Podcasts about Underground Railroad

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Network of secret routes & safehouses in 19th-century U.S. used by slaves to find freedom

  • 994PODCASTS
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  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
Underground Railroad

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Best podcasts about Underground Railroad

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Latest podcast episodes about Underground Railroad

accessAtlanta: Things to do in Atlanta
Rosalind Bentley speaks with Jeanine Michna-Bales about “Standing Together"

accessAtlanta: Things to do in Atlanta

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 61:24


While working on her photo essay about the Underground Railroad, Jeanine Michna-Bales became intrigued by the seminal role the anti-slavery movement played in the birth of the women's suffrage effort here in the United States. Through her research, she became captivated by the work of Inez Milholland. Milholland was in her early 30s when she became one of the most visible and electrifying advocates for women's right to vote. Through newspaper clippings, letters from Milholland to her husband, and other documents, Michna-Bales set out on a three-year quest to recreate Milholland's last campaign for women's suffrage using friends, volunteers, rented venues and costumes. Photographs from “Standing Together: Inez Milholland's Final Campaign for Women's Suffrage” are now on view at the Arnika Dawkins Gallery. Rosalind Bentley spoke with Michna-Bales about “Standing Together" and she brings us that conversation on this week's podcast.

Think Unbroken with Michael Unbroken | CPTSD, TRAUMA and Mental Health Healing Podcast
E139 The Power of Storytelling to Create Hope in your Life with Nick Nanton | Trauma Healing Coach

Think Unbroken with Michael Unbroken | CPTSD, TRAUMA and Mental Health Healing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 61:01


In this episode, we have guest speaker Nick Nanton. We talked about the power of storytelling to create hope in your life. There are certain times where you come across people in your life, and you get the opportunity to have a conversation with them, and it matters in a profoundly impactful way, and that's how I felt about this conversation. I came across Nick a couple of years ago after watching his documentary film dreamer, and I was moved by the fact that someone would be willing to tell stories about people that we would never hear otherwise. Then, I watched a documentary he did with Tim Ballard of Operation Underground Railroad. Nick Nanton has created over 60 films and one sold-out Broadway Show. He directed and produced documentaries on people like Rudy Ruettiger of Notre Dame, Peter Diamandis founder of the X Prize, and the first private space flight and organizations, like operation Underground Railroad, folds of Honor, canines for warriors, and more. Nick has over twenty-two Emmy Awards impact 100 at the United Nations, three gold records. He's a 40 under 40 and one of the best bars since he also is a lawyer, as if he didn't have enough accolades on his plate. And I think that's so much about this journey is just leveraging that understanding that we can look towards people who are just in front of us to follow, learn from, be guided by, and create massive change in our lives. And that's why I created the Think Unbroken Coaching Program; that's why I created the six-week immersive program. I was hoping you could come into this program to learn, to grow, to change, to transform, and to take what I understand and adapt it to your life in a way that can be practical. Now, of course, I always tell people that if you listen to this podcast, you never have to buy a program, read a book, or come to an event, but if you want to go to the next level, come and join the Think Unbroken Coaching Program. Learn more about, just go to https://coaching.thinkunbroken.com/ Learn more about at https://www.thinkunbrokenpodcast.com/ Learn more about NW Recovery at https://nw-recovery.com/

Small Town News
Galesburg, IL - The Potato Face Blind Man Knows What Fake Plants Feel Like

Small Town News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 58:04


Welcome to Galesburg, Illinois!  The town was first settled in 1836 and established to in order to open a manual labor college, which became Knox College.   It was home to the first anti-slavery society in Illinois, which was founded in 1837.  The fifth Lincoln-Douglas Debate was held on a temporary platform at Knox College.  This series of debates helped establish Lincoln as a national figure in the newly formed Republican Party and helped set him up for an eventual run for the Presidency in 1860.  Galesburg was also a stop on the Underground Railroad.  Carl Sandburg, notable poet and artist, was born in the town in 1878.  Sandburg won three Pulitzer Prizes and is most well known for his poetry which focused predominantly on Chicago.  Sandburg also wrote The Rootabaga Stories, a collection of short stories originally written for his daughters that are narrated by the Potato Face Blind Man.   Many other notable people have called the town home including artist Dorothea Tanning, President Ronald Reagan, Ferris Wheel inventor George Washington Gale Ferris Jr, and many others.  We hope you enjoy our visit to this cool little town.

92Y Talks
Colson Whitehead with Vinson Cunningham: Harlem Shuffle

92Y Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:00


Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Colson Whitehead (author of The Underground Railroad and The Nickel Boys) opens the 92Y Poetry Center's 83rd season with a presentation of his new novel, Harlem Shuffle, followed by a conversation with Vinson Cunningham. A love letter to 1960s New York, Harlem Shuffle is a family saga masquerading as a crime novel, a hilarious morality play, and a social novel about race and power. The program was recorded on September 14, 2021 in front of a live audience at New York's 92nd Street Y.

Texas Tales
Texas' Underground Railroad - The Path to Freedom

Texas Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:05


Who knew the path to freedom was south rather than north? In this episode we uncover how slaves in Texas participated in the Underground Railroad. This was a very eye opening subject for us and one that we believe is worth a listen. Hope you enjoy!

Sta Cagado con Sam Butler
Da Shit 70: The Other Underground Railroad (with Ramferi Cortez)

Sta Cagado con Sam Butler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 18:44


A lot of people know about the Underground Railroad that helped slaves escape from the south to the north, but not many know about the one that helped them escape further south: to Mexico. Follow Us: https://www.instagram.com/stacagadopodcast/ https://www.facebook.com/stacagadopodcast/

Coffee At New Jersey Audubon
Angling For Diversity

Coffee At New Jersey Audubon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 47:09


Todd Pride, President of Legacy Land and Water Partners, on why bio- and human diversity are two sides of the same coin, creating lasting bonds between kids and the natural world through fishing and hunting, and a new focus on the natural spaces of the Underground Railroad. For more information, please visit: https://njaudubon.org/coffee

The Curb | Culture. Unity. Reviews. Banter.
Shahn Devendran from LADbible Australia Talks UNHEARD, Racism in Australia, and Social Impact Campaigns in This Interview

The Curb | Culture. Unity. Reviews. Banter.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 31:55


The Curb is proudly part of the Auscast Network. Subscribe via RSS feed, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeart Radio or Google Podcasts.Download the episode directly here. Shahn Devendran is the series creator and producer of the powerful Amazon and LADbible Australia show, UNHEARD. Telling the story of racism in Australia from the perspective of those who live with the impact of racial discrimination, this is a powerful, important series. Andrew interviews Shahn about the creation of the series, the social impact campaigns that LADbible has engaged with, and how to encourage people who might not feel they live in a racist society to watch this show. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXp6JXi1F1Y&ab_channel=AmazonPrimeVideoAUNZ Song featured in this episode: Everything's Fucked - The Dirty Three Find out more about the series below. Amazon Prime Video today announced a ground-breaking new six-episode documentary series, UNHEARD, the first feature produced by LADbible Australia Originals and with production funding from Screen Australia. All six episodes of UNHEARD will premiere on Amazon Prime Video in Australia, New Zealand and select countries around the world on 29 October, with the first two episodes also available to stream for free on primevideo.com. UNHEARD will give Prime Video members an insight into critical issues of racial discrimination in Australia, including Indigenous deaths in custody, the targeting of Indigenous youth, attacks towards Asians during COVID, Islamophobia, the vilification of the African community and the treatment of asylum seekers and refugees. The six stand-alone episodes in the UNHEARD series are told through intimate interviews, blended with animation, archive footage, podcasts, photographs, phone conversations and infographics revealing the shocking statistics and complexities behind the larger issues. Each episode is led by the voices of personal accounts, so their experiences and calls for justice are presented without filter. “The opportunity to program this compelling investigative series is significant to us,” said Tyler Bern, Head of Content, Amazon Prime Video Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. “UNHEARD is a necessary action and awareness series that is globally relevant to Prime members in Australia and makes them aware of social injustice locally.  We are very proud to be involved with LADbible Australia on this production and showcasing this important documentary series.” The UNHEARD documentary series is an extension of LADbible Australia's UNHEARD campaign. Launched in February 2021, the campaign utilises LADbible Group's global audience of almost a billion and Australian audience of 11.8 million to support their campaign partners; the National Justice Project, Human Rights Commission, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services, The Refugee Council of Australia, Change.org, African Women Australia, Asian Australian Alliance, Islamophobia Register Australia, Deadly Connections Community and Justice Services and All Together Now. “The UNHEARD campaign and documentary series not only provides a platform for these powerful stories to be told, but also helps put a global focus on Australian incidents of racial injustice that are often overlooked,” says executive producer, writer and creator, Shahn Devendran, Head of Originals, LADbible APAC. “We are proud that LADbible's first feature documentary series is able to support our campaign partners, and in working with Amazon Prime Video and Screen Australia will help bring these important issues to light.” UNHEARD was written and produced by Shahn Devendran (LADbible Australia Originals), Jack Steele (Between Two Lines), Cathy Vu (SBS), Luke Cornish (Alone Out Here), Dan Mansour (The Final Word), Olivia Suleimon (Rosaline's Untaming) and Ellen Dedes-Vallas (Nickelodeon). UNHEARDwill join a growing list of Australian produced content available on Amazon Prime Video. Since 2019, Prime Video has commissioned14 Amazon Original series in Australia including The Test: A New Era for Australia's Team, Making Their Mark, a series of 10 stand-up comedy specials by some of Australia's best comedians, LOL: Last One Laughing AU with Rebel Wilson, Head Above Water, Luxe Listings Sydney, The Moth Effect and the upcoming Back to the Rafters. UNHEARD will also join thousands of TV shows and movies in the Prime Video catalogue, including hits like Golden Globe award-winner Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, Underground Railroad, Them, Val, The Boys, Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan, Coming 2 America, Tom Clancy's Without Remorse, The Tomorrow War, Cinderella, Nine Perfect Strangers, Upload, plus Emmy Award winners Fleabag, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Prime members will be able to watch UNHEARD anywhere and anytime on the Prime Video app for smart TVs, mobile devices, Fire TV, Fire TV stick, Fire tablets, Apple TV, and stream online. In the Prime Video app, Prime members can download episodes on their mobile devices and tablets and watch anywhere offline at no additional cost. Prime Video is available in Australia at no additional cost to a Prime membership for just $6.99 a month; new customers can find out more at www.primevideo.com and subscribe to a free 30-day trial. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Cosmic We with Barbara Holmes and Donny Bryant
Growing a Global Heart with Belvie Rooks

The Cosmic We with Barbara Holmes and Donny Bryant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:18


On this episode, Belvie Rooks joins Dr. Barbara Holmes and Dr. Donny Bryant in conversation for this episode of The Cosmic We. Belvie Rooks' work weaves the worlds of spirituality, feminism, cosmology and social justice with a passion for dialogue. She is the co-founder of Growing a Global Heart, a project to plant a million trees along the Trans-Atlantic Slave Route in West Africa and the Underground Railroad in the U.S. to honor the millions of lives lost during the slave trade. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropology and an MA in Inter-disciplinary Studies in Education and has taught and lectured at a number of colleges and universities including, the State University of New York at Old Westbury, University of the District of Columbia and University of California, Santa Cruz. Connect with us: To send a question to Dr. Barbara and Donny, or to share your thoughts, comments, or feedback with us about this show: Send us an email. Belvie Rooks: Growing A Global Heart The transcript for this episode will be available soon. This podcast is made possible, thanks to the generosity of our donors. If you would love to support the ongoing work of the Center for Action and Contemplation and the continued work of our podcasts, you can donate at cac.org/podcastsupport Thank you!

Gun Freedom Radio
2021 Second Amendment Foundation's Gun Rights Policy Convention: History of Women & Guns

Gun Freedom Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 11:40


Cheryl Todd of Gun Freedom Radio: The HISTORY of Women and Guns! Even when women could not legally vote, we did legally have guns. Our foremothers used guns to hunt, to protect their land and livestock, and to guard over the safety of their families. Firearms and ammunition in the home were basic household tools – as basic as having, say, a hammer and nails. Yet, here we are in the 21st Century now trying to reclaim that normalcy and those Rights to possess, carry and use these life-saving tools of protection. Somewhere along the way someone told us that women don't use tools. And too many of us bought into it. And someone told us that Moms – you know good moms – don't allow certain kinds of tools into their homes. And a group even commandeered the word – Moms. Moms Demand something...not really specified...but it equates to “guns are bad” and if you are a mom, or a woman, or a decent human being of any kind you will agree with them...or else face being ostracized and cancelled. Can you imagine – all the strong, smart, capable, competent women in our nation, and really the world, being convinced that hammers and nails are too dangerous for we women to handle? And yet, too many of us have bought into THAT idea when it comes to firearms and ammunition. It's embarrassing, really. And it's time to reclaim our equal rights to own whatever tools we need to pursue life, liberty and happiness – whether it's hammers, nails, guns or ammo. We know names like Annie Oakley (who became a sharpshooter out of the necessity to put food on the table for her family), Ida B Wells (an African-American feminist, investigative journalist, educator, and early leader in the civil rights movement – helping to co-found the NAACP), Harriet Tubman (anti-slavery superhero of the Underground Railroad), AND the many (mostly forgotten) women who fought in the American Civil War. And, then there was Eleanor Roosevelt – the First Lady of four-term Democratic President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Ashley Hlebinsky is that woman. Ashley not only was the curator for the Cody Firearms Museum for several years, and is a walking talking history encyclopedia, but she also has made history by testifying to Congress setting the record straight about MIS-NAMED “Ghost Guns” and in doing so has worked to preserve our freedoms. Suzanna Gratia Huff might have stopped a murderer from killing and wounding nearly 50 people. Suzanna has continued to use her voice to advocate for more life-saving freedoms for all of us. A woman who is one of my personal heroes is Julianne Versnell – one of our hosts every year for this very event, GRPC. Julianne has spoken at the United Nations, to defend the right of women to protect themselves with firearms. Through instruments such as the wrong-headed Arms Trade Treaty, international gun control is a genuine threat and could ultimately strip individual firearms rights from people here in the United States and indeed all over the world. Julianne has positively impacted the international debate on behalf of all women. Finally, no conversation about the History of Women and Guns could be complete without mentioning one of my mentors, Dianna Muller, who founded The DC Project: Women for Gun Rights. Dianna saw the need to bring women together to counter the anti-rights groups with the truth that women DO own guns, carry guns, and we value our Rights to do so. Dianna has grown The DC Project into a powerful force that has a State Director in all 50 states and whose members have run for offices, won elections, and have testified in front of both state and federal Legislative bodies on behalf of protecting our Second Amendment Rights. We stand on the shoulders of giants and we cast their vision into the history of our nation's future.

This Day in Quiztory
10.28_Abolitionist Levi Coffin

This Day in Quiztory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 1:14


#OTD Abolitionist Levi Coffin, an active leader in the Underground Railroad in his region, was born in Guilford County, North Carolina.

English Programme
19th-century underground railroad

English Programme

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 10:02


Both in 19th-century America and today, the initiative and choices of those making the journey are often ignored.

Critical Race Theory (CRT)
How migrants and their supporters are reviving the ethos of the 19th-century underground railroad

Critical Race Theory (CRT)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 10:02


Both in 19th-century America and today, the initiative and choices of those making the journey are often ignored.

Conversations at the Washington Library
213. Sailing to Freedom with Dr. Timothy D. Walker

Conversations at the Washington Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 43:09


In May 1796, an enslaved woman named Ona Judge fled the presidential household in Philadelphia and escaped to freedom on a ship headed for New Hampshire. Judge's successful flight was one of many such escapes by the sea in the 18th and 19th centuries. Enslaved people boarded ships docked in ports great and small and used coastal water ways and the ocean as highways to freedom. We often learn about the Underground Railroad in school, but what about its aquatic component? On today's episode, Dr. Timothy D. Walker joins me to discuss his new edited volume, Sailing to Freedom: Maritime Dimensions of the Underground Railroad, which was published by the University of Massachusetts Press in 2021. Walker is a Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, and along with the contributors to Sailing to Freedom, Walker guides us towards new horizons in our quest to better understand this history. About Our Guest: Dr. Timothy Walker (B.A., Hiram College, 1986; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University, 2001) is a professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  At UMD, he serves as Fulbright Program Advisor (faculty and students); prior posts include Director of Tagus Press and Director of the UMass in Lisbon Study Abroad Program. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/support

Divided Families Podcast
Ep. 39 | The "Underground Railroad" and Liberty in North Korea with Hannah Song

Divided Families Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:42


Liberty in North Korea, or LiNK, is a nonprofit that primarily works to help North Korean refugees hiding in China resettle in South Korea or the United States. The organization has many high school and college chapters, and seeks to raise awareness about human rights through North Korean issues. In this episode, Paul, a former member of LiNK himself, speaks with Hannah Song, President and CEO of LiNK. The two talk about the work LiNK does, stories of particular families' journeys, and how you can get involved. To learn more, you can find their website here: https://www.libertyinnorthkorea.org/ The videos mentioned in this episode can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhD2SabYvu0&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvsqpwI_IfU For updates, follow us on Instagram at @DividedFamiliesPodcast, and contact us at dividedfamiliespodcast@gmail.com

Nightside With Dan Rea
An Underground Railroad for Migrant Children? - Part 2 (11 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 38:36


The Biden Administration is reportedly flying migrant children to New York from Texas in an effort to discreetly resettle them across the region. According to online flight data, 2,000 migrants who entered the U.S. illegally have been flown to New York since August. Why has the Biden Administration not shared this information publicly? Does the secrecy and Administration's tactics raise concerns?

Nightside With Dan Rea
An Underground Railroad for Migrant Children? - Part 1 (10 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 37:51


The Biden Administration is reportedly flying migrant children to New York from Texas in an effort to discreetly resettle them across the region. According to online flight data, 2,000 migrants who entered the U.S. illegally have been flown to New York since August. Why has the Biden Administration not shared this information publicly? Does the secrecy and Administration's tactics raise concerns?

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear
Harriet Tubman: The Underground Railroad's Most Famous Conductor

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:35


Born a slave, Harriet Tubman escaped multiple times, went on to shepherd hundreds of other enslaved people to freedom, and gained renown as an abolitionist, military leader, Union spy and suffragist. Historian and archaeologist Dr. Cheryl LaRoche reveals what made Tubman one of the most remarkable women in U.S. history. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Common Mystics
S2E17: Escape to Freedom in McGraw, NY

Common Mystics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 43:28


On this episode of Common Mystics Jennifer and Jill explore the tiny town of McGraw in the Finger Lake region of New York state. Here the dead are active. Creepy cemeteries and haunted, abandoned buildings distract from the picturesque hillsides and trickling brooks. Who are the spirits that haunt this rural community? And why are […]

Shrinks on Third
Underground Railroad

Shrinks on Third

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 23:11


The one in which we discuss the brave and creative network of people and places that made freedom possible for thousands of enslaved people from the Southern U.S. How much do you know about the Underground Railroad? (Hint: we're not talking about the subway or the metro). 

Warrior's Day Off
The Lantern Network

Warrior's Day Off

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 31:15


S2 E9 features The Lantern Network, a nonprofit organization assisting underrepresented, high-potential youth of color as they pursue their career goals.  Students are coached academically and professionally, with access to a dedicated team of trainers, mentors, and recruiters, all of whom are there to connect the student with their greatest tools for success. Their vision is a bold and strong America where all people are valued by the content of their character and not by the color of their skin.  Tracy Davis, Co-Founder and Executive Director of The Lantern Network shares her personal journey and talks about the inspiration drawn from The Underground Railroad. Tracy describes the significance of their logo design, reminiscent of the quilts used to convey paths to freedom and the light from the lanterns that led slaves toward safe houses.  She talks about the parallels and how today, The  Lantern Network provides virtual safe houses that inspire, develop and propel Black youth toward economic freedom.  About Tracy DavisTracy is an accomplished trainer, coach, speaker, and consultant with more than 20 years of experience driving change and performance improvement across multiple industries. She holds an incredible catalogue of experience, certifications and degrees. Collaborating with start-ups to Fortune 500 companies, she has worked with a number of household names such as Chevrolet, Ernst & Young, GE, McDonald's, Toyota and more.A great conversation with Tracy Davis about The Lantern Network.  

Bubbly Bibbly
Hidden Gems That We Don’t Want You to Miss : Episode 42

Bubbly Bibbly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:16


 In this episode, Carmen and Rachel shared some of their favorite books that you may have missed. Let us know what your hidden treasure titles are; and, of course, check us out on Facebook and Instagram. “Underground Railroad” by Colson Whitehead “The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas “Where the Crawdads Sing” by Delia Owens “The […] The post Hidden Gems That We Don't Want You to Miss : Episode 42 appeared first on Bubbly Bibbly.

Race Trader Podcast
027 / Hamilton (2015)

Race Trader Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 58:27


This episode was recorded on October 1st, 2021. Enjoy! — Discussed: A little bit about Ron Chernow; the production value of Hamilton; the music of Hamilton; hip hop for white people; our relationship with musicals; other black musicals; a lack of originality with musicals; Jamaican Reggae covers; the time given to Hamilton's upbringing; Sufjan Stevens' proximity to musicals; the Animaniacs; duels; Hamilton's insecurities; Hamilton's false portrayal as an abolitionist; how they address slavery; Lin-Manuel Miranda's possible intent; The Haunting of Lin-Manuel Miranda by Ishmael Reed; the Obamas; J's relationship with history; IKEA furnished slave quarters; Lin-Manuel Miranda and colorism; the trope of the proud black woman; taking the good with the bad; proximity; Christopher Columbus; The Underground Railroad by Barry Jenkins; and closing thoughts. — Email us your thoughts, questions, and suggestions at bostonnj@racetraderpodcast.com. Discuss the show with the #racetraderpodcast hashtag on Twitter and everywhere else. Please don't forget to rate, review and listen on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/racetraderpodcast/message

The Talking Dead - A podcast dedicated to the AMC TV series The Walking Dead
The Talking Dead #551: “On the Inside” Feedback

The Talking Dead - A podcast dedicated to the AMC TV series The Walking Dead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 80:03


Was the horror house part of the Underground Railroad? How awesome was Lauren Ridloff? What classes did Jason take in high school? We answer these question and more in our listener feedback show for The Walking Dead season 11 episode 6, "On the Inside". --Please send us your comments, thoughts and feedback! Email us at talkingdeadpodcast@gmail.com, or post comments below. You can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/talkingdead, or leave us a voice message by clicking the "Send Voicemail" link in the header. Support the show by donating via PayPal, or by becoming a Patron.

NPR's Book of the Day
Colson Whitehead Finally Gets To Flex His Comedy Muscle

NPR's Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 14:31


After writing his Pulitzer Prize-winning books The Underground Railroad and The Nickel Boys, author Colson Whitehead needed a change of pace. So for his next novel, Harlem Shuffle, he decided to tackle topics near and dear to his heart: heists and New York real estate. In today's episode, Morning Edition host Noel King talks to Whitehead about his book's protagonist, a furniture retailer named Ray Carney, and what draws him to a double life of crime.

The Sci-Fi Sigh Podcast
Starry Nights with Nicole Glover | Episode 54

The Sci-Fi Sigh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 41:16


Constellations, astrological spells, murder-mystery and a bad ass female lead sign us up. We interviewed Nicole Glover, author of “The Conductors.” Check out this Underground Railroad story with a spellbinding twist, and hear from the maker of magic herself.________________________Catch up with Nicole Glover-Website: https://nicole-glover.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/nicoleglower?lang=enNext Book drops November 9, 2021:The Undertakers (A Murder & Magic Novel) Paperback ________________________Join our Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/thescifisigh?ltclid=74dee16e-c704-48b4-a577-240e80313ce7________________________Subscribe to our YouTube Channel-Wild, Wild Love:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9GIA4uF409uBzC-YXf-RQw

American Songcatcher
S2:E1 // Ain't Gonna Study War No More

American Songcatcher

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 78:19


Featured in this Episode: Traditional - “Down by The Riverside” (00:27) Mance Lipscomb (10:28) Ramblin' Jack Elliot (23:31) Emmylou Harris (45:17) Chris Thile (57:27) Teaser: After the civil war, songs such as these were created and sung from Alabama to Ohio for a perilous journey through the Underground Railroad, where the enslaved were in pursuit of their freedom. He wasn't a bluesman as much as a songster, known for his incredibly broad catalogue of songs and his front porch philosophizing. The student of Woody Guthrie, the father of Bob Dylan, the son who ran away to become a cowboy, and America's purveyor of folk music at 90 years old today. She's one of the most influential female singers of the 20th century, not just in country music but folk, pop and bluegrass, and is considered an American icon Widely considered the greatest mandolin player alive today, and perhaps to ever live, his acclaim reaches far and wide through several Grammy-winning projects and over 30 albums, despite only being 40 years old. Performances by the Host: “Down By The Riverside” - Traditional (8:16) “Take Me Back Babe” - Traditional (21:29) “Roving Gambler” - Traditional (42:37) “Angels Rejoiced Last Night” - The Louvin Brothers (55:08) “Bury Me Beneath the Willow” - Traditional (1:13:03) --- "Shine A Light" | Arhoolie Foundation Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support Independent Programming | Join the Patreon or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal Source Credits: American Songcatcher Website --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support

Fronteras
‘South To Freedom' Explores Mexico's Rise As An Antislavery Republic

Fronteras

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 21:30


The Underground Railroad to the North promised salvation for enslaved people in North America. But historian Alice L. Baumgartner explores how some slaves sought refuge in Mexico and how the country's push to abolish the practice stirred white salve owners in southern U.S. states, eventually setting the stage for the U.S. Civil War.

Honestly with Bari Weiss
The Story of One Teenager's Escape From Afghanistan

Honestly with Bari Weiss

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 51:50


It's been a month since the fall of Afghanistan. And Black Hawk helicopters and Humvees aren't the only things we left behind. Trapped in a country now controlled by the Taliban are hundreds of thousands of America's Afghan allies. These are the interpreters, advisers and others who worked with the U.S. government and with American organizations--and who we promised we would never abandon. Their chance at freedom — at life — now relies on normal Americans who are determined to right what the White House has gotten so terribly wrong. They are a rag-tag group of military veterans, human-rights activists, ex-special forces, State Department officials, non-profit organizers and private individuals with the kind of resources necessary to charter planes. And they have formed a 21st-century Underground Railroad. In time, history books will be written about these Americans and the Afghans they saved.Today, the story of one of them. A 15-year-old girl in Kabul named Rahima. And a woman called Esther in East Moline, Illinois, who stepped into the vacuum left by the U.S. government. To learn more about the Underground Railroad: https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/inside-the-underground-railroad-out f you are interested in helping people like Rahima please consider supporting: https://nooneleft.org and https://afghanevac.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Historia Obscura
Timbuctoo: New Jersey's Underground Railroad Terminus

Historia Obscura

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 17:51


This week on Historia Obscura: how a group of escaped black slaves in New Jersey created their own town, assisted in the escape of more slaves, and successfully fended off slave catchers. Special thanks to Patreon subscribers Barbara and Tom! Subscribe to my Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/historiaobscura! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/historiaobscura/message

The Book Review
Colson Whitehead on 'Harlem Shuffle'

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 69:07


Colson Whitehead's new novel, “Harlem Shuffle,” revolves around Ray Carney, a furniture retailer in Harlem in the 1960s with a sideline in crime. It's a relatively lighthearted novel, certainly compared to “The Underground Railroad” and “The Nickel Boys,” Whitehead's two previous novels, each of which won the Pulitzer Prize.“I usually do a lighter book, then a heavier book, but I felt compelled to write ‘The Nickel Boys' at the time that I did,” Whitehead says on this week's podcast. “I knew that in the crime genre, there's more room for jokes. There's just a lot more room for play. So I could exercise my humor muscle again. And then immediately, Carney … I wanted him to win, as soon as he appeared on the page. He was someone who was not as determined by circumstances — slavery, Jim Crow — as the characters in those previous two novels. And he pulls off some capers. And I think we — or at least I was rooting for him. So immediately the tone was different, and I gave myself to it.”Colm Toibin visits the podcast to talk about his new novel, “The Magician,” based on the life of the great German writer Thomas Mann. Toibin says that the book is not an attempt to “inhabit” Mann, or to fully understand him, which is impossible with such a complex person.“It's not an attempt to pin him down, so that by the end of the book you really know him,” Toibin says. “I'm as interested in his unknowability as I am in attempting to draw a very clear portrait of him. I think it's an important question. I often hear novelists saying, ‘I felt I really knew my character.' And I often feel the opposite. I often feel my character has become even more evasive the further attempts I have made to enter their spirit.”Also on this week's episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history as it celebrates its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams talk about what they've been reading. Pamela Paul is the host.Here are the books discussed in this week's “What We're Reading”:“A Time of Gifts” by Patrick Leigh Fermor“Latecomers” by Anita Brookner“The Makioka Sisters” by Junichiro Tanizaki

Professional rambler
Ep 34: Underground railroads and handmaid tale

Professional rambler

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 16:23


In the episode, I did a comparison and similarities between the underground rail round on amazon prime and the handmaid tale on hulu. Both the shows touch on a lot of heavy topics with the Underground Railroad being about black Americans and slavery while the handmaid tale is more on women and women reproductive rights. I talked about how both of the shows talked on how both of the shows talked and handled intersectionality of being black and a woman. Tune in! Feel free to email me at professionalramblerpodcast@gmail.com and or follow me at @professionalrambler. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/safiyat-aminu1/message

Poured Over
Colson Whitehead on THE HARLEM SHUFFLE

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 27:31


Two Pulitzers, a National Book Award, and a MacArthur Genius Grant: Colson Whitehead is one of the greatest novelists working today. From The Intuitionist to The Underground Railroad and The Nickel Boys, his incredible body of work is driven by sharp insight and brilliant sentences. Harlem Shuffle is his newest novel, a character study, a caper flick, and an absolute thrill to read. Colson joins us on the show to talk about his love of 1970s heist flicks, walking aimlessly around Harlem, messy internet searches, and more. Featured Books: Harlem Shuffle and The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead, Richard Stark's Parker novels, and The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith. Produced/hosted by Miwa Messer and engineered by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays.

The Ezra Klein Show
How Colson Whitehead Writes About Our ‘Big Wild Country'

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:35


“If he got a thrill out of transforming these ill-gotten goods into legit merchandise, a zap-charge in his blood like he'd plugged into a socket, he was in control of it and not the other way around,” writes Colson Whitehead in his new novel, “Harlem Shuffle.” “Dizzying and powerful as it was. Everyone had secret corners and alleys that no one else saw — what mattered were your major streets and boulevards, the stuff that showed up on other people's maps of you.”Whitehead is the author of “The Underground Railroad,” which won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and “The Nickel Boys,” which also won a Pulitzer, the first time two consecutive books by an author won. But he actually started “Harlem Shuffle” in between those two books. And now that he's finished it, he can't quite put it down. He's working on a sequel, he told me. The first time he's tried one.“Harlem Shuffle” is both a joyous and a troubled book. It's built around Ray Carney, a furniture salesman and fence for stolen goods, and a series of capers around 1960s-era Harlem. But at its core it's about patrimony, capitalism, ambition, race and the moral costs of striving in an unjust system.We talk about all that, and more: how Marvel Comics made Whitehead want to be a writer, how parenthood changed him, why he hopes to distill it all down to a haiku, whether the writing world is a just or unjust system, the nature of zombies, the nonfiction of the late-Aughts internet, the legacy of 9/11, his favorite heist movies, what his wife thinks his characters know that he doesn't — and I could keep going.This one's a fun one.Mentioned: "Wow, Fiction Works!" by Colson WhiteheadHarlem Shuffle by Colson WhiteheadThe Underground Railroad by Colson WhiteheadThe Nickel Boys by Colson WhiteheadZone One by Colson WhiteheadSag Harbor by Colson WhiteheadThe Noble Hustle by Colson WhiteheadBook recommendations: Love Goes to Buildings on Fire by Will HermesThe Buddha in the Attic by Julie OtsukaWhen the Emperor Was Divine by Julie OtsukaMad As Hell by Dave ItzkoffYou can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

Vacation Mavens
197 Crossing the Canadian Border & A Road Trip to Buffalo

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 43:42


This week Kim and Tamara are catching up on their respective August travels. Kim shares what it is like to cross the land border between Canada and the USA right now, plus what you need to know before you go. Meanwhile, Tamara almost made it to the Canadian border on her Western New York road trip, but not quite. She tells us about her eating adventures along the Upstate Eats Trail in Syracuse, Rochester, and Buffalo, New York. ABOUT OUR SPONSOR: ROOM STEALS Today's episode is sponsored by Room Steals.  Listeners may remember Room Steals from our discussion on finding hotel deals in Episode 185, but Room Steals is a Chrome browser extension that works alongside existing booking sites to show you what the wholesale price is for that room. Just install the browser extension and search for a hotel as you usually would on Hotels.com, Booking.com, Expedia, or Google. Once you've done your initial search, Room Steals will show you in a pop-up if that same room is available for less. If it is, you can click on that pop-up and book it directly through Room Steals. Downloading and using Room Steals is free; however, if you want to book a discounted room you have to pay an annual membership fee. Listeners can save 20% off the annual membership fee with promo code vacationmavens.  If you travel multiple times in a year, the subscription will quickly pay for itself. One listener already saved $400 using Room Steals on her first booking!  To learn more, visit roomsteals.com. That's roomsteals.com and use promo code vacationmavens to save 20% off your membership to Room Steals, and we thank them for their support. Crossing the Canadian Border The land border is still currently closed for Canadians looking to enter the USA, but US citizens are permitted to visit Canada. To cross the border, US citizens need to show a negative COVID test result taken within 72 hours of crossing (note 72 hours NOT 3 days so test timing matters). Tests need to be PCR tests done through a lab (not an at-home test). Anyone age-eligible needs to be fully vaccinated to enter Canada and be prepared to show your vaccination card. Children under 12 crossing with a vaccinated parent may need to be tested again at the border crossing. You also need to have a quarantine plan (identify a hotel where you would stay if you needed to quarantine in Canada.) Canada can also do random COVID testing at the border. You currently do NOT need a negative COVID test to return from Canada to the United States if you are crossing via a land border (anyone arriving into the US by air still needs to have a negative COVID test taken within 72 hours of boarding the plane.) You can upload all your documents into the Arrive CAN app prior to travel. Keep in mind that if you are driving through Western Canada you will want to pay close attention to any wildfires and road closures when planning your route. Be sure to check the Canadian government website for the latest updates. Upstate Eats Trail Road Trip Stops The Upstate Eats Trail runs from Binghampton to Buffalo to Rochester to Syracuse, New York with local food stops along the way This area also has a lot of history with the Erie Canal, suffrage movement, and Underground Railroad See Tamara's full blog post about the Upstate Eats Trail In Syracuse, Green Lakes State Park is home to a glacial lake with a beautiful blue color like you see in the some of the lakes up in Canada. In Downtown Syracuse, Dinosaur BBQ is a popular restaurant with excellent barbecue. Salt City Market is a food hall in Downtown Buffalo with many different types of cuisine from Burmese to Jamaican, Thai, and more. The Marriott in Downtown Syracuse is a beautiful historic hotel and has a great location for exploring downtown. On the way from Syracuse to Rochester, stop in Auburn, New York at the Harriet Tubman House National Historic Site and the New York State Equal Rights Center. In Rochester, stop at Bill Gray's for their red and white hot dogs with meat sauce. One location is right on Lake Ontario. Nearby you can grab a soft serve frozen custard Abbott's. Rochester is famous for the garbage plate, which was invented at Nick Tahou Hots. A garbage plate has potatoes (usually fries), macaroni salad, and is topped with either hamburgers or hot dogs and covered with meat sauce, onions, and other toppings. If you are visiting Rochester with kids, be sure to visit the Strong Museum of Play. This interactive museum focuses on play and has areas with interactive play as well as a Toy Hall of Fame and toys from different decades. High Falls is another spot to check out in Rochester, which is a 90' waterfall in the center of town. There is a nice bridge and viewing point overlooking the falls. Genessee Brew House is located right near the falls. Famous for Genessee Cream Ale, they now have a craft brewery and restaurant. Buffalo is known for a wide selection of food beyond wings, 35 craft breweries, 5 distilleries, street art, history and a revitalized waterfront. Tamara stayed at the Downtown Marriott in Buffalo in the Canalside district, which is where the boat tours leave and where you can rent kayaks, paddleboards, and water bikes. Buffalo River History Tours runs boat tours that explain the history of the river and the grain silos that line the banks. River Works is another entertainment district along the river that is home to ice hockey/roller derby rinks, a ropes course, a brewery, restaurant, tiki bar, entertainment venue and soon a Ferris wheel and zip lining. Silo City is home to a large number of grain silos and elevators that are being converted into lofts and commercial / exhibition space. Duende is a fun bar in Silo City that features live music on some evenings, outdoor space, and fun cocktails or local craft beers. General Mills still has a plant in Buffalo that manufactures Cheerios and Lucky Charms, and the area around it smells like cereal. There are many breweries in Buffalo and one favorite is Resurgence Brewing. Ted's Hot Dogs is famous for its spicy meat sauce. Anchor Bar is home to the original buffalo wings. Other local Buffalo foods to try include beef on weck, sponge candy, and Buffalo-style pizza. If you enjoy architecture, be sure to visit Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House. See more things to do on a Buffalo girls' trip. Full Episode Transcript [00:00:00.000] - Kim Tate We're saying goodbye to summer. Here's the latest of what we've been up to.   [00:00:15.440] - Announcer Welcome to Vacation Mavens, a family travel podcast with ideas for your next vacation and tips to get you out the door. Here are your hosts, Kim from Stuffed Suitcase and Tamara from We3Travel.   [00:00:29.940] - Kim Tate Today's episode is brought to us by our continuing sponsor, Room Steals. Room Steals is an extension that you can add to your browser. And while you're shopping for your next hotel room, you can see if you're getting the very best rate.   [00:00:43.230] - Tamara Gruber I don't know if I had mentioned to you, but my family is planning on doing a Thanksgiving get away this year with all of Glenn's family. It is a multi generational trip, hopefully to Aruba. It was something that was supposed to happen a couple of years ago and was cancelled. I don't know if it's going to happen, but right now that's what our plan is. And so I was like, you know what? It's Thanksgiving week. I don't think that there would be any deals on Room Steals, but let me just give it a quick look.   [00:01:08.730] - Tamara Gruber So I looked and we were going to do the Ritz Carlton in Aruba, and it looks like we could save almost $900 if we use Room Steals because it depends on what room types. Some would be like $400. Some would be 600 or would be $800. So now I need to go and tell my father in law, but he's going to pay for quite a few rooms. So if you think about if that's like $800 per room, you know, when you're doing, like, five rooms, that's a lot of money.   [00:01:37.110] - Kim Tate That's a lot of money.   [00:01:37.930] - Tamara Gruber It's a lot of money. So anyway, if anyone is thinking of planning some travel, I definitely suggest checking out Room Steals. As we mentioned, it's a Chrome browser extension that works alongside all of these different booking sites, like hotels or Booking or Expedia or even Google. And the nice thing is, you can see what the rate would be for free. And then if you want to book that rate, that's when you can sign up for Room Steals membership. And they are offering our listeners 20% off the annual membership fee with the promotion code, vacationmavens. It is Vacation Mavens. All one word, all lower case. Go ahead and check it out at Room Steals dot com.   [00:02:18.200] - Tamara Gruber So, Kim, I was hoping to use this episode to talk about our big announcement of a big trip that we're doing that we're going to see each other on for the first time in how long? I know. I don't know. I don't think we have an announcement to make.   [00:02:33.330] - Kim Tate I don't think we can announce it yet, but I can at least say what we're crossing our fingers for. We are crossing our fingers that Tamara and I will be going to Portugal in October. So I'm still hoping I'm crossing my fingers and my heart.   [00:02:49.080] - Tamara Gruber I think anyone that's trying to plan any trips right now is very much in this state of is it happening? Is it not happening? Especially if it's international. We're all trying to make the best decisions and look at the most recent information. And just recently we've gone through, do we do this or not? And we're like, okay, Portugal has the second best vaccination rate in Europe. Their cases are flattening out. They've got all these great measures in place.   [00:03:18.380] - Tamara Gruber Everything was coming together, all getting organized. We're ready to go. And it's like one of those things where just when you're about to pull the trigger, it's like because Europe announces that they are taking the US off of their safe list of countries that they're accepting into the European Union. So at first that's like, what is that going to mean? You read into it a little bit more. It looks like it probably will be mostly targeted towards unvaccinated travelers, but it's really up to each individual country now to determine what they're going to decide to do.   [00:03:55.110] - Tamara Gruber And so I think probably a lot of them will do is that you need to be both vaccinated and have a negative test for arrival and then implementing that vaccine passport that they're using throughout Europe to be able to check into hotels and go to restaurants and things like that. So it is definitely something to keep your eye on very closely as it can change at anytime.   [00:04:18.380] - Kim Tate I mean, we're over a year into this, so hopefully we've all learned to keep things fluid, but it's definitely a a situation that's up in the air. And like Tamara said, we're just trying to really follow all the rules and regulations, make sure. And the thing is, you have to make sure you're doing the research yourself because I saw someone recently. They showed up to the airport and they had done their own research and knew that they had to get a test and all this stuff. But people were at the airport and being denied their flight because they didn't have a test to show the airport check in, and they were complaining.   [00:04:52.500] - Kim Tate Well, the airline never sent us this information. They never told us this was needed, so you can't rely on getting your information from one source. You have to really kind of do the leg work yourself.   [00:05:03.120] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I think there's a lot of that, like, just not understanding what needs to happen. And I think sometimes I pay a little too much attention to the news, but you need to definitely follow all that information. I just put up a little Instagram story the other day just with some steps to take, make sure that you register for the Smart Traveler enrollment program, the Step program through the State Department, make sure you are following and read through everything on the embassy page to understand what the rules are and following those kind of resources, especially on social media, is that probably gets updated more quickly.   [00:05:39.220] - Tamara Gruber So you definitely need to get some information. But things are always changing even here in the US, right. We were just kind of talking about how difficult it is even to plan a travel podcast, because some of the things that we wanted to talk to you guys about this fall. Now it's probably not the best time to visit those destinations. So between fires and storms and other things, travel is continued to be fluid. But road trips tend to still be good. And you and I both made a road trip recently, right.   [00:06:09.540] - Kim Tate We did.   [00:06:10.360] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:06:10.890] - Kim Tate I think it's hopefully still in our ability. However, there's some interesting stuff, even with road tripping, it we had experience when we were in Canada, but yeah, I think that things right now. I mean, just as we've always said, things, you have to really pack your patience and do your research and be flexible and fluid.   [00:06:29.340] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So you got to finally visit Paul's family, which I'm so glad you were able to do that. So what was it like driving across the border? I guess both ways, especially since we're a little bit unequal partners in that. We are now allowed into Canada. But Canadians are not allowed to cross our border. So there's all these different rules to sort out. We talked about it a little bit last time, but now that you've been through it, maybe you could just talk about that would like, yeah, definitely.   [00:06:53.880] - Kim Tate So it's probably good to let everyone know what the experience was. In actuality, we got up to the border. We made good time. We were the only car at the border crossing where we went, and we were using one of the border crossings. That's not as busy up here. We have three that we well, actually, there's four that we can use kind of across the Washington, our side of the border that we do when we're traveling up to Edmonton, we normally pick ones that are a little bit further east than the traditional Vancouver ones.   [00:07:22.280] - Kim Tate So we passed at a slower location, and it was we were the only people there. We got up there and they wanted to see our passports. And then I had put our vaccine cards in my passport and it dropped, of course. And he's like, I just want your passports now. So he didn't want to see my card, but he saw that we had it. I'm guessing. So he gave that to us and looked at our passport, scan them and everything. And then he wanted to see our negative COVID test.   [00:07:52.420] - Kim Tate And so I pulled mine up on my phone. But the girls, they don't have digital ones because they're minors, so they don't have the digital account. So we had gotten print outs in advance, and he looked because I know that mine. We actually we got tested separately and mine and Mia was exactly three days before. And whereas Paul and Lizzy there was two days before, but early in the morning and he looked at his watch because he was looking for the 72 hours. So I was curious how that would work if they really hold to the 72 hours or it would be just kind of like three days before.   [00:08:28.270] - Kim Tate But he looked at his watch because ours got processed at 05:00 p.m.. And he wanted to make sure that the time that you got the test or the time that the results came for us. It was the time that the test was administered. So what happened, though, is we collected. We gave our sample probably around 1:20, but the test results said sample process at 05:00 p.m.. So there was like a holding period before they actually ran our sample. But our results didn't come in for two days after that.   [00:08:58.220] - Kim Tate But it's not based on when you're basically, I would say, is have your sample collected no sooner than 72 hours before you think you're going to pass that, you know, that border. And I know there's different rulings on if you're originating in one place and then connecting somewhere. And I think there's some stuff with that as well.   [00:09:20.230] - Tamara Gruber Well, you really have to account for traffic there, too, just yet.   [00:09:23.610] - Kim Tate I know that's what I was saying. So that's where we were, because it's like, okay, well, we want to leave the house at this time, but knowing my family, we're probably going to know we give it that time. So I want to give myself an hour cushion. But then we had, like I said, we had quite a bit of a cushion from just when the processing was when the test was processed. It was a few hours after we'd given our samples.   [00:09:48.540] - Tamara Gruber Did you do that through like, a standard state testing site. We did pharmacy or anything.   [00:09:54.690] - Kim Tate We did it through our normal clinic site. So our hospital, like our doctor's clinic has a drive through clinic set up for all the patients. And so we were able to just drive through there and do our little swabs and stick and imagine it has to be PCR. It has to be PCR. And Canada does not allow those Abbott ones.   [00:10:19.370] - Tamara Gruber Unless they've started self administered one.   [00:10:21.800] - Kim Tate Yeah, it has to be through a lab and stuff in there. They have different rules. So you just need to really make sure you're doing it the right way and stuff. So we got them and no problem. So he checked that. Now we had used the app that was the arrive can app, and I had it pulled up and in there. And again, I wonder how much they noticed this and don't ask for it then, because he didn't ask us for vaccination cards, and he didn't ask to see the app.   [00:10:46.760] - Kim Tate But I had it already, like in the hand on my lap. So then we got through. It's kind of funny how we did this because we drove separately. So Paul and Mia were right behind us, and they got up there and he wanted to see their arrive can, and he wanted to see their vaccination cards in addition to everything else. So I don't know how that worked, but yeah, so we had everything in order. So we had the arrived can filled out. The tricky thing about the arrive can is they actually make you create a quarantine, not create, but tell them what your quarantine plan is because because they can spontaneously request a test at the border.   [00:11:24.150] - Kim Tate And I'm guessing this is done more when you're flying. But I did have a friend recently say that it happened to their kids because they weren't able to get vaccinated. But those tests don't come through for three days or can be three days. And so when they give you the results, they've already let you into the country. But when they give you the results, if you're positive, you have to go into quarantine immediately at that point, and you have to follow that plan that you input into this app.   [00:11:52.290] - Kim Tate So we just put that we would stay at a residence in that was near his family. So that's just something to be mindful of that you do have to know what your arrangements will be. And you can't just say, oh, we'll just stay with family because it has to be in a situation where you can not touch or be around anyone else. So you have to be able to get your own food. You have to be able to not be with anyone who is not part of your traveling party.   [00:12:18.500] - Tamara Gruber Well, that's challenging. But you didn't have to make a reservation just in case.   [00:12:23.220] - Kim Tate No, I did not have to make a reservation. They just wanted to know what you would do. And I thought for some people who were going to Vancouver, I wondered if you could just put your home address in there and say, hey, I just turn around and go right back home.   [00:12:35.540] - Tamara Gruber Right.   [00:12:36.050] - Kim Tate But I don't know if the US. So that was the other. So then we get to the other flip side of it, which was once. The reason we drove up separately is because we actually parked one car at the airport, and we were driving up to together to visit Paul's family. And then we were able to me and I flew back early on our own to at an airport and picked up the car and drove home because she had a camp that started the day. And normally we do that drive in two days.   [00:13:00.300] - Kim Tate It's a little long for a one day drive. So we had that experience when we were ready to cross back in the border, we went through the same again, very small border crossing, and it was closed off. And so I was a little worried because I was like, okay, I didn't check the hours. But it was like, 10:00 a.m.. I was like, sure, truly, it's open at 10:00 a.m.. Maybe it's a weekend. And there was a border patrol agent there and got out of his car and it was like, pull forward.   [00:13:25.670] - Kim Tate And I was like, okay. And I rolled down the line. I'm like, Is this crossing not open? And he's like, Well, the border has been closed since March of 2020. Don't you know that? And I was like, no we are Americans. And so he's like, sdo you have American passports? And I was like. Yes, here they are.   [00:13:42.030] - Kim Tate And so he looked at him and he took them. And I was like, we're just visiting my husband's family, my in laws. And we're just coming back home. And he's like, okay, and move the thing. And he's like, drive forward to the booth. So we drove forward. I went through the process. And that was so like, they didn't want to test. They didn't want anything. They were just like, welcome home. Then we went through.   [00:14:02.340] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was listening to the Miles to Go podcast. And he also recently had gone up to Canada, I think, to visit family. And apparently you don't need a test to come back into the US when you are at a land crossing. Yes, you only do for a flight. Which seems so odd. I don't know why you wouldn't just have the same rule. But did you know that ahead of time, I had you gotten tested, just in case.   [00:14:27.690] - Kim Tate When I recorded the previous podcast, I had mentioned that we were going to buy those Abbott Binax and just do a testing. But then I had two friends who had both crossed recently. One had been crossing regularly to visit her family, and then the other one had just gone up to visit his family. But both of them said they've never been. There's nothing with testing required when you're crossing at the land border. So we did not buy those Abbott tests. And we just took it at words at the word.   [00:14:56.040] - Kim Tate And sure enough, they did not ask for any kind of test. So interesting. Yeah, it is kind of interesting. I don't know how that works, but we're thankfully lucky enough that we didn't have to do that extra step and expense.   [00:15:07.050] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Glad everything worked out and that you have a family.   [00:15:10.620] - Kim Tate It was so nice. I'm so glad we went. And it was good to be around my, you know, one niece, she had a new baby. So we were able to see him. And it was great.   [00:15:22.310] - Tamara Gruber It was nice.   [00:15:23.400] - Kim Tate We went to West Edmonton Mall. So for those people are curious, we didn't do it. We did mostly just hang out with family. But we did go out to eat a couple of times. They had some patio seating. And with it being summer, it was actually really nice to be in Edmonton and we went to West Edmonton mall, and the girls got some back to school shopping done. And we happened to be during a big hockey tournament. So there's a bunch of kids playing. They have a big ice rink in the middle of their West Edmonton wall.   [00:15:53.520] - Tamara Gruber As they do in Edmonton.   [00:15:54.990] - Kim Tate Yeah, exactly. It's like, is anyone surprised that they have a big hockey rink? If anyone doesn't know West Edmonton mall, I used to be kind of the largest mall in North America, and it and Mall of America, which is in Minnesota. I think they used to go back and forth. I don't know who's the current reigning champion because they would add on and do different things. But anyways, while the girls were shopping, we kind of stood and watched the kids play a hockey tournament. And it was a fun, very Canadian that.   [00:16:27.300] - Kim Tate Yeah, it was. And we got Tim Hortons coffee. So Tim Bits, it was a very Canadian esque situation. My sister in law is actually a pilot, a small plane pilot. She's working up her. She just got commercial pilots, but she's working up her hours and stuff. But she took Paul and the girls up in her little four seater plane up for a flight one day. So that was another fun thing they got to do. And they loved that. It's neat. Yeah. I stayed on the ground.   [00:16:56.350] - Kim Tate I did not go.   [00:16:57.540] - Tamara Gruber I'd be in after my one experience with the glider plane. I'm okay on small planes.   [00:17:04.130] - Kim Tate I remember when you and I have that chance to go on the helicopter in Ireland.   [00:17:09.170] - Tamara Gruber And we both were like.   [00:17:10.250] - Kim Tate No, maybe not a good idea.   [00:17:11.750] - Tamara Gruber See the helicopter for me is more about the motion sickness.   [00:17:15.560] - Kim Tate Yeah, that's what I was worried about.   [00:17:17.180] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was little planes. I'm just not a fan of the little plane inside.   [00:17:20.680] - Kim Tate Yeah. For me, I was pretty sure that I just know I'm not a calm flyer. Like I have fear flying. I used to have it really bad. And then as I flew more, I've gotten over it. But turbulence and stuff is just a problem. But I also know on the smaller planes, the motion sickness would really get to me if I couldn't be looking out continually and stuff.   [00:17:42.110] - Tamara Gruber Especially when they're like, oh, let's Zoom in to see the scenery. I really enjoyed our float plane that we did in Alaska when we went to see the bears and stuff, but it was short. So I did get to the motion sickness wasn't too bad, but yeah, well, I was up right near the Canadian border. I thought of you.   [00:18:01.870] - Kim Tate Exactly. You didn't quite cross. Yeah. Had you considered it?   [00:18:04.910] Initially, I was tempted. But it's funny because a friend of mine met me in Buffalo, and I'll explain the trip in a minute. But she's from New Jersey, and she actually never had Tim Hortons, which here in New England. There are some Tim Hortons around okay. So it's not like a brand new thing, but she was like, oh, what is that? I've never heard of it. And we're like, what have you never heard? It's important. So anyway, we're very used to our Dunkin Donuts here.   [00:18:29.570] - Kim Tate And, yeah, that's something. I don't even know if I've ever had a Dunkin Donuts. I can't think if I ever have.   [00:18:37.360] - Tamara Gruber Well, you know, I'm not a coffee person, so I don't get into that hole to be all I can evaluate the Donuts.   [00:18:43.490] - Kim Tate Yeah, I have to say that Tim Hortons, I like Tim Hortons more than McDonald's, but that's about where the level is at. So for people who are wondering, it's not like, you know, in Seattle, I'm so spoiled because we have a coffee stand booth of, you know, like, small source coffees at every corner. So it's a little different. So it's definitely like, drive through coffee. So I don't know if I could compare honestly what Duncan ones versus McDonald's versus Tim Hortons. I don't know if I could do any justice to that in there.   [00:19:13.740] - Kim Tate Yeah, but, yeah, I want to hear all about because I know you went up to Buffalo to do a big foodie trail. So what was that like?   [00:19:20.150] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I had talked to the tourism board from Visit Buffalo back in January. So this is a trip that they hosted me on because what intrigued me about Buffalo is it kind of has some similarities to where I live here in Providence. They talked about a big revitalization of their waterfront, a good foodie scene, craft breweries, things like that. So I thought, you know what that sounds like a fun summer getaway summer or fall. I didn't really want to go up to Buffalo in the winter. And so they've put together this entire Upstate Eats trail.   [00:19:55.190] - Tamara Gruber So it's really more Western New York. You could hit Binghamton, which is down more like Upstate, but a little closer to where the Finger Lakes and then cut through the Finger Lakes up to Buffalo. What I did, though, since I'm coming from Rhode Island, is I went right across Interstate 90, and I stopped first in Syracuse and spent a night there, and then one night in Rochester and then three nights in Buffalo. So I got to experience three stops along the Upstate Eats Trail and kind of got to see the unique foods of that area, which I just have so much fun discovering what foods are really unique and special.   [00:20:34.050] - Tamara Gruber And sometimes it's just like a twist on something like a hot dog. But it's just the thing that they have up there. So I found that when I moved to Rhode Island, so many people that live in Rhode Island have lived there all their lives, and they may not recognize that these things are not everywhere. But when I moved to Rhode Island, I'm like, oh, there's so many very unique foods. And I remember writing a post about the must try foods in Rhode Island. So it's become my thing to really discover those unique foods that you only find in certain places.   [00:21:04.500] - Tamara Gruber And I found a lot of other things along the way because that area just has so much history between the suffrage movement, the Underground Railroad, just overall industrialism and stuff. There's just so much history to explore there, too. So there were a lot of places in between those cities that I wanted to stop at. That I didn't always have a chance to. So I did a few on the way back. I'm working on a whole blog post that I'll link to in our show notes when this comes out about the different stops along the way.   [00:21:35.150] - Tamara Gruber But, yeah, my first surprise was that when I got to Syracuse, they have a glacial Lake there. That is that beautiful color that you see, like in Canada. I'm like, wait, I didn't know that we had this in New York, but then Syracuse, downtown. Syracuse is big for the University, Syracuse University, but it has a good downtown. There's a lot of diversity there. I didn't have. I didn't get a chance to do some of the things I would have liked to have done because it was a Monday in museums and some other things were closed.   [00:22:08.220] - Tamara Gruber But it's also that area is because of the Great Lakes. You see so much distribution and things. So the Erie Canal was a huge deal in terms of getting goods from the Great Lakes down into other parts of the state. So they have an Erie Canal Museum. And there's also stops along the Underground Railroad. They're in Syracuse. So the thing that I got to do, of course, was eat. I asked people, where should I eat? And certain places always came up in Syracuse. It was dinosaur barbecue.   [00:22:44.720] - Tamara Gruber So it was just like a big, famous place for barbecue. Which is funny. I was actually in my grocery store yesterday, and I had to buy a barbecue sauce, and I saw that they have dinosaur barbecue sauce. I'm like, either I've never noticed that before or I just didn't know where it came from. Right.   [00:22:59.330] - Kim Tate Right. Yeah.   [00:23:00.260] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:23:01.080] - Kim Tate Like the sauce, right.   [00:23:02.610] - Tamara Gruber I didn't realize that that was a restaurant. So I did that. And then kind of just spent my time walking around town. And then in the evening, I went to they have a food hall.   [00:23:12.710] - Kim Tate I love those.   [00:23:13.800] - Tamara Gruber So this food Hall, Salt City Market, was right next to the hotel where I was staying at, which was like a Marriott, which was beautiful. It was an old historic hotel that had been renovated and changed into a Marriott. And the food hall had all kinds of different cuisine. I had, like, I think I got a Jamaican meat pie. And then they had another place they made, like, homemade, I think, a peach pie, different things. They had Vietnamese and Burmese and Cambodian. So tons of different cuisines that you could try and sample.   [00:23:44.870] - Tamara Gruber So that was the cool thing. I always like when I see these kind of interesting food experiences. Yeah. Definitely.   [00:23:51.200] - Kim Tate We were talking about that when I was in Irvine. It's neat because we get so stuck in kind of the standard stuff. And maybe when you're traveling far away, you think of it. But yeah, that's nice.   [00:24:00.980] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. And then in Rochester, I went up. Well, first I stopped like an Auburn, and I stopped the Harriet Tubman house and did a tour there, just trying to take in a little bit more of the history. I've been through this area a couple of times and stopped at a few historic sites. And we're trying to put it all together at some point that I've seen a lot of it and also in Auburn, and they have an equal rights. It's like a New York State equal rights center.   [00:24:24.520] - Tamara Gruber So it deals with women's rights, civil rights and LGBTQ rights. So it's like this whole kind of all of the luminaries within New York who have fought for equal rights of some type. So that was an interesting little stop, too. Then in Rochester, I went to a place called Bill Grays, and they're famous for their red hots. So the red hot and their white hot. So apparently it's like you're talking about.   [00:24:52.000] - Kim Tate Like, the candy, right? No.   [00:24:53.610] - Tamara Gruber Exactly.   [00:24:54.210] - Kim Tate Oh, sorry.   [00:24:55.140] - Tamara Gruber I'm talking about hot dogs. Okay.   [00:24:57.600] - Kim Tate Sorry.   [00:24:58.410] - Tamara Gruber It's confusing, right?   [00:25:00.280] - Kim Tate That's what I thought.   [00:25:01.210] - Tamara Gruber Too, when I saw the red hots listed. So there's just all these different hot dog joints. They use specific hot dogs that are produced there. And this particular place, Bill Grays, has a white one. So it's like a white hot dog. Kind of looks like a sausage or something or what. But it's not those bright red hot dogs that you've seen. And sometimes in Maine, those are just kind of crazy from outer space. Hot dogs. There's kind of like a regular hot dog or a white hot dog.   [00:25:31.170] - Tamara Gruber But they put a meat sauce and onion and a bunch of other stuff on it. I'm kind of used to usually and onions. Yeah. But it's not chilly. It's kind of close. So that's kind of what makes it unique, like, where you go. And I know how there's always like, oh, I like this one because they do something in their particular style. I think everyone develops a style that they like. So anyway, I try to wait one just to see what it was like. And it's fine.   [00:25:59.910] - Tamara Gruber So I did that. And then I was right on Lake Ontario there. So I took a little to walk on the Lake. And every time I'm on the Great Lakes, I'm just amazed by, of course, how big they are. But you and the beach also felt like it was a nice, soft sand beach. And this is actually really nice.   [00:26:15.840] - Kim Tate You know, that's an area I've never been to or discovered. So that's nice. I think it's I'm sure it feels like it's overlooked by a lot of people. But I'm sure there's a lot of people who know about it. Probably it's probably got a great tourism industry.   [00:26:29.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. But I don't think when you think of New York, you think generally, of course, New York City, you think maybe the catskills, the other index, the finger likes things that we've talked about. And I think this section of Western New York isn't thought of as a tourist destination unless it's Niagara. But I will say Buffalo is only like half an hour from Niagara Falls, so it's easy to add in a few days there and expand what you can do in that area. It's also there's a lot of great ice cream stand.   [00:26:59.900] - Tamara Gruber It's a lot of this kind of, like, fast casual types of food. It definitely brought my tum along, but it was fun to explore the different styles. But one thing that they have in Rochester that is just so cool is the Museum of Play. And I've heard about this for a long time. Everyone always says it's something you have to do when you go to Rochester. So even though I wasn't going with a kid, I was by myself. I still went to the Strong. It's the National Museum of Play, and it has this whole reading area where it's focused on different genre or characters from books.   [00:27:38.710] - Tamara Gruber And it's like an amazing children's Museum, but with a real focus on play. So there's an area where it has toys from different generations. There's a Toy Hall of Fame. So it kind of reminds me of a place that you and I went to in Kansas City.   [00:27:55.550] - Kim Tate Where in Kansas City.   [00:27:57.130] - Tamara Gruber Where you look back and you're like, oh, I remember light bright. Remember that. Remember all this kind of different toys? So there's, like, the nostalgia factor. But then there's also an area where there's a whole Sesame Street thing or like a movement thing where you're building paper airplanes and learning, trying to see how far you can make them fly. There's a Wegman, which is like the big grocery store chain up there. So it's like the little like you would go to at a children's Museum where you're pretending to shop and pretending to check out.   [00:28:27.820] - Tamara Gruber And I imagine if I lived up there, I would have had a membership and been taking my kid there all the time. So much fun. They had a whole butterfly garden. There were, like a pinball arcade, like another type of arcade, just so much to do. That's very interactive. You could easily spend hours and hours. They are you're with kids. So if you do make it to that area with kids, definitely check out the Strong Museum of Play and also downtown. There's this area called High Falls.   [00:28:59.080] - Tamara Gruber That is basically I think it's like a 90 foot waterfall in the middle of town. It's like one of these surprising things that you're in the middle of what feels like not industrial city. But you have a strong presence there of Kodak and some other large commercial buildings. And there's really interesting architecture downtown. So you don't really expect to see this big waterfall in town. There's a great bridge that you can walk and get a good view of it. It's right by the genes. Have you heard of Genesee Cremale?   [00:29:33.210] - Tamara Gruber Jenny Cream ale? Is that just like an East Coast thing?   [00:29:36.130] - Kim Tate But I was like.   [00:29:36.780] - Tamara Gruber I haven't heard it very much. I think what people's grandfather's drink, it's like an old cream ale. So it's like one of the breweries that's been around for a long time. But now they still produce that. But they also have more of, like a craft brewery side as well. So I actually had dinner there because it's kind of like the next generation of these original breweries. And I did not try the cream ale, but I tried some others, and those were pretty good. And the other thing that Rochester is really famous for is called a garbage plate.   [00:30:06.930] - Tamara Gruber So it's one of their famous dishes that was created. And I was feeling exactly. It was so funny. I was talking to the tourism in person, and she was saying like, yeah, some people are like, why would you want to advertise your city with something with garbage in the name? But at the same time, so many people search for that because they know that that's the thing to eat there. So it's like, where are you going to get the best garbage plate. So I went to the place that invented the garbage plate, which is like a total little hole in the wall kind of place.   [00:30:35.970] - Tamara Gruber But now everywhere you go for dinner, if it's a casual place has their version of the garbage plate. So they might call it the everything plate or something like that. But it is basically like a pile of French fries, a bunch bunch of macaroni salad, which is like a strange combination to begin with, topped with either like burgers or cheeseburgers or hot dogs without buns. And then on top of that, just like this meat sauce and onions and ketchup and mustard. And who knows what else?   [00:31:07.910] - Tamara Gruber I'm not even sure. So it's just like this pile of carbs and meat I just presented to you on a plate. It's pretty funny. I think it's the kind of thing where if you are looking for something after a late night, it would hit the spot. I was really surprised at the place that I went to that originated it closed at, like, six. I'm like, is this more like a two in the morning kind of thing to eat?   [00:31:31.730] - Kim Tate Maybe they need to open up a thing in Colorado or Seattle? I'm just kidding.   [00:31:42.760] - Tamara Gruber But it was good to experience that because it was something that everyone's like, you got to try the garbage plate.   [00:31:47.830] - Kim Tate Yeah, it sounds. I don't know.   [00:31:50.500] - Tamara Gruber Oh, well, I like fries. So fries.   [00:31:53.420] - Kim Tate I like fries, but are you talking about macaroni salad, like the creamy potato salad thing?   [00:32:00.080] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. I thought it was going to be like, Mac and cheese. Yeah. But it's like macaroni salad, like the mayonnaise based one. Yeah.I like macaroni salad, like on a picnic and stuff.   [00:32:13.160] - Tamara Gruber But, like, apart from the so it would not be good for the people that are like, I don't like my food touching.   [00:32:19.670] - Kim Tate Yeah. Exactly.   [00:32:20.800] - Tamara Gruber Definitely not good.   [00:32:21.680] - Kim Tate My husband is not one of those people. He would probably be if he ate meat. He would be all over it, I'm sure.   [00:32:29.170] - Tamara Gruber But it's something like if you go there, you have to try it. Try it.   [00:32:32.870] - Kim Tate No, that's awesome. I'm glad you tried it. So you could report back. I'm sure there's some people listening right now on this podcast. They're like, oh, yeah. I'm craving one right now.   [00:32:40.240] - Tamara Gruber And people were, like, telling me where to go to favorite was funny. Yeah. But then I drove from Rochester over to Buffalo, and Buffalo was definitely so fun. I mean, if you're looking for a place where there's a wide selection of food, it's not just Buffalo wings. There are 35 craft breweries, five distilleries. There's a ton of street art. They have all these different areas that they've developed along the river front that are being revitalized. There's history. So there's a lot to do there now pretty busy for our three days there.   [00:33:19.270] - Tamara Gruber So we had a great time. It's like a lot of what interests me. I think when you go to a place and luckily, the friend that met me, there was not somebody that travels a lot, but she was really happy to have discovered something that she would have never thought to go to. And I was like, That's what I love to do. And she's like, Well, I need to travel with you more often. I'm like, yeah, come along.   [00:33:40.060] - Tamara Gruber So it was fun. But a couple of things that I'll call out. So we stayed at the downtown Marriott in Buffalo, which is a rate in the Canal Side District. So this is an area that has different boat tours going out from. We took one called the Buffalo River History Tour, and there's also one that go out more onto Lake Erie. And you can also rent kayaks and paddle boards and even those water bikes if you just want to explore the river front on your own. So you can do all of that rate in this Canal Side district.   [00:34:14.370] - Tamara Gruber And there's also a naval or more of a military ships park there. So if you like to climb onto an old naval ships and submarine, that kind of thing. So that would be a fun thing to do, I think, with kids as well. And it's just an area where they have, like, a carousel. And there's a little beer garden, and they do a lot of outdoor events. So they would do music there. I know the day that we were checking out, I look down from our hotel room and you could see this big lawn.   [00:34:42.550] - Tamara Gruber And there was a big yoga class taking place out there because it's very community driven to have a lot of entertainment, like free entertainment available for people as well. So that's one area there's this other area called River Works, which was about a mile from where we were staying. But we walked because it was pretty easy. And there they actually they're building out more of a whole entertainment center or district. I should say they have a couple of ice or roller banks, so they will do curling, their ice hockey, roller Derby.   [00:35:18.610] - Tamara Gruber They have a ropes course. There's a couple of bars there's a brewery, there's a Tiki bar. There's one of those floating Tiki bars that leaves from there as well. And what they're building right now is like a Ferris wheel. And then they're going to have zip lining between grain silos and some other rides and entertainment there. So it's going to be like this whole district. There's quite a bit of it. They are already and you can tell that they do concerts because the inside of the one restaurant was huge and clearly had a stage where they would have live entertainment.   [00:35:52.540] - Tamara Gruber So definitely like a fun place there. And another section that's being developed. It's called Silo City. So one of the things that Buffalo is really famous for is all these green silos, because their position on the Great Lakes, like corn and wheat would come in from the Midwest. And then they would put it onto trains or into the canals or whatever. And they would also process some of it there. They're actually still a General Mills plant there. And so when you're going by, it smells like Cheerios.   [00:36:26.580] - Kim Tate That's funny.   [00:36:27.570] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So like Cheerios or I don't know, something very sweet, because what's the one with the little leprechun, Lucky Charms, because they have a mural right next to the plants with those two things on it. So I'm like, really, it makes you hungry when you're near there that they have the largest collection of green silos in one area in the world. But a lot of them are abandoned now. And so when you go along the river front, you learn about this history. You see all these big old structures, but they're like, prime real estate for developing into different kinds of things.   [00:37:01.820] - Tamara Gruber So some of them this area of Silo City, they're into, like, lofts. And so that will be like part residential, part commercial. And they have an entertainment space and some of them or they will do, like art exhibits or poetry readings or live music, something like that. And we went to one of the bar. Well, there's 1 bar that's there as well called Duende, and we went good cocktails, local craft beer. And they had live music playing outside or just like a very cool settings. So there's a lot of these cool little places, you know, when you're just walking somewhere and you're like, oh, this is neat.   [00:37:40.820] - Tamara Gruber This is cool. This is not chain restaurants or overly busy, overly commercial. It has this nice modern vibe to it. And so we took a walking tour one day, and we met at one of the breweries called Resurgence Brewery. And again, that was a really cool space that felt like it was probably an industrial building and that's been transformed into this brewery. And that's something that we see here in Providence a lot, too. And great beer. So it was a lot of fun. And we definitely did a range of things for the food scene.   [00:38:16.420] - Tamara Gruber We went to Ted's Hot Dogs, which is famous for their spicy meat sauce that they put on their hot dog, of course, went to Anchor Bar because Buffalo wings were invented there. Okay.   [00:38:28.330] - Kim Tate I never knew. I figured it's funny how that becomes such a thing. Are you a Buffalo Wings fan to start with?   [00:38:37.160] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I love buffalo wings but I like them crispy with a lot of sauce.   [00:38:44.110] - Kim Tate I don't like the skin to be kind of rubbery. No, I like it crispy. And I also like lots of sauce. It's tricky finding those, because so often I find that they're not fried enough.   [00:38:57.580] - Tamara Gruber I agree. And I actually will say I Anchor Bar not my favorite wings that I've ever had, but it's definitely a tourist attraction. It's the kind of thing where you can buy swag from the T shirts and all that. And it's like a food challenge.   [00:39:10.850] - Kim Tate Like you have to eat a plate of wings to earn a shirt or something.   [00:39:13.750] - Tamara Gruber All the locals are, like, the only people that go to Anchor Bar, the tourist.   [00:39:18.380] - Kim Tate But fine.   [00:39:19.130] - Tamara Gruber They have a good business for that. Everyone has their own favorites, and they also have Buffalo style pizza. They have something called sponge candy, which I remember when I was told about it. I expect it to be like those marshmallowy kind of candies that you get in a sampler box. But it's not. It's actually like the circus peanuts kind of. And I wonder if it was going to be like that, too, but it's actually more of like a coffee, like a square, like an inch square crunchy butter crunch or coffee type of candy.   [00:39:51.880] - Kim Tate So I'm near bubbles in it. That's where it's sponge.   [00:39:55.240] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. And actually, what we found out was if you just leave it out when it's not sealed, then it I get spongy. It was not as crispy the second day. Yeah, it wasn't, again, my favorite, but it was interesting to seek it out. And it's just one of those things that you see everywhere, and people just don't understand that you don't know what sponge candy is.   [00:40:15.440] - Kim Tate Yeah. That's funny.   [00:40:16.850] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it was fun just exploring all of that. I would definitely recommend it if you enjoy the kind of things that I talked about, then give it a shot. Actually, I was looking into flying there, and I think they have direct flights from 20 different cities across the country, so maybe easier to get to than you might expect.   [00:40:38.980] - Kim Tate That sounds cool. It sounds like you had a lot of good experiences.   [00:40:41.870] - Tamara Gruber We did, and I got to hang out with a friend of mine that I used to be very close to. That just don't get to see very much anymore. So that was nice as well. The other thing we did was we visited one of the Frank Lloyd Wright houses.   [00:40:53.960] - Kim Tate Oh, yeah. I saw that.   [00:40:55.130] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:40:55.630] - Kim Tate That's the one architect I knew. And you were like, which architect? Yes.   [00:41:00.260] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Exactly. I know it's pretty easy between his style and the fact that he is probably the most famous architect. It's an easy guess, right?   [00:41:08.980] - Kim Tate Exactly. Well, it sounds like we both had kind of a nice little end to our summer, and you got to eat some good food. I got some good family time. And now, as we mentioned earlier, cross our fingers that we will see each other in person in October.   [00:41:24.520] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. We will let you guys know so you can follow along. Yeah. Otherwise, good luck with back to school shall even mention that that are going back to school.   [00:41:33.890] - Kim Tate Should you even mention what?   [00:41:35.330] - Tamara Gruber That we both have seniors?   [00:41:38.320] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:41:38.540] - Tamara Gruber I know.   [00:41:40.330] - Kim Tate For those of you who know that we are in the stressful College application time frame of our lives right now, right?   [00:41:49.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Well, especially for me. It's like the last is the last that it's like.   [00:41:55.330] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:41:55.960] - Tamara Gruber The thing of having only one is that it's your first and last at the same time.   [00:42:00.130] - Kim Tate Right? I guess for me, it's also the first one. I feel kind of guilty because my first one's kind of mad that she didn't know more advance. And so she's telling her little sister everything and making me feel really bad. Why didn't you have me take more AP classes?   [00:42:15.740] - Tamara Gruber I'm like. I don't know. So anyways, well, I'm pretty sure if you were, like, take all of these AP classes, she would have said, I don't want to take all these AP classes.   [00:42:27.260] - Kim Tate Well, it's just weird. It's sad how competitive it's gotten because she doesn't love history and routine, so I would never push her into those APS. So she took all the APS she could with math and science. But when you're going against people who've had seven and ten APS, it's a little hard to show up before, but she's a great student, and I'm sure she's going to end up where she's supposed to end up and have a great College experience.   [00:42:54.170] - Tamara Gruber I and Hannah will tell her she's better off that she didn't take a push because it's not really fun class.   [00:43:01.900] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:43:02.200] - Tamara Gruber Exactly. Yeah. So anyway, best of luck to everyone out there this year, back to school because obviously continues to be challenging.   [00:43:12.660] - Kim Tate Those who are going back to school. Enjoy your travels. I'm on your time not having to manage it, but, yeah. Thanks for joining us again. And we will look forward to talking to you guys again.   [00:43:23.260] - Tamara Gruber Soon. Take care.  

The 4&3 Podcast
89 - Afghanistan's Underground Railroad to Save Christians, Orphans

The 4&3 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 25:01


Friday, September 3, 2021: Today on the 4&3 Podcast, Faithwire's Dan Andros breaks down today's top stories along with Tré Goins-Phillips.*There's an underground railroad of heroes working to evacuate orphans, Christians and others from Afghanistan*Google Chromebook pulled from “Dirty Dozen” list of companies propagating sexual exploitation*Fact checkers don't want you to believe what you saw with your own eyes on Biden's watch*Joe Biden, the “devout Catholic,” said this morning he “doesn't agree” life begins at conception

Object Of Sound
Screwed Up Sound (feat. Lil Keke and Brandon ‘Jinx' Jenkins)

Object Of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 32:14


DJ Screw changed hip hop forever. You've heard his signature sound, even if you don't know his name. On this episode, co-hosted by Mogul's Brandon ‘Jinx' Jenkins, we sit down with Lil Keke to talk about the warbly, slowed-down style of mixing called Chopped and Screwed born out of Houston in the ‘90s, and how this sound spilled out from car stereos and into the culture at large.  For the playlist of songs curated for this episode head over to https://bit.ly/screwed-up-sound. Music In This Week's Episode: DJ Screw, Lil Keke - Pimp Tha PenDJ Screw, UGK - Tell Me Something GoodDJ Screw, Screwed Up Click - Shine and ReclineDJ Screw, Botany Boyz - Smokin And LeaninTrae Tha Truth, DJ Screw - Screw Tha World (feat. DJ Screw)DJ Screw - Elbows SwanginDJ Screw, Al-D - Why You Hatin Me Show Notes: Season Three of Mogul, hosted by Brandon Jinx Jenkins and featuring DJ Screw and the Screwed Up Click, is out now on Spotify.Lil Keke's forthcoming album, LGND, is out later this month. His previous album, Slfmade 3, is available now.Chopped and Screwed music is featured in the soundtracks of many cinematic works by Barry Jenkins, such as: Moonlight, If Beale Street Could Talk, and the Underground Railroad. Credits:This show is produced by work by work: Scott Newman, Jemma Rose Brown, Mayari Sherina Ong, Kathleen Ottinger and by Hanif Abdurraqib. The show is mixed by Sam Bair. 

Come This Far with Chris Taylor
Bonus- Taliban Underground Railroad

Come This Far with Chris Taylor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 28:43


The secret arrangement between the U.S. Special Operations Forces and the Taliban to operate an underground railroad type of operation to evacuate the highest priority Americans from Afghanistan. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/comethisfar/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/comethisfar/support

PreserveCast
[RE-RELEASE] Elevating Authentic Stories from the Underground Railroad

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 37:55


On this week's re-release of PreserveCast, we're heading back to the brackish marshes of Maryland's Eastern Shore to talk Tubman, slavery, and freedom. Few names have become as synonymous with grit, determination, and liberty as Harriet Tubman. A Moses for her people, Tubman has become an almost mythical character who represents the best of the American spirit in the face of incredible suffering and inhumanity. Yet, for many years, she lacked a rigorous and scholarly biography. Today's guest, Dr. Kate Clifford Larson, addressed that historical inequity and helped bring Harriet's real story to a new generation.

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 486: Clint Conley

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 63:44


This week Ken welcomes bassist and singer from Mission of Burma, long time Chronicle producer and personal hero Clint Conley to the show. Ken and Clint discuss the nexus of punk rock and television, finding interesting things in New England, growing up just outside NYC, having a father "in the business", grad school at BU, the interaction of the high brow and lowbrow, the arty and the boneheaded, weirdo bands, Cousin Brucie, Ed Sullivan, rock bands on TV, the importance of 1966 for Youth Culture, Batman, Gallant Men, copycat shows, Combat!, Secret Agent, The Rifleman, Man from U.N.C.L.E., plat spinning, vaudeville acts, Hollywood Palace, Boris Karlof, seeking out all the horror movies, Channel 9 and 11, Alan King, Ed Sullivan giving extra time to Sly Stone, The Rascals, Raymond Burr, fearing iron lungs and quicksand, the worthless nature of Tucker Carlson, Candid Camera, Prank Shows, Hulabaloo, Richard Pryor and George Carlin on young rock n roller John Davidson's show, My Mother the Car, Vic Morrow, the Twilight Zone disaster and E! Network's re-enactments, Eric Burden and the Animals, Gidget, band names, Night of Whirling Death, Wild Wild West, Car 54, Where Are You?, having a VCR in the 1970s, hating Lost in Space, being scared of Billy Mumy, taping Iggy Pop on Dinah Shore, the greatness of Green Acres, meeting Mary Tyler Moore, W.C. Fields tribute by his own son, The Smothers Brothers, The Amazing Randi, Johnny Carson: GOTCHA!, The 100 Foot Wave, and the greatness of Barry Jenkin's The Underground Railroad.

Trendy Lobotomy
A Man's Mansion is His Castle

Trendy Lobotomy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 47:25


The boys are back for this one too! Malcom and Chuck are back to hear more stories from us. Krys leads off with Prospect Place House in Ohio also known as the Trinway Mansion. Built by George Adams in 1856 to house his family and new wife. Rumor was the ghost of his first wife was none too happy with the new wife and haunted his current house. This new house had some modern amenities before they were common. The first house they built was burned to ground by arson. Cue a second house being built and some shady business about who may have burned it down. Native American burial ground and a woman named Satan or a shady carpenter, you decide. Or perhaps it was the fact that George was an abolitionist with his brothers and ran the Underground Railroad through the house rather than the mill that the family owned? Rumors and stories abound about this house, even more shady goings on after George died and left the house to his daughter. Anna's husband disappeared and a detective was employed. Cue a sighting in San Francisco with an unidentified gentleman. The house changed hands several times and is now the sight of the G.W. Adams Educational Center which teaches about the Underground Railroad. Oh, did we mention this house was haunted? Sightings, sounds, and some tragic stories center around this housed. Tori follows up by crossing the pond and ends up in Ireland. Leap Castle in Coolderry, County Offaly. Most likely built by the O'Bannon clan in the 13th century, this castle has had a bloody history. The castle changed hands into the O'Carrol clan and may have been built on a Neolithic burial ground, you want ghosts… Brother fought brother and murder ensued. Leap Castle has gone through many hands through the years. The current owners are in the process of renovating the castle and restoring it. During this process the oubliette was found, thank you to the O'Carrol clan. This location just happens to be at the confluence of two ley lines. Fae? Nasty deaths? Regardless of the reason, this castle is haunted. What kind of ghost is Krys's favorite? Kid ghosts and many, many more. There seems to be an elemental that makes it's home in the castle and the land surrounding it as well. Magick is afoot here for sure. Our theme music: “Danse Macabre - Busy Strings" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/trendylobotomypodcast?fan_landing=true)

Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Ohio

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 119:18


Become a Patreon Producer: www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast Find us at Our Official Website Be on the lookout for the upcoming documentary all about The Midnight Train Podcast!!   Well well well, here we are. Home state time. Creepy Ohio is where we are heading today! We're probably going to skip over the big boys like the Ohio State reformatory and places like that because well… You know about them. There will be plenty of good stuff though we promise!   Let's start off in good ol… Dayton? Sure Dayton it is! We're going to visit the Victoria Theatre. Fun fact about this place...The Victoria is one of the oldest continually operated theaters on the continent! It cost $225,000 to build and opened as the Turner opera house in 1866. If you're wondering, that's just under 4 million in 2021 money. According to an article, newspapers at the time called it the best theater west of Philadelphia! Impressive! General admission was $1. The best seats in the house were between $10 and $12. Arson was suspected of having caused an all-consuming fire May 16, 1869, which destroyed the theater at a loss of $500,000, about 10 million today,  of which insurance covered only $128,000, 2.5 million, so that sucks pretty bad. The rebuild took a few years and the theater reopened in 1871. The opera house resumed operations as "The Music Hall". In 1885 it became "The Grand Opera House". On September 18, 1899, it became the "Victoria Opera House", and in 1903, it became the Victoria Theatre, two years after the death of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom. Smooth sailing from here on out right? Wrong? 1913 brought about the Great Dayton Flood. The Dayton flood of March 1913 was caused by a series of severe winter rain storms that hit the Midwest in late March. Within three days, 8–11 inches (200–280 mm For all you civilized people out there) of rain fell throughout the Great Miami River watershed on already saturated soil, resulting in more than 90 percent runoff. The river and its tributaries overflowed. The existing levees failed, and downtown Dayton was flooded up to 20 feet (6.1 m) deep. This flood is still the flood of record for the Great Miami River watershed. The volume of water that passed through the river channel during this storm equaled the monthly flow over Niagara Falls. Daaaaaaaang! The ground floor of the theater was severely damaged. The theater's interior was rebuilt and remodeled. Ok now that disaster is out of the way…. Wait… What's that? There's more? Jeez… On January 16, 1918, fire struck again and gutted portions of the building. Due to WW1 the rebuild was delayed due to a materials shortage.  After the Armistice, The Victoria saw extensive interior remodeling and in 1919 re-opened as "The Victory Theatre" – a name commemorating the American war effort and its result. For many years after this, the theater had an amazing run and saw many of the top performers of the days come through. Al Jolson, The Marx Brothers, Helen Hayes, Fannie Brice, George M. Cohan, Lynn Fontayne, Gertrude Lawrence, Alfred Lunt, and some schhlub named Harry Houdini were just some of the big names to grace the theater! In the thirties the theatre  was fitted to also play talking pictures! Here's another fun tidbit of trivia, chainsaw was one of the pioneers of talking pictures! He started in the first talkie ever, it was called, "I Can't Believe This, What is this voodoo?" It was not good. In fact, don't look it up on YouTube, it's really really bad. Over the years the change in times and the way the city of Dayton was headed, threatened to close the theater. In 1975 it was slated for demolition, in favor of a proposed parking lot. A public outcry for the theater's preservation that year helped to earn the building its listing in the National Register of Historic Places and, thus, it escaped demolition. However, portions of the building were in poor or fading condition. All the while, it continued to be visited extensively by traveling theater companies.The theatre had a network of access tunnels stretching out beneath the city's streets for several blocks. It was said that, during Vaudeville times, the tunnels allowed circus animals to be unloaded from railroad cars blocks away from the theatre, and held underground until showtime. As late as 1979, much of the tunnel network was accessible to employees, although some sections were blocked off by city steam pipes.  In 1978, the theatre was greatly benefited by the donation of a cache of equipment and stage draperies from National Cash Register's (NCR) auditorium, which had been slated for demolition. NCR also donated its historic five-rank Estay pipe organ to the Victory, which was renovated and installed by aficionados. In 1986, Virginia Kettering donated $7 million to fund a downtown arts center, conditioning her donation on the requirement that the center include the Victory Theater and be located within the same one-block area.The 1989 rebuilding of the theater was extensive. It involved razing the interior commercial space within the forward, Main Street-facing section of the building as well as the stage house, while carefully preserving and restoring the 1866–71 facade and the 1919 auditorium. At the same time, the interior auditorium portion of the structure was completely renovated. All of the commercial space at street level was reclaimed for a grand, new lobby. The result was an extensively-new Victoria Theatre (as it was now so renamed) designed expressly for the performing arts. The auditorium retained its original appearance with completely restored plaster work, drapery, marble work, gilding, and fresco detailing. Additionally, the house received state-of-the-art upgrading to its wiring, lighting, and sound systems and now accommodated infrared sound transmitters for headphone use.   The current theater accommodates 1,154, with 635 seats in the orchestra, and 519 in the balcony. The proscenium measures 37'7" wide by 29'0" high by 39'3" deep. A full-sized orchestra pit lies just below the stage lip. Ten dressing rooms, accommodating up to 18 people, are off-stage left, in the basement and at stage level.   You know we love to get the history of these places and this one is pretty cool. So what about creepy stuff? Well let's check it out! First off according to a dayton.com article, there's the story of a touring actress in the early 1900s who went to her dressing room to change for the next scene, and never came out of the room. No trace of her was ever found, though fewer and fewer actors would use that dressing room, with reports that some would look into the mirror and see her face staring back again. The same article talks about how in the 1950s, a man committed suicide in the theater by wedging a knife into the seat in front of him and throwing himself upon it. When the curtains around the left exit door are pulled, some people claim to see his face.  Staff members through the years have said they heard strange noises like the rustling of satin or taffeta, or suddenly smelled the scent of roses in the air. Others are said to have seen the ghost of the Victoria's founder when they're alone in the building.   Diane Schoeffler-Warren, Victoria spokeswoman, told us that many of the historic theater's long-time volunteers and staff like to blame these strange occurrences on “Miss Vicki,” who was not a real person.       PARANORMAL FINDINGS Staff, patrons and performers have had a boatload of experiences with the spirits who visit or reside here.   Project Paranormal Investigations caught some hard evidence that greatly increases the known number of spirits who adore this theatre.   Apparently, the spirits here are a talkative group. They caught a boatload of EVP's of many spirits. One spirit once worked there as an usher, some crew members, actors and actresses, a director and a well dressed man with a dirty hat who watches people who come into the auditorium.   One EVP possibly suggests that the spirit of Vicki's killer is grounded here. “They will never catch me!”   This well-dressed man could be the spirit of the Victoria's founder keeping a close eye on the living and still enjoying his theer.   Spirits freely gave up their names: Isaac, Jacob, Alice, Jennifer Price, Bill and Miss Josephine Swartz who was a well-known ballet instructor.   One male spirit pleaded for help.   One gruff spirit didn't believe he was dead, and asked the investigator. “Do you want to fight?” This fiesta spirit said that the year was 2000.   One male spirit keeps the spirit of Vicky company. Hopefully he is a friend and her protector.   There was a negative, evil one there as well, reported by the other spirits. This spirit said that he was sent to keep another spirit stuck here. That's…. Nuts...ooh boy.    So that's fun stuff, haunted theaters are always good. Where should we head now?   How about a lunatic asylum that's now part of a college… We know that seems crazy but just run with us. The Ridges, a building formerly known as the Athens Lunatic Asylum, has been a constant source of ghost stories and sightings for years. The Ridges, was a Kirkbride Plan mental hospital operated in Athens, Ohio, from 1874 until 1993. After a period of disuse the property was redeveloped by the state of Ohio. Today, The Ridges are a part of Ohio University and house the Kennedy Museum of Art as well as an auditorium and many offices, classrooms, and storage facilities. The original design included an administration building with two wings, one that would house the males and the other for females. The building itself was 853 feet long, 60 feet wide, and built with red bricks fired from clay dug on-site. Built onto the back were a laundry room and boiler house. Seven cottages were also constructed to house even more patients. There was room to house 572 patients in the main building, almost double of what Kirkbride had recommended, leading to overcrowding and conflicts between the patients.The administrative section, located between the two resident wings, included an entrance hall, offices, a reception room on the first floor, the superintendent's residence on the second floor, and quarters for other officers and physicians on the 3rd and 4th floors. A large high ceiling amusement hall filled the 2nd and 3rd floors, and a chapel was included on the 4th floor. Behind and beneath the building's public and private spaces were the heating and mechanical systems, kitchens, cellars, storerooms, and workspaces.  The site, which was first comprised of 141 acres, would eventually grow to 1,019 acres, including cultivated, wooded, and pasture land. The grounds were designed by Herman Haerlin of Cincinnati and would incorporate landscaped hills and trees, decorative lakes, a spring, and a creek with a waterfall. Not only would the patients enjoy the beautiful landscape, but citizens also enjoyed the extensive grounds. Though the facility would never be fully self-sustaining, over the years, the grounds would include livestock, farm fields and gardens, an orchard, greenhouses, a dairy, a receiving hospital, a Tubercular Ward, a physical plant to generate steam heat, and even a carriage shop in the earlier years.  The hospital, first called the Athens Lunatic Asylum, officially began operations on January 9, 1874. Within two years, it was renamed the Athens Hospital for the Insane. Over the years, its name would be changed many times to the Athens State Hospital, the Southeastern Ohio Mental Health Center, the Athens Mental Health Center, the Athens Mental Health and Mental Retardation Center, and the Athens Mental Health and Developmental Center. During its operation, the hospital provided services to a variety of patients, including Civil War veterans, children, the elderly, the homeless, rebellious teenagers being taught a lesson by their parents, and violent criminals suffering from various mental and physical disabilities. With diagnoses ranging from the slightest distress to severely mentally ill, these patients were provided various forms of care, many of which have been discredited today. The asylum was best known for its practice of lobotomy, but it was also known to have practiced hydrotherapy, electroshock, restraint, and psychotropic drugs, many of which have been found to be harmful today. More interesting are the causes listed for admission, including epilepsy, menopause, alcohol addiction, and tuberculosis. General “ill health” also accounted for many admissions, which included in the first three years of operation 39 men and 44 women. For the female patients hospitalized during these first three years of the asylum's operation, the three leading causes of insanity are recorded as “puerperal condition” (relating to childbirth), “change of life,” and “menstrual derangements.” According to an 1876 report, the leading cause of insanity among male patients was masturbation. The second most common cause of insanity was listed as intemperance (alcohol). Depending upon their condition, a patient's treatment could range from full care to amazing freedom. Over the years, numerous buildings were added, including a farm office, a new amusement hall, additional wards and residences, a laundry building, power plant, garages, stables, mechanics shops, a firehouse, therapy rooms, and dozens of others. By the 1950s, the hospital was using 78 buildings and was treating 1,800 patients. In the 1960s, the total square footage of the facility was recorded at 660,888 square feet. At this time, its population peaked at nearly 2,000 patients, over three times its capacity. However, the number of patients would begin to decline for the next several decades as de-institutionalization accelerated. As the number of people at the Asylum declined, the buildings and wards were abandoned one by one. Comprised of three graveyards, burials began soon after the institution's opening as there were deceased patients who were unclaimed by their families. Until 1943 the burials were headed only by stones with numbers, with the names of the dead known only in recorded ledgers. Only one register exists today, which contains the names of 1,700 of the over 2,000 burials. In 1972 the last patients were buried in the asylum cemetery. Today the cemeteries continue to be maintained by the Ohio Department of Mental Health.   In 1977, Athens Asylum made news when it housed multiple personality rapist Billy Milligan. In the highly publicized court case, Milligan was found to have committed several felonies, including armed robbery, kidnapping, and three rapes on the Ohio State University campus. In preparing his defense, psychologists diagnosed Milligan with multiple personality disorder, from which the doctors said he had suffered from early childhood. He was the first person diagnosed with multiple personality disorder to raise such a defense and the first acquitted of a major crime for this reason. Milligan was then sent to a series of state-run mental hospitals, including Athens. While at these hospitals, Milligan reported having ten different personalities. Later 14 more personalities were said to have been discovered. After a decade, Milligan was discharged. He died of cancer at a nursing home in Columbus, Ohio, on December 12, 2014, at 59. The next year, the hospital made the news again when a patient named Margaret Schilling disappeared on December 1, 1978. It wasn't until January 12, 1979, 42 days later that her body was discovered by a maintenance worker in a locked long-abandoned ward once used for patients with infectious illnesses. Though tests showed that she died of heart failure, she was found completely naked with her clothing neatly folded next to her body. More interesting is the permanent stain that her body left behind. Clearly, an imprint of her hair and body can still be seen on the floor, even though numerous attempts have been made to remove it. By 1981 the hospital housed fewer than 300 patients, numerous buildings stood abandoned, and over 300 acres were transferred to Ohio University. In 1988, the facilities and grounds (excluding the cemeteries) were deeded from the Department of Mental Health to Ohio University.   The Athens Center officially closed in 1993, and the remaining patients transferred to another facility. The property stood vacant for several years before restoration began. The name of the property was changed to the “Ridges” and in 2001 renovation work was completed on the main building, known as Lin Hall. Today it houses music, geology, biotechnology offices, storage facilities, and the Kennedy Museum of Art. Over the years, other hospital buildings were modeled and used by the University, although many others still sit abandoned. wow… Crazy stuff. The info and the history cave from a great article at legends of America.com.    When the University took over the property, some students began to spend time at the Ridges. This is when many reports of paranormal activity began to surface. This includes hearing disembodied screams in the middle of the night, electric anomalies, rattling door handles and vanishing spectral images. Some of these events occurred in the area where Margaret Schilling's remains were found and, were thus, attributed to her. Her spirit is said to have appeared staring down from the window of the room where her lifeless body was discovered. Her apparition has been seen attempting to escape. Others have seen her wander in various parts of the building at night.   Other former patients are also said to remain in residence as well. Visitors have reported seeing strange figures standing in the empty wings of the former hospital. Many have heard the disembodied voices of those in agony and warning those that wish to listen to them. You may also hear the squeaks of gurneys that are no longer there. Some folks see strange lights and hear screams echoing through the walls. More frightening, many have come across the spirits of patients in the basement, who remain shackled there in their afterlife. Sadly, these may be the many spirits who died or suffered at the hands of staff in the asylum.   The cemetery is also said to be haunted by shadowy people and strange lights. In one area, the linear shapes of the graves form a circle, rumored to be a witches' meeting point.    Let's switch it up for a minute and talk about Moody's favorite things … The cryptids! So what kind of cryptids can one expect to find in Ohio? Well we are gonna let ya know!    Let's start with the Loveland Frogmen. Stories started popping out in the 50's, tales that differed slightly from one another, about a massive frog causing all manner of mischief.  Most of the stories start the same but there seem to be three major variations. In one story, the motorist is heading out of the Branch Hill neighborhood when he shines his car's headlights on the huge figures. The trio stood on their hind legs and just stood in the middle of the road. The man honks his horn. The figures perk up. They twist their necks around. A gasp!!!! All three look at the driver with leathery skin and frog faces.   Version number 3: same bridge, the motorist pulls over, he gets out of his car and spots the creatures. All three are conversing animatedly. The driver calls out to them. One of the Loveland Frogman gets up, points his finger at his friends in the universal gesture of “put a pin in it,” turns to the bothersome intruder, “can't you see we're holding a conversation? How rude,” holds out a wand over its heads, and flicks the Harry Potter approved apparatus… a blazing fire of sparks cannons out of the wand. The motorist flees the scene.    The other version goes like this: the motorist spots the creatures under the Loveland bridge, one of many going over the Little Miami river – he honks his horn. The creatures shot out from under the bridge, one lands on his hood and croaks… the driver passes out. On 3 March 1972 at 1:00 am, the Loveland police department goose marched into the madness. Officer Ray Shockey was gliding his car on Riverside Drive near the Totes boot factory and the Little Miami River when a suspicious animal ran across the road in front of his vehicle. He hit his brakes. Hit the steering wheel and looked on. The animal, now fully illuminated in his patrol car's headlights, blinked at Shockey… who was having a meltdown true to his last name; Shockey was in shock. Framed in his car's lamp stood the legendary Loveland Frogman. Shockey reported the sighting and stated, “it's crouched like a frog.” The creature then climbed over the guardrail and jumped into the river.   Two weeks after that wild incident, a second Loveland police officer, Mark Matthews, did Shockey a solid and reported seeing an unidentified animal, similar in height and facets, near the same road. And you know what… He shot the damn thing! That's right, killed it! Unfortunately Matthews didn't actually shoot a frogman…nope. According to Matthews, it was “a large iguana about 3 or 3.5 feet long”, and he didn't immediately pinpoint the creature's ID because it was missing its tail… not a freaking Loveland Frogman.    “It either got loose or was released when it grew too large"   In August 2016, local Cincinnati TV stations reported that "a night of fun turned into a chilling tale of horror" when two teenagers playing Pokémon Go between Loveland Madeira Road and Lake Isabella claimed to see a giant frog near the lake on August 3 that "stood up and walked on its hind legs".[7][8] It was later revealed to be a local student from Archbishop Moeller High School in a homemade frog costume.   Real or not? We may never know! You don't believe in the Frogmen you say well how about the grass man!    Often referred to as the Eastern Bigfoot, the Grassman is reportedly a 7-foot tall, 300-pound hominid.   According to famed cryptozoologist, Loren Coleman, the Ohio Grassmen have a more human-like appearance and are more human-looking and are shorter than the classic “Bigfoot”.  The Grassman is often seen around farms and especially eating tall grasses such as wheat, which is what its main diet is, and where its name comes from. In addition to a different diet, the Grassman also seems much more sociable than Bigfoot. Many Grassman sightings include more than one Grassman, and it is reported that mothers have been seen with babies. The first sightings of the Grassman date all the way to 1869, however, one of the most prominent sightings was in 1978. The grandchildren of Minerva residents Evelyn and Howe Clayton, along with their friends, ran inside screaming about a hairy monster they saw in the gravel pit outside. When the couple went out to investigate, they saw the Grassman, just as the children had described, and it quickly ran off. The family saw the creature a few more times, and claimed that it would leave the smell of rotten eggs wherever it passed through, though it never seemed to steal anything.    Yet another Bigfoot-type creature lurks in Ohio, this time near Minerva. The Minerva Monster was first spotted by the Cayton family in the late 1970s when they followed the sound of their barking dogs to a pit on their property where they disposed of trash. Inside the pit, they found a massive, 7-foot tall, 300-pound creature, covered in fur, staring at them as they approached. The creature returned to the family's property so often that it was witnessed by several other friends and family members and even investigated by the sheriff. During the creature's final appearance at the property, two creatures were spotted after the home was pelted with several rocks while the family was inside. We suspect this may have been chainsaw.    Although sightings continued in nearby counties, none were as detailed as the Cayton families, whose stories remained unchanged for decades.    How about the Charles Mills Lake Monster! This mysterious cryptid has only been documented one time. In March of 1959, teenagers Denny Patterson, Wayne Armstrong, and Michael Lane were running amok near the shores of Charles Mills Lake when they saw something that terrified them.   Out of the water came a 7-foot tall, armless, humanoid. The boys noted that the creature had glowing green eyes and massive webbed feet. After the boys reported what they had seen, authorities searched the area, finding footprints that they thought resembled tracks that scuba and snorkel diving fins would leave behind.   Crosswick Monster Around 20 miles north of the Loveland Frogman's territory lies Crosswick. Although the monster hasn't been spotted in nearly 200 years, the legend of the Crosswick Monster is still told in the area. According to reports, two young boys were playing on the banks of a small creek when they were startled by a massive, snake-like creature. The monster sprouted arms and snatched one of the boys, dragging him nearly 100 yards to a massive sycamore tree that was assumed to be its den.   The Crosswick monster dropped the child just outside a hole in the tree's bank. The 26-foot diameter tree was eventually chopped through by dozens of men from the town and when the serpent-creature reappeared, the men noted that it was between 12-14 feet tall. The monster escaped the men, crashing through a fence before darting into a cavern.   The full description read, “It is described as being 30 to 40 feet long, 12 to 14 feet tall when erect, 16 inches in diameter, and legs 4 feet long. It is covered with scales like a lizard's, of black and white color with large yellow spots. Its head is about 16 inches wide, with a long forked tongue, and the mouth inside deep red.”   Although the Crosswick Monster was never seen again, it is remembered as one of the most believable cryptid experiences in Ohio, as more than 60 men claimed to have witnessed it.   Dogman   Described as a werewolf-like creature, the Dogman has reportedly been seen all throughout Ohio. Eyewitnesses describe the Dogman creatures as between 4-6 feet tall, often very muscular, and with pink or gray skin. It is sometimes seen on all fours or walking bipedally.   One of the most recent accounts was in 2016 in Allen County. The Dogman is typically associated with Michigan, but in the past decade, several sightings have taken place throughout Ohio, an understandable migration.   Ok so let's get back to creepy places!    How about a haunted hotel? The Buxton inn  fits the bill! Buxton Inn was originally called the Tavern and it was built in 1812 by Orrin Granger. Today, the Buxton Inn is the oldest continuously running inn in Granville, Ohio. Aside from being an inn, Buxton also served as Granville's first post office and a stagecoach stop. The Buxton became very popular and was patronized by no less than President William Harrison himself. After Orrin Granger died, ownership of the inn changed. Although it went through several owners, it never closed down because of its popularity. In 1829, more additions were constructed for the building. In the 1850s, the inn was purchased by James W. Dilley and it was renamed to “The Dilley House”. Major Buxton and his wife acquired the property in 1865. They attracted many guests and the inn continued to thrive under their ownership. After the death of the Buxtons, retired opera singer Ethel Bounell took over the inn. The current owners of the inn are Orville and Audrey Orr. The Buxton Inn's long history lives on with the ghosts frequently seen there, the majority of which are the ghosts of its former owners. The first ghost ever reported at the hotel was Orrin Granger in the 1920's who built the hotel in 1812.   During the 70's, workers of the inn saw a man dressed in blue and since then they have refused to enter the inn after dark. Major Buxton (the man who the inn was named after) is also said to haunt the inn. He has been spotted in several locations around the inn.   Ethel “Bonnie” Bounell, the former innkeeper, is said to have died in room number nine. Guests who have stayed in the room have reported seeing a lady dressed in blue, Bonnie's favourite color.  Shadowy figures have been seen in rooms number seven and nine and even in the basement. Guests have also felt the presence of a ghostly cat jumping on their beds. Other reports include heavy doors slamming shut and opening of their own accord, with no apparent breeze or other valid explanation. People have also reported hearing footsteps behind them in empty hallways, and their names being called out.   Definitely spooky… anyone want to take a trip to hell? No? How about just helltown? Well that is where we're headed!    The village known as “Helltown” is purportedly teeming with crybaby bridges, spooked school buses, mass human sacrifice scenes, and a mutant python for good measure. The extreme folklore surrounding the region formerly known as Boston, Ohio is ironic since the only verifiable legend about the town is that it is deserted for a very frighteningly tragic reason. Founded in 1806, Boston Village's original claim to fame was its standing as the oldest village in Summit County. Boston's relatively uneventful life took a turn for the worse in 1974, when it became the unlucky victim of nationwide anxiety over the country's disappearing forestland. Using the laws of eminent domain, President Gerald Ford signed a bill that gave the federal government's National Park Service jurisdiction to expropriate land for the establishment of National Parks. The NPS decided that Boston Township would be the new home for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and began buying the properties of its longtime residents. The sentiment among citizens who had no choice but to leave their homes was expressed in a message scribbled on the wall of one of the houses: “Now we know how the Indians felt.” The empty homes were boarded up and adorned with U.S. “No Trespassing” signs. The government quickly fell behind on its plan to create the park and the village sat neglected. The remaining buildings, remnants of a “vanished” town, have created a fertile soil for the innumerable urban legends that have popped up over the years.   The hellish aura of the area only continued to grow when the NPS acquired Krejci Dump in 1985. Rangers visiting the site became ill and covered in rashes. It was soon discovered the dump was highly polluted with toxic chemicals improperly disposed of. The dump became a Superfund site and as of 2015 the NPS is wrapping up restoration of the area.    Helltown is home to six or seven separate legends, which has led this area in Boston Township in Ohio to be grouped as one large haunted site. The overgrowth creates a dark, almost cursed place, where ghosts, cults, Satanists, and even a wild-eyed serial killer were said to lurk. Helltown is the nickname given to the northern part of Summit County. The areas most associated with the legends are Boston Township and Boston Village, as well as portions of Sagamore Hills. First settled all the way back in 1806, Boston stands as the oldest village in Summit County. The construction of the Ohio and Erie Canal brought loads of people to the region in the mid-1820s. The area then began to flourish when a railroad station was constructed in the town. The station was named ‘Boston Mills,' and the name stuck.   Loads of legends come out of the Boston Cemetery, which sits deep in the middle of the area known as Helltown, including tales of a ghost who sits on a bench and stares out into space, forlorn, waiting for his family to come back for him. The only souls not forced to leave the area were the dead, now stuck in this abandoned ghost town, looking for their families which have left so long ago.   There are two roads through Helltown, both labeled as ‘dead ends' even though you can watch them continue on into the distance. Legend says that local Satanic cults put up these signs to keep people out of their secret hideouts. Stanford Road, one of the main roads in Helltown, is sometimes referred to as The End of the World, or Highway to Hell. It is a twisting, dangerous road with a very sharp incline, so steep that when a car crests the top of the hill, it looks as if it is driving off a cliff. Some stories indicate that the road itself is evil, and is known to take possession of your vehicle, causing fatal accidents. It is said that if you park your car at the end of Stanford Road, you may meet your gruesome fate at the hands of the strange people who still patrol the area, protecting it.   One rumor persists through the ages that the town's residents were actually evacuated due to a large chemical spill, and the National Park was just a cover-up. The chemical spills were said to have caused mutations in local children, and even created the Peninsula Python, a gigantic snake that slithers the area.    An account given by a local paranormal researcher who explored the area truly sums up the overall vibe of Helltown – “I have experienced much in my explorations of there, some of which I don't care to remember and some of which I can never hope to explain.       Helltown is not truly abandoned. It does have residents, but they are a strange and frightening breed. I have gone exploring the woods and cemetery of the area in the late night and wee morning hours, and have returned to my car to find strange people looking into its car windows. This has happened twice––once at 2:00 AM and once at 4:30 AM. Both times, the people fled as soon as they saw me approaching the car before I had a chance to speak to them. Both times, they were dressed in all black.       A part of me is glad that I didn't get to converse with them because I have heard too many tales about the ways of Hell Town residents. Supposedly, they are all Satanists and worship at the town's two evil churches. I have been to both of these churches, however not inside them. One, the Mother of Sorrows, has upside-down crosses hanging from it.       I have also been to the Boston Cemetery, where a ghost has been seen sitting on a bench. This cemetery is as dark a place as I have ever been. The graves date back to the early 1800s. I didn't see the ghost when I visited, but I did hear strange growls and howls from the depths of the graveyard.  This was more than enough to convince me to leave, as the prospect of getting attacked by some strange boneyard dwelling beast was not appealing, to say the least.”   Welllllll we might not be heading there any time soon! Ok we got one more place for ya. The Bellaire house. The history of Bellaire House stretches back to 1904, when it was constructed by Jacob Heatherington, who also owned a coal mine that ran directly beneath the property on Belmont Street.   When the original owner died, he left the land and the five-bedroom, one-and-a-half bath house to his daughter Eliza and son Edwin.    But not long after coming into her inheritance, Eliza Heatherington collapsed dead on the dining room floor in the house.   Legend has it that her grieving brother became obsessed with the idea of communicating with his dearly departed sister from beyond and invited mediums from across the country to his home for that purpose. Paranormal researchers believe that it was Edwin Heatherington who, through his experiments with the occult, unwittingly opened nearly a dozen different portals to the 'other side' throughout the house, allowing malevolent spirits to cross over.   Research suggests that the plot of land on which the house sits also conceals Native American burial caves, and it has been intimated, though not confirmed, that prior to the Civil War the site was part of the Underground Railroad used by fugitive slaves.   The Bellaire House sits on what is known as a Leyline. This means there is a consistent wellspring of paranormal activity that goes all through the house. A virtual spring of ghosts coming back from the dead.   Kristin Lee, the current owner of the house was affected by two floods which left her family homeless. After they moved into the home they saw “odd” things. Kristin Lee blamed everything except for the paranormal until the point when it was impossible to deny. She describes the history and her time there on the home's website.         "The house gained a mysterious reputation even during the years when it was sitting abandoned. The neighbors in the area claimed to see people roaming around in the house or peeking out of the windows. This was when the house was locked and no one was living there. There were some who thought that the kids were up to something nifty, but when I moved in there, it didn't take long for its history to resurface because that's when paranormal activities in the Bellaire House began to manifest in more violent ways. Jacob Heatherington built the Bellaire House in the vicinity of sacred Shawnee Native American burial caves. That makes the house 172 years old. Those caves were right behind the Bellaire House and the Ohio River is right in the front. Physics proves that water is a portal because it is always moving and the magnetic pull of the water creates a powerhouse of energy where spirits can cut through earthbound gravity, gain energy to port back and forth from their dimension to ours. The craziest part is that the portal sits right under the Bellaire House.   This area is still known as the Native American Internment Area. The thing is that the Native Americans who lived in this area used to bury their leaders, chieftain, shamans, healers, and witchdoctors in these caves. They used to hold their ceremonies in this area and practiced magic. In 1754 the French & Indian War rampaged through Bellaire. The native massacres by the hands of French soldiers were large. Blood still stains the grounds of the entire town of Bellaire. The residual energy of the slaughter still seeps inside the soil today.   She goes on to say:           Although Joe Estes & Associates cleaned the inhuman spirits, the house is always active to this day despite all the cleansing and Catholic rituals.   The ley line over which the Bellaire House is built is one of the alignments of ancient monuments and prehistoric sites in straight lines. It is believed by some that it indicates paths of positive energy inherent in the Earth. The Bellaire House is on the tip of one of the most ancient ley lines in the world! This could possibly be the reason why the Native Americans chose the land that the Bellaire House sits on because it is supercharged with such a profound energy source that it caused a direct connection to the great spirit, the old world gods, and intergalactic beings!   Research revealed that when Jacob Heatherington, who was a millionaire and used to run the city, died he left the coal mine company to his son Alex Heatherington, who was assisted by his daughter Lyde.   Unfortunately, the business started to fail due to Alex hearing and seeing things that were not there. He also began to have epileptic seizures and declared that "demons were trying to kill him." Back then people believed that he was haunted and cursed because of the coal mine explosions.   According to paranormal investigators, there are as many as 11 portals throughout the house. The most interesting thing is that no matter how hard paranormal investigators try, these portals refuse to stay closed.  Edwin and Lyde were also known to have servants. Mostly, all of them were named Mary. There was one particular Mary that had a child inside of the Bellaire House and it was rumored that the child had the bloodline that was needed to allow an entity inside of the Bellaire House to grow stronger to do Lyde's bidding. There are village rumors that a servant's child was lured to the attic and plunged to his death out of the window.   In March 1940, there was another explosion in the mines. This time in Coal Mine #2, which was commonly referred to as Willow Grove Mine at the time. It was about twenty minutes from Bellaire. The explosion trapped 180 men in the mine and took the lives of at least fifty men. Also, it left more than a hundred men burned and severely wounded. Although many members of the community tried to rescue the trapped men, only a few men could be saved. It's said that the rescue attempt continued for several days to no avail. This explosion at Coal Mine #2 further contributed to the haunting of the Bellaire House..   So what exactly happened to Kristen Lee and her family in that house. One day, Lee said she was home when she heard the sound of footsteps coming from the attic. She assumed it was her boyfriend, Jeff, whom she thought was working upstairs.   When sometime later she heard Jeff come through the front door downstairs, Kristen was shocked, but figured that the noise she heard from the attic was just the old house settling. A few weeks later, Kristen was napping on the couch when she was awakened by a presence next to her. She opened her eyes to discover a man's greyish figure in a cap.   She screamed in terror and demanded to know who he was. The man said nothing in response, got up from the couch, made his way to the foyer and vanished into thin air.   Lee noted that her boyfriend and son were asleep at the time, but the family dog appeared panic-stricken. She also pointed out that it was so cold in the room she could see her breath.   Lee says that was her first startling encounter with the supernatural inside the house, which she would later dub ‘a portal to hell.'   In the following months, Lee and her family would allegedly experience strange voices and footsteps, objects moving on their own and ghostly figures popping up out of nowhere. It came to a point where Lee sent her youngest son to stay with her parents and her oldest with his father because she feared for their safety inside the house.   Things finally came to a head one evening when Lee says the family dog was hurled against a bedroom wall by an invisible force, which at the same time pinned her down, rendering her motionless.   After that incident, Lee and her family promptly decided to move and rent out the house, but her tenants did not linger there either.   One family that briefly called Bellaire House their home allegedly lost six of eight family members while residing at 1699 Belmont Street.   Kristen Lee then tried to offload the house by selling it to the town of Bellaire for a dollar, but there were no takers, as the locals were well aware of its bad reputation.    Out of options she decided to turn the house into a spot where people could come and ghost hunt. And that is where it sits today. Maybe that'll be our next trip!    That's since creepy Ohio for you! Again we left out some of the more well known stuff and didn't have room to include every cool thing so we may be back for round two of creepy Ohio say since point as well! There are tons of cool creepy places in Ohio. Check them out!    https://www.imdb.com/search/keyword/?keywords=ohio

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast
Episode 1255 - Barry Jenkins

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 87:44


Barry Jenkins is grateful that he's been able to harness the tools of filmmaking in order to tell the stories of his ancestors. Barry and Marc get into all the details of making the ten-part series The Underground Railroad and how Barry differentiates between the projects he's made with his head and the ones he's made with his gut. The also talk about Moonlight, bringing James Baldwin's words to the screen, and why it was important to have an on-set counselor for this recent undertaking. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Films To Be Buried With with Brett Goldstein
Barry Jenkins • Films To Be Buried With with Brett Goldstein #160

Films To Be Buried With with Brett Goldstein

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 59:04


LOOK OUT! It's only Films To Be Buried With!Join your host Brett Goldstein as he talks life, death, love and the universe with the universally brilliant and show favourite - the writer, producer, director (+ more) BARRY JENKINS!Yes you did indeed get that entirely correct - Barry Jenkins himself. Director of Moonlight, If Beale Street Could Talk and The Underground Railroad to name but three of his crowning achievements… This is a long awaited, stars aligning moment as a lot of you will know from previous episodes of the podcast, and not only is it a treat to hear him talk about his most recent Underground Railroad series from casting to shot planning and beyond, you get to delve into the past and all kinds of tangents including liminal spaces, Miami memories, K-Pop feels, in-person publicity events, his horror loving mum, Clare Denis love and a truly poetic death scene. Indeed this episode has it all. You shall truly enjoy. Goodnight, genius!BARRY LINKSIMDBTWITTERMOONLIGHTTHE UNDERGROUND RAILROADTHE GAZEALICE SOLA KIMMOONLIGHT BEAT TAPE by Buddy Peace!BRETT GOLDSTEIN on TWITTERBRETT GOLDSTEIN on INSTAGRAMBRETT GOLDSTEIN on PATREONFTBBW PODCAST MERCHANDISETED LASSOSOULMATESSUPERBOB - Brett's 2015 feature filmCORNERBOYS with BRETT & SCROOBIUS PIPDISTRACTION PIECES NETWORK on FACEBOOKDISTRACTION PIECES NETWORK on INSTAGRAM Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/filmstobeburiedwith. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Allan McKay Podcast
312 -- UNDERGROUND RAILROAD — VFX Supervisor

The Allan McKay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 29:02


Dottie Starling is a Visual Effects Supervisor, CGI artist and digital modeler. Through both her freelance VFX career and her work with production houses such as Cinesite, Asylum, and Wildfire VFX, Dottie has worked on countless blockbuster motion pictures including Titanic, Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, 007's Die Another Day, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, Ocean's Thirteen and Tropic Thunder. Dottie has also worked with digital effects on the Academy Award-winning 12 Years a Slave, Oldboy, Selma, and the New Orleans-filmed television series Scream Queens. She has recently finished supervising Amazon's original series Underground Railroad directed by Barry Jenkins. In this Episode, Allan McKay interviews VFX Supervisor Dottie Starling about the path to becoming a Supervisor, the most crucial skill for the job, the challenge of creating visual effects that support the story (and the director's vision), as well as her experience supervising Amazon's original series Underground Railroad directed by Barry Jenkins. For more show notes, visit www.allanmckay.com/312/.

The Watch
‘The White Lotus' Season Finale and Barry Jenkins on ‘The Underground Railroad'

The Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 87:24


Chris and Andy break down the season finale of ‘The White Lotus' and reflect on why the season worked so well (1:00). Then they are joined by Barry Jenkins to talk about the challenges of creating ‘The Underground Railroad' (40:49) and what's coming next (1:17:41). Hosts: Chris Ryan and Andy Greenwald Guest: Barry Jenkins Producer: Kaya McMullen Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Look Behind The Look
Episode 1 | Season 2: Lawrence Davis Talks RESPECT

Look Behind The Look

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 30:35


I'm thrilled to kick off Season 2 with a look into the work of the tremendously talented and incredibly humble Lawrence Davis. His latest project, RESPECT, is in theaters as we speak, so please go see it to truly enjoy Jennifer Hudson as Aretha Franklin and also to bask in the work of hair magician, Lawerence Davis. He also shares with me the incredible story of what brought his career to fruition and set him on the path of what would become the department head for shows like Claws, Watchmen, The Underground Railroad, Mare of Easttown, and the upcoming Mothership. Lawrence joined me literally in between takes while working on Mothership for Netflix, so please enjoy our chat and please forgive any audio challenges - I apologize in advance but I did steal time in the makeup trailer and we had a slight audio challenge so I recommend watching this episode on youtube if you can! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/look-behind-the-look-pod/support

Currently Reading
Season 4, Episode 2: Books with Great Titles + Auto-Buy Authors

Currently Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 57:00


On this week's episode of Currently Reading, Meredith and Kaytee are discussing: Bookish Moments: a book that confused us both, and a great podcast episode Current Reads: a second in a series, a great premise, a great title, and a book filled with a-holes Deep Dive: the authors whose books we pre-order as soon as we know about them Book Presses: two presses from some of our favorite auto-buy authors As per usual, time-stamped show notes are below with references to every book and resource we mentioned in this episode. If you'd like to listen first and not spoil the surprise, don't scroll down!  New: we are now including transcripts of the episode (this link only works on the main site). These are generated by AI, so they may not be perfectly accurate, but we want to increase accessibility for our fans! *Please note that all book titles linked below are Amazon affiliate links. Your cost is the same, but a small portion of your purchase will come back to us to help offset the costs of the show. Thanks for your support!*   . . . . Bookish Moments of the Week: 2:10 - Diving In Podcast 2:39 - Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte 4:05 - Currently Reading Patreon 4:27 - The Novel Neighbor bookstore 4:45 - Novel Neighbor's Instagram @novelneighbor 6:39 - Super Host by Kate Russo 8:04 - The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin 8:06 - The Perfect Nanny by Leila Slimani Current Reads: 9:01 - The Last Thing He Told Me by Laura Dave (Meredith) 9:11 - Fabled Bookshop 9:29 - Book of the Month 13:57 - No Bad Deed by Heather Chavez 14:36 - The Escape Room by Megan Goldin (Kaytee) 14:53 - The Night Swim by Megan Goldin 15:33 - The Whisper Network by Chandler Baker 15:38 - The Boys Club by Erica Katz 16:08 - And Then There were None by Agatha Christie 16:11 - In a Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware 17:38 - All This Could Be Yours by Jami Attenburg (Meredith) 19:50 - Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir 21:44 - Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty  23:16 - The Nest by Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney 23:46 - Love Lives Here by Amanda Jette Knox (Kaytee) 24:06 - Love Lives Here by Maria Goff 26:31 - Hollowpox by Jessica Townsend (Meredith) 27:48 - Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling 27:51 - The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis 31:27 - Razorblade Tears by S.A. Cosby (Kaytee) 33:51 - Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson 33:56 - The Book Review Podcast 34:14 - Bluebird Bluebird by Attica Locke 34:23 - Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby Deep Dive - Auto-Buy Authors and Books 37:40 - Still Life by Louise Penny 38:02 - The Madness of Crowds by Louise Penny (Pre-order link) 38:12 - Winterhouse by Ben Guterson 38:19 - A Curse so Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer 38:27 - The Secret Book and Scone Society by Ellery Adams 38:33 - The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 38:49 - The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins 39:12 - Cazadora by Romina Garber (Preorder link) 39:14 - Lobizona by Romina Garber 39:34 - The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas 39:36 - On The Come Up by Angie Thomas 39:39 - Concrete Rose by Angie Thomas 40:19 - Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty 40:30 - Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty 40:48 - The One by John Marrs 40:49 - The Passengers by John Marrs 40:51 - The Minders by John Marrs 41:10 - Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead 41:15 - Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead (Preorder link) 41:47 - The Lincoln Highway by Amor Towles 42:19 - The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James 42:21 - The Broken Girls by Simone St. James 42:23 - The Haunting of Maddie Clare by Simone St. James 42:35 - Descent by Tim Johnston 42:36 - The Current by Tim Johnston 43:26 - A Carnival of Snackery by David Sedaris (preorder link) 43:57 - Four Hundred Souls edited by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain 45:48 - The Guest List by Lucy Foley 46:17 - The Lost Man by Jane Harper 46:33 - The Dry by Jane Harper 46:50 - Force of Nature by Jane Harper 47:14 - Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley 47:15 - The Editor by Steven Rowley 47:16 - The Guncle by Steven Rowley 47:57 - The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins 48:05 - I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes 48:17 - Wanderers by Chuck Wendig 48:19 - The Book of Accidents by Chuck Wendig 48:41 - The Nothing Man by Catherine Ryan Howard Books We Want to Press Into Your Hands: 49:35 - The Mother-In-Law by Sally Hepworth (Meredith) 51:36 - Gone Girl by Gillian Finn 52:24 - The Home-Maker by Dorothy Canfield  53:25 - Dear Martin by Nic Stone (Kaytee) 53:26 - Dear Justyce by Nic Stone 54:38 - Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes Connect With Us: Meredith is @meredith.reads on Instagram Kaytee is @notesonbookmarks on Instagram Mindy is @gratefulforgrace on Instagram Mary is @maryreadsandsips on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast.com @currentlyreadingpodcast on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast@gmail.com Support us at patreon.com/currentlyreadingpodcast

Stuff You Missed in History Class
SYMHC Classics: Harriet Tubman, Part 2

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021 33:33


We're continuing our classics with Harriet Tubman's story, which came out in 2016. There was a whole lot more to her life and work than the Underground Railroad. During the U.S. Civil War, she worked as a Union spy, eventually earning the nickname "General." Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Stuff You Missed in History Class
SYMHC Classics: Harriet Tubman, Part 1

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 32:58


We're revisiting this 2013 topic in honor of Juneteenth. Most people are familiar with Tubman's involvement with the Underground Railroad, but she was also a spy for the Union during the Civil War, among many other things. Untangling the truth from the myth is the trickiest part of her story. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com