Podcast appearances and mentions of philip bump

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Best podcasts about philip bump

Latest podcast episodes about philip bump

ChrisCast
Watching Martha's Vineyard freak out about airlifted refugees is chef's kiss!

ChrisCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 38:09


DeSantis, Fox News, and the Martha's Vineyard 'Stunt' On Tuesday, Venezuelan migrants flown to Martha's Vineyard sued Florida Governor Ron DeSantis for engaging in a duplicitous scheme to relocate them — a trip which was filmed and sent to Fox News as an exclusive. DeSantis admitted to his involvement in the scheme, but argued none of the travelers were forced to go. The attorneys representing the 48 people on those flights, however, claim that they were deceived into boarding — enticed with promises of jobs, housing, and cash assistance that never appeared. Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, suggests that this was a made-for-Fox event, and explains how the flights fit into a broader strategy DeSantis has been crafting for years. This is a segment from our September 23rd, 2022 program, Case Closed?.  Via On the Media: Listen | WNYC Studios | Podcasts --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chrisabraham/message

The Dan Abrams Podcast
The Dan Abrams Podcast with Philip Bump

The Dan Abrams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 44:44


Philip Bump of Washington Post joins Dan to discuss the John Durham investigation and Bump's piece, John Durham was successful, just not in the way Barr first intended

Fever Dreams
Return To Beartaria w/ Phillip Bump

Fever Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 47:07 Very Popular


Just when you thought Dr. Mehmet Oz was losing the war against Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, this week, the reality TV star found a new arsenal at his disposal. On this week's episode of The Daily Beast's Fever Dreams podcast, host Will Sommer and guest host Ursula Perano, politics reporter at The Daily Beast, discuss the latest in the Pennsylvania Senate race. Also on the podcast, Philip Bump, National correspondent at The Washington Post, explains how he became the guy to go through all of the 2020 election fraud claims, eventually debunking each of them one by one. As well, Sommer talks about the confusing mess that was far-right political commentator and Proud Boys founder Gavin McInnes' supposed arrest by the FBI last week. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Bulwark Podcast
Philip Bump: A Reminder that the "Russia Hoax" Is a Hoax

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 47:52 Very Popular


Trump may have been giddy thinking the raid would boost his numbers, but that's not showing up yet, and DeSantis fandom lives. Plus, Cheney won't go quietly, something has changed in the polls since Dobbs, and a reminder that the 'Russia Hoax' is a hoax. Philip Bump joins Charlie Sykes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Deadline: White House
“Sometimes silence is seen as agreement”

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 96:04 Very Popular


John Heilemann, in for Nicolle Wallace, discusses the DOJ's motion to unseal the Mar-a-Lago search warrant. Plus, Liz Cheney's fight for her congressional seat.Joined by: Katie Benner, Michael Bender, Andrew Weissmann, Barbara McQuade, Philip Bump, Peter Wehner, Tali Farhadian Weinstein, Peter Strzok, John Harris, and Vaughn Hillyard

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
Nikki Medoro - Will Mar-a-Lago raid spark Trump support, and do names have to be gender specific?

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:33


Curious reaction from both sides of the political spectrum over the FBI raid of former President Trump's Florida home reports Washington Post national correspondent Philip Bump who tells the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Trump has been sowing doubt over law enforcement and "The Swamp" for years. Also, backlash for a woman choosing to name her daughter Kevin, but what's really in a name?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
Nikki Medoro - Will Mar-a-Lago raid spark Trump support, and do names have to be gender specific?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:33


Curious reaction from both sides of the political spectrum over the FBI raid of former President Trump's Florida home reports Washington Post national correspondent Philip Bump who tells the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Trump has been sowing doubt over law enforcement and "The Swamp" for years. Also, backlash for a woman choosing to name her daughter Kevin, but what's really in a name?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
Mark Thompson: What Does Kansas Tell Us About November?

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 20:10


Philip Bump, National Correspondent at the Washington Post joins Mark Thompson to explain what Kansas voters tell us about November.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
Mark Thompson: What Does Kansas Tell Us About November?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 20:10


Philip Bump, National Correspondent at the Washington Post joins Mark Thompson to explain what Kansas voters tell us about November.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Velshi
Sam Stein is in for Ali Velshi

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 90:11 Very Popular


Sam Stein speaks with Daniel S. Goldman, Former House Impeachment Inquiry Majority Counsel, Rep. Ann McLane, (D) New Hampshire, Rep. Peter Welch, (D) Vermont, Clint Watts, NBC News & MSNBC National Security Analyst, Barbara McQuade, MSNBC Legal Analyst, Philip Bump, National Correspondent at The Washington Post, Michael Steele, Former RNC Chairman, Dr. Peter Hotez, Co-Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at Texas Children's Hospital, Sapphire Garcia-Lies, President of Kansas Birth Justice Society, and Elizabeth Nash, Principal Policy Associate of State Issues at Guttmacher Institute.

The Northwest Politicast
Steve Bannon's battle with Congress and the courts

The Northwest Politicast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 37:25


Just as his trial is about to begin, Steve Bannon, the alt-right ex-strategist to former-President Donald Trump, tries to make a deal with the January 6th Committee to testify. We'll explain what the move means for the hearings and the criminal charges against him. PLUS: President Biden heads to Saudi Arabia amid sinking poll numbers. AND: Russian and Chinese propaganda have made it into American media. Guests include ABC's Andy Field, Philip Bump of the Washington Post and more. The Northwest Politicast with Jeff Pohjola: From this Washington to that one, Jeff Pohjola will explore the issues and politics of the week. Frequent guests and top analysts break down the news to get to the heart of what matters most. Subscribe at nwnewsradio.com or on your favorite podcast app.

The Bill Press Pod
"Very Loud and Very Vocal." The Reporters' Roundtable July 15

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 50:06


January 6th Blockbuster. Trump: Legal Peril and Running Again. Candidates Matter. Roe Meets Real Life. Biden in Middle East. With Alayna Treene, Congressional reporter for Axios, Co-author of the Axios Sneak Peek newsletter, Jeff Dufour, Editor in chief at National Journal and Philip Bump, Washington Post: National correspondent and author of Newsletter: "How To Read This Chart."Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by The International Brotherhood of Teamsters. More information at Teamster.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Trump Was Warned He Might Cause A Riot. He Ignored The Warning

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 22:56


Yesterday's hearing covered connections between certain Trump allies and violent extremist groups, as well as warnings about possibly inciting violence that the president ignored. On Today's Show:Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, offers analysis of Tuesday afternoon's hearing of the January 6th committee.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Jan. 6 Hearing Recap: Trump Allies And Violent Extremists

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 40:34


Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, offers analysis of Tuesday afternoon's hearing of the January 6th committee.

This Day in Esoteric Political History
The Abramoff Scandal (2005) w/ Philip Bump

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 14:46 Very Popular


It's June 27th. This day in 2006, the Senate Indian Affairs Committee released a report about the breadth and depth of corruption on the part of lobbyist Jack Abramoff and his associates. Jody, NIki, and Kellie are joined by Philip Bump of the Washington Post to discuss how Abramoff cheated his clients out of millions — and the political price many Republicans paid as a result. Be sure to subscribe to Phillip's newsletter “How To Read This Chart!” //// Sign up for our newsletter! Find out more at thisdaypod.com And don't forget about Oprahdemics, hosted by Kellie, out now from Radiotopia. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro and Audrey Mardavich, Executive Producers at Radiotopia

On the Media
The Conspiracy Machine

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 50:37 Very Popular


In this week's January 6th committee hearings, a documentary selling election conspiracies was laughed off by the likes of Bill Barr. But myths about a stolen election are no joke. On this week's On the Media, hear about a pundit's efforts to revitalize and repackage The Big Lie. Plus, one man's escape from the conspiracy theory machine.  1. Philip Bump [@pbump], national correspondent at The Washington Post, on debunking election myths made for the silver screen. Listen. 2. Nina Jankowicz [@wiczipedia], former head of the Disinformation Governance Board, on the lessons learned from government-led attempts to counter disinformation. Listen. 3. Josh Owens [@JoshuaHOwens], former staff member at InfoWars, on what made him leave, and how he's come to terms with his past role in dangerous movement. Listen. Music in this Week's Show:Ava Maria D. 839 - Pascal Jean and Jean BrendersFirst Drive - Clive Carroll and John RenbournBoy Moves the Sun - Michael AndrewsExit Music (For A Film) - Brad Mehldau Trio

KGO 810 Podcast
Mark Thompson: 'The Inevitable Question Arrives: Will Trump Face Criminal Charges?'

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 18:45


Philip Bump, national correspondent at the Washington Post is with Mark Thompson to share his latest article, 'The inevitable question arrives: Will Trump face criminal charges?' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
Mark Thompson: 'The Inevitable Question Arrives: Will Trump Face Criminal Charges?'

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 18:45


Philip Bump, national correspondent at the Washington Post is with Mark Thompson to share his latest article, 'The inevitable question arrives: Will Trump face criminal charges?' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

John Howell
John Howell: Essential Cuts (6/9) - "Hearts Touched with Fire" and the Jan 6 Hearings Ahead

John Howell

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 43:37


*Mick Dumke from ProPublica joins the show to discuss an investigation into land Chicago slated for housing and gave to a soccer team. *The Washington Post's Philip Bump is on to talk about the Proud Boys and their part in the Jan 6 insurrection. *Greg Hinz of Crains Chicago Business is on to talk about Pritzker's campaign for re-election. *CNN's own David Gergen joins the show to talk about his new book, "Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made." *Plus, Revolution Brewing's John Carruthers has all the details on the return of Freedom Fest.

C-SPAN Radio - Washington Today
Uvalde 4th grader tells Congress she no longer feels safe at school

C-SPAN Radio - Washington Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 50:47


Today's program looks testimony from an 11 year old Uvalde mass shooting survivor, House passing gun violence bills, man arrested for trying to kill Justice Kavanaugh and Summit of the Americas. Interview with Washington Post's Philip Bump on Jan 6 Committee hearing Thursday (30). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

John Howell
John Howell: Essential Cuts (6/1) - Irvin's Consulting Problem & Pelosi Moves on Assault Weapons

John Howell

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 61:24


*Paul Vallas discusses his bid for Chicago mayor, saying that Lori Lightfoot's policies make her vulnerable. *Retired Riverside Police Chief Tom Weitzel says that investing in children at a younger age can help end the violence. *Joe Mahr of the Chicago Tribune dives into a consulting firm co-founded by Richard Irvin that is starting to raise some questions. *Philip Bump of the Washington Post takes a look at how John Durham failed to deliver for Donald Trump. *Plus, Mike Emanuel of Fox News stops by for his weekly visit and Bill Collar of Seymour, WI shares how his city is the home of the hamburger.

No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen
Republicans block gun reforms after the shooting in Uvalde, Texas

No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 36:53 Very Popular


Brian discusses the most recent shooting in Uvalde, Texas and what Republicans are pinning the blame on. Brian interviews the Democratic nominee for US Senate in Ohio, Tim Ryan, about what Congress is doing in the wake of these shootings, his response to his opponent JD Vance for blaming everything OTHER THAN guns, and whether he can reverse Ohio's rightward trend in the upcoming election. And The Washington Post's Philip Bump joins to discuss Dinesh D'Souza's disastrous film that purports to prove the election was stolen while presenting zero evidence whatsoever.Support Tim Ryan: timforoh.comDonate to the "Don't Be A Mitch" fund: https://secure.actblue.com/donate/dontbeamitchShop merch: https://briantylercohen.com/shopYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/briantylercohenTwitter: https://twitter.com/briantylercohenFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohenInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/briantylercohenPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohenNewsletter: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-upWritten by Brian Tyler CohenProduced by Sam GraberRecorded in Los Angeles, CASee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter
Battle between Elon Musk and Twitter: Who wins and who loses?

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 43:19


Margaret Sullivan, Philip Bump, and Khaya Himmelman discuss the state of social media and disinformation; Insider global EIC Nicholas Carlson discusses his decision to publish a sexual harassment allegation against Musk; Kathy Barnette answers questions about her relationship with the media and controversies in her past; and Bill Carter talks about "SNL" and the TV upfronts. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
CRITIQUES AND REBUTTALS

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 47:55 Very Popular


In this episode, Dinesh reviews his in-depth exchange in the Washington Post with Philip Bump, a classic case study in the impossible project to debunk the documentary. Dinesh also examines Dante's controversial discussion of whether or not non-Christians can be saved.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bulwark Podcast
Philip Bump: When Support for Jan 6 Is a Political Plus

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 44:36 Very Popular


Doug Mastriano won because he made clear he's ready to use the power of the state to steal an election, Republicans find 'replacement theory' useful, and D'Souza admits he has no evidence. Philip Bump joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Charlie Kirk Show
Everything You Need to Know about '2000 Mules' with Dinesh D'Souza

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 37:30 Very Popular


Charlie begins this episode by trolling gatekeeper and legacy media outlets like CNN+ that have for too long conflated fame and popularity. Just because your content is force fed into 100 million homes does not mean your content is popular. As new media continues to erode the influence and power of regime media, Charlie breaks down the growing divide between those who earn their audience (podcasters, popular Twitter accounts, OTT shows and platforms) and those who have their audience handed to them via establishment curation. Finally, Charlie plays the entire "2000 Mules" trailer and interview its director, Dinesh D'Souza for an in-depth discussion about what audiences can expect in the film, what MSM has said about the movie thus far, and what Dinesh expects the left's reaction to be once the entire world sees his groundbreaking film. Dinesh also rebuts Washington Post's columnist, Philip Bump's, early critique of the film in epic fashion, and explains why he says, "The Democrats Party has always been the party of voter fraud."  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Todd Herman Show
The media's obsession: sexualizing kids - Episode 97 - Hour 1 Media Sexualizing Kids

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 43:56


THE THESIS: The Mockingbirds are all in for sexualizing kids, just like they were all in for CRT, exactly like they all pimped the Russia hoax . . . and the insurrection lie and, of course, they are 100% behind the mRNA. These companies are lie factories, but they run on money. So, which members of The Party benefit financially from sexualizing kids? Pharma, the abortionists at Planned Parenthood THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Matthew 18:5-7 6 “If anyone causes one of these little ones—those who believe in me—to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea. 7 Woe to the world because of the things that cause people to stumble! Such things must come, but woe to the person through whom they come! Romans 1: 21-25 21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and reptiles. 24 Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts to sexual impurity for the degrading of their bodies with one another. 25 They exchanged the truth about God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator—who is forever praised. Amen. THE NEWS & COMMENT: NEW: Disney CEO Bob Chapek grovels, apologizes, and pledges to "be a better ally for the LGBTQ+ community." He delegated the company's moral authority to the "LGBTQIA+ Advisory Council" and now those internal activists have taken him as an ideological hostage. Navarro: Do you agree that the Florida parents law will "kill kids?" Buttigieg: That's right. Pete Buttigieg's “husband” leads kids in a pledge of allegiance to the gay pride rainbow Media In Sync Trots out ‘QAnon,' ‘Red Scare' Cards to Attack Parents Rights Movement; Questioning SCOTUS nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson's sentencing record towards child sex predators and championing Florida's new parental rights law is supposed evidence of the GOP ginning up a modern-day version of the “red scare,” wrote Washington Post “reporter” Philip Bump. Rufo: In 2014, the nonpartisan GAO published a 72-page report warning about child predators in public schools, recommending that administrators monitor teachers for "grooming behaviors" that could lead to "sexual misconduct" and "sexual abuse." Rufo: In 2017, the Department of Education published a report warning that public school employees "groom" and then commit "adult sexual misconduct" against 10% of all K-12 students. They define "grooming" as the process of isolating and manipulating a child. This polyamorous genderfluid witch is a preschool teacher in Florida. She's so proud of herself that she discusses her gender and sexuality with 4 year olds Not wanting to teach kids about sex and gender ideology is homophobic Here is Dr Oz, whom President Trump just endorsed, promoting transgenderism in children. In the full episode he even promotes surgery for children  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The PolicyViz Podcast
Episode #215: Philip Bump

The PolicyViz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 27:18


Philip Bump is a correspondent for The Washington Post based in New York. He largely focuses on the numbers behind politics and he is the author of the weekly newsletter, How To Read This Chart. In this week's episode of the... The post Episode #215: Philip Bump appeared first on PolicyViz.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
Mark Thompson: Racism in Judge Jackson's SCOTUS Confirmation Hearings

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 19:47


Philip Bump, National Correspondent at the Washington Post joins Mark Thompson to discuss his recent article, "GOP drops any subtlety in centering the Jackson nomination fight on race". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter
Ukrainian journalists suddenly turn into war correspondents

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 42:31


Olga Rudenko, editor in chief of The Kyiv Independent, talks with Brian Stelter about covering Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Plus, Associated Press executive editor Julie Pace discusses war zone deployments; and Anne Applebaum, Peter Pomerantsev, Kimberly Dozier, Mara Schiavocampo and Philip Bump join the conversation. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

COVID Era - THE NEXT NORMAL with Dave Trafford
How Tweets Become Evidence of War Crimes; Toyota Tacoma Song; Prehistoria Museum; Return To Work Commute

COVID Era - THE NEXT NORMAL with Dave Trafford

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 43:08


David Cooper is hosting the Late Showgram! This episode he talks to some of the people behind the stories that matter. Turning Ukraine-related tweets into evidence of war crimes and Russian disinformation being peddled by the US far right with Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington and author of their "How To Read This Chart" newsletter. Viral TikToker Cara Paige on her Toyota Tacoma song. Toronto's Skullstore and the Prehistoria museum owner, Ben Lovatt. Our return to work's sticking point: commuting with Toronto Star transportation reporter, Ben Spurr  

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
What Does Ukraine Mean For Biden's State Of The Union?

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 23:27


NOTE: This segment was recorded on Thursday morning. President Biden is scheduled to make an announcement this afternoon in response to the situation in Eastern Europe. After Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine early this morning, what can the rest of the world, and particularly President Biden do? On Today's Show:Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, talks about the invasion of Ukraine, next week's State of the Union, and other pressing matters facing the White House.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Thursday Morning Politics: Ukraine, Biden, More

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 33:49


Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, talks about the invasion of Ukraine and other pressing matters facing President Biden.

The Smerconish Podcast
The John Durham Probe Explained, For Dummies

The Smerconish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 20:49


The Washington Post's Philip Bump joins Michael to expertly explain a complex topic: Special Counsel John Durham's probe into the FBI's probe of the 2016 Trump presidential campaign. Original air date 15 February 2022.

The Numlock Podcast
Numlock Sunday: Philip Bump on How To Read This Chart

The Numlock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2022 23:39


By Walt HickeyWelcome to the Numlock Sunday edition.This week, I spoke to Philip Bump of the Washington Post, who a few weeks ago launched his newsletter How To Read This Chart. I'm a longtime fan of Bump's work at the Post; he's a really compelling writer and an outstanding blogger and has been weaving data journalism throughout his work so organically for such a long time I wanted to have him on for a podcast version of the Sunday edition to talk about the state of the art and the newsletter. We spoke about how charts took over the internet, how companies have managed to use increasing interest in data to suit their own ends in pitching mediocre polls, where the distrust of polling is coming from and the simple pleasures of weird charts.Bump can be found at the Washington Post and on Twitter, and his newsletter How To Read This Chart can be found here. This interview has been condensed and edited. You have just started this newsletter called How To Read This Chart. It's probably, what, two months old at this point? It's already off to a really great start.I appreciate it. That was the goal. Try and have it be compelling, and get people engaged. But yeah, I think about two months, which is sort of crazy how time flies.In one of the early issues, you mentioned that you were looking for a combination of breeziness and topicality. Do you want to talk a little bit about what kind of motivated you to both start a newsletter in this space and also kind of what your angle is?I do a lot of charts for my day job at the Washington Post. And one of the things that I have found is that often I will create a graph which to me seems pretty intuitive, but requires a little more explanation than I would've expected. That is absolutely a failing on my part, right? My job should be to make presentations of data that are simply intuitive enough that I don't need to have a lot of explication, but I also think that complicated charts can be visually interesting, and provide a lot of information once you dig into them a little bit.What I wanted to do was create something, create a tool, in which I encouraged people to be more open to more complicated presentations of data. To offer up interesting, visually striking data visualizations that I could then walk through, and say, "Here's how this works. Here's why this is actually a smart way to present this, even if at first it may be somewhat intimidating." Over the long term, with the goal of having people just generally feel more comfortable with looking at data visualization, understanding how to pick out their own stories from it, and understanding how it can convey a lot of information in the way that words can't.Yeah. I've enjoyed the approach and vibe of it a lot. I think that there are places on the internet that look at and evaluate and talk about charts a lot, and I think a lot of them will sometimes overengineer it. They'll be like, "Oh, look at this chart." And there are a lot of colors, there are shapes, there's a lot of stuff going on. I think that what I've really enjoyed about yours is that you very much look at this as a process where there aren't really right answers. That there are just choices that are made. Do you want to kind of expand on how you view the process of creating a chart?One of the things that I do too for my job is I do a lot of charts, right? So that means that I'm not sitting down and workshopping, A/B testing, different versions of charts. I'm like, okay, I'm doing a story on something that just broke. I need to make a chart. I did one that I included in the newsletter, which I thought was pretty good, which showed the evolution of votes for Supreme Court justices since the end of the Civil War, essentially. And so you start off, and I had different representations. I took all nine currently sitting seats and I sort of had little lines that wound their way through them with little nodes for where a new justice was added.And so at the beginning, it's just, they're all by voice vote, and so that's just a little black dot. And then eventually you start to see actual votes for it, and first all the votes are overwhelming, like 90 to 10 or whatever. And then all of a sudden you start seeing them being pretty evenly divided. That was something that I didn't have a chance to workshop because I needed to get it up because this is when Breyer announced his retirement.But I could then come back — and I didn't actually do this with this, I just sort of dropped it in a newsletter because I thought it was cool — but that's a good example of where you can say, okay, so how might you have done this in a way that provided more information? I got feedback from readers, like, this would be great if it's an interactive where you could mouse over it and see someone's name. That's absolutely true. I couldn't do that, in part because of the time crunch, but also in part because I couldn't then put it in the newsletter. There are all these boundaries and constraints. And one of the things I'm trying to do is get the voices of people who read the newsletter injected into the newsletters; I want people have feedback and thoughts to include that as well. Because part of the point is that I don't have all the answers.Yeah, I like that a lot. I like it because you really are grounded in news. Your day-to-day job is all about kind of covering the news. That comes with different constraints than doing a long term; if you had spent a week making an interactive about that, it wouldn't have actually been as effective because sometimes just getting something out sooner is better. No, exactly, you're right. I think too that one of the lessons there is that it doesn't have to be great, right? I mean you and I have experience in writing for institutions that have editors. But it is not the case that we simply write things and then let the editors clean it up. We try and write well the first time, right? This is a space where you don't have an editor. I don't have a graphics editor, right? Or when I do an interactive online, I don't have a data editor. Although I have sort of pitched that in the past as something that would be kind of cool. I mean, wouldn't it be cool if you had a lot of people who could do really basic code and then you could pass it over to a data editor, who could clean it up and make it, I mean, wouldn't that be cool? You could really expand the number of interactives you could do.Yeah, FiveThirtyEight was a shop like that. That was a really good time.There you go. But one of the things is trying to encourage people to just sort of jump into it, right? You don't have to worry about it being perfect. In the same way that I've been doing this long enough now that I can do something fairly quickly that is effective and isn't necessarily buggy. But the way you get there is by just sort of jumping into it and doing as much as you can, and having fun with it and making it. And here's the other thing that I'll say, I will put out graphics that I think are cool that I recognize are going to be complicated to people. You know why? Because I do this whole day, and sometimes I want to just have fun with it. And I think that's okay too in a lot of circumstances.Yeah. And that reminds me, a few weeks ago you had a particularly neat visualization, I pulled it up, it's a keogram, right? There was a guy who put a camera on his roof. Do you want to talk about that one?It was really cool. A guy I follow on Twitter retweeted it, it's this astronomer who lives in the Netherlands. And literally exactly what you said. He put a camera on the roof of an outbuilding in his house, and just pointed straight up with a fish eye lens and took a picture every 15 seconds for the entire length of 2021. And what results from that is you get this really cool pattern, this sort of hourglass pattern of when night falls — obviously less night over the course of the summer, more night when it gets to be winter. You can see how the sky is different colored at different times of the day. So twilight and dawn are much more blue because the sun isn't reflecting off the clouds as much. You can see when the moon is moving through. The phases of the moon are depicted in it.There's all this information. It's just this little rectangle with this little black hourglass sitting on a blue field. But when you look at it, you can pick out so much stuff. And then he, of course, as an astronomer, he finds a lot of stuff that you don't necessarily see. He goes through it and he picks out the movement of the constellations through the skies. He has this giant version of it you can get as well. And just, it's fascinating. It's just such a good use of visualizing data. It's not visualizing data intuitively. It's just a picture of the sky. But all you have to do is orient it by time of day and by time of year, and then all of a sudden you have an infographic that really tells you a lot about literally how the world works.I really loved it. Again, even as just like an art piece, it's really cool. I feel like there's been more conversation about chart crimes than it has in the past. You've been in the game a while now, and have definitely kind of seen good visualization, bad visualization, malicious visualization at times. That also seems to be a theme at some points in your newsletter. How has the internet's interactions with charts kind of evolved over the past couple years?Good question. I mean obviously it is something that's been powered by the connective capabilities of social media to a large extent. I think also there is a sort of nerdiness that emerges on social media more than in other places, just by virtue of the fact that it's grounded in technology, and age groupings and so on. And of course, you and I probably operate in nerdier circles than most people. Like my sister who spends a lot of time on Instagram, I'm not sure she sees a lot of chart crime tweets, right? Which isn't meant as a disparagement to her, she's just got different, more normal interests than you or I do.Part of it is not only the fact that you have that connectivity, which obviously we're all familiar with by now with the internet, but you also have a lot more people who are trying to present information. One of the things that's been fascinating over the course of the past decade or so is the ways in which corporations have really latched onto the idea of using data presentations to sell stuff. And so they'll do like these shitty polls, of like, "We polled 14 Airbnb members, and seven of them found that Airbnb is awesome." And they'll pitch those to Forbes contributors who go on to money laundering crimes. Alleged money laundering crimes...I didn't name names! But there's this pattern wherein corporations have figured out that people are compelled by data visualizations, and by sort of weird esoteric data points. And so they gin these up, but what that also means is that there's this big influx of visualizations and attention being paid to these things. A lot of media outlets who are trying to move from being crusty old newspapers to doing more interesting things online, there is this new attention being paid to how you present data for a lot of different reasons. I think that provides a lot more people who are skilled in this to some extent, and a lot more people who are paying attention to it, which I think is probably part of it.I love this point and I actually want to spend more time here just because it's rare that I get to be like, "Hey, you also see this, right?" It is wild just at how regularly I will see press releases, I will see corporate blogs, I will see all this kind of stuff that will either be hinged on a poll that they ran because they would like to get into the press, and they realize that's a decent way to launder a talking point. It's almost interesting kind of watching some of the techniques of data journalism kind of get co-opted a little bit by some of these corporate actors. You cover politics, and I'm sure that you see this time and time again in that space in particular too. You pointed out a LinkedIn poll a few weeks ago, that was just like, why are we talking about this? And this made it into what?It's in New York Times for God's sake, right.Is that a local newspaper? Where is that based?I live outside of New York City, and yeah, a lot of my neighbors get it. Yeah, I hope you've noticed that I go out of my way to insult The New York Times whenever I can in the newsletter. Not out of any ill will, but just because it's funny.Of course.There's one coming up in the one that's dropping this Saturday. Anyway! No, you're right, and part of that, I mean, bear in mind, you are familiar with political polls as well, but for years it's been a problem that you'll have political journalists who'll pick up internal campaign polls and treat them as serious, when those are the same thing, they're just marketing pitches using this front of data. You have that exact same factor which comes into play in doing politics reporting.You have a lot of journalists who simply don't know how to spot b******t, right? They just don't know how to be like, "I'm going to treat this with some caution." Instead they're getting pitched on, "Hey man, we have this new insight into what's going on." It's the exact same thing, it's just corporations have figured out how to do this. And it costs very, very little money for them to do it. If they find a reporter who isn't particularly savvy in assessing the validity of data collection mechanisms, then they get a bite pretty easily. "Hey, I'm going to the exclusive. LinkedIn did this poll. And we found that X." And someone's like, "Whoa, that's cool. Thanks for the exclusive. Send me the data." And then you and I get it, and we're like LOL. What the hell is this?Again, I'm not trying to judge. In the same way that if someone asked me to be an opera critic for a day, I would totally embarrass myself! I just don't know it. I don't know that world. But there's a reason why, if someone's putting on a crappy opera, they might want to have me come and do the review, right? Because they know that I'm not going to understand what's going on. And so I think we see a lot of that with corporate pitching in particular.It's great that you point out again, this isn't to knock the folks who do it because maybe they're credulous of a poll, but they're also like they take no b******t elsewhere. It's just kind of almost an expertise thing where knowing what's a rough poll, knowing what is a specious source of collecting responses, knowing what is, oh, the sponsor of this is perhaps a little sus. That is a skill. I think that your beat at the Post has been really good at kind of calling some of that out in the past.Yeah. I mean, I think it's fun, right? I mean it's fun to have to catch Tucker Carlson, who I do not assign any good faith effort on his part. It's fun to say, "Hey, actually this graph that you used is nonsense," and to call that out. I mean obviously his nightly audience is slightly larger than my newsletter audience.A little bit.You don't know. You don't know. My newsletter audience could be two million. I will say this, it's definitely a percentage of two million!Rounded to the nearest two million, sure!That's right. We're even. I think there's value in it, but also in recognizing how, through intentionality or accidentally, the people can offer you information that you should be skeptical of.I felt like at the beginning of my career, maybe 10 years ago or so, the challenge was convincing people that there was value in writing about polls, that there was value in writing about this kind of data, that there was value in making all these kind of viz and putting this investment into it. Now I feel like, battle's won, congratulations, high five, victory lap, champagne. But now the challenge is like, oh, we've got to be smart about how we actually end up using it, because those tools have also been — whether it's through a profit pursuit, or whether it's through political pursuit — we won one battle and now, oh wait, there's actually a whole lot of cleanup that we've got to keep doing.No, you're right. I think that there are a lot of ways in which data presentation right now is sort of a risky endeavor. From the visualization standpoint, it is obviously the case that we get a lot of dubious, questionable presentations that make their ways in front of us. And I think we're calling it out.I think polling itself is something that we could spend a whole half hour talking about this separately. But I think polling itself is something, that the skepticism of polling has been weaponized in the same way that say skepticism of a coronavirus vaccine has been weaponized, right?That's interesting.That you can pick out particular ways in which you can cast out in order to try and undercut the whole thing. It is much more common that we see that with polling, in part because you're always going to find a poll that gives you information you don't want. One of the things I thought has been fascinating in the course of the past several months has been this spate of new polls showing that President Biden's approval is quite low, and just the number of people, including the president, who are saying, "Oh, you can't put any stock in that." And it's just like, come on, man. How are you — and I made this point in the newsletter — you are asking us to say, here is the best information we have on the vaccine. It's imperfect. There have been mistakes that have been made. But we understand generally what things look like and we need to have confidence in that. And then on the same side, you're saying I ignore these polls because they're bad for me. It's b******t. You can't do that. That's not how it works.I think that we're seeing, and we saw Trump obviously spend a lot of time trying to downplay and denigrate polls that showed him doing poorly, and I think that's damaging. I do. Because polls are, for all the complaints about going to a diner and talking to voters, and yada, yada, yada, polls are talking to 1,000 people at one time, asking them more narrowly tailored questions, and not having a lot of space for follow up, obviously, but that's what polls do. I think for people that reject them out of hand, I think just moves us more into this space of uncertainty where all sorts of bad things can happen.There are always good polls, there are always bad polls. I will just say, in your newsletter, How To Read This Chart, one pervasive idea that I like is that it almost comes off similar to like Wirecutter where it's like you're evaluating the different tools and trying to figure out what the best way to talk about it is, and how to use it and all that kind of stuff. It's not like saying that the tools are invalid, or the tools don't work, or the tools always work, or this is a bad tool. It's acknowledging we're all coming from the position that this is a cool tool to have and a cool tool to use. Here are the best ways to use it. And also every time you make a bar chart, I get a commission, echoing the Wirecutter model. I mean, the goal is to some extent — and part of this is informed by Edward Tufte, who we are invariably going to get to as part of this conversation. He does these data visualization things and is sort of like the godfather of all this stuff. When I worked at Adobe as a designer back 20 years ago, I went to one of his seminars. And the thing that always struck me about that is that you're sitting through the seminar, and it's like the morning— Have you been to one of his seminars?I've not, no.So the morning you go through it — at least in Silicon Valley 20 years ago — but you sit through this really interesting assessment of how data visualization works. The O-ring story from the Space Shuttle Challenger, and all these various ways in which presenting data is important. And then you have a break, and then you come back in the afternoon, and it's all about how to make cool charts and PowerPoint. And at the time, I skipped it. I was like, I don't give a s**t about making cool charts for PowerPoint. But I realized it's brilliant from a business model because that's how he gets all these companies to pay to send people to his seminar, right? They go to seminar, and they say, "Hey, this is going to help me make better PowerPoint charts." And they're like, "Okay, fine. We'll pay the $1,500," or whatever. It's genius. But it's also value, that's the value he's added to people.One of the things I want do with the newsletter as well is give people, to some extent, some familiarity with the tool sets that are out there so they can broaden their approach a little bit. I will also at times slide in little recommendations. There was this spiral chart that was in the Times that got a bad rap, and I found a link to how to recreate that thing using R, which, no one that reads the newsletter is using R to make data visualizations. But A, it's there in case they do and want to, but B, it also makes them feel like, okay, I'm part of this kind of cool insider club that knows how to make visualizations in a pretty advanced way now. Which then gives people the confidence to do so, to explore it, ideally, hopefully. I don't know how many more charts I've brought into the world through my newsletter. Hopefully one or two!That's so smart. Because again, you never want to be in a course where you know everything. You never want to be in a course where it's completely out of your bound. You want to be in a course where you get a little bit of exposure to things that are a little bit beyond your grasp at the point and things that you have well in hand. I like the confidence that you put in your audience. It's just really good stuff, man. Is there any particular thing that you've had a chance to write about that you feel proudest of in the past couple weeks?I mean, the keogram one was good, just because it was not specifically news-centered. I don't know, just one of the things I try to do with the newsletter, which hopefully I succeed at to some extent, is to make it actually fun to read. It's super easy to write about a chart in a way that no one is interested in it. I'm not going to say it's hard to do it in a way that's a little more compelling, but I try and make it like I want it to be something where someone who is not really familiar with charts picks it up and at least finds it funny, even if they don't really care about charts or even if they don't really necessarily get the charts at the end of the day. I feel like I've done a pretty decent job with that. I think that that's the thing which I am probably happiest about is that people who I know aren't nerds on charts will come back and be like, "Hey, at least it's fun to read," which I think is a step in the right direction anyway.Where can folks find it? Where can folks get a chance to subscribe? Where can folks find you?Yeah. I'm on Twitter @pbump. The chart, I mean, I think if you search How To Read This Chart, I would hope it comes up pretty high in the results by now. If you go to wapo.st/readthischart, that'll actually take you directly there and you can sign up. Obviously it's free. I'd be very happy if you subscribe to the Washington Post, of course. But it's a free newsletter, it teaches a little bit about charts. And if you stick around after the break, we'll teach you how to make the excellent PowerPoint presentations, so you can send me $1,500 for this seminar too. It would be great.Sign up for Numlock News and wake up to the best stories in data every day.If you have anything you'd like to see in this Sunday special, shoot me an email. Comment below! Thanks for reading, and thanks so much for supporting Numlock.Thank you so much for becoming a paid subscriber! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Get full access to Numlock News at www.numlock.com/subscribe

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter
'High Conflict' author dissects the problem with 'conflict entrepreneurs'

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2022 39:07


Amanda Ripley joins Brian Stelter with secrets to de-escalating disputes. Plus, Oliver Darcy and Philip Bump discuss anonymous sourcing in light of the Tom Brady retirement stories; Shelby Talcott talks about Biden White House coverage; Kat Rosenfield likens Joe Rogan to "a weed;" Nic Robertson reports on Russian TV's interest in Tucker Carlson; and "Jeopardy!" victor Amy Schneider reflects on her winning streak.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Velshi
“Complete bullsh*t”

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 84:07


Ali Velshi is joined by Philip Bump, National Correspondent at The Washington Post, Rep. David Cicilline, Democrat of Rhode Island, Dr. Rick Bright, Senior Vice President of Pandemic Prevention and Response at The Rockefeller Foundation, Nse Ufot, CEO at New Georgia Project, Josh Shapiro, Pennsylvania Attorney General, Hugo Lowell, Congressional Reporter at The Guardian, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Democrat of New York, Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, Founding Director at Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research, Rep. Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota, Dorothy Roberts, Professor of Law, Sociology of Civil Rights and Africana studies at University of Pennsylvania, and, Errin Haines, Editor-at-Large at the 19th.

All In with Chris Hayes
Jan. 6 probe witnesses speak out

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 48:04


Guests: Dustin Stockton, Jennifer Lynn Lawrence, Mona Charen, Philip Bump, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Rep. Ro KhannaTonight: They are two of the planners of the January 6th rally now cooperating with the January 6th committee: Dustin Stockton and Jennifer Lawrence join Chris for their first interview together. Then, guess which Congressman just outed himself as one of the lawmakers texting Mark Meadows? Plus why Joe Biden is pausing the push for Build Back Better. And Dr. Anthony Fauci on whether America is ready for a massive wave of Omicron cases.               

No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen
Republicans' secret PowerPoint to subvert US democracy exposed

No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 41:13


A PowerPoint document that circulated among Trump administration officials outlining their plan to overthrow American democracy has been handed over to the January 6 Committee, followed by a muted response from the media and Democrats. Brian interviews EPA administrator Michael Regan about how he's insulating the department from the possibility of another administration that's hostile to its mission and whether the EPA is doing enough to combat climate change as we continue to feel its impacts. And National Correspondent for the Washington Post, Philip Bump, joins to discuss new COVID data now showing disproportionate impacts in Trump-voting counties.Donate to the "Don't Be A Mitch" fund: https://secure.actblue.com/donate/dontbeamitchShop merch: https://briantylercohen.com/shopYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/briantylercohenTwitter: https://twitter.com/briantylercohenFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohenInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/briantylercohenPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohenNewsletter: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-upWritten by Brian Tyler CohenProduced by Sam GraberRecorded in Los Angeles, CASee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

WCPT 820 AM
The Big Picture With Edwin Eisendrath 11.13.21

WCPT 820 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 156:31


Guests: Mark Maxwell, Ray Lopez, Philip Bump, Tim Hogan.

The Dan Abrams Podcast
The Dan Abrams Podcast with Philip Bump

The Dan Abrams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 35:09


Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, joins Dan to discuss the Wall Street Journal's decision to publish former President's Trump letter on the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Dan and Bump discuss Bump's article, "The 14 Things You Need to Know About Trump's Letter in the Wall Street Journal."

Velshi
The Big Lie's Command Center

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 83:55


Ali Velshi is joined by Congressman Pete Aguilar, Senator Sherrod Brown, the Washington Post's Philip Bump and Jacqueline Alemany, Professor Kellie Carter Jackson, Transhealth CEO Dallas Ducar, Eurasia Group President Ian Bremmer, the New Yorker's Sheelah Kolhatkar, and Bloomberg's Tim O'Brien. 

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter
October 24, 2021: Senator Blumenthal discusses the 'Facebook Papers;' a new report on YouTube's filter bubble; Jackie Calmes dissects the "both sides" problem in political coverage

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 39:17


Plus: An NYU psychologist explains how identity shapes our view of reality; why Donald Trump's new social network should be taken seriously; how Fox News gave birth to a false narrative about school boards. Richard Blumenthal, Suzanne Nossel, Philip Bump, Mara Schiavocampo, Oliver Darcy, Katie Paul, and Jay Van Bavel join Brian Stelter. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo
Jan 6 Committee Moves to Hold Bannon in Criminal Contempt

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:18


Chris discusses breaking news of former President Clinton's hospitalization with Dr. Sanjay Gupta, the latest in the January 6th Committee's investigation with Philip Bump, and goes one on one with William Shatner on his history-making mission to space. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Bill Press Pod
"Mired in Trump Muck." The Reporters' Roundtable- Oct 15

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:33


Trump vs. GOP. Bannon to Jail? Virginia Governors Race. Legislating the Curriculum. Gloom for Dems? With Sudeep Reddy, Managing Editor at Politico, Amanda Becker, Washington Correspondent at 19th News and Philip Bump, National Correspondent for The Washington Post.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo
Republicans Cling to Trump as He Pushes More Election Lies

Cuomo Prime Time with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:47


First, Chris discusses Bill Maher's warnings to democrats of a "slow-moving coup" with Philip Bump. Chris continues that conversation with democracy expert Steven Levitsky. Chris wraps up the show with Dr. Scott Gottlieb on what the end of the covid pandemic could look like. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Who is Responsible for the USA's Debt Problem?

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 9:05


With the debt ceiling fight taking up all the air in Washington right now, Democrats Republicans are pointing fingers about who is to blame for the mess we're in. But Washington Post National Political Correspondent Philip Bump says our debt problem is a bipartisan one.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

La Wikly
🔬 Los emails de Fauci y la fuga del laboratorio, una explicación

La Wikly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 18:03


4 de junio | Nueva YorkHola, maricoper. But his emails.El podcast de La Wikly también está disponible en iTunes, Spotify y iVoox.Añade el podcast a tu plataforma favorita haciendo click en el botón “Listen in podcast app” que aparece justo debajo del reproductor.Apoya el proyecto periodístico independiente de La Wikly con una suscripción premium que incluye tres newsletters extra a la semana, acceso a nuestra comunidad privada de Discord y eventos exclusivos para los maricopers premium:Leer esta newsletter te llevará 10 minutos y 14 segundos.Yo también quiero repartidores con ambiciones artísticas. Bienvenido a La Wikly.Lo importante: BuzzFeed y The Washington Post publicaron esta semana miles de correos electrónicos de Anthony Fauci, director del Instituto Nacional de Alergias y Enfermedades Infecciosas, entre el periodo de enero y junio de 2020.El objetivo: hacer un retrato de las tensiones que se vivieron y las decisiones que se tomaron en el inicio de la peor crisis pandémica en un siglo.La consecuencia: poner a disposición de los críticos de Fauci una ingente cantidad de documentos en los que encontrar contradicciones con respecto a otros comentarios que haya hecho a lo largo de la pandemia.Fauci es un objetivo habitual de la derecha desde que sus enfrentamientos con Donald Trump, o al menos los que se intuían, le convirtieron en el líder preocupado y anclado en la ciencia que los votantes demócratas pedían a gritos en 2020.Tanto lo pedían que incluso cayeron en la beatificación, perdonándole cualquier fallo cometido por el camino.Mientras que esa beatificación enfureció más si cabe a los conservadores, cada vez más empeñados en buscar el más mínimo indicio de fracaso en Fauci.Con ese contexto, llega la publicación de las más de 3.200 páginas de emails de Fauci que los medios han conseguido a través de la Freedom of Information Act, o FOIA, que permite hacer públicos documentos gubernamentales.Aunque con aspectos confidenciales siempre ocultos con los subrayados negros tan habituales de los documentos de inteligencia.🔬 Modelos de ganancia¿Y en qué se ha centrado la derecha? En todo lo que tiene que ver con la teoría de que el Covid-19 salió de un laboratorio de Wuhan que supuestamente recibía financiación estadounidense para estudios de modelos de ganancia de función en coronavirus.¿Modelos de ganancia de función? Es un tipo de investigación médica que, en el caso de los virus, experimenta con patógenos y mejora su habilidad para transmitir enfermedades con tal de estudiar cómo frenarlos en el mundo real.Y aunque la idea es adelantarse a futuros virus que puedan surgir de la naturaleza y estudiar cómo combatirlos, se puede convertir en un mecanismo potencialmente peligroso.En un artículo de opinión publicado en 2011 en The Washington Post, Fauci y dos coautores señalaron que “la cuestión es si los beneficios de dicha investigación superan a los riesgos".Los peligros inherentes de mejorar la transmisibilidad y letalidad de los virus hicieron que Obama detuviese la financiación gubernamental de nuevos proyectos de modelos de ganancia de función a partir de 2014.🇨🇳 Vuelta a ChinaEn Wuhan, donde surgieron los primeros casos de COVID-19, hay dos laboratorios que investigaban coronavirus en murciélagos. Uno de ellos es el Instituto de Virología de Wuhan (WIV).El WIV es fuente habitual de sospechas sobre la teoría de la fuga de laboratorio del Covid-19. Especialmente, de políticos republicanos.El senador republicano Rand Paul defiende que los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH) han financiado técnicas de modelos de ganancia de función en colaboración con el WIV y le ha preguntado en repetidas ocasiones a Fauci al respecto.Fauci ha negado la mayor y afirma que ninguna ayuda de los NIH ha servido para financiar investigaciones de modelos de ganancia de función.¿Pero hay evidencia de que los NIH hayan financiado alguna investigación de ganancia de función en el WIV?En 2017, el WIV publicó un estudio que decía que los investigadores habían encontrado un coronavirus de murciélago que podría transmitirse directamente a los humanos.Para ello, los investigadores de WIV utilizaron genética inversa para crear deliberadamente nuevos coronavirus para ver con qué facilidad podían pasar de células animales a humanas.Por otro lado, Fauci es director del Instituto Nacional de Alergias y Enfermedades Infecciosas (NIAID), parte del mismo NIH que financió proyectos de EcoHealth, que a su vez colabora con el WIV.En definitiva, Paul tendría razón al asegurar que dinero proveniente de los NIH y del NIAID podría haber sido destinado para financiar proyectos del WIV que hicieron estudios de modelo de ganancia de función, esos que fueron suspendidos por Obama.Sin embargo, no existen evidencias de que el coronavirus del Covid-19 sea el resultado de investigaciones llevadas a cabo en el WIV. Ni tampoco de que el dinero haya sido destinado a estas investigaciones en concreto.Desde EcoHealth, alegan que el WIV listó al NIH como financiador para resaltar todas las investigaciones que ayudaron a sacar las conclusiones sobre ese coronavirus que se transmitía de murciélagos a humanos.Es su forma de decir que el NIH nunca financió estudios de modelos de ganancia de función de forma directa.🐘 Ofensiva Fox NewsLa revelación de los correos electrónicos de Fauci han permitido a la derecha encontrar nuevos ejemplos con los que retratar la deshonestidad del epidemiólogo en lo que tiene que ver con la teoría de la fuga de laboratorio:Tucker Carlson, de Fox News, usó varios extractos de los emails precisamente con ese cometido en mente en su programa del miércoles por la noche. ¿Su conclusión?Que Fauci mintió sobre la financiación del NIH a estudios de modelos de ganancia de función en coronavirus en el Instituto de Virología de Wuhan.Que Fauci mintió sobre la probabilidad de que el origen del Covid-19 fuera el Instituto de Virología de Wuhan.Que Fauci podría ser el objetivo de una investigación criminal sobre su desempeño como líder epidemiólogo durante la pandemia.¿Es algo de esto cierto? Nah, pero Carlson usa pequeñas referencias de los emails para sacar conclusiones de una envergadura enorme —o al menos para alimentar más especulación que juegue en contra de Fauci.El columnista Philip Bump de The Washington Post señala cómo el tratamiento superficial de este tipo de información, de investigaciones todavía en curso y sin una conclusión clara, repercute en la opinión pública.Y que programas de televisión de amplia difusión como el de Carlson utilizan a su antojo recortes de información verídica como los emails de Fauci para respaldar sus tesis ideológicas.¿El resultado? Sus televidentes logran conclusiones sumamente contundentes sin pruebas que las respalden. Pura especulación.El error está en establecer una relación directa entre la atención que recibe una tesis y la veracidad de la misma. La posibilidad de que el virus haya escapado de un laboratorio es real, no está descartada.Pero que esa posibilidad esté en el centro del debate público no la hace, como afirmó Carlson en su programa, más probable que la tesis de que el virus tenga un origen zoonótico.Es decir, que se haya transferido de un animal a un humano.De hecho, una mayoría de científicos todavía piensa que el origen zoonótico es más probable que la fuga de laboratorio dada la historia de los virus que dieron ese salto.La polémica recuerda a lo sucedido en su momento con la publicación de los correos electrónicos de Hillary Clinton en 2015 y 2016, el material publicado por WikiLeaks en 2016 y los mensajes de texto entre dos funcionarios del FBI publicados en 2017.Y todo se repite: se liberan grandes cachés de documentos, las partes interesadas seleccionan elementos cuestionables y los presentan de alguna manera como definitivos.El llamado cherry-picking.A fin de cuentas, lo que se consigue no es de ninguna manera “la verdad”, sino datos hábilmente moldeados para encastrar a la perfección en el sesgo de confirmación de los consumidores de información.¿Desea saber más? El análisis de The Washington Post sobre las manipulaciones de Carlson sobre los emails es buenísimo. Y el portal conservador The Dispatch tiene un buen fact-check del Paul vs. Fauci sobre la financiación del Instituto de Virología de Wuhan.🎬 Una recomendaciónCon la colaboración de FilminTrain to Busan es una película surcoreana de 2016 dirigida por Yeon Sang-ho. Baste la premisa para entender por qué te la estoy recomendando hoy: “Una fuga química en una planta de biotecnología causa el inicio de un apocalipsis zombie que se propaga rápidamente por Corea del Sur”.Vale, no es China, pero son zombies*, y eso siempre está bien.En realidad, infectados.Train to Busan es una nueva entrega del cine de infectados que conocemos por 28 días después (y la superior 28 semanas después) o la española [REC], aunque con la idiosincrasia surcoreana que la hace más especial.Idiosincrasia surcoreana, imo: acción y dramatismo sobreactuados, y un humor que viaja entre lo extravagante y la vergüenza ajena.Ven por los zombies, quédate por el ritmo de la acción y gózalo al máximo con la gratuidad del slapstick y los chistes de padre. Y si terminas con ganas de más, hay secuela: Península. Y también está en Filmin.Train to Busan está disponible en Filmin.🥊 Un vídeo para saber quién se pega este findeLogan Paul es con facilidad una de las personas más odiadas de internet. No tanto como su hermano Jake Paul, pero casi. Y este domingo se enfrenta en una pelea de boxeo al mismísimo campeón Floyd Mayweather en un evento con el que se espera que el youtuber gane varios millones de dólares.Si no sabes cómo hemos llegado hasta aquí, tranqui que te lo explico.Los Paul son dos hermanos de Ohio que se empezaron a hacer famosos en la plataforma de vídeos cortos Vine, el precursor de TikTok.El cierre de Vine les hizo saltar a YouTube con un éxito desorbitado entre niños y adolescentes, quienes veían sus vídeos de vlogs, viajes y bromas pesadas hasta convertir a los Paul en dos auténticos behemoths de internet.Pero tardaron poco en liarla.A primeros de 2018, Logan publicó un vídeo en YouTube en el que exploraba junto a sus amigos un llamado bosque de suicidios en Japón. Efectivamente, se encontraron un cadáver, lo grabaron y luego Logan subió ese vídeo a YouTube. Se lió bastante parda:En los meses posteriores, Logan intentó restaurar su imagen al tiempo que su hermano Jake acaparaba los titulares negativos por diferentes dramas típicos de YouTube.Y también polémicas más preocupantes sobre su convivencia con empleados influencers a los que no trataba muy bien. Lo contó Taylor Lorenz hace poco.A finales de febrero de 2018, y como parte de esa estrategia para resurgir de las cenizas, Logan aceptó enfrentarse al youtuber británico KSI en una pelea de boxeo que acabaría en empate.Año y medio después, volvieron a enfrentarse en una pelea que ganó KSI por decisión de dos jueces contra uno. Pero el evento fue un éxito comercial tan grande que Logan y su hermano Jake decidieron explotar esa vía.Y así es cómo llegamos a la pelea con Mayweather que tuvo su primer incidente cuando el tonto de Jake le robó la gorra al boxeador delante de todas las cámaras y acabó llevándose un buen guantazo.Anyway, no sé cómo acabará lo del domingo, pero sin duda será interesante ver si Logan aguanta más de un par de rondas contra Mayweather. Lo que está claro es que los dos van a hacer mucho dinero.😆 Quitándole la graciaUna mujer empujando a un oso es con mucha probabilidad uno de los vídeos más locos que se han publicado en lo que va de año. El resumen es sencillo: este pasado fin de semana, una madre oso y sus oseznos paseaban por el muro que separa dos casas en San Gabriel Valley, California.Cuando cuatro perros de una de las casas empezaron a ladrar y atosigar a los visitantes, los oseznos huyeron y madre oso contraatacó hasta una aparición estelar:Una mujer se coló en la escena, corrió hacia la madre oso y la empujó al otro lado del muro para alejarla de sus perros.Vale. Entonces. Vamos a ver. WTF. Señora, explíquese:“Pensé, ‘Oh, Dios mío, eso es un oso y se está llevando a mi perro. Lo está levantando del suelo. En ese milisegundo, decidió empujar al oso como si fuera nada, aparentemente”, dijo Hailey Morinico en una entrevista con NBC Los Ángeles.Morinico también se grabó en TikTok explicando la experiencia. Tagrasioso, aunque los remixes con un extracto de un freestyle del rapero Mystical son bastante buenos. El verso que coincide con el empujón dice: “Si alguna vez me ves luchando en el bosque contra un oso grizzly, ¡AYUDA AL OSO!”.Accurate.Y para terminar, “F**k you Tim”:Hasta la semana que viene, This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.lawikly.com/subscribe

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter
April 11, 2021: Trump's war on truth continues in the Biden era; ADL CEO calls for Tucker Carlson's ouster; how '60 Minutes' story on Ron DeSantis feeds distrust in the media

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2021 42:53


Plus... Clarissa Ward responds to criticism of her Myanmar reporting trip; Katie Benner shares insights about the Matt Gaetz investigation; Robby Soave argues that the "60 Minutes" story on Ron DeSantis feeds distrust in the media. Jonathan Greenblatt, Philip Bump, Amanda Carpenter, Matt Gertz, Katie Benner, Robby Soave and Clarissa Ward join Brian Stelter. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter
November 1, 2020: Stelter on the coming 'test of American democracy'; CNN DC bureau chief on election night possibilities

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2020 38:53


Plus... What reporters are saying about the election in private; Susan Glasser says damage to election credibility "has already been done"; how will TV networks handle bogus Trump claims on election night?; CNN reporters on responding to Trump era technique to "flood the zone with sh*t..." Susan Glasser, Philip Bump, Olivia Nuzzi, Sam Feist, Oliver Darcy and Donie O'Sullivan join Brian Stelter. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy