Podcasts about united food

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 63PODCASTS
  • 122EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about united food

Latest podcast episodes about united food

The Bill Press Pod
"Absolutely Stunning." The Reporters' Roundtable- Early Thanksgiving Edition

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:40


Jan 6 Burner Phones and Subpoenas. Kyle Rittenhouse a Hero? Fate of Paid Family Leave. Fed Chair Stays On. Gas Prices and Covid Hurt Biden. Trump's New Lies. With Maya King, covering national politics for Politico, Alayna Treene, Congressional Reporter at Axios and Hunter Walker, Reporter TheUprising.info, Contributing Writer at Rolling StoneToday's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org .See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Reopening America
Essential Voices: Coming Together At The Grocery Store

Reopening America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 51:12


Since you love this podcast, we think you might like this one as well. Check out Essential Voices. In each episode, host Wilmer Valderrama will have intimate conversations with people on the frontlines of the food system, transportation, child-care and other workers who are so often overlooked. That conversation leads to a round-table discussion with activists and politically-active celebrities, discussing themes, issues, and areas of needed change. About this Episode Ben Hess and his grocery store co-workers did not know they would be on the frontlines of a pandemic when they took their jobs. Not only did they have to worry daily about getting sick, they also had to manage customers frustrated at following safety protocols and deal with empty shelves. While Ben continued working hard, the pandemic took a big toll on his physical and mental health. Roundtable guests: Actress and activist Sophia Bush, and Jim Araby, the Director of Strategic Campaigns at United Food and Commercial Workers Local 5 Union. Learn more about United Food and Commercial Workers Local 5 Union: https://ufcw5.org/  Learn more about Work in Progress, Sophia Bush's podcast: apple.co/workinprogress Episode Transcript: https://app.trint.com/public/63286a75-3040-45a9-b11c-3d97ef4a46e5 Listen and Subscribe to Essential Voices with Wilmer Valderrama on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts! https://www.iheart.com/podcast/1119-essential-voices-with-wil-84986899/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Bill Press Pod
"No Margin for Error." The Reporters' Roundtable Oct 29

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:24


Democrat's' Trust Issues. Some GOP House Members in on the Insurrection? Trump Still Here. Virginia Governor's Race. With Gabriel Debenedetti, National Correspondent at New York Magazine, Addy Baird, Politics Reporter at BuzzFeed News and Hunter Walker, Founder, Reporter at TheUprising.infoToday's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bill Press Pod
"Midnight in Washington" with Adam Schiff

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 32:06


California Congressman Adam Schiff was the Lead Impeachment Manager in Trump's first impeachment trial and is on the Select Committee investigating the January 6th insurrection His new book, Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost our Democracy and Still Could, starts with the January 6th insurrection but is more focused on the Republican lawmakers and Administration officials who failed to stand up to Trump.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the great men and women of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jacobin Radio
Jacobin Radio w/ Suzi Weissman: Striketober

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 61:21


Suzi talked to Crystal Hopkins, President of IATSE Local 871, just hours before a tentative agreement was reached late Saturday afternoon — ahead of the October 18 strike deadline. The contract still has to be ratified by union members and that remains a question mark. Crystal Hopkins describes the conditions and demands that are at the center of the negotiations: long working hours, low wages, and not being fairly compensated for the success of streaming service content they contribute to. IATSE workers have recounted stories like falling asleep while driving, working 17-hour days, and being unable to take time off. Listen in as we cover the issues at stake. Alex Press, Jacobin writer and labor podcaster, has been tracking the current strike wave that some are calling "Striketober." Ten thousand John Deere UAW workers are on strike for the first time since 1986. Two thousand nurses are on strike at a Catholic Health hospital in New York, 1400 workers at Kellogg's cereal plants across the country, eleven hundred coal miners at Warrior Met in Alabama, and four hundred twenty United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) members at Heaven Hill Distillery in Kentucky. Sixty thousand workers at IATSE may strike on October 18; Instacart workers have an Oct 18 work action; 24,000 workers at Kaiser Permanente are poised to walk out, and there are organizing drives at Amazon, and now Starbucks. So how do we characterize and explain this militancy? Alex's latest article, "US Workers Are in a Militant Mood," looks at these strikes and campaigns now underway and we get her take on the big picture for labor.

The Bill Press Pod
"Mired in Trump Muck." The Reporters' Roundtable- Oct 15

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:33


Trump vs. GOP. Bannon to Jail? Virginia Governors Race. Legislating the Curriculum. Gloom for Dems? With Sudeep Reddy, Managing Editor at Politico, Amanda Becker, Washington Correspondent at 19th News and Philip Bump, National Correspondent for The Washington Post.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bill Press Pod
Our Democracy in Peril-Part 3 "DEFCON 5."

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 38:17


Voter suppression is serious but one of the leading election law experts in the country says "Election Subversion" is the greater threat to American Democracy. In this episode, he explains what it is and why it's a "DEFCON 5" level emergency. Rick Hasen is Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine and was a CNN Election Law Analyst in 2020. He runs the Election Law Blog. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. In additional to representing workers in our grocery stores, pharmacies and food processing plants, the UFCW sponsors a wide range of valuable programs in communities around the country. More information at UFCW.org .See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Aspire: The Leadership Development Podcast
Leading with Your Values: Featuring Richard Shell

Aspire: The Leadership Development Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 36:27


A fast-track colleague is elbowing their way up the professional ladder in your organization by faking reports. Your boss asks you to lie to a stakeholder. The team leader is a serial sexual harasser. What should you do? Nobody prepared you for this part of professional life. You face a gut-wrenching choice: "go along to get along" or risk negatively impacting your career by speaking up for what you know is right. In this week's episode, Richard Shell shares his value model and how this structure has helped so many people find solutions to extremely difficult experiences.  In this episode, we also discuss: Leading From Any Position The Role of a Professor  And his books, The Conscience Code: Lead with Your Values. Advance Your Career  About G. Richard Shell:Richard Shell is Professor of Legal Studies, Business Ethics, and Management – and former Chair of its Legal Studies and Business Ethics Department -- at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Over his 30-year career, he has won every teaching prize that Wharton has to offer. He is also the Director of two week-long training programs for senior executives offered multiple times each year: Wharton's Executive Negotiation Workshop and its Strategic Persuasion Workshop. In these programs, he has taught everyone from members of Seal Team 6, FBI hostage negotiators, and UN diplomats working in the Middle East to leaders of Fortune 500 corporations, presidents of major universities and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs. Consulting clients have included Google, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts, and the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. He is the author of many books, including his most recent title, The Conscience Code: Lead with Your Values. Advance Your Career (HarperCollins Leadership 2021). Other works include Springboard: Launching Your Personal Search for Success (Penguin/Portfolio 2014), which was named Business Book of Year by America's largest business bookseller and short-listed for Management Book of the Year by the British Library. Professor Shell is best known for his award-winning Bargaining for Advantage: Negotiation Strategies for Reasonable People (3nd Edition, Penguin 2019) – required reading in many business and law school negotiation course classrooms -- and (with co-author Mario Moussa) The Art of Woo: Using Strategic Persuasion to Sell Your Ideas (Portfolio/Penguin 2007). His books are available in over seventeen languages. Follow G. Richard Shell:Website: https://grichardshell.com/ (https://grichardshell.com/)  Email: shellric@wharton.upenn.edu  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1400221137/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1400221137&linkCode=as2&tag=aspirewebsite-20&linkId=5d9aa76d18bc5e646254f22b5db3e80a Are you a superfan of the Aspire podcast? Well, now you can show off your support with the new Aspire swag, featuring tee shirts, hoodies and a variety of drinkware. You can find all your Aspire Swag athttp://www.teachbetter.com/swag ( www.teachbetter.com/swag) [caption id="attachment_3508" align="alignnone" width="1024"]https://joshstamper.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Aspire-Swag-Website-Image-update-6.18.21.png () Aspire: The Leadership Development Podcast Swag, Joshua Stamper, Teach Better[/caption] Use Discount Code: ASPIRE for 25% OFF Tee-Shirts, Hoodies, and Drinkware:https://teachbetterswag.com/collections/aspire-the-leadership-development-podcast ( ASPIRE: The Leadership Development Podcast)   This post contains affiliate links. When you make a purchase through these links, The Aspire Podcast gets a small percentage of the sale at no extra cost to you. Need a Presenter for a conference or school PD?https://joshstamper.com/contact/ (Contact Joshua Stamper ) for presentations on Restorative Practices, Leadership Development,...

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Race in America and International Relations

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


Travis L. Adkins, deputy assistant administrator for Africa at USAID and lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service and in the Prisons and Justice Initiative at Georgetown University, and Brenda Gayle Plummer, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, led a conversation on race in America and international relations. FASKIANOS: Welcome to the first session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Travis Adkins and Brenda Gayle Plummer with us to discuss race in America and international relations. Travis Adkins is deputy assistant administrator in the Bureau of Africa at USAID, and lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service, and in the Prisons and Justice Initiative at Georgetown University. As an international development leader, he has two decades of experience working in governance, civil society, and refugee and migration affairs in over fifty nations throughout Africa and the Middle East. Mr. Adkins was a CFR international affairs fellow and is a CFR member. Dr. Brenda Gayle Plummer is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research includes race and gender, international relations, and civil rights. Dr. Plummer has taught Afro-American history throughout her twenty years of experience in higher education. Previously she taught at Fisk University, the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the University of Minnesota. And from 2001 to 2005, Dr. Plummer served on the Historical Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of State. So, thank you both for being with us today. We appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts with us. Travis, I thought we could begin with you to talk about the ways in which you've seen race relations in America influence U.S. foreign policy. ADKINS: Sure. Thank you so much, Irina. And welcome to everyone. Thank you for joining. The first thing I would say is that America's long history of violence, exclusion, and barbarism towards Black people and indigenous people and Asian communities and immigrant communities in the United States have worked to give the lie to the notion of who we say we are in terms of freedom, in terms of democracy, in terms of the respect for human rights. And these are the core messages that we seek to project in our foreign policy. And we've not been able to resolve those contradictions because we have refused to face this history, right? And we can't countenance a historical narrative in which we are not the heroes, not the good guys, not on the right side of history. And the challenge that we've had is that we've seen that play out in so many ugly ways domestically. But it also has resonance and relevance in our foreign policy, because what it ends up doing is essentially producing a foreign policy of platitudes and contradictory posturing on the issues of human rights, on the issues of racial justice, on the issues of democratic governance when the world can see not only this history but this present reality of racial discrimination, of police brutality, of efforts to suppress the political participation of specific groups of people inside of America. They can see children in cages at the Southern border. They can see anti-Asian hate taking place in our nation, and they can hear those messages resounding, sometimes from our White House, sometimes from our Senate, sometimes from our Congress and other halls of power throughout the United States. And that works against the message of who we say we are, which is really who we want to be. But the thing that we, I think, lose out on is pretending that where we want to be is actually where we are. And I think back a couple weeks ago Secretary Blinken came out saying to diplomats in the State Department that it was okay for them to admit America's flaws and failings in their diplomatic engagements with other countries. But I would—I do applaud that. But I also think that saying that we would admit it to the rest of the world—the rest of the world already knows. And who we would have to need to focus on admitting it to is ourselves, because we have not faced this national shame of ours as it relates to the historical and the present reality of White supremacy, of racialized violence and hatred and exclusion in our immigration policy, in our education policy, in our law and customs and cultural mores that have helped to produce ongoing violence and hatred of this nature in which our history is steeped. I think the other part of that is that we lose the opportunity to then share that message with the rest of the world. And so, what I like to say is that our real history is better than the story that we tell. So instead of us framing ourselves and our foreign policy as a nation who fell from the heavens to the top of a mountain, it's a more powerful story to say that we climbed up out of a valley and are still climbing up out of a valley of trying to create and produce and cultivate a multiracial, multiethnic democracy with respect for all, and that that is and has been a struggle. And I think that that message is much more powerful. And what it does is it creates healing for us at home, but it also begins to take away this kind of Achilles' heel that many of our adversaries have used historically—the Soviet Union, now Russia, China, Iran—this notion that democracy and freedom and the moral posturing of America is all for naught if you just look at what they do at home. Who are they to preach to you about these things when they themselves have the same challenges? And so I think that we would strengthen ourselves if we could look at this in that way. And I would just close by saying that we often speak of the civil rights movement and the movement for decolonization in the world, and specifically in Africa where I mostly work, speak of them in the past tense. But I would argue that both of them are movements and histories that are continuously unfolding, that are not resolved, and that haven't brought themselves to peaceful kinds of conclusions. And this is why when George Floyd is killed on camera, choked for nine minutes and loses his life, that you see reverberations all over the world, people pushing back because they are suffering from the same in their countries, and they are following after anti-Asian hate protestors and advocates, Black Lives Matter advocates and protestors, people who are saying to the world this is unacceptable. And so even in that way, you see the linked fates that people share. And so I think that the more we begin to face who we are at home, the more we begin to heal these wounds and relate better in the foreign policy arena, because I think that it is a long held fallacy that these things are separate, right? A nation's foreign policy is only an extension of its beliefs, its policies and its aspirations and its desires from home going out into the world. So I will stop there. And thank you for the question. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Dr. Plummer, over to you. PLUMMER: Well, your question is a very good one. It is also a very book-length question. I'll try to address that. First of all, I would like to say that I find Mr. Adkins' statement quite eloquent and can't think of anything I disagree with in what he has said. There are a couple of things that we might consider as well. I think there are several issues embedded in this question of the relationship between race relations in the United States and it's policies toward other countries. One of them is, I think there's a difference between what policymakers intend and how American policy is perceived. There is also the question of precisely who is making and carrying out U.S. foreign policy. Now there was a time when that question I think could be very readily answered. But we're now in an age where we have enhanced roles for the military and the intelligence community. We have private contractors executing American objectives overseas. And this really places a different spin on things, somewhat different from what we observe when we look at this only through a strictly historical lens. I think we also need to spend some time thinking about the precise relationship between race and racism and what we might call colonial, more of imperialist practices. You might look, for example, at what is the relationship between the essentially colonial status of places like Puerto Rico and the Marianas and the—how those particular people from those places are perceived and treated within both the insular context and the domestic context. Clearly, everybody on the planet is shaped to a large degree by the culture and the society that they live in, that they grew up in, right? And so it is probably no mystery from the standpoint of attitudes that certain kinds of people domestically may translate into similar views of people overseas. But I think one of the things we might want to think about is how our institutions, as well as prejudices, influence what takes place. People like to talk, for example, about the similarities between the evacuation of Saigon and the evacuation of Kabul and wonder what is it called when you do the same thing over and over again and expect different results? We might want to think about what is it, institutionally, which creates these kinds of repetitions, creates situations in which diplomats are forced to apologize and explain continually about race and other conflictual issues in American society. We might also think about what you perhaps could call a racialization process. Do we create categories of pariahs in response to national emergencies? Do we create immigrants from countries south of the United States as enemies because we don't have a comprehensive and logical way of dealing with immigration? Do we create enemies out of Muslims because of our roles in the Middle East and, you know, the activities and actions of other states? There's some historical presence for this—the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, for example. So it seems to me that in addressing I think, you know, some of this very rich question, there are a number of ways and facets that we might want to look at and discuss more fully. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you very much. And now we're going to go to all of you for questions and comments. So you can either ask your question by raising your hand, click on the raised hand icon and I will call on you, or else you can write your question in the Q&A box. And if you choose to write your question—although we'd prefer to hear your voice—please include your affiliation. And when I call on you, please let us know who you are and your institution. So the first question, the first raised hand I see is from Stanley Gacek. Q: Yes, thank you very much. Thank you very much, Professor Plummer and Mr. Adkins, for a very, very compelling presentation. My name is Stanley Gacek. I'm the senior advisor for global strategies at the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, representing 1.3 million working women and men in the United States and Canada in the retail, wholesale, food production, healthcare, and services industries. Practically all of our members are on the frontlines of the pandemic. I also served as deputy director and interim director of the ILO mission in Brazil in 2011 to 2016. And my question is this. I wonder if the speakers would also acknowledge that an issue for the United States in terms of its credibility with regard to racial justice, human rights, and of course labor rights, is a rather paltry record of the United States in terms of ratifying international instruments and adhering to international fora with regard to all of these issues. One example which comes to mind in my area is ILO Convention 111 against discrimination in employment and profession, which could—actually has gone through a certain due diligence process in former administrations and was agreed to by business and labor in the United States but still the United States has failed to ratify. I just wondered if you might comment more generally about how that affects our credibility in terms of advocating for racial justice, human rights, and labor rights throughout the world. Thank you very much. FASKIANOS: Who can address that, would like to address that? PLUMMER: Well, I have very little immediate knowledge of this, and I have to say that labor issues and labor rights have been kind of a missing element in terms of being heavily publicized and addressed. I think it has something to do with the fact that over the course of the decades the United States has been less responsive to the United Nations, to international organizations in general. But in terms of the specifics, you know, precisely what has fallen by the wayside, I, you know, personally don't have, you know, knowledge about that. ADKINS: And I would just say more generally, not to speak specifically in terms of labor, where I'm also not an expert, but there is, of course, a long history of the U.S. seeking to avoid these kinds of issues in the international arena writ large as Dr. Plummer was just referring to. I just finished a book by Carol Anderson called Eyes Off the Prize, which is a whole study of this and the ways in which the U.S. government worked through the United Nations to prevent the internationalization of the civil rights movement which many—Malcom X and Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, and others—sought to frame it in the context of human rights and raise it into an international specter, and that was something that the U.S. government did not want to happen. And of course, we know that part of the genius of the civil rights movement writ large was this tactic of civil disobedience, not just to push against a law that we didn't like to see in effect but actually to create a scene that would create international media attention which would show to the world what these various communities were suffering inside of America, to try to create pressure outside of our borders for the cause of freedom and justice and democracy. And so there is that long history there which you've touched on with your question. Thank you for that. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome. Q: Good afternoon and thank you for your presentation. I just wonder about U.S. foreign policy, how it lines up with the domestic politics, you know, in terms of race relations, because if one was to believe U.S. propaganda, you know, this country is doing good in the world, it's the country to emulate. But you know, the events of—well, I guess the George Floyd case brought into graphic relief what most astute observers of the U.S. know, that race relations of the U.S. do not line up very well with the constitutional aspirations of the U.S. So what's going to change now, you know? And then there's also this pandemic and the way which race and class is showing us about the real serious inequalities in the U.S. So what's going to change in terms of lessons learned? And then moving forward, is also multilateralism going to come back into U.S. foreign policy in some way? That's it. PLUMMER: I think—I'm getting kind of an echo here. I don't know if other people are. I don't think anyone is—you know, who is thinking about this seriously doubts that the United States is in a crisis at the moment—a crisis of legitimacy not only abroad but also domestically. We have a situation in which an ostensibly developed country has large pockets, geographic pockets where there are, you know, 30, 40, 50 percent poverty rates. We have people who are essentially mired in superstition, you know, with regard to, you know, matters of health and science. And you know, I don't think anyone is, you know—is, you know—who is, you know, thinking about this with any degree of gravity is not concerned about the situation. Once again, I think we're talking here about institutions, about how we can avoid this sort of repetitive and cyclical behavior. But one thing I want to say about George Floyd is that this is a phenomenon that is not only unique to the United States. One of the reasons why George Floyd became an international cause célèbre is because people in other countries also were experiencing racism. There—other countries had issues with regard to immigration. And so really looking at a situation in which I think is—you know, transcends the domestic, but it also transcends, you know, simply looking at the United States as, you know, the sort of target of criticism. FASKIANOS: Do you want to add anything, Travis, or do you want to—should we go to the next question? ADKINS: Go on to the next question. Thank you. FASKIANOS: OK, thank you. Let's go to Shaarik Zafar with Georgetown, and our prior questioner was with Brooklyn—teachers at Brooklyn College. Q: Hey, there. This is Shaarik Zafar. I was formerly the special counsel for post-9/11 national origin discrimination in the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division—sorry, that's a mouthful—and then most recently during the Obama years I was a special representative to Muslim communities. So this—I first applaud the presentation. These issues are very near and dear to me. I think it's clear, you know, we have to own up and acknowledge our shortcomings. And I think, you know, I was really sad to hear that we actually worked against highlighting what I think is really an example of American exceptionalism, which is our civil rights movement and our civil rights community. When I was at State during the Obama years, we had a very modest program where we brought together U.S. civil rights leaders and connected them with European civil rights leaders. And the idea wasn't that we had it all figured out but rather that, you know, in some respects the United States has made some advances when it comes to civil rights organizing and civil society development in that respect—and perhaps more so than other countries. I was just thinking, I would love to get the panelists' thoughts on ways that we can continue to collaborate and—you know, on a civil society level between civil rights organizations in the United States and abroad and the way the U.S. government should actually support that—even if it means highlighting our shortcomings—but as a way to, you know, invest in these types of linkages and partnerships to not only highlight our shortcomings but look for ways that we could, you know, actually come to solutions that need to be, I think, fostered globally. Thanks so much. ADKINS: You know, the first thing I would say, Shaarik—thanks for your question—I thought it was interesting, this idea of framing the civil rights movement as a kind of example of American exceptionalism. And I think there's a way in which I would relate to that in the sense that folks did, at least nominally or notionally, have certain kinds of freedom of speech, certain kinds of rights to assembly. But even those were challenged, of course, when we see the violence and the assassinations and all of the machinations of the government against those who were leaders or participants in that movement. And so in that sense, perhaps I would agree. I might push back, though, in terms of American exceptionalism as it relates to civil rights, because these people were actually advocating against the U.S. government, who actually did not want them to have the rights that they were promised under the Constitution. Of course, many of us would not be free or able to speak up without the 13th and 14th and 15th Amendments. And so there's a sense in which we celebrate them, but there's also a sense in which they are actually indictments of the original Constitution which did not consider any of those things to be necessary elements of our society. In terms of civil society and where the U.S. government is engaged, I think that, you know, sometimes when we deal with these problems that are foreign policy related, you know, sometimes the answer is at home. Sometimes the answer is not, you know, a white paper from some high-level think tank. It's not something that starts ten thousand miles away from where we are, because I don't think that we would have the kind of standing and credibility that we would need to say that we believe in and support and give voice and our backing to civil society movements abroad if we don't do the same thing at home. And so everything that we want to do somewhere else, we ought to ask ourselves the question of whether or not we've thought about doing it at home. And I don't mean to suggest—because certainly no nation is perfect, and every nation has its flaws. But certainly, we would be called to the mat for the ways in which we are either acknowledging or refusing to acknowledge that we have, you know, these same—these same challenges. And so I think there still remains a lot of work to be done there in terms of how we engage on this. And you have seen the State Department come out and be more outspoken. You've seen the Biden administration putting these issues more out front. You have now seen the Black Lives Matter flag flying over U.S. embassies in different parts of the world. And some people might view that as co-optation of a movement that is actually advocating against the government for those rights and those respects and that safety and security that people believe that they are not receiving. And others might see it as a way to say, look, our nation is embracing civil society and civic protests in our nation as an example that the countries in which those embassies are in should be more open to doing the same kinds of things. And so it's a great question. I think it remains to be seen how we move forward on that—on that score. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Molly Cole. Q: Hi. My name is Molly Cole. I am a grad student of global affairs at New York University. I was just curious sort of what y'all thought about what the consequences of foreign policy on punishment systems and institutions as it pertains to race relations in the United States would be, also in tandem with sort of this strive for global inclusivity and equity and just sort of, I guess, hitting those two ideas against each other. ADKINS: Can you clarify the ideals for us, Molly? So one sounded like it was about maybe mass incarceration or the death penalty or things of that nature? You're talking about punitive systems of justice? And then the other seemed to be more about diversity, equity, and inclusion in the foreign policy space? But I don't want to put words in your mouth. I just want to make sure I understand the question. Q: You hit the nail on the head. ADKINS: OK. Do you want to go ahead, Dr. Plummer? PLUMMER: Oh. Well, again, a great question but, you know, one of, you know, it's—could write a book to answer. (Laughs.) Well, if you're talking about the sort of international regime of incarceration—is that what you were referring to? Q: Yes, essentially. So when we're—when we're considering, you know, these punitive systems, I'm thinking in terms of, you know, the death penalty, mass incarceration, private prisons, sort of this culmination of us trying to come up with these ideals, but doing it sort of on our own, while also combatting, you know, what the nation is calling for, what the globe is calling for. PLUMMER: Yeah. I think this sort of pertains to what I had mentioned earlier about just, you know, who is making and carrying out U.S. foreign policy, or domestic policy for that matter. There's a whole question of the state and, you know, what parts of the state are involved in this whole question of incarceration and are involved in the whole question of the death penalty. One of the things that we are aware of is that prisons have—some of the prisons are actually not being operated by civil authorities. They're operated by private entities. We saw this again in—you know, particularly in Afghanistan, where a lot of functions which normally, you know, are carried out by civil authorities are carried out by private authorities. And so this really puts a whole different perspective on the question or the relationship of citizens to the state and, you know, to any other particular group of citizens to the state. So I think that, you know, one of the problem areas then is to tease out what in fact are the obligations and privileges of government, and how do they differ from and how are they distinguished from the private sector. Q: Thank you. ADKINS: And I would just add quickly on this notion of hypocrisy and saying one thing and doing another, there was an interesting anecdote around this when President Obama visited Senegal. And he was delivering a fairly tough message about the treatment of members of the LGBT+ community in Senegal. And President Macky Sall got up essentially after President Obama and was essentially saying that, you know, we kind of appreciate this tough love lecture, but I would remind you, you know, that Senegal doesn't have the death penalty, right? And so on one hand we're actually saying something that has a grounding. Of course, people of all human stripes can have dignity, and have respect and be protected. But he is then hitting back and saying, hey, wait a minute, you kill people who break laws in your own country. And we don't have the death penalty. So who should actually be the arbiter of how is the correct way – or, what is the correct way to be? On the second part of your question, quickly, Molly, especially as it relates to the kind of diversity, equity, and inclusion piece, this is why also there has been a big push to look in our State Department, to look at USAID, to look at the face that America presents to the world. And all too often that face has been male, that face has been White. And that gives a certain perception of America, but it also means that we lose the tremendous treasure and talent of people who have language skills, who come from communities in which their own perspective on the world actually is a talent that they have. Specifically, because many of those communities—whether they've immigrated or come to America by different means—are also from groups who've been marginalized, who've been oppressed, who have a certain frame and a lens with which to engage with other nations in the world, either in terms of partnership, either in terms of deterrence. And so we lose out in many ways because we haven't done a great job in that—in that matter. FASKIANOS: I'm going to take a written question from Morton Holbrook, who's at Kentucky Wesleyan College. His question is: How should the United States respond to international criticism to the U.S.'s racial discrimination? And how will that affect the relationship between the U.S. and the international community? PLUMMER: Well, the United States, I think, has—(laughs)—no choice but to acknowledge this. Historically this has been a problem that when pressed on this issue in the past the response was always, well, you know, we know this is a problem and we're working on it. And the most egregious examples of racism are the responsibility of people who are either at the margins of society or who represent some sort of relic past that is rapidly disappearing, right? That was the message about the South, right? OK, the South is, you know, rapidly developing and so soon these vestiges of violent racism will be over. Well, again, the reason why that doesn't work anymore—(laughs)—is because we're always projecting this future, right, that—you know, it's always being projected further and further into the future. And we're never there yet. And it seems to me, again, that this is a problem of institutions. This is a problem of the embeddedness of racism in American life, and a refusal on the part of so many Americans to acknowledge that racism is real, and that it exists. And you know, I think we see many examples of this. I'm thinking of one instance where a George Floyd commemorative mural was painted on a sidewalk and some folks came along with some paint and painted over it, because they said it wasn't a racism corner, you know, while engaged in a racist act. So, you know, there really needs to be, I think, on a very fundamental level, some education—(laughs)—you know, in this country on the issue of race and racism. The question is, you know, who is—who will be leaders, right? Who will undertake this kind of mission? ADKINS: One thing I would say, quickly, on that, Irina, just an anecdote as well that also relates to really in some ways the last question about who our representatives are and what perspective they bring. Several years ago, I was on a trip—a congressional delegation to Egypt. And I was with several members of the CBC. And we met with President Sisi. And they were giving him a fairly rough go of it over his treatment of protesters who were protesting at that time in Tahrir Square, many of whom had been killed, maimed, abused, jailed. And he listened to them kind of haranguing him. And at the end of that speech that they were giving to him he said basically: I understand your points. And I hear your perspective. But he said, can I ask you a question? They said, sure, Mr. President. We welcome you to ask questions. And he said, what about Ferguson? And the day that he said that Ferguson was on fire with surplus military equipment in the streets of America, with, you know, tear gas and armed military-appearing soldiers in the streets of America who were seen, at least optically, to be doing the same thing, right? Not as many people were killed, certainly, but the point is you have this same problem. However, if that had been a different delegation, he might have scored a point in their verbal jousting. But President Sisi had the misfortune of saying this to two-dozen 70-plus-year-old Black people. And no one in America would know better than they what that is like. And so what they ended up replying to him by saying, exactly. No one knows this better than we do. And this is exactly why we're telling you that you shouldn't do it. Not because our country doesn't have that history, but because we do have that history and it has damaged us, and it will damage you. Which takes on a completely different tone in our foreign relations than if it was simply a lecture, and that we were placing ourselves above the nations of the world rather than among them. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go to Ashantee Smith. Q: Hello. Can you guys hear me? ADKINS: We can. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: OK, perfect. Hi. My name is Ashantee Smith. I am a grad student at Winston-Salem State University. In regards to some of the responses that you guys gave earlier, it gave me a question. And I wanted to know how you guys were putting the correlation between racism and immigration. PLUMMER: Well, yeah. The United States has a history of racialized responses to immigrants, including historically to White immigrants. Back in the day the Irish, for example, were considered to be, you know, something less than White. We know, however, that society—American society has since, you know, incorporated Europeans into the category of Whiteness, and not done so for immigrants from Latin America, Asia, and Africa, who remain racialized, who are perceived as being, in some respects by some people, unassimilable. We also have a phenomenon of the racialization of Muslims, the creation of outcast groups that are subjected to, you know, extremes of surveillance or exclusion or discrimination. So immigration is very much embedded in this, is a question of an original vision of the United States, you know, and you can see this in the writings of many of the founding fathers, as essentially a White country in which others, you know, are in varying degrees of second-class citizens or not citizens at all. So this is, I think, an example of something that we have inherited historically that continues to, you know, be an issue for us in the present. Yeah. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Pearl Robinson. Q: Hello. I am just so thrilled to see the two panelists here. I want—I actually raised my hand when you were talking about the labor rights issue. And I'm at Tufts University. And I'm currently working on an intellectual biography about Ralph Bunche. And I actually ran over here from the U.N. archives where I was actually reading about these issues. (Laughs.) And I wanted to just say that the discussion we're having now, it's sort of disjointed because we're dealing with lots of erasures, things that are overlooked, and they are not enough Carol Andersons and Brenda Gayle Plummer professors out there putting these things in press. But even more importantly, they are not sufficiently in our curriculum. So people who study international relations and people who do international relations don't know most of these things. So my quick point I just wanted to say was during World War II when Ralph Bunche was working for the OSS military intelligence, his archives are full of it, he went and he was interviewing our allies at their missions and embassies in the U.S.—the French, the British—asking them: What are your labor relations policies in your colonial territories? And this was considered important military information for the United States, as we were going to be—as Africa was an important field of operation. When you get to actually setting up the U.N., I was struck in a way I hadn't, because I hadn't read archives this way. (Laughs.) But I'm looking at conversations between Bunche and Hammarskjöld, and they're restructuring the organization of the United States—of the United Nations. And there are two big issues that are determining their response to the restructuring—the Cold War as well as decolonization. And I actually think that those two issues remain—they're structuring that conversation we're having right now. And they—we say the Cold War is over, but I love this phrase, of the racialization of the current enemies or people we think of as enemies. So I actually do think that this is a really good program we're having where we're trying to have the conversation. But the dis-junctures, and the silences, and the difficulties of responding I think speak volumes. The last thing I will say, very quickly, that incident about the discussion with President Sisi that Mr. Adkins—that needs to be canned. That needs to be somehow made available as an example that can be replicated and expanded and broadened for people to use in teaching. ADKINS: Well, I always listen when my teacher is talking to me, Dr. Robinson. Thank you for sharing that. And I'm working on it, I promise you. (Laughter.) FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to—we have lots of questions and raised hands, and we're not going to get to all of you. So I apologize right now. (Laughs.) We'll do the best we can. Jill Humphries. Q: Hello. My name is Jill Humphries. And I'm an adjunct assistant professor in the Africa Studies Program at the University of Toledo, and have been doing Africa-based work, I'm proud to say, for about thirty-three years, starting at the age twenty-two, and have used Dr. Plummer's work in my dissertation. And hello, fellow ICAPer (sp). So my question is this: There's an assumption that I believe we're operating in. And that is race and racism is somehow aberrant to the founding of this country, right? So we know that Saidiya Hartman and Frank Wilderson, the Afropessimist, make the argument that it is clearly key that it is fundamental to the development of our institutions. And so my question is this: You know, the—in the domestic scene the sort of abolitions clearly state that unless we fundamentally transform our norms and values, which impact, of course, our institutions, then we will continue to have the exact outcomes that are expected. The killing of George Floyd and the continuing, I think, need to kill Black bodies is essential to this country. And so my question is, in the context of foreign relations, international relations, are we also looking at the way in which, number one, it is not aberrant that racism is a constituent element in the development of our foreign policy and our institutions? And that unless we fundamentally first state it, acknowledge it, and then perhaps explore the way in which we dismantle, right—dismantle those norms and values that then impact these institutions, that we're going to continue to have the same outcomes, right? So for example, when Samantha Powers visited Ethiopia, if you've been following that whole narrative, there was a major backlash by the Ethiopian diaspora—major. My colleagues and friends, like, I've had intense conversations, right, around that. Same thing about the belief about Susan, former—Susan Rice's role, right, in continuing to influence our foreign policy, particularly towards the Horn of Africa. So my question is: What does that look like, both theoretically, conceptually? But more importantly for me, because I'm a practitioner on the ground, what does that look like in practice? And that's where I think Professor Adkins, working for USAID, could really kind of talk about. Thank you. ADKINS: Thank you. Yeah, you know, I think it goes back to Dr. Robinson's question a moment ago. And that is the first the acknowledgement and the calling out and the putting into relief and contrast the context in which we're operating, especially when we think about not even USAID specifically, but the industry of development—aid and development assistance kind of writ large. Because essentially what we have is a historical continuum that starts with the colonial masters and the colonial subjects. And then that because what is called, or framed, as the first world and the third world, right? And then that becomes the developing world and the developed world. Then that becomes the global north and the global south. All of which suggests that one is above, and one is below. That one is a kind of earthly heaven, the other kind of earthly hell. That one possessed the knowledge and enlightenment to lead people into civilization, and the other needs redemption, needs to be saved, needs to be taught the way to govern themselves, right? That this kind of Western notion of remaking yourself in the world, that your language, that your system of government, that your way of thinking and religious and belief and economics should be the predominant one in the world. And so I think, to me, what you're saying suggests the ways in which we should question that. And this is where you start to hear conversations about decolonizing aid, about questioning how we presume to be leaders in the world in various aspects, of which we may not actually be producing sound results ourselves. And thinking again about this notion of placing ourselves among nations rather than above nations in the ways in which we relate and engage. And I think that it's one of the reasons that we continue to have challenges in the realm of development assistance, in the realm of our diplomacy and foreign policy. Because, again, there is a pushback against that kind of thinking, which is rooted in a deep history that contains much violence and many types of economic and diplomatic pressures to create and sustain the set of power relations which keeps one group of people in one condition and one in another. And so it's a huge question. And how to bring that kind of lofty thinking down to the granular level I think is something that we will have to continue to work on every day. I certainly don't have the answer, but I'm certainly answering—asking, I should say—the questions. PLUMMER: I think I might also think about how is in charge. And this is—you know, it goes back to something we talked about before, when U.S. foreign policy is no longer exclusively rooted in the State Department? So in terms of, you know, who represents the United States abroad and in what ways, and how is that representation perceived, we're really looking at, you know, a lot of different actors. And we're also looking at, you know, changes in the way that the U.S. government itself is perceiving its role, both at home and abroad. And one of the questions was previously asked about the system of incarceration speaks to that, because we have to ask ourselves what are—what are—what are the proper roles and responsibilities and burdens of the state, the government and, you know, what is leased out—(laughs)—in some ways, for profit to private concerns? So I think that, you know, some of this is about, you know, a sense of mission that I don't see out there, that I think will in some respects have to be restored and reinvented. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Erez Manela. Q: Thank you very much for this really terrific and important panel. My name is Erez Manela. I teach the history of U.S. foreign relations at Harvard. And my question actually—I don't know if Irina planned this—but it follows on directly from the previous question. Because I kept on wondering during this panel what—I mean, the focus that we've had here, the topic that's been defined, is the way in which domestic race relations, domestic racism, have shaped U.S. foreign policy. But of course, U.S. foreign policy has been shaped—as the previous questioner noted—has been shaped directly by racism and perceptions of racial hierarchy for—well, since the very beginning. And Professor Adkins spoke very eloquently about it. And of course, Professor Plummer has written eloquently about that, including in her books on Haiti and international relations. But I guess I'm wondering if you could speak more about the specifics about the history that needs to be recognized in that realm, and then—and this is maybe self-interested—whether you have any recommendations, in the way that you recommended Carol Anderson's really terrific book—for reading that we can read ourselves or give our students to read, that would really drive that point home, the influence of racism, race perceptions, race hierarchies themselves on—directly on the conduct of U.S. foreign relations historically. PLUMMER: Well, Professor Manela, I appreciate your own work on Wilson. And you know, that in some respects—that would be a book that I'd recommend. (Laughs.) Might also think about Mary Dudziak's work on Cold War civil rights, and her law review article, Desegregation as a Cold War Imperative, which, you know, directly addresses these questions. Again, what I would like to see is some work that will—perhaps not necessarily a historical perspective—but will address this whole question of the sort of growing, I don't know what you'd call it, multiplicity or multivariant character of American policymaking, you know, as we—as we go forward, you know, past the Cold War era. There's an interesting item by a man named Andrew Friedman, who wrote a book called Covert Capital. I think the subtitle is something like Landscapes of Power, in which we discussed the rise of Northern Virginia as what he sees as the true capital of, you know, parts of the U.S. government, in being a center for the military and for intelligence community. And their shaping of that environment at home, as well as their influence in shaping U.S. policy abroad. So, you know, there's a lot of room for work on these—on these issues. ADKINS: And I would also just follow up—and thank you for the question—and add another book that I just finished. Daniel Immerwahr, from Northwestern University, How to Hide an Empire, which deals in many ways with U.S. foreign policy and the way in which it is explicitly racialized and ways in which that goes understudied in our—in our policy circles, and certainly in the world of education. FASKIANOS: I'm going to try to squeeze in one last question. And I apologize again for not getting to everybody's question. We'll go to Garvey Goulbourne as our final question. Q: Yes. Hi. Can you hear me? FASKIANOS: We can. Q: Yeah. My name's Garvey Goulbourne. I'm a student at the University of Virginia, actually studying abroad this semester in Rabat, Morocco. And my question to you both is: What mechanisms do we have to orient the narratives that our foreign policy leaders are brought up with? Thinking particularly of American exceptionalism and how we kind of place ourselves on a pedestal, whether they be foreign affairs schools or various institutions at different levels of American education, what tools do we have to address the foundations of American perspectives of themselves and our nation in relation to the rest of the world, particularly the global south? FASKIANOS: Who wants to go first? An easy question, of course, to close with. PLUMMER: Go ahead, Mr. Adkins. ADKINS: Sure, sure. Thank you for your question, Garvey. And congratulations on the move out to Morocco. Great to see you there. I think the first thing I would say, of course, is our tools, as far as I am concerned, relate certainly to education. And it's one of the reasons that I am in the classroom. But I know what that fight is like, because even education is taken over by these notions of White supremacy, by these notions of singular historical narratives. And this is why there's been such a push against the 1619 Project of the New York Times, why there is this kind of silly season around the misunderstood origins and contexts of critical race theory. There is this battle over who gets to tell the story of what America is, because it is more than—but it is more than one thing, obviously, to a multiplicity of people. And so I am kind of remiss—or, not remiss. There's no way for me to elucidate for you now a series of tools that will resolve these problems, because these are challenges that people have been wrestling with before our mothers' mothers were born. And so we only are continuing that fight from where we sit. And certainly, in the classrooms that I am in, whether they are in prisons or on campuses, we are always digging into the origin of these themes. And the main frame through which I teach is not just for students to understand this history for their health, but for them to understand this history as a lens through which to view the current world and all of the events and challenges that we find ourselves facing, to see if we can come up with new ways to address them. PLUMMER: Well, one of the things that Mr. Goulbourne could do, since he is in Morocco, is to make use of his own insights in his conversations with Moroccans. So, you know, there is still a role, you know, for individual actors to play some part in attempting to make some changes. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we unfortunately have to close this conversation. It was very rich. Thank you, Travis Adkins and Brenda Gayle Plummer or sharing your insights and analysis with us. We really appreciate it. To all of you, for your questions and comments. Again, I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you. You can follow Travis Adkins @travisladkins, and that's on Twitter. And our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday September 29, at 1:00 p.m. (ET) with Thomas Graham, who is a fellow at CFR. And we'll talk about Putin's Russia. So in the meantime, I encourage you to follow us at @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, Thinkglobalhealth.org, and ForeignAffairs.com for new research and analysis on global issues. So thank you all again and we look forward to continuing the conversation. ADKINS: Take care, everyone. Thank you. (END)

The Bill Press Pod
Our Democracy in Peril. Part 1: The Coup Timeline

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 30:45


In today's episode we go over the timeline of events leading up to the January 6th insurrection and explore the ways Donald Trump and his Chief of Staff, Mark Meadows, tried to overturn the presidential election.Our guide is Ryan Goodman, founding co-editor-in-chief of Just Security, an online forum for the rigorous analysis of national and international security. Goodman is a Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Reiss Center on Law and Security at New York University School of Law. He served as Special Counsel to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2015-16). He is a frequent guest of Chris Hayes on MSNBC. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. They staff our grocery stores, pharmacies, food plants and much more. More information at UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bill Press Pod
Where Science Meets Politics. With The Washington Post's Philip Bump.

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 36:13


Philip Bump is a National Correspondent for the Washington Post who uses science and data to analyze what politicians say or do. As Bill says, "when it comes to politics, he's got the best take on where we are today, how we got here and where we're heading tomorrow." Philip and Bill talk about Ron DeSantis, Mike Lindell, JD Vance, The GOP, AOC and Donald Trump. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union. They're the ones who serve us in the great retail stores like Macy's and Nordstrom's and big grocery stores, like Stop and Shop and Safeway. More information at UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bill Press Pod
"I Alone Can Fix It. Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year."

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 46:19


Carol Leonnig and Phil Rucker follow up their bestselling book, A Very Stable Genius, with this harrowing look at Trump's final year. Bill really loved it and he thinks you will too. You can buy it here on Amazon.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union, staffing our grocery stores, pharmacies, meatpacking plants, and cannabis dispensaries. More information at UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Turning Arizona Blue
Two Parts: Petition Signing Urgency Is Now / Dem Values and Volunteering At United Food Bank

Turning Arizona Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 14:17


First up, a quick reminder that signing time-sensitive petitions before mid-September will allow AZ voters the chance to overturn draconian measures for voter suppression and cuts to public education funding.  While another petition will fight "dark money" in our politics.Second, this episode highlights Democratic values through volunteerism at the United Food Bank in Mesa, AZ. We learn about the monumental challenge of combating food insecurity in AZ and follow Dems from LDs 12, 17, 25 and 28 in an evening shift filled with energy, music, fun and commitment.Turning Arizona Blue (TAB) the podcast is partnering with The Mule News, an online news service dedicated to Maricopa County Democratic politics. Please subscribe for free and confirm your subscription at our website https://themulenews.com/.Please subscribe to TAB where you get podcasts and follow Turning Arizona Blue on our Facebook page and on Twitter @TurningAz. Please reach us at turningazblue@gmail.com for financial and advertising support on our TAB and The Mule News platforms.Scheduling Note: TAB and The Mule News will take a break in August and we'll be back in September.

The Bill Press Pod
"The Seeds Have Been Planted for a Lot of Trouble." With Politics Expert Larry Sabato

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 30:50


Bill talks with one of the most astute political scientists and commentators in the business, Larry Sabato, the founder and director of the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia. He's the author of the Crystal Ball newsletter which is free and you can sign up here.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. Staffing our essential food stores, pharmacies, food plants and the Cannabis industry. More information at UFCW.orgSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Amanda Jaret (UFCW) / Randy Korgan (Teamsters 1932)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 54:40


President Joe Biden has the chance to change the makeup of the National Labor Relations Board, as the terms of two President Donald Trump nominees end in August. United Food and Commercial Workers Assistant General Counsel Amanda Jaret provided some background on the Biden nominees and more on today's episode of AWF Union Podcast. Teamsters Local 1932 Secretary-Treasurer/Principal Officer Randy Korgan also joined the show to advocate for union organizing in the warehouse and trucking industries. He explained the importance of holding organizing drives at Amazon facilities and more.

The Bill Press Pod
No Banging On The Table-The Reporters' Roundtable-July 9

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 39:53


Afghanistan Pull-out. Voting Rights Angst. GOP Chaos Plan. Harris Office Turmoil? January 6th Select Committee. Democratic Moderates in Control. GOP Still Focused on The Big Lie. With Sudeep Reddy Managing Editor at Politico, David Jackson, National Political Correspondent for USA TODAY and Ginger Gibson, Deputy Washington Editor at NBC News Digital.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Kentucky Tonight
Work Shifts: Kentucky's Labor Shortage and Hiring Challenges

Kentucky Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 56:34


Renee Shaw talks with her guests about the state's labor shortage and how companies are facing hiring challenges as they seek to keep pace with the economic recovery. Guests include Caitlin Blair, political and communications director for the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 227; Beth Davisson, vice president of workforce development for the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce; and others.

The Bill Press Pod
" News Was Breaking Out." The Reporters' Roundtable- June 25

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 45:31


Surfside Collapse. Infrastructure Deal. Voting Rights. Critical Race Theory. Jan 6 Select Committee. Rudy Suspended. Harris to the Border. Free Britney. With Maya King, covering national politics for Politico, Jason Dick, Deputy Editor at CQ Roll Call, Host of Political Theater podcast and Kris Van Cleave, Congressional Correspondent for CBS News. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, the backbone of our service workers. More information at UFCW.org.Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Lyn Montgomery (TWU Local 556) / Brigid Kelly (UFCW Local 700)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 54:40


Transit Workers Union Local 556 President Lyn Montgomery was the first featured guest on today's edition of the America's Work Force Union Podcast. She discussed the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the airline industry, passenger misconduct, protecting passengers and flight staff and relaxing COVID-19 guidelines. Today's episode also featured United Food and Commercial Workers Local 700 Communications Director Brigid Kelly. She spoke about the unpredictability of work during the pandemic, overworked grocery store workers trying to keep up with increased shopping demand, workers demanding a safer workplace and why passing the PRO Act will modernize labor law.

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Andrew Peterson (AFGE Local 1969) / Amanda Jaret (UFCW)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 54:40


What are U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs law enforcement officers doing to boost their standing within the administration? Hear from American Federation of Government Employees Local 1969 President Andrew Peterson on today's episode of the America's Work Force Union Podcast. He also discussed what is being done to fix other issues faced by the officers. United Food and Commercial Workers Union Assistant General Counsel Amanda Jaret also joined today's show. In addition to speaking about various National Labor Relations Board matters, Jaret discussed various labor related cases being considered by the U.S. Supreme Court.

AM Quickie
June 4, 2021: DeJoy Under FBI Investigation; UN Report: AI Drone Attacked Humans; Biden Boosts Overseas Vaccine Shipments

AM Quickie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 7:32


Welcome to Majority.FM's AM QUICKIE! Brought to you by justcoffee.coop TODAY'S HEADLINES: There's a new scandal nipping at the heels of Donald Trump's favorite Postal Service bureaucrat, Louis DeJoy. And – bad news for him – it involves the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Meanwhile, a United Nations report from Libya reveals that, possibly for the first time, a drone powered by artificial intelligence selected, pursued and attacked human targets – all on its own. That'll be enough about the wonders of technology, thanks. And lastly, the Biden administration is stepping up US shipments of coronavirus vaccines to foreign countries in a big way. It's an overdue but welcome measure to fight the virus in places where it's still spreading out of control. THESE ARE THE STORIES YOU NEED TO KNOW: He's one of Trump's last holdovers, but maybe not for long. The Washington Post reports that the FBI is investigating Postmaster General Louis DeJoy in connection with campaign fundraising activity involving his former business. FBI agents in recent weeks interviewed current and former employees of DeJoy and the business, asking questions about political contributions and company activities. Prosecutors also issued a subpoena to DeJoy himself. A DeJoy spokesman confirmed the investigation but insisted DeJoy had not knowingly violated any laws. The inquiries could signal legal peril for the controversial head of the nation's mail service – though DeJoy has not been charged with any crimes. Asked yesterday whether President Joe Biden believed DeJoy should step down, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Biden would leave the process to the Department of Justice. The Post says DeJoy – who was appointed to run the Postal Service by its board of governors last May – has been dogged by controversy for almost his entire time in office. Soon after starting in the job, he imposed cost-cutting moves that mail carriers blamed for creating backlogs across the country. Democrats accused the prominent GOP fundraiser, who personally gave more than $1.1 million to Trump's reelection campaign and the Republican Party, of trying to undermine his own organization because of Trump's distrust of mail-in voting. And they were totally right about that. But it seems it'll be other, previously hidden misdeeds that bring down this dastardly saboteur. Hey, whatever does the trick. UN Report: AI Drone Attacked Humans This preview of the next Terminator movie comes from the New York Times. A military drone that attacked soldiers during a battle in Libya's civil war last year may have done so without human control, according to a recent report commissioned by the United Nations. The drone, which the report described as a lethal autonomous weapons systems, was powered by artificial intelligence. It was used by forces backed by the government based in Tripoli, the capital, against enemy militia fighters as they ran away from rocket attacks. The fighters were hunted down and remotely engaged by the drone, according to the report. It did not say whether there were any casualties or injuries. The weapons systems, it said, were "programmed to attack targets without requiring data connectivity between the operator and the munition: in effect a true fire, forget and find capability.: The Kargu-2 was built by STM, a defense company based in Turkey. The Times says the report has been sent to a UN sanctions committee for review. The drone, a Kargu-2, was used as soldiers tried to flee. Once in retreat, they were subject to continual harassment from the drone, according to the report, which was written by the UN Panel of Experts on Libya. Zachary Kallenborn, a researcher who studies drone warfare at the University of Maryland, said the report suggested that for the first time, a weapons systems with artificial intelligence capability operated autonomously to find and attack humans. What a landmark. Oh boy. Biden Boosts Overseas Vaccine Shipments This global pandemic update comes from the Associated Press. President Biden announced yesterday that the US will donate a first tranche of twenty five million doses of surplus vaccine overseas through the UN-backed Covax program. The donation promises infusions for South and Central America, Asia, Africa and others at a time of glaring shortages abroad and more than ample supplies at home. The doses mark a substantial – and immediate – boost to the lagging Covax effort, which to date has shared just seventy six million doses with needy countries. The announcement came just hours after World Health Organization officials in Africa made a new plea for vaccine sharing because of an alarming situation on the continent, where shipments have ground to a near halt while virus cases have spiked. The AP says that overall, the White House has announced plans to share eighty million doses globally by the end of June. Of the first nineteen million donated through Covax, approximately six million doses will go to South and Central America, seven million to Asia and five million to Africa. The remaining six million in the initial distribution will be directed to US allies and partners. In a statement, Biden said, "As long as this pandemic is raging anywhere in the world, the American people will still be vulnerable. And the United States is committed to bringing the same urgency to international vaccination efforts that we have demonstrated at home.". Remember, this isn't over until it's over everywhere. AND NOW FOR SOME QUICKER QUICKIES: The Guardian reports that the Ethiopian government has brushed aside international calls for a ceasefire in the province of Tigray, saying its forces will soon eliminate all armed opposition. The UN said earlier this week that more than ninety percent of people in Tigray need emergency food aid. Between the starvation and the atrocities, it's a true horrorshow. ABC News reports that workers at a South Dakota meatpacking plant that became a coronavirus hotspot last year are considering a strike after contract negotiations between Smithfield Foods and the union have stalled. The Sioux Falls chapter of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union said workers have risked their health and lives throughout the pandemic, arguing the company should do more for its employees. Who can argue? According to Politico, federal prosecutors are examining whether Representative Matt Gaetz obstructed justice during a phone call he had with a witness in the sex-crimes investigation of the Florida congressman. The obstruction inquiry stems from a phone call the witness had with Gaetz's ex-girlfriend. At some point during the conversation, the ex-girlfriend patched Gaetz into the call. Awkward! The AP reports that George P. Bush this week launched his next political move: a run for Texas attorney general in 2022. Bush, who has served as Texas' land commissioner since 2015, is the son of former Florida Governor Jeb Bush. He is the last of the Bush family still in public office. Now that's worth a good clap. AM QUICKIE - JUNE 4, 2021 HOSTS - Sam Seder & Lucie Steiner WRITER - Corey Pein PRODUCER - Dorsey Shaw EXECUTIVE PRODUCER - Brendan Finn

The Bill Press Pod
Trump and The Law- w/ The Washington Post's David Fahrenthold

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 30:24


Two criminal investigations in NY. One in Georgia. Lawsuits all over. Can Trump escape accountability one more time? Bill talks to David Fahrenthold, the Pulitzer Prize winning reporter for The Washington Post. Fahrenthold has been on the Trump legal/finance beat since 2016. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.

The Dom Giordano Program
UFCW Local 1776 President Wendell Young IV On New CDC Masking Guidelines

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 26:10


Wendell W. Young IV, President of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1776 Keystone State, joins the Dom Giordano Program to discuss the union's stance on the CDC's mask guidelines. Earlier this week, Young provided an interview to KDKA in which he made the argument that supermarkets should classify along with airports and other busy areas as places that citizens should continue masking. Giordano and Young duke it out over this issue, with Giordano making the argument that the CDC would've specifically grouped supermarkets into their announcement if they had meant for supermarkets to be grouped together. Also, Giordano and Young discuss the push by the union to get its workers vaccinated, and who would be responsible for determining who is and isn't vaccinated and allowed to enter into businesses without a mask. (Photo by Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bill Press Pod
"A Coldly Political Perspective." The Reporters' Roundtable May 14

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 42:26


The Great Unmasking. Cheney Purged. It's Trump's Party. January 6th Denialism. Trump/Gaetz Indictments Coming? With Leah Askarinam Editor of National Journal Hotline, Sudeep Reddy, Managing Editor at Politico and Gabe Debenedetti National Correspondent for New York Magazine.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the frontline workers of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
"The Purge is On." The Reporters' Roundtable-May 7

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 35:57


Liz Cheney Drama. Biden Goes Populist. McConnell Obstructs. California Weird. With Jason Dick, Deputy Editor at CQ/Roll Call, Addy Baird, Politics Reporter for BuzzFeed News, Igor Bobic, Politics Reporter at HuffPost, and Maya King, Politics Reporter at Politico.Today's Bill Press Pod is sponsored by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union. With 1.3 million members they are on the frontlines in our grocery stores, pharmacies, meat processing plants and many other retail locations. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
Infrastructure: The View from Congress

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 34:09


Congressman John Yarmuth (D) KY is chair of the all important House Budget Committee. A very Blue representative from a very Red state, he talks with Bill about the chances for Biden's expansive infrastructure bill. Will the D's stick together? Will R's in Congress get on board? Why we need it all. Plus he has some very strong words for fellow Kentuckian, Mitch McConnell. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union. Manning the grocery stores, pharmacies and meat processing plants, they got us through the worst of the pandemic. More information at UFCW.org.

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Amanda Jaret (UFCW) / Steve Melink (Melink Corporation) / Matt Rothschild (Wisconsin Democracy Campaign)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 54:29


The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union Assistant General Counsel Amanda Jaret was the first of three guests on today’s edition of the AWF Union Podcast. Jaret spoke about the union efforts at Amazon in Alabama, Amazon’s exit bonuses to workers who quit during the time of voting for unions and organizing workers at a Tesla factory. Melink Corporation CEO Steve Melink was also featured on AWF Union Podcast today. He discussed his company's energy efficiency plans, President Biden’s infrastructure plans and clean coal and carbon capture projects. The final guest on today’s show was Steve Rothschild of the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign. He spoke about a state superintendent election, campaign finance reform and why the state of Wisconsin went for President Biden.

Alan Carter
Can Amazon's Canadian workers unionize?

Alan Carter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 8:14


Alan is joined by United Food and Workers Union's Debora De Angelis to discuss the possibility of unionizing for Canadian Amazon workers.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bill Press Pod
"Infrastructure Week"! The Reporters' Roundtable-April 1

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 43:28


Infrastructure. Govs vs. CDC. Border. Matt Gaetz/Tucker Carlson. Chauvin Trial. With Jennifer Haberkorn, Congressional Reporter for The LA Times, Matt Gertz, Senior Fellow at Media Matters for America and Alex Seitz-Wald, Senior Digital Politics Reporter for NBC News. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, on the frontlines in our grocery stores, meat packing plants and many more retail locations. More information at UFCW.org

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner
Service Worker Solidarity with Mikayla and Zoee of the Bitching and Wining Podcast

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 108:33


What's up to my curious clementines and tangential tangelos! Welcome back to the BNP y'all, and dang do I have an excellent episode on offer. Making their groundbreaking debut on Barbarian Noetics is Mikayla and Zoee of the Bitching and Wining podcast! Bitching and Wining is a comedy podcast out of Winnipeg, Manitoba, hosted by long time friends Mikayla and Zoee. Topics range far and wide from dating as a millennial, to dolphin people, to artisanal waxing, to yak fur and kangaroos, and everything in between! Mikayla and Zoee are an absolute delight to chat with and I'm excited to share this conversation with my BNP tribe. In this two-part conversation, we chat about how the girls met, how they decided to start a podcast and some of the karmic obstacles inherent in such an endeavor.  Then in the 2nd part of the talk, Mikayla  and Zoee share an inspiring story of how they joined with their local United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) chapter to unionize their workplace, a restaurant in their home town of Winnipeg. It's fascinating and instructive to hear the nuts and bolts of how they successfully executed their union drive and organized the union. Also instructive is the bonkers lengths the bosses at their restaurant went to attempt to prevent them from unionizing. You'll have to tune in to find out what happened once their union was affirmatively voted for and formed. Definitely subscribe to Bitching and Wining y'all! It's my go-to pod for when I need to lighten things up a bit from always talking about Joe Biden's hellish foreign policy or the decrepitude of the Earth's ecosystems.  Yikes. Sometimes we need a laugh, and Bitching and Wining delivers.  Also check them out on IG @ bitching.and.wining. Big thank you to Mikayla and Zoee for jumping on the pod and sharing some stories and some laughs with us. Crossover episode is coming soon where we flipped roles and I got to enjoy sitting back and answering questions as a guest on the Bitching and Wining pod.  Thank you for rating, reviewing and subscribing to the BNP wherever you listen to podcasts, and for spreading the word and telling a friend about the BNP- it's how we expand this tribe of philosopher-barbarians and un-fuck the world together!   Can haz patrons? Go to www.patreon.com/noetics and sign up for as little as $1/month to receive several hundred acres of beachfront real estate on Ibiza!*Can haz followers? BNP on IG @conantanner Send me a haiku at barbarian.noetics@gmail.comUntil next week everyone, be good to yourselves and to each other. One Love,ConanTRACKLIST FOR THIS EPISODEMetro Boomin - Overdue (Instrumental)Dykotomi - Corvid CrunkMIA - Paper Planes (Afrikan Boy Remix)J Dilla - Too Much (Extended Mix)L'indecis - The God Behind the PinesL'indecis - Plethoria (Full Album)Mindful Vibes - Episode Three (Mix)Durand Jones and the Indications - Morning in AmericaNighttime Ramen - Jazzy Beats Lo Fi (Mix) Tibeauthetraveler - Motions (Mix) Le Yus & L'indecis - Paradoxes*this offer is not valid... anywhere. I love you tho. Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/noetics)

AM Quickie
Mar 19, 2021: US Reaches Vaccination Goal

AM Quickie

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 9:00


Welcome to Majority.FM's AM QUICKIE! Brought to you by justcoffee.coop TODAY'S HEADLINES: The pace of vaccinations is stepping up in the United States. But one group of holdouts – Republican men – now threatens the collective goal of reaching widespread immunity. Meanwhile, with his business empire on the ropes and his social media accounts suspended, Donald Trump has more urgent and costly problems to worry about. Since losing the White House, he’s become a magnet for legal actions both civil and criminal. And lastly, Seattle got sued by big business after passing a measure mandating pandemic hazard pay increases for workers at large grocery chains. Now a federal court has ruled in favor of the city – and those essential workers. THESE ARE THE STORIES YOU NEED TO KNOW: With the US closing in on President Joe Biden’s goal of injecting one hundred million coronavirus vaccinations, officials announced yesterday the nation is now in position to help supply neighbors Canada and Mexico, the Associated Press reports. The Biden administration announced the outlines of a plan to loan vaccines to Canada and Mexico even as the president announced that the US is on the cusp of meeting his one hundred-day injection goal today. The US is injecting an average of about two point two million doses each day – and the pace of vaccination is likely to dramatically rise later this month in conjunction with an expected surge in supply. Meanwhile, the Washington Post reports that Mississippi on Tuesday joined Alaska in making the vaccines available to all residents age sixteen and older. A number of individual counties, from Arizona to North Carolina, have also beckoned everyone to make appointments. These places offer the rest of the country a glimpse of the future. Some residents are thrilled to have the chance to be inoculated. But many other people are holding back, spotlighting challenges related to equity, access and trust that could complicate the quest to reach the high levels of immunity needed to stop the virus’s spread. Nirav Shah, director of Maine’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention, told the Post he has been hearing from colleagues across the country that they are starting to see appointments go unfilled. Polling suggests rural residents and Republicans are among the least likely to get in line for a coronavirus vaccine. A recent NPR-PBS survey found white Republicans were more hesitant than any other subset of the population. Republican men were especially disinclined, with forty nine percent saying they don’t plan to get vaccinated. What can you say, except stupid is as stupid does? Trump Drowning In Lawsuits This update on the legal woes of a certain former Twitter user comes from the Washington Post. The district attorney is sifting through millions of pages of his tax records. The state attorney general has subpoenaed his lawyers, his bankers, his chief financial officer – even one of his sons. And that’s just in New York. Donald Trump is also facing criminal investigations in Georgia and the District of Columbia related to his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. And Trump must defend himself against a growing raft of lawsuits: twenty nine are pending at last count. No charges have been filed against Trump in any of these investigations. The outcome of these lawsuits is uncertain. But the sheer volume of these legal problems indicates that – after a moment of maximum invincibility in the White House – Trump has fallen to a point of historic vulnerability before the law. The Post identified six ongoing investigations that could involve Trump. Of the investigations, the broadest appear to be two in New York: a criminal probe begun by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Junior in 2018, and a separate civil inquiry begun by state Attorney General Letitia James in 2019. In addition, Trump faces three probes related to his efforts to overturn his loss to President Biden. Two are in Georgia, where Trump, in a phone call, pressured Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to find enough votes to let him win. In Washington, DC Attorney General Karl Racine has also opened a criminal investigation into Trump’s actions on January 6th, when his supporters sacked the Capitol. Among the twenty nine lawsuits Trump is facing, about eighteen result from disputes with his properties. The rest seem to have been brought on by his presidency. This may sound bad, but he’s getting off very, very easy. Seattle Hazard Pay Upheld Here’s some news about a legal victory for workers on the left coast. A federal judge has dismissed a grocery industry lawsuit that sought to block Seattle’s new law granting $4- an-hour raises to grocery store workers for the duration of the coronavirus pandemic, the Seattle Times reports. The law applies to large grocers, those with more than five hundred employees worldwide and stores larger than ten thousand square feet, in Seattle. It mandates a $4-an-hour pay boost for all workers in retail locations. And that pay boost must remain in effect for as long as Seattle remains in a declared civil emergency. The City Council passed the wage hike law unanimously in late January, the Times says, after advocacy from the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 21. Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, whose office defended the law, said QUOTE This is a big win for grocery store employees who have been critical and vulnerable frontline workers since the start of the pandemic ENDQUOTE. The lawsuit, filed in US District Court in Seattle, alleged the city’s law interferes with the collective-bargaining process between grocery stores and unions and also picks winners and losers by singling out large grocery companies. Holmes countered that the law is well within the city’s purview of protecting workers and regulating business. Other cities, mostly along the West Coast, including Los Angeles, Berkeley and Long Beach, California, have also recently forwarded or approved similar hazard pay boosts for grocery workers, according to the Times. Seattle has made several efforts to boost the pay of lower- wage essential workers who are often far more exposed to the virus than higher-wage office workers, many of whom have shifted to remote work. These are good ideas that more cities should copy, especially now that there’s court precedent behind them. AND NOW FOR SOME QUICKER QUICKIES: The Senate approved William Burns yesterday as director of the CIA, the New York Times reports. Burns was approved by unanimous consent in the Senate. A former ambassador in Russia and Jordan and a senior State Department official, Burns, sixty four, is the only career diplomat chosen to lead the CIA. And now he’s just another old white spy. Republican Representative Chip Roy of Texas said he had no apologies after he made what appeared to be a pro-lynching remark during a congressional hearing on combatting anti-Asian American violence, NBC News reports. In a tirade about free speech, Roy said Congress should QUOTE find all the rope in Texas and get a tall oak tree ENDQUOTE. In response, New York Democratic Representative Grace Meng said such rhetoric put a QUOTE a bull's-eye on the back of Asian Americans across this country ENDQUOTE. Indeed. ProPublica reports that nine months after racial justice protests swept across New York City and videos showed police punching, kicking and trapping demonstrators, the city agency responsible for investigating abuses has revealed the number of officers who have so far faced serious disciplinary charges. Two. One involved an officer who flashed a white power sign, and the other concerned an officer who hit a protester with a baton. Oink, I mean oy. Tanzania’s president, John Magufuli, one of Africa’s most prominent Covid-19 deniers, has died after a two-week absence from public life that prompted speculation that he had contracted the disease, the Guardian reports. He was sixty one. Magufuli denied the spread of Covid-19 in Tanzania and claimed vaccines were dangerous, suggesting instead that people pray and inhale herb-infused steam. What, no bleach injections? Trust the science! MAR 19, 2021 - AM QUICKIE HOSTS - Sam Seder & Lucie Steiner WRITER - Corey Pein PRODUCER - Dorsey Shaw EXECUTIVE PRODUCER - Brendan Finn

Civic
Vaccinations and Hazard Pay Concern Grocery Store Union

Civic

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2021 29:00


Grocery store workers are the latest to be eligible for vaccination. As part of our “Essential Worker” series we spoke with Jim Araby, director of strategic campaigns for United Food and Commercial Workers Local 5 about how they are trying to get their 28,000 members vaccinated and why they are fighting for hazard pay during the remaining days of the pandemic.

Steady Habits: A CT Mirror Podcast
Is CT's New Vaccine Strategy Prioritizing Speed Over Equity?

Steady Habits: A CT Mirror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2021 32:16


State residents were surprised by Gov. Ned Lamont’s announcement this week that Connecticut was changing course on its vaccine distribution plans. Instead of essential workers and those with underlying health conditions going next in line, the state will move to a strictly age-based vaccine rollout.  Some essential workers, such as grocery store employees, have told The Mirror that they’re “disgusted” by their removal from the front of the line. And Ron Petronella, of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 371 in Westport told WSHU, “It’s upsetting to us that the stores are busier now than ever, and the infection can spread more easily there, I think, than in the classroom.”  That’s in reference to the only exception being made to the age-based rollout, for school teachers and childcare workers, who’ll be able to get vaccines at clinics set up specially for them.  Lamont said this plan keeps it simple. “Look, we are not blazing a new trail. We looked over at Europe and we've seen a great deal of success there. The healthcare professionals gave me a great deal of confidence that we are still prioritizing those most at risk so I think it’s the right way to go,” Lamont said. The change, as we have documented, means fewer people of color and those at higher risk of dying from COVID-19 will be eligible for shots in the next round. Equity advocates, like Tekisha Everette, executive director of Health Equity Solutions, and a member of the state vaccine allocation subcommittee, tells us she’s “wary” of the age-based approach, and disappointed that her recommendations weren’t heeded. She also said she didn’t even learn of the change until moments before it became public.  Another group that was upset by the change is the disability rights community. Many states have prioritized people with underlying health conditions This episode, we also talk with Kathy Flaherty, executive director of Connecticut Legal Rights Project. She told The Mirror that the new plan was “heartbreaking” for people who “have been left behind.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bill Press Pod
The Enemy Within: QAnon. Proud Boys. Oath Keepers. 3%ers.

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 44:24


The Southern Poverty Law Center this week released their annual Year in Hate and Extremism report. Bill talks to the Center's Chief Investigative Reporter and Spokesperson, Michael Edison Hayden. He paints a scary picture of anti-democratic and racist right wing organizations. And discusses the radicalization of people not part of these organized groups. Oh, and yes, Trump made it worse. Today's Bill Press is supported by The United Food and Commercial Workers. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
"Hopeful But Realistic." The Roundtable Jan-22

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2021 42:36


Great Inauguration, Biden acts fast, Impeachment looms, chance for bi-partisanship? With Chris Lu, Fmr Top Obama WH Aide, Eliza Collins, Politics Reporter, The Wall Street Journal and David Jackson WH Correspondent for USA Today.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union. On the front lines keeping us fed and so much more. Information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
Accountability. w/Reps. Cicilline and Dingell

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2021 32:33


Congressman David Cicilline (D-RI is one of the three drafters of The Articles of Impeachment. Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-MI) has lived in what she calls Trump's "Hate Tunnel" for over 2 years. They give Bill the inside info on the 25th Amendment and the all but certain second impeachment of Donald Trump.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
Madeleine Albright: Worried Optimist

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2021 38:58


Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright talks to Bill about the state of foreign relations today, what to expect from President-elect Joe Biden and her recent book, "Hell and Other Destinations."Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by these unions fighting hard everyday for working men and women. The United Food and Commercial Workers Union,The International Association of Fire Fighters,The Laborers International of Union of North America,The International Brotherhood of Teamsters,The American Federation of Teachers,The International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers,The United SteelworkersandThe Iron Workers Union.

The Bill Press Pod
Ina Garten: Modern Comfort Food.

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 48:11


Ina Garten superfan Bill takes a needed step away from politics (for all of us!) to indulge his love of cooking and The Barefoot Contessa. They discuss her life in the kitchen, in The Office of Management and Budget (OMB, yes,really) and her new cookbook, Modern Comfort Food. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by these unions fighting hard everyday for working men and women. The United Food and Commercial Workers Union,The International Association of Fire Fighters,The Laborers International of Union of North America,The International Brotherhood of Teamsters,The American Federation of Teachers,The International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers,The United SteelworkersandThe Iron Workers Union.

The Bill Press Pod
Susan Rice: In the Biden White House

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2020 25:18


Susan Rice will be the Director of The Domestic Affairs Council in the Biden-Harris Administration. Bill talked to her about how her experiences in the Clinton and Obama Administrations shaped her views of public service, experiences that will no doubt influence how she approaches her new, high-level job. They discuss her book, Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by these unions fighting hard everyday for working men and women. The United Food and Commercial Workers Union,The International Association of Fire Fighters,The Laborers International of Union of North America,The International Brotherhood of Teamsters,The American Federation of Teachers,The International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers,The United SteelworkersandThe Iron Workers Union.

The Bill Press Pod
Punish Trump's Enablers!

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2020 40:15


We should not let Trump's election lawyers, the Republican Attorneys General or the Congressmen who joined their now dismissed Supreme Court case off the hook. There must be a cost or the GOP can continue to assault our democracy. Today Bill talks with Scott Harshbarger co-founder of Lawyers Defending American Democracy, former National President of Common Cause and two-time Attorney General of Massachusetts who lays out what should happen to the lawyers and AG's filing those frivolous lawsuits. His op ed in The Boston Globe here.Also joining the conversation is Les Francis, former Chief of Staff for Congressman Norman Mineta and Deputy White House Chief of Staff for President Jimmy Carter. He is focused on the GOP Congressmen who claimed the elections in their states were rigged but want Congress to accept THEIR own elections as fair. Nope. Read his piece for Real Clear Politics here.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by these unions fighting hard everyday for working men and women. The United Food and Commercial Workers Union, The International Association of Fire Fighters, The Laborers International of Union of North America, The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, The American Federation of Teachers, The International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers, The United Steelworkers and The Iron Workers Union.

The Bill Press Pod
"We Are Barely One Country"- With CNN's Ron Brownstein

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2020 37:29


One of the top political writers, Brownstein is a senior editor at The Atlantic & a senior political analyst for CNN. He and Bill worry about the future of both parties as the Red-Blue divide gets deeper. And Trumpism is not going away. Ron's CNN work can be found here. His work for The Atlantic here.Today's Bill Press Pods is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org

The Bill Press Pod
The Man Who Ran Washington

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2020 45:02


The Man Who Ran Washington: The Life and Times of James A. Baker III by Peter Baker(no relation), Chief White House Correspondent for The New York Times and his wife, Susan Glasser, Staff Writer for The New Yorker. Bill says its among the best political biographies he has ever read. And he's read a lot. Baker, Glasser and Bill explore a time in DC when things got done before Newt Gingrich tore it all down. Baker worked for presidents Ford, Reagan, Bush and Bush. But not Trump. Glasser and Baker give their deeply reported assessments of Trump right now, You can order the book from Amazon. Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
Trump Who? The Roundtable-Nov 6

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 36:52


Biden will win, but can he get anything done with the GOP Senate? With Sudeep Reddy, Managing Editor at Politico and Lauren Burke. Writer for Black Press USA.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
"It's a Television Show" -The Roundtable Oct 16th

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 58:38


E-mails! Dueling Town Halls. Covid. Amy Coney Barrett. 18 days to Go. With Matthew Gertz, Senior Fellow at Media Matters, Amanda Becker, Washington Correspondent 19th News and John T. Bennett, Washington Bureau Chief & Columnist, The Independent.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the frontline workers of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
"What On Earth is He Doing?" The Roundtable Oct 9

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2020 43:27


Trump's physical and mental state. WH Covid outbreak. Stimulus? Debates? Supreme Court? Domestic Terror in Michigan. With Igor Bobic, Politics Reporter at The Huffington Post, Sudeep Reddy, Managing Editor, Politico and Eliza Collins, Politics Reporter covering the presidential election for The Wall Street Journal.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. 1.3 Million strong. More information at UFCW.org.

The Bill Press Pod
A Progressive's Take on Biden 2020

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 26:08


Wisconsin Congressman Mark Pocan, Co-Chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus and an early and enthusiastic Sanders supporter, on his support for Biden-Harris, the protests and police violence in Kenosha and which way will Wisconsin go in the presidential race.Today's Bll Press Pod is sponsored by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union, with millions on the front lines in our grocery stores and pharmacies. Many have been sickened by Covid-19 and too many have died. More information at UFCW.org

The Bill Press Pod
103 Union Grocery Workers Dead from Covid.

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2020 18:34


United Food and Commercial Workers Union President Marc Perrone on the casualties, the end of hazard pay, the dangers of enforcing mask mandates and steps the Union is taking to fill the gaps left by an inadequate Federal Government response.

The Bill Press Pod
The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump. Episode 2

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2020 47:24


"The Goldwater Rule" has been used by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) to convince mainstream media to suppress the expertise of psychiatrists on Donald Trump's mental state. Bill talks to two psychiatrists who explain the origins of the"Rule, " and how they had tried to modify it in the face of the dangers Trump posed. Now, they say, their expertise is no longer welcome in the mainstream media. Bill's guests are Dr. Bandy Lee, a psychiatrist on the faculty of the Yale Medical School and the Editor of The New York Times bestseller, The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President. Also joining Bill is Dr. Leonard Glass, is associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.Today's Bill Press Pod is sponsored by The United Food and Commercial Workers Union. On the frontlines during the pandemic in our grocery stores, pharmacies and food processing plants. More Information at UFCW.ORG.

The Bill Press Pod
"The Panic is Heightening" The Roundtable July 24

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2020 52:34


Moms face the Feds in Portland. GOP Convention OFF but schools ON? Trump claims he doesn't dementia. Again. Obama and Joe talk. AOC shines. With Pema Levy, Reporter for Mother Jones, Ginger Gibson, Editor at NBC News Digital and Chris Lu, fmr. Obama Cabinet Secretary.Today's Bill Press Pod is sponsored by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, on the frontlines in our supermarkets and food processing plants. More Information at UFCW.org

The Bill Press Pod
Beware Angry Voters In a Down Economy-The Roundtable-July 17

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2020 44:42


Trump losing it. Covid winning. Schools not opening. Masks. Masks. The Roundtable with Addy Baird, Politics Reporter, BuzzFeed News, Sudeep Reddy, Managing Editor, Politico and Vann Newkirk, Senior Editor for The Atlantic and host of the Floodlines Podcast.Today's Bill Press Pod is sponsored by the frontline workers of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org