with a headline of "Skye's Comeback".  We had no idea at that time that later this year she would be on the final list for The Collin's Cup, finish 6th at 7.0 World Champs and then crush IM Chattanooga by more than 25 minutes. Was that part of the plan?  Did that win gap come as a surprise? How cool is that new purple Trek bike?   All those questions and more coming up right now with Skye Moench! Results (ironman.com)   Post interview: Skye adding another voice to the pros who thinks that The Collins Cup is a "must do" race and opportunity to connect with other pros and make new friends. Focus on the long distance and Kona.  It sounded to me that she raced St George, but goal was Kona Ironman Florida vs Ironman Cozumel     Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News: No, Running Doesn't Wear Down Your Cartilage. It Strengthens Your Joints. Numerous studies have shown that, contrary to what your sedentary friends may sometimes argue, running does not cause arthritis. New research shows, in fact, that running may actually help strengthen your joints against future wear and tear, says Jean-Francois Esculier, leader of research and development for The Running Clinic (headquartered near Montreal, Canada) and a medical professor at the University of British Columbia.   In a Sept. 3 paper in Sports Medicine, Esculier's team examined 43 studies that had used MRI to measure the effect of running on cartilage. One major finding of these studies, he says, was that the impact from running squeezes water out of cartilage and into the underlying bone. That means that an MRI taken immediately after running will show a decrease in cartilage thickness. So, Esculier says, “If you want to say running is bad, you can show a study that shows it reduces the thickness of the cartilage.” But the effect is transient and harmless, he says, because the moment you finish your run, the cartilage begins to reabsorb water and expand back to normal. “It only takes an hour,” he says. In fact, he says, running may actually be beneficial. Historically, Esculier says, doctors, researchers, and runners were taught that cartilage simply is what it is, and won't respond to training. “But we now know that cartilage can adapt,” he says. “Even with novice runners, after only 10 weeks, you see changes in cartilage so that it can actually tolerate more load.” What's happening, he says, is a side-effect of having fluid squeezed out of the cartilage into the underlying bone. When it comes back, he says, it brings with it nutrients that feed the cartilage and make it stronger. “So not only is running not bad for your joints, it's actually good for your joints,” he says. It isn't just beginners whose joints can strengthen with use. Studies of more experienced runners, he says, suggest that they have developed cartilage that is more resistant to the type of impacts seen in running than that of non-runners. One of the more dramatic studies looked at competitors in the TransEurope FootRace, a 4,486-kilometer mountain run (2,787 miles) that went from Sicily to northern Scandinavia in 64 days. A team of scientists followed the runners, using a portable MRI to assess them every 900 kilometers or so. Amazingly, Esculier says, they found not only that the competitors didn't have cartilage damage, but that their cartilage adapted during the race. About Bill's friend London Marathon - Raphael Pacheco Deb Connelly - Monday Running   What's New in the 303: Small Town America at the Heart of Gravel Racing? The Rad Dirt in Trinidad Shows Us Why Posted on October 5, 2021 By Becky Furuta If the heart of gravel racing is the wild west of cycling – where the rules are few and weirdness is welcomed instead of scrutinized – small town America is its soul. The lure of gravel racing is in the long, off-road adventure. It's tricky trails and hellacious hills and mud so thick it's like riding through peanut butter and rolling roads with expansive views. It's dust and limestone chunks and pea gravel that bury your tires like quicksand. Due in part to its grassroots heritage, gravel remains the antidote to the technology-driven, aggressive and often super-competitive mentality of road cycling. Most of today's gravel grinders began as small-scale events, and often with no entry fees. Despite their growth, they're dripping with the same low-key attitude that attracted participants in the first place. Small towns and gravel are perfectly paired. A convergence of factors have fueled gravel's popularity, but all speak to quiet country roads with little traffic and natural scenery. The character of these towns shape the events and the way they unfold. Trinidad, Colorado is no exception. And the quirky town on the New Mexico border may well become one of gravel's new hotspots. The small city of 9000 residents was founded in 1862 after rich coal seams were discovered in the region. By 1910, Trinidad was a company town. Colorado Fuel and Iron operated the largest steel mills in the West, and dozens of mines, coke ovens and transportation lines cropped up to support local industry. CF&I created small communities for the workers they recruited to come from Europe, believing they were less likely to try and organize. To the contrary, this led to one of the darkest chapters in American labor history. Just a few miles north of Trinidad in the Spring of 1914, Union organizer Louis Tikas and 20 others were killed in a violent company crackdown known as the Ludlow Massacre. It was a bloody insurrection that occurred in protest of brutal working conditions. Three of the victims – a woman and her two children – suffocated in the dirt pit where they were hiding. By the 1920s, the coal industry was fading but Trinidad found a new, strange prosperity when mobster Al Capone and his family took the town during prohibition. They were able to easily blend in with local Italian families who continued to call the city home. Lavish hotels, a Carnegie library, an Opera House and the oldest synagogue in the state of Colorado cropped up in what would be called “the Victorian jewel of Southern Colorado.” Just having dirt alone isn't enough to make Trinidad a gravel success story. Part of an event's draw is the community itself, and how well they embrace the cyclists who come to visit. It's about the community and the culture, the adventure and the Instagram images of rolling hills and farmland. It's about getting people to drive hours in search of something different. Trinidad seems to understand all of that. City Council members greeted riders at the start and the finish. Restaurants enthusiastically marketed to gravel tourists. (Just ask me about the singing waiters at Rino Italian Restaurant downtown.) The route featured unique terrain you won't find at other gravel events. Only time will tell if Trinidad's next identity is built around bikes and outdoor tourism, but judging by the reactions of participants in The Rad Dirt Fest, it's right on track. Trinidad, like so many other rural communities, may well become a town transformed by bikes.     Video Of The Week: Ironman Chattanooga 2021 Highlights   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Babbittville Radio – Babbittville
Lucy Charles-Barclay: St George Post-Race

Babbittville Radio – Babbittville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 27:00


Lucy Charles-Barclay had a race for the ages at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in St. George. She joined us to chat about her spectacular race, her epic season, her plans for the Sub-8 Challenge, and her goal to make the 2024 Olympic team! WATCH the interview on the Babbittville YouTube channel here.   The post Lucy Charles-Barclay: St George Post-Race appeared first on Babbittville.

Babbittville Radio – Babbittville
Kristian Blummenfelt: Olympics Debrief and St George Preview

Babbittville Radio – Babbittville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:42


Kristian Blummenfelt joined me for a chat a few days before the 70.3 World Championship in St George. Kristian Blummenfelt won the Olympic Gold Medal in Tokyo and is looking to add to that with a 70.3 World Title here in St. George. WATCH the interview on the Babbittville YouTube channel here.   The post Kristian Blummenfelt: Olympics Debrief and St George Preview appeared first on Babbittville.

Story time with Philip and Mommy!
Monster Stories: Scales and Tails - St. George and the Dragon

Story time with Philip and Mommy!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 12:10


A Knight defeats a dragon.

Morning Prayer from Pasadena and Cormack NL
Morning Prayer for Sunday, October 3, 2021

Morning Prayer from Pasadena and Cormack NL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 34:26


Welcome to Morning Prayer! Thanks to Marilyn Simmons (reading our first lesson, Job 1:1, 2:1-10) and the Wildwood Singers of St George's Anglican Church for leading our music (Hold Fast to the Right and I'm Willing Lord). Instead of a sermon, Rev Joe and Rev Amy discuss the second part of the gospel lesson, Mark 10:2-16, where Jesus welcomes the children. (With apologies for the sound quality during our discussion!)You can watch a video of the service here.Rev Joe Pagano wrote a sermon on the first part of today's gospel lesson, Jesus's teaching on divorce, for Sermons That Work. You can read that sermon here. You can also find a link to the Sermons That Work podcast recording of the sermon here.Parts of today's service were recorded at the Tablelands in Gros Morne National Park.Thank you for joining us today. 

Mile High Endurance Podcast

This week we have pro triathlete Jeanni Metzler who has been all over the podiums at IRONMAN 70.3 races all year.  Jeanni joining us to talk about her 2nd place at St George beating out friend and competitor Taylor Knibb.  The 29 year old pro lives in Boulder with her husband Taylor "BigMetz" and dog Milli. Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD   We're huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation.   Highlights: Nano-emulsified CBD making it water-soluble for high bioavailability. Phytocannabinoid rich CBD containing over 110 cannabinoids, 10 times that of typical industrial hemp. No THC. This is NOT an isolate - our CBD is whole hemp plant CBD. Curcumin added as an additional herbal extract to target inflammation.    Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Jeanni Metzler (2nd at St George) Endurance News 2021 IRONMAN Chattanooga Results Study Women's Hearts Respond -Differently to Marathon Training Than Mens What's new in the 303 Still a couple of triathlons in October and Cold weather riding tips Video of the Week Ironman Chattanooga Highlights   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Jeanni Metzler (aka Metzler) Jeanni Metzler (formerly Seymour) is a multiple 70.3 winner who also moved up to the full distance in 2019 with a podium finish at IRONMAN Texas.   Born and raised in South Africa, she now lives and trains alongside her husband and fellow pro Justin Metzler in Boulder, and she has claimed emotional victories in both locations.   Tracing her journey to Colorado, she says: "My cousin got me into road cycling when I was about 17 and then introduced me to a local triathlon group in Johannesburg, the rest was history!"   She won her age group at her first 70.3 race in Buffalo City, East London in 2011. Taking up the chance to be a professional in 2012 as she turned 20, she had to make a drastic decision to give herself the best chance of success.   Jeanni explains: "I left South Africa with pretty much nothing - but, with the support of my family, I was able to make a life for myself as a professional athlete in the United States."   The first couple of years were tough, but her breakthrough moment came late in 2015 when she won IRONMAN 70.3 Austin thanks to a storming run. This was to become a common theme.   Jeanni came back a year later to defend her title and then won the inaugural 70.3 Xiamen race that November.   She was on her way now, and the wins started to stack up. In 2017 there were four 70.3 titles at Liuzhou, Monterrey, Boulder and Los Cabos, as well as a first top-10 in the 70.3 World Championship in Chattanooga. Just for good measure, she grabbed a Challenge Iceland title too.   But it was the triumph in her adopted home of Boulder which struck a chord and showed how far she'd come. She had previously been sixth in 2015 and runner-up in 2016.   There were also two significant returns to her country of birth in 2018, first to win 70.3 South Africa (at the scene of that 2011 age-group success) and then to place seventh in the 70.3 World Championship at Port Elizabeth.     Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   Results (ironman.com)         Ironman Chattanooga for Sept 25, 2022 on Oct 4th 12p.   Study Women's Hearts Respond -Differently to Marathon Training Than Mens BRITTANY HAMBLETON SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 Over the last several decades, female athletes have often been left out of sports science research, and the majority of studies have focused primarily on young, healthy males as subjects. It has only been in recent years that researchers have begun to include women in their studies, and, perhaps not surprisingly, some differences are beginning to emerge. A recent study looking at the differences between male and female marathoners found that women's hearts actually respond differently than men's after training for a marathon.   The study The paper, entitled “Sex differences in cardiovascular adaptations in recreational marathon runners,” aimed to examine various changes in heart function in male and female marathoners and recreational athletes. The researchers included 52 marathoners (28 females and 24 males) who had completed five to seven marathons over three years and 49 recreationally active adults (25 females and 24 males) as controls.   The researchers studied the hearts of each participant, focusing on three main measurements:   Left ventricle function: the left ventricle pumps oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. Aortic stiffness: occurs when the elastic fibers within the arterial wall (elastin) begin to fray due to mechanical stress. Ventricular-vascular coupling: the ratio of arterial to left ventricle elastance, a key determinant of cardiac performance. The results After studying the hearts of all the participants, the researchers found that women who have completed multiple marathons do not have reduced left ventricle function or aortic stiffness compared to male marathoners or female recreationally active athletes (both of which are good things). Interestingly, they appear to have better ventricular-vascular coupling compared to the other test groups, which means their hearts are more mechanically efficient after undergoing a marathon training cycle. In other words, women's hearts may respond better to marathon training than men's.   The reason for this is unclear, but the researchers believe it could have something to do with the estrogen levels in female athletes. Studies show that estrogen positively modulates cardiac hypertrophy (the heart's tendency to get bigger with training), lowers blood pressure and decreases arterial stiffness, all of which make for a healthier, stronger heart.   The researchers conclude the studying by acknowledging that future studies are needed to better understand the influence of sex hormones (in particular, estrogen) on cardiovascular adaptations in marathon runners. This will create a greater understanding of how women adapt to marathon training and may lead to better training protocols for female distance runners in the future.   Brownlees Step Aside, Alex Yee is The New Heir to The British Tri Throne – Triathlete   What's New in the 303:   Still a Couple of Triathlons in Colorado in October The Last Call Triathlon at Boyd Lake near Loveland was the last triathlon along the front range but there are still a couple of opportunities to race in Montrose and Alamosa. The Black Canyon Triathlon (Montrose) October 2nd and the Splashland Triathlon (Alamosa) October 19th are still on the calendar. These are pool based triathlons and in Alamosa the pool is a hot springs–and the swim is last.   With fall colors peaking in the high country, a trip to either venue will be full of color and adventure. We caught up with Montrose resident Julie Burdick who participates in all of the Southwestern Triathlon Series triathlons to learn more. As a busy mom of twins and recovering from Covid, she is looking forward to this week's triathlon more than ever.   Ready for Some Cold Weather Riding? Some “Pro Tips” on Embrocation Products Posted on September 29, 2021 By Val Sanford   With cooler weather heading our way (finally) and cyclocross season upon us, now might be the time to try embrocation to help warm those muscles up. Here are some “pro tips” from a top maker–Bluerub.   PERFORM BETTER IN COLD WEATHER   If you cycle in cold weather, use an embrocation product like bluerub's MUSCLE to increase your comfort while riding. You'll add warmth and increased circulation to your legs, so you can ride farther and go longer.    HOW EMBROCATION WORKS   Embrocation products blend warming ingredients like capsicum, mint essential oils, clove oil, black pepper essential oil, camphor, and menthol to signal the body to “warm-up” the area where it was applied. When used before cold-weather exercise, it acts as a signal to tell the body to increase circulation to the legs. You'll feel the cold less, and your legs will thank you.   7 PRO-TIPS FOR USING EMBROCATION   EMBRO AFTER YOU KIT UP You've got the idea now that embrocation is all about warming! So you'll want to put on your kit first. That will keep all those warming oils away from the parts of your body you definitely don't want to ‘warm-up.” Think capsicum blended into your chamois. Yikes!   APPLY ABOUT 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU RIDE Typically, you'll feel the effects of embrocation about 30 minutes after you apply it. But everyone's body is different, so you'll want to do some experimentation before a big race. This means you'll need to be thinking about your pre-race/pre-ride routine and make sure you've given yourself plenty of time.   Remember, though, that embrocation products won't replace your warm-up. You'll still need to stretch, warm-up, and do your pre-ride physical routine.   Pro-tip: Apply CHAMOIS first, for the obvious reasons.   REALLY WORK IT IN I've heard some say they channel their inner massage therapist to really work the embrocation into the muscles and to thoroughly cover the skin. Roll down your socks, roll up the legs of your bibs, and really spend a few minutes working it in. While legs are the most common spot, you can apply to your lower back, shoulders, neck, and ankles.   When you use something that is also a recovery product, like MUSCLE, you'll get a double benefit from the massage in helping relieve any leftover pre-ride stiffness or soreness in your muscles. You can even reapply after your shower to give sore spots some relief.   Pro-tip: not all embrocation products are non-staining. So do a spot test before going all-in on your favorite kit.   AVOID YOUR EYES, MOUTH, AND OTHER SENSITIVE PARTS You know how much you hate it when you've been cutting peppers and then touch your eye or your lip? Well, that's what it'll feel like if you touch your eyes after applying embro. Wash your hands with warm soap and water, or use a wipe (although this may not get all of it off your hands). You can also use single-use gloves to apply and then toss. It's not an eco-friendly solution, but it can save you on a race when you don't have access to warm, soapy water.   Pro-tip: Fill your bottles, pack your phone, snacks, and other essentials before applying embrocation, just to be on the safe side.   KEEP YOUR LEGS WARM Embrocation creams don't actually add any extreme cold-weather protection to your legs. So if you're riding in chilly weather – especially if there's a breeze — you'll need to protect your legs from the elements. Try using knee warmers or even thermal tights (with our without embrocation). Be mindful of how cold it is and be aware of how it's affecting you.   Pro-tip: Use an embrocation even when the weather isn't cold. It is a great transition solution between cool weather when tights are too much, yet you want a little extra warmth before getting out for a ride.   SHAVE YOUR LEGS Embrocation products come in a variety of forms: oils, balms, salves, creams. bluerub's MUSCLE's is a lightweight cream that goes on smoothly. If your legs are hairy, it can get caught in the hair and not be thoroughly or evenly applied. The embrocation will wash off more fully and easily on smooth skin. Plus, you know you look great with shaved legs! (Try SHAVE for smooth, soft skin.)   Pro-tip: Don't apply on just-shaved legs. Give your pores a little breathing room before using warming oils like those in an embrocation product.   WASH BEFORE YOU SHOWER I love settling into a hot, steamy bath after being outside in the cold, wet weather. But hot water can reactivate the essential oils and give you the surprise of your life! Okay, not the surprise of your life, but you could definitely feel like jumping out of the water!   Use warm, soapy water to remove the embrocation before getting into a hot shower or bath. No-rise wipes can help but may not get all the oils off, so test it to be sure.   Pro-tip: Don't use the same washcloth to wash your face. Some people like using a loofah to help remove the embrocation. Just like your washcloth, keep it 'embrocation only' to avoid any accidental application to your face or nether parts.   So those are our pro-tips for using embrocation cream during cold weather rides.    Video Of The Week: Ironman Chattanooga 2021 Highlights   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

303Endurance Podcast
Jeanni Metzler

303Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 66:21


This week we have pro triathlete Jeanni Metzler who has been all over the podiums at IRONMAN 70.3 races all year.  Jeanni joining us to talk about her 2nd place at St George beating out friend and competitor Taylor Knibb.  The 29 year old pro lives in Boulder with her husband Taylor "BigMetz" and dog Milli. Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD   We're huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation.   Highlights: Nano-emulsified CBD making it water-soluble for high bioavailability. Phytocannabinoid rich CBD containing over 110 cannabinoids, 10 times that of typical industrial hemp. No THC. This is NOT an isolate - our CBD is whole hemp plant CBD. Curcumin added as an additional herbal extract to target inflammation.    Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Jeanni Metzler (2nd at St George) Endurance News 2021 IRONMAN Chattanooga Results Study Women's Hearts Respond -Differently to Marathon Training Than Mens What's new in the 303 Still a couple of triathlons in October and Cold weather riding tips Video of the Week Ironman Chattanooga Highlights   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Jeanni Metzler (aka Metzler) Jeanni Metzler (formerly Seymour) is a multiple 70.3 winner who also moved up to the full distance in 2019 with a podium finish at IRONMAN Texas.   Born and raised in South Africa, she now lives and trains alongside her husband and fellow pro Justin Metzler in Boulder, and she has claimed emotional victories in both locations.   Tracing her journey to Colorado, she says: "My cousin got me into road cycling when I was about 17 and then introduced me to a local triathlon group in Johannesburg, the rest was history!"   She won her age group at her first 70.3 race in Buffalo City, East London in 2011. Taking up the chance to be a professional in 2012 as she turned 20, she had to make a drastic decision to give herself the best chance of success.   Jeanni explains: "I left South Africa with pretty much nothing - but, with the support of my family, I was able to make a life for myself as a professional athlete in the United States."   The first couple of years were tough, but her breakthrough moment came late in 2015 when she won IRONMAN 70.3 Austin thanks to a storming run. This was to become a common theme.   Jeanni came back a year later to defend her title and then won the inaugural 70.3 Xiamen race that November.   She was on her way now, and the wins started to stack up. In 2017 there were four 70.3 titles at Liuzhou, Monterrey, Boulder and Los Cabos, as well as a first top-10 in the 70.3 World Championship in Chattanooga. Just for good measure, she grabbed a Challenge Iceland title too.   But it was the triumph in her adopted home of Boulder which struck a chord and showed how far she'd come. She had previously been sixth in 2015 and runner-up in 2016.   There were also two significant returns to her country of birth in 2018, first to win 70.3 South Africa (at the scene of that 2011 age-group success) and then to place seventh in the 70.3 World Championship at Port Elizabeth.   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   Results (ironman.com)   Ironman Chattanooga for Sept 25, 2022 on Oct 4th 12p.   Study Women's Hearts Respond -Differently to Marathon Training Than Mens BRITTANY HAMBLETON SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 Over the last several decades, female athletes have often been left out of sports science research, and the majority of studies have focused primarily on young, healthy males as subjects. It has only been in recent years that researchers have begun to include women in their studies, and, perhaps not surprisingly, some differences are beginning to emerge. A recent study looking at the differences between male and female marathoners found that women's hearts actually respond differently than men's after training for a marathon.   The study The paper, entitled “Sex differences in cardiovascular adaptations in recreational marathon runners,” aimed to examine various changes in heart function in male and female marathoners and recreational athletes. The researchers included 52 marathoners (28 females and 24 males) who had completed five to seven marathons over three years and 49 recreationally active adults (25 females and 24 males) as controls.   The researchers studied the hearts of each participant, focusing on three main measurements:   Left ventricle function: the left ventricle pumps oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. Aortic stiffness: occurs when the elastic fibers within the arterial wall (elastin) begin to fray due to mechanical stress. Ventricular-vascular coupling: the ratio of arterial to left ventricle elastance, a key determinant of cardiac performance. The results After studying the hearts of all the participants, the researchers found that women who have completed multiple marathons do not have reduced left ventricle function or aortic stiffness compared to male marathoners or female recreationally active athletes (both of which are good things). Interestingly, they appear to have better ventricular-vascular coupling compared to the other test groups, which means their hearts are more mechanically efficient after undergoing a marathon training cycle. In other words, women's hearts may respond better to marathon training than men's.   The reason for this is unclear, but the researchers believe it could have something to do with the estrogen levels in female athletes. Studies show that estrogen positively modulates cardiac hypertrophy (the heart's tendency to get bigger with training), lowers blood pressure and decreases arterial stiffness, all of which make for a healthier, stronger heart.   The researchers conclude the studying by acknowledging that future studies are needed to better understand the influence of sex hormones (in particular, estrogen) on cardiovascular adaptations in marathon runners. This will create a greater understanding of how women adapt to marathon training and may lead to better training protocols for female distance runners in the future.   Brownlees Step Aside, Alex Yee is The New Heir to The British Tri Throne – Triathlete   What's New in the 303:   Still a Couple of Triathlons in Colorado in October The Last Call Triathlon at Boyd Lake near Loveland was the last triathlon along the front range but there are still a couple of opportunities to race in Montrose and Alamosa. The Black Canyon Triathlon (Montrose) October 2nd and the Splashland Triathlon (Alamosa) October 19th are still on the calendar. These are pool based triathlons and in Alamosa the pool is a hot springs–and the swim is last.   With fall colors peaking in the high country, a trip to either venue will be full of color and adventure. We caught up with Montrose resident Julie Burdick who participates in all of the Southwestern Triathlon Series triathlons to learn more. As a busy mom of twins and recovering from Covid, she is looking forward to this week's triathlon more than ever.   Ready for Some Cold Weather Riding? Some “Pro Tips” on Embrocation Products Posted on September 29, 2021 By Val Sanford   With cooler weather heading our way (finally) and cyclocross season upon us, now might be the time to try embrocation to help warm those muscles up. Here are some “pro tips” from a top maker–Bluerub.     PERFORM BETTER IN COLD WEATHER   If you cycle in cold weather, use an embrocation product like bluerub's MUSCLE to increase your comfort while riding. You'll add warmth and increased circulation to your legs, so you can ride farther and go longer.    HOW EMBROCATION WORKS   Embrocation products blend warming ingredients like capsicum, mint essential oils, clove oil, black pepper essential oil, camphor, and menthol to signal the body to “warm-up” the area where it was applied. When used before cold-weather exercise, it acts as a signal to tell the body to increase circulation to the legs. You'll feel the cold less, and your legs will thank you.   7 PRO-TIPS FOR USING EMBROCATION   EMBRO AFTER YOU KIT UP You've got the idea now that embrocation is all about warming! So you'll want to put on your kit first. That will keep all those warming oils away from the parts of your body you definitely don't want to ‘warm-up.” Think capsicum blended into your chamois. Yikes!   APPLY ABOUT 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU RIDE Typically, you'll feel the effects of embrocation about 30 minutes after you apply it. But everyone's body is different, so you'll want to do some experimentation before a big race. This means you'll need to be thinking about your pre-race/pre-ride routine and make sure you've given yourself plenty of time.   Remember, though, that embrocation products won't replace your warm-up. You'll still need to stretch, warm-up, and do your pre-ride physical routine.   Pro-tip: Apply CHAMOIS first, for the obvious reasons.   REALLY WORK IT IN I've heard some say they channel their inner massage therapist to really work the embrocation into the muscles and to thoroughly cover the skin. Roll down your socks, roll up the legs of your bibs, and really spend a few minutes working it in. While legs are the most common spot, you can apply to your lower back, shoulders, neck, and ankles.   When you use something that is also a recovery product, like MUSCLE, you'll get a double benefit from the massage in helping relieve any leftover pre-ride stiffness or soreness in your muscles. You can even reapply after your shower to give sore spots some relief.   Pro-tip: not all embrocation products are non-staining. So do a spot test before going all-in on your favorite kit.   AVOID YOUR EYES, MOUTH, AND OTHER SENSITIVE PARTS You know how much you hate it when you've been cutting peppers and then touch your eye or your lip? Well, that's what it'll feel like if you touch your eyes after applying embro. Wash your hands with warm soap and water, or use a wipe (although this may not get all of it off your hands). You can also use single-use gloves to apply and then toss. It's not an eco-friendly solution, but it can save you on a race when you don't have access to warm, soapy water.   Pro-tip: Fill your bottles, pack your phone, snacks, and other essentials before applying embrocation, just to be on the safe side.   KEEP YOUR LEGS WARM Embrocation creams don't actually add any extreme cold-weather protection to your legs. So if you're riding in chilly weather – especially if there's a breeze — you'll need to protect your legs from the elements. Try using knee warmers or even thermal tights (with our without embrocation). Be mindful of how cold it is and be aware of how it's affecting you.   Pro-tip: Use an embrocation even when the weather isn't cold. It is a great transition solution between cool weather when tights are too much, yet you want a little extra warmth before getting out for a ride.   SHAVE YOUR LEGS Embrocation products come in a variety of forms: oils, balms, salves, creams. bluerub's MUSCLE's is a lightweight cream that goes on smoothly. If your legs are hairy, it can get caught in the hair and not be thoroughly or evenly applied. The embrocation will wash off more fully and easily on smooth skin. Plus, you know you look great with shaved legs! (Try SHAVE for smooth, soft skin.)   Pro-tip: Don't apply on just-shaved legs. Give your pores a little breathing room before using warming oils like those in an embrocation product.   WASH BEFORE YOU SHOWER I love settling into a hot, steamy bath after being outside in the cold, wet weather. But hot water can reactivate the essential oils and give you the surprise of your life! Okay, not the surprise of your life, but you could definitely feel like jumping out of the water!   Use warm, soapy water to remove the embrocation before getting into a hot shower or bath. No-rise wipes can help but may not get all the oils off, so test it to be sure.   Pro-tip: Don't use the same washcloth to wash your face. Some people like using a loofah to help remove the embrocation. Just like your washcloth, keep it 'embrocation only' to avoid any accidental application to your face or nether parts.   So those are our pro-tips for using embrocation cream during cold weather rides.    Video Of The Week: Ironman Chattanooga 2021 Highlights   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Chopper's Politics
Jacob Rees-Mogg gets down with the kids

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 40:28


The Leader of the House of Commons, twenty students and a pub in Westminster. Christopher Hope hands the microphone over to the most politically engaged young people since Jacob Rees-Mogg was a lad, as the politics class of St George's School, Harpenden, grill the Conservative MP. Up for discussion: carbon zero, mental health policy and whether his tax affairs are truly above board. Plus, is Mr Rees-Mogg still chasing his own teenage ambition of becoming Prime Minister? And what's his McDonald's order? Listen to find out.Read more from Christopher Hope: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/c/cf-cj/christopher-hope/ |Sign up for the Chopper's Politics newsletter: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/newsletters |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Listen to Off Script: https://playpodca.st/offscript |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Seeking Excellence
Ep 97 | Improving Mental Health Despite Our Troubling Times by Josie Kuhlman w/ Monica St. George

Seeking Excellence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:07


How does our mind and mental health affect our spirituality? How can we find true joy in the present moment? Learn more about how to have a healthier mind, body, and soul! Josie chats with Monica St. George, who works in mental health counseling. Follow Monica on Instagram @monicastgeorge Resources: Practicing the Presence of God by Brother Lawrence The Mindful Catholic by Greg Botarro

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Diana Hassel on St George

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 85:50


This week we are breaking down St. George and have local athlete Diana Hassel to share her race report.  Diana is one of the most successful amateur triathletes in the world. She is the 2017 Hawaii Ironman Champion W50-54.  Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD We're huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation. Venga offers personalized CBD plans. All you have to do is take a simple quiz to get you started! Answer a few questions and, voila - there's your personalized CBD recommendation! It's all based on YOU - what CBD YOU need right now to meet your goals. Guys, it's super easy to go take this quiz on their website. Just go to vengacbd.com/quiz and (you didn't hear it from us but…) there's a freebie in it for you just for taking the quiz. We trust these guys 100% and they'll make it really easy for you to get started with the RIGHT CBD.  Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Diane Hassel Endurance News IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St George 2021 IRONMAN World Championship moves to UT in May 2022 2021 IRONMAN Chattanooga September 26 TriRating Rankings What's new in the 303 DU Triathlon Team Wins at Oktoberfest Video of the Week Lucy Charles "Pure Joy" Finish at IRONMAN 70.3 World Champs in St George   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Diana Hassel Diana M Hassel, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, Dipl. ACVECC Professor & Equine Section Head Equine Emergency Surgery & Critical Care Diana is one of the most successful amateur triathletes in the world. She is the 2017 Hawaii Ironman Champion W50-54.  Over the years she has become an advocate for training smart and she really enjoys helping triathletes who seek her advice. It was only normal for her to join our coaching staff in 2015. Diana discovered her passion for triathlon later in life, having competed in her first triathlon at age 29. As a child she ran cross country and track and has been an avid master's swimmer and competitor since 1986. Diana is also a cat 2 cyclist and has held age group titles in the Colorado State Time Trial Championships, Road Race Championships and Best All Around Rider. She began competitive cycling during her PhD training at UC Davis that readily translated into successful triathlon performances. She has extensive experience with both heart rate and power training for the bike. Her knowledge of training methods and her vast experience in racing combined with her unparalleled results will be a great asset to SmartTriathlonTraining. Diana is one of the most decorated athletes with 10 Hawaii Ironman age group podium awards including one World Championship. Diana will be helping all of our athletes on our internal “ask the coach” page. Her career as a surgeon and criticalist in veterinary medicine with a PhD in Comparative Pathology and lifelong fascination with exercise physiology and nutrition adds to her coaching expertise. Diana lives in Ft Collins Colorado with her husband, Dean, who is also a triathlete, and her daughter Mikayla, an avid horseperson.   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News: St. George, Iconic Race and a Look Into the Future; Coloradans do Well! Posted on September 21, 2021 By Bill Plock The authentic joy Lucy Charles Barclay beamed to the world the second she broke the tape is something I'll never forget. It gave me goosebumps and seemed deep seated, especially as she came to hug her husband with tears running down her face. I have never seen or felt such happiness. Barclay, like all the athletes battled very unusual weather with a down pour of rain and hail and lightening that threatened the race. With a Barclay comfortably in the lead all day, she knew she was having “a day” and said at the press conference recalling her thoughts, “they better not cancel this race!” Gustav Iden of Norway didn't quite lead the entire way but went to the front of the pack on the bike part way through and never looked back. Fellow countryman and gold medalist Kristian Blummenfelt was in that lead group when he suffered a serious mechanical failure with his wheel and fell out of contention. Boulder's Sam Long, with a solid swim battled hard to ride into second place never did catch Iden. Iden won by 5 minutes retaining his World Champion status he gained after winning in Nice in 2019. The second place finishes for Long and another Boulder resident, Jeanni Metzler may be a glimpse into the future of the sport.  Just two years ago Long finish 26 minutes back and has kept a poster of Nice in his “pain cave” as motivation ever since. Metzler has been climbing the ranks and finished 3rd in Boulder a few weeks ago behind Taylor Knibb and Emma Palant Brown, but in St. George she beat both of them. Metzler passed Knibb just a few minutes out saying later, “I didn't want a sprint finish with Taylor as I don't think that would've gone well.” Knibb finished about 30 seconds back and the two training partners and friends shared exuberant hugs in the finish area . It felt like the finish area was filled with camaraderie and respect unlike any race I had seen before. This wasn't “new blood” so to speak, but in way it felt like a new group of champions and future champions were making their mark in St. George. At the press conference, the top five male and female finishers all were under the age of 28. It's a young group who genuinely seem to enjoy each other. Of the ten, eight raced together at the Collins Cup just four weeks prior. When asked if that played into the feeling of camaraderie, Sam Long said, “I do think we all got to know each other there. It also could be because we are all pretty young, it was a bit of a different atmosphere. And I also think the sport is changing, where you can talk smack but in a friendly way and at the end everyone knows it is for fun.” Besides Coloradans, Long, Metzler and Knibb, several age group athletes made it in the top five. In no particular order. Colleen D'Reuck, Diana Hassel, Mike Wein, Eric Long (Sam's dad), and Sandi Wiebe.   So what about Kona maybe moving to St. George? St. George is an iconic venue with massive hills to run up and down. And the ride up Snow Canyon provides a separation point (along with an amazing picturesque backdrop) just before athletes start their run. There is speculation that the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona will move in the future and St. George seems primed to be a top choice. It has all the features that make a world championship course with hills, weather exposure, and a welcoming community and a downtown finish with plenty of potential to the house larger crowds seen in Kona. It is certainly more accessible than Kona and far less expensive for athletes, spectators and industry supporters. Sand Hollow reservoir is great for the swim with plenty of room for transition. In Kona the iconic pier is busting at the seams with room (barely) for 1,800 athletes. In St. George 4,200 athletes competed. Undoubtedly the age group women probably don't love the current format with the last group starting their swim at almost 10 o'clock. In normal years that would force them to be running at the hottest part of the day. This year, some had to be pulled out of the water with the rare thunderstorm that rolled through. In previous years, the 70.3 Championship features two days of racing—one for the men and one for the women. In St. George that seems a difficult task with races not generally taking place on Sundays in Utah. It will be interesting to see what happens in the future. Next year the 70.3 Championship will return to St. George along with a full distance race in June. We shall see! But for now, the young group of pro's stole the show and perhaps this race will serve as a springboard for future success for all of these athletes as they scatter into the world doing more races. In fact, watch this coming weekend in Chattanooga where Sam Long will attempt defend his title as champion and battle rival Lionel Sander—keep an eye on that! IRONMAN 70.3 Championship in St George Results (ironman.com)   IRONMAN World Championship Returns to Kona in October 2022 with Two-Day Race Format   The 2021 Supersapiens IRONMAN World Championship will take place in St. George, Utah, on May 7, 2022, giving professional triathletes the opportunity to claim a world championship title and a share of the $750,000 prize purse that goes with it. The ongoing uncertainty regarding Kailua-Kona, Hawaii`s ability to host the event in February required a change in venue to outside of Hawai`i for the first time since the inaugural event in 1978. St. George was selected as the first new host location of the event outside of Hawai`i in 40-plus years based on its strong community support, challenging course, and experience hosting IRONMAN® triathlons and other major events, including the successful recently completed 2021 Intermountain Healthcare IRONMAN 70.3® World Championship presented by Utah Sports Commission. St. George will also host the 2022 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship on October 28-29, 2022. For the first time in the 40-plus year history of the IRONMAN World Championship, the pinnacle event for triathlon will take place over two days with the 2022 IRONMAN World Championship returning to Kona, Hawai`i on October 6 and 8, 2022. The two-day event will see an expanded women's professional field of 50 athletes race on Thursday, October 6, and 50 professional men race on Saturday, October 8. Details of the age-group races will be communicated in the coming weeks. “The loss of the past two IRONMAN World Championship races certainly dealt us an economic blow. Our restaurants have always received a big boost from the race, athletes, and their families. We are very excited to hear that with two races next October we can plan to make up for the economic losses from the past two race cancellations,” said Luana Hospitality Principal, Eric von Platen Luder “It has been a challenging few years, however we have stayed true to our goal to create exceptional experiences for our ‘ohana,” said Diana Bertsch, Senior Vice President, World Championship Events for The IRONMAN Group. “We are grateful to our host communities in St. George and Kailua-Kona as well as their local and state officials, for their willingness to trust us. Our team is committed to putting on incredible race weeks as we add pages to the IRONMAN World Championship history books in May and October 2022.”  IRONMAN athletes registered for the 2021 and 2022 editions of the IRONMAN World Championship triathlon, along with athletes currently registered for 2022 IRONMAN St. George, will be contacted directly with additional information. For more information and event details for the IRONMAN World Championship, please visit www.ironman.com/im-world-championship.   IRONMAN Chattanooga Pro Rankings by TriRating https://www.trirating.com/ironman-chattanooga-2021-sept-26-seedings/     When Her Friend Crashed at Worlds, She Gave Up Her Own Race to Help Would you DNF to give aid to a fellow competitor? SEPTEMBER 22, 2021 SUSAN LACKE    When Emily Hippen and Tristen Rogers qualified for the Ironman 70.3 World Championship together at Steelhead 70.3 earlier this year, they immediately began making plans for a joint trip to St. George. “We were in the same age group, and so excited to have both made the cut,” said Hippen. “We had been talking about this big race and planning our time in St. George for months.” As members of the same triathlon team, HAT House Altitude Team in Denver, Colorado, the two were already frequent training buddies. But in St. George, they became more than that; they became close friends with an unbreakable bond. The pivotal moment came at mile 40 of the world championship race, when a freak storm blew through the course, bringing high winds, hail, and lightning. Approximately 70 age-group women who were still in the midst of the swim in Sand Hollow were pulled from the water; Hippen and Rogers were just a few miles into the bike leg. “I was on a climb when I saw about 20 or 30 women just standing on the side of the road,” said Rogers. “I thought that Ironman was halting the race for our safety, until the worst of the storm passed, and was preparing to stop. But then realized, when I got to the top of the climb, that these women had voluntarily pulled over because they were literally being blown off their bikes and some looked fearful for their safety. The bike ride at that point instantly became one of survival, and not of performance.” Rogers continued on, her knuckles white from the tight grip on her handlebars. After all, this was a world championship race— the first one since 2019—and she was determined to make it to the finish. Besides, she reasoned, the storm would surely pass. Meanwhile, Hippen was just ahead of her teammate on the course (“I'd been pushing all day to stay ahead of her,” she said) with the same white knuckles. She, too, was waiting for the storm to pass, when she reasoned the ride would become much easier. Just before a pivotal turn in the course, Rogers finally laid eyes on her teammate—but not the way she expected. “I heard a bunch of women ahead of me scream, and looked up and literally saw feet in the air and then a body hit the ground,” said Rogers. “It happened so fast.” Hippen, unconscious after crashing during the bike leg at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship. (Photo: Courtesy of Emily Hippen) Rogers didn't realize it was her teammate who she'd seen fly into the air until she stopped to give aid. Hippen was unconscious, her eyes rolled back in her head. While other athletes hurried ahead to alert medical authorities at the aid station, Rogers stayed with her friend. A volunteer arrived to assist, and Rogers gave what information she could—Hippen's name, the name of her husband, and a phone number. When an ambulance arrived minutes later, Rogers was thanked for her help and told she could resume her race. Though the storm had finally passed by then, she couldn't bring herself to finish the race. After riding her bike back into town, she turned in her timing chip, racked her bike, and immediately headed for the hospital. Hippen, thankfully, was fine—banged up, to be sure, but expected to make a full recovery. In her post-crash fog, she was especially surprised to see Rogers. “Tristen stayed with me at the hospital, helped my husband get there, picked up my prescriptions, and got me back to our Airbnb,” Hippen said. “She did it all. All while she could have been finishing a race that was very important to her.” For Rogers, taking the DNF wasn't a difficult decision. “I don't think I would have been happy with myself had I not stopped. I want to promote all things good about being a positive member of our endurance community,” she said. “On our team website, one of the examples we have for people who are interested in joining is, ‘If you wouldn't stop and help someone on the side of the road because it is going to mess up your data/Strava/personal record, then we probably are not the team for you.'” While Hippen recovers, she'll be cheering on her friend who plans to finish her race via a self-supported 70.3 in Denver. The two have plans to qualify again for 70.3 Worlds and, this time, to finish together. “Tristen is a model athlete,” said Hippen. “Being a champion is so much more than crossing the finish line ahead of others. It means being a champion of fellow athletes and giving selflessly to others. And Tristen is a true champion.”   What's New in the 303: Pioneers Win Oktoberfest Sprint Triathlon LONGMONT, Colo. – The University of Denver Triathlon Team won the women's team event at the 2021 Oktoberfest Sprint at Union Reservoir on Sunday morning, taking each of the top-five spots and placing all nine of its athletes in the top 16. Denver freshman Freya McKinley, competing in only her second collegiate race, won the individual women's competition in a total time of 1:03:28. Graduate student Emily Pincus followed in second place at 1:05:17, while freshman Avarie Faulkner finished less than a minute later (1:06:10) to round out the podium for the Pioneers. Freshmen Olivia Ebenstein (1:06:26) and Bella Chirafisi (1:07:25) joined their teammates in the top five. The race was the DU program's first-ever in its home state. "It was just a dominating performance, wire-to-wire," said head coach Barbara Perkins. "They mixed it up a little bit with their positions during the race, but it was a super exciting meet for us. We're just so thrilled to be here, back to racing in our home state and just show what we can do. It was a strong showing, but we still have a lot more to prove this season." Also finishing for the Pioneers were senior Amanda Ballard in 11th (1:13:48), junior Stormy Hegg in 13th (1:14:57) and freshman Marta Meinardi in 16th (1:16:13). For Hegg and Meinardi, the race represented their first as collegians. Senior Grace Arlandson was among the leaders following the swim and was the first into the second transition after the bike leg, but she didn't complete the race as she was a pre-planned DNF. Pincus led all women out of the 750-meter swim in Union Reservoir and was followed closely behind by teammates Meinardi, Chirafisi, Arlandson, McKinley and Ebenstein. The Pioneers held each of the first seven spots heading into the first transition, and it was a lead they never relinquished in the race McKinley posted the fourth-fastest swim at 9:31 and moved out to the front heading into the run after recording the second-fastest bike time, finishing the 12.9-mile non-draft ride at 32:59, six seconds behind Arlandson. She completed the 5-kilometer run in 19 minutes and 12 seconds, the best mark among the women. "It was a phenomenal race, I really enjoyed it," McKinley said. "Being out there with everybody and having the motivation of the other girls and the support was so nice. To be able to race a local race in Colorado was awesome." The University of Colorado came in second place in the women's team event after placing athletes in each of the 6-10 spots, while the Air Force Academy finished third. Barbara Perkins was named the University of Denver's first triathlon head coach in program history in July 2020 and is in her second season in that position in fall 2021. In the inaugural 2020-21 campaign, Perkins guided the program's first season that featured three DU triathletes finishing in the top 10 in the Pioneers' only collegiate race: the Clermont Challenge in Florida in March 2021. Perkins joined the University of Denver as an assistant coach for the men's and women's swimming and diving team in November 2019 and served two seasons full-time in that position. Her role as the triathlon head coach was converted to a full-time position on July 21, 2021.   Video Of The Week: Lucy Charles "Pure Joy" Finish at IRONMAN 70.3 World Champs in St George https://www.instagram.com/tv/CUI1PPmpQFp/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

303Endurance Podcast
Diana Hassel on St George

303Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 85:50


This week we are breaking down St. George and have local athlete Diana Hassel to share her race report.  Diana is one of the most successful amateur triathletes in the world. She is the 2017 Hawaii Ironman Champion W50-54.  Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD We're huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation. Venga offers personalized CBD plans. All you have to do is take a simple quiz to get you started! Answer a few questions and, voila - there's your personalized CBD recommendation! It's all based on YOU - what CBD YOU need right now to meet your goals. Guys, it's super easy to go take this quiz on their website. Just go to vengacbd.com/quiz and (you didn't hear it from us but…) there's a freebie in it for you just for taking the quiz. 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First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Diane Hassel Endurance News IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St George 2021 IRONMAN World Championship moves to UT in May 2022 2021 IRONMAN Chattanooga September 26 TriRating Rankings What's new in the 303 DU Triathlon Team Wins at Oktoberfest Video of the Week Lucy Charles "Pure Joy" Finish at IRONMAN 70.3 World Champs in St George   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Diana Hassel Diana M Hassel, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, Dipl. ACVECC Professor & Equine Section Head Equine Emergency Surgery & Critical Care Diana is one of the most successful amateur triathletes in the world. She is the 2017 Hawaii Ironman Champion W50-54.  Over the years she has become an advocate for training smart and she really enjoys helping triathletes who seek her advice. It was only normal for her to join our coaching staff in 2015. Diana discovered her passion for triathlon later in life, having competed in her first triathlon at age 29. As a child she ran cross country and track and has been an avid master's swimmer and competitor since 1986. Diana is also a cat 2 cyclist and has held age group titles in the Colorado State Time Trial Championships, Road Race Championships and Best All Around Rider. She began competitive cycling during her PhD training at UC Davis that readily translated into successful triathlon performances. She has extensive experience with both heart rate and power training for the bike. Her knowledge of training methods and her vast experience in racing combined with her unparalleled results will be a great asset to SmartTriathlonTraining. Diana is one of the most decorated athletes with 10 Hawaii Ironman age group podium awards including one World Championship. Diana will be helping all of our athletes on our internal “ask the coach” page. Her career as a surgeon and criticalist in veterinary medicine with a PhD in Comparative Pathology and lifelong fascination with exercise physiology and nutrition adds to her coaching expertise. Diana lives in Ft Collins Colorado with her husband, Dean, who is also a triathlete, and her daughter Mikayla, an avid horseperson.   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News: St. George, Iconic Race and a Look Into the Future; Coloradans do Well! Posted on September 21, 2021 By Bill Plock The authentic joy Lucy Charles Barclay beamed to the world the second she broke the tape is something I'll never forget. It gave me goosebumps and seemed deep seated, especially as she came to hug her husband with tears running down her face. I have never seen or felt such happiness. Barclay, like all the athletes battled very unusual weather with a down pour of rain and hail and lightening that threatened the race. With a Barclay comfortably in the lead all day, she knew she was having “a day” and said at the press conference recalling her thoughts, “they better not cancel this race!” Gustav Iden of Norway didn't quite lead the entire way but went to the front of the pack on the bike part way through and never looked back. Fellow countryman and gold medalist Kristian Blummenfelt was in that lead group when he suffered a serious mechanical failure with his wheel and fell out of contention. Boulder's Sam Long, with a solid swim battled hard to ride into second place never did catch Iden. Iden won by 5 minutes retaining his World Champion status he gained after winning in Nice in 2019. The second place finishes for Long and another Boulder resident, Jeanni Metzler may be a glimpse into the future of the sport.  Just two years ago Long finish 26 minutes back and has kept a poster of Nice in his “pain cave” as motivation ever since. Metzler has been climbing the ranks and finished 3rd in Boulder a few weeks ago behind Taylor Knibb and Emma Palant Brown, but in St. George she beat both of them. Metzler passed Knibb just a few minutes out saying later, “I didn't want a sprint finish with Taylor as I don't think that would've gone well.” Knibb finished about 30 seconds back and the two training partners and friends shared exuberant hugs in the finish area . It felt like the finish area was filled with camaraderie and respect unlike any race I had seen before. This wasn't “new blood” so to speak, but in way it felt like a new group of champions and future champions were making their mark in St. George. At the press conference, the top five male and female finishers all were under the age of 28. It's a young group who genuinely seem to enjoy each other. Of the ten, eight raced together at the Collins Cup just four weeks prior. When asked if that played into the feeling of camaraderie, Sam Long said, “I do think we all got to know each other there. It also could be because we are all pretty young, it was a bit of a different atmosphere. And I also think the sport is changing, where you can talk smack but in a friendly way and at the end everyone knows it is for fun.” Besides Coloradans, Long, Metzler and Knibb, several age group athletes made it in the top five. In no particular order. Colleen D'Reuck, Diana Hassel, Mike Wein, Eric Long (Sam's dad), and Sandi Wiebe.   So what about Kona maybe moving to St. George? St. George is an iconic venue with massive hills to run up and down. And the ride up Snow Canyon provides a separation point (along with an amazing picturesque backdrop) just before athletes start their run. There is speculation that the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona will move in the future and St. George seems primed to be a top choice. It has all the features that make a world championship course with hills, weather exposure, and a welcoming community and a downtown finish with plenty of potential to the house larger crowds seen in Kona. It is certainly more accessible than Kona and far less expensive for athletes, spectators and industry supporters. Sand Hollow reservoir is great for the swim with plenty of room for transition. In Kona the iconic pier is busting at the seams with room (barely) for 1,800 athletes. In St. George 4,200 athletes competed. Undoubtedly the age group women probably don't love the current format with the last group starting their swim at almost 10 o'clock. In normal years that would force them to be running at the hottest part of the day. This year, some had to be pulled out of the water with the rare thunderstorm that rolled through. In previous years, the 70.3 Championship features two days of racing—one for the men and one for the women. In St. George that seems a difficult task with races not generally taking place on Sundays in Utah. It will be interesting to see what happens in the future. Next year the 70.3 Championship will return to St. George along with a full distance race in June. We shall see! But for now, the young group of pro's stole the show and perhaps this race will serve as a springboard for future success for all of these athletes as they scatter into the world doing more races. In fact, watch this coming weekend in Chattanooga where Sam Long will attempt defend his title as champion and battle rival Lionel Sander—keep an eye on that! IRONMAN 70.3 Championship in St George Results (ironman.com)   IRONMAN World Championship Returns to Kona in October 2022 with Two-Day Race Format   The 2021 Supersapiens IRONMAN World Championship will take place in St. George, Utah, on May 7, 2022, giving professional triathletes the opportunity to claim a world championship title and a share of the $750,000 prize purse that goes with it. The ongoing uncertainty regarding Kailua-Kona, Hawaii`s ability to host the event in February required a change in venue to outside of Hawai`i for the first time since the inaugural event in 1978. St. George was selected as the first new host location of the event outside of Hawai`i in 40-plus years based on its strong community support, challenging course, and experience hosting IRONMAN® triathlons and other major events, including the successful recently completed 2021 Intermountain Healthcare IRONMAN 70.3® World Championship presented by Utah Sports Commission. St. George will also host the 2022 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship on October 28-29, 2022. For the first time in the 40-plus year history of the IRONMAN World Championship, the pinnacle event for triathlon will take place over two days with the 2022 IRONMAN World Championship returning to Kona, Hawai`i on October 6 and 8, 2022. The two-day event will see an expanded women's professional field of 50 athletes race on Thursday, October 6, and 50 professional men race on Saturday, October 8. Details of the age-group races will be communicated in the coming weeks. “The loss of the past two IRONMAN World Championship races certainly dealt us an economic blow. Our restaurants have always received a big boost from the race, athletes, and their families. We are very excited to hear that with two races next October we can plan to make up for the economic losses from the past two race cancellations,” said Luana Hospitality Principal, Eric von Platen Luder “It has been a challenging few years, however we have stayed true to our goal to create exceptional experiences for our ‘ohana,” said Diana Bertsch, Senior Vice President, World Championship Events for The IRONMAN Group. “We are grateful to our host communities in St. George and Kailua-Kona as well as their local and state officials, for their willingness to trust us. Our team is committed to putting on incredible race weeks as we add pages to the IRONMAN World Championship history books in May and October 2022.”  IRONMAN athletes registered for the 2021 and 2022 editions of the IRONMAN World Championship triathlon, along with athletes currently registered for 2022 IRONMAN St. George, will be contacted directly with additional information. For more information and event details for the IRONMAN World Championship, please visit www.ironman.com/im-world-championship.   IRONMAN Chattanooga Pro Rankings by TriRating https://www.trirating.com/ironman-chattanooga-2021-sept-26-seedings/     When Her Friend Crashed at Worlds, She Gave Up Her Own Race to Help Would you DNF to give aid to a fellow competitor? SEPTEMBER 22, 2021 SUSAN LACKE    When Emily Hippen and Tristen Rogers qualified for the Ironman 70.3 World Championship together at Steelhead 70.3 earlier this year, they immediately began making plans for a joint trip to St. George. “We were in the same age group, and so excited to have both made the cut,” said Hippen. “We had been talking about this big race and planning our time in St. George for months.” As members of the same triathlon team, HAT House Altitude Team in Denver, Colorado, the two were already frequent training buddies. But in St. George, they became more than that; they became close friends with an unbreakable bond. The pivotal moment came at mile 40 of the world championship race, when a freak storm blew through the course, bringing high winds, hail, and lightning. Approximately 70 age-group women who were still in the midst of the swim in Sand Hollow were pulled from the water; Hippen and Rogers were just a few miles into the bike leg. “I was on a climb when I saw about 20 or 30 women just standing on the side of the road,” said Rogers. “I thought that Ironman was halting the race for our safety, until the worst of the storm passed, and was preparing to stop. But then realized, when I got to the top of the climb, that these women had voluntarily pulled over because they were literally being blown off their bikes and some looked fearful for their safety. The bike ride at that point instantly became one of survival, and not of performance.” Rogers continued on, her knuckles white from the tight grip on her handlebars. After all, this was a world championship race— the first one since 2019—and she was determined to make it to the finish. Besides, she reasoned, the storm would surely pass. Meanwhile, Hippen was just ahead of her teammate on the course (“I'd been pushing all day to stay ahead of her,” she said) with the same white knuckles. She, too, was waiting for the storm to pass, when she reasoned the ride would become much easier. Just before a pivotal turn in the course, Rogers finally laid eyes on her teammate—but not the way she expected. “I heard a bunch of women ahead of me scream, and looked up and literally saw feet in the air and then a body hit the ground,” said Rogers. “It happened so fast.” Hippen, unconscious after crashing during the bike leg at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship. (Photo: Courtesy of Emily Hippen) Rogers didn't realize it was her teammate who she'd seen fly into the air until she stopped to give aid. Hippen was unconscious, her eyes rolled back in her head. While other athletes hurried ahead to alert medical authorities at the aid station, Rogers stayed with her friend. A volunteer arrived to assist, and Rogers gave what information she could—Hippen's name, the name of her husband, and a phone number. When an ambulance arrived minutes later, Rogers was thanked for her help and told she could resume her race. Though the storm had finally passed by then, she couldn't bring herself to finish the race. After riding her bike back into town, she turned in her timing chip, racked her bike, and immediately headed for the hospital. Hippen, thankfully, was fine—banged up, to be sure, but expected to make a full recovery. In her post-crash fog, she was especially surprised to see Rogers. “Tristen stayed with me at the hospital, helped my husband get there, picked up my prescriptions, and got me back to our Airbnb,” Hippen said. “She did it all. All while she could have been finishing a race that was very important to her.” For Rogers, taking the DNF wasn't a difficult decision. “I don't think I would have been happy with myself had I not stopped. I want to promote all things good about being a positive member of our endurance community,” she said. “On our team website, one of the examples we have for people who are interested in joining is, ‘If you wouldn't stop and help someone on the side of the road because it is going to mess up your data/Strava/personal record, then we probably are not the team for you.'” While Hippen recovers, she'll be cheering on her friend who plans to finish her race via a self-supported 70.3 in Denver. The two have plans to qualify again for 70.3 Worlds and, this time, to finish together. “Tristen is a model athlete,” said Hippen. “Being a champion is so much more than crossing the finish line ahead of others. It means being a champion of fellow athletes and giving selflessly to others. And Tristen is a true champion.”   What's New in the 303: Pioneers Win Oktoberfest Sprint Triathlon LONGMONT, Colo. – The University of Denver Triathlon Team won the women's team event at the 2021 Oktoberfest Sprint at Union Reservoir on Sunday morning, taking each of the top-five spots and placing all nine of its athletes in the top 16. Denver freshman Freya McKinley, competing in only her second collegiate race, won the individual women's competition in a total time of 1:03:28. Graduate student Emily Pincus followed in second place at 1:05:17, while freshman Avarie Faulkner finished less than a minute later (1:06:10) to round out the podium for the Pioneers. Freshmen Olivia Ebenstein (1:06:26) and Bella Chirafisi (1:07:25) joined their teammates in the top five. The race was the DU program's first-ever in its home state. "It was just a dominating performance, wire-to-wire," said head coach Barbara Perkins. "They mixed it up a little bit with their positions during the race, but it was a super exciting meet for us. We're just so thrilled to be here, back to racing in our home state and just show what we can do. It was a strong showing, but we still have a lot more to prove this season." Also finishing for the Pioneers were senior Amanda Ballard in 11th (1:13:48), junior Stormy Hegg in 13th (1:14:57) and freshman Marta Meinardi in 16th (1:16:13). For Hegg and Meinardi, the race represented their first as collegians. Senior Grace Arlandson was among the leaders following the swim and was the first into the second transition after the bike leg, but she didn't complete the race as she was a pre-planned DNF. Pincus led all women out of the 750-meter swim in Union Reservoir and was followed closely behind by teammates Meinardi, Chirafisi, Arlandson, McKinley and Ebenstein. The Pioneers held each of the first seven spots heading into the first transition, and it was a lead they never relinquished in the race McKinley posted the fourth-fastest swim at 9:31 and moved out to the front heading into the run after recording the second-fastest bike time, finishing the 12.9-mile non-draft ride at 32:59, six seconds behind Arlandson. She completed the 5-kilometer run in 19 minutes and 12 seconds, the best mark among the women. "It was a phenomenal race, I really enjoyed it," McKinley said. "Being out there with everybody and having the motivation of the other girls and the support was so nice. To be able to race a local race in Colorado was awesome." The University of Colorado came in second place in the women's team event after placing athletes in each of the 6-10 spots, while the Air Force Academy finished third. Barbara Perkins was named the University of Denver's first triathlon head coach in program history in July 2020 and is in her second season in that position in fall 2021. In the inaugural 2020-21 campaign, Perkins guided the program's first season that featured three DU triathletes finishing in the top 10 in the Pioneers' only collegiate race: the Clermont Challenge in Florida in March 2021. Perkins joined the University of Denver as an assistant coach for the men's and women's swimming and diving team in November 2019 and served two seasons full-time in that position. Her role as the triathlon head coach was converted to a full-time position on July 21, 2021.   Video Of The Week: Lucy Charles "Pure Joy" Finish at IRONMAN 70.3 World Champs in St George https://www.instagram.com/tv/CUI1PPmpQFp/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

The Retrospectors
On This Day: See Facts? Ceefax!

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 10:25


The BBC's teletext information service, Ceefax, launched on 23rd September, 1974 - providing the British public with a way to look up headlines, football results and TV listings, some twenty years before the launch of Internet Explorer.Countless National Lottery winners discovered their victories via the analogue service, which was discontinued in 2012. To this day, devotees still share ancient samples of it by uploading old VHS tapes to the web.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly explain why teletext never caught on in France; revisit the 1,445-episode ‘soap opera' ITV Oracle ran on its rival service; and play a Teletext-style Bamboozle quiz of their very own… Further Reading:• ‘The Editors: Goodbye Ceefax' (BBC, 2012): https://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theeditors/2012/10/goodbye_ceefax.html• ‘Minitel: The Old New Thing' (WIRED, 2001): https://www.wired.com/2001/04/minitel-the-old-new-thing/• ‘Pages from Ceefax - Three and a half hours of outdated news, sport and weather' (No Data Available, 2013): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JU8P5G-GM_gWe had EVEN MORE to say about this internet 0.1, including the underwhelming Ceefax competition prizes on offer in the 1970s, the impact the BBC's teletext service had on the development of the TV remote control, and how to research cinema listings for the St George's Centre Harrow in 1995. To hear bonus material this and every week*, support the show NOW at Patreon.com/Retrospectors!*top two tiers onlyThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Beyond YOUR Comfort Zone
Ironman 70.3 World Championships 2021 St. George...The Tough Get Going

Beyond YOUR Comfort Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 25:57


This was the most unexpected race I have ever done. I was calmer than I have ever been leading into the race, especially for it being a World Championship race. Calm before the storm really proved true on Saturday morning. I wouldn't have believed it if you'd tried to tell me beforehand what the weather would do.  And how challenging it would make the course, especially because the course was made to be difficult so it earned the title of a world championship course.Some races are a battle just because of the nature of the sport, this race added another element with the weather working against us for so much of the race. The nagging thoughts to quit or just not care about trying my best were so loud.The saying “When the going gets tough, the tough get going” became the theme of the race after I looked back on the details of the race. I continued to fight and move up the ranking until the last minutes of the race. I had a huge burst of energy toward the end of the race, and I let that carry me into the finish line. I was running so fast that my mind was willing but my body was weak, and I almost tripped on the red carpet.It is amazing to see how determined our spirits are when things get harder and harder. How do you go through your race of life? Do you give into the pain or stay determined?This race will be implemented in my heart forever. The lessons I learned from Saturday will help me to keep moving when I go through the storms of life. 

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Kristian Blummenfelt on St George

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 65:11


This week we have Gold medalist and current 70.3 world record holder, Kristian Blummenfelt joining us to talk about the Tokyo Olympic Triathlon win and his outlook for IRONMAN 70.3 St George. Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD   We're huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation.   Venga offers personalized CBD plans. All you have to do is take a simple quiz to get you started! Answer a few questions and, voila - there's your personalized CBD recommendation! It's all based on YOU - what CBD YOU need right now to meet your goals.   Guys, it's super easy to go take this quiz on their website. Just go to vengacbd.com/quiz and (you didn't hear it from us but…) there's a freebie in it for you just for taking the quiz.   We trust these guys 100% and they'll make it really easy for you to get started with the RIGHT CBD.    Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Kristian Blummenfelt Endurance News IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St George Kristian Blummenfelt sprints to Edmonton win and World Championship double What's new in the 303? Pro race insights from Jocelyn McCauley 8 of Colorado's crazy tests on foot and bike - Springs Gazette Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Kristian Blummenfelt A multiple Norwegian Triathlon Champion and IRONMAN 70.3 Champion, Kristian Blummenfelt is one of the fastest triathletes in the world over the middle distance.    Kristian was originally a swimmer, but also excelled on his feet by competing at the 2011 European Cross-Country Championships as a junior and showcasing the necessary tools to excel in the sport of triathlon.   Blummenfelt prospered as a junior, winning numerous events. Victories at ITU Junior European Cup events in Brno, Tabor and Antalya were followed by a Senior ITU victory at Tartu. His first major success came at the 2015 European Championship where he picked up a bronze medal.   Kristian's Norwegian National titles came in 2015, 2016 and 2018, and now he was also showing off his talents on the IRONMAN 70.3 circuit. He notched three consecutive victories in Bahrain between 2017 and 2019, and in both the 2018 and 2019 renewals set new world records for the half-IRONMAN.   2019 was a highly successful campaign for the Norwegian as he was also crowned winner of the ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final. He finished a highly creditable fourth meanwhile at the 70.3 World Championship in Nice, a race won by one of his training partners Gustav Iden.   Kristian is also an Olympian, having competed at the 2016 Rio Games where he finished in 13th place.  He won gold at the Tokyo 2021, won again in Edmonton and World Championship double August 21st.   Blummenfelt's sporting hero growing up was Alexander Dale Oen, a swimmer from his native Norway and a European champion in 2008.  Unsurprisingly for someone who has set those world records, Kristian's motto is “go big or go home”.   Kristian Blummenfelt (protriathletes.org)   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   Kristian Blummenfelt sprints to Edmonton win and World Championship double Win or lose (and this year it has mostly been the former for the Norwegian), Kristian Blummenfelt impacts more races than anyone else. So powerful is his cycling ability and mentality, you feel as though he is on a mission to challenge anyone who thinks they can breakaway on the bike (from him) and win.   The result of that – for me at least, and it has been the case for some time now – is that the first major measure I look at during a race is not who is leading the swim, who is in the lead pack, is there a break etc. It's, “did you exit the swim ahead, or behind Kristian Blummenfelt?”   Ahead, and – if you have the legs to follow him – you gain access to the world's greatest domestique (!) to help overcome any swim deficit. If you are behind and you miss the Blu Train… expect a very difficult next 90 minutes.   And that, perhaps, is the primary reason why Great Britain's Alex Yee wasn't able to challenge for world championship gold on Saturday in Edmonton, despite producing the fastest run by a long way. Blummenfelt swam 18:36, Alex 18:53. Those 17 seconds would prove impossible to recover from.   Preview of the Showdown in St. George at IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships 303 is heading to St. George to bring you in-person coverage of the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships. With no Kona this year, all eyes are on the desert of southwest Utah. With a hilly run course, fast bike and a predicted temperature near 100 degrees, the real sizzle isn't the rubber meeting the road, it's the clash of top triathletes on heels of the Collins Cup that has no doubt sparked some rivalries. In the women's field in particular, the match up of Daniela Ryf and Taylor Knibb seems most intriguing. At the Collins Cup they went head to head and Knibb had the biggest victory of the day of all athletes crushing Daniela by double digit minutes. But Daniela reportedly wasn't feeling her best and we all know of the four time IRONMAN World Champion capabilities. No doubt she is looking for some revenge. Obviously as the championship, the field is stacked. Maybe there is a chink in Ryf's armor? Maybe not, but Lucy Charles, Ellie Salthouse, Sky Moench, Paula Findlay and Jeanni Metzler, all with great races in Slovakia could be in the mix at the end. No doubt there are others like Holly Lawrence who crashed in the Collins Cup could fight for the podium.   The mens field offers similar drama with Sam Long, the top ranked American and one of the favorites will have stiff competition from Lionel Sanders, Gustav Iden and fellow Norwegian and Olympic Gold Medalist Kristian Blummenfelt. Last May, Long and Sanders battled shoulder to shoulder in St. George and the two have had some fun social media banter in the last 12 months. After the race in May, Long said he knew he could take advantage of the downhill with his long stride and he did so almost winning so it will be interesting to see what happens.   The Norwegians are going to be tough to beat. Both Iden and Blummenfelt have had fantastic seasons. Iden handedly won his race in Slovakia and Blummenfelt has focused on training for St. George since winning Olympic gold. With no Jan Frodeno, putting odds on this race is challenging. There are many podium worthy contenders like Chris Leiferman, Rudy Von Berg, Alistair Brownlee, Ben Kanute, Javier Gomez, Sam Appleton and maybe a dark horse to watch is Collin Chartier from Louisville, Colorado.   What's New in the 303:   Pro Race Insights from Jocelyn McCauley   https://303cycling.com/cyclists-4-community-raffling-off-new-cervelo-to-raise-money/   8 of Colorado's crazy tests on foot and bike: Jagged alpine to rowdy singletrack at night Here's a nod to some of the state's most infamous challenges spanning 100-plus miles:   Hardrock 100 Clearly, lockdowns of last year fueled ambitions. Example: François D'haene's record dash over the San Juan Mountains this summer. The French man became the first in the fearsome race's 28-year history to clock a time under 22 hours — stunning, considering the 100 miles and 33,000 feet of climbing in the jagged alpine around Silverton, Telluride and Ouray. Lottery-based entry, race is usually mid-July.   LEADVILLE 100 RACE Andy Fox of Evergreen, Colo. rides his bike near Twin Lakes during the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race Saturday, August 14, 2010 in Leadville, Colo.   Gazette file Leadville Trail 100 This is a classic in the ultra world. Where miners once flocked for gold, now runners and mountain bikers race to finish within demanding cutoffs (30 hours for runners, 12 for cyclists). It's a test of lung power, starting from North America's highest incorporated town near 10,200 feet and rising to Hope Pass above 12,600 feet. It's better known as Hopeless Pass. Lottery-based, races in late August.   Run Rabbit Run Are you a tortoise or a hare? That is the first question to ask when approaching this 100-mile sufferfest from Steamboat Springs. While gaining 20,000 feet of elevation, you'll be covering parts of the Continental Divide and the town's recognizable summits: Mount Werner and Emerald and Rabbit Ears mountains. Hares finish under 36 hours, tortoises under 30. Usually mid-September.   Flaming Foliage Relay This 165-mile overnighter showcases autumn's aspen glow where it is famously glorious, along Guanella, Georgia and Fremont passes. Running teams might struggle to admire the beauty. Their heads are down on the course between Idaho Springs and Buena Vista, crossing roads and trails amounting to about 17,000 vertical feet. Usually mid-September.   Triple Bypass In 1988, a group of cycling buddies thought it would be fun to ride from Evergreen to Vail. Ever since, that's been the idea of fun for riders traversing a trio of heart-pounding passes over 100-plus miles and 10,000-plus feet. An exclusive bunch has made it a “double triple” in recent years, pedaling back the way they came. Slated for late July/early August 2022.   Breck 100 Mountain bikers have come to know this, not the Leadville 100, as Colorado's ultimate endeavor on a saddle — a tantalizing route shaped like a clover leaf, crossing the Continental Divide three times. But the race has been on hold for two years; the pandemic again caused a cancellation this summer. And the past two plans were a condensed course, closer to 70 miles. Will the real Breck 100 return? “That's the million-dollar question,” says organizer Thane Wright. Previously mid to late July.   SBT GRVL Colorado's gravel revolution begins in Steamboat Springs, a cycling town proud of its crunchy backroads. This race has risen to prominence with a variety of endurance courses amid classic scenery. They have recently ranged from nearly 40 miles to more than 140 miles, with climbing between 2,000 and 9,400 feet. Slated for Aug. 22, 2022. Vapor Trail 125 Any ultra competitor knows about “sleep demons,” those hallucinations that manifest at night. That's when this whacky mountain bike foray begins, in the darkness of 10 p.m. It begins in Salida, where some of the whackiest riders reside, molded by the vaunted Monarch Crest. Vapor is reserved for the most skilled and wilderness prepared. One must negotiate technical singletrack by headlamp and sustain long climbs over 125 miles. Slated for Aug. 26, 2022.     Video Of The Week: Kristian Blummenfelt History Maker   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

The Triathlete Hour
Triathlete Hour: Ep. 72 - There's no secret sauce to Kat Matthews' success

The Triathlete Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 75:51


Welcome to the Triathlete Hour. We've got one last championship race in this condensed tri championship season: the 70.3 Worlds this weekend in St. George, Utah. And so today Laura Siddall joins us first for a quick Worlds preview with our predictions—and why the women's race is the way more competitive and exciting one this time around. Check out all the coverage on our site: Your Guide to the 70.3 World Championship Women Contenders Your Guide to the 70.3 World Championship Men Contenders The Pros' Predictions for 70.3 Worlds And then I chat with British up-and-comer Kat Matthews—who could surprise everyone this weekend in St George. Kat is a British Army captain and picked up triathlon back in 2015 with some colleagues and friends, realized as she says “she was quite good at this,” and slowly got more and more serious. In 2019, when she crossed the line second out of all the women at a big European 70.3 while still an age-grouper who trained part-time after work, she realized she could be really good. Kat moved up to the pro ranks and had a sub-9 hour ironman on debut, set the Ironman Florida course record last year, and then ran a 2:49 for second at Ironman Tulsa back in May. She tells us how gradually progressing load has been her secret sauce, how there really are no secrets, and how it's really all just a series of choices. Plus, we have an interesting discussion about how many athletes and commentators have remarked on her ability to run fast despite, in their words, “not being skinny." What does that say about some weird ideas we all seem to have about body image?

Newson Health Menopause & Wellbeing Centre Playlist
116 - Testosterone: the forgotten hormone with Professor Isaac Manyonda

Newson Health Menopause & Wellbeing Centre Playlist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 36:08


Professor Isaac Manyonda, professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at St George's Hospital in London, makes a welcome return to the podcast to discuss the important hormone, testosterone, with Dr Louise Newson.  The experts discuss why awareness of testosterone in women is usually overshadowed by estrogen and they describe what type of symptoms can be greatly improved by replacing testosterone, as well as the different preparations available, licensing issues and challenges of accessing the medication on the NHS.   Isaac's top 3 tips if you're considering testosterone:  Understand that testosterone isn't just a male hormone, it is a key female hormone, and tell your doctor this if they are unaware!  Be clear (with your doctor) about what symptoms testosterone can help specifically that estrogen alone may not fully alleviate, such as brain fog, sleep disturbances, lack of energy, and low libido.  If your usual doctor will not prescribe testosterone for you, look into what other NHS clinics in your region will, it can take a bit of finding out how to receive it. It should be something you can access via the NHS, but change is slow.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Businesses and the Mandate

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 10:33


How will businesses respond to the president's vaccine mandate? And what sorts of things are they weighing when crafting their own policies? Don Willie from the St. George Chamber of Commerce explains what choices companies and workers are facing. Guest Host: Marty Carpenter See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.