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Latest podcast episodes about Reply

The Spin Sucks Podcast with Gini Dietrich
[REPLY] The Differences between Marketing, Communication and PR

The Spin Sucks Podcast with Gini Dietrich

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 13:38


Please enjoy this summer reply of last year's popular, The Differences between Marketing, Communications and PR! What drives Gini Dietrich absolutely batty? Thinking that the diffrent elements of communication are totally different fields that stand alone. We're all communicators whether we're in email marketing or crisis communications or anything in between. Listen to this week's episode to find out why.

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories
My Entitled Friend Decided To Kick Me Out Of Her Bridal Party Due TO My Hair Loss r/Relationships

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 23:05


Relationship Reddit Stories, OP has been helping their friend with their upcoming wedding, has spent loads of money on dresses but due to health issues has started losing her hair. Bride decides to kick her out of the wedding.

The Working With... Podcast
What Do I do With This email?

The Working With... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 14:01


What do I do with this email? That's what we'll be looking at in this week's episode. You can subscribe to this podcast on: Podbean | Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | TUNEIN Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Linkedin   Email Mastery Course The Time Blocking Course The Working With… Weekly Newsletter The Time And Life Mastery Course The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl's YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page   Episode 235 | Script Hello and welcome to episode 235 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein and I am your host for this show. Email. Possibly the most revolutionary new form of communication in the business world over the last thirty years. It's transformed the way businesses communicate with each other and speeded up aspects of our work that in the past took days if not weeks to do before its advent.  However, as with all great new things, it can be abused and email has likely been one of the most abused innovations. Now, things that could have waited until the next meeting, are often quickly written down in an email and sent to the other side of the world, with an expectation of an almost instant reply. And that is where many of the issues with email rest. But, another problem for us today is where do you put important emails that do not need a reply, but do need to be kept for informational purposes or just in case? That is what we will be exploring this week.  And so, without further ado, let me hand you over to the Mystery Podcast Voice for this week's question.  This week's question comes from Anna. Anna asks, hi Carl, I get hundreds of emails each day, many of which do not need a reply, I just need to keep them, and I struggle to know where to put them. I don't trust sending them to the archive, so I have a huge list of folders that are now overwhelming me. Do you have any tips or tricks to better manage email? Great question, Anna, thank you for sending it in. The key to getting on top of email is to understand the basics of what you need. Let me explain: The inbox is for collecting email. It is where all the messages that are sent to your address will come in. It's the collection point. The archive is for emails that you've either dealt with or want to keep for future reference and then there's the trash for emails you no longer need to keep.  Now, on their own, those folders could work in a system. But I feel there's one folder that bridges the gap between the inbox and the archive and that is a folder for emails you need to take action on.  I call this folder the “Action This Day” folder. Any email that requires action from me, will go into that folder. That could be emails I need to reply to, emails I want to read such as newsletters or reference emails with information I want to transfer to a project note.  Over the years, I've seen some pretty elaborate structures in email with long lists of project folders or folders for bosses and colleagues emails. These are still the most common ways for people to organise their email. It can work—up to a point. It stops working once the folder list becomes so long it takes forever to find a folder to save a mail message.  And there lies the “secret” to better managing email—speed.  As with most things related to productivity, the less time you spend organising your tools and stuff, the more time you can spend doing the work. All these folders you created, Anna, work if the volume of email you receive is low—less than twenty to thirty mails per day—when you receive over 100 emails a day, this system is going to break. It will slow you down so you spend far too much time organising it instead of dealing with it.  A question I would ask you, is why do you not trust archive? The archive is a great place to store your non-actionable, reference mail because it is searchable via sender's name, keyword, topic or date range. As long as you know at least one of those search terms, you will find anything in seconds.  Now if there is a fear you will lose it in archive, always remember, if you receive an email there will be a copy of it somewhere. If you replied with an acknowledgement mail (a thank you for sending that mail) then you also have a copy of it in your sent folder. There's nothing wrong in asking someone to resend an email they sent you. I am sure people would prefer that to someone simply ignoring their mail.  Search within email has come a long way in the last five years. All top email services have excellent search. Gmail, Outlook, and Apple Mail are fast and have multiple ways to find a mail.  There are thousands of articles and videos online explaining how to get the most out of search on these services. This is where we can develop our skills and learn how to search our email effectively. Just type a search query in Google for “How to search Gmail, or Outlook, Apple Mail” etc. Then set aside an hour or two to study.  It will take a little while to become competent at search, but once you learn the basics and apply what you learn, your confidence in your archive will grow and pretty soon you will be able to let go of all those folders.  Now, what about managing your mail. What do you do with it? Well, there are a number of different types of email. The easiest to deal with are all those newsletters you receive that you don't read.  Often these are newsletters from industry bodies you feel compelled to read because they are about your industry. Now if you read them, great. When they arrive, put them in your action this day folder for reading later in the day.  If you don't read them, unsubscribe from them.  Here's an interesting thing, there will always be someone who does read them and if there is anything interesting they will tell you. You can always ask them to forward them the email. Alternatively, you can resubscribe at any time.  The problem I've seen is people who subscribe to these newsletters and never read them. They place them in a dedicated folder and pretty soon they have thousands of unread newsletters. Seriously, you are never going to read them. Let them go.  All those mails are taking up digital space and slowing down your mail. You want mail to be fast and efficient. With thousands of unread newsletters clogging up your system, you will be slow.  Get real, and be honest with yourself. If you are not reading these mails, let them go. Unsubscribe.  Actionable mails get dropped into your Action This Day folder for acting on later in the day. These are easy to deal with when you are processing mail. If you need to reply, drop it in your Action This Day folder.  Now those emails that contain a paragraph or two that are relevant to a project but do not need a reply—the CC'd emails. What I do is rather than send the whole email to my project notes, I copy and paste the relevant parts of the email directly into the project note and link back to the original email. If your email app doesn't allow linking directly to a mail, then copy and paste the title of the email together with the date the mail was sent into your project notes. That way, if you do need to reference the original email again, you have your search terms.  There is a class of mail that doesn't need a reply immediately but does require a lot of work. This to me is a project and therefore I would treat the email as an instruction to begin a project. That means I open up a project note in my projects folder in my notes app, paste the email and add the link back, then I will add a task in my task manager's inbox. I can decide later when I will begin work on the project. The original email is then archived. I have a link back to the original email, and the relevant instructions are now in a project note.  For linking back, Gmail, of course, is the best at this as each email you receive will have its own unique URL. Apple Mail allows you to drag and drop emails into notes that generate an in-system link back, and With Outlook as long as you are using OneNote as your notes app, any email sent to OneNote will also have a track backlink.  And that's a good point, I know there are a lot of great notes apps around, but you are only making things harder for yourself if you are using Outlook mail and a third-party notes app that doesn't allow you to link back to an email. Apple Mail and Apple Notes work fantastically together. My advice is don't make life harder for yourself than is strictly necessary.  Now, what about emails you are waiting for a reply on. This one is interesting because in many ways if you don't trust the person you sent the email to reply to you, then there's an issue with trust, not an issue with email. It's easier to blame mail, a lot harder to blame your own lack of trust.  However, there are some emails you may need to keep as you wait for a response. One of which would online orders. I keep the order confirmation email in a waiting for folder, just in case there is a problem with the order. However, emails I sent to a colleague or client, I would add a note in the relevant project to tell me when I sent an email.  The problem with waiting for folders is they don't automatically clean themselves out. What I mean is when you get what you asked for, we forget to remove the sent email from our waiting for folder. Pretty soon, that folder fills up with things you are still waiting for and stuff that you received a reply to weeks ago.  This is about minimising what you are keeping. It's more effective to add a note to the project note with a date you sent the email than it is to add another mail to a waiting for folder.  Another issue I have with waiting for folders is if you have a task that says “get presentation materials from Jane”, and you send the email to Jane asking for the materials, you have not completed the task. You do not have the materials from Jane, therefore the task is not complete. The task was not “send email to Jane” it was to get the presentation materials. Don't complete the task, reschedule it a day or two in the future. That will be the reminder to you that you still have not received the materials.  Managing email can be simple or complex. Which one you choose will have a big impact on how effective you are at dealing with mail. The truth is we've always received a lot of mail. Even before email. The trick is to develop a system that filters out the necessary learning only the necessary to deal with.  One final point. There are two parts to managing email. Processing and doing. Don't mix up the two. Processing is about clearing your inbox as fast as possible. It does not involve doing email—even if it would take two minutes or less. Just clear that inbox as fast as you can. Then set aside an hour at the end of the day for dealing with your actionable mail. Doing it later in the day avoids email ping pong because it's unlikely you will get a reply on the same day. Reply in the morning and you'll be doubling up your email.  I have a course on managing email called Email Mastery. I have put a link to that in the show notes for you.  SO, there you go, Anna. I hope that has covered most of the types of emails you receive. Thank you for your question. And thank you to you too for listening. It just remains for me now to wish you all a very very productive week.   

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #92: Alterra Mountain Company CEO Rusty Gregory

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 91:45


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 25. Free subscribers got it on June 28. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoRusty Gregory, CEO of Alterra Mountain Company, owner of the Ikon PassRecorded onJune 23, 2022About Alterra Mountain CompanyOwned by: KSL Capital and Henry Crown and CompanyAbout the Ikon PassHere’s a breakdown of all the ski areas that are party to Alterra’s Ikon Pass:Why I interviewed himIn its first five years, Alterra has gotten just about everything right – or about as right as any ski company can as it Starfoxes its way through an asteroid belt filled with Covid and empowered workers and shattered supply chains and The Day After Tomorrow weather patterns and an evolving social fabric and the sudden realization by U.S. Americans that there’s such a thing as outside. The company changed the name of one of America’s iconic resorts, managed a near meltdown of its Pacific Northwest anchor, met Covid as well as it could, and continually tweaked Ikon Pass access tiers to avoid overwhelming partner mountains while still offering skiers good value. Oh, and adding Sun Valley, Snowbasin, Chamonix, Dolomiti Superski, Kitzbühel, Schweitzer, Red Mountain, Mt. Bachelor, and Windham to the pass – all since Covid hit.If it’s all seemed a little improvisational and surprising, that’s because it has been. “I have a great propensity for enjoying chaos and anarchy,” Gregory tells me in the podcast. That explains a lot. In the frantic weeks after Covid zipped North American skiing shut in March 2020, angry skiers demanded concessions for lost spring skiing. Vail released, all at once, an encyclopedic Epic Pass credit plan, which metered discounts based upon number of days skied and introduced an “Epic Coverage” program that secured your investment in the event of everything from a Covid resurgence to the death of a beloved houseplant. Alterra, meanwhile, spun its plan together in four dispatches weeks apart – a renewal discount here, a deferral policy there, an extension six weeks later. “We’re continuing to strengthen our offerings,” Gregory told me on the podcast mid-way through this staggered rollout.In other words, Dude, just chill. We’ll get it right. Whether they ultimately did or not – with their Covid response or anything else – is a bit subjective. But I think they’ve gotten more right than wrong. There was nothing inevitable about Alterra or the Ikon Pass. Vail launched the Epic Pass in 2008. It took a decade for the industry to come up with an effective response. The Mountain Collective managed to gather all the best indies into a crew, but its reach was limited, with just two days at each partner. M.A.X. Pass, with five days per partner, got closer, but it was short on alpha mountains such as Jackson Hole or Snowbird (it did feature Big Sky, Copper, Steamboat, and Winter Park) and wasn’t a season pass to any ski area. The Ikon Pass knitted together an almost impossible coalition of competitors into a coherent product that was an actual Epic Pass equal. Boyne, Powdr, and the ghosts of Intrawest joining forces was a bit like the Mets and the Red Sox uniting to take on the Yankees. It was – and is – an unlikely coalition of competitors fused around a common cause.The Ikon Pass was a great idea. But so was AOL-Time Warner – or so it seemed at the time. But great things, combined, do not always work. They can turn toxic, backfire, fail. Five years in, Alterra and Ikon have, as Gregory tells me, “dramatically exceeded our expectations in every metric for the fifth year in a row.” While Rusty is allergic to credit, he deserves a lot. He understands how complex and unruly and unpredictable skiing and the ski industry is. He came up under the tutelage of the great and feisty Dave McCoy, founder of the incomparable and isolated Mammoth Mountain, that snowy California kingdom that didn’t give a damn what anyone else was doing. He understood how to bring people together while allowing them to exist apart. That’s not easy. I can’t get 10 people to agree to a set of rules at a tailgate cornhole tournament (the beer probably doesn’t help). Everyone who loves the current version of lift-served skiing – which can deliver a skier to just about any chairlift in the United States on a handful of passes (and that’s definitely not all of you), and has inspired an unprecedented wave of ski area re-investment – owes Gregory at least a bit of gratitude.What we talked aboutThe accidental CEO; Alterra’s “first order of business was to do no harm”; Rusty’s mindset when the Ikon Pass launched; the moment when everyone began believing that the Ikon Pass would work; reflections on the first five years of Alterra and Ikon; the challenges of uniting far-flung independent ski areas under one coalition; “every year we have to make the effort to stay together”; the radically idiosyncratic individualism of Dave McCoy; what it means that Ikon has never lost a partner – “there’s no points in life for losing friends”; Alterra doesn’t like the Ikon Base Plus Pass either; Covid shutdown PTSD; the long-term impact of Covid on skiing and the world; the risks of complacency around the Covid-driven outdoor boom; why Alterra’s next CEO, Jared Smith, comes from outside the ski industry; how the Ikon Pass and Alterra  needs to evolve; preserving the cultural quirks of individual mountains as Alterra grows and evolves under new leadership; “we dramatically exceeded our expectations in every metric for the fifth year in a row”; the importance of ceding local decisions to local resorts; “I have a great propensity for enjoying chaos and anarchy”; the current state of the labor market; Ikon Pass sales trends; “having too many people on the mountain at one time is not a great experience”; staying “maniacally guest-experience focused”; Crystal Mountain’s enormous pass price increase for next season; why Deer Valley and Alta moved off the Base Pass for next season; Mayflower, the resort coming online next to Deer Valley; the Ikon Session Pass as a gateway product; why Alterra pulled Mammoth, Palisades Tahoe, and Sugarbush off the Mountain Collective Pass; Sun Valley and Snowbasin joining Ikon; Ikon’s growing European network; whether Alterra would ever look to buy in Europe; “we’re making constant efforts” to sign new Ikon Pass partners; “we’re very interested in Pennsylvania”; I just won’t let the fact that KSL owns Blue and Camelback go; “Alterra needs to move at the right pace”; whether we will ever see more Ikon partners in the Midwest; why Alterra hasn’t bought a ski area since 2019; whether Alterra is bidding on Jay Peak; and thoughts on Rob Katz’s “growth NIMBYism” speech.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewGregory has been Alterra’s CEO for about four and a half years. That seems to be about four and a half years longer than he wanted the job. In 2017, he was enjoying retirement after four decades at Mammoth. As an investor in the nascent Alterra Mountain Company – a Frankenski made up of Mammoth, Palisades Tahoe, and the remains of Intrawest – he helped conduct a wide-reaching search for the company’s first CEO. He ended up with the job not through some deft power play but because the committee simply couldn’t find anyone else qualified to take it.His only plan, he said, was to do no harm. There are, as we have seen, plenty of ways to make multi-mountain ski conglomerates fail. Boyne alone has managed the trick over the extra long term (a fact that the company does not get nearly enough credit for). The years after Gregory took the job in February 2018 certainly tested whether Alterra and Ikon, as constructs, were durable beyond the stoke of first concept.They are. And he’s done. At 68, confined for the past half decade to a Denver office building, I get the sense that Gregory is ready to get away from his desk and back in the liftline (or maybe not – “I will be so pissed if I have to wait in a line,” he tells me on the podcast). He’s earned the break and the freedom. It’s someone else’s turn.That someone else, as we learned last month, will be Jared Smith, Alterra’s current president. Gregory will move into a vice chairman of the board role, a position that I suspect requires extensive on-the-ground snow reporting. Smith, who joined Alterra last year after nearly two decades with Live Nation/Ticketmaster, has plenty to prove. As I wrote in May:Gregory was the ultimate industry insider, a college football player-turned-liftie who worked at Mammoth for 40 years before taking the top job at Alterra in 2018. He’d been through the battles, understood the fickle nature of the ski biz, saved Mammoth from bankruptcy several times. Universally liked and respected, he was the ideal leader for Alterra’s remarkable launch, an aggressive and unprecedented union of the industry’s top non-Vail operators, wielding skiing’s Excalibur: a wintry Voltron called the Ikon Pass. That such disparate players – themselves competitors – not only came together but continued to join the Ikon Pass has no doubt been at least partly due to Gregory’s confidence and charisma.Smith came to Alterra last June after 18 years at Live Nation and Ticketmaster. I don’t know if he even skis. He is, by all accounts, a master of building products that knit consumers to experiences through technology. That’s a crucial skillset for Alterra, which must meet skiers on the devices that have eaten their lives. But technology won’t matter at all if the skiing itself suffers. Alterra has thrived as the anti-Vail, a conglomerate with an indie sheen. Will the Ikon Pass continue to tweak access levels to mitigate crowding? Will Alterra continue its mega-investments to modernize and gigantify its resorts? Can the company keep the restless coterie of Boyne, Powdr, Jackson Hole, Alta, Taos, A-Basin, Revelstoke, Red, and Schweitzer satisfied enough to stay united on a single pass? For Alterra, and for the Ikon Pass, these are the existential questions.I have been assured, by multiple sources, that Smith does, in fact, ski. And has an intuitive understanding of where consumers need to be, helping to transform Ticketmaster from a paper-based anachronism into a digital-first experience company. Covid helped accelerate skiing’s embrace of e-commerce. That, according to Gregory, is just the beginning. “Different times require different leadership, and Jared Smith is the right leader going forward,” Gregory tells me in the podcast.Alterra’s first five years were a proof of concept: can the Ikon Pass work? Yes. It works quite well. Now what? They’ve already thought of all the obvious things: buy more mountains, add more partners, play with discounts to make the thing attractive to loyalists and families. But how does Alterra sew the analogue joy that is skiing’s greatest pull into the digital scaffolding that’s hammering the disparate parts of our modern existence together? And how does it do that without compromising the skiing that must not suffer? Is that more difficult than getting Revelstoke and Killington and Taos to all suit up in the same jersey? It might be. But it was a good time to get Gregory on the line and see how he viewed the whole thing before he bounced.Questions I wish I’d askedEven though this went long, there were a bunch of questions I didn’t get to. I really wanted to ask how Alterra was approaching the need for more employee housing. I also wanted to push a little more on the $269 Steamboat lift tickets – like seriously there must be a better way. I also think blackout dates need to evolve as a crowding counter-measure, and Vail and Alterra both need to start thinking past holiday blackouts (as Indy has already done quite well). I’ve also been preoccupied lately with Alterra’s successive rolling out of megaprojects at Palisades Tahoe and Steamboat and Winter Park, and what that says about the company’s priorities. This also would have been a good time to check in on Alterra’s previously articulated commitments to diversity and the environment. These are all good topics, but Alterra has thus far been generous with access, and I anticipate ample opportunities to raise these questions with their leadership in the future.What I got wrongWell despite immense concentration and effort on my part, I finally reverted to my backwater roots and pronounced “gondola” as “gon-dole-ah,” a fact that is mostly amusing to my wife. Rusty and I vacillated between 61 million and 61.5 million reported U.S. skier visits last year. The correct number was 61 million. I also flip-flopped Vail’s Epic Pass sales number and stated at one point that the company had sold 1.2 million Epic Passes for the 2021-22 ski season. The correct number is 2.1 million – I did issue a midstream correction, but really you can’t clarify these things enough.Why you should consider an Ikon PassI feel a bit uncomfortable with the wording of this section header, but the “why you should ski X” section is a standard part of The Storm Skiing Podcast. I don’t endorse any one pass over any other – my job is simply to consider the merits and drawbacks of each. As regular readers know, pass analysis is a Storm pillar. But the Ikon Pass is uniquely great for a handful of reasons:An affordable kids’ pass. The Ikon Pass offers one of the best kids’ pass deals in skiing. Early-birds could have picked up a full Ikon Pass (with purchase of an adult pass) for children age 12 or under for $239. A Base Pass was $199. That’s insane. Many large ski areas – Waterville Valley, Mad River Glen – include a free kids pass with the purchase of an adult pass. But those are single-mountain passes. The Ikon lets you lap Stratton from your weekend condo, spend Christmas break at Snowbird, and do a Colorado tour over spring break. The bargain child’s pass is not as much of a differentiator as it once was – once Vail dropped Epic Pass prices last season, making the adult Epic Pass hundreds of dollars cheaper than an Ikon Pass, the adult-plus-kids pass equation worked out about the same for both major passes. Still, the price structures communicate plenty about Alterra’s priorities, and it’s an extremely strong message.A commitment to the long season. On April 23 this year, 21 Ikon partners still had lifts spinning. Epic passholders could access just nine resorts. That was a big improvement from the previous season, when the scorecard read 20-2 in favor of Ikon. Part of this is a coincidence – many of Alterra’s partners have decades-long histories of letting skiers ride out the snow: Killington, Snowbird, Arapahoe Basin, Sugarloaf. Others. But part of it is Alterra’s letting of big operational decisions to its individual resorts. If Crystal Mountain wants to stay open into June, Crystal Mountain stays open into June. If Stevens Pass has a 133-inch base on April 18… too bad. Closing day (in 2021) is April 18. The long season doesn’t matter to a lot of skiers. But to the ones it does matter to, it matters a lot. Alterra gets that.That lineup though… The Ikon Pass roster has been lights out from day one. But as the coalition has added partners, and as key mountains have migrated from Epic to Ikon, it has grown into the greatest collection of ski areas ever assembled. As I wrote in March:Whatever the reason is that Snowbasin and Sun Valley fled Epic, the ramifications for the North American multipass landscape are huge. So is Alterra’s decision to yank its two California flagships and its top-five New England resort off of the Mountain Collective. Those two moves gave the Ikon Pass the best top-to-bottom destination ski roster of any multi-mountain ski pass on the continent.Good arguments can still be made for the supremacy of the Epic Pass, which delivers seven days at Telluride and unlimited access to 10 North American megaresorts: Whistler, Northstar, Heavenly, Kirkwood, Park City, Crested Butte, Vail, Beaver Creek, Keystone, and Breckenridge, plus Stowe, one of the top two or three ski areas in the Northeast.But many of Vail’s ski areas are small and regionally focused. I like Hunter and Jack Frost and Roundtop and Mount Brighton, Michigan, and their value as businesses is unquestioned, both because they are busy and because they draw skiers from rich coastal and Midwestern cities to the Mountain West. But the Epic Pass’ 40-some U.S. and Canadian mountains are, as a group, objectively less compelling than Ikon’s.The Ikon Pass now delivers exclusive big-pass access to Steamboat, Winter Park, Copper Mountain, Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth, Crystal Washington, Red Mountain, Deer Valley, Solitude, and Brighton, as well as a killer New England lineup of Killington, Stratton, Sugarbush, Sunday River, and Loon. The pass also shares big-mountain partners with Mountain Collective: Alta, Arapahoe Basin, Aspen Snowmass, Banff Sunshine, Big Sky, Jackson Hole, Lake Louise, Revelstoke, Snowbasin, Snowbird, Sugarloaf, Sun Valley, and Taos. For pure fall-line thrills and rowdy, get-after-it terrain, there is just no comparison on any other pass.In large parts of America, it’s become impossible to imagine not buying an Ikon Pass. The lineup is just too good. Epic still makes more sense in many circumstances. But for the neutral party, aimed primarily for big-mountain destinations in a city not defined by access to a local, the Ikon is telling a damn good story.Podcast NotesRusty and I talked a bit about the huge jump in Crystal’s pass price for next season. Here’s a more comprehensive look that I wrote in March, based on conversations with Crystal CEO Frank DeBerry and a number of local skiers.We also discuss Mayflower Mountain Resort, which is to be built adjacent to Deer Valley. Here’s a bit more about that project, which could offer 4,300 acres on 3,000 vertical feet. The developers will have to overcome the ski area’s relatively low elevation, which will be compounded by Utah’s larger water issues.Rusty explained why Alterra pulled Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth, and Sugarbush off the Mountain Collective pass ahead of next ski season. Here were my initial thoughts on that move. A tribute to Mammoth Mountain founder Dave McCoy, who died in 2020 at age 104:Previous Storm Skiing Podcasts with Rusty or Ikon Pass mountain leadersThe Summit at Snoqualmie President & GM Guy Lawrence – April 20, 2022Arapahoe Basin COO Alan Henceroth – April 14, 2022Big Sky President & COO Taylor Middleton – April 6, 2022Solitude President & COO Amber Broadaway – March 5, 2022The Highlands at Harbor Springs President & GM Mike Chumbler – Feb. 18, 2022Steamboat President & COO & Alterra Central Region COO Rob Perlman – Dec. 9, 2021Jackson Hole President Mary Kate Buckley – Nov. 17, 2021Crystal Mountain, Washington President & CEO Frank DeBerry – Oct. 22, 2021Boyne Mountain GM Ed Grice – Oct. 19, 2021Mt. Buller, Australia GM Laurie Blampied – Oct. 12, 2021Aspen Skiing Company CEO Mike Kaplan – Oct. 1, 2021Taos Ski Valley CEO David Norden – Sept. 16, 2021Alterra CEO Rusty Gregory – March 25, 2021Sunday River GM Brian Heon – Feb. 10, 2021Windham President Chip Seamans – Jan. 31, 2021Sugarbush President & GM John Hammond – Nov. 2, 2020Sugarloaf GM Karl Strand – Part 2 – Sept. 30, 2020Sugarloaf GM Karl Strand – Part 1 – Sept. 25, 2020Palisades Tahoe President & COO Ron Cohen – Sept. 4, 2020Alterra CEO Rusty Gregory – May 5, 2020Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – April 1, 2020Sunday River President & GM Dana Bullen – Feb. 14, 2020Loon Mountain President & GM Jay Scambio – Feb. 7, 2020Sugarbush President & COO Win Smith – Jan. 30, 2020Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – Nov. 21, 2019Killington & Pico President & GM Mike Solimano – Oct. 13, 2019Future Storm Skiing Podcasts scheduled with Ikon Pass mountainsBoyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – September 2022Sun Valley VP & GM Pete Sonntag – September 2022The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 69/100 in 2022, and number 315 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Please be patient - my response may take a while. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Real Estate Rookie
Rookie Reply: 19 Best Real Estate Investing Apps We Couldn't Live Without

Real Estate Rookie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 14:50


The best real estate investing apps are ones you could not live without. Whether you're a full-time real estate investor, managing a few properties, or still trying to get your first deal done, these apps can help you find, manage, and cash flow your rentals quicker. Ashley and Tony both use these apps daily and probably couldn't run their real estate investment portfolios without them.To help you scale up your real estate investing, Ashley and Tony have written down their most-used real estate investing apps. Now, anytime you see a potential deal, need to chat with a team member, or simply want to time how long you've been working at a rental property, you can. Most of these apps are free, so you can download them today, try them out, and buy your first (or next) deal faster!If you want Ashley and Tony to answer a real estate question, you can post in the Real Estate Rookie Facebook Group! Or, call us at the Rookie Request Line (1-888-5-ROOKIE).Links from the ShowReal Estate Rookie PodcastReal Estate Rookie Youtube ChannelReal Estate Rookie Facebook GroupBuilding an Out-of-State Empire by Using the Right Type of Real Estate Agent w/ Sarah WeaverZillowRealtor.comLandGlidePopStreamOnXDealCheckMLSHomesnapPersonal CapitalEasy CalculatorGoogle taskGoogle CalendarGoogle DocsSpliceQuickbooks TimeMileIQSchlageRingLoom MobileLoomMonday.comWrikeMiroCheck the full show notes here: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/rookie-194Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories
My Boyfriend Found Out I Was Rich And His WHOLE Attitude Changed Towards Me r/Relationships

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 21:22


Relationship Reddit Stories, OP has been with their boyfriend for 8 months and when they went to visit OP's parent's house, it became apparent that their family is wealthy. Upon seeing this boyfriend's attitude changed towards her.

Bwrosas Discussions
Reply To @Cyberpunk Jordan & Juice To It BOI Recent Video & Comment On The Archie Sonic Worst Idea.

Bwrosas Discussions

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 22:28


n this video, I once again talk about what @Cyberpunk Jordan considers on of the worst moments in Archie Sonic's history and Juice To It BOI twitter response to it. As Well as do a response to the infamous moment from Archie Sonic Issue 150 between Bunnie and "Sonic" (whose really Evil Sonic aka Scourge), and what Jordan assume is correct on if they did or didn't. 00:00 - Intro/what @Cyberpunk Jordan considers on of the worst moments in Archie Sonic's history and Juice To It BOI twitter response to it. 05:40 - Response to the infamous moment from Archie Sonic Issue 150 between Bunnie and "Sonic" (whose really Evil Sonic aka Scourge), and what Jordan assume is correct on if they did or didn't. Comments are Welcomed Like The Podcast VENMO: @Brian-Walmer-2 Cash App: $bwrosas98 #CyberPunkJordan #ArchieSonic #BunnieRabbot #MechaSally #SonicTheHedgehog #KenPenders #Rally4Sally #SallyAcorn --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bwrosas/support

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories
My Friend Is DEMOTING Me As Her Maid Of Honor After Everything I Did r/Relationships

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 21:59


Relationship Reddit Stories, OP is her best friend's maid of honor in her wedding and has committed so much towards it. However as the wedding draws closer, a friend has demoted her to bridesmaid.

The Unapologetic Man Podcast
Texting Mastermind: How to Text a Girl Where She'll Actually Reply

The Unapologetic Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 25:59


So you've been able to get a girl's number, you're so excited and text her immediately to try and arrange a date, only to find that she doesn't seem interested anymore. What happened? The truth is bad texting can easily make a woman lose interest in you. So in today's episode, Mark teaches you the fundamentals of how to text a girl in an interesting way, to where she can't help herself but want to keep talking to you. Apply for a FREE Consultation with Mark: https://coachmarksing.com/coaching/ Grab Mark's Free Program: "The Approach Formula": http://www.CoachMarkSing.com/The-Approach-Formula Follow Mark on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coachmarksing/ Contact Mark Directly: CoachMarkSing@Gmail.com

Drive with Jim Wilson
NSW Shadow Treasurer takes aim at government in explosive budget reply

Drive with Jim Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 8:30


The NSW Shadow Treasurer Daniel Mookhey has fired shots at Perrottet government failures during a fierce budget reply on Drive. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF

Sid Choraria is a Private investor & Portfolio manager, in Asia equities. Having served in senior investment roles at multi-billion-dollar funds, Sid's CV boasts a stint at Goldman Sachs, working in their technology investment banking unit.Having regularly featured on CNBC and the Goldman Alumni Network, amongst others, Sid presents an eloquent description of his valuation framework, explaining how he systematically analyses a company's price and its resilience to what he calls ‘the risk of impermanence'.Having worked in Asia for 15 years, and growing up in the region too, Sid intimately understands the nuances of Asia's corporate culture. Sid offers his outlook for regional equities, unpicking the effect of regulatory crackdowns on China's technology heavyweights, including Alibaba. However, it was his analysis of a 100-year-old Japanese company that caught Warren Buffett's attention, and this is where we start the interview. Enjoy!Check out Sid's blog content, on his LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sidchoraria/Thanks to Cofruition for consulting on and producing the podcast. Want further Opto insights? Check out our daily newsletter: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/newsletter------------------Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results. CMC Markets is an execution-only service provider. The material (whether or not it states any opinions) is for general information purposes only and does not take into account your personal circumstances or objectives. Nothing in this material is (or should be considered to be) financial, investment or other advice on which reliance should be placed. No opinion given in the material constitutes a recommendation by CMC Markets or the author that any particular investment, security, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person.The material has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research. Although we are not specifically prevented from dealing before providing this material, we do not seek to take advantage of the material prior to its dissemination.CMC Markets does not endorse or offer opinions on the trading strategies used by the author. Their trading strategies do not guarantee any return and CMC Markets shall not be held responsible for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein.

Wizard on the Wynd
The Darkness Does Not Reply

Wizard on the Wynd

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 57:25


Wizard on the Wynd has rebranded to include a wider range of gaming content. We will be returning to the world of Farrir soon, but for now I am uploading two stories recorded on Zoom during lockdown. Please bear in mind the audio is from players home mics so the quality is low and sometimes we are referring to things on a screen. The video can be watched on our patreon - https://www.patreon.com/forgingfarrir DM: Kai Savage Primrose Reedbanks: Riona Datta-Savage Stodge Reedbanks: Kai Savage Taegus Scatterheart: Kester Savage Roszana Scatterheart: Katt Thorn   Music: Kevin MacLeod Ambience: Tabletop Audio Sound Effects: Quiet World Art: Jared Blando and Tyler Jacobsen   Tyranny of Dragons is a Dungeons and Dragons 5e adventure published by Wizards of the Coast.

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories
Wife Keeps Saying She's Places That She Isn't As I Have A Tracker On Her Car r/Relationships

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 23:00


Relationship Reddit Stories, OP tells us how his suspicions regarding his wife and cheating. When he confirms that she's not been at the places she says she is over the phone.

Arise and Abide
Reply in Peace

Arise and Abide

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 11:05


Reading Judges 18:1-31 (NLT) ~ Scripture reading followed by discussion.  Dan looking for easier land to conquer. Moses' grandson being reviled as the apostate Levite. It doesn't matter what family you are from; you need your own personal relationship with the LORD. We set our hearts on the things we love, when we should be setting our hearts on God. Micha had put his hope in things that could be easily taken away. It was better for Micha that the idols were taken from his life. Short tempered men literally translated bitter of soul, people whose bitter disappointment with life has made their actions unpredictable. Letting our actions reflect our circumstances vs letting our actions reflect God's love. The call to love others as God has loved us. We can have our hearts set on God and then get distracted by our circumstance, so keep your heart set on God and seek Jesus' response in every situation.

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales
#164: Productized Service: 6 Step Cold Email Sequence = 4% reply rate, 2% conversion rate, 40 new customers, and $20k in sales (Patrick Frank)

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 25:20


Patrick Frank is a Video Entrepreneur and the Founder of Patchbay Media. Patchbay Media works with creative agencies, schools & education organizations, small businesses, and advocacy nonprofits to create targeted, cinematic videos for more effective online marketing. He's also the Founder of EditVideoCalls.com. EditVideoCalls.com turns your everyday Zoom calls into useful, shareable videos. by helping coaches & consultants create social media videos, training videos, and website videos from the Zoom calls they're already having. He's also the author of Zoom Out, the video first playbook. EditVideoCalls.com: https://editvideocalls.com/ Join the Facebook Group (B2B SaaS Cold Outreach Mastery): http://morgandwilliams.com/fbgroup

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 14, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 22:39


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 13, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 9:10


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 12, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 18:10


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 8, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 8:53


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 7, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 6:43


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 5, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 13:52


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 4, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 7:31


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 3, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 7:29


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 2, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 5:26


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded
Chapter 1, Wycliffe's Work for England, by L. Laurenson.

Down to Earth But Heavenly Minded

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 8:36


Wycliffe's Work for England L. Laurenson Contents 1 The Most Interesting Book in the World 2 Rome: Mediaeval and Modern 3 Conversion and Conflict 4 Wycliffe and the National Opposition 5 Wycliffe and the Bishops 6 The "Poor Priests". 7 More about the "Poor Priests" 8 Rome attempts to extinguish the light 9 The Wonder of the Book 10 The Oldest Book in the World 11 The Early Christian Centuries 12 The Rise of the Papacy 13 Christianity in Early Britain 14 The First English Bible THANK GOD FOR THE BIBLE, THE BEST BOOK OF ALL. In the preparation of this book the following works have been consulted, and the help received is herewith gratefully acknowledged by the Author. GREEN: "A Short History of the English People." TREVELYAN: "England in the Age of Wycliffe." PENNINGTON: "John Wyclif: His Life, Times, and Teaching." HOOK: "Ecclesiastical Biography." 6 Vols. NEAL: "History of the Puritans." SHORT: "History of the Church of England." RANKE: "History of the Popes." 3 Vols. VAUGHAN: "John de Wycliffe, D.D." ROBERTSON: "The Roman Catholic Church in Italy." HISLOP: "Two Babylons." M'KILLIAM "A Chronicle of the Popes." SYDNEY: "Modern Rome in Modern England." O'DONNOGHUE: "The Peculiar Doctrines of the Church of Rome." EUSEBIUS: "Ecclesiastical History." Cruse's Trans. MILMAN: "History of Christianity." 4 Vols. WITHROW: "The Catacombs at Rome." MUSTON: "Israel of the Alps." Hazlit Trans. By the same author "Four Points about a Wonderful Book," "The Inspiration of the Book," "The Vital Importance of the Book," "Britain's Open Bible," "A Bright Sunset," "Those 37000 Children," "The Story of Rebekah," "The Story of Ruth," "The Story of Christianity in Britain." "Messiah the Prince." "My Class for Jesus." "The Great Prophetic Outline." An Exposition of Matthew 24, 25. "The Grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ." "The Man Who Did His Best." The Captain's Heroism." "How Young Hislop Died for the Truth." "Maggie's Resting Place." "John Wycliffe's Great Work." "Bonfires of Bibles." "The Boy Martyr of Brentwood." "Mason's Mistake." "Suddenly." "Forgiven." "Trying to be a Christian." The Sailor's Devotion." "The Sailor's Folly." "Outline of the Book of Exodus." "What Saith the Scriptures?" (A Reply to Dr Black.) "Seven Wonderful Gifts."

Resourceful Designer
The Magic Email - RD296

Resourceful Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 15:08


Has this ever happened to you? A new client contacts you looking for a designer. Their project sounds fun, and you seem to hit it off well with them. They verbally agree to your terms, and since everything sounds encouraging, you send them a formal proposal. And you wait in anticipation for them to approve your proposal and give you the go-ahead to get started on their project. And then you wait and wait, but you don't hear back. You send follow-up emails but don't receive any replies. The client has ghosted you. If you're not familiar with the term "ghosted," it's when someone ends all communication and contact with another person without any apparent warning or justification. Subsequently, they ignore any attempts to reach out or communication made by the person they're ghosting. And by that definition, this client is ghosting you. And it's not only with new clients. Sometimes an exiting client may ghost you in the middle of a project. You send them a proof and don't hear back. Or you ask them a question or for content you need, and you don't get a reply. This is any time you don't hear back from a client for whatever reason, even after several failed attempts at contacting them. What do you do? You send them The Magic Email, that's what. The Magic Email. What is The Magic Email, you ask? According to Blair Enns, Author and CEO of Win Without Pitching, a sales training organization for creative professionals. The Magic Email is a message you send to raise deals from the dead. That's its purpose, to solicit a response from someone who has been avoiding you. According to Enns, you must resist the temptation of sending an overly polite email. He suggests you do the opposite. Don't make excuses for your client's behaviour. And don't go soliciting a yes or any other answer from them. Enns suggests you strip away all emotions and let your prospect go matter-of-factly. And you that that with the following Magic Email. Within the last existing email thread, you had with your client, hit reply, change the subject to "Closing the Loop," and then write the following. Hi [FirstName]; I haven't heard back from you on [project/opportunity], so I'm going to assume you've gone in a different direction or your priorities have changed. Let me know if we can be of assistance in the future. Regards, [You] That's it. Enns says this removes the emotional reasons for the prospect to continue avoiding you. You are stripping out your neediness by no longer feigning politeness, by not asking how they've been or by being anything other than completely practical. This Magic Email says, "I can read between the lines, and you have decided we are not doing business together. No hard feelings – it's just business. You can call me if things change." What to expect after sending The Magic Email. You can expect one of three things to happen when you send The Magic Email. 1. Silence. Silence is the least likely scenario where you don't get a response at all. There's no longer any reason for the client not to wrap things up. All they have to do is send you a one-line acknowledgement email to remove this stress from their own lives. 2. Thank You. The client will send you a reply acknowledging that they have decided to cancel the project or they've moved in a different direction. This gives you closure and allows you to stop wasting energy over something that wasn't going to happen and move on to other clients and projects. There's no need to sulk about it. The deal was already done, probably a long time ago. The client just didn't tell you. 3. No, Wait! This is the response you're hoping for. According to Enns, by retreating unemotionally, where you might otherwise be inclined to advance, you suddenly become the one that might get away. The client stops seeing you as the predator that keeps sending them emails, to the prize they're about to lose. There's a psychological effect of this unemotional retreat that can be staggering in its effectiveness. And any resentment the client had over you harassing them turns into guilt about not replying to you earlier. This gives you the upper hand emotionally, and you suddenly become much more attractive to the client. You can learn more about all of this on Blair Enns site winwithoutpitching.com Variations of The Magic Email. Variation by Kai Davis We recently had a discussion in the Resourceful Designer Community about The Magic Email. Particularly about the different variations. Kai Davis of kaidavis.com adapted his Magic Email from Blair Enns' He says he split-tested it, and his version works better. His version is to send this one-sentence email. "Since I have not heard from you on this, I have to assume your priorities have changed." That's it, nothing else. Davis says it works because it's simple, intentionally vague, and effective. People are loss averse. Meaning their natural inclination is to reply immediately to keep you from walking away. You are taking back control of the situation by declaring it's over. Davis goes on to say that you may find this email rude. And that's the discussion we had in the Resourceful Designer Community. But he says it's not rude, just direct. It's the client who doesn't answer your emails that is rude. The person has already ignored you for weeks, so you have nothing to lose. It's just business. To learn more from Kai Davis' use of The Magic Email at themagicemail.com Variation by Chris Voss You can find another variation of The Magic Email in former FBI negotiator Chris Voss's book Never Split The Difference. Voss' variation is a simple message that provokes a "no" response, which gives the other party a feeling of safety and the illusion of control while encouraging them to define their position and explain it to you. This is how it works. Reply to an existing email thread. Change the subject line to a "no-oriented question." such as "have you given up on this?" In the body of the message, write the same or a very similar sentence. Don't add details or explanations. One short sentence is all you need. For example. "Have you given up on this project?" or "Have you moved in a different direction?" According to Voss, this is not a trick or technique. It's a respectful approach that gives the other party the freedom to respond truthfully to you without pressure. Which variation would you use? What version of The Magic Email would you use? We had our discussion in the Resourceful Designer Community, but I would love to know your thoughts. Leave a comment below and let me know how you approach clients who are ghosting you. Nobody likes to be ignored. And it's a waste of time and energy pursuing someone ghosting you. It's frustrating. So the next time something like this happens to you, try sending a variation of The Magic Email and see what happens. Who knows. You may light that fire under the client and get your stalled project back on track.

Providence Presbyterian Church
Job's First Reply to Bildad - A Man Full of Questions, Part 1

Providence Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 39:00


The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #91: Snow Partners (Big Snow, Mountain Creek) CEO Joe Hession

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Paid subscribers receive thousands of extra words of content each month, plus all podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoJoe Hession, CEO of Snow Partners, owners of Mountain Creek, Big Snow American Dream, Snowcloud, and Terrain Based LearningRecorded onJune 15, 2022About Mountain CreekLocated in: Vernon Township, New JerseyClosest neighboring ski areas: National Winter Activity Center, New Jersey (6 minutes); Mount Peter, New York (24 minutes); Campgaw, New Jersey (51 minutes); Big Snow American Dream (50 minutes)Pass affiliations: NoneBase elevation: 440 feetSummit elevation: 1,480 feetVertical drop: 1,040 feetSkiable Acres: 167Average annual snowfall: 65 inchesTrail count: 46Lift count: 9 (1 Cabriolet, 2 high-speed quads, 2 fixed-grip quads, 1 triple, 1 double, 2 carpets – view Lift Blog’s inventory of Mountain Creek’s lift fleet)About Big Snow American DreamLocated in: East Rutherford, New JerseyClosest neighboring ski areas: Campgaw, New Jersey (35 minutes); National Winter Activity Center, New Jersey (45 minutes); Mountain Creek, New Jersey (50 minutes); Mount Peter, New York (50 minutes)Pass affiliations: NoneVertical drop: 118 feetSkiable Acres: 4Average annual snowfall: 0 inchesTrail count: 4 (2 green, 1 blue, 1 black)Lift count: 4 (1 quad, 1 poma, 2 carpets - view Lift Blog’s of inventory of Big Snow American Dream’s lift fleet)Why I interviewed himTwenty-five years ago, Vail Resorts was known as “Vail Associates.” The company owned just two mountains: Vail and Beaver Creek, which are essentially right next door to each other in Eagle County, Colorado. The resorts were, as they are today, big, snowy, and fun. But they were not great businesses. Bankruptcy threatened. And the ski media – Skiing, Powder – was mostly dismissive. This was the dawn of the freeskiing era, and the cool kids were running the Circuit of Radness: Snowbird, Squaw, Mammoth, Jackson Hole, Whistler, the Powder Highway. Vail was for suburban dads from Michigan. Beaver Creek was for suburban dads from New York. If you wanted the good stuff, keep moving until you got to Crested Butte or Telluride. Vail was just another big Colorado ski resort, that happened to own another big Colorado ski resort, and that was it.Today, Vail is the largest ski company in history, with (soon to be) 41 resorts scattered across three continents. Its Epic Pass transformed and stabilized the industry. It is impossible to talk about modern lift-served North American skiing without talking about Vail Resorts.There was nothing inevitable about this. Pete Seibert, Vail’s founder, did not enter skiing with some snowy notion of Manifest Destiny. He just wanted to open a great ski resort. It was 18 years from Vail Mountain’s 1962 opening to the opening of Beaver Creek in 1980. It was nearly two more decades until Vail bought Keystone and Breck in 1997. It was 11 more years until the Epic Pass debuted, and a few more before anyone started to pay attention to it.What Snow Partners, led by Joe Hession, is doing right now has echoes of Vail 15 years ago. They are building something. Quietly. Steadily. Like trees growing in a forest. They rise slowly but suddenly they tower over everything.I’m not suggesting that Snow Partners will be the next Vail. That they will buy Revelstoke and Jackson Hole and Alta and launch the Ultimo Pass to compete with Epic and Ikon. What Snow Partners is building is different. Additive. It will likely be the best thing to ever happen to Vail or Alterra. Snow Partners is not digital cameras, here to crush Kodak. They are, rather, skiing’s Ben Franklin, who believed every community in America should have access to books via a lending library. In Snow Partners’ version of the future, every large city in America has access to skiing via an indoor snowdome.This will change everything. Everything. In profound ways that we can only now imagine. The engine of that change will be the tens of millions of potential new skiers that can wander into a Big Snow ski area, learn how to ski, and suddenly train their radar on the mountains. Texas has a population of around 29.5 million people. Florida has about 22 million. Georgia has around 11 million. Those 61.5 million people have zero in-state ski areas between them. They could soon have many. There are countless skiers living in these states now, of course, refugees from the North or people who grew up in ski families. But there are millions more who have never skied or even thought about it, but who would, given the option, at least try it as a novelty. And that novelty may become a hobby, and that hobby may become a lifestyle, and that lifestyle may become an obsession.As anyone reading this knows, there’s a pretty direct line between those first turns and the neverending lines rolling on repeat in your snow-obsessed brain. But you have to link those first couple turns. That’s hard. Most people never get there. And that’s where Big Snow, with its beginner zone loaded with instructors and sculpted terrain features – a system known as Terrain Based Learning – is so interesting. It not only gives people access to snow. It gives people a way to learn to love it, absent the broiling frustration of ropetows and ice and $500 private instructors. It’s a place that creates skiers.This – Big Snow, along with an industry-wide reorientation toward technology – is Hession’s vision. And it is impossible not to believe in his vision. Hession announces in this podcast that the company has secured funding to build multiple Big Snow ski areas within the foreseeable future. The combination of beginner-oriented slopes and simple, affordable packages has proven attractive even in New Jersey, where skiers have access to dozens of outdoor ski areas within a few hours’ drive. It makes money, and the business model is easily repeatable.Mountain Creek, where Hession began working as a parking lot attendant in his teens, is, he says, a passion project. The company is not buying anymore outdoor ski areas. But when Big Snows start minting new skiers by the thousands, and perhaps the millions, they may end up driving the most profound change to outdoor ski areas in decades.What we talked aboutThe nascent uphill scene at Mountain Creek; “most people don’t realize that this is what New Jersey looks like”; celebrating Big Snow’s re-opening; the three things everyone gets wrong about Big Snow; the night of the fire that closed the facility for seven months; how the fire started and what it damaged; three insurance companies walk into a bar…; why six weeks of work closed the facility for more than half a year; staying positive and mission-focused through multiple shutdowns at a historically troubled facility; New Jersey’s enormous diversity; skiing in Central Park?; “we’re creating a ski town culture in the Meadowlands in New Jersey”; everyone loves Big Snow; the story behind creating Big Snow’s beginner-focused business model; why most people don’t have fun skiing and snowboarding; the four kinds of fun; what makes skiing and snowboarding a lifestyle; what Hession got really wrong about lessons; the “haphazard” development of most ski areas; more Big Snows incoming; why Big Snow is a great business from a financial and expense point of view; looking to Top Golf for inspiration on scale and replicability; where we could see the next Big Snow; how many indoor ski domes could the United States handle?; what differentiates Big Snow from Alpine-X; whether future Big Snows will be standalone facilities or attached to larger malls; is American Dream Mall too big to fail?; finding salvation from school struggles as a parking lot attendant at Vernon Valley Great Gorge; Action Park; two future ski industry leaders working the rental shop; Intrawest kicks down the door and rearranges the world overnight; a “complicated” relationship with Mountain Creek; Intrawest’s rapid decline and the fate of Mountain Creek; leaving your dream job; ownership under Crystal Springs; how a three-week vacation will change your life; transforming Terrain Based Learning from a novelty to an empire; “I’ve been fascinated with how you go from working for a company to owning a company”; the far-flung but tightly bound ski industry and how Hession ended up running Big Snow; how much the Big Snow lease costs in a month; an Austin Powers moment; this is a technology company; an anti-kiosk position; the daily capacity of Mountain Creek; buying Mountain Creek; the art of operating a ski area; the biggest mistake most Mountain Creek operators have made; the bargain season pass as business cornerstone; “we were days away from Vail Resorts owning Mountain Creek today”; bankruptcy, Covid, and taking control of Mountain Creek and Big Snow in spite of it all; how much money Mountain Creek brings in in a year; “a lot of people don’t understand how hard it is to run a ski resort”; a monster chairlift project on the Vernon side of Mountain Creek; “a complicated relationship” with the oddest lift in the East ( the cabriolet) and what to do about it; “no one wants to take their skis on and off for a 1,000 feet of vertical”; which lift from Mountain Creek’s ancient past could make a comeback; bringing back the old Granite View and Route 80 trails; why expansion beyond the historic trail network is unlikely anytime soon; Creek’s huge natural snowmaking advantage; why no one at Mountain Creek “gives high-fives before the close of the season”; Hession is “absolutely” committed to stretching Creek’s season as long as possible; the biggest job of a ski resort in the summertime; the man who has blown snow at Mountain Creek for 52 years; whether Snow Operating would ever buy more outdoor ski resorts; “variation is evil”; the large ski resort that Hession tried to buy; “I don’t think anyone can run a massive network of resorts well”; an Applebee’s comparison; whether Mountain Creek or Big Snow could ever join a multi-mountain ski pass; why the M.A.X. Pass was a disaster for Mountain Creek; why Creek promotes the Epic and Ikon Passes on its social channels; changing your narrative; not a b******t mission statement; why the next decade in the ski industry may be the wildest yet; and the Joe P. Hession Foundation.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewI’ll admit that it can be awfully hard to appreciate the potential of Big Snow from the point of view of the casual observer. For anyone living in the New York metro area, the place spent a decade and a half as a vacant laughingstock, a symbol of excess and arrogance, an absurdly expensive novelty that was built, it seemed, just to be torn down. As I wrote last year:On Sept. 29, 2004, a coalition of developers broke ground on a project then known as Meadowlands Xanadu. Built atop a New Jersey swamp and hard by Interstate 95, the garish collection of boxes and ramps with their Romper Room palette could be seen from the upper floors of Manhattan skyscrapers, marooned in their vast asphalt parking lot, an entertainment complex with no one to entertain.It sat empty for years. Crushed, in turn, by incompetence, cost overruns, the Great Recession, lawsuits, and funding issues, the building that would host America’s first indoor ski slope melted into an eternal limbo of ridicule and scorn.I didn’t think it would ever open, and I didn’t understand the point if it did. This is the Northeast – we have no shortage of skiing. At four acres on 160-foot vertical drop, this would instantly become the smallest ski area in nine states. Wow. What’s the next item in your master development plan: an indoor beach in Hawaii?But eventually Big Snow did open: 5,545 days after the center’s groundbreaking. And it was not what I thought it would be. As I wrote the month after it opened:For its potential to pull huge numbers of never-evers into the addictive and thrilling gravitational pull of Planet Ski, Big Snow may end up being the most important ski area on the continent. It is cheap. It is always open. It sits hard against the fourth busiest interstate in the country and is embedded into a metro population of 20 million that has outsized influence on national and global trends. Over the coming decades, this ugly oversized refrigerator may introduce millions of people to the sport.I wrote that on Jan. 13, 2020, two months before Covid would shutter the facility for 177 days. It had only been open 94 days when that happened. Then, 388 days after re-opening on Sept. 1, 2020, fire struck. It caused millions in damage and another 244-day closure. After endless negotiations with insurance companies, Big Snow American Dream finally re-opened last month.So now what? Will this place finally stabilize? What about the disastrous financial state of the mall around it, which has, according to The Wall Street Journal, missed payments on its municipal bonds? Will we see more Big Snows? Will Snow Operating bid on Jay Peak? Will we ever get a real chairlift on Vernon at Mountain Creek? With Big Snow rebooted and live (take three), it was time to focus on the future of Snow Operating. And oh man, buckle up.Questions I wish I’d askedI could have stopped Joe at any time and asked a hundred follow-up questions on any of the dozens of points he made. But there would have been no point in that. He knew what I wanted to discuss, and the narrative is compelling enough on its own, without my input.Why you should ski Mountain Creek and Big SnowBig SnowIf you’re approaching Big Snow from the point of view of a seasoned skier, I want to stop you right there: this is not indoor Aspen. And it’s not pretending to be. Big Snow is skiing’s version of Six Flags. It’s an amusement park. All are welcome, all can participate. It’s affordable. It’s orderly. It’s easy. And it has the potential to become the greatest generator of new skiers since the invention of snow.And that will especially be true if this thing scales in the way that Hession believes it will. Imagine this: you live in Houston. No one in your family skis and so you’ve never thought about skiing. You’ve never even seen snow. You can’t imagine why anyone would ever want to. It looks cold, uncomfortable, exotic as moonrocks, and about as accessible. You’re not a skier and you probably never will be.But, what if Big Snow sprouts out of the ground like a snowy rollercoaster? It’s close. It’s cheap. It could be fun. You and your buddies decide to check it out. Or you take someone there on a date. Or you take your kids there as a distraction. Your lift ticket is well under $100 and includes skis and boots and poles and bindings and a jacket and snowpants (but not, for some reason, gloves), and access to instructors in the Terrain Based Learning area, a series of humps and squiggly snow features that move rookies with the ground beneath them. You enter as a novice and you leave as a skier. You go back. Five or six more times. Then you’re Googling “best skiing USA” and buying an Epic Pass and booking flights for Denver.And if that’s not you, how about this scenario that I face all the time: nonskiers tell me they want to try skiing. Can I take them? Given my background, this would not seem like an irrational request. But I’m not sure where to start. With lift tickets, rentals, and lessons, they’re looking at $150 to $200, plus a long car ride in either direction, just to try something that is cold and frustrating and unpredictable. I’m sure as hell not teaching them. My imagination proves unequal to the request. We don’t go skiing.Big Snow changes that calculus. Solves it. Instantly. Even, as Joe suggests in our interview, in places where you wouldn’t expect it. Denver or Salt Lake City or Minneapolis or Boston. Places that already have plenty of skiing nearby. Why? Well, if you’re in Denver, a snowdome means you don’t have to deal with I-70 or $199 lift tickets or figuring out which of the 100 chairlifts in Summit County would best suite your first ski adventure. You just go to the snowdome.The potential multiplying effect on new skiers is even more substantial when you consider the fact that these things never close. Hession points out that, after decades of refinement and tweaking, Mountain Creek is now finally able to consistently offer 100-day seasons. And given the local weather patterns, that’s actually amazing. But Big Snow – in New Jersey or elsewhere – will be open 365 days per year. That’s three and a half seasons of Mountain Creek, every single year. Multiply that by 10 or 20 or 30 Big Snows, and suddenly the U.S. has far more skiers than anyone ever could have imagined.Mountain CreekThere exists in the Northeast a coterie of unimaginative blockheads who seem to measure their self-worth mostly by the mountains that they dislike. Hunter is a big target. So is Mount Snow. But perhaps no one takes more ridicule, however, than Mountain Creek, that swarming Jersey bump with the shaky financial history and almost total lack of natural snow. Everyone remembers Vernon Valley Great Gorge (as Mountain Creek was once known), and its adjacent summertime operation, the raucous and profoundly dysfunctional Action Park. Or they remember Intrawest leaving Creek at the altar. Or that one time they arrived at Creek at noon on Dec. 29 and couldn’t find a place to park and spent half the afternoon waiting in line to buy a bowl of tomato soup. Or whatever. Now, based on those long-ago notions, they toss insults about Creek in between their Facebook posts from the Jackson Hole tram line or downing vodka shots with their crew, who are called the Drinksmore Boyz or Powder Dogzz or the Legalizerz or some orther poorly spelled compound absurdity anchored in a profound misunderstanding of how impressed society is in general with the antics of men in their 20s.  Whatever. I am an unapologetic Mountain Creek fan. I’ve written why many times, but here’s a summary:First, it is close. From my Brooklyn apartment, I can be booting up in an hour and 15 minutes on a weekend morning. It is a bargain. My no-blackout pass for the 2019-20 season was $230. It is deceptively large, stretching two miles from Vernon to Bear Peaks along New Jersey state highway 94. Its just over thousand-foot vertical drop means the runs feel substantial. It has night skiing, making it possible to start my day at my Midtown Manhattan desk job and finish it hooking forty-mile-an-hour turns down a frozen mountainside. The place is quite beautiful. Really. A panorama of rolling hills and farmland stretches northwest off the summit. The snowmaking system is excellent. They opened on November 16 this year and closed on April 7 last season, a by-any-measure horrible winter with too many thaws and wave after wave of base-destroying rain. And, if you know the time and place to go, Mountain Creek can be a hell of a lot of fun, thanks to the grown-up chutes-and-ladders terrain of South Peak, an endless tiered sequence of launchpads, rollers and rails (OK, I don’t ski rails), that will send you caroming down the mountain like an amped-up teenager (I am more than twice as old as any teenager).I don’t have a whole lot to add to that. It’s my home mountain. After spending my first seven ski seasons tooling around Midwest bumps, the glory of having a thousand-footer that near to me will never fade. The place isn’t perfect, of course, and no one is trying to tell that story, including me, as you can see in the full write-up below, but when I only have two or three hours to ski, Creek is an amazing gift that I will never take for granted:Podcast notesHere are a few articles laying out bits of Hession’s history with Mountain Creek:New VP has worked at Creek since his teens – Advertiser-News South, Feb. 22, 2012Mountain Creek Enters Ski Season With New Majority Owner Snow Operating – Northjersey.com, Nov. 23, 2018I’ve written quite a bit about Big Snow and Mountain Creek over the years. Here are a couple of the feature stories:The Curse of Big Snow – Sept. 30, 2021The Most Important Ski Area in America – Jan. 13, 2020This is the fourth podcast I’ve hosted that was at least in part focused on Mountain Creek:Big Snow and Mountain Creek Vice President of Marketing & Sales Hugh Reynolds – March 3, 2020Hermitage Club General Manager Bill Benneyan, who was also a former president, COO, and general manager of Mountain Creek – Dec. 4, 2020Crystal Mountain, Washington President and CEO Frank DeBerry, who was also a former president, COO, and general manager of Mountain Creek – Oct. 22, 2021Here are podcasts I’ve recorded with other industry folks that Hession mentions during our interview:Vail Resorts Rocky Mountain Region Chief Operating Officer and Mountain Division Executive Vice President Bill Rock – June 14, 2022Mountain High and Dodge Ridge President and CEO Karl Kapuscinski - June 10, 2022Alpine-X CEO John Emery – Aug. 4, 2021Fairbank Group Chairman Brian Fairbank – Oct. 16, 2020Killington and Pico President and General Manager Mike Solimano – Oct. 13, 2019Here’s the trailer for HBO’s Class Action Park, the 2020 documentary profiling the old water park on the Mountain Creek (then Vernon Valley-Great Gorge) grounds:Hession mentioned a retired chairlift and retired trails that he’d like to bring back to Mountain Creek:What Hession referred to as “the Galactic Chair” is Lift 9 on the trailmap below, which is from 1989. This would load at the junction of present-day Upper Horizon and Red Fox, and terminate on the landing where the Sojourn Double and Granite Peak Quad currently come together (see current trailmap above). This would give novice skiers a route to lap gentle Osprey and Red Fox, rather than forcing them all onto Lower Horizon all the way back to the Cabriolet. I don’t need to tell any regular Creek skiers how significant this could be in taking pressure off the lower mountain at Vernon/North. Lower Horizon is fairly steep and narrow for a green run, and this could be a compelling alternative, especially if these skiers then had the option of downloading the Cabriolet.Hession also talked about bringing back a pair of intermediate runs. One is Granite View, which is trails 34 (Cop Out), 35 (Fritz’s Folly) and 33 (Rim Run) on Granite Peak below. The trail closed around 2005 or ’06, and bringing it back would restore a welcome alternative for lapping Granite Peak.The second trail that Hession referenced was Route 80 (trail 24 on the Vernon side, running beneath lift 8), which cuts through what is now condos and has been closed for decades. I didn’t even realize it was still there. Talks with the condo association have yielded progress, Hession tells me, and we could see the trail return, providing another connection between Granite and Vernon.Creek skiers are also still obsessed with Pipeline, the double-black visible looker’s right of the Granite lift on this 2015 trailmap:I did not ask Hession about this run because I’d asked Hugh Reynolds about it on the podcast two years ago, and he made it clear that Pipeline was retired and would be as long as he and Hession ran the place.Here are links to a few more items we mentioned in the podcast:The 2019 Vermont Digger article that lists Snow Operating as an interested party in the Jay Peak sale.We talked a bit about the M.A.X. Pass, a short-lived multi-mountain pass that immediately preceded (and was dissolved by), the Ikon Pass. Here’s a list of partner resorts on that pass. Skiers received five days at each, and could add the pass onto a season pass at any partner ski area. This was missing heavies like Jackson Hole, Aspen, and Taos, but it did include some ballers like Big Sky and Killington. Resorts of the Canadian Rockies, which includes Fernie and Kicking Horse and is now aligned with the Epic Pass, was a member, as were a few ski areas that have since eschewed any megapass membership: Whiteface, Gore, Belleayre, Wachusett, Alyeska, Mountain High, Lee Canyon, and Whitewater. Odd as that seems, I’m sure we’ll look back at some of today’s megapass coalitions with shock and longing.This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 19. Free subscribers got it on June 22. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 67/100 in 2022, and number 313 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

The Adam Ragusea Podcast
The actual science of the "industrial seed oil" panic (E14)

The Adam Ragusea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 75:40


Thanks to Tippsy Sake for sponsoring this episode! Use code ADAM 10% off all products, and code ADAM30 for $30 off your first Sake Box: https://www.tippsysake.com/discount/ADAM This episode summarizes a scholarly exchange in the journal Advances in Nutrition regarding polyunsaturated fats (such as those obtained from "industrial seed oils) and their impact on human health. We begin with this 2021 paper by Dr. Glen Lawrence: "The Saturated Fat-Unsaturated Oil Dilemma: Relations of Dietary Fatty Acids and Serum Cholesterol, Atherosclerosis, Inflammation, Cancer, and All-Cause Mortality": https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33693484/ Next is this letter-the-editor rebutting Lawrence's paper by Dr. Martha Belury, Dr. Emilio Ros and Dr. Penny Kris-Etherton, "Weighing Evidence of the Role of Saturated and Unsaturated Fats and Human Health": https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-abstract/13/2/686/6556254 And this rebuttal letter by Dr. Jeff Moore: "The Dietary Guidelines Are Correct: Saturated Fat Should Be Limited and Replaced with the Proposed Alternatives to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality": https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-abstract/13/2/688/6556255 Finally, Dr. Lawrence's rebuttal to the rebuttals: "Reply to MA Belury et al. and J Moore": https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-abstract/13/2/690/6556307 Here's an earlier (2018) scholarly article on this subject that I found to be very helpful general background: "Dietary fat and cardiometabolic health: evidence, controversies, and consensus for guidance": https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6053258/ 00:00 Introduction 04:07 Definitions of key terms and other background 17:58 Why the panic is spreading 29:39 Deep dive on the science

Real Estate Rookie
Rookie Reply: How to Choose Your Real Estate Investment Strategy

Real Estate Rookie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 13:17


This week's question comes from Natalie on the Real Estate Rookie Facebook Group. Natalie is asking: How did you narrow your focus to determine your strategy? And how do you get good at analyzing real estate deals? This is one of the most-asked questions we receive. When you're starting as a rookie real estate investor, every strategy seems like a good one. You may hear a guest on the Real Estate Rookie show talk about wholesaling or flipping or short-term rentals. Before long, you're already planning your next exciting purchase even if you had another one already in the works. This “shiny object syndrome” is common when getting started, and while it's good to know about many different investing strategies, changing yours too often can lead you well off the path to financial freedom.Here are some suggestions if you're torn between strategies and need to up your analysis game:Look at your resources and base your investing strategy upon what makes sense for you specificallyPledge to become an expert in a certain strategy and don't try building too many bridgesSet up a strong foundation in your current investing strategy, then you can pivot wherever you wantPractice your deal analysis daily and send your calculations to other investors as a pulse checkGet to know your investing area as much as you can (even if you're remote investing!)And more in the episode…If you want Ashley and Tony to answer a real estate question, you can post in the Real Estate Rookie Facebook Group! Or, call us at the Rookie Request Line (1-888-5-ROOKIE).Links from the ShowReal Estate Rookie PodcastReal Estate Rookie Youtube ChannelReal Estate Rookie Facebook GroupBPCON2022Check the full show notes here: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/rookie-192Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cyber Casts
The Reply Guy From Hell

Cyber Casts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 36:02


Reply guys. Maybe you've got one, maybe you are one. If you're a public person online, and especially if you're a woman, you tend to attract a few fans or detractors who respond to every single thing you post. Sometimes those interactions can be obnoxious. Sometimes, they can be so much worse.Today's Cyber is about a reply guy from hell, a person who—for almost two decades—has used the internet to wage sustained harassment campaigns against multiple women. It's a bizarre and disturbing story that involves Twitter DMs, revenge porn, and Animal Crossing.On this episode of Cyber, Motherboard Senior Staff Writer Anna Merlan walks us through the story of the man who has been harassing women online for almost 20 years.Stories discussed on this episode:These Women Say One Man Terrorized Them Online for Years. Then, They Decided to Band TogetherWe're recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.