Podcasts about Telluride

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Best podcasts about Telluride

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Latest podcast episodes about Telluride

Arroe Collins
Kathleen Ermitage Producer Of Mixtape Trilogy Stories Of The Power Of Music

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023 20:56


With a strong foundation in nonfiction and educational filmmaking, Kathleen Ermitage is a director, writer, and producer. Her work includes award-winning content funded by the Gates Foundation and MacArthur Foundation and more than 200 educational films distributed nationally on Channel One. With John Scheinfeld and Dave Harding, she worked as an associate producer and researcher on Chasing Trane, feature documentary Sergio Mendes: In the Key of Joy, Herb Alpert Is, PBS programs, and a film about a major league baseball team. Their documentaries have been official selections at the Telluride, Toronto, IDFA (Amsterdam), and DOC NYC film festivals, released theatrically all over the world, and aired on PBS's Independent Lens.

The Daily Sun-Up
A new affordable housing proposal in Telluride gets pushback; North American Aerospace Defense Command

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 14:56


Today – we're talking to Colorado Sun outdoor reporter Jason Blevins about housing in the high country and a new affordable housing proposal in Telluride that is getting pushback. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast
Morning Magazine Podcast – Monday, January 30, 2023

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 26:30


On today’s Morning Magazine, we'll look at policies around domestic animals in the urban wildlife interface in Telluride and CityCast Denver chats with The Colorado Sun's environment reporter about some proposals ahead of a federal water management deadline. Listen: (Download […]

Blue Gems Podcast
42 | The Kayak of Short Term Rentals with Robert Montana

Blue Gems Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 31:29


Robert Montana is talking to us about his business, Jaunt Direct, a booking platform creating wins for hosts and guests of STRs. Most of the time there are barriers to entry for a product like this, but Robert eliminates that all together with a simple and streamlined approach. The bulk of the work in setting up on Jaunt Direct is uploading all the information.Robert himself was an avid traveler who lived out of his backpack. He started out as an STR investor because he fell in love with snowboarding in Telluride, CO. He bought a second house to rent out on Airbnb when he wasn't using it and hasn't looked back since. He's encouraging STR investors to run numbers as a long term rental, and is getting into more detail about this in the episode.Robert is also getting into how Airbnb is a tool, not a business. Airbnb started out as a way to invite strangers into your home, and that's part of what drew Robert to STRs. Having multiple platforms, and multiple streams of income, can give you peace of mind. As an emergency medical doctor, Robert has been around the world and met amazing people and is sharing a glimpse of what that looked like and how it eventually influenced him to join the STR game.Blue Gems Management- https://bluegemsmgmt.coSTR Meet Up- https://bluegemsgroup.comConnect with RobertJauntDirect.comFB- Robert Montana[00:00] Episode teaser[00:35] Show intro[01:08] What's going on with Robert Montana?[05:03] Why wouldn't everyone sign up for a free site that advertises for them?[13:36] What does Robert's platform look like today and why did he start this website?[17:50] Blue Gems Management[18:17] Advice for someone just getting started in STRs[21:59] What is a day in the life of Robert?[23:28] The last blue gem[26:54] Robert's top 3 countries[29:31] Where to connect with Robert[30:41] Wrapping it up

Seventh Row podcast
Sundance 2023: The Spotlight Program and The Eight Mountains

Seventh Row podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 45:33


In the second episode of the Sundance 2023 podcast season, we discuss Sundance's Spotlight Program, its only feature film program dedicated to films that premiered at other festivals. We discuss the program's history of picking great films and giving them the spotlight they needed (but didn't get at other festivals).  We discuss four of the five films programmed in the Spotlight section: Other People's Children, Joyland, L'Immensità, and The Eight Mountains. Since we already talked about Other People's Children in depth on a previous episode, we only discuss it briefly here. Additionally, we go deep on The Eight Mountains, which Alex loved, and briefly discuss the other two films in the program that we've seen which we weren't too keen on. We've actually written books featuring several of the films that screened in Spotlight, including You Were Never Really Here, Girlhood, and The Worst Person in the World. And several of the films previously programmed in the last decade have made our list of the best films of the 2010s. Click here to read the episode show notes. You will also find an AI-generated transcript in the show notes.  About the Sundance 2023 season This is the second episode of our new podcast season on the 2023 Sundance Film Festival. Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the 2023 Sundance podcast season and coverage on the website. Sundance 2023 runs from January 19-28, and we'll be covering this year's festival in a new podcast season about the films this year and how the programming fits into the festival's history. This is Seventh Row's second podcast season (the first was on Women at Cannes in 2022). Sundance 2023 Bingo Because the festival loves to program films by slot and quota, we are also introducing our annual Sundance Bingo Card, which you can download here. Play along during the festival (or look at past festival editions and the films you've caught which screened there). You can find this year's bingo card in the show notes on our website. In each expisode we'll track our progress on the Bingo card, individuall and as a Seventh Row team. Become a Member All of our episodes that are over 6 months old are available to members only. We also regularly record members only episodes. To get full access to the podcast, including episodes from past Sundance Film Festivals and past Sundance films, become a member. How to follow our Sundance 2023 coverage Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the 2023 Sundance podcast season and coverage on the website. Follow Seventh Row on Twitter and Instagram @SeventhRow; Alex Heeney @bwestcineaste Twitter and Instagram; and Orla Smith @orlamango on Twitter and @orla_p_smith on Instagram. Show Notes Links to articles/books on films that previously screened in Spotlight Read our list of Seventh Row's 50 Favourite Films of the 2010s, which also includes many films that screened in Sundance's Spotlight Program, including Oslo, August 31st (#1), Their Finest, Raw, and You Were Never Really Here. Get our ebook on Lynne Ramsay's most recent Spotlight film: You Were Never Really Here: A Special Issue Get our ebook on the Céline Sciamma, Portraits of resistance: The cinema of Céline Sciamma, which includes an interview with Sciamma on Girlhood conducted in Park City at Sundance in 2015 when the film screened in Spotlight. Read Orla Smith's interview with writer-director Haifaa Al-Mansour on The Perfect Candidate, which previously screened in Spotlight in 2020. Read Alex Heeney's interview with writer-director Rebecca Miller on Maggie's Plan, which previously screened in Spotlight in 2016. Read Alex Heeney's interview with director Lone Scherfig on Their Finest, which previously screened in Spotlight in 2017. Download the Sundance 2023 bingo card to follow along at home. Related episodes to E2: Sundance 2023 Spotlight program Discover all of our past podcast episodes on films that screened at Sundance. To listen to all of these related episodes, become a member. Ep. 116: Virtual film festivals: Taking stock of their past, present, and future (Members Only). Sundance is one of the only festivals in 2023 still offering a virtual component. On this episode, we talked about the advent of virtual film festivals and what we'd like to see in the future. Ep. 129: Highlights of 2022 Fall Film Festivals (Members Only). We discuss the best films that screened on the festival circuit in fall 2022. This includes a free in-depth discussion of Other People's Children. Episodes on Films featured in the Spotlight section Ep. 112: Joachim Trier's The Worst Person in the World (Free). As the world experts on the films of Joachim Trier (our book on his work will be out later this year), we published an episode on his twice Oscar-nominated film The Worst Person in the World (2021), which screened in Spotlight in 2022. Ep. 73: Explorations of rape culture in Promising Young Woman and The Assistant (Members Only). Although The Assistant premiered at Telluride in 2020, it only really started generating buzz after its 2021 screening in the Spotlight Program at Sundance. In this episode, we discuss its depiction of rape culture alongside a bigger Sundance hit (which was also much less nuanced), Promising Young Woman. Ep. 107: Another Round and Oslo, August 31st: Are men OK? Masculinity, mental health, & addiction(Members Only). Joachim Trier first came to Sundance in 2012 with Oslo, August 31st (which premiered at Cannes in 2011), our #1 film of the 2010s. We talk about how the film addresses masculinity, mental health, & addiction and how this compares with the more recent film, a decade later, Another Round. Episodes on genre films featured in the Sundance Spotlight program Ep. 17: The Nightingale (Members Only): Having launched her career in the World Dramatic Competition at Sundance, Jennifer Kent once again returned to the festival with her second feature, The Nightingale, which premiered at Venice to an underwhelming response. We thought the film was rich and excellent in many ways (if flawed), and went deep on it on the podcast. Ep. 112: Raw and Thelma and modern female monsters (Members Only): After receiving rave reviews (and press about vomiting walkouts) at Cannes and TIFF, Julia Ducournau (who later won the Palme d'Or for Titane) screened her first feature, Raw at Sundance in the Spotlight program. We talk about the film in comparison with Joachim Trier's Thelma. Ep. 38 Australian Westerns: The True History of the Kelly Gang, Sweet Country, and The Dressmaker (Members Only): Warwick Thornton's fantastic feature Sweet Country previously screened in the Sundance Spotlight program after premiering (and winning an award) at Venice and TIFF. In this episode, we discuss how Thornton decolonizes the Australian Western, as well as how this compares to Australian Westerns about settler characters (made by settlers).

KOTO Community Radio News
Noticias 1-16-23

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 7:44


- El condado de San Miguel comienza un nuevo sistema de notificaciónes - La ciudad elabora estrategias para limpiar la nieve - Telluride analiza el programa de boletos para la gente local para festivales

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 1-13-23

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 21:10


- Alpine rangers prep for 2023 in the high country - Town discusses water rates - Telluride tourism looks abroad

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 1-12-23

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 19:51


- A conflicted council passes Town Vision Plan - CCAASE recommends 2023 grant funding - Telluride approves tourism contract

Seventh Row podcast
132: Women Talking by Sarah Polley

Seventh Row podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 99:13


In this episode, we discuss why the film Women Talking didn't work on every level. This includes the didactic screenplay, the bland and placeless production design, the typecasting, and the poor direction of group scenes. We are joined by special guest Dr. Angelo Muredda, who has a PhD in CanLit. To read the show notes and get the AI-generated transcript of the episode, click here. At Seventh Row, we've been long-time fans of Sarah Polley. We have even published episodes on her films Take This Waltz and Stories We Tell. Women Talking is her first bad, if well-intentioned, film. But it's been getting enormous Oscar buzz since its Telluride premiere. Angelo and Alex read the book by Miriam Toews, on which the film is based. We discuss the problems in the source text that get translated into the film — and how the film works (or doesn't) as a page-to-screen adaptation. This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, as well as special guest Dr. Angelo Muredda. About the film Women Talking Based on a true story that happened in Bolivia, Women Talking is a fictional reimagining with an alternate ending. Almost every woman and girl in a small Mennonite community has been raped in their sleep by men or boys in the community. Traumatized and beaten down, a group of women volunteers from three families convene for a couple of days to discuss what the women should do. They must decide whether to stay and fight or to leave. The film then follows them through their discussions. The film Women Talking was adapted from the Miriam Toewes novel of the same name by Sarah Polley. Timings 00:00 Introduction 04:40 Why are talking about Women Talking? 07:20 An overview of our problems with Women Talking 25:05 Adapting Miriam Toews's novel 34:00 The lack of specificity in Women Talking's depiction of a Mennonite community 36:50 The casting and performances in Women Talking 52:10 The film's treatment of its trans and disabled characters 1:06:05 Sarah Polley's direction and the film's cinematography 1:19:55 How Women Talking fits into CanLit 1:24:00 Why is this film resonating? Show Notes Read the 2019 New York Times article that Alex cites on the episode: in the piece, mennonites are interviewed about their thoughts on Miriam Toews's novel, Women Talking. Read Alex's interview with the writer-director of Felix & Meira, a film about a Hasidic Jewish woman who decides to leave her community. On the episode, Alex compares Women Talking to films about Hasidic Jews. Read Alex's interview with the writer-director of Menashe, a film about Hasidic Jews made with actors who are part of the Hasidic Jewish community. On the episode, Alex compares the depiction of mennonites in Women Talking to the depiction of Hasidic Jewish characters in Menace Read Angelo's recent review of Armageddon Time for Film Freak Central. Related episodes Ep. 43: Take This Waltz and Paper Year: Canadian marriage stories (Members Only) - We go deep on Sarah Polley's second feature, Take This Waltz, a film about a marriage breaking up, and compare it to another female-directed Canadian film about a troubled marriage, Paper Year. Ep. 40: Stories We Tell, Louder Than Bombs, & Mouthpiece: Dead mothers (Members Only): We discuss Sarah Polley's third feature, the creative nonfiction film Stories We Tell alongside two of our favourite films that are also about dead mothers. All three films were on Seventh Row's 50 favourite films of the decade list. Ep. 73: Promising Young Woman and The Assistant: Explorations of rape culture (Members only): We discuss two films that explore rape culture, one that does it thoughtfully (The Assistant) and one that does it poorly (Promising Young Woman). In the current episode, we regularly compare Women Talking to Promising Young Woman and refer back to this discussion in Ep. 73 Bonus 27: Empathy on film with Dr. Brett Pardy (FREE to everyone) - Dr. Pardy did his PhD research on how films can create empathy, and we discuss on Ep. 132 how Women Talking fails to create empathy. Where to find us Special Guest Angelo Muredda holds a PhD in disability studies on Canadian Literature and is a lecturer in the English department at Humber College. Angelo has also contributed to our ebook Portraits of resistance: The cinema of Céline Sciamma with an essay on the female gaze, and to our ebook Roads to nowhere: Kelly Reichardt's broken American dreams with an essay on Wendy and Lucy. You can find Angelo on Twitter and Instagram @amuredda. Host Alex Heeney is the Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row. Find her on Twitter @bwestcineaste. Host Orla Smith is the Executive Editor of Seventh Row. Find her on Twitter @orlamango and on Instagram @orla_p_smith. Become a Member All of our episodes that are over 6 months old are available to members only. We also regularly record members only episodes. To get full access to the podcast, become a member at http://seventh-row.com/join

KOTO Community Radio News
Off The Record 1-10-23: Lifties

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 58:30


Two lift operators discuss the lifty lifestyle, seasonal work, making the most of all that Telluride has to offer, and other topics of note. And, of course, we play some staple lifty tunes.

KOTO Community Radio News
Noticias 1-9-23

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 8:17


- El Ayuntamiento de telluride hablara sobre lo que quiere hacer y con el departamento de turismo - Mountain Village prohíbe las bolsas de plástico de un solo uso - El distrito escolar de Telluride analiza la expansión

Song of the Day
Landon Conrath - Telluride

Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 2:51


Today's Song of the Day is "Telluride" from Landon Conrath's album, Nothing Matters Anyway, out now.

CRUISE CONTROL RADIO
KIA EV9 , MACH E ORDERS , AVERAGE CAR COST , HEMI HERITAGE

CRUISE CONTROL RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 40:59 Transcription Available


On this edition of Cruise Control with Fred Staab and Les Jackson Kia is hoping for another Telluride with its under-development EV9 all-electric SUV. Dodge released the first of its last call Hemi powered Challengers   Ford opens the Mach E order banks for 2023 The average cost of a car loan is setting records. What are most people paying each month? We have the details   All that and more when we get rolling on Cruise Control.   Watch Cruise Control live every Saturday at 10 AM Eastern.  Youtube www.youtube.com/user/CruiseControlVideo Facebook www.facebook.com/CRUISECONTROLRAD

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS
Marshall Miles Interviews Larry Rand and Tom Gruenewald, Taconic Learning Center’s 2023 Winter Class Offerings

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 18:49


PLEASE NOTE: Our Winter Term Registration is now OPEN! Four courses will be IN-PERSON at Noble Horizons; Only two courses will be on ZOOM. When you want to enter a TLC Zoom class, click here TLC is a non-profit membership organization providing the opportunity for lifelong learning to residents of the Northwest Corner of Connecticut and adjacent communities in New York and Massachusetts. TLC's courses cover a wide variety of academic subjects taught by volunteers, all experts in their fields. Click on Course Listings on the left to see what courses we offer. Annual membership dues of $60 per person are fully tax-deductible. There are no other set fees. Individuals may sign up for any number of courses. Classes lasting two hours are held once a week at one of our three conveniently located venues. Attendees are free to come and go as they like; there are no exams. Those taking advantage of TLC's program will rekindle the excitement of learning, expand their horizons, be able to share their knowledge, have fun and make new friends. TLC is a wonderful way to stay involved and well informed. Join today! For more information, click on an item on the left, or contact us by mail or by phone. Taconic Learning Center, Inc. PO BOX 1752, Lakeville, CT 06039 Tel. 860-364-9363 Courses for Winter 2023 Please select "Registration" on the left to register. Click here to enter Zoom meeting for any of the Zoom-based TLC Courses For your Information: Meeting ID: 893 2055 3978. Passcode: 128295 https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89320553978?pwd=Y3lSYk5jUHN5ZFhvOWp6azBOWHMwdz09 Location: Noble Horizons Times: Monday, 10am-Noon Dates: Jan 16 - Feb 20 Sessions: 6 decorative leaf MEN PLAN, THE GODS LAUGH, PART II Sessions One and Two: Gen. Burgoyne's campaign to take Albany, NY (ended at Saratoga) and Gen. Clinton's campaign to take Philadelphia, in the American Revolution. No cooperation! Sessions three and four: General Lee's two invasions of the North ending in the battle of Gettysburg. Bloody! Session five: Admiral Yamamoto's campaign to take Wake Island in WW II. A disaster! Session six: Examples of three important elements in waging war: -Tactics: Hannibal and the Battle of Cannae, 262 BC. -Weapons: Henry V and the Battle of Agincourt, 1415 AD -Misdirection: Invasion of Sicily, WW II, and "The Man Who Never Was" Instructor: Thomas Key See this instructor's bio Get Class List Location: Noble Horizons Times: Monday, 1-3pm Dates: Jan 16 - Feb 20 Sessions: 6 decorative leaf The Perennial Questions Why are we here? Who am I? What is true? Human beings have posed these questions as long as they have been able to think. In this six-week class we will take a look at a few of the most enduring approaches to these questions. We will consider ideas about the purpose of human life, the means and ends of self-knowledge, and the challenge of discerning what is really true. Instructor: Lyn Mattoon See this instructor's bio Get Class List Location: ZOOM Times: Tuesday, 1-3pm Dates: Jan 17 - March 7 Sessions: 8 decorative leaf Alexis de Tocqueville: Democracy in America In 1831, Alexis de Tocqueville, a young French aristocrat, traveled to America and found the future. The nations of the earth, he concluded, or at least the enlightened part of them, were moving inevitably toward a condition of social equality that in the world of politics was taking the form of democracy. This new kind of polity was rising on the ruins of the old, hierarchical societies, and the young republic was the clearest example of it. Previous visitors from overseas had concentrated on the minutiae of daily American life, but Tocqueville was after bigger game. He wanted to tease out the broad implications of increasing social equality and democracy rather than focus on the details that were bound to differ from one nation to another. These implications then would have the widest possible relevance to the various societies of the emerging modern world. This new dispensation, Tocqueville realized, was full of both promise and peril, and he devoted himself to transmitting this balanced assessment to his European contemporaries. The book that resulted, Democracy in America, has been called the "greatest work ever written about one country by a citizen of another." Because his conclusions were so general and of such wide application his book appropriately addressed the Americans of his own time, his fellow citizens in France still trying to come to terms with the modern world, and, not least, speaks to our own distracted society today, the uneasy inheritor of the raw republic in whose image he saw the future. I'll include a PowerPoint presentation to illustrate my talks. Instructor: Robert Rumsey See this instructor's bio Get Class List Location: Noble Horizons Times: Wednesday, 1-3pm Dates: Jan 18 - Feb 22 Sessions: 6 decorative leaf Experimental Cinema: A six-session session course on the history and the development of Experimental Cinema This course attempts to present the participants a historical view of the genre, styles and the role of the filmmakers who developed and perfected the concept and the vision of Experimental Cinema. Invention of the movie camera offered a broad and diverse tool for artists to express their own interpretation of nature and life around them. Camera became another tool, a "brush" for artists to create moving images which projected their own aesthetic principles and perceptions. There will be a presentation of early cinema from France, Soviet Union, England and the United States. Early films by the Lumiere Brothers to Andy Warhol and how through ages, cinema has evolved from a vehicle to tell a story or document everyday life, to a tool expressing an individual artist's personal vision. Through the sessions of the lectures there will be an ongoing discussion about the goal for Experimental Films, which is to place the viewer in a more active and more thoughtful relationship to the film, which will be discussed. The 6 sessions will be an opportunity for the participants to understand this particular form of cinema and the various expressions and theorizations from various artists. The sessions will be coordinated with projections of stills from movies and at the end of each session there will be screening of a film, and an open discussion by the participants. During the entire sessions of the courses, informal and open-minded discussions of opinions will be encouraged. SPECIAL NOTE: Donald Sosin who is a well regarded musician and has composed musical scores for may experimental films will be appearing at the Wednesday, January 18th session for the Experimental Cinema. please see details below. Donald Sosin is one of the world's foremost silent film composers, performing his keyboard and instrumental scores all over the world. From 1971 to the present he has performed at many of the world's leading venues for silent film, including Lincoln Center, MoMA, BAM, the TriBeCa Film Festival, and many festivals including Telluride, Denver, San Francisco and Seattle, as well as AFI Silver, the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival, the Thailand Silent FIlm Festival, Italy's two major festivals in Bologna and Pordenone, and the Jecheon International Music and Film Festival in South Korea. Donald and his wife Joanna Seaton are the only people in the world who have created a repertoire of new songs for silent films, and have performed at many of the above venues, as well as at many colleges (Yale, Emory, Brown,etc.) They teach workshops in silent film music, and created scores for over 60 DVD/Blu-Ray releases on the Criterion, Kino, Milestone, Flicker Alley and other labels. With klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals, Donald has written and recorded three scores for Jewish-themed silents which they perform live all over the US and Europe under the auspices of the Sunrise Foundation for Education and the Arts. Donald grew up in Rye NY and Munich and played on Broadway for many years, after composition studies at Michigan and Columbia. His music has been heard on PBS, TCM, online, and in the concert hall. Donald and Joanna have two musical children and live in Lakeville CT. Website: oldmoviemusic.com Avant-garde filmography: Donald was commissioned to score the following films for two major collections of avant-garde films, Bruce Posner's Unseen Cinema collection, and Kino's Avant-garde DVD set. Piano except as indicated Anémic Cinéma (1924-26) Rrose Sélavy aka Marcel Duchamp Beggar on Horseback (fragment, 1925) James Cruze Bronx Morning, A (1931) Jay Leyda (chamber ensemble) Coney Island at Night (1905) Edwin S. Porter Enchanted City, The (1922) Warren Newcombe Ghost Train, The (1903) unknown Ghosts Before Breakfast (1928) Hans Richter H20 (1929) Ralph Steiner Hearts of Age, The (1934) William Vance & Orson Welles Jack and the Beanstalk (1902) Edwin S. Porter Life and Death of 9413: A Hollywood Extra, The (1927) Robert Flaherty & Slavko Vorkapich Looney Lens: Pas de Deux (1924) Al Brick Love of Zero, The (1928) Robert Florey & William Cameron Menzies Manhatta (1921) Charles Sheeler & Paul Strand (orchestra) Pie in the Sky (1934-35) Elia Kazan, Ralph Steiner & Irving Lerner Retour à la Raison, Le (1923) Man Ray Skyscraper Symphony (1929) Robert Flaherty Telltale Heart, The (1928) Charles Klein Twenty-Four Dollar Island (c. 1926) Robert Flaherty (voice and synthesized orchestra, percussion) Überfall (1928) Instructor: Varoujan Froundjian Get Class List Location: Noble Horizons Times: Thursday, 10am-Noon Dates: Jan 19 - March 9 Sessions: 8 decorative leaf Unsung Heroes of WWII We all know of Winston Churchill, FDR, Dwight Eisenhower; the Battle of Britain, the Battle of the Bulge, and more. What most of us do not know of are the unsung heroes of World War II, those who contributed significantly to the Allies' victory: men and women who were critical to the war effort but engaged in clandestine operations; men and women who provided essential services to the Allied effort. This course is both a lecture by Lynne Olson (author of Citizens of London and other exceptional books) together with classes led by Larry and Carol Rand. Instructor: Larry&Carol Rand Get Class List Location: Zoom Times: Friday, 1-3pm Dates: Jan 20 - March 10 Sessions: 8 decorative leaf Shakespeare Playreading We'll read aloud and discuss Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night's Dream . The two plays are often called "festive" comedies because each commemorates a significant day marked by popular license in the Elizabethan calendar. Twelfth Night refers to the last night of the twelve days of Christmas, and in spite of its religious origin it was a thoroughly secular celebration. A Midsummer Night's Dream takes its title from the evening before midsummer day, the summer solstice and the longest day of the year, when the prospect of warmth and lengthening days inspired much misbehavior. If time permits, we'll also read Troilus and Cressida, one of Shakespeare's so-called "problem plays," which contain both tragic and comic elements and thus resist easy placement in the canon. I'll scroll the texts of the plays on your screens. Instructor: Robert Rumsey See this instructor's bio Get Class List

92Y Talks
Actor Bill Nighy and Director Oliver Hermanus in Conversation with Annette Insdorf

92Y Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 50:59


In this episode of 92NY Talks, Annette Insdorf interviews star Bill Nighy and director Oliver Hermanus, following a preview screening of their new film Living. Acclaimed at film festivals including Sundance and Telluride, it's the touching portrait of a joyless civil servant in 1953 London — a magnificently understated performance by Nighy — whose dire diagnosis leads him to transformation. The conversation was recorded on December 6th, 2022 in front of a live audience at The 92nd Street Y, New York.

Next Best Picture Podcast
Interviews With "Living" Director Oliver Hermanus & Writer Kazuo Ishiguro

Next Best Picture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 25:26


"Living" has had one of the most extended lives of any film this awards season, premiering all the way back at Sundance and then going on to also screen at Venice, Telluride and TIFF before opening in limited release a few days ago from Sony Pictures Classics. A remake of Akira Kurosawa's classic film "Ikiru," the film stars Bill Nighy in a rare showcase leading role for the respected British actor, which has generated Oscar buzz for his performance and Nobel Prize-winning writer Kazuo Ishiguro's screenplay. Ishiguro and director Oliver Hermanus were kind enough to spend some time with us talking about their work on the film, which you can listen to down below. Thank you, and enjoy!   Check out more on NextBestPicture.com Please subscribe on... SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/nextbestpicturepodcast iTunes Podcasts - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/negs-best-film-podcast/id1087678387?mt=2 Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/7IMIzpYehTqeUa1d9EC4jT And be sure to help support us on Patreon for as little as $1 a month at https://www.patreon.com/NextBestPicture

Next Best Picture Podcast
Interview With "Bardo" Co-Screenwriter, Nicolás Giacobone

Next Best Picture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 25:34


"Bardo, False Chronicle Of A Handful Of Truths" had its world premiere at the Venice International Film Festival, where it initially had a nearly three-hour runtime. The film was re-edited after its Telluride screening and received a critical bump from the initial negative reviews, and is now available to stream on Netflix. Academy Award-winning director Alejandro G. Iñárritu ("The Revenant") co-wrote the screenplay with Nicolás Giacobone ("Birdman" & "John And The Hole"), who was kind enough to spend a few minutes talking with us about how he and Alejandro work together, the personal nature of the story, the many shapes it has taken and more. Please take a listen down below and enjoy. Thank you!   Check out more on NextBestPicture.com Please subscribe on... SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/nextbestpicturepodcast iTunes Podcasts - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/negs-best-film-podcast/id1087678387?mt=2 Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/7IMIzpYehTqeUa1d9EC4jT And be sure to help support us on Patreon for as little as $1 a month at https://www.patreon.com/NextBestPicture

KOTO Community Radio News
Noticias 12-19-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 8:50


- El invierno ve un salto en las enfermedades respiratorias - Proyecto de vivienda Voodoo obtiene luz verde - Telluride considera el desarrollo en el estacionamiento de Shandoka

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 12-19-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 16:17


- COVID boosters approved for young children - Telluride looks back on a year of events - Roving Rabbis bring Hanukkah to Mountain Village

The Localist  with Carrie Rollwagen
2022 Year in Review … Plus, Buy-Local Bingo!

The Localist with Carrie Rollwagen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 43:39


On today's episode, Carrie introduces a free game of Buy-Local Bingo — download a copy at carrierollwagen.com and make buying local this season even more fun. We also shares a year in review, complete with Carrie's favorite Localist episodes of 2022, favorite books she's read this year, and a few local things she's bought that made the year better. Find full show notes at localistpodcast.com.   Get the Buy-Local Bingo card Sign up for our mailing list to get the Localist Guide to Coffee Shops in Birmingham. Join the email list to get the semi-weekly newsletter Follow Carrie on Instagram   Goal Setting Episodes: New Year Goals that Actually Work How Do I Actually Set a SMART Goal? Feeling Like You've Already Failed Is Normal Learn to Focus and Deal with Disruptions The Essential Part of Goal Setting that Most People Skip What to Do When Your Year Already Feels Off-Track   Christmas Stories and Santa Podcast: Localist Christmas stories Localist Christmas Spotify Playlist   Favorite Purchases of 2022 Hooga Book Light Coava instant coffee You Need a Budget (YNAB) Meal Plans Nourish (and the Nourish podcast) Mealfit Fit Five   Favorite Episodes of 2022 Housing Crisis in Telluride with Megan Ossolo of Butcher and the Baker A Bookstore the Serves the Prison Community with Johnny Ardis Navigating the Resale Market with Peddling Post What Can Your Business Do about Climate Change with Bryn Carey of Ski Butlers High Standards, Low Waste: Talking Sustainability with Filter Coffee   Favorite Books of 2022 Business Playing Big by Tara Mohr The Power of Moments by Chip and Dan Heath Fiction/Fantasy The Mirror Visitor by Christelle Dabos Deadly Education by Naomi Novik Audio Wintering by Katherine May Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

Jere Metcalf Podcast
280. Ben Wood: How to Cultivate Serendipity, Against All Odds

Jere Metcalf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 72:07


A very special guest on the podcast this week.World famous architect, Ben Wood, who, in short, cultivated serendipity against all odds… not just in how he won business, in how he changed China and architecture globally. Before he had made a name for himself, Ben, from a middle class family in rural Georgia, was winning  business that world renowned architects were competing for.He won  business nationally and globally from developing growth management strategies for Snowmass, Aspen, Telluride and Park City to authoring the master plans for the Revitalization of New York Times Square to designing developments in major cities across the United States as well as in Japan, England and throughout Europe and in China. Ben is perhaps is most renowned for being the Architect who designed Shanghai's famous Xintiandi (which means “New Heaven and Earth).Xintiandi is so successful that it has become a verb and not only in China but across the globe. Developers say to architects, ‘Can you Xintiandi this project for me?' Ben says he listens to people and culture and he sees not only the vision and design, he sees opportunity where others didn't. He's done it, not just once, again and again. We talk about Ben's life, how against all obvious odds, he cultivates serendipity.*** Don't miss Ben's book releasing soon, ‘Into the Dragon's Mouth', stories from an American Architect Who Changed China. ***Shownotes - 0:00 - Ben Wood: How to Cultivate Serendipity, Against All Odds5:02 - Ben shares his back story13:01 - Deciding to become an architect22:47 - The story of winning29:12 - Being a visionary (looking to the future, not the past)31:28 - Earning great clients38:10 - People first44:22 - Ideas48:40 - Ben's ‘BusinessFeeder', DR Bar (Shanghai)54:51 - Passion and serving people57:00 - The Final 3People/Resources Mentioned - Benjamin C. ThompsonSteven SpielbergJeffrey Katzenberg DreamWorks Animation Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT Harvard University National Art Gallery Time Magazine Ben's Ted Talk Elon MuskBeryl MarkhamBooks -Leonardo da Vinci - by Walter IsaacsonSteve Jobs - by Walter IsaacsonThe Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick) - by Seth Godin West with the Night - by Beryl Markham‘Into the Dragon's Mouth', stories from an American Architect Who Changed China - by Ben Wood* - Releases in 2023Quotes-He who flies highest sees the farthest… just remember, just as you needed a runway to take off, remember to consider your landing. Find something you do well, and do it almost better than anybody in the world.www.JereMetcalfPodcast.comPowered byJere Metcalf Partners404.627.7789Jere@mpartners.ioJeremetcalfpart

92Y Talks
Actor Bill Nighy and Director Oliver Hermanus with Annette Insdorf: 92NY Talks Episode 330

92Y Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 50:59


In this episode of 92NY Talks, Annette Insdorf interviews star Bill Nighy and director Oliver Hermanus, following a preview screening of their new film Living. Acclaimed at film festivals including Sundance and Telluride, it's the touching portrait of a joyless civil servant in 1953 London — a magnificently understated performance by Nighy — whose dire diagnosis leads him to transformation. The conversation was recorded on December 6th, 2022 in front of a live audience at The 92nd Street Y, New York.

I'll Call You Right Back
I'll Call You Right Back #225 - Rev. Justin Criado

I'll Call You Right Back

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 105:02


This week, I sit down with writer, editor, and author Rev. Justin Criado. Justin and I have been friends for many years. Justin currently lives in a small town in Colorado called Telluride. He moved there about 6 years back to work for the local paper the Telluride Daily Planet. Currently, he's an Editor and writes a monthly column called “The Chopping Block.” When he's not working, you can find him ripping through town on his Harley dawned with a set of deer antlers or at a local venue trying to catch a metal show. On top of all that, Justin is now a fully independent published author. He stops by the studio to talk to me about his brand new book called ‘Chronicles of Chaos.' CoC is a compendium of short non-fictional columns written through the thick of the pandemic compiled into one complete body of work. This week we talk about everything from what everyday life looks like as an editor of a paper, the subject matter he gravitates toward, his process of writing, and how ‘Chronicles of Chaos' came together. If you're looking for a new book, head over to Justin's page and click the link in the bio to purchase. The final product is really impressive. I'm proud to see a great friend pouring their heart and soul into doing what they love. I read this entire thing and I can say that you will not be disappointed. Enjoy it! Buy a copy of Chronicles of Chaos! - WWW.ILLCALLYOURIGHTBACK.COM - Follow us on Instagram - illcallyourightback Follow us on Twitter - ICYRBpodcast Like us on Facebook - I'll Call You Right Back Podcast

Upzoned
Homeowners Struggling to Get Insurance in Wildfire-Prone Colorado

Upzoned

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 39:26 Very Popular


An increasing risk of wildfires has made insurance carriers wary of certain areas in Colorado—according to a recent Denver Post article—raising their premiums and, in some cases, opting to not cover them, at all. In just the past few years, heavily forested areas of the state have been hit hard by wildfires. The Marshall Fire of December 2021, for instance, caused $2 billion in damages and has turned out to be the most expensive wildfire in the state's history. Quite often, homeowners discover that they're underinsured when these things happen, meaning their insurance policies don't provide enough money to rebuild their homes once a fire occurs. In mountain communities like Aspen, Vail, Telluride, Steamboat Springs, and others, insurance companies are starting to pull out, altogether. So, what are homeowners to do? Abby Kinney and co-host Chuck Marohn discuss the situation in today's episode of Upzoned. ADDITIONAL SHOW NOTES “Will insurance companies opt to leave Colorado?” by Noelle Phillips, The Denver Post (November 2022). Abby Kinney (Twitter). Chuck Marohn (Twitter). Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom.

Driven Car Reviews
2023 Kia Telluride X-Pro Goes Beyond Suburbia

Driven Car Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 17:13


The wildly popular Telluride 3-row SUV has become Kia's flagship model. 2023 models get a mid-cycle refresh with the expected nip and tuck on the nose and tail. But it's two new models that will get extra track- X-Line and X-Pro. Both get a rugged look that'll be the envy of the cul-de-sac plus a smidge more off-road capability. X-Pro goes the extra mile on the forest service road with all-terrain tires and upgraded cooling for better towing. Tom Voelk teams up with Edmunds' Brian Wong to check out the X-Pro SX-Prestige off-road just outside of San Antonio, TX. It'll all the SUV most families will ever need. Just wish Kia would have kept the amber DRLs… Oh, and Buc-ee's!

Faux Reel Podcast
Ranger with Austin Peck

Faux Reel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 42:52


RANGER is a story about rite of passage. Set within Kenya's Maasai homeland, an intimate and contemporary story of self-discovery unfolds, as 12 women become East Africa's first all-female anti-poaching unit. Upending the male-dominated, reliance upon military-style training to make a wildlife ranger, Virginia, Liz, Momina and Damaris instead undergo a year-long program of deep trauma-release and healing, triggering profound transformation within themselves and sending shockwaves through their communities. The film screened at the Mountainfilm Fest 2022 in Telluride, CO. In this episode, Dawn and Austin talk about the importance of being present, his wife's midwifery work complimenting his making of this film, and the ethics of intervention when you're a documentarian. Follow the film: Website Instagram @rangerfilm Watch the film: Human Rights x Arts Presents Ranger Dec 7, 2022 ONLINE Frozen River Film Festival Feb 5-12, 2023 Victoria Film Festival in British Columbia Feb. 3-12, 2023 Support the conversation program in the film: https://zeitzfoundation.org/

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Girona Gravel with Trek Travel

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 47:07


This week I recount my recent trip to Girona, Spain with Trek Travel. Our knowledgeable guides took us on a 5 day adventure throughout the region exposing us to Girona's plentiful and diverse gravel. As a bonus, we were able to connect with a number of local cycling brands contributing to Girona's reputation as the hub of European cycling. Trek Travel  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Girona Gravel Live [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the show, I'm releasing some recordings I did during the tractor on a gravel tour. I participated in, in November. It was a great trip. I encourage you to check it out on Trek's website and I appreciate Trek's support in getting the over there to have this wonderful experience. With my friend. Was able to sit down with our guides as well as some other members of the Jarana cycling community. To give you a flavor for this wonderful cycling city. I hope you enjoy and let's dive right in Day 1 [00:00:56] Craig Dalton: Right here we are, day one, Trek Gerona Gravel tour here in Gerona, Spain here in the hotel. Nord got set up on my Trek demo bike. Not the one you'd expect for these gravel trips, but it turns out the gravel roads here in Gerona are pretty smooth and you don't need the big wide tires that I typically ride at home. So we're riding a 35 C Pirelli tire on these Damani bikes. The great thing was, Sent them over. My fit measurements had everything dialed, so it was just some quick adjustments Right before the ride. Today we did about 25 miles today as a shakeout ride. Riding along, essentially along the river, out and back on either side of the river, which a lot of fun. We got into some single track. Super smooth. Not a lot of elevation today. That's gonna come tomorrow where I'm excited that we're riding off to the Mediterranean. So great first day. Great intro. The guides. Rafa and Mickey are awesome. Mickey's a local here in Jerron and Rafa's from London. Bringing a little bit of international flavor to the trip. We've got a group of about six of us, so it's pretty easy to keep people together. I've got two friends from San Francisco along for the ride, so that is a joy and a pleasure. More later in the week, and I'll get some commentary, a little bit more specifics about the writing from Mickey Rafa along the way to to give you an idea about what to expect. It's a five day experience here in the Jonah Gravel tour. They've got some other options I think, coming online next year, but super excited for the days to come as the mileage is gonna creep up, and I'm told the technicality is gonna creep up as well. So super excited for that. We'll see how these 35 C tires on the demos go, but I'm confident we've got the right equipment for the job. Day 2 [00:02:50] Craig Dalton: Okay, so on day two of the Trek Gerona gravel tour today, we did about 60 miles of gravel, about 1800 feet of climbing on our way to the Mediterranean beach, the Mediterranean Ocean. We started in Gerona and followed the prominent river all the way to the east. Surprisingly, the whole ride, we were on gravel roads, beautiful gravel. Started out getting outta town on some small paths right next to the river. Some real fun single track to wake you up and then onto some amazing roads through forests. There's a lot of forests here. We were told that the trees that were being planted there were for the paper industry. They were super beautiful tall trees and lined in rows, and we just weaved throughout them until 29 kilometers later. We met the van, the Trek travel van, and our second guide Mickey, who had water refills and food and everything we needed for the second half of our ride out there to the coast where we went through orchards, basically this incredibly smooth gravel road. Very, very little car traffic. I think maybe we saw a few, maybe three vehicles out there the whole day, but super pleasant ride. Relatively flat for 60 miles, only 1800 feet of climbing. We got to the ocean to meet Mickey in the van again. Had an amazing lunch and a few of us decided we were gonna jump into the. It wasn't exactly warm, but it wasn't unpleasant. It was so fun to kind of get off the gravel bike in the middle of your ride and go for a swim and play around. And one of the riders, James, my friend from San Francisco, took a nap on the beach while we were in the water and we had to rouse him to get him back on the bike for our 45 kilometer return home. Adding up to, as I said, 60 miles and no idea why I'm converting miles to kilometers and vice versa. Including them in the same sentences. But anyway, I'm a bit groggy from the ride. The legs are taken a little bit to get used to it, but it's been amazing. The town's been amazing. We, we spent sunset at, on the wall here in Jerome, next to the big church, and you can see the purities and the sun was setting right over the pys. Pretty incredible Second day. Getting ready for the third day, which I guess is a little bit more technical. I'll get some of the guides on to describe some of the terrain, excuse me, that we're going through and we'll see how the legs hold up. Day 3 [00:05:29] Craig Dalton: Day three of our Jer gravel cycling tour with track travel. Today was a little bit more technical, especially with the 35 Sea Tires. We got out into some rolling farm roads and definitely off into some single track and double track. That was pretty amazing, the first 30 K or so, rolling farm roads. Just a little bit punchier than we've been experiencing. A little bit looser gravel in most cases. But nothing too technical on the. 30 K of the ride. We had this amazing stop at Ro Roca corba cycling, a new 17th century Chateau kind of building that's being converted into a cycling. Kind of lodge and Airbnb pretty amazing. They took the kind of areas that used to house the cattle underneath the building and made them into kind of the bike room and a little cafe. It's a super like rustic arc, arc ceilings beautiful stonework on the grounds. This beautiful old building, it's being renovated by a couple professional cyclists, ones who's already retired, and one who's in the Women's Pro tour today. So that was really special. Kind of get to tour that facility and definitely something. It's about 30 kilometers outside of. Jer. So kind of an interesting place to stay. You know, the ideal might be stay in Gerona for, you know, four or five days and then go out there for three or four days, or two or three days to just get a little bit of different starting point. It's a little closer to closer to some of the climbs particularly for the roadies. So, you know, if you're interested in getting out and hitting some of those climbs and having a little less distance in your legs from Gerona, that's a good option. Once we left there, the riding got a little bit more technical through some farms. Took a lot of single track. Some punchier climbs actually reminds me of what I recently experienced at, at big sugar in Arkansas. Kind of loose gravel, the sense definitely some loose gravel pushed the technical capabilities. Clearly. Track is the, has done a really good job of making roots that are gonna explore different areas of your gravel cycling ability again today. Was definitely on the more technical side, particularly if you were a newer rider of which we had at least one in today's ride. And you know, you could. Some of them were, some of the dissents were definitely making them think, but everybody went through fabulously. We even got to stop at the property, which my one of the guides fathers owned, and I'll get him on to talk about that a little bit. But it was great being able to reminisce with him and he learned to swim up there. His father owned a restaurants, a typical Catalan food restaurant in this really beautiful building, which was kind of cool to see. Then we rolled back into, I'm always looking at the GPS and amazed that, you know, we could be within seven kilometers of Jerome and still in these amazing forests and woods, riding gravel, basically all the way back into town. So another great day out there. It's interesting how they've explored. The first day was kind of getting to know your bike a little bit. Second day was that long. Ride out to the beach. Not very technical. Beautiful, beautiful gravel roads today being more technical, and we'll see what the next two days have to bring us. Day 4 [00:08:46] Craig Dalton: All right. Day four, Gerona gravel. Definitely woke up feeling a little tired, not gonna lie. Fourth day riding in a row with some big climbs. Yesterday. Got a massage yesterday afternoon, which was awesome and quite affordable here in Gerona, which was a bonus. Got up this morning, got the bikes ready. We got the route loaded up. We were riding through the fields. Kesier de Las Selva known for the cork. It's cork production. So they actually, it was kind of interesting. They, the trees kind of about five feet kind of from the ground up. Five feet they chop and that's the cork that they used to make cork bottles, flooring, everything. So that was super cool to see. We continued rolling through some dirt roads through there, through the mountain range of Lis gravis. Then we tackled a famous road climb called Santa Aea, known as the George hie Climb for Local. This was awesome. I mean, I know we're here to talk about gravel and the gravel was great that first half of the morning, but that road climb was spectacular as well. I kind of felt like it was a bonus, obviously, like we signed up for a gravel trip, but to be able to do kind of a famous climb, road climb was amazing. It was great gradient, fantastic descent. Right at the bottom of it, we turned up another dirt road and had a a 12 K climb to lunch. Great climb kind of loose. Actually more similar to riding I do at home than the first couple of days. So that was interesting. Got up to a church where Salvador Dolly was married, had some lunch, then we dropped down the kind of backside of that climb. But before we got to the bottom in Jer, we took another hard right and got into a trail system right above. Rode some steep descents through and down back into town. Those steep descents were very much like mount ta. You know, maybe 12, 15% grade going down and loose. A lot of fun. I discovered by the time I got back to town that I managed to cut the sidewall of my. But fortunately the sealant held and it was all good for me to roll back into town. We dropped a few people off and ended up going on an extended loop, a pretty vicious climb on the extended loop they call extended loops for the avid riders. My legs were screaming at me, but it was a, it was a lot of fun. We were kind of just, again, in that same area going up into the ELs Angels climb area. Steep dirt climbs pretty loose. We grinded that climb for a while, but the descent was a hell of a lot of fun. Pretty gentle loose rock, but pretty easy to handle at speed. Fun. Coming back into the town the way that route did was a lot of fun. It really felt like you were kind of entering a village, not downtown gerona like we've done in some other, the the entrances back into town. Anyway, another great day out there for day four. Super fun, super varied. The team has done a really good job of kind of making each day feel different and like many areas around the world, kind of directionally where you head outta town, the, the dirt and the gravel. Has just a different feel to it. So it's been fun to explore. We've got one more day on the official tour, and then I've got an extra day here. So we're gonna do a sixth day of riding where I think we'll head back out to the Mediterranean Ocean. Cuz how, how cool is that? Day 5 [00:12:17] Craig Dalton: All right. Day five of the Jarana. The gravel tour with truck travel, bit of a shorter day, as most of the clients were leaving today, it's the end of the official tour. So our guides took us on a really fun kind of single tracky tour through a different part of the surrounding area that we hadn't visited before. Lots of fun. Just kind of a great community day where we got to interact with the other riders a bit, and the writing wasn't too challenging nor too long as the ideal schedule had you back by noon and getting checked out of the hotel. Fortunately, we don't have to leave today. So we decided at least a few of us who were staying on a couple extra days to go out and climb the LA angels. Road climb again. We had such a good time. The day before on that climb, we thought it'd be fun to go back up. And we had some energy in our legs and a little bit of time in the afternoon to go tackle that. So we said goodbye to the other members of our tour group and our guides and headed off on a road loop. It was great. We talked about the climb a bit the other day. Just a fun group. Growed climb we saw a bunch of pros climbing up at which was always fun got to the top crews back down and put another day behind us in the books Day 6 and 7 [00:13:31] Craig Dalton: All right. Well, the official tour from track is over at day five. We had a couple extra days on our hands over in Gerona and you better believe we wanted to go out there and ride Mickey. One of our guides that you'll hear from later in this broadcast was nice enough to share. Another route. Out to the coast for us. So we really enjoyed that ride out to the coast, just super satisfying to kind of hit the Mediterranean. I shouldn't come back. Over to Gerona, but he had us go over some great trails on the way out and then a really, really fun road climb. Just gradual great fun descent down into the Mediterranean. You got to the top and you could see the ocean just super satisfying. We sat around in a cafe for gosh. Probably an hour and a half, just drinking some teas and coffees and having some snacks. We were having a great time, but we realized we needed to head back to Gerona. And Mickey's rude had us go through some similar type of terrain that we were on in our coastal roots, a few days back, those nice long flat undulating gravel trails that seemed to be pervasive in this area. So we're super appreciative of Mickey. Sharing one of his favorite routes that he loves to do with his friends, with us. So we could get another big day. You know, on the bike. I'll move on to day seven. As I'm recording this after the fact day seven, we didn't have a bunch of time left. So we decided we were going to basically revisit the route from day one, some of that nice single track and double track along by the river, it was actually fun without the group with just two of us remaining on the bikes, the kind of rip the single track a little bit harder. We were comfortable with the bikes. We'd been on them for seven days at that point. So really fun to just kind of rip the single track and nail it a little bit harder. Knowing that we could go as hard as we wanted because we had an overnight in Barcelona and then we were going to be on a plane saying a sad goodbye to Gerona. Overall. It was a fantastic trip. Jarana is a very special community. There's a reason why so many cyclists flock there it's clear whether you're a gravel cyclist road cyclist, or even mountain biker that there's ample terrain every direction outside of Jarana. And then the town itself is just really special, special. Between the old world, the old town roads and the city. City walls, the church walls. It was just a really great experience. Our guides from track were phenomenal and I wanted to introduce you to them. So I've recorded some tracks. That'll play immediately after this commentary. So you can get to know Mickey and Rafa, who were our guides throughout the week for track travel. I also was able to capture a little bit of audio from a few different sources. We talked a little bit about Roca Corp, but cycling. Both the 17th century Villa that's being converted into a cycling Airbnb, as well as there's Roca, Corbus cycling clothing, which was founded by a gentleman by the name of a test who's happening to be opening his store this month in Jarana. So it was able to get him on the mic. I had Andrew from the Airbnb. Cycling house. And then also Oscar from Castelli Castelli just opened up a flagship community store in Gerona that week we were there as well. We witnessed a number of group rides going out from the facility. So it was great to hear what Castelli's perspective was for opening that facility. And I was surprised to learn it had. Had little to do with selling. Jerseys and clothing and bib shorts, as you would imagine, and everything to do with promoting the cycling community and creating yet another hub. In Jarana for cyclists. Which brings us back to why you should all go to Jarana. As i just mentioned it's a great place to go and i highly recommend it and i hope you enjoyed this overview of my experience there. With that said let's jump right into those conversations Rapha - Trek Travel Guide [00:17:33] Craig Dalton: Okay, can I get your name and what you do with Trek? [00:17:36] Rapha: My name is Rafael and I'm a second [00:17:38] Craig Dalton: guide for Trek Travel. And [00:17:40] Rapha: where are you from? Well that's a good question cuz originally from the Philippines grew up for most of my life, 20 years in London and now anywhere in Europe. So I'm a resident of France, but I gotta find a place to live , so. [00:17:54] Craig Dalton: And how long have you been guiding for truck [00:17:56] Rapha: travel? This will be my fifth year now, guiding for truck. [00:17:59] Craig Dalton: And what does that look like? Are you always based here in Jer or are you all over the place? We, we [00:18:03] Rapha: sort of congregate here in the beginning of the year and then come back at the end of the year, but in between, we're all over [00:18:09] Craig Dalton: Europe. And are you leading, I know Trek Travel has got many, many road tours. Probably a lesser degree of gravel tours. Are you leading trips on the road and gravel [00:18:21] Rapha: for now? Yeah, and we're, we're starting off gravel next year and so it's a mainly road for the beginning. Next year we're gonna bring in unpaved which is gonna be a whole gravel series. So we have a whole unit of bikes just traveling throughout Europe, and it's gonna be exciting for next year. Yeah, [00:18:37] Craig Dalton: it's exciting. I heard, I heard from the, the extended team that you're gonna really build out the gravel experiences for next year, which is great. I think if my experience in Jerome with the gravel tour is any indication there's gonna be a lot of magical trips across Europe, helping riders discover gravel all over the. [00:18:56] Rapha: Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I do a lot of the road tours and I'll see just a patch of undiscovered area and I'm thinking, Hey, where does that go? Or I'll be traveling along the hills and in between you're gonna see these gravel patches of fires and you just want to go and explore. And essentially that's what the guides that went into design these trips or, or want to do, they want to do that. They want to find out those roads. Where does it lead to? Can I connect these dots and see the town and where am I gonna. [00:19:25] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think it's one of the things I've talked about on the podcast a lot, just the power of local knowledge as we're following the GPX files or following you guys' guides through Jer here. You know, there's a lot of nuance, a lot of little trails that you can pop onto that would be easy to miss if you just sort of saw a heat map of the area. You might just choose the carriage way instead of the the nice trails. So it's really cool and important. I. To have guides that are local to kind of pick apart the best of the best for us to ride on. [00:19:57] Rapha: Yeah, I mean this is what we do. We, this is what we do for fun. So on our time off whilst we do a lot of road riding for work on our time off, we want to go out there and ride gravel. And so this is why we get to know the places. We live around here and in the places that we research gravel all we're doing is just riding and riding and riding and then through. Time, just knowledge. You build up tracks in your head and you wanna put that onto design and then maybe create a trip around it. Find a hotel, find a restaurant, the best restaurants, best hotels to stay and yeah, it's awesome. [00:20:30] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I feel that way. Whenever anybody comes to Marin County, I just wanna show them the best of the best and not the most obvious trails, but the, the ones only the locals know. Yeah. [00:20:41] Rapha: You, you wanna share it? I mean, it's, its more fun riding a gravel. It's more fun with people, friends and random people that you meet up on [00:20:48] Craig Dalton: trails as well. Yeah. When we were, when we first arrived during the week and you were giving an overview, you were talking about kind of the progression of roots that we'd be doing during the week. I thought it was very interesting, like the thoughtfulness in, in how you guys conceived of the roots and the, the relative challenges, whether they be distance or technic. Can you talk about, you know, if someone's come coming into one of the spring trips for the Trek Travel Corona gravel tour, what would how would you describe it? [00:21:16] Rapha: Well, so, well, there was no brief in the beginning, so actually when we rode this, For the research we rode 500 kilometers in five days and it looked like a picture of a lung with all the trees of just dead ends. But once we put it all together, we decided to, okay. Day one is a bit of an introduction. Let's get you used to the surfaces, the mixed surfaces, but we're gonna keep it flat. And on the second day we're gonna add on a little bit of distance just to make sure you have endurance for grab, because it's a lot of work. You know, you're doing a lot of cadence. Mind work as well, trying to figure out what's coming up. And then day three we add technicality. Now we're having multi services, soft sand, big rocks, technical climbs, and technical descents, which, you know, your wheels dig in, you gotta react to it. And then we put all of that together for the fourth day where you. Pick up all the skills you've had and we put it all in a fourth day for you to enjoy. Yeah. Right [00:22:11] Craig Dalton: on. And can you talk about the bikes that people are offered for this [00:22:15] Rapha: trip? Okay. For this trip, we are currently running Damani 2019 s SL seven. So it has gravel wheels on it for 35 millimeter. And it's just fun. That's what it is. So it's, it's not an all out gravel. It tests your limits on this ride and you get electronic shifting. So when you really need that gear on those technical climbs, you're gonna get it. Of course you're gonna prepare for it, but you're gonna get, get the gears. Yeah. When [00:22:39] Craig Dalton: I first saw that, that was the bike spec, I mean, it almost immediately had me thinking of more the trails that we took out to the coast when the carriageway, the, the, you know, the reclaimed rail line. Right. But at the end of the day, like now, four days into this, You're pushing the limits of these bikes and it's been a hell of a lot of fun. I mean, it, I really do think it's one of, it is kind of a perfect bike for this situation because it did everything you needed to do if you were ever on the road, it felt snappy and lively and it could withstand some of the abuse we were putting it through today. [00:23:11] Rapha: Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, these, these can do rock gardens and slick rock on, on good terrain. Good. These bikes are perfect around your owner. Of course, you know, you can always go wider. You can get flat bars and you go, world is your oyster. When it comes to gravel. I mean, you ask anybody what is gravel to you and they'll give you a million answers depending on who you're talking to. So every, everyone's got their preferences, and next year, you know, who knows? We have Wider checkpoints next year and it's it's gonna cater up to 50 mil tires and it's gonna be amazing. So we have sneak preview, we have a few in the warehouse at the moment in, and we can't wait for next [00:23:48] Craig Dalton: year at a checkpoint. Yeah, I think it, I mean, the checkpoint's obviously like gonna be a little bit more versatile and you can imagine the opportunity if you have a rider on day one that's seeming a little nervous. Maybe you spec it with a 40 to begin with and maybe you swap out the wheels and maybe you put him or her on 50 millimeters just to give them additional comfort. And who knows, maybe it's even for day four, we put you on 50 millimeters cuz we know it's gonna be kind of more challenging, technically speaking. [00:24:17] Rapha: Yeah, I mean, absolutely. We're gonna, as guides, you know, we're gonna test write these. We have a few in now and we're gonna have fun and check it out. So to checkpoint with all this capabil. It's gonna be more forgiving and hopefully you'll get more people coming in and not be so scared about gravel and check it out and try, try something different from [00:24:37] Craig Dalton: road riding. Yeah, for sure. As someone who didn't grow up in gerona, what have been some of your favorite things that you've discovered in town? [00:24:43] Rapha: Oh, you know what? Last night was probably one of the best nights ever because it was random. Mickey invited me down to the cast Telluride, and we did a Night Gravel, which is absolutely epic. Like, it's add just a different layer of difficulty, not seeing too far around and the group dynamic and you know, getting to know people and. Absolute blast. [00:25:04] Craig Dalton: Yeah, we were more than a little jealous that we didn't have lights with us and our legs were probably cooked enough that we shouldn't go for another eye, but we probably would've been excited to do so. Craig, maybe next time we're gonna invite you around. Exactly. Outside of Jer, since you've done Trek travel trips in a bunch of different places, what would be like one other trip that you'd recommend? Gravel or road? Either way. Oh, that's, [00:25:26] Rapha: it's like choosing between your children really. Like I adore all the trips and, but for me, this. The classic climb of the Alps. It's so stunning. It's beautiful and it's challenging. That's one of my favorite trips. And what, [00:25:39] Craig Dalton: what classic climbs, if you can recall, some of 'em are on that [00:25:43] Rapha: trip. Yeah. Yeah. So I mean, we start in a place LA Luce and the first ride you're doing quarter cord Qure. Okay. And, sorry, my mistake. Yeah. Qure. And it's a, it's a first. Already you're getting like 1500 meters of elevation in a 55 kilometer ride. So it's just day one and you're already getting straight up, okay, we're here to climb and we're gonna go all out the whole week. Nice. Of course, we, we do the epic outdoors at the end trip, sort of the icing of the cake and so that's the last climb of the, [00:26:20] Craig Dalton: of the trip. Yeah. It's certainly nice for anybody who's been watching the tour to come over and knock off any one of those climbs that are bucket list. [00:26:27] Rapha: Yeah, it is, it is a backless trip. I was fortunate, fortunate enough to climb outdoors on the TDF day in 2022, and the atmosphere there is unbelievable. Just the, the crowd cheering you on it, it just gives you an extra beat and you are just hammering up the hill just because of the people cheering you on. It's absolutely epic. And then of course you get more quieter climbs. So Wears is a great climb, but like Holyland. It's not celebrated enough for just Serenity, and it's, it's still challenging. It's 21 kilometers and but it's a good, it's a good time. Yeah. It's underrated my opinion. Amazing. My favorite call. [00:27:05] Craig Dalton: Awesome. I love your passion for it, . Thank you. Cool. And I, again, I wanted to thank you for all your help this week. It's been great getting to know you and riding with you. If it's, if it's unclear in anything we've said before, Each day we've had one of these guys riding with us and so one person's in the van and we've got one person on a bike with us. So we've had good camaraderie and lots of miles to get to know one another. So thanks again for everything [00:27:28] Rapha: this week. Thank you to, to you guys. Cause without you we wouldn't be here. And it's an absolute pleasure to be guiding you around here and it's so fun just doing own gravel. Cheers. Thank you. Miqui [00:27:38] Craig Dalton: All right, sir, can I get your name and what you do for truck travel? [00:27:42] Miqui: Yeah, so my name is Mickey Mic Reta, and I'm one of the guides of the truck travel ju gravel. [00:27:50] Craig Dalton: And not only are you one of the guides, you're a local here [00:27:52] Miqui: in Gerran. Yeah, I'm local. I'm born and raised in Gerran and I'm very happy to have you guys here in Gerona. Let's, let's [00:28:01] Craig Dalton: actually start with that. You've been in Gerona your whole life as you just. What's it been like growing up here? How has the town changed and as cycling has become more of a hub, how has it been infused into Gerona culture? [00:28:14] Miqui: So I would say cycling has always been a part of Ger. I remember as a kid going to a bunch of mountain bike races with my brother, probably. I did my mountain bike race, my first one when I was like six years old. And then, After that, it's just, it's been growing like crazy and I remember probably about eight years ago as one, it just went insane. Like all the pros started moving here and somehow it created a community that is just like a magnet for all the cyclists anywhere in the world up until the point that now I would say Juran is the cycling capital of the. [00:28:55] Craig Dalton: What is it about the roads and trails around here that you think attracted them people to gerona? Obviously, you've given us a great sample these five days of what the gravel has been like, and it's been spectacular. We've touched on some of these roads. I'd just like to hear in your words, why do you think everybody's coming here? [00:29:14] Miqui: So I would say Jona has everything you are looking for in. Or anything related to cycling? The weather is good all year round. It's true we have a rainy season, which lasts for a couple weeks or a month. We have a very few weeks in summer, which is very hot in very few weeks in winter, which is very cold. But the rest of the year is incredible. It has an. Endless options of road riding. If you wanna ride to the peer, you can, it's a long ride, but you can actually do it if you wanna ride from ju to the coast and do a nice short loop, short-ish you can do it if, yeah, I would say in ju you could be riding for almost a month and you would never repeat a single ride. [00:29:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I believe it. I mean, just from sampling it for this week. Yeah, for sure. And I mean, I think it's great that you've. Flat options. You've got hilly options. I think today we were up on kind of the local climb you would probably do after [00:30:12] Miqui: work. Yeah. You guys were up on Los Angeleses, which. I feel like it's just incredible to have a climb like that starting at three kilometers from the center of Una and yeah, it's, it's a long climb. It's about 10 kilometers and on top you get views of the purines. You get views of the ocean, well, the sea. Yeah. I feel like we are very lucky [00:30:33] Craig Dalton: in here. Yeah. Yeah. I feel like it's like probably one of those climbs that every local athlete knows their exact time to the top. Yeah. [00:30:41] Miqui: I would say that. People's fitness, you always ask, what's their time of Los Angeles ? [00:30:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That'll tell you if you're a compatible rider with them. So let's talk about the, the Trek Jer Gravel tour. I think you had a hand in a lot of the mapping, being a local and figuring out all the roots. How did you go about kind of, I always say whether it's an event organizer or a tour, it's almost like a love letter to your community and your trails, right? You're. You've got guests coming in from out of the country or out of the area and you wanna show them the best of the best. How did you go about thinking about the, the trails and roads we were [00:31:17] Miqui: on? The thing about this trip is that I had, I had to think that I couldn't make it super intense cuz sometimes we are taking guests at not super experienced on, on gravel riding or they just come from the. So I couldn't make a trip very technical, but as you guys saw, we have a few avid options after the look we do every day, which are a little more technical. But yeah, I feel like I, I was really happy when they actually said, Hey Mickey, do you want to give us a hand with this trip? Because, It's Una, I'm, I'm, that's where I started riding and I love grow riding, so actually my favorite ride of the trip is the one where we go to the coast. So we start in Una. It's super flat. We actually did on an incredible day. It was super sunny and we stop at the at the sea and yeah, we have lunch by the sea. Then after you guys went for a little swim and then we brought back to Una, we tried to stop at the brewer, which was unfortunately close that day. But yeah, I just think it's, I was very happy when Trek Travel said, Hey, do you wanna give us a [00:32:23] Craig Dalton: hand on this? Yeah. It's interesting. I think it's, it's sort of, you know, I imagine Trek travel draws a lot of road athletes Yeah. Onto their trips. So I think it is very approachable, but definitely had moments where you needed some skill. Not, you know, I think for more experienced gravel riders, riders, there was, there was no fear. It was just fun and exhilaration. But for a couple of the newer rider, When they were going down the looser descents, they were probably a little bit scared but exhilarated when they got to the bottom. Yeah. [00:32:54] Miqui: I don't think it's, it's nothing crazy. We haven't put anything on this trip, which would be like dangerous or scary for like total beginners. We've had intellectual, we, we classify rider in four levels, four being the, the most expert. And we've had people on this trip, they're like level twos and they've. They've loved the descents, they love the writing. Yeah. I think it's, it's got a great balance of hardcore and not hardcore, so. Yeah. [00:33:23] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's super interesting. I mean, we, we sort of weave through the farmlands and into little villages, and it's been a real pleasure to kind of pop out of some woods and go through some, you know, 17th century sanctuary buildings and then back out onto some trails. It's, it's super fun. So, [00:33:39] Miqui: and that's the thing about Juran, right? So everyone, Toronto is for road cycling, but as a local, I'm a hundred percent sure that there is actually a lot more gravel riding than there is road riding in Toronto. Yeah, I [00:33:56] Craig Dalton: believe you. I mean, I think within four kilometers of town every day we've been on the dirt. Yeah. [00:34:01] Miqui: The extension of like farm roads and Yeah, just unpaved roads. I mean, I'm not talking about single track, I'm just talking. Real, what I like to call the real gravel, which is smooth and fast. [00:34:15] Craig Dalton: Yeah. You were telling me about that railroad line that used to go from the Yeah. The sea to the purities, and now it's all a gravel road. Yeah, [00:34:23] Miqui: so I would say it's about 50 years ago when they removed the, the train line, the, well, the railway, which there was a train that went from sun follow g. Which is one of the towns on the coast. And then it run all the way up to Ola and now yeah, they just remove the whole railway and they lay gravel on it and it's just an incredible, it's, it's actually a bike path, so on the weekend it's gonna be full of kids on bikes and yeah, the extension to the Villa Verde, which that it's included on the Villa Verde, is just incredible. How [00:35:02] Craig Dalton: many kilometers do you think that that trail. It's over a hundred kilometers. That's amazing. I mean, to be able to cruise, I mean, and relatively flat presumably, until it gets to the purity side. Yeah. It's [00:35:14] Miqui: totally flat. But since a train used to Yeah. Be on it, so they made sure it was super flat [00:35:20] Craig Dalton: for it. Yeah. Miles and miles and miles. Going back to the community in Ger, what are some of your favorite kind of, if a cyclist is coming to town, what are some of the go-to businesses they should [00:35:30] Miqui: visit? So if a cyclist comes in, ger, I would say most people, they would come here for about at least a week. So you're gonna have time to visit all of them, which they are all a hundred percent worth visiting. But there is a couple of places. You should a hundred percent go see if you're here for a short period of time. One of them being a coffee shop called La Fabrica, which it's only open in the mornings and lunch, so it's, it's the perfect place to brunch. Yeah. [00:36:05] Craig Dalton: Quick aside, I literally ran into someone I know, know from the United States today, and they told us to go have brunch at [00:36:13] Miqui: Left Africa Till Africa is owned by Christian Mayer and Amber Mayer. He was, well, he's a, he's a former, Yeah, they were the pioneers in Una, so they were the first ones to open a coffee shop, only focused for cyclist, of course, for everyone. And now it has become like a super great, like it's, it's a tourist attraction right now, but that's what kind of triggered the whole cycling movement in Joran. Okay. [00:36:41] Craig Dalton: So La Africa, and what's the [00:36:42] Miqui: second one? La Africa. They also have another coffee shop, which is only for. Which LA Fabric is more like brunch and food. The other coffee shop is called Espresso Mafia, which is one meal walking from La Fabrica, and that's basically where Christian roast the coffee and then you can drink it at Espresso Mafia. And then another place you should go visit in general, well, mid January. Trek and track travel. It's opening the first track store in the world, which is gonna have truck travel inside of it. And with a rental fleet, we are going to be the biggest, as in space, we're gonna have the biggest bike shop in ju, which it's pretty exciting. [00:37:29] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that's really exciting. And then finally, what's one sort of cultural place within Jerron that a tourist should visit? [00:37:36] Miqui: The whole old town itself. If you go to Juna, I highly recommend getting a walking tour of the Old Town because you're really gonna see what our culture is here and how it was in the past. And everything around the old town is just, it's just incredible. [00:37:55] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That's fun. You recommended we go up onto the wall for sunset. Yeah. And we've, we missed it the first night. The second night we, we made it up. We may have had to like randomly climb over a fence to make it there in time because we couldn't find the way up. But we got there and it was spectacular with view. Is that the purities that you're looking at out there? Yeah. You [00:38:14] Miqui: get to see Purees, you get to see a bunch of things and yeah, there is a restaurant called Aro. Which is in one of the steps. Well, there's like, Juna has 200 million cathedrals, but in one of them. On the stairs there is a restaurant called , which they actually film Game of Thrones there. And the terrace of the restaurant, it's actually on a little like flat section it has on those stairs. And I think it's a really cool location. [00:38:45] Craig Dalton: That's super. Cool. Well, thank you so much for coming on. Thank you so much for all the hospitality this week. It's been great to getting to know you and the local terrain [00:38:55] Miqui: here. Yeah. Thank you guys for coming. Girona Cycling Friends [00:38:57] Andrew - RocaCorba: All right. Can I let me get your name and let me know where we're at. What's this beautiful place? So my name is Edward Green. I'm the guest, the general manager slash I don't know what, at Rocka Culpa cycling. So we are a cycling tourism business just outside of Jer Corona in a town called Bans. We are based on a 17th century Catalan estate, or Maia as it is in Catalan. And we are basically trying to be a boutique hotel with some villas attached, which is exclusively for cyclists, road, gravel, mountain. Whatever you enjoy on two wheels is, is what we wanna do. And how far away from Ger are we? So we are currently 18 kilometers from Gerona, or 10 or 11 miles depending. Country. And about a 30 to 45 minute ride depending on, on how you get to us. Can you describe where we are in, in the villa right now? So we're downstairs basically in what used to be the old like area for the animals. So we've got some troughs around us, but we've done huge renovations to basically create our cycling dungeon down here. So we've got beautiful old vaulted Catalan ceiling. Rustic concrete floors, beautiful stone work, and then cycling history all around us with some beautiful frames. Cycling jerseys. Good coffee from the rocket espresso machine. Everything you can need for a good cycling stay. And what time of year is best to come here? Pretty much all, all year. To be honest. I don't think there's necessarily a bad month anymore, like December and Januarys tends to be quite quiet, but we see strong gravel riding in October, November, and the rest of the year is a lot of road riding. Summer is quite warm, so unless you like waking up early, probably avoid summer a little bit. But like June and September, October, probably buffer the. I'll note when you said strong gravel riding, you looked right at exactly a hundred percent. You are the epitome of what we see in November. . Tell us a little bit about the rest of the. So we are on 37 hectares and it's basically an old, what was an old family estate of the Campier family. The estate dates back to the 17th century, so 1673, and it was with the same family until 2018 when we took it over to create. What we want to create is basically cycling paradise all you need in one place. Out in the countryside, but close to Gerrin. And how many rooms do you have available here? So currently we're at eight rooms, but we'll be at 13 by April next year. So we're currently in the process literally starting today, which is very exciting of putting in five beautiful unsweet rooms in this main can poly manor house, partially they'll have views over down towards the lake onto some vineyards, but also into the courtyard and just generally over the rolling hills of, of Jerome. And tell us a little bit about the village. So just on our doorstep, we have the town of Olas which has a beautiful lake in it. It's where they had the rowing for the 92 Barcelona Olympic. It's a great place for like active people, for families, et cetera. But there's a lot of rowing. A lot of of the British university teams come out and train here. A lot of the national teams come and train as well, but generally just a fantastic place to be. Good quality of life and just down to earth and authentic. Amazing. And how do people find out about staying here? So if you have a look on Rocka coba cycling.cc, you'll find us and you can kind of do anything from there. Or if you are enjoy climbing, just Google Rocka Coba, you'll find the climb, and then you'll find us and the clothing. Amazing. Thank you. Perfect. That was great. [00:42:14] Oscar - Castilli: Okay. Can I get your name? Hi, my name is Oscar. And Oscar. Where are we standing today? Well, today we are in the, the first flag shipper store in the, in the war from Costelli here in Una. And what's the plan for the store? What are you trying to do with the community here? Well, una, you know, is the Jamaica for for European cyclists, I think all over the world. So, right now Castelli store, it's coming to. The big cycling club in Giona and well, why not in Spain? Nice. And we, we rolled by here last night and there was a big group ride going out on the gravel. Yeah. We have almost 40 people doing the full moon ride. It was amazing. So always we keep a surprise for all the riders. We stop in a food truck in the middle of the forest with fire. Some dinner and and beer. So it was super fun. That's amazing. And if someone's coming to Jerone to, to visit, do you have a calendar of events that they can look at? Yeah, they can, they can follow us on our Instagram and yeah, you can check. So, but every week we have a ride, so, and 2023, especially now it's coming a low season for the weather, but from February. So it's coming. A lot of events. Yeah. Amazing. Thanks Oscar, and congratulations on opening the new Castelli store. Yeah, big pleasure. Thanks for coming. [00:43:30] Mattias - Rococorba Clothing: All right. Right. Can you tell me your name and your shop? Mattias from Roco, COBA Clothing, Giron Mattias. Tell us a little bit about the brand. Yeah, it's a brand. It started in 2017 in the top of the mountain of Roco Coba. It's a very famous climb here in Giron, and I decided to, to put a food truck up there and to start at the same time closing brand called Roca corba. And yes, five years. Later. I just opened a new shop in GI selling all my stuff, selling online, gold wide, and really happy too. Have, what are some of the products that you sell? I sell Jersey t-shirts, shorts accessories, bags, Macs, beat ons. A lot of things sucks. Yeah. Amazing. These jerseys I see on the wall are beautiful, very colorful, very expressive. What inspires you and the, the designs? Yeah. Yeah. Right now I have like more or less 50, 60 different designs and I inspir it from everywhere. My slogan is cycling apparel inspired by the rob because we have so many different landscapes or different places and always I, I have inspired inspiration in the. In our region. Yeah. And when is the shop opening up? I hope next Thursday it will be open. Now it's ready and I have to do some things, little things, but next Thursday, big opening here in J in the center. Amazing. I'm excited. We got a preview. We are able to pick up some of your lovely clothing. You said you, you're available worldwide. Where can people find you on the. Yeah, we can find in ro.com. We have online shop with all the products and we we ship worldwide. Amazing. Thank you. Thank you. Pleasure, . [00:45:22] Craig Dalton: So that's going to do it for this first international version of the gravel ride podcast. I've been talking and dreaming about international gravel travel for some time. So I was super excited to have this opportunity with track travel. To explore Durona with their Gravel cycling tour. It was amazing trip. As I said before, I highly encourage you to check it out. As Raffa mentioned. They're unveiling a whole new series of gravel adventures for 2023. So they're really leaning into this gravel travel concept. What I loved about it was that unlike a gravel event where you might be focused on. Simply one ride when you visit somewhere amazing. Here. We were able to focus on riding every single day and there was no one ride that we needed to save ourselves for to get across the finish line. It was really about. Exploring as much as our legs could handle. I wasn't as fit as I had normally been when I've gone over to Europe in the, in the past, but it was still an amazing trip, still an amazing experience that I highly, highly recommend. If you're interested in connecting and learning more about the trip, please visit truck travel.com. If you're interested in pinging me, please visit the ridership's that's www.theridership.com. If you're able to support the show, please visit buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride or ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 11-28-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 24:50


- Ridgway housing project hunkers down for the winter - Telluride honors World AIDS Day - Coffee, Croissants, and Cribbage

KOTO Community Radio News
Noticias 11-28-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 7:18


- Mountain village se mueve con un plan para nuevas viviendas - Telluride acaba con el plástico de un solo uso - El bazar de los artistas locales

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #108: Vail Mountain Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Beth Howard

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 75:56


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Nov. 28. It dropped for free subscribers on Dec. 1. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoBeth Howard, Vice President and General Manager of Vail Mountain, ColoradoRecorded onNovember 14, 2022About Vail MountainClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: Vail ResortsPass affiliations: Epic PassLocated in: Vail, ColoradoClosest neighboring ski areas: Beaver Creek (20 minutes), Copper Mountain (23 minutes), Ski Cooper (42 minutes), Keystone (42 minutes), Loveland (43 minutes), Arapahoe Basin (47 minutes), Breckenridge (50 minutes) - travel times may vary considerably in winter and heavy traffic.Base elevation: 8,120 feetSummit elevation: 11,570 feetVertical drop: 3,450 feetSkiable Acres: 5,317* Front Side: 1,655 Acres* Back Bowls: 3,017 Acres* Blue Sky Basin: 645 AcresAverage annual snowfall: 354 inchesTrail count: 276 (53% advanced/expert, 29% intermediate, 18% beginner)Lift count: 32­­ (one 12-passenger gondola, one 10-passenger gondola, 4 six-packs, 14 high-speed quads, 1 fixed-grip quad, 2 triples, 1 T-bar, 3 platters, 5 carpets)Why I interviewed herI articulated this as well as I could a couple months ago, in an article about Vail Resorts' decision to limit lift ticket sales for the coming ski season:It was a notion quaint and earnest. Simplistic but no less authentic. To start with Vail would have seemed presumptuous. This American place most synonymous with skiing. Three-sided and endless, galloping back into valleys, super-fast lifts shooting in all directions. I wanted to be ready. To feel as though I'd earned it.My first trip West was in 1995. But I did not ski Vail until 2004. In our megapass-driven, social-media-fueled moshpit of a present, I doubt anyone thinks this way anymore. Vail is a social-media trophy – go seize it. But I proceeded slowly to the big time. Primed on Midwest bumps, anything would have seemed enormous. First, the rounds of Summit County. Then Winter Park. As though skiing were a videogame and I could not pass to the higher levels until I'd completed those that came before.  And then there it was. That first time standing over Sun Down Bowl, the single groomed path winding toward High Noon below. Eleven thousand feet over Colorado. Sliding down the ridges. Powder everywhere. Back to Blue Sky. Laps all day through unmarked glades. Refills from the sky even though it was April. Three thousand feet of up and down. The enormous complexity of it all. The energy. That impossible blend of wild and approachable.Vail Mountain and – on that same trip – Beaver Creek, were exactly what I needed them to be: the aspirational summit of America's lift-served skiing food chain. The best mountains I'd ever skied. I won't say it was The Experience of a Lifetime. But it was the best five days of skiing that I had, up to that point, ever done.I'm not sure what else I can add to that. Vail Mountain sits at the summit of American lift-served skiing. Yes I know, Backflip Bro: the terrain is not as Rad-Gnar as Snowbird or Jackson Hole or Taos or Palisades Tahoe or Big Sky. It does not get as much snow as Alta or Baker or Wolf Creek or Kirkwood. It does not minimize and mitigate crowds like Telluride or Aspen or Sun Valley.But Vail Mountain stands out even on that hall-of-fame lineup. Five thousand-plus acres of approachable terrain seated directly off the interstate. The Big Endless: 18 high-speed chairlifts, the Back Bowls™, a bit of rowdy and wild back in Blue Sky, a frenetic base village. If any mountain in Vail Resorts' sprawling, intercontinental empire is almost guaranteed to deliver The Experience of a Lifetime™, it's the namesake OG of them all: Vail Mountain. Even after all the growth and change and the Epic Pass atom bomb, Vail Mountain remains one of the greatest ski areas in North America.It's also a personal favorite of mine, and one that I've been eager to feature on the podcast since I expanded The Storm's focus from the Northeast to the entire country last year.What we talked aboutOpening weekend at Vail Mountain; staying open until May in 2022 and whether the ski area could do it again; marking Vail's 60th anniversary; Vail's founders; building the mountain and the town from raw wilderness; Vail in the ‘80s; Afton Alps; transitioning from food-and-bev to resort leadership; a Colorado-Tahoe comparison; what it means for Vail Mountain to share the Vail Resorts masthead with Whistler; going deep on the Game Creek Express upgrade and the new Sun Down Express lift; how Vail decides between a four- or six-place lift, and why Game Creek got the promotion to sixer; the future of fixed-grip lifts on Vail Mountain; why it was finally time to build the long-proposed Sun Down lift, and how that will change the ski experience and flow around the mountain; how this happened at High Noon Express (in February 2020), and how unusual it was:How Sun Down may help prevent a repeat; why Vail built Sun Down before the proposed Mongolia Express outlined in the resort's master plan (see below); thinking through the future of the Eagle Bahn gondola; a potential future portal at West Lionshead and the sorts of lifts we could see there; how Pride Express could evolve up and down the mountain; how the Cascade Village lift could better serve day skiers; the potential for terrain expansion in Blue Sky Basin; the growth and future of snowmaking on Vail Mountain; housing drama with the town at East Vail; why Vail rejected the town's $12 million offer for the land; how Vail's housing market has devolved to crisis levels over the decades; what other towns are doing to fix housing and whether any of that could work at Vail; the evolution of two housing markets – one for locals and one at market rate; the potential for Ever Vail; reaction to $275 walk-up lift tickets; and the factors that will go into setting lift ticket limits each day this season.   Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewI've already written extensively about the valiant and courageous VAIL SHEEP DEFENDERS, an elite squadron whose mission is to ensure that local bighorns only have to poop next to rich people. In May, this group of nincompoops – the Vail Town Council – voted to condemn land where Vail Resorts planned to build 165 beds of worker housing on six acres of a 23-acre parcel (the remainder was to be set aside for bighorn habitat). Vail, which had already spent years permitting the project with the previous council, pushed back, and now the whole disaster has been swallowed by the courts, where it will likely remain for years.Meanwhile, the VAIL SHEEP DEFENDERS somehow missed the groundbreaking on, among other properties, a nearly $8 million, 5,700-square-foot mansion rising on that same bighorn habitat. This image – provided by Vail Resorts – distills the absurdity of the whole thing pretty well:In September, I chatted about this with Colorado Sun reporter Jason Blevins, who has lived in Eagle County for decades. He had a much more nuanced view:“Both sides have completely valid arguments here. Vail Resorts needs housing. They have the property, they went through three years of planning with the previous council to win all the approvals to develop this thing. They created a bighorn sheep management plan … Election came, new council came in, and that new council is more inclined to protect that herd than accommodate with housing. They've offered the company different spots in the valley where they could build. But the process has progressed, and it's along, and Vail is ready to pretty much break ground right now …“Yes, this is about bighorn. That council 100 percent supports the bighorn herd, and in their heart of hearts they are working to protect the bighorn. … And those bighorn have been there longer than us, and this is their winter habitat. They unquestionably come down in the winter … along the highway there.”The whole situation, Blevins told me, is reminiscent of the Telluride Valley Floor drama in the late ‘90s, in which the town and a developer took a land dispute all the way to the Colorado Supreme Court (read the court's full decision here). The town ended up paying $50 million to acquire the land. “Think of all the housing you could have build with $50 million in the early 2000s,” Blevins said.Unfortunately, Blevins said, “this one is lining up to follow that track. Could this fight go all the way to the Supreme Court? Could the town of Vail end up having a public fundraising campaign with rich residents giving money to support sheep habitat? Will it go that far? With the complaint filed last week, it certainly appears as though this is going to be a protracted legal battle that will end up costing the town millions and millions of dollars if they buy it from Vail Resorts. And the end result is no more new housing. So the true losers on this are the people in this town who need a place to sleep and live in that town.”  You can listen to our full exchange on this topic, including a long discussion of the elusive NIMBY, starting at 56:50:So the housing drama made the pod timely. But so did the fact that Vail is installing two new chairlifts and celebrating its 60th anniversary. So did the fact that its peak-day lift tickets just hit $275. Really though, I wasn't sitting around waiting for an excuse to talk about Vail. It's Vail. One of the greatest ski areas in America. It's always interesting, always relevant. It's one of a handful of ski areas that evokes skiing whether you ski 100 days a year or never. Aspen, Telluride, Vail. The podcast was built to score interviews like this: a big-time mountain seated at the heart of our collective lift-served skiing experience. Enjoy.Questions I wish I'd askedI would have liked to have explored the impacts of the mountain town housing crisis on employees and the environment a bit more deeply. What does it mean to have a 50- or 60-mile commute through one of America's most extreme wintertime environments? How does such a setup further exacerbate the I-70 traffic that everyone so loathes? How sustainable and safe is this whole ecosystem?Last year, Vail Resorts, Alterra, Boyne Resorts, and Powdr – America's four largest ski area operators – launched “the ski industry's first unified effort to combat climate change with shared commitments around sustainability and advocacy.” These efforts include portfolio-wide shifts to renewable energy sources, climate advocacy, and “responsible” stewardship of the environment. All admirable and necessary steps toward creating sustainable 21st century businesses.However. I would propose an additional pillar to this joint pledge: these operators must commit to working with local, state, and national governments to encourage building density, expand mass transit, and limit individual car use wherever possible within the mountains.It is not just the ski area operators that are missing this. We built modern U.S. America on the premise of unlimited land and unlimited individual, anytime mobility. But this model does not scale up very well. When Congress passed the Interstate Highway Act in 1956, the nation had 156 million residents. It now has around 338 million. Interstate 70 through the Colorado Rockies is a miracle of engineering and one of the most beautiful roads in the world. But this thoroughfare, combined with poor regional planning and a U.S. American mentality that thinks you can shape the Colorado High Country in the same fashion as suburban Atlanta, have delivered Los Angeles-caliber traffic to the otherwise pristine high alpine.This is not sustainable. It was a dumb way to build a country. Sprawl and our car-centric culture are environmental and human disasters, the invisible antagonists to all our high-minded climate goals. Ski area operators and the municipalities they operate in have an incredible opportunity to showcase a different sort of America: a transit-oriented, weather-resilient, human-centered built ecosystem in which employees walk or ride a bus (or, God help us, a gondola) to work from hubs close to or on the mountain; the great mass of skiers arrive via transport other than a personal vehicle; and a Saturday on Interstate 70 does not resemble a wartime evacuation.For those of you fearful that this means Manhattan-in-the-mountains, that's not what I'm proposing here. Nor am I suggesting a Zermatt-style ban on individual automobiles. Just a better transit and housing mix so people who don't want the expense and hassle of wintertime commuting can avoid it. We actually have a pretty good model for this: the college town. Most students live, without cars, in dorms on or close to campus. Free and frequent shuttlebuses port them around town. A dense and walkable university center gives way to successive waves of less-dense housing, for more established employees or those with families. Some commuting occurs, but it is minimal. The university is a self-contained world that absorbs as much impact as it can from the problems it creates by concentrating many humans on a small footprint.The fact that the Town of Vail cannot accommodate 165 humans on 23 acres of land is pathetic. Their willingness to invest $12 million into ensuring people cannot live on this parcel crystalizes how unserious they are, long term, about creating a more sustainable, livable Vail. Rather than fighting Vail Resorts, the town ought to be partnering with them – as the previous council did on permitting this project – to see if the company could shrink the six acres down to three or four, and bump the 165 beds up 30 or 40 percent, with select units reserved for employees who agree to live car-free and use a shuttle system instead. The town's current, combative posture is only going to push the employees that could have lived in East Vail farther out into the mountains and into daily, likely solo commutes in a car, all of which will further degrade the mountain environment the town claims to treasure. This project could have been a model for cooperation and imaginative development. Instead, it's turned into a spectacle, a disappointment, the most predictable and U.S. American thing imaginable.   What I got wrongI pronounced Vail Mountain founder Pete Siebert's name as “See-bert,” rather than “Cy-ber.” We also discussed Vail Mountain's remaining fixed-grip lifts, putting that total at just one. However, the ski area still has three fixed-grip chairlifts: the Cascade Village quad, the Gopher Hill triple rising out of Vail Village, and the Little Eagle triple at the top of Eagle's Nest.Why you should ski Vail MountainThere's a lot of pressure on Vail Resorts' flagship. While it's fairly easy to get to and navigate, Vail Mountain, for most skiers, is big, far, and exotic; a thing of myth, considered with reverence; less vacation destination than fantasy. It's work to get there, and no one wants to work without reward. Ride to your New England or Wisconsin or North Carolina local on a Saturday, and you'll cope with whatever mess they came up with. Arrive at Vail, and you expect the best skiing of your life.Vail can give you that. Yes, I know, Wasatch Bro, “Vail is great. Everyone should go there.” Sick burn, Bro. Original and hilarious. I'm not saying it's better than Utah or Tahoe or Aspen or Winter Park, but I am saying that the skiing at Vail Mountain is usually very good, often spectacular, rarely bad. It is big enough that there are always uncrowded bits somewhere. And since such a large percentage of the skiers here are tourists, and since most tourists are allergic to anything off-piste – and since only a small percentage of a 5,317-acre resort can be groomed at any one time – you can ride the ungroomed all day, most days, in relative isolation (meaning you're not speed-checking every four seconds at Fort Meyers Freddy arcs edge-to-edge turns over the fall line).I've often wondered how many skiers there are on Vail Mountain on any given Saturday. They won't tell me, but I'm guessing it's the population of a small city – 30,000 people? While the sorts of liftline nightmares profiled above do occasionally happen, they are, as Blevins (a Vail local) said in our interview, pretty rare, and pretty short-lived. The ski area moves people around really well.Everyone should ski Vail Mountain at least once. There is a sense of awe in being there. It is one of the best pure ski areas on the continent. Great terrain for (nearly) all abilities (sorry Backflip Bro, but you can hike over to East Vail). A terrific little town. Easy to get into and out of (off peak, at least). Affordable if you have enough sense to purchase an Epic Pass in advance. There are bigger and emptier and snowier ski areas out there, but Vail is going to give most skiers just about everything they want and a lot more than they need. The high expectations are earned, and, nearly always, met.Podcast NotesHoward and I talked quite a bit about elements of Vail Mountain's 2018 masterplan. Here's where new lifts could run on the frontside:And here's where they could run on the backside. You can also see potential new trails in Blue Sky Basin and Teacup Bowl:Vail is also aggressively building out snowmaking on the front of the mountain. Here's what that system could look like at full build-out:The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 127/100 in 2022, and number 373 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com.The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing year round. Join us. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Obstacle Running Adventures
308. World's Toughest Mudder with Mark Gaudet and First Woman to Hit 100 Miles Kris Rugloski!

Obstacle Running Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 85:35


This is the second of two episodes on World's Toughest Mudder. Click here for part one.  For this episode we have Mark Gaudet and Kris Rugloski! Mark won the Spartan Ultra World Championships in Telluride last year and has an extensive military background.  Both of these add up to a pretty strong contender for WTM and he was able to place 2nd! Kris is the current Hyrox World Champion and has also set a record for the fastest time completing the ultra grand slam.  She went into WTM with the intention of getting 100 miles and that's exactly what she did! 0:00 – 2:55 – Intro 2:55 – 7:44 – Quick News 7:44 – 8:44 – Content Preface 8:44 - 45:10 - Mark Gaudet Interview 45:10 - 1:22:29 - Kris Rugloski Interview 1:22:29 - End – Outro Next episode will be an episode on the Deka World Championships with a first timer to the show! ____ News Stories: OCR Buddy's "Best of OCR" Nominations (likely closed at this point) Curt Maggit Engaged Rachel Watters and Lionhearted 100 Fundraiser Emily Sotello Death Yara Yara Yara Trifecta Record Deka Fit Team Podiums Dragon Secret Link Bubble Secret Link Ferret Secret Link Goth Secret Link ____ Related Episodes: 45. World's Toughest Mudder, Las Vegas Rock N Roll Half Marathon, Mattapoisett 5k, and YMCA Turkey Trot 5 Miler! 46. World's Toughest Mudder Champion's Brunch with Will Hicks and Heather Bode, Kingston 5k Turkey Trot, and Newburyport Harborside Half Marathon! 97. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 1: Community Dinner and Event) 98. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 2: Champion's Brunch and Bar Crawl), and Taunton YMCA Turkey Trot! 150. World's Toughest Mudder Hot Lap Recap, Javier Escobar's Pit Planning Party, and Mike's Lap By Lap Experience! 151. World's Toughest Mudder Brunch Audio and Bar Crawl Interviews! 152. World's Toughest Mudder Pit Crew Debriefing, and Drunk Javier Escobar Interview! 201. World's Toughest Mudder Memories! 254. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 1: Interviews with Volunteers, Pit Crew, Athletes, and Pit Audio) 255. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 2: Brunch Interviews and Audio) 256. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 3: Bar Crawl Interviews) 257. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 4: Katie Knight and Mark Batres) 305. Preparing for a First World's Toughest Mudder with Anthony Kunkel and Michael Lopez! 307. World's Toughest Mudder with Tyler Veerman and New Champion DJ Fox! ____ The OCR Report Sponsored Athletes: Javier Escobar, Kelly Sullivan, Ryan Brizzolara, and Joshua Reid! Support us on Patreon for exclusive content and access to our Facebook group For a podcast shirt, send $20 to Katelyn-Ritter-8 on Venmo with your size and address Check out our Threadless Shop Use coupon code "adventure" for 10% off MudGear products Use coupon code "ocrreport20" for 20% off Caterpy products Like us on Facebook: Obstacle Running Adventures Follow our podcast on Instagram: @ObstacleRunningAdventures Write us an email: obstaclerunningadventures@gmail.com Subscribe on Youtube: MStefano Running Intro music - "Streaker" by: Straight Up Outro music - "Iron Paw" by: Dubbest

CarProUSA Radio Show
CarPro Radio Show November 26 22 Hour 3

CarProUSA Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 34:01


In this hour Jerry talks about end-of-the-month incentives, the CarPro gift guide, if Kia will make a hybrid Telluride, if the Toyota Yaris will ever come back and more. 

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 11-23-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 28:43


- Telluride takes step to finance Voodoo housing project - Listening Club explores the “Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus” - Things fall into place with health access facilitator

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #106: Boyne Resorts President and CEO Stephen Kircher

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 116:19


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Nov. 21. It dropped for free subscribers on Nov. 24. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoStephen Kircher, President and CEO of Boyne ResortsRecorded onNovember 9, 2022About Boyne ResortsBoyne Resorts owns 10 ski resorts, a scenic chairlift, and a bunch of hotels and golf courses that you can read about in my other newsletter, The Storm Golfing Journal. Here's an overview of the stuff we're covering here:Why I interviewed himSkiing, as a business, is ruthless. More failures than triumphs. More ghosts than living souls. Like humanity itself, I suppose. Enough corpses exist to create a knucklehead talking point for anyone doubting the long-term viability of, for example, Vail Resorts. They just point to the graveyard and say, “Well what about American Skiing Company? What about SKI? What about Intrawest?”Well, D*****s, what about Boyne? Founded 74 years ago on a Michigan hillside and now a 10-resort, continent-spanning titan, Boyne Resorts is the Ford Motor Company of skiing. Imagine old Everett Kircher, chomping a cigar and riding eight-foot-long skis down Hemlock, a good-old-boy of the Michigan backwoods, getting a load of Boyne Resorts 2022, with its arsenal of megalifts and Ikon Pass access tags all blippity-blinging on the social medias. It would shock him no less than Henry Ford stepping out of his 1903 workshop and stumbling upon a plugged-in F-150 Lightning with satellite radio and $100,000 pricetag.Both of these companies started a long time ago as something very different and evolved into something very Right Now. This is what good companies do, and what almost no companies actually manage over time. See: Kodak, Blockbuster, K-Mart failing to envision digital film, streaming, ecommerce. Boyne Resorts is the longest-running multi-mountain ski company in North America, and possibly in the world. Why? They adapted. Part of their evolution, as Stephen and I discuss in this podcast, was persistence through the near-bankruptcy of key properties in past decades. Part of it was having the vision to build a scenic chairlift in, of all places, Gatlinburg, Tennessee in the 1950s. Part of it was relentless investment in snowmaking. Part of it was a pivot to showmanship and experience. And part of it was dumb luck and timing. There's no single reason why Boyne Resorts has survived and evolved for 74 years, and there's no guarantee that anyone else could exactly replicate their model. But Boyne Mountain, the company's namesake and original resort, is one of the last ski areas in the country to persist under its original ownership. There's a lot we can learn from that fact, and from what Boyne Resorts did in the years since their original mountain's founding to keep the thing from becoming another wintertime phantom.What we talked aboutBoyne's system-wide commitment to the long season; Boyne Resorts' many and varied 2022 lift projects; Sunday River's massive growth potential and how the Jordan 8 will serve that; “people don't understand the idea of rebalancing”; why the company is dropping an eight-pack at Boyne Mountain; what happened when a helicopter had to dump a Cypress lift tower, and whether that impacted the project's timeline; why Boyne didn't buy Sun Valley, Telluride, or Jackson Hole; Boyne Resorts' decades-long expansion; why Boyne had to back out of half-ownership of Solitude; why Boyne purchased Shawnee Peak and what the potential is there for upgrading lifts and expanding terrain; whether Pleasant could ever join the Ikon Pass ; changing the name to Pleasant Mountain; whether Boyne will buy more ski areas; ski areas that the company passed on buying; EuroBoyne?; how Crystal Mountain exited Boyne's portfolio – “It was a bummer that we lost it from the Boyne family”; preventing overcrowding; “there's a collaborative approach within the Ikon”; whether Boyne bid on White Pass; how close Boyne came to closing Boyne Mountain in the 1990s, how the finances had deteriorated to that point, and how the company saved itself; how a Tennessee chairlift saved the whole company; why there aren't more scenic chairlifts in America; dreaming up and building the Michigan Sky Bridge; the five things driving Boyne's incredible investment spree and whether it's sustainable; the importance of owning the resorts that you run and the land that you operate on; “I think it's a Golden Age for North American skiing”; how European skiing leapt ahead of North America in on-hill infrastructure; how and why Boyne brought the first eight-pack chairlift to the United States; how Boyne's 2030 plans are unfolding with a different strategy from 2020; “growth changes the flow of traffic”; why it's taken longer to get 2030 plans for Cypress and Brighton than for Boyne's other resorts; “we had a lot of old Riblets in our system”; the importance of creating a sense of place without the pitfalls of becoming “Intrawest 2.0”; why Boyne finally went wide with RFID; why liftline fast lanes have flopped at Boyne's resorts in the past; and Boyne's obsessive focus on snowmaking.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewBoyne is just absolutely rolling right now. In September, when The Highlands announced that it would retire three Riblet triples for a D-line six-pack in 2023, I itemized the big projects underway across Boyne' Resorts' portfolio:About five years ago, statement lifts started raining out of the Montana sky. After rolling out four high-speed lifts in five years (the Powder Seeker six in 2016, Ramcharger 8 and the Shedhorn high-speed quad in 2018, and the Swift Current 6 in 2021), Big Sky recently unveiled a gargantuan base-to-summit lift network that will transform the mountain, (probably) eliminating Mountain Village liftlines and delivering skiers to the high alpine without the zigzagging adventure across the now-scattered lift network. Skiers will board a two-stage out-of-base gondola cresting near the base of Powder Seeker before transferring to a higher-capacity tram within the same building.Impressive as the transformation of Big Sky has been, it represents a fraction of the megaprojects going on across Boyne's 10-resort empire. Here's a survey of what's happening around Boyneworld this offseason alone:SugarloafAs the centerpiece of their 450-acre West Mountain expansion, New England's second-largest ski area is currently rebuilding and retrofitting the Swift Current high-speed quad from Big Sky. Installation is scheduled for next summer. I discussed this expansion and the rest of the mountain's 2030 plan with GM Karl Strand two years ago:Sunday RiverBoyne's third eight-pack is rising on Jordan Peak. It's gonna be a bomber, an overbuilt look-ahead lift that will eventually serve an outpost called “Western Reserve,” which may double the 870-acre resort's size. The mountain is also continuing work on the Merrill Hill expansion, a big piece of the mountain's 2030 plan.LoonLast December, Boyne opened eight-pack number two at Loon Mountain, New Hampshire. The event was electric. Meanwhile, the quad that once served that side of the mountain sat in the rebuild barn, so it could replace and retire the Seven Brothers triple, work that has been ongoing all summer.Pleasant Mountain (formerly Shawnee Peak)Boyne bought Maine's oldest ski area less than a year ago, so they've yet to announce any big-time lift projects. For now, the company did the impossible, winning social media for a day with their unanimously lauded decision to change the ski area's name back to Pleasant Mountain, which it had carried from 1938 to 1988. While this doesn't alter the ski experience in any way, it does show that Boyne is here to wow people. Just wait until they start talking lifts and expansion.Boyne MountainEight-pack number four will be here, on Boyne's shortest ski area, a 500-foot Michigan bump. The chair will replace a pair of ancient triples, dropping skiers atop one of the best pods of beginner skiing in the Midwest, a delightful jumble of long, looping greens threading through low-angle forest.Big SkyI mean what isn't happening at Big Sky? This gondola-tram complex will instantly become one of the most iconic lift networks in North American skiing. I recapped the Montana flagship's evolution from backwater to beefcake with mountain COO Taylor Middleton earlier this year:BrightonBoyne's snowiest mountain is also one of the few without a long-term 2030-type plan. This, Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher explained to me, is because the resort sits on Forest Service land, complicating the long-term planning process. No matter. The ski area recently began the permitting process for a D-Line (what else?) sixer to replace Crest Express, the ski area's oldest high-speed quad.Summit at SnoqualmieThe motley agglomeration of what was once four separate ski areas is about to Rip Van Winkle its way into modernity. The ski area's 2030 plan, announced in April, sketches out eight new or upgraded lifts, including a trio of triples at freewheeling Alpental. The first lift is going in as I type this – a fixed-grip carpet-loaded triple to replace the old Hidden Valley Riblet double. GM Guy Lawrence and I went through these updates in a podcast recorded two days prior to the announcement:CypressBoyne's only Canadian ski area is upgrading its Sky summit double with a carpet-loaded quad.One month later, Loon announced a 30-acre South Peak expansion that will finally connect the monster Escape Route parking lots with the ski area via a carpet-loaded quad next year:Here's the full story:It had been more than two years since Kircher's last stop on the podcast, and the big projects just keep dropping. There are plenty more on the way, too, but this seemed like a pretty good time to check in to see what was driving this investment binge.What I got wrong* I referred to Sunday River's upcoming Western Reserve expansion as the “Western Territories.”* In framing Boyne's expansion story, I asked why the company started buying additional resorts “in the ‘90s.” The company began expanding in the ‘60s, of course, with the addition of The Highlands. What I had meant to ask was, why did the company begin expanding in earnest with the 1997 purchase of Crystal Mountain. Over the next decade, Boyne would add five more resorts, doubling its portfolio.* I said that Vail “bought” Andermatt-Sedrun in Switzerland. They only own a 55 percent stake in the ski area – the other 45 percent is under the control of local investors.* I said in passing that Deer Valley was not on the Ikon Pass. It is, of course, as a seven-day partner on the full pass. What I had meant to say was that the Ikon Pass is not Deer Valley's season pass.* I said that Boyne had been a “laggard” in RFID. Kircher points out that the company had introduced the technology at Brighton and Crystal a number of years ago.* I stated that there was no snowmaking at Summit at Snoqualmie – Kircher points out that the resort uses “a small amount” on their tubing hill and terrain park.Podcast NotesThe Gatlinburg Skylift is a pretty incredible complex. I stopped by in September:As Kircher noted, SNL had its fun with the Sky Bridge (5:20):Boyne Resorts on The Storm Skiing PodcastStorm archives are well-stocked with Boyne Resorts interviews. This is Kircher's third appearance on the podcast. Funny note: The Storm featured Kircher for podcast number 6, and 100 episodes later on number 106.My interviews with the leaders of Big Sky and Summit at Snoqualmie both rank in the top 10 for total number of all-time Storm Skiing Podcast downloads (out of 117 podcasts):Leaders of each of Boyne's New England resorts have appeared on the podcast multiple times. The exception is Pleasant Mountain, which I'll feature on an episode once their long-term plans come together.I also interviewed the leaders of each of Boyne's Michigan resorts:That just leaves Brighton and Cypress. I'll get to Brighton soon enough, and I'll wrap Cypress in after I officially enter Canada in May.Meet my new co-host, Rocky the catMy cat wouldn't shut up and is the third party in this podcast. His name is Rocky. He is 17. Or so. He looks like he's about 700. He could be. I adopted him from a shelter in May 2006. Meaning he's been in my life longer than either of my kids, by several years. A fact that astonishes me, really. All he does is meow meow meow all goddamn day. He wants to eat every five minutes. Meow meow meow. That's the problem during this podcast – he is demanding his five-times-hourly feeding. Otherwise, he is a sweet animal. He comes when you call him, like a dog. He hates the outside and sheds like a yeti. He's best buddies with my 5-year-old son and he looks like a miniature cow:He's moved all over New York City with me, though he would be just as happy living in a box truck in a Tampa strip mall. He can no longer run or jump, though he still manages the stairs quite well. He is not a smart animal, and that may have contributed to his longevity – he is not curious enough to get himself into trouble. He still manages to make quite a mess. A cat is the highest-maintenance animal I can manage, and just barely. But I quite like him, even if he chose an unusual hour, on this one day, to vary from his normal 22-hour-per-day sleep schedule and interject himself into our conversation.The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing all year long. Join us.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 125/100 in 2022, and number 371 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, or, more likely, I just get busy). You can also email skiing@substack.com. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

KOTO Community Radio News
Noticias 11-21-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 14:01


- Telski retrasa el día - SMART lanza nueva ruta de autobús - La encuesta de Healthy Kids Colorado proporciona información sobre la comunidad de jóvenes en Telluride

Obstacle Running Adventures
307. World's Toughest Mudder with Tyler Veerman and New Champion DJ Fox!

Obstacle Running Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 86:44


We were planning for this and next episode to be on Deka World Championships but unfortunately there were a trifecta of reasons that stopped us from being in Atlantic City to cover it live! Instead, we plan to have two episodes on World's Toughest Mudder (released earlier than planned).  For this episode we have Tyler Veerman and DJ Fox! Tyler is no stranger to ultra endurance OCR as he did really well in Telluride last year for the Spartan Ultra World Championships.  WTM is very different than a Spartan event though, less burpees but much more water!  We talk about his experience at the race, his decision to stop after 100 miles, and him comparing the experience to Telluride last year! DJ came on the scene hot at last year's WTM and secured a podium position of third place!  He has since dedicated even more time and effort into this event and has been training at the Ultra House with Anthony Kunkel.  We would all say that it paid off as he took the win overall this year! 0:00 – 4:52 – Intro 4:52 – 11:00 – Quick News 11:00 – 12:05 – Content Preface 12:05 - 46:46 - Tyler Veerman Interview 46:46 - 1:21:14 - DJ Fox Interview 1:21:14 - End – Outro Next episode will hopefully be part 2 of our World's Toughest Mudder Episodes! ____ News Stories: Savage Point Series Spartan Fenway Stadium Results World's Toughest Mudder Team Winner Spartan San Jose Sprint, Super, and Beast Podiums Deka Fit Podiums: Men and Women Deka Strong Podiums: Men and Women Deka Mile Podiums: Men and Women Shark Secret Link Survey Secret Link Mermaid Secret Link Gym Secret Link ____ Related Episodes: 45. World's Toughest Mudder, Las Vegas Rock N Roll Half Marathon, Mattapoisett 5k, and YMCA Turkey Trot 5 Miler! 46. World's Toughest Mudder Champion's Brunch with Will Hicks and Heather Bode, Kingston 5k Turkey Trot, and Newburyport Harborside Half Marathon! 97. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 1: Community Dinner and Event) 98. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 2: Champion's Brunch and Bar Crawl), and Taunton YMCA Turkey Trot! 150. World's Toughest Mudder Hot Lap Recap, Javier Escobar's Pit Planning Party, and Mike's Lap By Lap Experience! 151. World's Toughest Mudder Brunch Audio and Bar Crawl Interviews! 152. World's Toughest Mudder Pit Crew Debriefing, and Drunk Javier Escobar Interview! 201. World's Toughest Mudder Memories! 254. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 1: Interviews with Volunteers, Pit Crew, Athletes, and Pit Audio) 255. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 2: Brunch Interviews and Audio) 256. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 3: Bar Crawl Interviews) 257. World's Toughest Mudder! (Part 4: Katie Knight and Mark Batres) 305. Preparing for a First World's Toughest Mudder with Anthony Kunkel and Michael Lopez! ____ The OCR Report Sponsored Athletes: Javier Escobar, Kelly Sullivan, Ryan Brizzolara, and Joshua Reid! Support us on Patreon for exclusive content and access to our Facebook group For a podcast shirt, send $20 to Katelyn-Ritter-8 on Venmo with your size and address Check out our Threadless Shop Use coupon code "adventure" for 10% off MudGear products Use coupon code "ocrreport20" for 20% off Caterpy products Like us on Facebook: Obstacle Running Adventures Follow our podcast on Instagram: @ObstacleRunningAdventures Write us an email: obstaclerunningadventures@gmail.com Subscribe on Youtube: MStefano Running Intro music - "Streaker" by: Straight Up Outro music - "Iron Paw" by: Dubbest

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 11-17-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 26:17


- Telski delays Opening Day - Healthy Kids Colorado Survey provides insight into Telluride's young community - Med Center enters a period of transition

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #105: Sundance Mountain President and General Manager Chad Linebaugh

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 71:54


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Nov. 17. It dropped for free subscribers on Nov. 20. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoChad Linebaugh, President and General Manager of Sundance Mountain, UtahRecorded onNovember 7, 2022About SundanceClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: Broadreach Capital Partners and Cedar Capital PartnersPass affiliations: Power PassReciprocal pass partners:* 3 days at each Mountain Capital Partners ski area: Arizona Snowbowl, Purgatory, Hesperus, Brian Head, Nordic Valley, Sipapu, Pajarito, Willamette Pass* 3 days each at Snow King, Ski Cooper* 1 unguided day at SilvertonLocated in: Sundance, UtahClosest neighboring ski areas: Park City (47 minutes), Deer Valley (50 minutes), Woodward Park City (50 minutes), Utah Olympic Park (51 minutes), Solitude (57 minutes), Brighton (1 hour), Snowbird (1 hour, 7 minutes), Alta (1 hour, 10 minutes) – travel times may vary considerably in winter.Base elevation: 6,100 feetSummit elevation: 8,250 feetVertical drop: 2,150 feetSkiable Acres: 515Average annual snowfall: 300 inchesTrail count: 50 (20% black, 45% intermediate, 35% beginner)Lift count: 9 (1 high-speed quad, 4 fixed-grip quads, 1 triple, 3 carpets)The map above is last season's, and does not include the Wildwood expansion that's coming online for the 2022-23 ski season. Here's where the new terrain will sit - you can see Jake's landing looker's right, and Flathead rising looker's left:And here's an overhead view of the new terrain:Update [11/24/2022]: the new trailmapWhy I interviewed himIt sits inconspicuous and unassuming, 13 air miles and 49 road miles south of Little Cottonwood Canyon. Five hundred acres in a 5,000-acre resort. Step off your plane at Salt Lake airport and you're 40 minutes away from half a dozen powder bangers and this is not one of them. It's Sundance. “Isn't that that film fiestival?” Epkon Bro asks as he punches Park City into his GPS. “No time for that on my HASHTAG POWDY TOWN TRIP!”And that's OK. We won't be needing Epkon Bro for today's stop. Because where we're going today is Utah before Utah skiing went nuclear. Before the California invasion. Before this state with just 15 ski areas became third in the nation in annual skier visits. When Snowbird opened in 1971, Utah had 1.1 million residents. Today it has 3.1 million. On any given Saturday, every single one of them is angling their SUV toward the mouth of the Cottonwoods.Except everyone skiing Sundance. Here's the locals bump we all wish we had: 300 inches of snow, 2,000-plus feet of vert, owners with the cash Gatlings blowing full auto. Everyone else, somewhere else. Most of the tourists. Most of the Salt Locals. Certainly the Epkon hordes, trying to ski their passes down to $5 a day. So, here it is: Utah skiing before all the things that changed Utah skiing, mostly for the worse. Twenty years ago? Thirty? Who cares. You found it. Enjoy it.What we talked aboutEarly snow in the West; from breakfast waiter to running the resort; when big brother takes you skiing; Sundance in the 1970s; setting yourself apart when you're the ski area down the road from the Wasatch; the longest-tenured ski resort employee in the country?; Timp Haven; enter Robert Redford; the resort's expanse and legacy of conservation; working for Redford; the origins and impact of the Sundance Film Festival; why Redford sold Sundance; a profile of the new owners; industry veteran Bill Jensen's impact on the resort; Sundance's rapid and radical transformation under its new owners; the fantastically weird Ray's lift and why the mountain finally upgraded it; bringing back the old Mandan lift unload and corresponding terrain; breaking down the new alignments for Stairway and Outlaw; why Red's isn't a high-speed lift; the massive new lift project Sundance is planning next and the potential terrain expansion that could go with that; what the new lift would mean for Flathead; why Outlaw ended up as a quad, rather than a six-pack; how Outlaw ended up running chairs from Big Sky's Swift Current quad; why the resort retired the Navajo lift in 1995, and brought back a similar lift called Jake's a decade ago; why Jake's runs on a different line than Navajo; Jake's odd lower mid-station; re-thinking the road that runs beneath Jake's; Sundance's huge snowmaking expansion; going deep on Sundance's Wildwood expansion and new lift; the return of hot bread and honey-butter; potential far-future expansion; upgrading the Bearclaw lodge; night-skiing; whether Sundance could expand its group of season pass reciprocal partners; and the possibility of Sundance joining Indy Pass.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewA decade ago, Sundance was a relic. Old lifts. Slow lifts. Fixed-grip lifts all. A handle tow at the bottom. No carpets. One chair out of the base: the unbelievable Ray's, a mile-long up-and-over doozy with two midstations and a ride time longer than the State of the Union. Some snowmaking. Not a lot. Not enough.Two years ago, longtime owner Robert Redford sold the joint. The new owners brought in Bill Jensen, a U.S. Ski & Snowboard Hall of Famer and onetime overlord of Breckenridge, Vail, Telluride, and Intrawest. Overnight, they smashed the place to bits and remade it in the image of a modern ski resort: Ray's demolished (it's going to live on at Lookout Pass), in its place a high-speed quad up the frontside – all the way up the frontside, to where the Mandan lift once landed – and a short connector lift in back; expanded night-skiing; dramatically expanded snowmaking; a trio of progression carpets at the base; more parking. This year: a 10-trail, 15-acre beginner-focused expansion. On its way out next: the 47-year-old Flathead triple. With what? You'll have to listen to the podcast for details on that.Once Flathead goes, Sundance will have one of the newest lift fleets on the continent (Redford did replace Arrowhead with a lift called Red's in 2016, and put in a new lift called Jake's in 2012), a reliable and modern collection buffeted by an ever-evolving snowmaking system that can defend the place from its relatively low elevation. It will have better skier flow, and (probably) more terrain for them to ski on.What it won't have are any of the ever-increasing numbers of Epkon Bros. The ones who won't ski anywhere off-pass. The ones obsessed with stats and biggest-tallest-most. The ones how don't mind company.Sundance is building something different. And it's something worth trying. What I got wrongI asked Chad why Jake's lift did not have a mid-station, like the old Navajo lift. Jake's does have a mid-station, of course, but it's just a touch higher than the bottom load. What I'd meant to ask was this, “why doesn't Jake's have a mid-mountain mid-station, as Navajo had?” I also incorrectly stated that Jake's followed the same line as Navajo, which was a bad reading of the trailmap on my part. Regardless, we sort it all out on the pod.Why you should ski SundanceIt's worth going a bit deeper on passes here, as Utah has what is probably the most mature megapass market of any major ski hub in America. All 14 of the state's major commercial ski areas are affiliated with one pass or another, including Sundance:If you've never heard of the Power Pass, it's the season pass for Mountain Capital Partners eight ski areas: Arizona Snowbowl, Purgatory, Hesperus, Brian Head, Nordic Valley, Sipapu, Pajarito, and Willamette Pass. Like the Ikon Pass, which includes Alterra's 14 ski areas plus a bunch of partners, the Power Pass has some add-ons: Copper Mountain, Loveland, Monarch, and Sundance. Here's the full roster:Anyway, it's a relatively low-volume regional pass, in no danger of overrunning Sundance or any other partner.Sundance doesn't have the elevation, snowfall totals, or sheer size of its megapass neighbors just to its north, but it doesn't have their crowds either, and it has just enough of those other things to make the skiing interesting. On weekends, on holidays, on fight-for-your-life LCC powder days, this is your post-up spot, an alternative where you can rack vert without really worrying about it and without really trying.Podcast notesSundance has one of the most interesting lift histories in the country. Most ski areas simply drop new lifts on their old lines. Sundance rarely does that, instead shuffling machines all over the mountain to try different configurations. Here's what the mountain looked like in 1988:In 1995, they removed the Navajo and Mandan doubles and installed the wacky Ray's, which landed lower than Mandan before curling over the mountain's backside:By 2012, Sundance realized it needed a second out-of-base lift again, and it build the Jake's quad. This lands approximately where Navajo did decades earlier, but follows a shorter line, starting from the newer, upper parking lots:Interestingly, the new Red's quad, built in 2016, follows approximately the same line as the Arrowhead triple, the 1985 Yan lift that it replaced, but Outlaw and Stairway both follow different lines than Ray's, with different load, unload, and mid-station points. Don't expect a direct replacement for Flathead either – Linebaugh outlines what that dramatic change will look like in the podcast.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 124/100 in 2022, and number 370 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, or, more likely, I just get busy). You can also email skiing@substack.com.The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing all year round. Join us. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 11-16-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 26:43


- Public Health prepares for winter - Telluride passes 2023 budget - County renewing its hazard plan

The Sunny Side
Ep. 59 - Powerball Properties

The Sunny Side

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 32:15


We've all done it, dreamed of winning the Powerball and the house- buying spree that follows. This week, the CBG Luxury Team talks about their favorite properties around the world, and what those $2 billion Powerball winnings would buy. From Europe to Telluride to the Hamptons & Malibu, the world's  dream properties are clearly in focus for your favorite real estate team that did not win Powerball! In “What Caught Your Eye”, Marisela goes back home to Royal Palm Yacht and Country Club highlighting the best valued, move-in ready property in east Boca Raton's most desirable development. Scott points out a new construction Penthouse condo in Fort Lauderdale that he plans to show the team's client next week. Join the team for this fantasy filled journey around with world on some else's tab!!

Next Best Picture Podcast
Interviews With "Armageddon Time" Director/Writer James Gray & Stars Jeremy Strong & Banks Repeta

Next Best Picture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 39:57


James Gray's "Armageddon Time" had its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year and later screened at the Telluride and New York Film Festivals before releasing in theaters last week from Focus Features. The film tells the personal childhood story of a young James Grey (played by Banks Repeta as Paul Graff) growing up in 1980s Queens, New York, during a time of social and political change that was sweeping the country. Jeremy Strong, who plays Paul's father Irving, was on hand with Gray to discuss their work on the film alongside another interview I conducted with Banks Repeta, who went into detail about what it was like working with Strong, Anne Hathaway, and the legendary Anthony Hopkins and more. Please take a listen to my interviews with all of them and enjoy! Thank you!   Check out more on NextBestPicture.com Please subscribe on... SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/nextbestpicturepodcast iTunes Podcasts - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/negs-best-film-podcast/id1087678387?mt=2 Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/7IMIzpYehTqeUa1d9EC4jT And be sure to help support us on Patreon for as little as $1 a month at https://www.patreon.com/NextBestPicture

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 11-4-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 21:06


- A Building F redevelopment looms, when the time is right - A Day in the Life of a Miner with Fintan Cole - Climate Tech Start-Up at Home in Telluride

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz
OF COURSE WE HAVE A COURSE

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 46:08 Very Popular


Kelly and Lizz are making sassy sister Halloween plans and spilling the tea on the 2023 Kila Telluride event on today's episode of The Carpool Podcast.  Killing it is out, and ‘ate that' is in on today's millennial word of the day. And the gals definitely ‘ate' the new Car Mom car buying course. This course has been in the works for ages and is finally ready for The Car Mom crew. Today's episode sponsor is thecarmomofficial.com, where you can now grab your copy of the course and get to buying. Inside you'll find absolutely everything you need to know about the car-buying process. Kelly and Lizz dub San Antonio, Texas c-u-u-u-t-e and have only positive things to say about their stay at the Hotel Emma. Goat cheese, fennel, and rosemary were everywhere, and Kelly was all about seconds. The 2023 Telluride has a handful of exterior updates, and the gals share their take on how Kia rolls out new models year after year.  Kelly brings a click monster of an article to discuss titled, “Stylists reveal 14 items from your 2022 wardrobe that you should get rid of,” from Insider. From headbands to high-waisted pants, the article doubles down on styles Kelly and Lizz thought were just coming back. Moral of the story: Love your body, love what you're wearing, and love the way you're made. In today's advice segment, Kelly directs a listener to Gap to find a cute holiday outfit for her little guy. Kelly's driveway dump brings you slippers galore and a star-studded, hilarious, and wholesome movie recommendation: What to Expect When You're Expecting. In industry news, a Toyota Grand Highlander has been spotted in Michigan, and it's giving minivan. Jeep wants help naming their all-new electric Wagoneer SUV, codenamed Wagoneer S, for speed.  Diane from Kentucky calls in with today's ditch the drive-through and shares a quick and easy quiche that's perfect for heating up during the week.  Blake's Besties honors Nicolette, who lost three babies this year: Primrose, Paul, Emma, and Paige, who lost her daughter Heiden Adelle in September at 17 weeks. Kelly and Lizz extend a huge thank you to all the amazing moms who wrote in and shared their stories. They've read them all, they're with you, and will be praying for you! To share your ditch the drive-through recipe with us, call (959) CAR-POOL and leave us a message! Want our advice on your next car (or just got a life question for us)? Shoot us an email for a chance to get your questions featured on the show at hello@thecarmomofficial.com Follow the Carpool Podcast on IG Follow the Carpool Podcast on YouTube Follow Kelly on IG Follow Lizz on IG Visit thecarmomofficial.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices