Podcasts about Park City

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 758PODCASTS
  • 1,423EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Park City

Show all podcasts related to park city

Latest podcast episodes about Park City

Staffing & Recruiter Training Podcast
TRP 0072 Rehumanize the Sales Process with Shari Levitin

Staffing & Recruiter Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:13


As the founder of the Shari Levitin Group, Shari has helped create over 1 billion dollars in increased revenue for companies in over 40 countries teaching her authentic, heartfelt approach. Shari is the bestselling author of Heart and Sell: 10 Universal Truths Every Salesperson Needs to Know, a contributor to Forbes, CEO Magazine, and Huffington Post.   Additionally, Shari has been recognized as follows: ●     Top 100 Global Inspirational Leader for 2021 by PeopleHum ●     Top 50 Keynote Speakers for 2020 by Top Sales World ●     Top Ten Voices in Sales for 2018 for LinkedIn ●     20 sales experts who starred in the Salesforce documentary film "The Story of Sales.” ●     Top 35 Most Influential Women in Sales globally (Sales Hacker) ●     2020 Gold Medal Winner for Top Post by Top Sales World ●     Top 30 authors and books to read by Vengreso, the largest digital transformation company in the U.S ●     Guest lecturer at Harvard University where her book was chosen as the textbook for selling for the Strategic Selling Program Shari, her husband, and son live in Park City, Utah. When she is not creating killer content, and presenting at sales kick-offs, Shari enjoys skiing, rock climbing, reading, and standing on her head. Links www.sharilevitin.com https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6770133385466785792/

Blind Shots Podcast
Blind Shots Podcast Season 3, Episode 5 – Brian Ross and the story of Park Mammoth Golf Course

Blind Shots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 61:59


This episode presents the story that I've been wanting to tell you for more than a year and a half. It's a little bit of the story of the once and future Park Mammoth Golf Course in Park City, Kentucky. And to help me tell it's story, we're speaking again with friend of the podcast,…

Varied Not Random
VNR #28 - Should gym owners rent, buy or build their own space?

Varied Not Random

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 64:13


- Adrian & Pat talk with Chris Spealler, the owner of Park City Fit.- Park City Fit is located in Park City, Utah, which is a very expensive location to pay rent or attempt to buy a building.- Chris walks down the path which led him to purchase raw land and build a brand new 10,000 square foot facility for his business.- He faced many obstacles, delays and frustrations during this long process. - Chris candidly shares the pros and cons of this experience as a way to help educate other gym owners who may be considering whether to keep paying rent to someone else or try to become their own landlord.

Sexy Unique Podcast
Salty Utah Queens Ep. 23 - Are You Kidding Me?

Sexy Unique Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:56


On this week's episode of RHOSLC, Lisa lures Whitney to a Tex Mex restaurant in Park City, Mary deals with Robert Sr.'s homecoming, Jen buys some ugly diamond necklaces and Jennie is harassed by her baby-obsessed husband. Come see SUP Live in New York on 12/5. Tickets are selling fast so get yours now before they sell out! For ad-free episodes and bonus content, join the SUP Patreon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast
S3:EP1 - Ted Ligety: Back Home in Utah

Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:23


Over the past two decades, Utah native Ted Ligety has hopscotched across five continents every year, collecting World Cup crystal globes and Olympic gold medals. This winter, he's back home in Utah! Last Chair kicks off season three with an in-depth interview with Utah's own Olympic champion.Check out these stats: 25 World Cup wins, five crystal globes, five World Championship titles and two Olympic gold medals. Not a bad career for the Utah native.With a growing family (wife Mia and three sons) back home and his Utah-based global business, Shred, Ligety decided to retire last February. And he's anxious to make a few fun runs of his own on the slopes of Utah's Deer Valley Resort this winter.This blockbuster season three opening episode of Last Chair will introduce you to the Park City native and take you inside his view of skiing. Here's some of what's in store on Last Chair. Some of his own faves for skiing in Utah. How an Olympic defeat in 2010 inspired him to the greatest years of his career.  His favorite GoPro edit.  From an athlete who's skied in over 50 countries, his global favorites.  His best date night dinner back home.  And, of course, his favorite High West whiskey. How old were you when mom and dad trusted you to be on your own at the resort?I think it was pretty young, probably like five or six years old. So I tell that to my wife, Mia, and she's like, 'No way! We're not leaving Jax to the mountain like next year or the year after. But yeah, like, I think when I was seven, maybe eight, I would take my younger brother - so pretty young age ripping around the mountains. And it was fun. I mean, it's such an awesome way to grow up and explore.Ted, you weren't viewed as a future star as a junior racer. Did hard work make the difference?One hundred percent! What was good about not being dominant at a young age was that I had to work harder. I had that work ethic instilled, had that hunger instilled in me. I was forced to take risks and explore and ask different questions than guys that were good. You're now a ski ambassador for Deer Valley, a role Stein Eriksen held for many years. What do you remember of him from growing up here?I grew up skiing in Deer Valley and watching Stein ski, and it was funny. As a kid you would kind of make fun of Stein's style - he had a very distinct style. I skied with him on the NASTAR course once when I was probably like 14 years old. all of a sudden he was like, wham, right into amodern race stance and like beating all of us 13, 14 year olds. And he was probably in his 70s then. Stein was still a competitive guy even even later on. And, you know, he was an inspiration, for sure, growing up here.Ted, what's the spirit that motivates you?"I love just being out in the outdoors, being in the mountains, especially when there's snow on them. It's like a cleansing feeling being out there - this freedom to go fast, ski down a hill, the wind in your face. It's exhilarating. It's just magical being on the mountains,Check out more with Ted Ligety on Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast presented by High West Distillery and Saloon on your favorite podcast platform. Subscribe to get first access to every episode.Ted Ligety by the Numbers25 World Cup winsFive World Cup crystal globesFive World Championship medalsGrowing up in Utah, Ted Ligety was influenced by great champions like Stein Eriksen. In 2013, he matched the record of three gold medals in one World Championship, a mark held by Eriksen, Toni Sailer and Jean-Claude Killy. A pretty prestigious group of champions for the kid from Park City. (Tom Kelly)

Bitch Talk
Basic Bitching - Leaky Leftovers, Horrible Homilies, and My Name is Pauli Murray

Bitch Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 41:53


We're basic bitching about some important life lessons after Ange attempts to go to church, and Producer Char brings Prime Rib leftovers on a plane. Trust us, it's more traumatic (and hilarious!) then it sounds. And then we cap off the episode with an interview from Sundance 2021 with two of our favorite guests, director duo extraordinaire Betsy West and Julie Cohen. Their documentary, My Name is Pauli Murray, is available to stream on Amazon, and to watch in select theaters near you. This is one of our favorite documentaries of the year about a woman who was born in 1910, and has been a trailblazer for everything we're still fighting for today, including women's rights, the LGBTQ community, and Black Lives Matter. Support independent filmmakers and learn about this incredible person!You can follow director Julie Cohen on TwitterYou can follow director Betsy West on Instagram and TwitterThanks for listening and for your support! We couldn't have reached 600 episodes without your help! --Be well, stay safe, Black Lives Matter, AAPI Lives Matter, and thank you for being vaxxed!--SUPPORT US HERE!Subscribe to our channel on YouTube for behind the scenes footage!Rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts!Visit our website! www.bitchtalkpodcast.comFollow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.Listen every other Thursday 9:30 - 10 am on BFF.FMPOWERED BY GO-TO Productions 

BiCurean
4.8 DisInformation Society

BiCurean

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 68:33


Desiree, co-founder of Grinding Stone Collective and producer of the First Foods Podcast, is a Miwok multimedia journalist, and a live-media event producer. You can see lots of her documentary photography now in the New Mexico Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe, NM at the Beyond Standing Rock exhibit. Some of her recent notable work is speaking at Princeton University in April 2019 and again in November 2020. With the Firestarter Films crew as an Associate Producer, Camera Operator and Investigative Journalist on the feature-length documentary film Akicita: The Battle of Standing Rock, our project premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. She was part of the organizing body the did Boulder Valley Indigenous People's Day 2019, which was heavily focused on #MMIWG2S, the epidemic that takes so many lives of Native women, girls, and two spirits.(Read her full bio here- https://bit.ly/3i57nVA) Roger Wolsey (@RogerWolsey) is a Spiritual Director, United Methodist pastor, Speaker, Writer, and fellow Human. He leads with his heart to bring us into community with one another. A passionate advocate for social justice, Roger has the unique capacity to sit with the discomfort of difference. This allows him to move past the common reactions to find connections others might not be able to achieve. He writes for several online publications and published his first book, Kissing Fish, in 2011 and currently serves on the board of ProgressiveChristianity.org.Erik and I invited them on the show because they are both inspiring humans who have developed the skills to engage folks effectively in the face of disinformation. Given everything we have been facing and expect to face, we thought other folks would appreciate the opportunity to learn from their experience and expertise. Questions can be submitted before the event here: https://app.sli.do/event/jod8sbka #604434Referenced items:The illusion of explanatory depth (IoED), Do you understand how a zipper works?First Foods- https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=230281248632461&ref=watch_permalinkGrindingstone- https://www.Grindingstone.orgWhat To Know About Disinformation History, Tactics, and Real-Life Examples- https://e-rosalie.medium.com/what-to-know-about-disinformation-history-tactics-and-real-life-examples-95ab13f0254Books recommended on the show:When Everything Matters by Dr Cindy Blackstock The Way of Love by Bishop Michael CurryCult of Trump by Steven Hassan- https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Cult-of-Trump/Steven-Hassan/9781982127343★ Support this podcast ★

Whiskey And Wonder
Ep.49 – Feral Children

Whiskey And Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 85:41


This week, Tyler & Megan learn all about feral children, both real and mythical. While learning this week, the two will be sampling High West Distillery's Rendezvous Rye, something Tyler picked up from the distillery in Park City, Utah while he was on vacation!.   As always, thank you so much for your support! Don't drink and drive!   Places you can find us: whiskeyandwonder.com Instagram: @whiskeypodcast or @whiskey.tyler or @whiskey.megan YouTube: Whiskey & Wonder Twitter: @whiskyandwonder or @tyler_whiskey Email:  contact@whiskeyandwonder.com     tyler@whiskeyandwonder.com megan@whiskeyandwonder.com  Facebook: facebook.com/whiskeyandwonder Paypal: paypal.me/whiskeyandwonder Patreon: patreon.com/whiskeyandwonder   If you have a drinking problem, reach out to the folks at 1-800-662-HELP (4357).

Meet the Mentor with Dr. Bill Dorfman

Robert Sertner has developed and produced series television, low-budget theatricals, and over 125 movies for television, enjoying a reputation of delivering consistently high-rated high-concept  entertainment with much sought-after talent including directors, writers, authors and actors. He has  produced projects starring Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Hillary Swank, Kristen Bell, Steve Buscemi,  Courtney Cox, and Pierce Brosnan, among many others.   Sertner began his show business career in the mailroom of Dick Clark Productions, later moving to  Orion Television, where he produced his first half hour comedy pilot for NBC. In 1988 Sertner  formed von Zerneck/Sertner Films, which rapidly grew to become one of the leading independent  suppliers of long-form entertainment in the world, with an international library of over 100 titles.  Sertner switched his sights from long-form to series television in 2010 on NO ORDINARY FAMILY for ABC Studios. Next came ABC's hit drama REVENGE, followed by multiple pilots, including MISTRESSES, which ran for four seasons on ABC. That was followed by another hit series,  QUANTICO; which he followed up with four seasons of the Peabody Award-winning series,  UnREAL, which was nominated for multiple Emmy awards and which also enjoyed phenomenal  critical acclaim.  Sertner's past long-form successes include the record-shattering teen docudrama THE PREGNANCY  PACT, which premiered as one of the highest rated movies in Lifetime's history; as well as another  record-breaking success: GIRL, POSITIVE, a multiple award-winning drama about the tragedy of teen  AIDS, for which he won an inaugural Television Academy Honors Award.   Over the years, Robert Sertner has produced some of television's most ambitious projects, many of  which enjoyed both critical and commercial success. Sertner has also been involved with many non profit boards, including AIDS Project Los Angeles, and he has been an active political fundraiser. He  currently resides in Park City, Utah with his partner Steve. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Artifice
108: Ryan Innes

Artifice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 93:45


Growing up in tiny Thatcher, Ariz., Innes was raised in the traditional musical environment of a small town. As a youth, he was classically trained on piano and sang in the Phoenix Boys Choir and local church musical groups. But…It wasn't until he was introduced to R&B that Innes began a deep and personal involvement with music that would begin to change his life. At 24 years old, he applied to the media music program at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, a city that has become a mecca of emerging talent, producing such artists as Imagine Dragons, Neon Trees and Lindsey Stirling. During his time at BYU, Innes gained confidence as a performer while singing with the popular a cappella group Vocal Point. Around the same time, Innes began writing his own songs, influenced by melodic, vocal-centric artists like Ray Charles, Amos Lee and Ray LaMontagne. In 2010, Innes recorded a self-titled EP…and began performing solo shows, promoting his EP and gaining a loyal following with his original songs and captivating covers. While gaining popularity in the local music scene, Innes landed a residency at The Montage in Park City, Utah. The new gig not only allowed him to quit his day job, but also to continue to polish his performing and songwriting skills. In 2013, Innes took a break from his residency to try out for NBC's The Voice. Singing John Mayer's “Gravity”, Innes quickly received a four-chair turn and picked Usher as his coach. Mentored by Usher and fellow grammy-winner Pharrell Williams, Innes performed a rendition of Bill Withers' “Ain't No Sunshine” in the battle rounds, solidifying his place as a crowd favorite. Innes released his debut album THE INBETWEEN in April 2018, it's one that he hopes can capture the ups and downs of life, giving voice to the listener's own feelings of struggle and hope Early April of 2020 Ryan appeared on yet another NBC Music TV show, Songland. Over the years, Innes has developed a distinct and dynamic artistic voice. One that can be heartbreakingly intimate at one moment and soaringly epic the next. The range of emotions Innes can articulate in a single song or across a setlist mirrors the emotional scope of the artist's life, a contrasting mélange of turmoil, peace, grief and hope. www.ryaninnes.com/

Electrify This!
Farewell Fossil Gas, Hello Better Buildings: A Building Electrification Status Update

Electrify This!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 56:36


With more than 100 million housing units and commercial buildings burning fossil fuels for space or water heating or for cooking across the United States, our building sector needs a major retrofit. Buildings cause 13 percent of the nation's greenhouse gas emissions, and every new fossil-fueled appliance or structure locks in higher emissions and costs for decades to come – not to mention serious health impacts from burning fuels indoors. To reach net-zero by 2050, we must electrify all new buildings by 2025 and all new building equipment by 2030. So how do we do this? Where is it happening? Who is leading and who is stalling? On this episode of Electrify This!, host Sara Baldwin speaks with building electrification experts to discuss efforts underway to get gas out of buildings and switch to clean electricity, including city leadership and California's new, landmark 2022 Energy Code.Guests: Denise Grab, Manager, Carbon-Free Buildings, RMI.  Denise works to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from buildings in the West and across the U.S., and she brings over a decade of experience in advancing clean energy, climate, and clean air policy and law throughout the country. Prior to RMI, she served as the Western Regional Director at the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law, an Adjunct Professor at New York University School of Law, an associate at a major law firm, and a law clerk for a federal district court judge. Denise obtained a JD from Yale Law School, a Masters in Environmental Management from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and a BS  with highest honors in Environmental Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. Tyler Poulson, Deputy Director, Building Electrification Institute (BEI). BEI equips cities across North America with the knowledge, tools and resources needed to accelerate the transition of building systems away from fossil fuels and towards high efficiency electric options. Tyler focuses on helping cities develop critical state and utility partnerships while advancing policies that will accelerate building electrification across their regions. Tyler previously focused on clean energy and climate change solutions in local government sustainability offices for Salt Lake City and Park City, UT. He has past experience in the finance sector and a Masters in Economics from the University of Utah. To Dig in Deeper, Check out these Must-Read Resources:Building Electrification Institute Building Electrification Institute | City Playbooks for the Equitable Electrification of Multifamily Buildings RMIRMI | Gas Stoves: Health and Air Quality Impacts and SolutionsRMI | Regulatory Solutions for Building DecarbonizationBuilding Energy Exchange | Low Carbon Multifamily Retrofit PlaybooksCity and County of Denver | Renewable Heating and Cooling PlanBuilding Decarbonization Coalition | The Flipside Report: A White Paper on Targeted Geographic Electrification in California's Gas Transition  

Dental Digest
85. Speaker Recap from the Alleman's Mastership Retreat

Dental Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 45:51


In August I had the opportunity to attend the Alleman's mastership reunion in Park City, Utah. The Mastership Reunion was a 3 day event that showcased some incredible speakers. 3 of those speaker, Dr. Jihyon Kim, Dr. Ashley Chung and Dr. Steve Schiffenhaus are here in today's episode to share a few pearls from their lecture.   

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 4 | New York Flash Floods @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 31:14


New York Flash Flood//The violent Afghan sport of Buzkashi/ Buslimo//Park City / Ski trip NOORY / Hanidcapping

Gospel Tangents Podcast
Mormon Historians' Community (Part 6 of 8)

Gospel Tangents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 25:07


Steve Pynakker, evangelical host of Mormon Book Reviews and I got together again on August 27 to celebrate his 50th video on his podcast.  Steve attended his first Mormon History Association meetings in June, and he discusses his experiences at the recent meetings in Park City, Utah.  Steve and Rick Bennett discussed the recent loss […] The post Mormon Historians' Community (Part 6 of 8) appeared first on Gospel Tangents.

Christian Science | Daily Lift
Discerning the counterfeit

Christian Science | Daily Lift

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021


Elizabeth Beall, CS, from Park City, Utah, USA

The Piff Pod
Ep 171 - Piff & Jade Take Park City

The Piff Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 28:34


Jade Simone is back from vacation and back on The Piff Pod! Piff and Jade join Matt to recap their last-minute vacation to Park City, Utah. Befriending chipmunks, six mile hikes, alpine slides, extreme zip lines, and more! Check out Piff the Magic Dragon on PIFFTREON for VIP access including EXCLUSIVE PODCAST EPISODES every week, live video chats with the Piff Crew, exclusive merch, and much more! https://www.patreon.com/PiffTheMagicDragon

Mormon Stories - LDS
1464: From EFY Singer to Ex-Mormon EFY Director - Jessie Funk

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 316:40


Today Mormon Stories is lucky enough to be joined by the wonderful Jessie Funk! For anyone familiar with the music of the youth seminars held by the LDS church known as “EFY”, singer Jessie Funk's name should ring a bell. After Jessie's career touring with the broadway musical “Footloose”, releasing several studio albums and books, starting her organization “The Ivy Foundation”, and raising her two children, she recently changed tunes, choosing to leave the Mormon church. We are excited to speak with Jessie about her Mormon upbringing, career (in and outside of the church), her faith crisis, and her new venture “Especially for Truth”, a week-long summer seminar for post-Mormon teens. Wrapping up her first “EFT” event last week where John and Carah were invited as guest speakers, we hope powerhouse Jessie Funk joining the post-Mormon activist space will be music to your ears! And a bonus? There are still tickets left to her Especially for Truth event for post-Mormon women in Park City this coming weekend Aug 27-29th! Visit especiallyfortruth.com ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 —————

Ditching Hourly
Carl Richards - Making Stuff On Purpose

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 54:40


Carl Richards of Behavior Gap joins me to talk about why it makes sense for him to sell his new book for $10,000.Talking Points The paradox of working in public every day The terror of going from 0 to 1 Using permission-less projects to get going The importance of noticing “tailwind” Turning flaws into features Using impostor syndrome as a compass Reacting to negative feedback about pricing How to decide whether to start a podcast Carl's BioCarl Richards is a Certified Financial Planner™ and creator of the Sketch Guy column, appearing weekly in The New York Times since 2010.Carl has also been featured on Marketplace Money, Oprah.com, and Forbes.com. In addition, Carl has become a frequent keynote speaker at financial planning conferences and visual learning events around the world.Through his simple sketches, Carl makes complex financial concepts easy to understand. His sketches also serve as the foundation for his two books, The One-Page Financial Plan: A Simple Way to Be Smart About Your Money and The Behavior Gap: Simple Ways to Stop Doing Dumb Things with Money (Portfolio/Penguin).His sketches have appeared in a solo show at the Kimball Art Center in Park City, Utah as well as other showings at Parsons School of Design in New York City, The Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, California, and an exhibit at the Mansion House in London. His commissioned work is on display in businesses and educational institutions across the globe.Find Carl online here: https://behaviorgap.com https://behaviorgap.com/radio/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/thinkingcarl https://twitter.com/behaviorgap Transcript Of The Show[00:00:00] Jonathan: Hello, and welcome to ditching hourly. I'm Jonathan Stark. And today I'm joined by Carl Richards of behavior gap. Carl, welcome to the show.  [00:00:08] Carl: Thanks, Jonathan, super excited to talk to you.  [00:00:10] Jonathan: Same here. So before we get started for anyone who hasn't yet heard of you, could you give folks just quick background? [00:00:17] Carl: Yeah. So I it's crazy to let me think about how to do it quickly. So I. Was a financial advisor and that's not normally thought of as a creative job. But one day I found myself in immediate and I had a familiar experience that I finally realized. Going on. I was meeting with clients and I thought I was really good at communicating. [00:00:44] And these were really smart clown. My clients were really smart, successful people, and I was trying to explain a concept to them and I was just getting blank stares. Despite thinking that I was really good at this and knowing that these are smart people. So since they were smart people, it was clearly impact. [00:01:01] I remember who it was either a doctor and a technology sales rep, really technical sales rep. And I remember thinking that. This is bad, right? Like I'm doing the best I can. There's this concept they really need to understand, and I'm not getting it across. So out of a act of really desperation and I had never really done this before. [00:01:21] I didn't think of myself as a doodler. I didn't draw, I didn't do visual journal. Like I had done none of this. I'd never taken an art class in my life, but I don't have an act of desperation. I was like, there was a whiteboard in the office that I had never used and I jumped up and was like, no, like this. [00:01:35] And I drew. Like a couple of boxes and some arrows and some circles or something. And I remember the feeling in the room when the clients were like, oh, now I.  [00:01:46] Jonathan: Yeah.  [00:01:47] Carl: And I became a diff is my word. I like to use to that experience of taking something that was seemingly complex, whether it was or not, it doesn't matter, but seemingly complex and reducing it to something simple. [00:02:00] And so I started doing that publicly. I just, I started a little blog. This was years and years ago. My mom and my sister were the only ones that would read it. Like I found out later, my sister was lying. So it was really just the mom, but I kept doing it. And every time a question came up, every time I read something or somebody asked me a question or a client asked me a question, and at this point it was all about money investing and spending and budgeting. would answer the question and then I would try to, I would try to draw some simple sketch. And at this point, it was Sharpie and cardstock and if the Jitsu snap scanner.  [00:02:36] I did that for a while. I just kept putting them up on this little blog. And I did that for awhile. It was probably a year which is, seems like it happened pretty quick to be honest, I'm a year. [00:02:45] And then I got an email and there's a little bit of story that I'm leaning out, but not much. I got an email from the editor at the New York times saying, Hey, we love these women. Do it for us. And I knew enough to say yes and figure it out later. So  [00:03:01] Jonathan: Yeah.  [00:03:01] Carl: that started this column for the New York times that we did. [00:03:04] And again, I had no clue this would happen when I said yes, but we did that column ended up running weekly for 10 years, that led to the book. And then, maybe three or four years into that column, I kinda got bored. Just straight money. And expanded the definition of money and started doing things around creativity. [00:03:24] And we started thinking of it as a business life column. And so that expanded it to imposter syndrome and fear and doing public work and then. The two books and some speaking engagements. And I started getting asked to do speak at creative conferences, and I did an art show, a solo eight week art show and another one in London. [00:03:43] And all of it was a hundred percent by accident. And I couldn't ever believe that it happened so that's a little bit of the bio.  [00:03:51] Jonathan: Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah. I love the juxtaposition of certified financial planner and creator of the sketch guy column.  [00:03:57] It feels like  [00:03:59] Carl: super fun to  [00:03:59] Jonathan: interesting Venn diagram there. Okay, cool. So I'm glad you brought up the New York times thing. Cause I was going to ask you about that backstory and yeah. [00:04:09] Is there a piece that, so I would love to connect the dots if there are any dots to connect. Was it, because the listener is probably either blogging or something like that, YouTube channel, or they are thinking about starting one, maybe it's a mailing list. Maybe it's a podcast, but people who listen generally do some sort of. [00:04:29] You content creation and I have a I'll just quickly say short stories, not dissimilar. Where I was just, years ago, 2000, I don't even know five ish. I was blogging about a really niche topic for, I feel like I, I posted six posts in six weeks maybe. And a book publisher contacted me completely out of the way. [00:04:52] And I'm just curious if the New York times thing was completely out of the blue, or if you did anything to was there any, anything you did that actually led to that? Or was it pretty much out of the blue? [00:05:03] Carl: I wish I had something more, like I've been asked this question so many times, including my editor at the time, it was like, Hey, what would you tell? Wants to, and I was like, Ron, I've got nothing for you. The only thing I have. And this, unfortunately like this doesn't fit into the tips, tricks and tactics and hacks that everybody wants because we all want deeply. [00:05:24] We just want a tactic that we can follow it up. I think this, endless focus that I have on tactics and we all have on tactics is actually just a place to hide. [00:05:33] Jonathan: I agree. [00:05:34] Carl: but so I'm not gonna it would be cute to make up a story. But it really was the only thing I have is playing in traffic. Right, Like that, that, that was it. I didn't even know what SEO was like. I didn't I just kept doing the thing and I don't know why for some people doing the thing that you just can't not do. Like for some people that lead, that ends up being a quiet life of disappointment and desperation, and for other people. [00:06:05] Something hits and I wish I knew the answer to that. That's the question I've been thinking about for over a decade? Cause they're doing work in public doesn't guarantee that a book publisher is going to reach out to you. In fact, it's highly unlikely that they will, but I promise you, the only thing I have is I promise you, they won't, if you don't do it  [00:06:24] Jonathan: Yup. I'm actually glad. That you have a non-answer there because it is an answer it's stop worrying about that stuff. Keep playing in traffic, you know it, [00:06:32] Carl: yeah.  [00:06:33] That's all. I often want to be like we, I play a lot of, I think a lot about emphasis hugs versus punches in the nose and this feels like both it's like deeply empathetic look, brother, I get you. I understand. That this can be a lonely pursuit. You got a thing that's bothering you, and by bothering, like stirring within you and you can't stop doing it and you're going to do it publicly, you can do it. And I and stop worrying about all that other stuff. I didn't even know. I just did the work and sometimes it's going to work and sometimes it's not. And that's the big mystery for me.  [00:07:08] Jonathan: I'm a big fan of Seth Godin's approach of suggesting for people who just need a little bit more than what we're seeing right now. Just find the minimum viable audience for the present that you made. And it's so doable. It just feels so doable. Okay. We can move on. I just curious if I'm glad you, it was out of the blue basically, because I think that frees people actually to just focus on creating stuff, they want to create. [00:07:33] Carl: Gentlemen, before you move on, let me say it like that's that has not stopped. Like I don't have the same thing for the first book. Same thing for the second. Same thing for the book I'm working on now say it like it's, there is no master plan. And so I, yeah, I think to me, that's actually freeing, like you said, so I, Yeah. [00:07:53] it hasn't stopped. [00:07:54] I haven't come up with a formula since.  [00:07:57] Jonathan: okay. So let me, so let's go into that a little bit, because I do know for some things we're going to get into here you have at least one probably multiple daily practices. So it feels like you must have systems in place that Allow you to continue or not allow you to but support you in showing up every day. [00:08:16] Yeah, I can traffic. And this isn't really a show about systems, but I would just say to the person listening that, I don't, I wouldn't say I have a master plan. I don't know every step I'm going to take over the next three, even let's just say. Definitely three years, but I've got a rough goal for the kind of impact I want to have and who I want to help. [00:08:36] And I have a strategy to do that. And there's some systems in place that helped me show up every day and do it and, meet with great people like this, have them on the podcast. And there, there are, it's not that there are no tactics. It's just not worth worrying about the tactics. You just, have a goal, set up a system to support it and look it heads down and do the system. [00:08:55] Carl: Yeah. I The word that keeps coming to mind as you're talking is habits. Like I, I have a habit of noticing things in the world. I even have it. There's like a, I even joked, there's a face I make it's I call it the, her face huh. Like I have a habit of looking for that to happen a couple of times a day. [00:09:13] And then when it happens, I pull out my iPhone and see, this is the interesting piece. If you don't have a knife, if you don't have an iPhone, you can't do this. That's the places to hide. But I'm trying, I'm only going to tell you this, tell your listeners this, because I think it demonstrates like how simple it needs to be. [00:09:30] I mentioned that earlier cardstock Sharpie and Fujitsu, snap, scanner. I didn't have a flatbed scanner. There was no music playing there. So. [00:09:37] now it's like I noticed something in the world. I pull out my phone under notes. I have a folder called ideas. I take a note and if I'm moving, I'll just record on voice memo. [00:09:49] The note, then that folder, when it's time to put something into the world, I go to that folder. And I pull up the idea, like there's one in there from last there's one in there. Let me just do a real quick notes. There's Yeah. [00:10:03] there was one real, oh yeah. Re the idea of re-investing. Like I have a habit of, as soon as I feel better, like healthy, I'm energetic, I'll go make a big athletic goal. [00:10:14] And somebody [00:10:15] somebody was like what if you just reinvested that energy? So that's an idea that will go up on the podcast tomorrow. I go into the notes folder. There's an ideas folder. I pull it up. Oh, reinvest is there. When I do something with the idea of reinvest, I move it to another folder. [00:10:29] The folder is called used ideas. And that's the end of the, that's the end of the system.  [00:10:35] Jonathan: Yeah   [00:10:36] Carl: Yeah.  [00:10:36] there are habits and I think James Claire's work around process and systems are super smart. And I think that's the thing that sometimes I think there's a big difference between being creative and the process of making stuff.  [00:10:52] Jonathan: oh, that's a good point. [00:10:53] Carl: And I don't think of myself as creative, although I do now because I'm like, oh, actually it turns out being creative. Isn't some magic for some people. It is. And that's awesome. Like cool. But there's also a process of, and I call it making stuff on purpose. It's like stuff. It's not art. It's not, I it is, but there's no fancy feelings about it. [00:11:12] There's a big difference between being creative and sometimes they're the same thing, but just for people who don't feel like they're creative, you can create a system for making stuff. It's just like another widget. It's not a big deal. So anyway, yeah, I agree that there are systems, process and habits.  [00:11:27] Jonathan: Yep. Yep. And James has been on the show. So folks if you're interested, if you don't know who James Claire is, check out the podcast in his book, Atomico atomic habits. It's fabulous. So yeah, my, I do a daily mailing list and I just, when I have one of those ideas, same thing, probably talk face. I like that. [00:11:43] And I whip out the phone and I start a new Gmail message and I typed the idea or I say the idea and I just close it and it automatically saves on all my devices. It's instantly available everywhere.  [00:11:53] Carl: So good.  [00:11:54] Jonathan: Yeah, and it's just, it's the teeniest tiniest little spark will happen during the day. And I just know if I don't instantly grab it, I'm going to forget it. [00:12:01] 30 seconds later, kids come and say something, make gone all gone. But if you get into the habit of capturing those things, even if you don't have an answer, it's just an inspiration sometimes and or weird observation or paradox, if you don't capture that it is going to be gone. But when you do capture it, you get into the habit. [00:12:19] I sh I have like over 600 of these unreal. Ideas in this folder. And same thing if I don't have an idea for today, I just open up the folder and oh yeah, let's write about that  [00:12:29] Carl: can I just mention two things, one I've heard that like it's gone thing and I think that's true for, I don't know where the boundary conditions are on any of this stuff. I only want to mention this because maybe there's some listeners. Think a little differently about it. And I have finally I've noticed that the good stuff sticks. [00:12:49] I don't know where, again, I don't know the boundary condition of it. I don't know. So I've started to be a little less precious about the idea I got to capture it. I got to grab it. Because I find that the good stuff comes back and I don't, again, I don't know if that's just me or, Elizabeth Gilbert's thing at some point, if you don't let the idea out into the world that we'll find a new host. [00:13:09] I don't know. Is it three times? Is it one time? Is it, I don't know, but, so I've started to be just recently, I've developed a little less preciousness around oh, and I'll even find myself saying it to the idea. Hey right now, I'm driving brother. But if you're really good and you want me to be involved, could you come back? [00:13:26] Cause I think you're not nice. And I'd like to see you again, right? Like that kind of thing. And then the second thing I would mention is sorry, got what the second thing was, it was preciousness and then  [00:13:35] Jonathan: If it'll come back,  [00:13:36] Carl: it will come back. Exactly. Oh, this the not knowing the answer. I like it took me five years to finally get my editor convinced that point of the column was often the question. Cause there was always this, like this common refrain in journalists of so what what's the point here? And I would have to say the point is the question. And so I only mentioned that because I like, I wouldn't be scared. To share observations and create stuff that you don't know the answer to. [00:14:07] And you can be upfront about this. And I say this like almost every day on the podcast, I'm like, I don't know. I don't know, but I think it's interesting. And I probably, you, this is, I think we get hung up in this oh, where am I going to find ideas? And this is all the same thread. It's if you think something's interesting. [00:14:24] And again, it's just for me, if that her face, like I could be reading something. If I notice I have to pause and go back and read a sentence that's assigned to me where I'm like, oh, that's, there's something interesting. If you find something interesting, we live in such an inter it's such a connected world now that I promise, how, no matter how silly you think it is, there's something it's out there. [00:14:47] That's going to find it. Interesting. It's just a function of doing it long enough in a space where the signal gets clear. So I just wanted to mention that idea. You don't have to have the answers. In fact, I think it's far more. Gosh, far more honest and far more interesting to follow somebody on the exploration. [00:15:06] I think of the work I do really as like Shackleford journal. I don't know, it's not advice, but if you come this way, if you happen to find yourself on this trail, I found a spring here and it was interesting. It was nice to know that there's water and there's a tree around the corner that provides good shade. [00:15:23] I don't know if you, if it's good for you, but it was good for me. So that's the one thing I wanted to do.  [00:15:28] Jonathan: Yeah, I do like that. And I did notice that on the podcast where you're like this isn't advice, it's observation things I've observed and there's something, the thing I like about that is it removes the word should from any sentence you would ever write, because the word should always scares me. If that comes out of my mouth, I'm like, that's a little, yeah. Yeah. It's a Derek Sivers has a really. He is a very similar approach. I don't know if you're familiar with his stuff, but  [00:15:52] Carl: for sure.  [00:15:53] Jonathan: yeah, his, especially his new book or it's like how to live. And it's chapter after chapter of almost contradictory ways that you could run your life. [00:16:03] Some of them are completely contradictory, like one right after the other. And it's here's a bunch of ways you could do it.  [00:16:10] Carl: right.  [00:16:11] Jonathan: It's a fascinating approach. It's and maybe most fascinating. Yeah. How rare it is most books that you'd buy, self-help book would be like, here's what you do first get up at 4:00 AM, make your bet, like the classic stuff. [00:16:24] And it's yeah, I already read that. And that's not gonna work for me for whatever reason. Cool. All right. I have a feeling that we could talk for four hours.  [00:16:31] Carl: Right.  [00:16:32] Jonathan: This is great. Obviously if people want more of this kind of like talking about Karl's content, like the actual content go to behavior, gap.com and just start reading. [00:16:42] There's like loads and loads of great stuff there. But what I really the primary reason I reached out is, pricing podcast and you've got a new book coming out that has a pun intended novel pricing structure. Could you talk about that a little bit? Where'd that idea come well first, what is it? [00:16:59] And then where did that idea come from? Those sorts of things. [00:17:02] Carl: Yeah.  [00:17:03] Again, no grand scheme here. I I wanted to okay. So keep in mind. Let me just describe what it is first. So I do the sketches. I noticed years and years ago. I. Other people who gave financial advice for living. So this would range from CPAs attorneys, financial advisors, financial planners, private equity, venture capital, anybody who kind of deals with money and takes risk for a living started to ask for these images. [00:17:33] And they would I specifically remember the first time was like aye. You remember the guy's name? He said, Hey, could I, would you, could I have a print of one of these and would you sign it? And I was like, that is so silly. No. And he said I'll give you two twenty-five dollars for an unsigned one. [00:17:50] I'll give you a hundred dollars for a sign when I was like, give me the pen, so that was the first time. And I was like, oh, that's interesting. Again. I'm not very good at seeing the future, but I'm really good at noticing T well, I'm getting better at noticing tailwind. And so it was like, oh, that's interesting. [00:18:05] So we started selling like prints and that's that? That's where like the art show I did an eight week solo 50 piece show that sold out and I was like, Ooh. [00:18:14] Jonathan: Wow.  [00:18:15] Carl: it was tailwind. So there's this group of people who use. So this is like purpose art, and I've got lots of friends who are off. [00:18:23] They don't have that kind of an audience and this idea would not work unless you had that kind of an audience. So people give my first book, the behavior gap sold to those same people and they would give it away to their clients. So it's, so it's been years of me thinking like, oh, isn't that interesting? [00:18:43] These are tools. The sketches themselves. And then the writing that goes with the sketches are actual tools. We think of them as conversation grenades. I think I stole that from class. You throw them in a room and conversations break out and it's the exact kind of con it's supportive conversations for people to give financial advice for a living. [00:19:00] They, they're the exact kind of conversations these people want to be having. So with all of that, and in mind, I was like, wow, I should create a, I want to create Yeah. [00:19:08] I've got to tell you another part of this story. I got contacted by somebody who said. I get these kinds of phone calls every once in a while. [00:19:15] It's actually quite annoying, but they're like, look, do you own all the rights to your material? And I do. And it's been very intentional. And do you own the name bay area? Like I do. Would you sell the whole thing to us? [00:19:28] And I was like, for how much? And they threw out a number and I was like tomorrow. And it didn't work out, but it got me thinking, and again at NFTE has played into this too. All of these little things mashing together got me thinking, like, how could I ever release? And Bob Dylan selling his catalog for 600 million, like all of those things were in the past. And I was like could I sell a fractional piece of my library? [00:19:53] And so I was thinking through that and I was like who would I sell it to? And I could sell it to people who use it, not just enjoy it, but people would use it. And wouldn't it be interesting if those people thought of themselves as owners, not just customers. So all of that came together and I was like, all Right. [00:20:05] I want to create, and then Austin Cleveland's book the size of it, six by six, the map. [00:20:10] Soft cover matte finish, like all of that, all of it came together. It was like, okay, I'm going to do a coffee table book. That's eight by eight square soft cover, matte finish. And I'm going to make, I love playing with the juxtaposition of kind of Swiss grid and hand-drawn elements. I love that. It's it feels like a business suit with flip flops. [00:20:31] Like I just love playing around with that. And we, I love juxtaposition and I, we also have a fundamental concept here called permissionless project. So it was like, okay, how can I do this project that would involve no one else's permission, no gatekeeper and a publisher? No, nothing. [00:20:43] So that's what, that's how the present came about. And it's eight, eight by eight soft cover. It's 52. I took 52 sketches. We wrote up 52 essays. We got a really fine I feel like the subtitle of the book should be better than the New York times, because these are all things that have appeared. [00:21:00] Then they went through more editorial processes based on feeds. So it's 52 sketches, 52 essays. Each fold of the book is a sketch and an essay when we mixed them up a little bit on which side and how they're done. But each bolt of the book is self-contained sketch essay. And then I was like, all right, great. [00:21:15] What should I do with this? And I thought, okay, the people, the fractional ownership, the sell of the library and all that MFT, like all of that came together. And I was like, what if I only made this available to a hundred people?  [00:21:25] And each person will get a hundred. Signed and numbered. So I'm gonna, I'm literally calling the printer and saying I'm printing, I'm actually printing 11,000 because I want to keep a thousand as artist proofs for myself to give to friends. [00:21:37] But so 10 I'm ordering 10. That's the only print run. It will never be printed. And I, all of this is I get so excited about it. Cause it's all part of my ethos. Like a project that has a start, a finish. It's not gonna be around forever. Like I love calling the printer saying 10,000, like the first print run. [00:21:53] I'm like, no final. Only, never again. And then I'm gonna get this 10,000. I'm going to go sit in the printers place and sign one of 10,002 of them. That's going to take me a week. And then you get the book. A hundred copies of the book to give to your clients. Again, that's the part that you know, is relatively unique here. [00:22:13] A hundred copies of the book to give to your clients. You get the digital rights, the forever digital use rights for the 52 sketches in the 52 S. These people will use the people who will buy this will use it. These in social media, they'll use them in their client newsletter and they'll use them occasionally. [00:22:32] We've had people in Texas print them on a billboard. Yes, of course  [00:22:37] Jonathan: I thought I saw that. I thought it was, I thought it was like digital magic.  [00:22:41] Carl: Yeah no. That one, the one you saw probably was digital magic, but there is a real one and I just haven't been able to get a picture of it. So you can print them on a t-shirt. You can print them on a mug as long as you're not selling. To give to clients. So like you, we call it, do the, do whatever you want license. [00:22:55] So you get to do whatever you want. Licensed 52 sketches forever. Cool. Geez. How do you price that? What do you do? And so I knew enough for my art show because when I did the art show, I went, I literally read everything. I get my hands on and how to price art. And I don't know if you know this, but there's no manual.  [00:23:13] Jonathan: Yeah. I do know that. [00:23:15] Carl: Yeah. There's no, like I looked everywhere. There's no, like in my world you can price a comp a comparable ass. Of similar risk and similar reward. And you've known with the price in the art world. There's nothing. So the same thing with the book, I was like wait a second. This isn't really a book. It's 52 weeks of marketing. [00:23:34] It's all these other things. I was like I just picked a number and partially I was like, Okay. [00:23:38] you know what? I want to do something that scares me. And I've always wanted to do a million dollar book launch.  [00:23:43] And so we priced it at $10,000 a piece, a hundred people can buy. It's a million dollars. [00:23:48] We've actually made 20 slots available. That would include me coming to speak at your book, like at a book. [00:23:54] party. So those are 20,000. So it's actually, what is that? It's a hundred and it's a hundred. And if those all sell, it's a $1.2 million. [00:24:03] Jonathan: Amazing [00:24:03] Carl: And it's crazy, right? And I feel all those feelings of wait, who told you, you could do this. [00:24:08] I have a buddy is called imposter syndrome. And he shows up every time I do something cool. He comes every time I talk about like right now, I totally I'm like what? That's nuts. I can hear listeners being like what I'm scared to death. And that's part of the project.  [00:24:22] Jonathan: Yeah, imposter syndrome is a good sign. If imposter syndrome shows up, it means you're doing something interesting and new. Okay. So that's incredible. Very cool. Totally. I saw it and I was just like, oh, we have to talk about this. Has someone besides imposter syndrome shown up to throw rocks? [00:24:39] Carl: Oh, for sure. Yeah. I We've only recently started announcing, you saw one of the early announcements you probably saw. And talk  [00:24:45] Jonathan: Yeah, I think so.  [00:24:47] Carl: And Blair is a friend of mine and he's had something to do with this. I'll call him and be like, really? Am I doing it? And he's do you know the answer to this? [00:24:52] Yeah.  [00:24:52] I th I, I think I saw, I'm trying to spend less and less time on Twitter. I do use Twitter for a lot for broadcasting, but I'm trying not to do a lot of interacting with. I did see like people in my industry saying things like it's obviously a top that's a joke that will always say like the market's certainly frothy at this point, if Carl's doing this and then somebody else, the one that, and those are like, whatever, like it's certainly, it's not for you. [00:25:18] You clearly don't understand somebody else said oh, here's Carl playing a joke on all his loyal fans. And w I then explained to him what it was. It was like, no joke here. This is what, and he's oh, I didn't get that. It had the digital rights. So those things I'm like, it's not for you. [00:25:33] The one that I heard the most recently was somebody saying, I thought you were all about helping people. Why are you suddenly leaving everybody? Yeah. So that, and I can feel that and then say, and it's Okay. [00:25:48] for me to do a project like this. Yeah, [00:25:50] for sure. And I don't know if it'll work. We've already, pre-sold a bunch of them. [00:25:53] We opened up 21 early seats. Cause there were people who sent notes saying literally like I'm bringing a bag of cash to your door. And I was like, oh, okay. But I don't know if we'll get to, I don't even know if we'll get to 15. But I'm okay with that because next year we could sell 10 more and 10 more until all hundred go.  [00:26:12] Jonathan: right. [00:26:13] Carl: I don't know if it'll work is what I'm saying. I have no idea if that will work, but there's enough tailwind for me to try.  [00:26:19] Jonathan: Yeah, I love that. I actually wrote that down tailwind. That's your so you'd note you're noticing engine is very good. Where you'll notice this sort of puppy, dog face stuff, but then also like when something happens, it's not just like you move on to the next thing. It's whoa, there's the sort of after effect of motion happening here just really good detector. [00:26:40] Carl: We generally, we tried to systemize that a bit. Like I think of it as a system. Like we use early detection stuff, like Twitter's a great place to toss something out. And again, if you get no feedback, I actually, I don't use that as a, I don't use that as a sign. It's only if I get feedback that I'm like, oh, interesting. [00:26:59] Because no feedback, actually the sample size is so small that no matter what the feedback is, it's inconclusive. So the only thing I can ever say from it is oh, interesting. Like maybe I should try a little more of that. [00:27:13] Jonathan: Right. [00:27:13] Carl: And just it's just a slight tailwind at that point. [00:27:15] And then, but we try to we have systems now for like, where does the idea get tested first? Behavioral up radio is where it gets heard first. And then if it makes it out of behavior, I pray a little go here. And if it makes it go there, I'll go here. And eventually it'll end up in volume for right. [00:27:29] Cause that's part of it. That's the other thing I should tell you the book's name. We were like, what did we name the book? I was like Let's just call it volume one. So somebody on the team actually suggested volume one. I'm like we can't do that. Like my publisher would never like we don't have a, what was her, the design of the book jar then? [00:27:44] How cool is this? Like when we'd realized we didn't have to design for Amazon or the bookstore, all we had to design was for the moment. I just envisioning it. I'm doing it right now. Like a financial person, but it's advice giver has it in their hand and they hand it to a customer, a client that moment we could design the entire book cover for that moment. [00:28:07] Really cool. So that's some fun stuff.  [00:28:10] Jonathan: Huge. That's amazing. Yep. You're just so focused on what it's for. This is what it's for.  [00:28:17] Carl: Yep. And that circles back to your idea of throwing stones. I have tried to get really good, and I'm not very good at it, but I try so hard that it's not for them. So that's phrase like it's not for you. And so if there's anybody throwing stones, I understand and empathize and get it. [00:28:37] And there's a reasonable, if they're thoughtful, I treat them as gold because I can make the project better. But largely I would say. It must not either. I didn't communicate well enough or it's not for you.  [00:28:48] And both of those are within my power, which is really freeing to me because if I didn't communicate clearly that's on me. [00:28:55] And if it's not for you, there's nothing I can do. It's okay. We'll just move on. [00:28:59] Jonathan: right. Yeah. Not everyone gets the joke as they say so. Okay. So you just mentioned the behavior gap radio.  [00:29:06] Carl: Yeah.  [00:29:06] Jonathan: Let's talk about that a little bit because I am signed up to that. It's well, you can describe it. What's the  [00:29:12] Carl: Yeah.  [00:29:13] I think for your listeners, this may be the most important idea because obviously I, there was a whole bunch of caveats around that book, project. Make it unique. I had somebody tell me a good friend of mine said, Carl, you're an N of one for this project. I don't know anybody else who could do it cause you've got a market that needs it. [00:29:29] So I understand that. But there's a bunch of N of one projects for everybody listening has an N of one project, right? Like you're the only one that could do it. So don't let that be a place to hide. But behavior radio to me is a, so let me just describe how it happened. I was noticing things in the world. [00:29:47] And it was actually a challenge from Seth Goden. He, we were having breakfast and he said, Carl, why aren't you writing a daily blog? And I said, cause it's, he's unabashed about how powerful it's been for him. And I'm like I don't like to write. He's you like to talk. And so why don't you just record? [00:30:03] I'm like, oh my gosh, really? And this was before like the most recent like podcast craze.  [00:30:10] Jonathan: Yeah.  [00:30:11] Carl: So I just started recording. Initially the notes folder I described early on wasn't notes. It was audio files, just what do they call it? Voice memos. So I started recording voice memos and I was saving them on a Dropbox file folder and somebody on the team. [00:30:26] And when I say team there's three.  [00:30:28] Jonathan: Yeah.  [00:30:28] Carl: Somebody on the team pound. And then they're like, what are you? Do you mind if I, why don't we start a podcast? And I was like no, I don't want to, no, I can't all sorts of imposter syndrome. They're like Okay. [00:30:37] What if I just put them on SoundCloud? And we embed the player someplace. [00:30:42] And it was like, oh Yeah. [00:30:43] fine. And then the times ran across them and they were like, can we run them every once in a while? So they ran it around as well, but then they stopped. And so it was just us posting these things up and I'd get notes, emails from people saying, I love your podcast. And I'd be like, I don't have a podcast. [00:30:57] And they would say, I don't know what you call it, but would it, could you put it on iTunes so I can listen to it in the car? I'm like, all right. it. And but remember it was just part of my process. That's why I think everybody could do this. It's awesome. Cleanse work, show your work. So I just started recording these every day and sometimes I do six a day and sometimes I take days off. [00:31:22] Still have the six, like I've, I haven't missed a day for a very long time, except Sundays I take Sundays off in terms of publishing. And then the people that I was having a conversation with the folks at super cast and super cast is a paid subscriber based podcast system, which is amazing. You can go check it out. [00:31:38] And they were like, wait, you're doing this anyway. And so I decided I didn't care if anybody listens. And Seth says that this is the story I tell myself, at least I'm not sure it's true, but I try to tell myself I don't care if anybody would listened to it,  [00:31:49] I'm doing it anyway. It's the idea generation. [00:31:52] Seth says, it's the metacognition, right? It's thinking about your thinking and it's the exercise of that muscle, because like you said, you have hundreds of them sitting in there. Like I did too. Like I, people are like, when are you gonna run out ideas? And never as long as I keep exercising the muscle,  [00:32:06] Jonathan: right.  [00:32:06] Carl: so I'm doing It anyway. [00:32:08] So yeah, somebody was like what if you just made it a paid podcast? So I had this little items I want to do a little experiment. What if I told no one about it for awhile? I just put it up and all we did, so we didn't lean on my list. We didn't lean on the TA. Anybody else? Like we just, all we did was we posted about it on Twitter. We take little snippets, audio grams, post them on Twitter and Instagram. What if we did that? And I thought if I did that for a year and I made it $10 a month, would it, would I be happy or sad at the end of this? It was like, dude, there's no doubt. If I had no audience and I started doing that every day and I put it on Instagram and Twitter, that's all I did every day. [00:32:49] I took a snippet or I took the highlight. I wrote the highlight on Instagram and Twitter. I said, if you like this, you'd love my daily podcast. It's 10 bucks. Go here, sign up. If you did that everyday for a year, I would be willing to bet money that you would be happy. You did.  [00:33:06] Jonathan: Such a good way to put it  [00:33:07] Carl: Like it's I don't know how happy. I don't know why, but I guarantee you'd be happy.  [00:33:12] Jonathan: Here's the flip side of that because I agree with you, but let's just let the devil come in and advocate. So that's a lot of time to invest in something and I want to pay off Carl. I want it to pay off. I want my tea. I could use that. I could bill $200 for that hour or two every day. So I'm losing, whatever, 365 minus Sunday's times, at least a hundred. [00:33:37] Carl: Yeah, I don't buy it. So here's what I don't buy it. I see the point totally. And I think  [00:33:41] Jonathan: It's opportunity cost at least. [00:33:42] Carl: Yeah, I think it's a very good conversation. So number one, it doesn't take me an hour. It takes me about 15 minutes. So we got that. So I should describe it. Yeah. It's a daily podcast. [00:33:50] I was like, oh, I don't want to start a podcast. I don't wanna have guests. That's so much work. So we have I have another concept that I love called turn the flaw into the feature.  [00:33:58] So it started with the Sharpie, Right. [00:34:00] Like I downloaded that, believe me, I did, I downloaded the illustrator and tried to figure out how to use it and couldn't figure out how to use it. [00:34:05] So I was like, I'll just, okay, crap. I'll just have to use a Sharpie and cardstock and a Fujitsu, snap scanner. I did that. And a couple of years later, I hired a designer and I said, Hey, take this and turn it into a beautifully designed product. I put it out and everybody was like, why I love the Sharpie. So the flaw became the feature. [00:34:23] So in this case, behavioral operators, I was like, oh no podcasts have guests and they're long and they're thoughtful. I didn't have time for any of that. And I didn't want to do it. And I wasn't very good. So I was like, okay but I want to do one okay. What's the fly is, it's just me talking. So it's me talking between three and 12 minutes and I have no problem with it being three minutes. [00:34:43] In fact, I work really hard to make it three minutes. So it's me talking between three and 12. And now I've asked anybody want me to have guests do no, in fact, I just had somebody yesterday, send me a message saying your podcast fits perfectly into my time while I'm getting, like making my coffee. And I love it because I don't have to set aside a bunch of times. So the flaw has become a feature. So reasonable one, it doesn't take that much time. So if I was saying that to myself, I really want to do this, but it takes too much time. I would say. How could I do it in a way that didn't take much time? [00:35:18] Number two? I don't know what the value would be. So remember the value extraction. I'm always thinking value creation and value extraction. Value extraction doesn't have to be money value extraction could be thinking about my thinking. Seth claims you'd write his daily blog if nobody read it.  [00:35:34] Jonathan: I would do. I would, I'm terrified of stuffing my daily blog. I would never stop it because my brain would dry up. Like it's where all my ideas. So I've been thinking about this a lot lately and ideas. I don't make my ideas, pop into my head and have created the conditions. That cause a certain kind of idea to pop into my head. [00:35:59] So it's like these events are happening to me, but if I took away the conditions, the events would stop happening to me, even though they're happening in my head. They're like outside events. It's if I moved to, I don't know Afghanistan, or if I live in Providence, Rhode Island, different events are gonna happen to me and it's going to come. [00:36:18] Different actions. I'm going to have to make different decisions because outside events are, you can, are predictably different in those two places. And if I stopped doing my daily list, that'd be like moving my brain to a place where it would stop having these things happen to it. It's hard. I haven't figured out how to describe this very well but taking, yeah, go ahead. [00:36:40] Carl: are those things? Are those things creating value in other areas of your life?  [00:36:44] Jonathan: oh, a hundred percent. [00:36:46] Carl: Yeah, so that's that to me is the most interesting part, right? Wait, I don't want to do this thing cause it's gonna take an hour and I could have built a hundred dollars. Or 200 or 500, whatever the number is. [00:36:55] And that would be like saying, the New York times didn't pay me very well. If at all, how could I possibly calculate what it was worth to me?  [00:37:06] Jonathan: Yes. So there's the leap of faith and I've made that leap and it and there's a solid ground on the other side of the chasm. So the thing for the listener who doubts this yeah. I have to, yes, there is. I can give maybe a lead, even more specific question. It's really a question is why are you doing it in the first place? [00:37:27] So if you want to do it to make a million dollars, then don't do it. But if you want to do it because you want to do it, it seems like a fun way to spend your day instead of doing actual work or not. Even your whole day is spent 15 minutes. Then go ahead. It's like the, when I'm coaching someone and they're like, but how is this going to pay off? [00:37:47] And I'm like, I don't know, but I'm sure it's, like you said at the beginning, I'm sure if you don't do it, you're going to be stuck right. Where you are right now in two years, in five years in 10 years. [00:37:55] Carl: Yeah.  [00:37:56] That inability to draw a linear line between creation and capture. Is I think a real hangup for most of us. And I have gotten so comfortable with the idea because we live, we go deep down this hole, but if we live in a complex adaptive system and in complex adaptive systems, you can't draw linear straight lines between creation and capture. [00:38:17] You have to be comfortable. The idea that it's going to be a messy, everybody will tell you that. That's why you see so many of those little hand drawn things that look like balls of yard, right? You have a hockey stick and that's like the myth hockey stick up into the right. [00:38:30] It's the myth. And then you have the ball of yarn is the reality. Like I had no clue that this was going to happen. My entire career is a giant ball of yarn. I have no clue what's going to happen now. And I've now gotten to the point where that if I'm not in that condition, I think I just think of it as an irreducible uncertainty, right? [00:38:53] If I'm not living in uncertainty with extended breaks, Right. [00:38:56] Like time to rest and recover because uncertainty is, can be a little taxing, but if I'm not living in uncertainty, then I'm doing something wrong. So I love sess. Like it may not work. So I agree. Just go and see everybody. [00:39:11] I think everybody, who's honest about a creative career says this same thing,  [00:39:17] Jonathan: The argument you mean. [00:39:18] Carl: Yeah. Everybody who has a creative career, that's worked  [00:39:21] Jonathan: Oh, yeah, [00:39:22] Carl: and there, and if they're artists that, I just mean that by like self-aware of it, like it's not necessarily dishonest. I'm just.  [00:39:28] Jonathan: sure.  [00:39:29] Carl: They'll say I don't, I didn't know. [00:39:31] Like I, I had a plan, but mostly it's mostly it's this thing that you could not do. And we've all felt it. And most of us bury it, but if you're feeling it, like all I'm suggesting is damn, I call it dancing with dragons, like dance with a little bit.  [00:39:45] Jonathan: Yeah. Let it out. [00:39:46] Carl: Yeah. And find a forum. And now it's, I don't care if it's just to your neighborhood coffee shop or if it's on Twitter, like whatever, find a forum, let it out, play in public because I promise you if you do it consistently for a year, you won't be sad. [00:39:59] You did it. I don't know why you'll be happy, but I know you will be sad.  [00:40:03] Jonathan: Yeah. I hundred percent agree with that. I've just, I've got a lot of engineering mindset folks who. Who feels like they can predict the future in many ways. And when there's decreased amount of certain, about like building stuff software and so forth. So it's I know if I do this, then it's going to do that. [00:40:17] So it's tough to say to them, it's okay, but you gotta trust. You gotta let go and not know exactly how it's gonna play out. But you're right. If you show up for you. And you're doing something that's meaningful you in some way that you want to do, not just because you think there's a big payout at the end, because you want to do it. [00:40:35] You're not going to be sad that you did it. You're not, so it's so good. Okay. Is there more to talk about with the podcast, the daily podcast? Or could we jump over? If so then let's definitely do that. I'm also curious about the mailing list and we we, I guess we already did talk about selling the sketches. [00:40:53] I have a number of illustrators on the list and it's and they're struggling. It's like, how do I, how could I possibly, how can I sure it was in the bowl doing illustration without going on Upwork and just being told what to do by horrible client. [00:41:09] Carl: Yeah. Yeah. So I don't know, but let me wrap up the real Brady. I would just say the reason I like that as a topic for this audience is because everybody could do it. If you just took your process, And decided to do your work publicly. How did you pick that pen? Which app do you use? I know that's a little tactical, but it's I tried, like just so many of us are convinced we don't have anything to say and I just would beg you to believe me, like that's classic imposter syndrome thinking. [00:41:36] Yeah. Because it's become easier. Second nature for you. Both of those in air quotes, it's become easier. Second nature for you. You think it's easier. Second nature for everyone else. And if it's easy and second nature for everyone else, it must not be valuable because it's common. It turns out it's not, none of those things are true. [00:41:54] You've just forgotten. Like I always in my audience, I always tell him, like you forgotten that most people in the world don't know what standard deviation means. Megan, you throw it around, like it's like a normal term. So that's w B area, the podcast, everybody could just start doing that and you look, it doesn't have to be a paid podcast just anyway. [00:42:13] So that was allied wrap that up the illustration thing. I don't know. I have I have a unique tailwind because these are it's purpose art. But there's a lot of it going on, I see really good friend of mine that does he does. He does marketing cartoons, the Marketoonist Tom fish, board marketing. [00:42:29] Marketoonist like he does marketing opportunities.  [00:42:32] Jonathan: Huh?  [00:42:33] Carl: Illustrations around. So I think that maybe it's just look, somebody came up, asked me if they could have one on the wall. I said, sure. And they paid me for it. And then we started now we sell digital downloads for a hundred dollars a piece. [00:42:48] You get the high res file and the forever do whatever you want. Licensed is what we call it. And now who's going to pay a hundred dollars. Like the people who pay the a hundred dollars for these are people who typically it's not, I have a few sketches that people hang on their walls in their house. [00:43:04] Like one, maybe I'm the only one. My wife would allow it, our house. But the rest are like in the office. They're they serve a purpose.  [00:43:12] Jonathan: Right. [00:43:13] Carl: I don't know outside of that, except that I've watched some people do. And it's always the same. The formula is always the same. It's like play in traffic, do a lot of it. [00:43:22] And then find interesting ways. There's so many interesting illustrators Right. [00:43:26] now on Instagram getting paid for all the standard ways, like a notebook, a print, a t-shirt and then. Digital rights to it. I've followed. I have a collection of those people. Cause I just love because they're permissionless, right? [00:43:41] Like nobody there's no gallery owner. There's no, like they're direct to the people in Kevin Kelly's standard thousand true fans approach. So that's all I really got on that. I don't really know how to be helpful there. [00:43:54] Jonathan: I think that was pretty helpful. And again, it's it's like a bunch of things that we've said, I think all would contribute into observations that might work for the illustrators in the audience. It's, there's not a million.  [00:44:08] Carl: Yeah.  [00:44:08] Jonathan: it's, there's just not, you don't have to worry as much about all of that stuff that you might be worrying about. [00:44:12] And I just, I do love the working in public or playing in traffic and paying attention to what's meaningful to people, but there's, there is also the thing of like I started doing a Sunday comic and I love it. It's super fun. Is anything going to happen from it? Not, no, I don't think so. [00:44:31] It's just another way to communicate the ideas that I read about it. And it breaks up the, cause I do even Sundays. Seven days a week, I'm putting stuff out. So it breaks it up for me. And it's a different way to communicate hard ideas in a funny way. So I dunno maybe something will happen, but it's just fun. [00:44:52] Carl: as I'm listening to Jonathan, I'm thinking like I've actually had this conversation probably a hundred times with people. So I do like here's, what I would do is I would find one person that would buy something. Going from zero to one is, I don't know, 60, 70, 80% of the way.  [00:45:08] Jonathan: Yeah.  [00:45:08] Carl: And it, because it's all the fears, they're all the tactical places to hide, but what is it? [00:45:13] So I don't care what it is. Like I just worked with somebody here locally that loves to draw zombie sort of drawings, which I'm just not into it. I have no interest in, but I love this person because they're way into it. Like I'm thinking agnostic. I just am super stoked when you have a thing. And his thing is he draws these zombie things. I'm like, what are, these would be super cool is a skateboard deck.  [00:45:34] Go would do, would you do me a favor? Just go by one blank screen, draw one and put it up for sale for 50 bucks and just see Hey, made this thing. I hope you like it. Classic stuff. [00:45:48] Like I do that in public and S and if you don't have it, anybody in public listening, do you send an email to 10 people?  [00:45:57] Jonathan: Yeah.  [00:45:57] Carl: I made this thing. Okay. How about stickers? I made a pack of five stickers. People seem to find my my sketches, a little humorous and light-hearted and it makes me feel good. [00:46:05] So I made a packet of five stickers. They're $12. Like we could okay. Make a mug, do a t-shirt do it. Like we could riff all day. Hang on what the thing is, but the what matters is the zero to one. Can you get somebody to buy it? Can you get one person?  [00:46:20] Jonathan: Yeah, I'm chuckling because of the terror of doing that first skateboard. I just it's just so classic. [00:46:27] Carl: Sure. And he hasn't done it yet. And I'm literally I actually went out and bought this kid he's well, he's 20 he's 24. He's an amazing, like one of the best artists I've ever seen, but no one knows it.  [00:46:38] And I actually went out and bought his domain, his name as a domain was available. So I bought it and I told him, you either start putting stuff up on this. [00:46:47] We're 60 days from now, I'm going to start putting stuff up drawn with my left hand in your name. He's and only because I'm trying to force the issue cause I care about him. But Yeah. it's super scary and I think that's why we all go try to find a million places to hide no cell one thing. [00:47:06] Jonathan: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:47:07] Carl: one thing there's nothing left to hide.  [00:47:09] Jonathan: Yep, totally. And there's so many people in my audience who just sold their time. They've never really sold anything. They're just renting themselves out or they have a job without a boss or benefits and they've never priced anything. They've never put a price for something. On a thing and said, this is 50 bucks period, and yeah. [00:47:30] Carl: Can I riff on that for just a  [00:47:31] Jonathan: yeah.  [00:47:32] Carl: I think there's a reason that's so scary and it's it please. I'm like trying to be massive. I'll actually probably get emotional about it because you, excuse me. When you create something like that, you are literally putting yourself up for judgment, Right. You're taking it's. I think It's the most intimate. I have spent my life studying risk and risk-taking I back country ski and I'm involved with lots of venture capitalists and private. like, I know a lot about risk. I cannot think of a more intimate form of risks. Then, what we're talking about here is because you're literally saying, and I always think of this. [00:48:08] When I hear Seth say this, say here, I made this, I hope you like it. I think of holding something in my hands and extending my arms to somebody else and saying here, Jonathan, I made this. And then the words I hope. You like it. And because, there are going to be plenty of people who don't and they are going to have no problem in an anonymous way being vocal about it, and you're going to hear it. [00:48:33] And you're like, so I think, I don't think there's any more intimate form of risk. So that is art. That's what you're scared of.  [00:48:42] Jonathan: Yup.  [00:48:42] Carl: And on the other side of that fear is like the most intense, wonderful satisfaction of putting something into the world. And so balancing that I just think is so beautiful. [00:48:56] Like I just it's like that, that, that rift just now, like that's at the heart of the work I want to do more of is like, how do we get more people to say. I made this I hope you like it to the world because we need that. We, I, as a quote, unquote, consumer need that book. I need that print. I need that. [00:49:20] T-shirt because it shows to me there's still people making things they care about. And if that's the only world I want to live in.  [00:49:27] Jonathan: Yeah, wow. I don't think we can top that. [00:49:29] Carl: Yeah. Super fun.  [00:49:31] Jonathan: Carl. Thanks so much for coming on is sharing your observations and experience and expertise. Where should folks go to find out more about what you're up to? [00:49:40] Carl: Probably the easiest is behavior app.com. And and then, if you're interested in seeing the sort of broadcast stuff on Twitter, it's at behavior and Instagram app behavior,  [00:49:49] Jonathan: Amazing. Wow. Thanks again.  [00:49:51] Carl: Jonathan, my pleasure. That was really good.  [00:49:53] Jonathan: All right folks, that's it for this week. I'm Jonathan Stark and I hope you join me again next time for ditching hourly. Bye.

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca
Getting a Shingles Wake Up Call with Dr. Anna Cabeca

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 22:03


Dr. Anna tells the story of how she got a big wake up call about her life and health after she got shingles during a recent vacation. Find out why Dr. Anna felt betrayed by her body at first but then came to realize that the shingles were a sign that she needed to slow down and reconnect with what her body needed to thrive and what you need to do to do the same. [0:55] We often get wake up calls in life that tell us there is something better we need to be doing for our health. [1:55] Dr. Anna recently had an experience with shingles after traveling and working across several states. While shooting a documentary with Dr. Trevor Cates in Park City, Utah. she woke up with a lesion on her back. The next day, the number of lesions increased to four. [4:10] Her first response was to be angry at her body and frustrated that, despite eating healthy foods and living a healthy lifestyle, her body still became infected with an uncomfortable disease. But was she really as healthy as she believed? [4:50] Shingles is a disease caused by the chickenpox virus and often ends up buried and dormant in a particular nerve dermatome. Shingles tend to wrap around and stay limited to one half of your body, and often causes a lot of pain, including long-term neuropathic pain after the disease is gone. [7:05] Roughly 1 in 1000 people will experience shingles in their lifetime and the number of adults over the age of 30 getting it has been increasing since 1998. We have to look at what is compromising the immune system of young adults and causing this increase. [7:50] When we are stressed, our body is producing cortisol which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. If there is inflammation in your system and you go on vacation, underlying infections can flare up. This is the likely scenario with Dr. Anna's shingles infection. [10:05] As soon as she realized that the infection was shingles, she immediately started antiviral therapy and increased the immune boosting supplements she was taking. [10:40] Eventually, she was no longer angry at her body for “failing” her but, instead was thankful for her body showing her that she needs to slow things down and take the rest her body was asking her for. [11:40] Between the treatment and rest, Dr. Anna was able to beat the shingles within the week. [11:55] Dr. Anna's Immune Protocol was crucial to her success in treating the shingles in addition to the power of alkalizing superfoods and higher vitamin intake. [12:50] When it comes to shingles, vitamin D3 is especially powerful as a treatment. [14:25] Vitamin C is our immune champion. It's necessary on a regular basis because it supports so many vital functions of our bodies. Added together with the other elements of the Immune Bundle, you have a powerful support system for your health and immune system. [17:10] There is a shingles vaccine that you can get if you're in the US called Shingrex. If you're over the age of 50 and may have a weaker immune system, it may be a good option for you. [18:15] You need to be thinking about how you are treating your body. Are you taking time to destress? Are you nourishing your body with healthy foods that support a strong immune system? Get ahead of shingles before it becomes a major issue for you.       Mentioned in this Episode: Mama Doctors Immunity Bundle: drannacabeca.com/products/mama-doctors-immunity-bundle Daily Dose Supplements Girl Power - drannacabeca.com/collections/best-sellers/products/girl-power-daily-dose-monthly-pack Hottie - drannacabeca.com/collections/best-sellers/products/hottie-daily-dose-monthly-pack Superwoman - drannacabeca.com/collections/best-sellers/products/daily-dose-monthly-packs Man of Steel - drannacabeca.com/collections/best-sellers/products/man-of-steel-daily-dose-monthly-pack youtube.com/thegirlfrienddoctor dranna.com/show     Always seek the advice of your own physician or qualified health professional before starting any treatment or plans. Information found here and results are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional and are not intended as medical advice.

SHR Soundbites
Revenues Juggling Act

SHR Soundbites

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 9:50


Jenifer Morgan, Revenue Manager, Leisure Hotels & Resorts, joins Jason Emanis, from Park City, Utah, where she's opening a new hotel, Black Rock Mountain Resort. With front-of-the-house staff shortages, Revenue leaders like Jenifer are having to juggle the business by adjusting length-of-stay restrictions and shutting down room blocks. And while some areas of the country are doing well others are being impacted by the COVID variant, including her two properties in Missouri. Meeting weekly with Marketing and Operations teams to discuss promotions, guest reactions to rates, productive social campaigns and develop short-term strategies, Jenifer and her cohorts developed a plan to market to different segments for their Nevada property, a corporate business hotel, and have have doubled their transient, leisure bookings. She's tackling pricing by referring to her Comp set from STAR but also reviewing similar amenities and ratings and frequently taking a look back to see how well they've done.

Utah's Morning News
7 o'clock report August 17, 2021

Utah's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 21:57


Several large school districts in the state start the school year today.  We take a look at the emphasis this year on mental health.  Plus we have the latest on the evacuations underway at the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Rob McNealy - The Ultimate Settlement Coin (TUSC) || EP 526

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 79:14


Rob McNealy is a serial entrepreneur, podcaster, cryptocurrency advocate, self-defense activist, welder/artist, indie filmmaker and recovering corporate MBA. He received a BS from Central Michigan University in GIS and marketing, and earned an MBA from Colorado State University.  Rob is a Co-Founder of TUSC (The Universal Settlement Coin), a decentralized, non-ICO cryptocurrency project that is focused on supporting financially marginalized industries with their payments issues.  Rob has been married to his wife Kristie McNealy, MD for more than 21 years. They live in the Salt Lake City, Utah area where they homeschool their four children and spend their winters skiing in Park City, Utah. Podcast Website: https://robmcnealy.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/robmcnealy (365,000+ followers) Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@robmcnealyactual IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm11393442 LBRY: https://lbry.tv/$/invite/@robmcnealy:e Minds: https://www.minds.com/robmcnealy Rarible:https://app.rarible.com/robmcnealy LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robmcnealy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robmcnealyactual YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/robmcnealy Everipedia: https://everipedia.org/wiki/lang_en/rob-mcnealy Parler: https://parler.com/robmcnealy Medium: https://robmcnealy.medium.com TUSC Description TUSC, The Universal Settlement Coin, is a cryptocurrency-based payment system with ultra-low fees for retailers, featuring accounts that can never be shut down due to politics. TUSC is a decentralized, open-source, non-ICO, and community run project. Decision making for TUSC is done by the community through a blockchain-based voting system. TUSC was built on a delegated proof of stake (DPOS) blockchain. Twitter: https://twitter.com/tuscnetwork TUSC Website: https://tusc.network TUSC Marketing Partner Website: https://tuscmp.one LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tuscnetwork LBRY: https://lbry.tv/$/invite/@TUSC:a Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tuscactual LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tuscnetwork YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/tuscnetwork Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/TUSCActual Minds Group: https://www.minds.com/groups/profile/1222286135543902208/feed Recent media: https://freebeacon.com/guns/cryptocurrency-seeks-to-lure-firearms-companies-amid-threat-banks-will-cut-off-gun-industry/ https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/gun-friendly-tusc-cryptocurrency-launches-new-blockchain/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

OH MY GOSS with Andrew and Matt
PARK CITY THROWDOWN w/ MELINDA

OH MY GOSS with Andrew and Matt

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 68:11


We fight! We fight big time! 

Homicide Worldwide Podcast
Dennis Lynn Radar the "BTK" Killer Ep 033 Part 2

Homicide Worldwide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 156:36


Dennis Lynn Rader (born March 9, 1945) is an American serial killer known as BTK (an abbreviation he gave himself, for "bind, torture, kill"), the BTK Strangler or the BTK Killer. Between 1974 and 1991, Rader killed ten people in Wichita and Park City, Kansas, and sent taunting letters to police and newspapers describing the details of his crimes. After a decade-long hiatus, Rader resumed sending letters in 2004, leading to his 2005 arrest and subsequent guilty plea. He is serving ten consecutive life sentences at El Dorado Correctional Facility in Prospect Township, Butler County, Kansas.https://www.biography.com/crime-figure/dennis-raderhttps://serialkillersinfo.com/documents/btk-confession-court-transcript/https://survivingbtk.weebly.com/early-years.htmlThe BTK Killer: Then And Now | Oxygen Official SiteSon of BTK killer's victims recalls finding his dead family at age 15https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6669831/Son-BTK-killers-victims-tells-family-strangled-bound-age-15.htmlhttps://www.karisable.com/skazbtk.htmhttps://www.scribd.com/doc/50693130/BTK-Serial-Killer-Dennis-Radar-Summary-Of-Evidence-Court-RecordFind us on Patreon. patreon.comTo our wonderful listeners. If you are listening to us on apple podcasts? (and even if your'e not) Please! take few minutes and leave a 5 STAR review. It'll really help out the show. If you have a show suggestion? please email us at: homicideworldwidepodcast@gmail.com

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Cotopaxi and Sustainable Capitalism

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 11:11


Cotopaxi's Davis Smith and Annie Agle joined Boyd to talk about how they have built the successful, Utah-based company with ethical principles.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KPCW Cool Science Radio
New Therapy Helps People Recover From Trauma

KPCW Cool Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 20:57


On Cool Science Radio , John and Lynn bring Leah Harter on the show. Harter is the Director of Counseling at the Christian Center of Park City. She talks with them about a therapy that she and her team use to help people recover from trauma and other distressing life experiences, including PTSD, anxiety, depression, and panic disorders. This effective psychotherapy method is called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing or EMDR.

Homicide Worldwide Podcast
Dennis Lynn Rader the "BTK" Killer Ep 032 Part 1

Homicide Worldwide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 116:51


Dennis Lynn Rader (born March 9, 1945) is an American serial killer known as BTK (an abbreviation he gave himself, for "bind, torture, kill"), the BTK Strangler or the BTK Killer. Between 1974 and 1991, Rader killed ten people in Wichita and Park City, Kansas, and sent taunting letters to police and newspapers describing the details of his crimes. After a decade-long hiatus, Rader resumed sending letters in 2004, leading to his 2005 arrest and subsequent guilty plea. He is serving ten consecutive life sentences at El Dorado Correctional Facility in Prospect Township, Butler County, Kansas.https://www.biography.com/crime-figure/dennis-raderhttps://serialkillersinfo.com/documents/btk-confession-court-transcript/https://survivingbtk.weebly.com/early-years.htmlThe BTK Killer: Then And Now | Oxygen Official SiteSon of BTK killer's victims recalls finding his dead family at age 15https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6669831/Son-BTK-killers-victims-tells-family-strangled-bound-age-15.htmlhttps://www.karisable.com/skazbtk.htmhttps://www.scribd.com/doc/50693130/BTK-Serial-Killer-Dennis-Radar-Summary-Of-Evidence-Court-RecordFind us on Patreon. patreon.comTo our wonderful listeners. If you are listening to us on apple podcasts? (and even if your'e not) Please! take few minutes and leave a 5 STAR review. It'll really help out the show. If you have a show suggestion? please email us at: homicideworldwidepodcast@gmail.com

Your Longevity Blueprint
Skin Tips From the Spa Doctor Dr. Trevor Cates

Your Longevity Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 38:08


Your skin is a direct reflection of what's going on inside your body. Hormonal imbalances, deficiencies, and inflammation can all show up on your skin. Dr. Trevor Cates joins me to talk about how our internal health shows up on our skin, what the six root causes of our skin issues could be, and why we need to simplify our skincare routine.   The 6 Root Causes Behind Skin Issues Inflammation Nutritional Deficiencies Hormonal Imbalances Blood Sugar Imbalances Oxidative Damage Microbiome Imbalances   About Dr. Trevor Cates Dr. Trevor Cates is author of the USA Today and Amazon bestselling book Clean Skin From Within and founder of The Spa Dr. natural skincare line. She received her medical degree from the National University of Natural Medicine and was the first woman licensed as a naturopathic doctor in the state of California. She currently lives in Park City, Utah where she helps patients from around the world achieve naturally glowing skin. She has been on various TV shows, including The Doctors and Extra TV. Dr. Cates interviews over 250 experts on The Spa Dr. podcast and hosted her own PBS special, Younger Skin From Within. She believes the key to healthy skin is inner and outer nourishment with natural and non-toxic ingredients.   Redefining Skincare from the Inside Out Dr. Trevor Cates explains how our internal health shows up on our skin and what the six root causes of your skin issues could be. She's also redefining the skin types we've grown up with to five new categories that are much more inclusive of skin problems. Trevor believes that if we focus on four main lifestyle changes, we can improve not only our skin health but our overall health, too. By focusing on our diet, our exercise, and our mental health, we can revolutionize skincare. Diet can be a huge trigger for your skin. Trevor explains what foods you should avoid, especially if you have skin issues, and what you should load your plate up with. We both agree that our plates should be full of a rainbow of vegetables.   Organic Skincare If you have dry skin, Trevor explains why it's not enough to drink a glass of tap water. Most tap water filters out so many vital vitamins and nutrients, leaving our body crying out for hydration. Trevor recommends drinking filtered water. Trevor also recommends eating organic and using organic skincare and other beauty products. She explains what organic means in the skincare industry and why some ingredients are harder, or impossible, to source organically. Finally, we talk about Trevor's own skincare range. It's so simple with so few ingredients but over the years, we've overly complicated skincare. Simple and organic is better. Get colors in your diet. What are your favorite rainbow foods? Let me know in the comments on the episode page. Call the Integrative Health and Hormone Clinic today and schedule your first appointment at 319-363-0033.   Quotes “It's not that certain foods don't have some nutritional value, it's just that they have become a big trigger for a lot of people. Sometimes the body just needs a break from them. Some people can eliminate certain foods for a period of time and work on the cut microbiome and gut health and then maybe go back to eating those foods. We first need to get rid of some of these triggers and give the body a break.” [17:24] “I'm really surprised what people try to get away with at companies. What they will or won't put on the labels and what they consider marketing versus what's truly ethical. They don't always keep you safe.” [24:43] “Sometimes it's hard for people to believe how easy skincare can be. I really think we overcomplicate skincare.” [32:59] “I encourage people to remember the four different areas: clean plate, clean slate, clean body, clean mind. Those are all really important for longevity. If you can do one of these every day, it doesn't have to take a lot of time, it's really those daily lifestyle choices that we make.” [34:27]   In This Episode How your skin reflects your inner health [4:30] The 5 new redefined skin types [7:00] What lifestyle changes you can make to improve your skin health [14:30] What foods you should and shouldn't eat [15:30] Why drinking a glass of water isn't enough for hydrating your skin [20:15] What organic means in the skincare industry [25:15] What a thorough skincare routine might look like [31:00]   Links & Resources Use Code BERBERINE for 10% off Berberine Support Use Code drgray20 for 20% Off at The Spa Dr. Store Body Essentials Daily Essentials Pearl and Rose Petal Exfoliant Find Out Your Skin Personality Type   Find Dr. Trevor Cates Online Follow Dr. Trevor Cates on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Pinterest   Find Your Longevity Blueprint Online Follow Your Longevity Blueprint on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | LinkedIn Get your copy of the Your Longevity Blueprint book and claim your bonuses here Find Dr. Stephanie Gray and Your Longevity Blueprint online    Follow Dr. Stephanie Gray on Facebook | Instagram | Youtube | Twitter | LinkedIn Integrative Health and Hormone Clinic Podcast Production by the team at Counterweight Creative    Related Episodes  Episode 53: Keto Green Approach To Hormones With Dr. Anna Cabeca  Episode 41: How To Reduce Toxins In The Home With Genevieve White  Episode 31: Gut/Brain Connection With Dr. Lauryn Lax

Can You Survive This Podcast?

Jack Carr is a New York Times Best Selling author and a Navy SEAL Sniper. He is the author of The Terminal List, True Believer, and Savage Son. As a Navy SEAL, he led special operations teams as a Team Leader, Platoon Commander, Troop Commander and Task Unit Commander. Over his 20 years in Naval Special Warfare he transitioned from an enlisted SEAL sniper to a junior officer leading assault and sniper teams in Iraq and Afghanistan, to a platoon commander practicing counterinsurgency in the southern Philippines, to commanding a Special Operations Task Unit in the most Iranian influenced section of southern Iraq throughout the tumultuous drawdown of U.S. Forces. Jack retired from active duty in 2016 and lives with his wife and three children in Park City, Utah. Visit him at officialjackcarr.com and follow along on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook at @JackCarrUSA. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

KPCW Mountain Money
Alpen + Hyde

KPCW Mountain Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 10:03


Expect to escape from all the virtues and vices Park City at Alpen + Hyde Massage . Located on Main Street in the Treasure Mountain Inn, Park City's newest spa encourages residents and visitors alike with Ashleigh Brilliant's quote “Sometimes the most urgent and vital thing you can do is rest.” Joining us this morning is Shana Ominsky , owner and Spa Director of Alpen + Hyde Massage .

This Conversation with Jed Taufer
Allison English Watkins - Pedal to the Metal

This Conversation with Jed Taufer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 54:55


Allison English Watkins specializes in capturing family portraits that will be treasured heirlooms for generations. For over 25 years Allison has been creating portraits for her beloved clients and celebrating their lifetime milestones. Living in the beautiful mountains of Park City, Utah, Allison loves incorporating the gorgeous landscape into her portraits as much as possible. Besides being a Master Photographer, Craftsman and Certified Professional photographer, Allison's portraits have won numerous awards during her career. A few career highlights include being PPA Diamond Photographer of the year, IPPA Master Photographer of the year and having 3 wedding albums finish in the IPC Top 10 wedding albums of the year. Allison has won multiple LexJet Sunset Awards, Kodak Gallery Awards and Fuji Masterpieces and has been international published. In 2018 she was the recipient of the Professional Photographers of America National Award presented by the Intermountain Professional Photographers Association for her service to the photographic community. Currently, Allison stays busy serving on the Professional Photographers of America Board of Directors and is a PPA Approved Photographic Juror. Allison also travels and educates photographers on the fine art of family portraiture. Allison is also part of the Camera Craftsmen of America, a group dedicated to the fine art craft of photography. Allison's greatest joys are her husband of almost 25 years, her 3 kids and her cat S'mores.

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast
TPM Episode 237: Todd Ligare, Pro Skier

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 79:27


Growing up in Park City, Todd Ligare's life was based around ski racing and making the US Ski Team.  As a teenager, he started traveling the world and after a decade of racing and travel, Todd got slower and while he still earned a scholarship to ski race in college, his race dream had now turned into the Tangerine Dream, he wanted to ski for the biggest cameras of all over at TGR.  This podcast is another lesson in making things happen for you through hard work and hustle. Todd Ligare Show Notes: 3:00:  Last name, having older brothers, growing up in Park City, and a family of skiers 8:00:  Ski programs, other sports, when does skiing get serious, and how much did he ski 12:00:  "I Ride Park City", who is his crew, race sponsorship, The Winter Sports School 21:00:  Stanley:  Get 30% off sitewide with the code drinkfast Alpine Vans:  Upgrade your adventure, Upgrade your life 10 Barrel Brewery:  Buy their beers, they support action sports more than anyone 24:00:  Tanner Hall, weed, his look, music, Michael Jordan, and The US Team 30:00:  Subsidized by the US Team, traveling the world solo, and dirtbagging it 35:00:  Partying on planes, racing hurt, frustration, and college scholarship 42:00:  Peter Glenn Ski and Sports Alpine Vans:  Upgrade your adventure, Upgrade your life Rollerblade:  Find out all about the award-winning Skate to Ski program 44:15:  Dynastar, networking, strategies to get noticed, and first shoot with TGR 53:00:  Atomic, Armada, and Amer buys Armada 56:30:  Sponsorship, money, and what's the future look like 68:00:  Inappropriate Questions with Griffin Post

The Entrepology Podcast
231: Body: The Secret to Amazing Skin, Health, and Entrepreneurial Impact with Dr. Trevor Cates

The Entrepology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 40:27


I am super excited to be joined by an amazing colleague, friend, and innovator in the world of naturopathic medicine, Trevor Cates!   Dr. Trevor Cates is on a mission to improve our health on the inside as a reflection of our health on the outside. She is the founder of the natural skincare line, The Space Dr., and the author of the Amazon bestseller, Clean Skin From Within. She has been featured on various TV shows, including The Doctors and Extra TV, and has even interviewed over 250 experts on her own podcast, The Spa Dr. Podcast.   In this episode, we're going deep on everything you need to know about caring for your skin! Dr. Cates speaks about the microbiome of our skin, what elements of our skincare routine we really need to say goodbye to, some of the commonly held myths about skincare, and the connection between what is going on in the inside of our bodies in relation to our skin.   Dr. Trevor Cates is so full of wisdom and insight! You're going to get so much out of today's conversation!   Key Takeaways: [1:20] About today's episode with Dr. Trevor Cates. [2:32] Welcoming Dr. Cates to the podcast! [2:57] How Dr. Cates got to where she is today with The Spa Dr. and transforming people's health. [7:19] Dr. Cates speaks about the shift she is seeing in the healthcare industry around treating the skin from within. [9:33] The connection between the inside of our body in our skin. [12:39] The key decisions we should be making with regards to our skin health. [15:00] What we need to be mindful of when it comes to putting products on our skin. [20:45] Dr. Cates debunks and addresses common skincare myths! [23:18] Key skincare principles and why Dr. Cates' incredible skincare line is so effective. [26:40] Everything you need to know about deodorant and sunscreen! [29:38] Dr. Cates shares her biggest motivators behind being an entrepreneur. [34:03] Dr. Cates' KPIs! [38:10] Where to learn more about Dr. Cates and the incredible work she's putting out into the world!   Mentioned in This Episode: The Spa Dr. — Save 20% off your purchase with the coupon code: Save20 The Skin Quiz | The Spa Dr. Skin Care Shopping Wallet Guide | The Spa Dr. VIP Beauty Inside | The Spa Dr.   More About Dr. Trevor Cates Dr. Trevor Cates is the author of the USA Today and Amazon bestselling book, Clean Skin From Within, and the founder of The Spa Dr. natural skincare line.    Dr. Cates received her medical degree from the National University of Natural Medicine and was the first woman licensed as a naturopathic doctor in the state of California.    Currently, Dr. Cates lives in Park City, Utah where she helps patients from around the world achieve naturally glowing skin. She has been featured on various TV shows, including The Doctors and Extra TV. She has interviewed over 250 experts on The Spa Dr. Podcast and has hosted her own PBS special, Younger Skin From Within. She believes the key to healthy skin is inner and outer nourishment with natural and non-toxic ingredients.   Connect with my Guest: Website: The Spa Dr. — Save 20% off your purchase with the coupon code: Save20 Social Media: Facebook, Instagram, Youtube & Twitter   If you enjoyed our conversation and would like to hear more: Please subscribe to The Entrepology Podcast on Stitcher or iTunes. We would also appreciate a review!   Come Join Your Community on The Entrepology Collective Facebook Page! They say that you're the product of the five people with whom you spend the most time. Imagine you could spend time with hundreds of fellow entrepreneurs and go-getters looking to up-level their business, body, and mindset! Come hang out with us on Facebook and let us collectively inspire and support you towards your vision of contribution, your commitment towards better health, and your journey of mindset mastery. We're in this together! Come join us today!   BADASS FUEL — Fuel for Badass Women Scientifically Supported Ingredients | Support, Not Replacement | Non-GMO Two years ago, someone asked me what supplements I take to maintain my health, energy, and edge — and they were surprised that I only took four things consistently. For myself and my patients, there are four basics that support — at a foundational level — nearly every system in our bodies. In my quest for the highest quality ingredients and the easiest system for consistently incorporating supplementation into my routine, I formulated and manufactured my own line of foundational supplements. Trusted for myself and my patients, and under the guidance of your own healthcare provider, I'm excited to invite you to check out our foundational product line: Badass Basics. Learn more or order the products yourself by visiting BadassFuel.com!   CALL TO ACTION Which skincare practices to you implement from the inside and the outside? Did you learn any new skincare tips today? Let us know over on our free Facebook group, The Entrepology Collective!  

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
The 5 O'Clock Report: Park City Fire Chief dies on vacation in Oregon

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 27:27


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BLOCKtalk
Episode 24: AGENT ADVISORY BOARD ROUNDTABLE: PART 1

BLOCKtalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 56:28


The 2021 Concierge Auctions Agent Advisory Board are top agents and brokers, who have billions of dollars combined in luxury sales from across the globe, represent a think tank on the state of luxury real estate sales and marketing. The board meets quarterly to share insights and guide Concierge Auctions particularly with its relationship to the brokerage community, with a focus on agent-specific education, tools, and technology. Join Frank Aazami of Russ Lyon Sotheby's, Matt Beall of Hawaii Life, Paul Benson of Engel & Völkers, and Moderators Laura Brady, CEO of Concierge Auctions, in this episode as they discuss: + Exciting achievements in real estate + Upcoming projects and brokerage news + State of the local markets + How auctions benefit the local markets (Scottsdale, Park City, Kauai)

Dave and Dujanovic
Oakley City stops building new homes amid drought

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 18:18


Due to the ongoing drought, the Utah town of Oakley, just east of Park City, has halted building houses. Dallas Hanse, with Oakley City Public Works Water Director, joins the show to talk more about the pause. We also hear from listeners: do you think Capitol hill should control whether your city bans new home builders? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KPCW Cool Science Radio
Avi-on is Lighting Up Park City

KPCW Cool Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 24:28


On Cool Science Radio , Eric Miller, President, and CEO of Park City-based Avi-on Labs joins Lynn and John. Avi-on designs and builds a family of Bluetooth® enabled lighting products that are reliable, state of the art, easy to configure and manage with any smartphone.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #49: Lonesome Pine Trails, Maine Board of Directors President Mike Lavertu

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 77:29


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.Lonesome Pine, Maine, has 500 vertical feet served by a 1960s Hall 1000 T-bar. All photos courtesy of Lonesome Pine.WhoMike Lavertu, President of the board of directors of Lonesome Pine Trails, MaineRecorded onJuly 13, 2021Why I interviewed him If you’ve ever skied Maine, you probably felt as though you’d arrived at the end of the earth. And if you’ve skied Maine, you’ve probably skied Sunday River or Sugarloaf or Saddleback. And sure, they’re all remote. But from the point of view of New England’s largest state, you’re just getting moving: Lonesome pine is another five hours and 40 minutes past Sunday River, five hours 10 minutes past Sugarloaf, and five and a half hours from Saddleback. When you finally get there, you’re reached the top of America. Fort Kent sits hard by the St. John River, across the water from Canada. The ski area rises directly over the town, 500 vertical feet and a dozen trails and 10 snowguns and a T-bar. It’s a simple operation, but one that’s served its community for more than 50 years, and without the bankruptcies and debts and harebrained owners that have sunk operations large and small across New England. It is at once homey and exotic, a snowy town square perched across the street from a neighborhood, north-facing toward the world’s longest frontier. I’ve never skied there, but I’ve long wondered about this humble-brash little mountain that sits quietly in the snowy north, pushing operations into April as larger mountains shut down across New England. When Mike reached out to see if I’d be interested in an interview, I agreed immediately.A group of local volunteers fix up Lonesome Pine’s old groomer: L to R - Taylor “Tiger” Martin, hill maintenance and groomer operator/full-time music teacher; Matt Deprey, owner of Valley Iron Works in Fort Kent; Ryan Malmborg, groomer operator and volunteer; Isaiah Martin, 14, Taylor’s son. Deprey’s son, Sawyer, waits in the background. The ski area recently purchased a replacement groomer.What we talked aboutLonesome Pine as labor of love; the small ski area’s surprisingly robust race program; how to transform a 1960s T-bar so it doesn’t jerk its riders up the hill; Lonesome Pine’s unique ownership structure; the mountain’s huge volunteer squad; how Fort Kent supports Lonesome Pine; how the tiny ski area stabilized its finances; yes it can even get too cold for Maine skiers; season passes; everyone needs a bar (the kind with alcohol); how a small ski area wrangles something as spectacularly expensive as a replacement groomer; how Saddleback’s Cupsuptic T-bar became a pile of parts at the base of Lonesome Pine; the caravan that carried the lift across the state; trying to figure out the origin of the T-bar that the ski area installed used more than 30 years ago; whether the ski area would ever replace the T-bar with a chairlift; dreaming of a magic carpet upgrade; the possibility of adding tubing and skating to the ski area; using volunteers to run the snowmaking operation; pushing skiing to April; the mountain’s limited operating schedule; operating during Covid; why the Canadian border closure may have worked in Lonesome Pine’s favor; and the expansive and mysterious Canadian ski world. Lavertu and his son, Caleb, put in some time snowmaking.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interview A few months back, I put out a call at the end of one of the podcasts: if you ran a ski area anywhere in America, I wanted to talk to you. I didn’t care how small or remote it was. I am here to tell the full story of lift-served skiing in America. I love the Epic Pass and its flagship Western cloud-scrapers as much as I love the cowboy indies like Plattekill and the town bumps like Lonesome Pine. Mike took me seriously, and I’m glad he did – it’s far easier to track down the GM of Killington or Sugarbush or Sunday River than it is to figure out who runs Titus or Whaleback. The former, after all, are parts of conglomerates and have all the modern communications and marketing infrastructure that comes with that. An end-of-the-road bump with an antique website, run largely by volunteers, it’s never been obvious to outsiders who ran Lonesome Pine. I’d tried, in the past, to figure it out. But it’s a good story and I was thrilled when Mike reached out. If you’re the Mike of some other little ski area in the U.S. or Canada or hell Slovenia or Japan, hit me up. I want to share what you have to say.Lonesome Pine is the kind of place where a pick-up cornhole game can break out in the lodge at any time.What I got wrongThe origin of Lonesome Pine’s T-bar seemed like one of those mysteries lost to time. A 1960s-era Hall 1000, it arrived at the ski area in the mid-80s. On that, there is consensus across various online sources. But where was it for the two decades prior? In the interview, Mike speculated that it came from Vermont. In follow-up emails, he had leads telling him it came to Lonesome Pine from Pennsylvania via a Vermont broker. More digging revealed the true source: Victor Constant, the little-known but still-operating ski area at West Point, New York. This made sense: that ski area’s triple chair arrived in 1983. While I believe this is correct, I can’t find a historical trailmap showing a T-bar at Victor Constant – just this 2016 trailmap, which is the same one in use today. If anyone has any additional information on the Victor Constant T-bar – year of installation, old trailmaps, general memories – please let me know.Saddleback donated its Cupsuptic T-bar to Lonesome Pine, which runs the same 1960s vintage machine to its summit. Here the parts are loaded up for transport north from Rangeley last year.Why you should ski thereFor all its bucolic coziness, there are not a lot of in-town ski areas in New England. Cranmore and Bousquet are two of them. Are there others? It’s one of the great shortcomings of eastern skiing. At Aspen or Park City, you ski to the bottom and walk to the bar in a city that predates lift-served skiing by half a century. In most of the Northeast, ski areas sit isolated in the countryside, a car ride from everything. Lonesome Pine is one of the few that defies this template. It’s feasible that a kid could grow up across the street. It’s right down the road from the local school. Bars and downtown sit within walking distance. A visit to Lonesome Pine will give skiers a pretty good sense of what a more imaginatively human-scaled version of Northeast skiing could be. When Lonesome Pine sent a crew down to collect the Cupsuptic T-bar, they expected to have to take the whole lift down, but Saddleback had already removed the towers for them. Get on the email list at www.stormskiing.com

The Halfstep Pod
Episode 20: Goodbye PC + Race Recap: El G vs Lagat 2004 Olympics

The Halfstep Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 60:10


On Episode 20 of The Halfstep Pod, Connor and Grant discuss Grant's final week in Park City as he heads to Honolulu this weekend in preparation for the upcoming Olympics in Tokyo. The guys then get into their race recap of the 2004 Athens Olympics 1500 meter final. A final that came down to Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco, the 4 time World Champ at the distance searching for his elusive Olympic Gold, vs Bernard Lagat of Kenya, the man who had most recently beaten El Guerrouj before the Games and was already an Olympic Medalist. We encourage everyone to watch the race online before/after/while listening to the podcast to have the best experience! Just google "2004 Olympic 1500 final" for results. They talk about both runners' legacies in the sport, the somewhat sketchy era of track and field they existed in during the early 2000s, and a bunch of little details in the race that are often missed. As always, thanks to everyone for listening. You can find us at halfsteppod@gmail.com or DM us on instagram at @ halfstep_pod. Be sure to rate us and subscribe if you haven't already in order to get our podcasts as soon as they drop!   

Inspired Nonprofit Leadership
124: Are You Facing the Same Challenges as Other Nonprofit Leaders?

Inspired Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 38:33


My guest for this episode is Dr. Rob Harter. Rob is a nonprofit executive professional with over 26 years of experience in leading and building nonprofit organizations. Rob is known as an inspirational leader with contagious energy and entrepreneurial spirit. In 2010, Rob became the Executive Director of CCPC, (Christian Center of Park City) a humanitarian and community-focused nonprofit organization with a bold vision to serve as a leading networker of community services, based in Park City, Utah. He is a sought-after speaker and seminar facilitator, and he founded and hosts the “Nonprofit Leadership Podcast”. Rob was honored to have chaired the MLK Jr. Commission for Human Rights for the State of Utah; is currently Chair of the Utah Nonprofit Association's Board and is a former Board Member for Mountainlands Community Housing Organization and was recognized as a “Hometown Hero” by Salt Lake Magazine. Rob loves deep-powder skiing, hiking, mountain biking, devouring great books, and traveling to new places. Most of all, Rob loves spending quality time with his amazing wife and children. Here's what to expect during the episode: Lessons learned in leadership during COVID. Nimbleness and resilience are some of the key elements to keeping a nonprofit afloat in times of crisis. Most significant challenges that nonprofits face coming out of 2020. Some organizations didn't get the usual attention they did before. Effects of the pandemic to boards of directors. It's interestingly positive for the most part! Adjustments that nonprofits have done to their models and the shift to doing things virtually. What motivates Rob, an executive CEO, to do the things he does? It's all about creating a ripple effect in the community! ~ You can see Rob on his website/podcast https://nonprofitleadershippodcast.org/ His email is rob@ccofpc.org and his LinkedIn is on https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-rob-harter-25457313/ Get Mary's free guide: Six Steps You Must Know to Unleash the Potential of Your Board, by going to https://www.hilandconsulting.org/6stepsreport Mary's book is now available on Amazon or wherever books are sold: Love Your Board! The Executive Directors' Guide to Discovering the Sources of Nonprofit Board Troubles and What to Do About Them. Be sure to subscribe to Inspired Nonprofit Leadership so that you don't miss a single episode, and while you're at it, won't you take a moment to write a short review and rate our show? It would be greatly appreciated!   Let us know the topics or questions you would like to hear about in a future episode. You can do that, and follow us, on Facebook. Connect with Mary! LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maryhiland Inspired Nonprofit Leadership Facebook Group: https://tinyurl.com/inspirednonprofitleadership Company Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hilandconsulting Website: https://www.hilandconsulting.org

Twins Tale
Getting Twins on a Good Sleep Schedule | Twin Mom Tiffany Marshall

Twins Tale

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 51:34


In today's episode, Nat chats with  twin mom and former pro snowboarder Tiffany Marshall. Tiffany is mom to mo di twin boys who are 2 1/2 years old, born at 32 weeks gestation, and had a NICU stay. Tiffany reveals she is miserable with her twins' sleep schedule, so Nat flips the script on Tiffany and gives her advice on how to get her twins to bed before 11 pm. Tiffany Marshall is twin mom to mono-di twin boys living in Park City, Utah. Tiffany spent many years as a professional snowboarder. After several years competing on the World Cup circuit she decided to finish up college and earn an MBA. She is now a writer and is in the process of getting her first two novels published.Tiffany's Top 3 Pieces of Advice for Twin Parents:1. Learn to be the best advocate not only for yourself but for your babies. As a twin parent, you will most likely have to jump through more hoops than if you were only giving birth to a single baby. It only took me a few days to realize that I had to be bold. Not rude, but bold and transparent with my care team. If you think something is wrong, speak up and advocate for your babies. You are their only voice! I feel like a lot of us have this awe of doctors. We approach them as if they are gods (and some of them are) but you have to learn to think of them as part of your team; all trying to win at the same game. Use their expertise to help you succeed with the best possible outcome – healthy babies. 2. Create an environment at home that makes life easier for you. Moms go through a lot to bring life into this world. Take some time to set yourself up for success. 3. Being a parent of multiples is such an incredible journey and everyone will want to give you advice (because everyone knows someone with twins and they raised their kids to be absolutely perfect – please, sense my sarcasm here) Do what works for you. Breastfeed for one week or through toddlerhood, allow screen time or don't, dress your kids the same or don't, let your kids sleep with you or don't…Do whatever works best for you and tune out all of the bad vibes. Being a twin parent is challenging enough! What She Wishes She Had Done Differently:1. I wish I would have allowed myself the opportunity to celebrate my pregnancy. Having a miscarriage definitely changes you and your perspective. I was terrified. Looking back, I wish I had those bump pictures and I allowed myself to celebrate those small milestones. 2. Because I was on bedrest for pretty much my entire pregnancy, I wish I hadn't left so many balls up-in-the-air. My Jeep was fourteen years old and I meant to really take some time to look at cars before the boys arrived but being on bed rest didn't allow me to check that off my list. Once the boys arrived, I was so preoccupied with recovering from my C-section, traveling back-and-forth to the NICU, and pumping every three hours, I didn't have the time or energy to tackle buying a car. So long story short, check off big tasks on your to-do list at the very beginning of your pregnancy if you are able to. 3. I wish I would have purchased my Willow pumps sooner. I bought them four months after my boys were born and they would have been amazing to have on the drive to and from the NICU every three hours.Know a twin parent who'd like to be a guest? Have them apply at Twiniversity.com/podcast.SUBSCRIBEMake sure to SUBSCRIBE to A Twins Tale for more awesome stories of twins at ages and stages from birth to college, from the creators of Twiniversity.If you liked this podcast, check out the Twiniversity Podcast with Natalie Diaz!CLASSESExpecting twins? Check out our twin pregnancy and breastfeeding twins classes here!MEMBERSHIPSign up today for a Twiniversity Membership! Choose from 2 levels starting at $6.99/month to connect with other parents of twins in a monthly Zoom twin club, build your twin parenting community in our private Facebook group, and expand your twin parent knowledge with our video learner library. Click here for details.FIRST YEAR WITH TWINSAre your twins in their first year? Check out our free First Year with Twins resource to learn tips, advice, and ideas for getting through your first year with twins!BABY SAFETY COURSEOffered on-demand, the Complete Baby Safety Course includes 30 instructional videos on infant, toddler, and child CPR, a variety of first aid techniques you may need with kids, a full explanation about different kinds of car seats and how to install them, and a room-by-room description of how to best childproof your home. Click here for details.CONTACT USVISIT Twiniversity.com for tons of free twin tips!FOLLOW us on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and Twitter.SUBSCRIBE to our email newsletter!Visit the Twiniversity Etsy Shop

Mama Mystery - A True Crime Podcast
Ep 71 : BTK - Dennis Rader

Mama Mystery - A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 89:09


For years, the BTK killer was known to the public as BTK which stood for Bind, Torture, Kill. An abbreviation and name that he gave himself to claim the reign of terror he caused between 1974 to 1991. During that span of time, BTK killed ten people, including two children in Wichita and Park City, Kansas and played a taunting game of cat and mouse with investigators and local newspapers. But then, communications stopped… for ten years, nobody heard from BTK, leaving the investigation at a standstill until he started sending letters again in 2004 which ultimately led investigators to a man named Dennis Lynn Rader – THE LONGEST RUNNING SERIAL KILLER IN US HISTORY…. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mamamystery/support

Alpha Hippie Podcast
AH230: Jeff Byers

Alpha Hippie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 47:32


Jeff Byers is the co-founder and CEO of Amp Human-- a human performance company and venture-backed startup based in Park City, Utah. They work with the world's best athletes and teams, including Super Bowl and Stanley Cup Champions, and Tour de France winners. In addition, Amp Human has assembled one of the best scientific advisory boards in the industry to help push innovation and research forward. Their flagship product, PR Lotion, gives the body more bicarb (a natural electrolyte) to neutralize lactic acid in muscles which allows athletes to push harder, feel better, and go longer.Prior to starting Amp Human, Jeff was an early member of a biotech company for 3 years, which inspired him to build Amp Human. At the biotech he and his co-founder saw an opportunity within the biotech to leverage its technology outside of medicine and in the human performance space and establish themselves at the forefront of human performance.Before his business career, Jeff attended the University of Southern California, where he was a 2-time captain and a multiple year starter for their championship football team. While playing he graduated with his undergraduate degree in 3 years and proceeded to earn his masters in business administration before entering the NFL. He had a 4 year career in the NFL, mostly for the Carolina Panthers, serving as a backup but also starting a handful of games.Connect with Jeff & Amp:InstagramFacebookConnect with Angelo & Alpha Hippie:Book a CallWebsiteInstagramFacebookFree Facebook GroupSubscribe to the Alpha Hippie Podcast:Apple PodcastsSpotifyIf you are called to support the podcast, please share the show with a friend!!! This is the best way to spread the message ❤️

The Halfstep Pod
Episode 17: Straight Line Speed (Alt Title: Grant made the Olympics again)

The Halfstep Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 77:54


On Episode 17 of The Halfstep Pod, Grant and Connor go chronologically from Grant's return to Park City after the 10k final, all the way through the 5k final and the reaction to Grant making the Olympic team in his second event. (2nd place in the 5k). The guys get detailed on the Trials environment, the structure and difficulty of the 5k prelims, the 10 am race start time on Sunday for the Final, and, of course, the last 100 meters of the 5k race, which saw Grant pushed out into lane 5 across the finish line.  Thanks to everyone for listening and sorry for the delay between episodes! Please continue sending us your listener questions (halfsteppod@gmail.com) or DM us on instagram! Be sure to rate us and subscribe if you haven't already in order to get our podcasts as soon as they drop!    Timestamps:  3:00- Grant's time back in Park City post 10k 8:40- 5k Prelim & Prelims in general 34:00- 5k Final recap 49:00- Final sprint drama 59:30- Eye toward Olympics & Misc ramblings

Dead Bodies Podcast
Ep 121 - The BTK Killer Dennis Rader

Dead Bodies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 56:49


“BTK” stands for “bind, torture, kill”: Dennis Lyn Rader gave himself the title. Between 1974 and 1991, Rader killed ten people in Wichita and Park City, Kansas, and sent taunting letters to police and newspapers describing the details of his crimes. It was 2005 before he was arrested and jailed for life. In this episode we hear excerpts from his police interviews.

Ali on the Run Show
386. Elise Cranny, Professional Runner for the Bowerman Track Club

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 75:56


“I feel so lucky that running has made me feel empowered and given me a lot of confidence. Finding that throughout high school was something that was really life-changing for me. I really want the younger generation to have that opportunity and to see the power of sport and the power they can find in themselves and in their team, and in connecting with others who have similar goals and passions. I really want to inspire that younger generation and see all the great things that they can do.”   Welcome to U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials Week! The Trials officially kick off tomorrow, June 18, at historic Hayward Field in Eugene, OR, and today's guest, Elise Cranny, is definitely one to watch. Elise runs professionally for Nike and the Bowerman Track Club, and she will be competing in both the 5K (June 18) and 10K (June 26). Elise comes into the Trials with the fastest qualifying time in the 10K, and the third-fastest time in the 5K (behind her BTC teammates Shelby Houlihan and Karissa Schweizer), and she is fit, both physically and mentally. Just a few weeks ago, Elise won the 1500m event at the Portland Track Festival, running a 4:02 and earning both a personal best and an Olympic qualifying time (though she won't be going for the 1500m at the Trials). Before going pro, Elise was a standout runner at Stanford University. She was a 12-time All-American, and finished second at NCAA Championships four times. On this episode, Elise talks about her path to the Trials, her dreams for making her first Olympic team, her history with RED-S, and her experience as a Voice in Sport mentor. Keep your eyes on Elise this week!   SPONSOR: AfterShokz — Visit ontherun.aftershokz.com for 15% off wireless headphones.   What you'll get on this episode: Elise talks about her 1500m win at the Portland Track Festival (3:50) Elise confirms which events she'll be competing in at the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials (7:20) On training at altitude in Park City, UT (11:50) Comparing the 1500, 5K, and 10K (14:30) What it's like working with Coach Shalane Flanagan (17:50) The workouts Elise loves — and the ones she loves a little bit less (22:00) On getting dropped at practice (25:40) How Elise has built her mental toughness and confidence (29:00) What Elise says her strengths and weaknesses are on the run (31:00) What Bowerman Track Club practice is like (35:00) Elise shares her running story (37:00) Elise's experience with RED-S in college (42:10) On the decision to go pro (46:30) Elise looks back on her first practice with Bowerman Track Club (50:00) Elise shares her pre-race rituals (1:01:20) Elise's biggest hopes, dreams, and goals both on and off the track (1:06:00)   What we mention on this episode: Sinclaire Johnson on Episode 373 of the Ali on the Run Show Gabriela DeBues-Stafford on Episode 353 of the Ali on the Run Show Shelby Houlihan & Karissa Schweizer on Episode 357 of the Ali on the Run Show Shalane Flanagan on Episode 242 of the Ali on the Run Show Voice in Sport Sterling K. Brown's 2018 Stanford University commencement address   Follow Elise: Instagram @elise.cranny   Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava   Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play   SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

The Outdoor Biz Podcast
The Big Gear Show with Sutton Bacon and Kenji Haroutunian EP 280

The Outdoor Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 34:41


Sutton and Kenji tell us how the idea for the show came to life and some of the coolness we'll see in Park City this summer. Facebook Twitter Instagram   The Outdoor Biz Podcast   Please give us a rating and review HERE   Show Notes The Big Gear Show Darren Bush Kenji Consults Nantahala Outdoor Center Outdoor Industry Association Lance Camisasca Outdoor Retailer The Outdoor Press Camp Paddlesports Retailer Rutabaga Paddlesports A16 John Mead Park City Grassroots Outdoor Alliance Connect with Kenji and Sutton kenji@thebiggearshow.com sutton@thebiggearshow.com info@thebiggearshow.com Facebook Instagram Linkedin   Snippets 04:11 - 04:26 More curated, More focused events 09:31 - 09:12 Inspiration for an Outdoor Show Outdoors 11:27 - 11:47  The Demo is Awesome

The Perfect Scam
How a Dream Vacation House Evaporated

The Perfect Scam

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 37:09


When Melany Robinson discovers that she has breast cancer in July of 2020, she decides she needs to plan something positive to look forward to in 2021 — a much needed vacation. After scouring the internet, she finds the perfect home on Craigslist in her favorite place, Park City, Utah. But six months and almost $20,000 later, Melany discovers that her dream rental is part of an elaborate scam.

7 Figure Flipping with Bill Allen
[456] Mental Hacks to 10X Your Productivity (With Brian Moran)

7 Figure Flipping with Bill Allen

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 44:20


This COMPLETELY changed my life a few years ago.There are a couple specific mental shifts you can make to “rewire” your brain so you get MUCH more done in less time.As entrepreneurs and real estate investors, this is huge.I learned it from a guy named Brian Moran.You might know him as the author of the bestselling book “The 12-Week Year.”Today Brian is joining me on the 7 Figure Flipping Podcast for what might be one of the most powerful episodes we've ever recorded.Get this stuff down and you will be UNSTOPPABLE…Listen in now!Want to Learn More From Brian?Brian is a world-renowned productivity expert.We've been using his methodology in our mastermind groups for the past couple years. But this July, we're taking it a step further…Brian is joining us in Park City, Utah, for a special workshop with the 7 Figure Altitude group.This is happening July 14-15 in-person!He'll be breaking down his success framework tactic by tactic.If you're already an Altitude member, this is your chance to hang out with Brian live.If you're not a member of Altitude but this sounds interesting to you, let's talk.Hit the link below to apply to join the group and we'll chat and see if it's a good fit.CLICK HERE to Apply to Join Altitude >>Catch you on the flip side!Links and ResourcesI highly recommend Brian's book "The 12-Week Year." This is the book that changed everything for me. You can get your copy on Amazon or at 12WeekYear.com. While your'e there, check out Brian's free "Getting Started" course where he walks you through the fundamentals of his methodology. You can jump into that at 12WeekYear.com/GettingStarted!- CLICK HERE: 12WeekYear.comIf you're an experienced real estate investor and you're ready to get around a community of active house flippers and wholesalers who will support you, hold you accountable, and push you to set goals that inspire you as you grow your business, check out 7 Figure Altitude and see if it looks like a good fit. If it is, I invite you to fill out a quick application to join. If you have any questions, reach out!- CLICK HERE: 7FigureAltitude.comFlip Hacking LIVE tickets for October 2021 are available now… and seats are filling up fast. If you want to learn the exact systems and strategies the nation's top house flippers and wholesalers are using to flip 100s of houses per year, reserve your spot today. Hit the link below to sign up!- CLICK HERE: FlipHackingLIVE.com====================Want to continue your house flipping / wholesaling journey? Here are a few more resources to check out...Subscribe: Join the 7 Figure Flipping email list to get the latest house flipping and wholesaling secrets, plus insider access to real estate investing tips, training, and more! Click Here: https://7figureflipping.com/subscribe7 Figure Flipping Podcast: Subscribe and get more episodes like this one delivered to you every week! Click Here: https://7figureflipping.com/listenFacebook Group: We've built a community of serious investors who are learning and growing their businesses together. Join the Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fliphacking/7FigureFlipping.com: Learn more about who we are, our mentoring groups, upcoming events, and the causes we support at our website. Plus, grab some free downloads and other materials to help you on your real estate investing journey! Click Here: https://7figureflipping.com/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ali on the Run Show
373. Sinclaire Johnson, Professional Runner for the Bowerman Track Club

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 62:26


“I feel like I’m in a good position to have a real crack at making the team.” With the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials coming up, now's a great time to get to know as many of the competitors as possible! Today (bonus episode day!), Bowerman Track Club's Sinclaire Johnson is here. Sinclaire is BTC's resident rookie: She joined the team last year, and made her official debut as a Bowerman member in February, where she ran and won the 800m at the Prickly Pair Invitational. (Not bad for the new kid!) On this episode, Sinclaire confirms that she will be competing in the 1500m at the Trials (her personal best is a 4:03.72, officially making her one to watch). She talks about running at Oklahoma State University, where she was the 2019 NCAA 1500m champion, and explains her decision to forgo her fifth-year eligibility in favor of going pro. She talks about signing with Nike, and about why she wanted to join Bowerman Track Club. (It has a little something to do with Shelby Houlihan.) Sinclaire and the team are training at altitude in Park City right now, though she otherwise calls Portland, OR, home. SPONSOR: Ranger Ready Repellents — Use code ONTHERUN10 for 10% off your purchase. What you’ll get on this episode: What life is like training at altitude in Park City (3:55) Sinclaire talks about her Bowerman Track Club racing debut — and win! (12:30) How Sinclaire is feeling looking forward to the Track & Field Trials (17:45) What Sinclaire’s childhood was like, and when running entered the picture (21:45) On winning NCAA Championships in the 1500m in 2019 (31:30) The decision to go pro (37:45) Why Bowerman Track Club? (43:45) All about Craig (55:00) What we mention on this episode: Shelby Houlihan on Episode 357 of the Ali on the Run Show Emma Abrahamson’s “A Day in the Life of Sinclaire Johnson” video Emma Abrahamson on Episode 319 of the Ali on the Run Show Follow Sinclaire: Instagram @sinclairejohnson Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you’re enjoying the show, please subscribe, and leave a rating and review on iTunes or Apple Podcasts. And, as always, spread the run love by sharing this episode with your friends, family members, running buddies, or favorite internet strangers!