Podcasts about Counterpoint

Polyphonic music with separate melodies

  • 337PODCASTS
  • 1,025EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 23, 2022LATEST
Counterpoint

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Counterpoint

Latest podcast episodes about Counterpoint

Forgotten Cello Music
51. Guglielmo Quarenghi: Introduction and COUNTERPOINT installment #1 The Five Species

Forgotten Cello Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 23:40


Quarenghi was a cellist, composer, and pedagogue (an author, too) from Italy in the 19th C. This episode features a biographical sketch about him from The Violoncello and Its History and Counterpoint. I introduce him and the Five Species of Counterpoint. All together I am planning 5 episodes (shorter in scope) that cover Quarenghi and his dealing with Counterpoint in the cello method. They are: Counterpoint: the Five Species Counterpoint: Imitation Counterpoint: Canon Counterpoint: Fugue Capriccio for cello and piano Quarenghi seems to have been an interesting character at least in so far as he wrote an enormous Cello Method--about 500 pages--and provided ALL musical examples from his own creative output, i.e, he composed them. But what's more is that he included an entire section on counterpoint, which I never recall seeing in a cello method before. This inclusion is certainly no after thought, signifying the importance of the old form that masters such as Palestrina, Gabrieli, and Bach cultivated to the highest degree. If you wish to read more my blog post focuses on this topic of counterpoint giving an overview of the forms Quarenghi showcases in Part the Third, Section 2 of his cello method. http://travelingcellojourney.com/2022/09/08/counterpoint-canon/ To watch me perform several of the forms including the 5 Species click her for my youtube channel. Thanks for listening. If you have any thoughts on this topic leave a voice message or send an email to travelingcellogroup@gmail.com Get some unique merch when you sign up for my TravelingCello patreon at one of three levels $3, $20, or $25/month. Or simply listen and tell your friends to listen to all the episodes. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/forgottencellomusic/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/forgottencellomusic/support

The Counterpoint Podcast
Component Shortage: Will it drive the eSIM migration?

The Counterpoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 27:30 Transcription Available


The COVID-19-led semiconductor shortage disrupted the supply chains of several industries. The shortage also accelerated lead times for key components such as chipsets, DDIs & PMICs that power all electronics around us. While the auto sector was heavily affected, telecom operators were also struck due to the lack of physical SIM cards as SIM plants shifted their production to higher-value technologies.With no significant CapEx investment in mature nodes, SIM shortage means telcos cannot activate new subscriptions, potentially losing customers and market share. And while mobile network operators have been resistant to moving to eSIM, the eSIM is still gathering pace. Premium flagship smartphones from Samsung and Apple come with one physical SIM slot and one eSIM. Even the latest iPhone 14 series in the US ditches the physical SIM slot altogether and comes with eSIM-only capabilities.With component shortages expected to continue until 2023, how do the mobile network operators reorganize their supply chain and forecast SIM needs in advance? We discuss all this and more in the podcast.In the latest episode of ‘The Counterpoint Podcast', host Peter Richardson is joined by Counterpoint's Senior Analyst William Li, and Olivier Leroux, President and Founder of Oasis Smart-SIM to talk about how the telecom industry is dealing with disruptions due to semiconductor shortage. We also discuss the real impact of SIM shortage and the development of eSIM to mitigate some of these issues.Follow us on social media platforms –Twitter – https://twitter.com/counterpointtrLinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/counterpoint-technology-market-research/YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMg5uHXDVM71UTF-lE_e--g/

ZKM | Karlsruhe /// Specials /// Specials
insonic counterpoint für 4 Computerflügel

ZKM | Karlsruhe /// Specials /// Specials

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 145:09


Mit Werken von Conlon Nancarrow, Klarenz Barlow, Jagyeong Ryu (UA), Jean-Claude Risset, Ludger Brümmer, u.a.; Soloklavier: Susanne Achilles [25.09.2021] Im Rahmen des Projektes »EASTN-DC« werden selbstspielende Klavierwerke im ZKM Foyer präsentiert. Die wohl gelungensten akustischen Musikmaschinen sind durch die Integration von Instrument und Computer steuerbare Konzertflügel. Deren Entwicklung folgt einer langen Historie von autark spielenden Player Pianos bis hin zu Nancarrows präziser Papierrollen-Steuerung mit pneumatischer Mechanik. Computerflügel ermöglichen eine ungeahnte rhythmische Präzision, die sich bei mehreren verwendeten Instrumenten auch als Raumklang artikuliert. Mit freundlicher Unterstützung des ComputerStudio der Hochschule für Musik Karlsruhe, das dieses Konzert mit der Leihstellung von drei Computerflügeln ermöglicht, werden im großen Klangraum des Foyer des ZKM insgesamt vier Computerflügel von einem Computer gesteuert.

Roots to Renewal
Season Two, Episode Two: Mary Berry on the Culture of Agriculture

Roots to Renewal

Play Episode Play 28 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 47:12 Transcription Available


Sponsored by Tierra Farm; Music by Aaron DessnerThis is the second episode of our second season, and what an honor and pleasure it is to welcome Mary Berry, Director of The Berry Center in Kentucky, a nonprofit organization “dedicated to bringing focus, knowledge and cohesion to the work of changing our industrial agricultural system into a system and culture that uses nature as the standard, accepts no permanent damage to the ecosphere, and takes into consideration human health in local communities.” Mary and her brother, Den, were raised by their parents, Wendell and Tanya Berry, at Lanes Landing Farm in Henry County, Kentucky from the time she was six years old. She attended Henry County public schools and graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1981. She farmed for a living in Henry County starting out in dairy farming, growing Burley tobacco, and later diversifying to organic vegetables, pastured poultry and grass-fed beef. Mary speaks all over the country as a proponent of agriculture of the middle, in defense of small farmers, and in the hope of restoring a culture and an economy that has been lost in rural America. In this episode Mary shares her thoughts on the importance of place in our work and lives, the culture of agriculture and its vital role in supporting healthy local communities, the essential work of educating young farmers, and her father's legacy and influence on her life and work.If you'd like to learn more about Mary's work and The Berry Center, visit https://berrycenter.org. Donate to Hawthorne Valley.More About Mary BerryMary is married to Trimble County, Kentucky farmer, Steve Smith, who started the first Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farming endeavor in the state of Kentucky. If daughters Katie Johnson, Virginia Aguilar and Tanya Smith choose to stay in Henry County, they will be the ninth generation of their family to live and farm there.Mary currently serves on the Boards of Directors of United Citizens Bank in New Castle, Kentucky, the Schumacher Center for a New Economics in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and Sterling College in Vermont. She speaks all over the country as a proponent of agriculture of the middle, in defense of small farmers, and in the hope of restoring a culture and an economy that has been lost in rural America. Her writings have appeared in various publications and collections, including “Letters to a Young Farmer: On Food, Farming, and Our Future” (Princeton Agricultural Press, 2016) and the introduction for a new edition of essays, “Our Sustainable Table”, Robert Clark, ed. (Counterpoint, 2017).

The Rock Presbyterian Church
Week 6 - Wisdom in Counterpoint

The Rock Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 47:00


Screaming in the Cloud
Authentication Matters with Dan Moore of FusionAuth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 37:19


About DanDan Moore is head of developer relations for FusionAuth, where he helps share information about authentication, authorization and security with developers building all kinds of applications.A former CTO, AWS certification instructor, engineering manager and a longtime developer, he's been writing software for (checks watch) over 20 years.Links Referenced: FusionAuth: https://fusionauth.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/mooreds TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today on this promoted episode, which is brought to us by our friends at FusionAuth by Dan Moore, who is their head of DevRel at same. Dan, thank you for joining me.Dan: Corey, thank you so much for having me.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while. I believe it predates not just you working over at FusionAuth but me even writing the newsletter and the rest. We met on a leadership Slack many years ago. We've kept in touch ever since, and I think, I haven't run the actual numbers on this, but I believe that you are at the top of the leaderboard right now for the number of responses I have gotten to various newsletter issues that I've sent out over the years.And it's always something great. It's “Here's a link I found that I thought that you might appreciate.” And we finally sat down and met each other in person, had a cup of coffee somewhat recently, and the first thing you asked was, “Is it okay that I keep doing this?” And at the bottom of the newsletter is “Hey, if you've seen something interesting, hit reply and let me know.” And you'd be surprised how few people actually take me up on it. So, let me start by thanking you for being as enthusiastic a contributor of the content as you have been.Dan: Well, I appreciate that. And I remember the first time I ran across your newsletter and was super impressed by kind of the breadth of it. And I guess my way of thanking you is to just send you interesting tidbits that I run across. And it's always fun when I see one of the links that I sent go into the newsletter because what you provide is just such a service to the community. So, thank you.Corey: The fun part, too, is that about half the time that you send a link in, I already have it in my queue, or I've seen it before, but not always. I talked to Jeff Barr about this a while back, and apparently, a big Amazonian theme that he lives by is two is better than zero. He'd rather two people tell him about a thing than no one tells him about the thing. And I've tried to embody that. It's the right answer, but it's also super tricky to figure out what people have heard or haven't heard. It leads to interesting places. But enough about my nonsense. Let's talk about your nonsense instead. So, FusionAuth; what do you folks do over there?Dan: So, FusionAuth is an auth provider, and we offer a Community Edition, which is downloadable for free; we also offer premium editions, but the space we play in is really CIAM, which is Customer Identity Access Management. Very similar to Auth0 or Cognito that some of your listeners might have heard of.Corey: If people have heard about Cognito, it's usually bracketed by profanity, in one direction or another, but I'm sure we'll get there in a minute. I will say that I never considered authentication to be a differentiator between services that I use. And then one day I was looking for a tool—I'm not going to name what it was just because I don't really want to deal with the angry letters and whatnot—but I signed up for this thing to test it out, and “Oh, great. So, what's my password?” “Oh, we don't use passwords. We just every time you want to log in, we're going to email you a link and then you go ahead and click the link.”And I hadn't seen something like that before. And my immediate response to that was, “Okay, this feels like an area they've decided to innovate in.” Their core business is basically information retention and returning it to you—basically any CRUD app. Yay. I don't think this is where I want them to be innovating.I want them to use the tried and true solutions, not build their own or be creative on this stuff, so it was a contributor to me wanting to go in a different direction. When you start doing things like that, there's no multi-factor authentication available and you start to wonder, how have they implemented this? What corners have they cut? Who's reviewed this? It just gave me a weird feeling.And that was sort of the day I realized that authentication for me is kind of like crypto, by which I mean cryptography, not cryptocurrency, I want to be very clear on, here. You should not roll your own cryptography, you should not roll your own encryption, you should buy off-the-shelf unless you're one of maybe five companies on the planet. Spoiler, if you're listening to this, you are almost certainly not one of them.Dan: [laugh]. Yeah. So, first of all, I've been at FusionAuth for a couple of years. Before I came to FusionAuth, I had rolled my own authentication a couple of times. And what I've realized working there is that it really is—there a couple of things worth unpacking here.One is you can now buy or leverage open-source libraries or other providers a lot more than you could 15 or 20 years ago. So, it's become this thing that can be snapped into your architecture. The second is, auth is the front door to application. And while it isn't really that differentiated—I don't think most applications, as you kind of alluded to, should innovate there—it is kind of critical that it runs all the time that it's safe and secure, that it's accessible, that it looks like your application.So, at the same time, it's undifferentiated, right? Like, at the end of the day, people just want to get through authentication and authorization schemes into your application. That is really the critical thing. So, it's undifferentiated, it's critical, it needs to be highly available. Those are all things that make it a good candidate for outsourcing.Corey: There are a few things to unpack there. First is that everything becomes commoditized in the fullness of time. And this is a good thing. Back in the original dotcom bubble, there were entire teams of engineers at all kinds of different e-commerce companies that were basically destroying themselves trying to build an online shopping cart. And today you wind up implementing Shopify or something like it—which is usually Shopify—and that solves the problem for you. This is no longer a point of differentiation.If I want to start selling physical goods on the internet, it feels like it'll take me half an hour or so to wind up with a bare-bones shopping cart thing ready to go, and then I just have to add inventory. Authentication feels like it was kind of the same thing. I mean, back in that song from early on in internet history “Code Monkey” talks about building a login page as part of it, and yeah, that was a colossal pain. These days, there are a bunch of different ways to do that with folks who spend their entire careers working on this exact problem so you can go and work on something that is a lot more core and central to the value that your business ostensibly provides. And that seems like the right path to go down.But this does lead to the obvious counter-question of how is it that you differentiate other than, you know, via marketing, which again, not the worst answer in the world, but it also turns into skeezy marketing. “Yes, you should use this other company's option, or you could use ours and we don't have any intentional backdoors in our version.” “Hmm. That sounds more suspicious and more than a little bit frightening. Tell me more.” “No, legal won't let me.” And it's “Okay.” Aside from the terrible things, how do you differentiate?Dan: I liked that. That was an oddly specific disclaimer, right? Like, whenever a company says, “Oh, yeah, no.” [laugh].Corey: “My breakfast cereal has less arsenic than leading brands.”Dan: Perfect. So yeah, so FusionAuth realizes that, kind of, there are a lot of options out there, and so we've chosen to niche down. And one of the things that we really focus on is the CIAM market. And that stands for Customer Identity Access Management. And we can dive into that a little bit later if you want to know more about that.We have a variety of deployment options, which I think differentiates us from a lot of the SaaS providers out there. You can run us as a self-hosted option with, by the way, professional-grade support, you can use us as a SaaS provider if you don't want to run it yourself. We are experts in operating this piece of software. And then thirdly, you can move between them, right? It's your data, so if you start out and you're bare bones and you want to save money, you can start with self-hosted, when you grow, move to the SaaS version.Or we actually have some bigger companies that kickstart on the SaaS version because they want to get going with this integration problem and then later, as they build out their capabilities, they want the option to move it in-house. So, that is a really key differentiator for us. The last one I'd say is we're really dev-focused. Who isn't, right? Everyone says they're dev-focused, but we live that in terms of our APIs, in terms of our documentation, in terms of our open development process. Like, there's actually a GitHub issues list you can go look on the FusionAuth GitHub profile and it shows exactly what we have planned for the next couple of releases.Corey: If you go to one of my test reference applications, lasttweetinaws.com, as of the time of this recording at least, it asks you to authenticate with your Twitter account. And you can do that, and it's free; I don't charge for any of these things. And once you're authenticated, you can use it to author Twitter threads because I needed it to exist, first off, and secondly, it makes a super handy test app to try out a whole bunch of different things.And one of the reasons you can just go and use it without registering an account for this thing or anything else was because I tried to set that up in an early version with Cognito and immediately gave the hell up and figured, all right, if you can find the URL, you can use this thing because the experience was that terrible. If instead, I had gone down the path of using FusionAuth, what would have made that experience different, other than the fact that Cognito was pretty clearly a tech demo at best rather than something that had any care, finish, spit and polish went into it.Dan: So, I've used Cognito. I'm not going to bag on Cognito, I'm going to leave that to—[laugh].Corey: Oh, I will, don't worry. I'll do all the bagging on Cognito you'd like because the problem is, and I want to be clear on this point, is that I didn't understand what it was doing because the interface was arcane, and the failure mode of everything in this entire sector, when the interface is bad, the immediate takeaway is not “This thing's a piece of crap.” It's, “Oh, I'm bad at this. I'm just not smart enough.” And it's insulting, and it sets me off every time I see it. So, if I feel like I'm coming across as relatively annoyed by the product, it's because it made me feel dumb. That is one of those cardinal sins, from my perspective. So, if you work on that team, please reach out. I would love to give you a laundry list of feedback. I'm not here to make you feel bad about your product; I'm here to make you feel bad about making your customers feel bad. Now please, Dan, continue.Dan: Sure. So, I would just say that one of the things that we've strived to do for years and years is translate some of the arcane IAM Identity Access Management jargon into what normal developers expect. And so, we don't have clients in our OAuth implementation—although they really are clients if you're an RFC junkie—we have applications, right? We have users, we have groups, we have all these things that are what users would expect, even though underlying them they're based on the same standards that, frankly, Cognito and Auth0 and a lot of other people use as well.But to get back to your question, I would say that, if you had chosen to use FusionAuth, you would have had a couple of advantages. The first is, as I mentioned, kind of the developer friendliness and the extensive documentation, example applications. The second would be a themeability. And this is something that we hear from our clients over and over again, is Cognito is okay if you stay within the lines in terms of your user interface, right? If you just want to login form, if you want to stay between lines and you don't want to customize your application's login page at all.We actually provide you with HTML templates. It's actually using a language called FreeMarker, but they let you do whatever the heck you want. Now, of course, with great power comes great responsibility. Now, you own that piece, right, and we do have some more simple customization you can do if all you want to do is change the color. But most of our clients are the kind of folks who really want their application login screen to look exactly like their application, and so they're willing to take on that slightly heavier burden. Unfortunately, Cognito doesn't give you that option at all, as far as I can tell when I've kicked the tires on it. The theming is—how I put this politely—some of our clients have found the theming to be lacking.Corey: That's part of the issue where when I was looking at all the reference implementations, I could find for Cognito, it went from “Oh, you have your own app, and its branding, and the rest,” and bam, suddenly, you're looking right, like, you're logging into an AWS console sub-console property because of course they have those. And it felt like “Oh, great. If I'm going to rip off some company's design aesthetic wholesale, I'm sorry, Amazon is nowhere near anywhere except the bottom 10% of that list, I've got to say. I'm sorry, but it is not an aesthetically pleasing site, full stop. So, why impose that on customers?”It feels like it's one of those things where—like, so many Amazon service teams say, “We're going to start by building a minimum lovable product.” And it's yeah, it's a product that only a parent could love. And the problem is, so many of them don't seem to iterate beyond that do a full-featured story. And this is again, this is not every AWS service. A lot of them are phenomenal and grow into themselves over time.One of the best rags-to-riches stories that I can recall is EFS, their Elastic File System, for an example. But others, like Cognito just sort of seem to sit and languish for so long that I've basically given up hope. Even if they wind up eventually fixing all of these problems, the reputation has been cemented at this point. They've got to give it a different terrible name.Dan: I mean, here's the thing. Like, EFS, if it looks horrible, right, or if it has, like, a toughest user experience, guess what? Your users are devs. And if they're forced to use it, they will. They can sometimes see the glimmers of the beauty that is kind of embedded, right, the diamond in the rough. If your users come to a login page and see something ugly, you immediately have this really negative association. And so again, the login and authentication process is really the front door of your application, and you just need to make sure that it shines.Corey: For me at least, so much of what's what a user experience or user takeaway is going to be about a company's product starts with their process of logging into it, which is one of the reasons that I have challenges with the way that multi-factor auth can be presented, like, “Step one, login to the thing.” Oh, great. Now, you have to fish out your YubiKey, or you have to go check your email for a link or find a code somewhere and punch it in. It adds friction to a process. So, when you have these services or tools that oh, your session will expire every 15 minutes and you have to do that whole thing again to log back in, it's ugh, I'm already annoyed by the time I even look at anything beyond just the login stuff.And heaven forbid, like, there are worse things, let's be very clear here. For example, if I log in to a site, and I'm suddenly looking at someone else's account, yeah, that's known as a disaster and I don't care how beautiful the design aesthetic is or how easy to use it is, we're done here. But that is job zero: the security aspect of these things. Then there's all the polish that makes it go from something that people tolerate because they have to into something that, in the context of a login page I guess, just sort of fades into the background.Dan: That's exactly what you want, right? It's just like the old story about the sysadmin. People only notice when things are going wrong. People only care about authentication when it stops them from getting into what they actually want to do, right? No one ever says, “Oh, my gosh, that login experience was so amazing for that application. I'm going to come back to that application,” right? They notice when it's friction, they noticed when it's sand in the gears.And our goal at FusionAuth, obviously, security is job zero because as you said, last thing you want is for a user to have access to some other user's data or to be able to escalate their privileges, but after that, you want to fade in the background, right? No one comes to FusionAuth and builds a whole application on top of it, right? We are one component that plugs into your application and lets you get on to the fundamentals of building the features that your users really care about, and then wraps your whole application in a blanket of security, essentially.Corey: I'll take even one more example before we just drive this point home in a way that I hope resonates with folks. Everyone has an opinion on logging into AWS properties because “Oh, what about your Amazon account?” At which point it's “Oh, sit down. We're going for a ride here. Are you talking about amazon.com account? Are you talking about the root account for my AWS account? Are you talking about an IAM user? Are you talking about the service formerly known as AWS SSO that's now IAM Identity Center users? Are you talking about their Chime user account? Are you talking about your repost forum account?” And so, on and so on and so on. I'm sure I'm missing half a dozen right now off the top of my head.Yeah, that's awful. I've been also developing lately on top of Google Cloud, and it is so far to the opposite end of that spectrum that it's suspicious and more than a little bit frightening. When I go to console.cloud.google.com, I am boom, there. There is no login approach, which on the one hand, I definitely appreciate, just from a pure perspective of you're Google, you track everything I do on the internet. Thank you for not insulting my intelligence by pretending you don't know who I am when I log into your Cloud Console.Counterpoint, when I log into the admin portal for my Google Workspaces account, admin.google.com, it always re-prompts for a password, which is reasonable. You'd think that stuff running production might want to do something like that, in some cases. I would not be annoyed if it asked me to just type in a password again when I get to the expensive things that have lasting repercussions.Although, given my personality, logging into Gmail can have massive career repercussions as soon as I hit send on anything. I digress. It is such a difference from user experience and ease-of-use that it's one of those areas where I feel like you're fighting something of a losing battle, just because when it works well, it's glorious to the point where you don't notice it. When authentication doesn't work well, it's annoying. And there's really no in between.Dan: I don't have anything to say to that. I mean, I a hundred percent agree that it's something that you could have to get right and no one cares, except for when you get it wrong. And if your listeners can take one thing away from this call, right, I know it's we're sponsored by FusionAuth, I want to rep Fusion, I want people to be aware of FusionAuth, but don't roll your own, right? There are a lot of solutions out there. I hope you evaluate FusionAuth, I hope you evaluate some other solutions, but this is such a critical thing and Corey has laid out [laugh] in multiple different ways, the ways it can ruin your user experience and your reputation. So, look at something that you can build or a library that you can build on top of. Don't roll your own. Please, please don't.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: So, tell me a little bit more about how it is that you folks think about yourselves in just in terms of the market space, for example. The idea of CIAM, customer IAM, it does feel viscerally different than traditional IAM in the context of, you know, AWS, which I use all the time, but I don't think I have the vocabulary to describe it without sounding like a buffoon. What is the definition between the two, please? Or the divergence, at least?Dan: Yeah, so I mean, not to go back to AWS services, but I'm sure a lot of your listeners are familiar with them. AWS SSO or the artist formerly known as AWS SSO is IAM, right? So, it's Workforce, right, and Workforce—Corey: And it was glorious, to the point where I felt like it was basically NDA'ed from other service teams because they couldn't talk about it. But this was so much nicer than having to juggle IAM keys and sessions that timeout after an hour in the console. “What do you doing in the console?” “I'm doing ClickOps, Jeremy. Leave me alone.”It's just I want to make sure that I'm talking about this the right way. It feels like AWS SSO—creature formerly known as—and traditional IAM feels like they're directionally the same thing as far as what they target, as far as customer bases, and what they empower you to do.Dan: Absolutely, absolutely. There are other players in that same market, right? And that's the market that grew up originally: it's for employees. So, employees have this very fixed lifecycle. They have complicated relationships with other employees and departments in organizations, you can tell them what to do, right, you can say you have to enroll your MFA key or you are no longer employed with us.Customers have a different set of requirements, and yet they're crucial to businesses because customers are, [laugh] who pay you money, right? And so, things that customers do that employees don't: they choose to register; they pick you, you don't pick them; they have a wide variety of devices and expectations; they also have a higher expectation of UX polish. Again, with an IAM solution, you can kind of dictate to your employees because you're paying them money. With a customer identity access management solution, it is part of your product, in the same way, you can't really dictate features unless you have something that the customer absolutely has to have and there are no substitutes for it, you have to adjust to the customer demands. CIAM is more responsive to those demands and is a smoother experience.The other thing I would say is CIAM, also, frankly, has a simpler model. Most customers have access to applications, maybe they have a couple of roles that you know, an admin role, an editor role, a viewer role if you're kind of a media conglomerate, for an example, but they don't have necessarily the thicket of complexity that you might have to have an eye on, so it's just simpler to model.Corey: Here's an area that feels like it's on the boundary between them. I distinctly remember being actively annoyed a while back that I had to roll my marketing person her own entire AWS IAM account solely so that she could upload assets into an S3 bucket that was driving some other stuff. It feels very much like that is a better use case for something that is a customer IAM solution. Because if I screw up those permissions even slightly, well, congratulations, now I've inadvertently given someone access to wind up, you know, taking production down. It feels like it is way too close to things that are going to leave a mark, whereas the idea of a customer authentication story for something like that is awesome.And no please if you're listening to this, don't email me with this thing you built and put on the Marketplace that “Oh, it uses signed URLs and whatnot to wind up automatically federating an identity just for this one per—” Yes. I don't want to build something ridiculous and overwrought so a single person can update assets within S3. I promise I don't want to do that. It just ends badly.Dan: Well, that was the promise of Cognito, right? And that is actually one of the reasons you should stick with Cognito if you have super-detailed requirements that are all about AWS and permissions to things inside AWS. Cognito has that tight integration. And I assume—I haven't looked at some of the other big cloud providers, but I assume that some of the other ones have that similar level of integration. So yeah, so that my answer there would be Cognito is the CIAM solution that AWS has, so that is what I would expect it to be able to handle, relatively smoothly.Corey: A question I have for you about the product itself is based on a frustration I originally had with Cognito, which is that once you're in there and you are using that for authentication and you have users, there's no way for me to get access to the credentials of my users. I can't really do an export in any traditional sense. Is that possible with FusionAuth?Dan: Absolutely. So, your data is your data. And because we're a self-hosted or SaaS solution, if you're running it self-hosted, obviously you have access to the password hashes in your database. If you are—Corey: The hashes, not the plaintext passwords to be explicitly clear on this. [laugh].Dan: Absolutely the hashes. And we have a number of guides that help you get hashes from other providers into ours. We have a written export guide ourselves, but it's in the database and the schema is public. You can go download our schema right now. And if—Corey: And I assume you've used an industry standard hashing algorithm for this?Dan: Yeah, we have a number of different options. You can bring your own actually, if you want, and we've had people bring their own options because they have either special needs or they have an older thing that's not as secure. And so, they still want their users to be able to log in, so they write a plugin and then they import the users' hashes, and then we transparently re-encrypt with a more modern one. The default for us is PDK.Corey: I assume you do the re-encryption at login time because there's no other way for you to get that.Dan: Exactly. Yeah yeah yeah—Corey: Yeah.Dan: —because that's the only time we see the password, right? Like we don't see it any other time. But we support Bcrypt and other modern algorithms. And it's entirely configurable; if you want to set a factor, which basically is how—Corey: I want to use MD5 because I'm still living in 2003.Dan: [laugh]. Please don't use MD5. Second takeaway: don't roll your own and don't use MD5. Yeah, so it's very tweakable, but we shipped with a secured default, basically.Corey: I just want to clarify as well why this is actively important. I don't think people quite understand that in many cases, picking an authentication provider is one of those lasting decisions where migrations take an awful lot of work. And they probably should. There should be no mechanism by which I can export the clear text passwords. If any authentication provider advertises or offers such a thing, don't use that one. I'm going to be very direct on that point.The downside to this is that if you are going to migrate from any other provider to any other provider, it has to happen either slowly as in, every time people log in, it'll check with the old system and then migrate that user to the new one, or you have to force password resets for your entire customer base. And the problem with that is I don't care what story you tell me. If I get an email from one of my vendors saying “You now have to reset your password because we're migrating to their auth thing,” or whatnot, there's no way around it, there's no messaging that solves this, people will think that you suffered a data breach that you are not disclosing. And that is a heavy, heavy lift. Another pattern I've seen is it for a period of three months or whatnot, depending on user base, you will wind up having the plug in there, and anyone who logs in after that point will, “Ohh you need to reset your password. And your password is expired. Click here to reset.” That tends to be a little bit better when it's not the proactive outreach announcement, but it's still a difficult lift and it adds—again—friction to the customer experience.Dan: Yep. And the third one—which you imply it—is you have access to your password hashes. They're hashed in a secure manner. And trust me, even though they're hashed securely, like, if you contact FusionAuth and say, “Hey, I want to move off FusionAuth,” we will arrange a way to get you your database in a secure manner, right? It's going to be encrypted, we're going to have a separate password that we communicate with you out-of-band because this is—even if it is hashed and salted and handled correctly, it's still very, very sensitive data because credentials are the keys to the kingdom.So, but those are the three options, right? The slow migration, which is operationally expensive, the requiring the user to reset their password, which is horribly expensive from a user interface perspective, right, and the customer service perspective, or export your password hashes. And we think that the third option is the least of the evils because guess what? It's your data, right? It's your user data. We will help you be careful with it, but you own it.Corey: I think that there's a lot of seriously important nuance to the whole world of authentication. And the fact that this is such a difficult area to even talk about with folks who are not deeply steeped in that ecosystem should be an indication alone that this is the sort of thing that you definitely want to outsource to a company that knows what the hell they're doing. And it's not like other areas of tech where you can basically stumble your way through something. It's like “Well, I'm going to write a Lambda to go ahead and post some nonsense on Twitter.” “Okay, are you good at programming?” “Not even slightly, but I am persistent and brute force is a viable strategy, so we're going to go with that one.” “Great. Okay, that's awesome.”But authentication is one of those areas where mistakes will show. The reputational impact of losing data goes from merely embarrassing to potentially life-ruining for folks. The most stressful job I've ever had from a data security position wasn't when I was dealing with money—because that's only money, which sounds like a weird thing to say—it was when I did a brief stint at Grindr where people weren't out. In some countries, users could have wound up in jail or have been killed if their sexuality became known. And that was the stuff that kept me up at night.Compared to that, “Okay, you got some credit card numbers with that. What the hell do I care about that, relatively speaking?” It's like, “Yeah, it's well, my credit card number was stolen.” “Yeah, but did you die, though?” “Oh, you had to make a phone call and reset some stuff.” And I'm not trivializing the importance of data security. Especially, like, if you're a bank, and you're listening to this, and you're terrified, yeah, that's not what I'm saying at all. I'm just saying there are worse things.Dan: Sure. Yeah. I mean, I think that, unfortunately, the pandemic showed us that we're living more and more of our lives online. And the identity online and making sure that safe and secure is just critical. And again, not just for your employees, although that's really important, too, but more of your customer interactions are going to be taking place online because it's scalable, because it makes people money, because it allows for capabilities that weren't previously there, and you have to take that seriously. So, take care of your users' data. Please, please do that.Corey: And one of the best ways you can do that is by not touching the things that are commoditized in your effort to apply differentiation. That's why I will never again write my own auth system, with a couple of asterisks next to it because some of what I do is objectively horrifying, intentionally so. But if I care about the authentication piece, I have the good sense to pay someone else to do it for me.Dan: From personal experience, you mentioned at the beginning that we go back aways. I remember when I first discovered RDS, and I thought, “Oh, my God. I can outsource all this scut work, all of the database backups, all of the upgrades, all of the availability checking, right? Like, I can outsource this to somebody else who will take this off my plate.” And I was so thankful.And I don't—outside of, again, with some asterisks, right, there are places where I could consider running a database, but they're very few and far between—I feel like auth has entered that category. There are great providers like FusionAuth out there that are happy to take this off your plate and let you move forward. And in some ways, I'm not really sure which is more dangerous; like, not running a database properly or not running an auth system properly. They both give me shivers and I would hate to [laugh] hate to be forced to choose. But they're comparable levels of risk, so I a hundred percent agree, Corey.Corey: Dan, I really want to thank you for taking so much time to talk to me about your view of the world. If people want to learn more because you're not in their inboxes responding to newsletters every week, where's the best place to find you?Dan: Sure, you can find more about me at Twitter. I'm @mooreds, M-O-O-R-E-D-S. And you can learn more about FusionAuth and download it for free at fusionauth.io.Corey: And we will put links to all of that in the show notes. I really want to thank you again for just being so generous with your time. It's deeply appreciated.Dan: Corey, thank you so much for having me.Corey: Dan Moore, Head of DevRel at FusionAuth. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry, insulting comment that will be attributed to someone else because they screwed up by rolling their own authentication.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Antitrust Code by Concurrences
The complex definition of fairness

Antitrust Code by Concurrences

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 23:56


In this new episode, Jennifer Baker (EU Policy and Tech Reporter) is interviewing Giuseppe Colangelo (University of Basilicata - Potenza, Stanford Law School) on the definition of fairness. Video available on Concurrences Youtube channel  Follow us on Twitter @CompetitionLaws and join the Concurrences page on Linkedin to receive updates on our next podcast episodes. If you want to read more about this topic, check the Concurrences website where you can find all relevant articles: 1. Konstantina Bania, Sean-Paul Brankin, Jean Cattan, Francis Donnat, Damien Geradin, Martin d'Halluin, Pierre Larouche, Theano Karanikioti, Alexandre de Streel, Joëlle Toledano, Pat Treacy, Daniel Zimmer, The Digital Market Act, September 2022 2. Oles Andriychuk, Diane Coyle, David J. Gerber, Pier Luigi Parcu, Amelia Fletcher, Jorge Padilla, Salvatore Piccolo, Philip Lowe, Maurits J. F. M. Dolmans, Daniel Zimmer, Juliane Kokott, Ariel Ezrachi, Maurice Stucke, Svend Albæk, Hanna Schröder, Competition Overdose: Exploring the Limitations, searching for the treatment, February 2022 3. Eleanor M. Fox, Liber Amicorum, Antitrust Ambassador to the World, Fairness as a Counterpoint to Efficiency in Competition Policy?, p.308, October 2021 4. Fatma El-Zahraa Adel, Fairness in EU Competition Policy: Significance and Implications. An Inquiry into the Soul and Spirit of Competition Enforcement in Europe, Damien GERARD, Assimakis KOMNINOS et Denis WAELBROECK (dir.), February 2021 This podcast series has received unrestricted financial support from Meta. The opinions and judgments expressed by the speakers are entirely their own and do not necessarily reflect those of Meta, Inc.

Forbes India Daily Tech Brief Podcast
Apple overtakes Android phones in the US, and could gain in other markets too; Amazon said to lag Flipkart in India

Forbes India Daily Tech Brief Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 4:38


For the first time, there are more iPhones in use in the US than Android-based smartphones. Apple has overtaken Android devices to account for more than half of smartphones used in the US. And Amazon is lagging rival Flipkart in India on several important metrics, according to investment firm Sanford C. Bernstein. Notes: For the first time, there are more iPhones in use in the US than Android-based smartphones. Apple has overtaken Android devices to account for more than half of smartphones used in the US, Financial Times reported on September 2, citing data on the installed user base of iPhones from market researcher Counterpoint. The increased market share gives Apple an edge over Google as it pushes into sectors including finance and healthcare, according to the Times. “Over the past four years the flow has consistently been Android to iOS,” Jeff Fieldhack, Counterpoint's research director, told Financial Times. “This is a big milestone that we could see replicated in other affluent countries across the globe,” Fieldhack added. Amazon is lagging rival Flipkart in India on several important metrics and struggling to make inroads in smaller Indian cities and towns, according to a report by investment firm Sanford C. Bernstein, TechCrunch reported on September 2. Amazon's 2021 gross merchandise value in the country, where it has invested over $6.5 billion, stood between $18 billion and $20 billion, compared with Flipkart's $23 billion, the analysts said in a report on August 30 that was obtained by TechCrunch. India's ecommerce market is expected to double in size to more than $130 billion by 2025. Amazon has more than 85 percent of its customers from Tier 2/3 cities/towns, shopping India's largest selection across electronics, grocery, fashion and beauty, everyday essentials, and more, the e-commerce giant told TechCrunch in a statement. A large number of small businesses and local stores rely on it to go online, Amazon said. Around 50 percent of Amazon's one million sellers come from Tier 2/3 cities/towns, and more than 100,000 exporters sell to its customers worldwide. And the company is committed to digitising 10 million MSMEs, generating 2 million jobs and enabling $20 billion in cumulative exports by 2025, Amazon said, according to TechCrunch. After calling off its Artemis I launch attempt on September 3 when engineers could not overcome a hydrogen leak, the US space agency NASA has decided to not try again, for now, it said in a blog post. This was the second time NASA scrubbed the launch. The leak was detected in an interface between the liquid hydrogen fuel feed line and the Space Launch System rocket, developed by Boeing. Mission managers met and decided they will forego additional launch attempts in early September. Artemis is Nasa's attempt to return humans to Moon and then establish a sustainable presence there to prepare for missions to Mars. Theme music courtesy Free Music & Sounds: https://soundcloud.com/freemusicandsounds

Play to Potential Podcast
665: 93.05 Raghu Ananthanarayanan - Counterpoints to each archetype

Play to Potential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 13:58


NUGGET CONTEXT Raghu goes into depth about how for every Pandava Archetype, there is a Counterpoint on the Kaurava side who has similar set of skills but the difference is the orientation (dharmic vs adharmic). He also goes on to speak about how each of the Pandava archetypes has a shadow side that they need to get in touch with to be effective as a Leader (as a King in those days or as a CEO today). GUEST Raghu is formally trained as an engineer with an MS in Bio-Medical Engineering from IIT, Madras, He has been in immersive involvement in questions of human life.  He says that three extraordinary teachers mentored him when he was going through a very difficult phase of life, namely, J Krishnamurti, Yogacharya Krishnamacharya and Pulin K Garg. He was intimately involved with them for more than a decade from his late twenties. This engagement not only transformed him, it gifted him with the path that he has walked, his sAdhana.  He has been Cofounder of the Sumedhas Academy of Human Context since 1995, and of the Barefoot Academy of Governance with TISS since 2012. As Director of FLAME TAO Knoware Pvt Ltd his work spans the commercial world of consulting by helping redesign the client organization for greater alignment and synergy. His work revolves around helping individuals, groups and organizations discover their dharma, and become the best they can be. This aligns with his own personal Sadhana. ​His recent book - 5 Seats of Power - Discovering the best you can be through the Mahabharata - provides thought-provoking frameworks drawn from Indic Wisdom for understanding leadership and culture-building. In our conversation we dig into details around Raghu's journey and his insights from the book.  Published in Aug 2022. HOST Deepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organizational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaraman OTHER GUESTS 1.Vijay Amritraj 2.Amish Tripathi 3.Raghu Raman 4.Papa CJ 5.Kartik Hosanagar 6.Ravi Venkatesan 7.Abhijit Bhaduri 8.Viren Rasquinha 9.Prakash Iyer 10.Avnish Bajaj 11.Nandan Nilekani 12.Atul Kasbekar 13.Karthik Reddy 14.Pramath Sinha 15.Vedika Bhandarkar 16.Vinita Bali 17.Zia Mody 18.Rama Bijapurkar 19.Dheeraj Pandey 20.Anu Madgavkar 21.Vishy Anand 22. Meher Pudumjee 23.KV Shridhar (Pops) 24.Suresh Naraynan 25.Devdutt Pattanaik 26.Jay Panda 27.Amit Chandra 28.Chandramouli Venkatesan 29.Roopa Kudva 30.Vinay Sitapati 31.Neera Nundy. 32.Deepa Malik 33.Bombay Jayashri. 34.Arun Maira 35.Ambi Parameswaran 36.OP Bhaat 37.Indranil Chakraborty 38.Tarun Khanna 39. Ramachandra Guha 40. Stewart Friedman 41. Rich Fernandez 42. Falguni Nayar 43. Rajat Gupta 44. Kartik Hosanagar 45. Michael Watkins 46. Matt Dixon 47. Herminia Ibarra 48. Paddy Upton 49. Tasha Eurich 50. Alan Eagle 51. Sudhir Sitapati 52. James Clear 53. Lynda Gratton 54. Jennifer Petriglieri. 55. Matthew Walker 56. Raj Raghunathan 57. Jennifer Garvey Berger 58. BJ Fogg 59. R Gopolakrishnan 60. Sir Andrew Likierman. 61. Atul Khatri 62. Whitney Jonson 63. Venkat Krishnan 64. Marshall Goldsmith 65. Ashish Dhawan 66. Vinay Sitapati 67. Ashley Whillans 68. Tenzin Priyadarshi 69. Ramesh Srinivasan 70. Bruce Feiler 71. Sanjeev Aggarwal and T. N. Hari 72. Bill Carr 73. Jennifer Wetzler 74. Sally Helgesen 75. Dan Cable 76. Tom Vanderbilt 77. Darleen DeRosa 78. Amy Edmondson 79. Katy Milkman 80. Harish Bhatt 81. Lloyd Reeb 82. Sukhinder Cassidy 83. Harsh Mariwala 84. Rajiv Vij 85. Dorie Clark 86. Ayse Birsel 87. Ravi Venkatesan E2 88. Pradeep Chakravarthy 89. Dan Pink 90. Alisa Cohn 91. Ayelet Fishbach 92. Thomas Wedell-Wedellsborg  DISCLAIMER All content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain. The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third-party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability. The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

Get Up in the Cool
Episode 311: Cary Lung (Old Time Mandolin, Counterpoint, and Kenny Hall)

Get Up in the Cool

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 66:28 Very Popular


Welcome to Get Up in the Cool: Old Time Music with Cameron DeWhitt and Friends! This week's friend is Cary Lung, with special guests Maya Whitmont and Clyde Curley! We recorded this back in July in Port Townsend, Washington. Tunes in this episode: * The Third of July (0:42) * The Old Hometown Band (15:54) * Portsmouth Aires (31:46) * Baby Ben (47:54) * Lee's Retreat from Gettysburg (59:59) * Bonus track: John Riley the Shepherd Catch Tall Poppy String Band on their Colorado tour in August! https://www.tallpoppystringband.com/shows Support Get Up in the Cool on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/getupinthecool Buy Get Up in the Cool merch like t-shirts, phone cases, and masks! https://get-up-in-the-cool-swag.creator-spring.com/ Sign up at https://www.pitchforkbanjo.com/ for my clawhammer instructional series! Check out Cameron's other podcast, Think Outside the Box Set: https://boxset.fireside.fm/ Check out Cameron's old time trio Tall Poppy String Band: https://www.tallpoppystringband.com/

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast
Kurt Becker's Stroll Through Racing History presented by Keeneland - Counterpoint

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 5:18


Kurt Becker's Stroll Through Racing History presented by Keeneland. Kurt looks back at the racing career of Counterpoint    

The Meb Faber Show
Michael Mauboussin, Counterpoint Global – Everything Is a DCF Model (The Best Investment Writing Volume 6)

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 28:31


Today's episode features Michael Mauboussin reading his piece, Everything Is a DCF Model. Michael is Head of Consilient Research on Counterpoint Global at Morgan Stanley Investment Management. He joined Morgan Stanley in 2020 and has 33 years of investment experience. The Best Investment Writing series features top research pieces that we've shared via The Idea Farm in the past year. Subscribe here so you get these sent to you each week. Check out the past series of The Best Investment Writing below: Volume 5 Volume 4 Volume 3 Volume 2 Volume 1 ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Stream by AlphaSense. Stream is an expert transcript library used by people just like you to quickly perform preliminary diligence on new ideas related to their target companies in the tech, media, telecom, healthcare, consumer and industrial sectors; avoiding the time, hassle, and cost of traditional expert network calls.  With over 15,000 on-demand expert call interviews, 100+ new transcripts added each day, AI smart search technology, and 70% of our experts unique to our network, it's no wonder the world's leading financial firms choose Stream. Sponsor dollars for the entire Best Investment Writing series are being donated to the charity of the guest's choice. Today's sponsor dollars are being donated to the Santa Fe Institute on behalf of Michael Mauboussin. ----- Interested in sponsoring the show? Email us at Feedback@TheMebFaberShow.com ----- Past guests include Ed Thorp, Richard Thaler, Jeremy Grantham, Joel Greenblatt, Campbell Harvey, Ivy Zelman, Kathryn Kaminski, Jason Calacanis, Whitney Baker, Aswath Damodaran, Howard Marks, Tom Barton, and many more.  ----- Meb's invested in some awesome startups that have passed along discounts to our listeners. Check them out here! 

Lexman Artificial
Sam Harris and Lexman Discuss Counterpoint

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 4:46


Sam Harris and Lexman discuss the concept of counterpoint and whether or not there are any interfering technicians on the horizon.

Larkspur-Rixtrema
Will the Fed invert the yield curve and cause recession? Investing Counterpoint Episode 2

Larkspur-Rixtrema

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 28:58


Daniel and Yon discuss possible scenarios and stress testing clients' portfolios for different shapes of the yield curve. What happens if Fed keeps increasing short term rates, long term interest rates fall? Find out in this episode of the Investing Counterpoint Episode 2 #retirementplanning #retirement #retiremeradvisor #stresstest #finance #financialadvisor #fed Become a Trusted Risk Management Advisor By Applying Science-Based Risk Software! Portfolio Crash Testing PRO - https://rixtrema.com/landings_pctpro?source=vimeo

Weight Matters
Counterpoint: The Carbohydrate-Insulin Model Debate, Revisited

Weight Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 36:35


Is a calorie just a calorie? Drs. Saunders and Aronne are joined today by Dr. Samuel Klein to chat about his research on metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity and offer his perspective on the hot button discussion around the carbohydrate-insulin model.

Screaming in the Cloud
Incidents, Solutions, and ChatOps Integration with Chris Evans

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 33:28


About ChrisChris is the Co-founder and Chief Product Officer at incident.io, where they're building incident management products that people actually want to use. A software engineer by trade, Chris is no stranger to gnarly incidents, having participated (and caused!) them at everything from early stage startups through to enormous IT organizations.Links Referenced: incident.io: https://incident.io Practical Guide to Incident Management: https://incident.io/guide/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: DoorDash had a problem. As their cloud-native environment scaled and developers delivered new features, their monitoring system kept breaking down. In an organization where data is used to make better decisions about technology and about the business, losing observability means the entire company loses their competitive edge. With Chronosphere, DoorDash is no longer losing visibility into their applications suite. The key? Chronosphere is an open-source compatible, scalable, and reliable observability solution that gives the observability lead at DoorDash business, confidence, and peace of mind. Read the full success story at snark.cloud/chronosphere. That's snark.cloud slash C-H-R-O-N-O-S-P-H-E-R-E.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's promoted guest is Chris Evans, who's the CPO and co-founder of incident.io. Chris, first, thank you very much for joining me. And I'm going to start with an easy question—well, easy question, hard answer, I think—what is an incident.io exactly?Chris: Incident.io is a software platform that helps entire organizations to respond to recover from and learn from incidents.Corey: When you say incident, that means an awful lot of things. And depending on where you are in the ecosystem in the world, that means different things to different people. For example, oh, incident. Like, “Are you talking about the noodle incident because we had an agreement that we would never speak about that thing again,” style, versus folks who are steeped in DevOps or SRE culture, which is, of course, a fancy way to say those who are sad all the time, usually about computers. What is an incident in the context of what you folks do?Chris: That, I think, is the killer question. I think if you look at organizations in the past, I think incidents were those things that happened once a quarter, maybe once a year, and they were the thing that brought the entirety of your site down because your big central database that was in a data center sort of disappeared. The way that modern companies run means that the definition has to be very, very different. So, most places now rely on distributed systems and there is no, sort of, binary sense of up or down these days. And essentially, in the general case, like, most companies are continually in a sort of state of things being broken all of the time.And so, for us, when we look at what an incident is, it is essentially anything that takes you away from your planned work with a sense of urgency. And that's the sort of the pithy definition that we use there. Generally, that can mean anything—it means different things to different folks, and, like, when we talk to folks, we encourage them to think carefully about what that threshold is, but generally, for us at incident.io, that means basically a single error that is worthwhile investigating that you would stop doing your backlog work for is an incident. And also an entire app being down, that is an incident.So, there's quite a wide range there. But essentially, by sort of having more incidents and lowering that threshold, you suddenly have a heap of benefits, which I can go very deep into and talk for hours about.Corey: It's a deceptively complex question. When I talk to folks about backups, one of the biggest problems in the world of backup and building a DR plan, it's not building the DR plan—though that's no picnic either—it's okay. In the time of cloud, all your planning figures out, okay. Suddenly the site is down, how do we fix it? There are different levels of down and that means different things to different people where, especially the way we build apps today, it's not is the service or site up or down, but with distributed systems, it's how down is it?And oh, we're seeing elevated error rates in us-tire-fire-1 region of AWS. At what point do we begin executing on our disaster plan? Because the worst answer, in some respects is, every time you think you see a problem, you start failing over to other regions and other providers and the rest, and three minutes in, you've irrevocably made the cutover and it's going to take 15 minutes to come back up. And oh, yeah, then your primary site comes back up because whoever unplugged something, plugged it back in and now you've made the wrong choice. Figuring out all the things around the incident, it's not what it once was.When you were running your own blog on a single web server and it's broken, it's pretty easy to say, “Is it up or is it down?” As you scale out, it seems like that gets more and more diffuse. But it feels to me that it's also less of a question of how the technology has scaled, but also how the culture and the people have scaled. When you're the only engineer somewhere, you pretty much have no choice but to have the entire state of your stack shoved into your head. When that becomes 15 or 20 different teams of people, in some cases, it feels like it's almost less than a technology problem than it is a problem of how you communicate and how you get people involved. And the issues in front of the people who are empowered and insightful in a certain area that needs fixing.Chris: A hundred percent. This is, like, a really, really key point, which is that organizations themselves are very complex. And so, you've got this combination of systems getting more and more complicated, more and more sort of things going wrong and perpetually breaking but you've got very, very complicated information structures and communication throughout the whole organization to keep things up and running. The very best orgs are the ones where they can engage the entire, sort of, every corner of the organization when things do go wrong. And lived and breathed this firsthand when various different previous companies, but most recently at Monzo—which is a bank here in the UK—when an incident happened there, like, one of our two physical data center locations went down, the bank wasn't offline. Everything was resilient to that, but that required an immediate response.And that meant that engineers were deployed to go and fix things. But it also meant the customer support folks might be required to get involved because we might be slightly slower processing payments. And it means that risk and compliance folks might need to get involved because they need to be reporting things to regulators. And the list goes on. There's, like, this need for a bunch of different people who almost certainly have never worked together or rarely worked together to come together, land in this sort of like empty space of this incident room or virtual incident room, and figure out how they're going to coordinate their response and get things back on track in the sort of most streamlined way and as quick as possible.Corey: Yeah, when your bank is suddenly offline, that seems like a really inopportune time to be introduced to the database team. It's, “Oh, we have one of those. Wonderful. I feel like you folks are going to come in handy later today.” You want to have those pathways of communication open well in advance of these issues.Chris: A hundred percent. And I think the thing that makes incidents unique is that fact. And I think the solution to that is this sort of consistent, level playing field that you can put everybody on. So, if everybody understands that the way that incidents are dealt with is consistent, we declare it like this, and under these conditions, these things happen. And, you know, if I flag this kind of level of impact, we have to pull in someone else to come and help make a decision.At the core of it, there's this weird kind of duality to incidents where they are both kind of semi-formulaic and that you can basically encode a lot of the processes that happen, but equally, they are incredibly chaotic and require a lot of human impact to be resilient and figure these things out because stuff that you have never seen happen before is happening and failing in ways that you never predicted. And so, this is where incident.io plays into this is that we try to take the first half of that off of your hands, which is, we will help you run your process so that all of the brain capacity you have, it goes on to the bit that humans are uniquely placed to be able to do, which is responding to these very, very chaotic, sort of, surprise events that have happened.Corey: I feel as well—because I played around in this space a bit before I used to run ops teams—and, more or less I really should have had a t-shirt then that said, “I am the root cause,” because yeah, I basically did a lot of self-inflicted outages in various environments because it turns out, I'm not always the best with computers. Imagine that. There are a number of different companies that play in the space that look at some part of the incident lifecycle. And from the outside, first, they all look alike because it's, “Oh, so you're incident.io. I assume you're PagerDuty. You're the thing that calls me at two in the morning to make sure I wake up.”Conversely, for folks who haven't worked deeply in that space, as well, of setting things on fire, what you do sounds like it's highly susceptible to the Hacker News problem. Where, “Wait, so what you do is effectively just getting people to coordinate and talk during an incident? Well, that doesn't sound hard. I could do that in a weekend.” And no, no, you can't.If this were easy, you would not have been in business as long as you have, have the team the size that you do, the customers that you do. But it's one of those things that until you've been in a very specific set of a problem, it doesn't sound like it's a real problem that needs solving.Chris: Yeah, I think that's true. And I think that the Hacker News point is a particularly pertinent one and that someone else, sort of, in an adjacent area launched on Hacker News recently, and the amount of feedback they got around, you know, “You're a Slack bot. How is this a company?” Was kind of staggering. And I think generally where that comes from is—well, first of all that bias that engineers have, which is just everything you look at as an engineer is like, “Yeah, I can build that in a weekend.” I think there's often infinite complexity under the hood that just gets kind of brushed over. But yeah, I think at the core of it, you probably could build a Slack bot in a weekend that creates a channel for you in Slack and allows you to post somewhere that some—Corey: Oh, good. More channels in Slack. Just when everyone wants.Chris: Well, there you go. I mean, that's a particular pertinent one because, like, our tool does do that. And one of the things—so I built at Monzo, a version of incident.io that we used at the company there, and that was something that I built evenings and weekends. And among the many, many things I never got around to building, archiving and cleaning up channels was one of the ones that was always on that list.And so, Monzo did have this problem of littered channels everywhere, I think that sort of like, part of the problem here is, like, it is easy to look at a product like ours and sort of assume it is this sort of friendly Slack bot that helps you orchestrate some very basic commands. And I think when you actually dig into the problems that organizations above a certain size have, they're not solved by Slack bots. They're solved by platforms that help you to encode your processes that otherwise have to live on a Google Doc somewhere which is five pages long and when it's 2 a.m. and everything's on fire, I guarantee you not a single person reads that Google Doc, so your process is as good as not in place at all. That's the beauty of a tool like ours. We have a powerful engine that helps you basically to encode that and take some load off of you.Corey: To be clear, I'm also not coming at this from a position of judging other people. I just look right now at the Slack workspace that we have The Duckbill Group, and we have something like a ten-to-one channel-to-human ratio. And the proliferation of channels is a very real thing. And the problem that I've seen across the board with other things that try to address incident management has always been fanciful at best about what really happens when something breaks. Like, you talk about, oh, here's what happens. Step one: you will pull up the Google Doc, or you will pull up the wiki or the rest, or in some aspirational places, ah, something seems weird, I will go open a ticket in Jira.Meanwhile, here in reality, anyone who's ever worked in these environments knows that step one, “Oh shit, oh shit, oh shit, oh shit, oh shit. What are we going to do?” And all the practices and procedures that often exist, especially in orgs that aren't very practiced at these sorts of things, tend to fly out the window and people are going to do what they're going to do. So, any tool or any platform that winds up addressing that has to accept the reality of meeting people where they are not trying to educate people into different patterns of behavior as such. One of the things I like about your approach is, yeah, it's going to be a lot of conversation in Slack that is a given we can pretend otherwise, but here in reality, that is how work gets communicated, particularly in extremis. And I really appreciate the fact that you are not trying to, like, fight what feels almost like a law of nature at this point.Chris: Yeah, I think there's a few things in that. The first point around the document approach or the clearly defined steps of how an incident works. In my experience, those things have always gone wrong because—Corey: The data center is down, so we're going to the wiki to follow our incident management procedure, which is in the data center just lost power.Chris: Yeah.Corey: There's a dependency problem there, too. [laugh].Chris: Yeah, a hundred percent. [laugh]. A hundred percent. And I think part of the problem that I see there is that very, very often, you've got this situation where the people designing the process are not the people following the process. And so, there's this classic, I've heard it through John Allspaw, but it's a bunch of other folks who talk about the difference between people, you know, at the sharp end or the blunt end of the work.And I think the problem that people are facing the past is you have these people who sit in the, sort of, metaphorical upstairs of the office and think that they make a company safe by defining a process on paper. And they ship the piece of paper and go, “That is a good job for me done. I'm going to leave and know that I've made the bank—the other whatever your organization does—much, much safer.” And I think this is where things fall down because—Corey: I want to ambush some of those people in their performance reviews with, “Cool. Just for fun, all the documentation here, we're going to pull up the analytics to see how often that stuff gets viewed. Oh, nobody ever sees it. Hmm.”Chris: It's frustrating. It's frustrating because that never ever happens, clearly. But the point you made around, like, meeting people where you are, I think that is a huge one, which is incidents are founded on great communication. Like, as I said earlier, this is, like, a form of team with someone you've never ever worked with before and the last thing you want to do is be, like, “Hey, Corey, I've never met you before, but let's jump out onto this other platform somewhere that I've never been or haven't been for weeks and we'll try and figure stuff out over there.” It's like, no, you're going to be communicating—Corey: We use Slack internally, but we have a WhatsApp chat that we wind up using for incident stuff, so go ahead and log into WhatsApp, which you haven't done in 18 months, and join the chat. Yeah, in the dawn of time, in the mists of antiquity, you vaguely remember hearing something about that your first week and then never again. This stuff has to be practiced and it's important to get it right. How do you approach the inherent and often unfortunate reality that incident response and management inherently becomes very different depending upon the specifics of your company or your culture or something like that? In other words, how cookie-cutter is what you have built versus adaptable to different environments it finds itself operating in?Chris: Man, the amount of time we spent as a founding team in the early days deliberating over how opinionated we should be versus how flexible we should be was staggering. The way we like to describe it as we are quite opinionated about how we think incidents should be run, however we let you imprint your own process into that, so putting some color onto that. We expect incidents to have a lead. That is something you cannot get away from. However, you can call the lead whatever makes sense for you at your organization. So, some folks call them an incident commander or a manager or whatever else.Corey: There's overwhelming militarization of these things. Like, oh, yes, we're going to wind up taking a bunch of terms from the military here. It's like, you realize that your entire giant screaming fire is that the lights on the screen are in the wrong pattern. You're trying to make them in the right pattern. No one dies here in most cases, so it feels a little grandiose for some of those terms being tossed around in some cases, but I get it. You've got to make something that is unpleasant and tedious in many respects, a little bit more gripping. I don't envy people. Messaging is hard.Chris: Yeah, it is. And I think if you're overly virtuoustic and inflexible, you're sort of fighting an uphill battle here, right? So, folks are going to want to call things what they want to call things. And you've got people who want to import [ITIL 00:15:04] definitions for severity ease into the platform because that's what they're familiar with. That's fine.What we are opinionated about is that you have some severity levels because absent academic criticism of severity levels, they are a useful mechanism to very coarsely and very quickly assess how bad something is and to take some actions off of it. So yeah, we basically have various points in the product where you can customize and put your own sort of flavor on it, but generally, we have a relatively opinionated end-to-end expectation of how you will run that process.Corey: The thing that I find that annoys me—in some cases—the most is how heavyweight the process is, and it's clearly built by people in an ivory tower somewhere where there's effectively a two-day long postmortem analysis of the incident, and so on and so forth. And okay, great. Your entire site has been blown off the internet, yeah, that probably makes sense. But as soon as you start broadening that to things like okay, an increase in 500 errors on this service for 30 minutes, “Great. Well, we're going to have a two-day postmortem on that.” It's, “Yeah, sure would be nice if we could go two full days without having another incident of that caliber.” So, in other words, whose foot—are we going to hire a new team whose full-time job it is, is to just go ahead and triage and learn from all these incidents? Seems to me like that's sort of throwing wood behind the wrong arrows.Chris: Yeah, I think it's very reductive to suggest that learning only happens in a postmortem process. So, I wrote a blog, actually, not so long ago that is about running postmortems and when it makes sense to do it. And as part of that, I had a sort of a statement that was [laugh] that we haven't run a single postmortem when I wrote this blog at incident.io. Which is probably shocking to many people because we're an incident company, and we talk about this stuff, but we were also a company of five people and when something went wrong, the learning was happening and these things were sort of—we were carving out the time, whether it was called a postmortem, or not to learn and figure out these things. Extrapolating that to bigger companies, there is little value in following processes for the sake of following processes. And so, you could have—Corey: Someone in compliance just wound up spitting their coffee over their desktop as soon as you said that. But I hear you.Chris: Yeah. And it's those same folks who are the ones who care about the document being written, not the process and the learning happening. And I think that's deeply frustrating to me as—Corey: All the plans, of course, assume that people will prioritize the company over their own family for certain kinds of disasters. I love that, too. It's divorced from reality; that's ridiculous, on some level. Speaking of ridiculous things, as you continue to grow and scale, I imagine you integrate with things beyond just Slack. You grab other data sources and over in the fullness of time.For example, I imagine one of your most popular requests from some of your larger customers is to integrate with their HR system in order to figure out who's the last engineer who left, therefore everything immediately their fault because lord knows the best practice is to pillory whoever was the last left because then they're not there to defend themselves anymore and no one's going to get dinged for that irresponsible jackass's decisions, even if they never touched the system at all. I'm being slightly hyperbolic, but only slightly.Chris: Yeah. I think [laugh] that's an interesting point. I am definitely going to raise that feature request for a prefilled root cause category, which is, you know, the value is just that last person who left the organization. That it's a wonderful scapegoat situation there. I like it.To the point around what we do integrate with, I think the thing is actually with incidents that's quite interesting is there is a lot of tooling that exists in this space that does little pockets of useful, valuable things in the shape of incidents. So, you have PagerDuty is this system that does a great job of making people's phone making noise, but that happens, and then you're dropped into this sort of empty void of nothingness and you've got to go and figure out what to do. And then you've got things like Jira where clearly you want to be able to track actions that are coming out of things going wrong in some cases, and that's a great tool for that. And various other things in the middle there. And yeah, our value proposition, if you want to call it that, is to bring those things together in a way that is massively ergonomic during an incident.So, when you're in the middle of an incident, it is really handy to be able to go, “Oh, I have shipped this horrible fix to this thing. It works, but I must remember to undo that.” And we put that at your fingertips in an incident channel from Slack, that you can just log that action, lose that cognitive load that would otherwise be there, move on with fixing the thing. And you have this sort of—I think it's, like, that multiplied by 1000 in incidents that is just what makes it feel delightful. And I cringe a little bit saying that because it's an incident at the end of the day, but genuinely, it feels magical when some things happen that are just like, “Oh, my gosh, you've automatically hooked into my GitHub thing and someone else merged that PR and you've posted that back into the channel for me so I know that that happens. That would otherwise have been a thing where I jump out of the incident to go and figure out what was happening.”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: The problem with the cloud, too, is the first thing that, when there starts to be an incident happening is the number one decision—almost the number one decision point is this my shitty code, something we have just pushed in our stuff, or is it the underlying provider itself? Which is why the AWS status page being slow to update is so maddening. Because those are two completely different paths to go down and you are having to pursue both of them equally at the same time until one can be ruled out. And that is why time to identify at least what side of the universe it's on is so important. That has always been a bit of a tricky challenge.I want to talk a bit about circular dependencies. You target a certain persona of customer, but I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that one explicit company that you are not going to want to do business with in your current iteration is Slack itself because a tool to manage—okay, so our service is down, so we're going to go to Slack to fix it doesn't work when the service is Slack itself. So, that becomes a significant challenge. As you look at this across the board, are you seeing customers having problems where you have circular dependency issues with this? Easy example: Slack is built on top of AWS.When there's an underlying degradation of, huh, suddenly us-east-1 is not doing what it's supposed to be doing, now, Slack is degraded as well, as well as the customer site, it seems like at that point, you're sort of in a bit of tricky positioning as a customer. Counterpoint, when neither Slack nor your site are working, figuring out what caused that issue doesn't seem like it's the biggest stretch of the imagination at that point.Chris: I've spent a lot of my career working in infrastructure, platform-type teams, and I think you can end up tying yourself in knots if you try and over-optimize for, like, avoiding these dependencies. I think it's one of those, sort of, turtles all the way down situations. So yes, Slack are unlikely to become a customer because they are clearly going to want to use our product when they are down.Corey: They reach out, “We'd like to be your customer.” Your response is, “Please don't be.” None of us are going to be happy with this outcome.Chris: Yeah, I mean, the interesting thing that is that we're friends with some folks at Slack, and they believe it or not, they do use Slack to navigate their incidents. They have an internal tool that they have written. And I think this sort of speaks to the point we made earlier, which is that incidents and things failing or not these sort of big binary events. And so—Corey: All of Slack is down is not the only kind of incident that a company like Slack can experience.Chris: I'd go as far as that it's most commonly not that. It's most commonly that you're navigating incidents where it is a degradation, or some edge case, or something else that's happened. And so, like, the pragmatic solution here is not to avoid the circular dependencies, in my view; it's to accept that they exist and make sure you have sensible escape hatches so that when something does go wrong—so a good example, we use incident.io at incident.io to manage incidents that we're having with incident.io. And 99% of the time, that is absolutely fine because we are having some error in some corner of the product or a particular customer is doing something that is a bit curious.And I could count literally on one hand the number of times that we have not been able to use our products to fix our product. And in those cases, we have a fallback which is jump into—Corey: I assume you put a little thought into what happened. “Well, what if our product is down?” “Oh well, I guess we'll never be able to fix it or communicate about it.” It seems like that's the sort of thing that, given what you do, you might have put more than ten seconds of thought into.Chris: We've put a fair amount of thought into it. But at the end of the day, [laugh] it's like if stuff is down, like, what do you need to do? You need to communicate with people. So, jump on a Google Chat, jump on a Slack huddle, whatever else it is we have various different, like, fallbacks in different order. And at the core of it, I think this is the thing is, like, you cannot be prepared for every single thing going wrong, and so what you can be prepared for is to be unprepared and just accept that humans are incredibly good at being resilient, and therefore, all manner of things are going to happen that you've never seen before and I guarantee you will figure them out and fix them, basically.But yeah, I say this; if my SOC 2 auditor is listening, we also do have a very well-defined, like, backup plan in our SOC 2 [laugh] in our policies and processes that is the thing that we will follow that. But yeah.Corey: The fact that you're saying the magic words of SOC 2, yes, exactly. Being in a responsible adult and living up to some baseline compliance obligations is really the sign of a company that's put a little thought into these things. So, as I pull up incident.io—the website, not the company to be clear—and look through what you've written and how you talk about what you're doing, you've avoided what I would almost certainly have not because your tagline front and center on your landing page is, “Manage incidents at scale without leaving Slack.” If someone were to reach out and say, well, we're down all the time, but we're using Microsoft Teams, so I don't know that we can use you, like, the immediate instinctive response that I would have for that to the point where I would put it in the copy is, “Okay, this piece of advice is free. I would posit that you're down all the time because you're the kind of company to use Microsoft Teams.” But that doesn't tend to win a whole lot of friends in various places. In a slightly less sarcastic bent, do you see people reaching out with, “Well, we want to use you because we love what you're doing, but we don't use Slack.”Chris: Yeah. We do. A lot of folks actually. And we will support Teams one day, I think. There is nothing especially unique about the product that means that we are tied to Slack.It is a great way to distribute our product and it sort of aligns with the companies that think in the way that we do in the general case but, like, at the core of what we're building, it's a platform that augments a communication platform to make it much easier to deal with a high-stress, high-pressure situation. And so, in the future, we will support ways for you to connect Microsoft Teams or if Zoom sought out getting rich app experiences, talk on a Zoom and be able to do various things like logging actions and communicating with other systems and things like that. But yeah, for the time being very, very deliberate focus mechanism for us. We're a small company with, like, 30 people now, and so yeah, focusing on that sort of very slim vertical is working well for us.Corey: And it certainly seems to be working to your benefit. Every person I've talked to who is encountered you folks has nothing but good things to say. We have a bunch of folks in common listed on the wall of logos, the social proof eye chart thing of here's people who are using us. And these are serious companies. I mean, your last job before starting incident.io was at Monzo, as you mentioned.You know what you're doing in a regulated, serious sense. I would be, quite honestly, extraordinarily skeptical if your background were significantly different from this because, “Well, yeah, we worked at Twitter for Pets in our three-person SRE team, we can tell you exactly how to go ahead and handle your incidents.” Yeah, there's a certain level of operational maturity that I kind of just based upon the name of the company there; don't think that Twitter for Pets is going to nail. Monzo is a bank. Guess you know what you're talking about, given that you have not, basically, been shut down by an army of regulators. It really does breed an awful lot of confidence.But what's interesting to me is the number of people that we talk to in common are not themselves banks. Some are and they do very serious things, but others are not these highly regulated, command-and-control, top-down companies. You are nimble enough that you can get embedded at those startup-y of startup companies once they hit a certain point of scale and wind up helping them arrive at a better outcome. It's interesting in that you don't normally see a whole lot of tools that wind up being able to speak to both sides of that very broad spectrum—and most things in between—very effectively. But you've somehow managed to thread that needle. Good work.Chris: Thank you. Yeah. What else can I say other than thank you? I think, like, it's a deliberate product positioning that we've gone down to try and be able to support those different use cases. So, I think, at the core of it, we have always tried to maintain the incident.io should be installable and usable in your very first incident without you having to have a very steep learning curve, but there is depth behind it that allows you to support a much more sophisticated incident setup.So, like, I mean, you mentioned Monzo. Like, I just feel incredibly fortunate to have worked at that company. I joined back in 2017 when they were, I don't know, like, 150,000 customers and it was just getting its banking license. And I was there for four years and was able to then see it scale up to 6 million customers and all of the challenges and pain that goes along with that both from building infrastructure on the technical side of things, but from an organizational side of things. And was, like, front-row seat to being able to work with some incredibly smart people and sort of see all these various different pain points.And honestly, it feels a little bit like being in sort of a cheat mode where we get to this import a lot of that knowledge and pain that we felt at Monzo into the product. And that happens to resonate with a bunch of folks. So yeah, I feel like things are sort of coming out quite well at the moment for folks.Corey: The one thing I will say before we wind up calling this an episode is just how grateful I am that I don't have to think about things like this anymore. There's a reason that the problem that I chose to work on of expensive AWS bills being very much a business-hours only style of problem. We're a services company. We don't have production infrastructure that is externally facing. “Oh, no, one of our data analysis tools isn't working internally.”That's an interesting curiosity, but it's not an emergency in the same way that, “Oh, we're an ad network and people are looking at ads right now because we're broken,” is. So, I am grateful that I don't have to think about these things anymore. And also a little wistful because there's so much that you do it would have made dealing with expensive and dangerous outages back in my production years a lot nicer.Chris: Yep. I think that's what a lot of folks are telling us essentially. There's this curious thing with, like, this product didn't exist however many years ago and I think it's sort of been quite emergent in a lot of companies that, you know, as sort of things have moved on, that something needs to exist in this little pocket of space, dealing with incidents in modern companies. So, I'm very pleased that what we're able to build here is sort of working and filling that for folks.Corey: Yeah. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to go through the ethos of what you do, why you do it, and how you do it. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to go? Ideally, not during an incident.Chris: Not during an incident, obviously. Handily, the website is the company name. So, incident.io is a great place to go and find out more. We've literally—literally just today, actually—launched our Practical Guide to Incident Management, which is, like, a really full piece of content which, hopefully, will be useful to a bunch of different folks.Corey: Excellent. We will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:29:52]. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. Really appreciate it.Chris: Thanks so much. It's been an absolute pleasure.Corey: Chris Evans, Chief Product Officer and co-founder of incident.io. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me why your latest incident is all the intern's fault.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Locked On Raptors - Daily Podcast On The Toronto Raptors
The case for the Raptors going all-in to trade for Kevin Durant w/ Will Lou

Locked On Raptors - Daily Podcast On The Toronto Raptors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 47:57


In Episode 1210, Sean Woodley is joined by William Lou (The Raptors Show, Sportsnet 590 The Fan) to talk about the case for the Toronto Raptors ponying up and going all-in to acquire Brooklyn Nets star Kevin Durant, even if it costs Scottie Barnes or Pascal Siakam. Off the top, they dig into how far they'd go in negotiations to land KD, with the one inescapable fact of it all being that... it's Kevin Durant. Is it worth giving up Scottie Barnes and all the potential he has? Or is the sure thing that is Durant worth the gamble -- especially if he can moved later in his contract for at least some form of return if things don't work out in the early days of his contract. Next, Sean and Will talk about the idea of including Precious Achiuwa in an OG Anunoby, Gary Trent Jr. and draft picks package, and whether it would be a dealbreaker to trade three valuable pieces for one. Counterpoint: it's Kevin Durant. Lastly, Sean picks Will's brain on the Raptors' off-season moves, and why keeping Thad Young and Chris Boucher while adding Otto Porter Jr. sets the Raptors up to hit the ground running the event the team they have today is the one they roll out on opening night. Somehow that segment spirals into a Kevin Durant conversation as well, because these are the times we live in. It's Kevin Durant, man. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! TrueBill Don't fall for subscription scams. Start cancelling today at Truebill.com/LOCKEDONNBA. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Arcade1up Pre-order now from arcade1up.com - that's Arcade, the number 1, Up, dot com - for an estimated early September ship date! They are giving away a NBA JAM Shaq edition to a Locked On listener! Enter for a chance to win a game console for your man-cave at arcade1up.com/lockedon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

A Minute with Miles
Counterpoint

A Minute with Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:01


Counterpoint, also called polyphony, is the art, in musical composition, of combining two or more simultaneous lines of music.

Byzantium & Friends
74. Laments for the Fall: Constantinople and Tenochtitlan in counterpoint, with Eleni Kefala

Byzantium & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 65:46


A conversation with Eleni Kefala (University of St. Andrews) on the fall of two empires, the Byzantine and the Aztec. What role did these momentous events play in the emerging identity of western Europe? And how were they experienced by the Romaioi and the native Mexica, especially through the laments that they wrote and sang about these events? The conversation is based on Eleni's book The Conquered: Byzantium and America on the Cusp of Modernity (Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington D.C. 2020).

ROM (by Xataka México)
El mexicano que le ganó una demanda millonaria a Google

ROM (by Xataka México)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 11:49


Samsung y Apple tienen nueve de los diez teléfonos más vendidos en todo el mundo. La lista de Counterpoint confirma que Apple es el líder, mientras Samsung hace un buen trabajo con sus equipos que no van dirigidos a la gama más alta. Escuchaste un fragmento del ROM 193, puedes descargar el programa completo en tu aplicación de podcast preferida. También pueden ver nuestro programa en video y en vivo todos los miércoles a las 17:00 horas en nuestros sitios oficiales de Facebook y YouTube.

ROM (by Xataka México)
Apple y Samsung tienen los teléfonos más vendidos del mundo

ROM (by Xataka México)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 10:48


Samsung y Apple tienen nueve de los diez teléfonos más vendidos en todo el mundo. La lista de Counterpoint confirma que Apple es el líder, mientras Samsung hace un buen trabajo con sus equipos que no van dirigidos a la gama más alta. Escuchaste un fragmento del ROM 193, puedes descargar el programa completo en tu aplicación de podcast preferida. También pueden ver nuestro programa en video y en vivo todos los miércoles a las 17:00 horas en nuestros sitios oficiales de Facebook y YouTube.

Untitled Star Trek Project

Star Trek: Voyager, Series 5, Episode 10. First broadcast on Wednesday, 16 December 1998. This week: a clever script, a complete absence of banter, a frog alien that scores zero on the B'omar Scale, astonishingly good incidental music by Mahler and Tchaikovsky, and two outstanding performances from Mark Harelik and Kate Mulgrew — all working together perfectly to create one of Voyager's Best Episodes Ever. Enjoy. (You will.)

The Nikhil Hogan Show
138: Nicholas Baragwanath

The Nikhil Hogan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 91:51


0:00 Start  1:34 How has the book, "The Solfeggio Tradition", been received? 6:43 Italian solfeggio explained in 4 minutes  11:41 Should children delay singing solfeggio until their voice has broken?  14:15 Did 18th-century plainsong sound more like galant music rather than medieval music?  16:10 What about Palestrina?  19:35 An example of a lesson in Italian solfeggio  22:33 How do you learn to accompany a melody line by sight with the correct harmony?  28:00 How do you follow the rules of counterpoint when switching between hexachords?  32:33 How do you know when there is a change of syllable vs a continuation of a melisma?  34:57 Does the appoggiatura take the target note's syllable or have its own?  36:20 Up 4th Down 5th Bass Motion in Italian Solfeggio  37:19 Mozart improvisation solfeggio lesson (K. 545)  41:19 Notation is the curse of the modern musician  48:02 Did Mozart know Italian solfeggio?  51:10 Why did the Germans complain about the Italians keeping solfeggio as a trade secret?  53:11 Were violinists like Paganini, Corelli and Vivaldi familiar with Italian solfeggio?  57:11 Did the Italian Maestros abandon teaching solfeggio syllables if the students struggled with pitch?  59:11 Did Italian solfeggio completely die out in the 19th-century?  1:00:49 Did Italian musicians think of the bass in terms of solfeggio syllables?  1:05:56 What was the 18th-century Italian understanding of Keys and Tonality?  1:09:02 What are good solfeggio manuscripts to practice to with and how much proportion of time is spent worrying about syllable placement vs actual singing?  1:12:10 Do we have access to 18th-century plainchant that doesn't sound like medieval music?  1:17:19 Is there any value to practicing solfeggi exercises with "Ah" even if we don't know which syllables to use?  1:18:45 What are your favorite solfeggi collections?  1:19:46 What's your opinion on Johann Fux and his method of teaching counterpoint?  1:21:19 What do you think of Nicola Sala's counterpoint treatise?  1:22:39 How does your solfeggio expertise inform the way you would teach partimento?  1:25:08 Are those manuals of singing by maestros who changed to Fixed Do still useful for learning diminution?  1:25:57 What's the state of Italian solfeggio research today?

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast
Nuclear Family by Joseph Han

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:04


Joseph Han reads from the first chapter of his novel, Nuclear Family, published in June 2022 by Counterpoint.

What’s Next at 3M
Meet Ron Stafne, a counterpoint to the Great Resignation

What’s Next at 3M

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 13:32


There's a flip side to the Great Resignation, and it might be embodied in one Ron Stafne. Fresh out of high school in 1965, Ron went looking for a job and found 3M. Fifty-seven years later, he's still here, working as a lean value stream engineer at our ceramic fibers manufacturing plant in Menomonie, Wisconsin. What's kept him engaged for so long? “I just say ask questions. There's no question that is not meaningful, and that's the only way to continue to broaden your knowledge,” Ron told us. “Just continue to ask for a sharing of information. I still learn stuff. Each day it seems, new things come up. We have such a unique business and product that it's just fun.” So, in a time when everybody is talking about leaving, we talked with Ron about why he stays, what motivates him to continue working into his later years, and the sign he's looking for to determine when it's the right time to retire.

Wheel Takes
LOC (Ch47-48): The Counterpoint I Didn't Ask For

Wheel Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 109:15


In this week's episode, people seem to take some stupid pills; Elayne gives unsolicited advice; an inn is chosen; and we meet a new queen.~~~Material covered in this episode: Chapters 47 and 48 of LORD OF CHAOSThis episode contains SPOILERS through Chapter 48 of LORD OF CHAOS~~~Check out our TWITTER, INSTAGRAM, TIKTOK and FACEBOOKCheck out our Patreon at patreon.com/wheeltakesEmail us at wheeltakespodcast@gmail.comUS-friendly MERCHANDISE: https://www.zazzle.com/store/wheeltakesmerch/productsEurope-friendly MERCHANDISE: https://wheel-takes-merch.myspreadshop.co.uk/allSend us a card!Wheel Takes PodcastP.O. Box 1457El Segundo, CA 90245Ali's nicknames confusing you? Check out our NAME KEY!Check out the Prediction Tracker: https://bit.ly/37cyadl!~~~Support the Prague Shakespeare Company!US-based donation link: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=P3XXBTWT4SKLY__;!!LpKI!yRseJwkaasaNLZf5LUF-SJG--u97dLQUppRndhKmWCQxNXuV5SUOaJdbb7svXF1Kug$Donate via check:Payable to: Prague Shakespeare Company AmericaPrague Shakespeare Company America1111 North Country Club DriveShoreacres, TX 77571Memo: In Support of PSCEuropean resources: https://www.pragueshakespeare.com/support-psc.html~~~Music: DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS by Alexander Nakarada.Art: Collin Rice.

High Action
Counterpoint

High Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 39:27


Welcome to "High Action" - a podcast about our favorite instrument, the guitar, and the extraordinary people who play it! We are Perry Smith, Will Brahm, and John Storie - the New West Guitar Group. Season 2 features the members of NWGG performing and discussing for the listeners the many exciting topics of contemporary guitar playing. This week Perry John and Will discuss the topic of Counterpoint. Check out the episode for a discussion and playing examples.  Follow and support us on Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/newwestguitargroup★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

650-Word True Stories
Counterpoint

650-Word True Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 23:22


Lynn Edelson • Counterpoint / Julie Evans • Baptizing John Coltrane / Leanne Sowul • Over the Rainbow / BTL: Jeremiah Horrigan • One Question, Three Answers

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Counterpoint - Kelly Harris & Lorne Honickman

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 20:24


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The History Channeler
Counterpoint/Counterpoint - Sane Gun Regulation

The History Channeler

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 17:26


*Trigger warning: This issue speaks honestly and frankly about reality, which is very, very upsetting.  Host Scott Pinkmountain returns from years in the wild to deliver the long-awaited solution to the seemingly intractable debate around the 2nd Amendment. Spoiler alert - it's not intractable. He solved it, quite elegantly and fairly, actually. 

Scattered Abroad Network Master Feed
Far Better By: Following the Design of the Home

Scattered Abroad Network Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 17:12


Visit our website: www.scatteredabroad.org and remember to subscribe to our email list.  "Like" and "share" our Facebook page: https:// www.facebook.com/sapodcastnetwork  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ the_scattered_abroad_network/  Subscribe to our YouTube channel: The Scattered Abroad Network  Contact us through email at: thescatteredabroadnetwork@gmail.com. If you would like to consider supporting us in anyway, please reach out to us through this email.  BJ Clarke's Information: Interested in Preaching? Visit: MSOP.org Watch "Counterpoint" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaLJgBkQhSM&list=PLsRLTIUXqLYFsOWARWLTgCNIDevybi7hh Follow MSOP on: Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook. Facebook: Type In Memphis School of Preaching (It is a page not a group) and hit “Like” YouTube: Type In Memphis School of Preaching  and hit “Subscribe” Twitter: Type In MSOP_Preaching and hit “Follow” Instagram: Type In Memphis School of Preaching and hit “Follow”

Far Better
Far Better By: Following the Design of the Home

Far Better

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 17:12


Visit our website: www.scatteredabroad.org and remember to subscribe to our email list.  "Like" and "share" our Facebook page: https:// www.facebook.com/sapodcastnetwork  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ the_scattered_abroad_network/  Subscribe to our YouTube channel: The Scattered Abroad Network  Contact us through email at: thescatteredabroadnetwork@gmail.com. If you would like to consider supporting us in anyway, please reach out to us through this email.  BJ Clarke's Information: Interested in Preaching? Visit: MSOP.org Watch "Counterpoint" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaLJgBkQhSM&list=PLsRLTIUXqLYFsOWARWLTgCNIDevybi7hh Follow MSOP on: Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook. Facebook: Type In Memphis School of Preaching (It is a page not a group) and hit “Like” YouTube: Type In Memphis School of Preaching  and hit “Subscribe” Twitter: Type In MSOP_Preaching and hit “Follow” Instagram: Type In Memphis School of Preaching and hit “Follow”

Black Op Radio
#1095 – Paul Bleau, Jim DiEugenio

Black Op Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 70:10


  Oliver Stone mega-event in Quebec City, Canada Quebec City Meets Oliver Stone How the event was conceived The historic Chateau Frontenac hotel is a partner of the event Len Osanic to be present at the event !! Quebec City is one of the best cities for tourism in Canada Buy the ticket for the main event here Oliver Stone to be interviewed by one of the premier journalists of Canada The event is being organized by the Quebec City Film Festival For the week preceeding the event, some of Oliver Stone's best movies to be shown The first marquee event is on 13th of June JFK: Revisited to be shown on the 13th Cinema Le Clap shows in June An expert panel on the JFK assassination featuring Oliver Stone, Jim DiEugenio and Paul Bleau This will be an invite-only event To get an invitation for JFK panel discussion, please mail pbleau@slc.qc.ca If you're attending the event, then please choose a hotel near the old city The Auberge Saint Antoine hotel is a good place to stay Book: Chasing the Light by Oliver Stone: Hardcover, Paperback, Kindle, Audiobook Representatives of the Quebec Film Festival to be interviewed on Black Op Radio Part B: Jim DiEugenio; beginning at xx:xx Oliver Stone mega-event in Quebec City, Canada Paul Bleau is trying to get Donald Sutherland and Abraham Bolden via zoom Paul is a fan of Black Op Radio Video: Oliver Stone on JFK Revisited: Through the Looking Glass in Cannes 2021; Standing Ovations The DVD and the book of the film to be released after this event At Kennedys and King Article: Gagne Desperately Dispenses CPR for the Lone Gunman (Part 1) by David Mantik Part 2 coming up soon Article: Cleaning up after My Debate with Buzzanco by Jim DiEugenio Jim DiEugenio debates Robert Buzzanco (Aaron Good's American Exception podcast) Jim DiEugenio debates John McAdams: Episodes 442 and 443 (2009) Buy the entire season here for just $10 Noam Chomsky aka Chumpsky is a buffoon when it comes to the JFK case Gerald Posner afraid to debate Jim !!! Fred Litwin chickened out of a debate with Jim !!! The JFK Assassination: On the Trail of Delusion? w/ Fred Litwin (J.G Michael's Parallax Views) The JFK Assassination: On the Trail of Delusion? Counterpoint w/ James DiEugenio (J.G Michael's Parallax Views) An absolutely wonderful article coming up on Col. L. Fletcher Prouty The article is about the ARRB's hatchet job on Prouty Bob Fox to review JFK: Destiny Betrayed part-by-part Article: A Review of Oliver Stone's JFK: Destiny Betrayed (Chapter 1) by Bob Fox  

Scattered Abroad Network Master Feed
Far Better By: Giving the Word to our Children

Scattered Abroad Network Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 17:06


Visit our website: www.scatteredabroad.org and remember to subscribe to our email list.  "Like" and "share" our Facebook page: https:// www.facebook.com/sapodcastnetwork  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ the_scattered_abroad_network/  Subscribe to our YouTube channel: The Scattered Abroad Network  Contact us through email at: thescatteredabroadnetwork@gmail.com. If you would like to consider supporting us in anyway, please reach out to us through this email.  BJ Clarke's Information: Interested in Preaching? Visit: MSOP.org Watch "Counterpoint" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaLJgBkQhSM&list=PLsRLTIUXqLYFsOWARWLTgCNIDevybi7hh Follow MSOP on: Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook. Facebook: Type In Memphis School of Preaching (It is a page not a group) and hit “Like” YouTube: Type In Memphis School of Preaching  and hit “Subscribe” Twitter: Type In MSOP_Preaching and hit “Follow” Instagram: Type In Memphis School of Preaching and hit “Follow”

Far Better
Far Better By: Giving the Word to Our Children

Far Better

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 17:06


Visit our website: www.scatteredabroad.org and remember to subscribe to our email list.  "Like" and "share" our Facebook page: https:// www.facebook.com/sapodcastnetwork  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ the_scattered_abroad_network/  Subscribe to our YouTube channel: The Scattered Abroad Network  Contact us through email at: thescatteredabroadnetwork@gmail.com. If you would like to consider supporting us in anyway, please reach out to us through this email.  BJ Clarke's Information: Interested in Preaching? Visit: MSOP.org Watch "Counterpoint" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaLJgBkQhSM&list=PLsRLTIUXqLYFsOWARWLTgCNIDevybi7hh Follow MSOP on: Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook. Facebook: Type In Memphis School of Preaching (It is a page not a group) and hit “Like” YouTube: Type In Memphis School of Preaching  and hit “Subscribe” Twitter: Type In MSOP_Preaching and hit “Follow” Instagram: Type In Memphis School of Preaching and hit “Follow”

Far Better
Far Better By: Allowing God to be Present

Far Better

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:40


Visit our website: www.scatteredabroad.org and remember to subscribe to our email list.  "Like" and "share" our Facebook page: https:// www.facebook.com/sapodcastnetwork  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ the_scattered_abroad_network/  Subscribe to our YouTube channel: The Scattered Abroad Network  Contact us through email at: thescatteredabroadnetwork@gmail.com. If you would like to consider supporting us in anyway, please reach out to us through this email.  BJ Clarke's Information: Interested in Preaching? Visit: MSOP.org Watch "Counterpoint" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaLJgBkQhSM&list=PLsRLTIUXqLYFsOWARWLTgCNIDevybi7hh Follow MSOP on: Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook. Facebook: Type In Memphis School of Preaching (It is a page not a group) and hit “Like” YouTube: Type In Memphis School of Preaching  and hit “Subscribe” Twitter: Type In MSOP_Preaching and hit “Follow” Instagram: Type In Memphis School of Preaching and hit “Follow”

Scattered Abroad Network Master Feed
Far Better By: Allowing God to be Present

Scattered Abroad Network Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:40


Visit our website: www.scatteredabroad.org and remember to subscribe to our email list.  "Like" and "share" our Facebook page: https:// www.facebook.com/sapodcastnetwork  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ the_scattered_abroad_network/  Subscribe to our YouTube channel: The Scattered Abroad Network  Contact us through email at: thescatteredabroadnetwork@gmail.com. If you would like to consider supporting us in anyway, please reach out to us through this email.  BJ Clarke's Information: Interested in Preaching? Visit: MSOP.org Watch "Counterpoint" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaLJgBkQhSM&list=PLsRLTIUXqLYFsOWARWLTgCNIDevybi7hh Follow MSOP on: Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook. Facebook: Type In Memphis School of Preaching (It is a page not a group) and hit “Like” YouTube: Type In Memphis School of Preaching  and hit “Subscribe” Twitter: Type In MSOP_Preaching and hit “Follow” Instagram: Type In Memphis School of Preaching and hit “Follow”

The Delta Flyers
Counterpoint

The Delta Flyers

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 60:06 Very Popular


The Delta Flyers is a weekly Star Trek: Voyager rewatch & recap podcast hosted by Garrett Wang & Robert Duncan McNeill. Each week Garrett and Robert will rewatch an episode of Voyager starting at the very beginning. This week's episode is Counterpoint Garrett and Robbie recap and discuss the episode, and share their insight as series regulars. Counterpoint: A Devore officer asks Janeway for asylum after he intercepts Voyager to search for two families of alien refugees who have been rescued by the ship's crew. We want to thank everyone who makes this podcast possible, starting with our Executive producers Megan Elise & Rebecca McNeill And a special thanks to our Ambassadors, the guests who keep coming back, giving their time and energy into making this podcast better and better with their thoughts, input, and inside knowledge: Lisa Klink, Martha Hackett, Robert Picardo, Ethan Phillips, Robert Beltran, Tim Russ, Roxann Dawson, Kate Mulgrew, & Brannon Braga Additionally we could not make this podcast available without our Co-Executive Producers: Stephanie Baker, Philipp Havrilla, Kelton Rochelle, Liz Scott, Eve England, Sab Ewell, Sarah A Gubbins, Jason M Okun, Luz R., Marie Burgoyne, Chris Knapp, Utopia Science Fiction Magazine, Courtney Lucas, Matthew Gravens, Elaine Ferguson, Brian Barrow, Captain Jeremiah Brown, Heidi Mclellan, Rich Gross, Mary Jac Greer, John Espinosa, James Zugg, Deike Hoffmann, Mike Gu, Anna Post, Shannyn Bourke, Vikki Williams, Kelly Brown, Lee Lisle, Mary Beth Lowe, William McEvoy, Sarah Thompson, Samantha Hunter, Holly Smith, KMB, Dominic Burgess, Ashley Stokey, Amber Eason, Mary Burch, Nicholaus Russell, Dominique Weidle, Lisa Robinson, Normandy Madden, Joseph Michael Kuhlmann, Darryl Cheng, Alex Mednis, AJ Freeburg, Elizabeth Stanton, Kayla Knilans, Barbara S., Tim Beach, Ariana, Meg Johnson, Victor Ling, Marcus Vanderzonbrouwer, Nathan Walker, Shambhavi Kadam, James H. Morrow, Christopher Arzeberger, Megan Chowning, Tae Phoenix, Nicole Anne Toma, Donna Runyon, Nicholas Albano, Daniel O'Brien, Bronwen Duffield, Brandon May, Jeremy Mcgraw, & Jason Bonnett And our Producers: Jim Guckin, James Amey, Katherine Hendrick, Eleanor Lamb, Richard Banaski, Ann Harding, Ann Marie Segal, Charity Ponton, Chloe E, Kathleen Baxter, Craig Sweaton, Nathanial Moon, Carole Patterson, Warren Stine, Mike Schaible, AJ Provance, Captain Nancy Stout, Claire Deans, Matthew Cutler, Maxine Soloway, Joshua L Phillips, Barbara Beck, Aithne Loeblich, Dat Cao, Cody Crockett, Scott Lakes, Stephen Riegner, Debra Defelice, Tara Polen, Jenna Appleton, Jason Potvin, Cindy Ring, Andrei Dunca, Jason Wang, Gabriel Dominic Girgis, Amber Nighbor, Amy Tudor, Jamason Isenburg, Mark G Hamilton, Liza Albright, Rob Johnson, Kevin Selman, Maria Rosell, Michael Bucklin, Lisa Klink, Jennifer Jelf, Justin Weir, Normandy Madden, Mike Chow, John Mann, Holly R. Schmitt, Michael "Klink" Klinckhardt, Rachel Shapiro, Eric Kau, Megan Moore, Melissa A. Nathan, Captain Jak Greymoon, David Wei Liu, David J Manske, Roxane Ray, Amy Rambacher, Jessica B, E.G. Galano, Cindy Holland, Craig M. Nakashian, Julie McCain, Will Forg, Max Wilson, Estelle Keller, Carmen Puente-Garza, & Russell Nemhauser Thank you for your support! “Our creations are protected by copyright, trademark and trade secret laws. Some examples of our creations are the text we use, artwork we create, audio, and video we produce and post. You may not use, reproduce, distribute our creations unless we give you permission. If you have any questions, you can email us at thedeltaflyers@gmail.com.”

The Ivy Podcast
Industry insights from the San Francisco Recruiter with Stephen Sorrow, Principal at Counterpoint Solutions

The Ivy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 27:43


Stephen helps creative agencies and growing organizations find talented professionals. He founded Counterpoint Solutions in 2017 to help candidates and […]

The Vibrant Life
Ep 54. Counterparts in Counterpoint

The Vibrant Life

Play Episode Play 24 sec Highlight Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 11:43 Transcription Available


The title of today's podcast is Counterparts in Counterpoint. I want to offer that you can love yourself and think of yourself as three separate people: past you, present you, and future you. It can be so helpful when you do this, and I want to share my personal take...Support the show (https://paypal.me/vibrantlifepodcast)

Corked Stats
The Counterpoint, Episode 10

Corked Stats

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 24:32


Big Johnny Stud Expands On His Favorite Fantasy Baseball Podcasts:Bubba & Batflip: Jordan Montgomery Sinker, Joe Ryan FastballSleeper & Bust: Beuhler Being NitpickedRotoWire: MacKenzie Gore RealityDCN w/Wardog: Gerrit Cole & Myles Straw

New Books Network
Alexander Zaitchik, "Owning the Sun: A People's History of Monopoly Medicine from Aspirin to COVID-19 Vaccines" (Counterpoint, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 78:05


Although the dividing line between private life and public responsibilities can never be definite and clear, there is a moral threshold which is crossed both by those who assume power to change the lives of many men through public action and by those who undertake to represent in a public role the will and interests of many other men. A new responsibility, and even a new kind of responsibility, and new moral conflicts, present themselves. – Stuart Hampshire, foreword to Public and Private Morality (1978) Hampshire's thoughts help articulate the inherent tensions underlying an institutionalized system of monopoly medicine that has commandeered the myth of free-market ideology in an ongoing and highly successful effort to profit from pharmaceutical patents generated by U.S. government-funded scientific research. This is the broader thesis of investigative journalist Alexander Zaitchik's latest book, Owning the Sun: A People's History of Monopoly Medicine from Aspirin to COVID-19 published by Counterpoint in March of 2022. Zaitchik highlights the politics and players from founding fathers to the FDA's Francis Kelsey to Hayek and the Chicago School in an engaging and well-researched narrative laying bare the situational ethics across the professional domains of the pharmaceutical industry, publicly-funded university research, and medicine more broadly while highlighting the public-private tension baked into our ‘free market' political economy and its reification of knowledge through patent and intellectual property law. Zaitchik's narrative deftly outlines how generations of public health and science advocates have attempted to hold the line against pharmaceutical special interests and their allies in government while documenting privatized medicine's evolution in the U.S. and its globalizing effects. From the controversial arrival of patent-seeking German chemical companies in the late nineteenth century to present-day coordination between industry and philanthropic organizations—including the influential Gates Foundation—that defeated efforts to loosen intellectual property restrictions for countries to produce vaccines against COVID-19. Relevant and smartly written with a disturbing message for everyone who cares about the cost and access of medicine. Listeners will find the book and Zaitchik's observations in this interview engaging as well as his 2018 article in The New Republic that previews part of the book's larger thesis: Complement and expand the topic focus with these recent NBN segments: 1) Davos Man: How the Billionaires Devoured the World (2022) written by Peter S. Goodman and interviewed by Caleb Zakarin. 2) Disorder: A History of Reform, Reaction, and Money in American Medicine (2021) written by Peter S. Swanson and interviewed by Stephen Pimpare. Alexander Zaitchik is a freelance journalist and contributor to Atlantic magazine, The New Republic, The Nation and Foreign Policy among others, and has authored four books including this latest just published by Counterpoint Press in Berkeley. Keith Krueger lectures at the SILC Business School in Shanghai University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Screaming in the Cloud
The Multi-Colored Brick Road to the Cloud with Rachel Dines

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 38:08


About RachelRachel leads product and technical marketing for Chronosphere. Previously, Rachel wore lots of marketing hats at CloudHealth (acquired by VMware), and before that, she led product marketing for cloud-integrated storage at NetApp. She also spent many years as an analyst at Forrester Research. Outside of work, Rachel tries to keep up with her young son and hyper-active dog, and when she has time, enjoys crafting and eating out at local restaurants in Boston where she's based.Links: Chronosphere: https://chronosphere.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/RachelDines Email: rachel@chronosphere.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: The company 0x4447 builds products to increase standardization and security in AWS organizations. They do this with automated pipelines that use well-structured projects to create secure, easy-to-maintain and fail-tolerant solutions, one of which is their VPN product built on top of the popular OpenVPN project which has no license restrictions; you are only limited by the network card in the instance. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/deployandgoCorey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. A repeat guest joins me today, and instead of talking about where she works, instead we're going to talk about how she got there. Rachel Dines is the Head of Product and Technical Marketing at Chronosphere. Rachel, thank you for joining me.Rachel: Thanks, Corey. It's great to be here again.Corey: So, back in the early days of me getting started, well, I guess all this nonsense, I was an independent consultant working in the world of cloud cost management and you were over at CloudHealth, which was effectively the 800-pound gorilla in that space. I've gotten louder, and of course, that means noisier as well. You wound up going through the acquisition by VMware at CloudHealth, and now you're over at Chronosphere. We're going to get to all of that, but I'd rather start at the beginning, which, you know, when you're telling stories seems like a reasonable place to start. Your first job out of school, to my understanding, was as an analyst at Forrester is that correct?Rachel: It was yeah. Actually, I started as a research associate at Forrester and eventually became an analyst. But yes, it was Forrester. And when I was leaving school—you know, I studied art history and computer science, which is a great combination, makes a ton of sense—I can explain it another time—and I really wanted to go work at the equivalent of FAANG back then, which was just Google. I really wanted to go work at Google.And I did the whole song-and-dance interview there and did not get the job. Best thing that's ever happened to me because the next day a Forrester recruiter called. I didn't know what Forrester was—once again, I was right out of college—I said, “This sounds kind of interesting. I'll check it out.” Seven years later, I was a principal analyst covering, you know, cloud-to-cloud resiliency and backup to the cloud and cloud storage. And that was an amazing start to my career, that really, I'm credited a lot of the things I've learned and done since then on that start at Forrester.Corey: Well, I'll admit this: I was disturbingly far into my 30s before I started to realize what it is that Forrester and its endless brethren did. I'm almost certain you can tell that story better than I can, so what is it that Forrester does? What is its place in the ecosystem?Rachel: Forrester is one of the two or three biggest industry analyst firms. So, the people that work there—the analysts there—are basically paid to be, like, big thinkers and strategists and analysts, right? There's a reason it's called that. And so the way that we spent all of our time was, you know, talking to interesting large, typically enterprise IT, and I was in the infrastructure and operations group, so I was speaking to infrastructure, ops, precursors to DevOps—DevOps wasn't really a thing back in ye olden times, but we're speaking to them and learning their best practices and publishing reports about the technology, the people and the process that they dealt with. And so you know, over a course of a year, I would talk to hundreds of different large enterprises, the infrastructure and ops leaders at everyone from, like, American Express to Johnson & Johnson to Monsanto, learn from them, write research and reports, and also do things like inquiries and speaking engagements and that kind of stuff.So, the idea of industry analysts is that they're neutral, they're objective. You can go to them for advice, and they can tell you, you know, these are the shortlist of vendors you should consider and this is what you should look for in a solution.Corey: I love the idea of what that role is, but it took me a while as a condescending engineer to really wrap my head around it because I viewed it as oh, it's just for a cover your ass exercise so that when a big company makes a decision, they don't get yelled at later, and they said, “Well, it seemed like the right thing to do. You can't blame us.” And that is an overwhelmingly cynical perspective. But the way it was explained to me, it really was put into context—of all things—by way of using the AWS bill as a lens. There's a whole bunch of tools and scripts and whatnot on GitHub that will tell you different things about your AWS environment, and if I run them in my environment, yeah, they work super well.I run them in a client environment and the thing explodes because it's not designed to work at a scale of 10,000 instances in a single availability zone. It's not designed to do backing off so it doesn't exhaust rate limits across the board. It requires a rethinking at that scale. When you're talking about enterprise-scale, a lot of the Twitter zeitgeist, as it were, about what tools work well and what tools don't for various startups, they fail to cross over into the bowels of a regulated entity that has a bunch of other governance and management concerns that don't really apply. So, there's this idea of okay, now that we're a large, going entity with serious revenue behind this, and migrating to any of these things is a substantial lift. What is the right answer? And that is sort of how I see the role of these companies in the ecosystem playing out. Is that directionally correct?Rachel: I would definitely agree that that is directionally correct. And it was the direction that it was going when I was there at Forrester. And by the way, I've been gone from there for, I think, eight-plus years. So, you know, it's definitely evolved it this space—Corey: A lifetime in tech.Rachel: Literally feels like a lifetime. Towards the end of my time there was when we were starting to get briefings from this bookstore company—you might have heard of them—um, Amazon?Corey: Barnes and Noble.Rachel: Yes. And Barnes and Noble. Yes. So, we're starting to get briefings from Amazon, you know, about Amazon Web Services, and S3 had just been introduced. And I got really excited about Netflix and chaos engineering—this was 2012, right?—and so I did a bunch of research on chaos engineering and tried to figure out how it could apply to the enterprises.And I would, like, bring it to Capital One, and they were like, “Ya crazy.” Turns out I think I was just a little bit ahead of my time, and I'm seeing a lot more of the industry analysts now today looking at like, “Okay, well, yeah, what is Uber doing? Like, what is Netflix doing?” And figure out how that can translate to the enterprise. And it's not a one-to-one, right, just because the people and the structures and the process is so different, so the technology can't just, like, make the leap on its own. But yes, I would definitely agree with that, but it hasn't necessarily always been that way.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, these days, we're seeing serverless adoption on some levels being driven by enterprises. I mean, Liberty Mutual is doing stuff there that is really at the avant-garde that startups are learning from. It's really neat to see that being turned on its head because you always see these big enterprises saying, “We're like a startup,” but you never see a startup saying, “We're like a big enterprise.” Because that's evocative of something that isn't generally compelling.“Well, what does that mean, exactly? You take forever to do expense reports, and then you get super finicky about it, and you have so much bureaucracy?” No, no, no, it's, “Now, that we're process bound, it's that we understand data sovereignty and things like that.” But you didn't stay there forever. You at some point decided, okay, talking to people who are working in this industry is all well and good, but time for you to go work in that industry yourself. And you went to, I believe, NetApp by way of Riverbed.Rachel: Yes, yeah. So, I left Forrester and I went over to Riverbed to work on their cloud storage solution as a product marketing. And I had an amazing six months at Riverbed, but I happened to join, unfortunately, right around the time they were being taken private, and they ended up divesting their storage product line off to NetApp. And they divested some of their other product lines to some other companies as part of the whole deal going private. So, it was a short stint at Riverbed, although I've met some people that I've stayed in touch with and are still my friends, you know, many years later.And so, yeah, ended up over at NetApp. And it wasn't necessarily what I had initially planned for, but it was a really fun opportunity to take a cloud-integrated storage product—so it was an appliance that people put in their data centers; you could send backups to it, and it shipped those backups on the back end to S3 and then to Glacier when that came out—trying to make that successful in a company that was really not overly associated with cloud. That was a really fun process and a fun journey. And now I look at NetApp and where they are today, and they've acquired Spot and they've acquired CloudCheckr, and they're, like, really going all-in in public cloud. And I like to think, like, “Hey, I was in the early days of that.” But yeah, so that was an interesting time in my life for multiple reasons.Corey: Yeah, Spot was a fascinating product, and I was surprised to see it go to NetApp. It was one of those acquisitions that didn't make a whole lot of sense to me at the time. NetApp has always been one of those companies I hold in relatively high regard. Back when I was coming up in the industry, a bit before the 2012s or so, it was routinely ranked as the number one tech employer on a whole bunch of surveys. And I don't think these were the kinds of surveys you can just buy your way to the top of.People who worked there seemed genuinely happy, the technology was fantastic, and it was, for example, the one use case in which I would run a database where its data store lived on a network file system. I kept whining at the EFS people over at AWS for years that well, EFS is great and all but it's no NetApp. Then they released NetApps on tap on FSX as a first-party service, in which case, okay, thank you. You have now solved every last reservation I have around this. Onward.And I still hold the system in high regard. But it has, on some level, seen an erosion. We're no longer in a world where I am hurling big money—or medium money by enterprise standards—off to NetApp for their filers. It instead is something that the cloud providers are providing, and last time I checked, no matter how much I spend on AWS they wouldn't let me shove a NetApp filer into us-east-1 without asking some very uncomfortable questions.Rachel: Yeah. The whole storage industry is changing really quickly, and more of the traditional on-premises storage vendors have needed to adapt or… not, you know, be very successful. I think that NetApp's done a nice job of adapting in recent years. But I'd been in storage and backup for my entire career at that point, and I was like, I need to get out. I'm done with storage. I'm done with backup. I'm done with disaster recovery. I had that time; I want to go try something totally new.And that was how I ended up leaving NetApp and joining CloudHealth. Because I'd never really done the startup thing. I done a medium-sized company at Riverbed; I'd done a pretty big company at NetApp. I've always been an entrepreneur at heart. I started my first business on the playground in second grade, and it was reselling sticks of gum. Like, I would go use my allowance to buy a big pack of gum, and then I sold the sticks individually for ten cents apiece, making a killer margin. And it was a subscription, actually. [laugh].Corey: Administrations generally—at least public schools—generally tend to turn a—have a dim view of those things, as I recall from my misspent youth.Rachel: Yeah. I was shut down pretty quickly, but it was a brilliant business model. It was—so you had to join the club to even be able to buy into getting the sticks of gum. I was, you know, all over the subscription business [laugh] back then.Corey: And area I want to explore here is you mentioned that you double-majored. One of those majors was computer science—art history was sort of set aside for the moment, it doesn't really align with either direction here—then you served as a research associate turned analyst, and then you went into product marketing, which is an interesting direction to go in. Why'd you do it?Rachel: You know, product marketing and industry analysts are there's a lot of synergy; there's a lot of things that are in common between those two. And in fact, when you see people moving back and forth from the analyst world to the vendor side, a lot of the time it is to product marketing or product management. I mean, product marketing, our whole job is to take really complex technical concepts and relate them back to business concepts and make them make sense of the broader world and tell a narrative around it. That's a lot of what an analyst is doing too. So, you know, analysts are writing, they're giving public talks, they're coming up with big ideas; that's what a great product marketer is doing also.So, for me, that shift was actually very natural. And by the way, like, when I graduated from school, I knew I was never going to code for a living. I had learned all I was going to learn and I knew it wasn't for me. Huge props, like, you know, all the people that do code for a living, I knew I couldn't do it. I wasn't cut out for it.Corey: I found somewhat similar discoveries on my own journey. I can configure things for a living, it's fun, but I still need to work with people, past a certain point. I know I've talked about this before on some of these shows, but for me, when starting out independently, I sort of assumed at some level, I was going to shut it down, and well, and then I'll go back to being an SRE or managing an ops team. And it was only somewhat recently that I had the revelation that if everything that I'm building here collapses out from under me or gets acquired or whatnot and I have to go get a real job again, I'll almost certainly be doing something in the marketing space as opposed to the engineering space. And that was an interesting adjustment to my self-image as I went through it.Because I've built everything that I've been doing up until this point, aligned at… a certain level of technical delivery and building things as an engineer, admittedly a mediocre one. And it took me a fair bit of time to get, I guess, over the idea of myself in that context of, “Wow, you're not really an engineer. Are you a tech worker?” Kind of. And I sort of find myself existing in the in-between spaces.Did you have similar reticence when you went down the marketing path or was it something that you had, I guess, a more mature view of it [laugh] than I did and said, “Yeah, I see the value immediately,” whereas I had to basically be dragged there kicking and screaming?Rachel: Well, first of all, Corey, congratulations for coming to terms with the fact that you are a marketer. I saw it in you from the minute I met you, and I think I've known you since before you were famous. That's my claim to fame is that I knew you before you were famous. But for me personally, no, I didn't actually have that stigma. But that does exist in this industry.I mean, I think people are—think they look down on marketing as kind of like ugh, you know, “The product sells itself. The product markets itself. We don't need that.” But when you're on the inside, you know you can have an amazing product and if you don't position it well and if you don't message it well, it's never going to succeed.Corey: Our consulting [sub-projects 00:14:31] are basically if you bring us in, you will turn a profit on the engaging. We are selling what basically [unintelligible 00:14:37] money. It is one of the easiest ROI calculations. And it still requires a significant amount of work on positioning even on the sales process alone. There's no such thing as an easy enterprise sale.And you're right, in fact, I think the first time we met, I was still running a DevOps team at a company and I was deploying the product that you were doing marketing for. And that was quite the experience. Honestly, it was one of the—please don't take this the wrong way at all—but you were at CloudHealth at the time and the entire point was that it was effectively positioned in such a way of, right, this winds up solving a lot of the problems that we have in the AWS bill. And looking at how some of those things were working, it was this is an annoying, obnoxious problem that I wish I could pay to make someone else's problem, just to make it go away. Well, that indirectly led to exactly where we are now.And it's really been an interesting ride, just seeing how that whole thing has evolved. How did you wind up finding yourself at CloudHealth? Because after VMware, you said it was time to go to a startup. And it's interesting because I look at where you've been now, and CloudHealth itself gets dwarfed by VMware, which is sort of the exact opposite of a startup, due to the acquisition. But CloudHealth was independent for years while you were there.Rachel: Yeah, it was. I was at CloudHealth for about three-plus years before we were acquired. You know, how did I end up there? It's… it's all hazy. I was looking at a lot of startups, I was looking for, like, you know, a Series B company, about 50 people, I wanted something in the public cloud space, but not storage—if I could get away from storage that was the dream—and I met the folks from CloudHealth, and obviously, I hadn't heard about—I didn't know about cloud cost management or cloud governance or FinOps, like, none of those were things back then, but I was I just was really attracted to the vision of the founders.The founders were, you know, Joe Kinsella and Dan Phillips and Dave Eicher, and I was like, “Hey, they've built startups before. They've got a great idea.” Joe had felt this pain when he was a customer of AWS in the early days, and so I was like—Corey: As have we all.Rachel: Right?Corey: I don't think you'll find anyone in this space who hasn't been a customer in that situation and realized just how painful and maddening the whole space is.Rachel: Exactly, yeah. And he was an early customer back in, I think, 2014, 2015. So yeah, I met the team, I really believed in their vision, and I jumped in. And it was really amazing journey, and I got to build a pretty big team over time. By the time we were acquired a couple of years later, I think we were maybe three or 400 people. And actually, fun story. We were acquired the same week my son was born, so that was an exciting experience. A lot of change happened in my life all at once.But during the time there, I got to, you know, work with some really, really cool large cloud-scale organizations. And that was during that time that I started to learn more about Kubernetes and Mesos at the time, and started on the journey that led me to where I am now. But that was one of the happiest accidents, similar to the happy accident of, like, how did I end up at Forrester? Well, I didn't get the job at Google. [laugh]. How did I end up at CloudHealth? I got connected with the founders and their story was really inspiring.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: It's amusing to me the idea that, oh, you're at NetApp if you want to go do something that is absolutely not storage. Great. So, you go work at CloudHealth. You're like, “All right. Things are great.” Now, to take a big sip of scalding hot coffee and see just how big AWS billing data could possibly be. Yeah, oops, you're a storage company all over again.Some of our, honestly, our largest bills these days are RDS, Athena, and of course, S3 for all of the bills storage we wind up doing for our customers. And it is… it is not small. And that has become sort of an eye-opener for me just the fact that this is, on some level, a big data problem.Rachel: Yeah.Corey: And how do you wind up even understanding all the data that lives in just the outputs of the billing system? Which I feel is sort of a good setup for the next question of after the acquisition, you stayed at VMware for a while and then matriculated out to where you are now where you're the Head of Product and Technical Marketing at Chronosphere, which is in the observability space. How did you get there from cloud bills?Rachel: Yeah. So, it all makes sense when I piece it together in my mind. So, when I was at CloudHealth, one of the big, big pain points I was seeing from a lot of our customers was the growth in their monitoring bills. Like, they would be like, “Okay, thanks. You helped us, you know, with our EC2 reservations, and we did right-sizing, and you help with this. But, like, can you help with our Datadog bill? Like, can you help with our New Relic bill?”And that was becoming the next biggest line item for them. And in some cases, they were spending more on monitoring and APM and like, what we now call some things observability, they were spending more on that than they were on their public cloud, which is just bananas. So, I would see them making really kind of bizarre and sometimes they'd have to make choices that were really not the best choices. Like, “I guess we're not going to monitor the lab anymore. We're just going to uninstall the agents because we can't pay this anymore.”Corey: Going down from full observability into sampling. I remember that. The New Relic shuffle is what I believe we call it at the time. Let's be clear, they have since fixed a lot of their pricing challenges, but it was the idea of great suddenly we're doing a lot more staging environments, and they come knocking asking for more money but it's a—I don't need that level of visibility in the pre-prod environments, I guess. I hate doing it that way because then you have a divergence between pre-prod and actual prod. But it was economically just a challenge. Yeah, because again, when it comes to cloud, architecture and cost are really one and the same.Rachel: Exactly. And it's not so much that, like—sure, you know, you can fix the pricing model, but there's still the underlying issue of it's not black and white, right? My pre-prod data is not the same value as my prod data, so I shouldn't have to treat it the same way, shouldn't have to pay for it the same way. So, seeing that trend on the one hand, and then, on the other hand, 2017, 2018, I started working on the container cost allocation products at CloudHealth, and we were—you know, this was even before that, maybe 2017, we were arguing about, like, Mesos and Kubernetes and which one was going to be, and I got kind of—got very interested in that world.And so once again, as I was getting to the point where I was ready to leave CloudHealth, I was like, okay, there's two key things I'm seeing in the market. One is people need a change in their monitoring and observability; what they're doing now isn't working. And two, cloud-native is coming up, coming fast, and it's going to really disrupt this market. So, I went looking for someone that was at the intersection of the two. And that's when I met the team at Chronosphere, and just immediately hit it off with the founders in a similar way to where I hit it off with the founders that CloudHealth. At Chronosphere, the founders had felt pain—Corey: Team is so important in these things.Rachel: It's really the only thing to me. Like, you spend so much time at work. You need to love who you work with. You need to love your—not love them, but, you know, you need to work with people that you enjoy working with and people that you learn from.Corey: You don't have to love all your coworkers, and at best you can get away with just being civil with them, but it's so much nicer when you can have a productive, working relationship. And that is very far from we're going to go hang out, have beers after work because that leads to a monoculture. But the ability to really enjoy the people that you work with is so important and I wish that more folks paid attention to that.Rachel: Yeah, that's so important to me. And so I met the team, the team was fantastic, just incredibly smart and dedicated people. And then the technology, it makes sense. We like to joke that we're not just taking the box—the observability box—and writing Kubernetes in Crayon on the outside. It was built from the ground up for cloud-native, right?So, it's built for this speed, containers coming and going all the time, for the scale, just how much more metrics and observability data that containers emit, the interdependencies between all of your microservices and your containers, like, all of that stuff. When you combine it makes the older… let's call them legacy. It's crazy to call, like, some of these SaaS solutions legacy but they really are; they weren't built for cloud-native, they were built for VMs and a more traditional cloud infrastructure, and they're starting to fall over. So, that's how I got involved. It's actually, as we record, it's my one-year anniversary at Chronosphere. Which is, it's been a really wild year. We've grown a lot.Corey: Congratulations. I usually celebrate those by having a surprise meeting with my boss and someone I've never met before from HR. They don't offer your coffee. They have the manila envelope of doom in front of them and hold on, it's going to be a wild meeting. But on the plus side, you get to leave work early today.Rachel: So, good thing you run in your own business now, Corey.Corey: Yeah, it's way harder for me to wind up getting surprise-fired. I see it coming [laugh]—Rachel: [laugh].Corey: —aways away now, and it looks like an economic industry trend.Rachel: [sigh]. Oh, man. Well, anyhow.Corey: Selfishly, I have to ask. You spent a lot of time working in cloud cost, to a point where I learned an awful lot from you as I was exploring the space and learning as I went. And, on some level, for me at least, it's become an aspect of my identity, for better or worse. What was it like for you to leave and go into an orthogonal space? And sure, there's significant overlap, but it's a very different problem aimed at different buyers, and honestly, I think it is a more exciting problem that you are in now, from a business strategic perspective because there's a limited amount of what you can cut off that goes up theoretically to a hundred percent of the cloud bill. But getting better observability means you can accelerate your feature velocity and that turns into something rather significant rather quickly. But what was it like?Rachel: It's uncomfortable, for sure. And I tend to do this to myself. I get a little bit itchy the same way I wanted to get out of storage. It's not because there's anything wrong with storage; I just wanted to go try something different. I tend to, I guess, do this to myself every five years ago, I make a slightly orthogonal switch in the space that I'm in.And I think it's because I love learning something new. The jumping into something new and having the fresh eyes is so terrifying, but it's also really fun. And so it was really hard to leave cloud cost management. I mean, I got to Chronosphere and I was like, “Show me the cloud bill.” And I was like, “Do we have Reserved Instances?” Like, “Are we doing Committed Use Discounts with Google?”I just needed to know. And then that helped. Okay, I got a look at the cloud bill. I felt a little better. I made a few optimizations and then I got back to my actual job which was, you know, running product marketing for Chronosphere. And I still love to jump in and just make just a little recommendation here and there. Like, “Oh, I noticed the costs are creeping up on this. Did we consider this?”Corey: Oh, I still get a kick out of that where I was talking to an Amazonian whose side project was 110 bucks a month, and he's like, yeah, I don't think you could do much over here. It's like, “Mmm, I'll bet you a drink I can.”—Rachel: Challenge accepted.Corey: —it's like, “All right. You're on.” Cut it to 40 bucks. And he's like, “How did you do that?” It's because I know what I'm doing and this pattern repeats.And it's, are the architectural misconfigurations bounded by contacts that turn into so much. And I still maintain that I can look at the AWS bill for most environments for last month and have a pretty good idea, based upon nothing other than that, what's going on in the environment. It turns out that maybe that's a relatively crappy observability system when all is said and done, but it tells an awful lot. I can definitely see the appeal of wanting to get away from purely cost-driven or cost-side information and into things that give a lot more context into how things are behaving, how they're performing. I think there's been something of an industry rebrand away from monitoring, alerting, and trending over time to calling it observability.And I know that people are going to have angry opinions about that—and it's imperative that you not email me—but it all is getting down to the same thing of is my site up or down? Or in larger distributed systems, how down is it? And I still think we're learning an awful lot. I cringe at the early days of Nagios when that was what I was depending upon to tell me whether my site was up or not. And oh, yeah, turns out that when the Nagios server goes down, you have some other problems you need to think about. It became this iterative, piling up on and piling up on and piling up on until you can get sort of good at it.But the entire ecosystem around understanding what's going on in your application has just exploded since the last time I was really running production sites of any scale, in anger. So, it really would be a different world today.Rachel: It's changing so fast and that's part of what makes it really exciting. And the other big thing that I love about this is, like, this is a must-have. This is not table stakes. This is not optional. Like, a great observability solution is the difference between conquering a market or being overrun.If you look at what our founders—our founders at Chronosphere came from Uber, right? They ran the observability team at Uber. And they truly believe—and I believe them, too—that this was a competitive advantage for them. The fact that you could go to Uber and it's always up and it's always running and you know you're not going to have an issue, that became an advantage to them that helped them conquer new markets. We do the same thing for our customers. Corey: The entire idea around how these things are talked about in terms of downtime and the rest is just sort of ludicrous, on some level, because we take specific cases as industry truths. Like, I still remember, when Amazon was down one day when I was trying to buy a pair of underwear. And by that theory, it was—great, I hit a 404 page and a picture of a dog. Well, according to a lot of these industry truisms, then, well, one day a week for that entire rotation of underpants, I should have just been not wearing any. But no here in reality, I went back an hour later and bought underpants.Now, counterpoint: If every third time I wound up trying to check out at Amazon, I wound up hitting that error page, I would spend a lot more money at Target. There is a point at which repeated downtime comes at a cost. But one-offs for some businesses are just fine. Counterpoint with if Uber is down when you're trying to get a ride, well, that ride [unintelligible 00:28:36] may very well be lost for them and there is a definitive cost. No one's going to go back and click on an ad as well, for example, and Amazon is increasingly an advertising company.So, there's a lot of nuance to it. I think we can generally say that across the board, in most cases, downtime bad. But as far as how much that is and what form that looks like and what impact that has on your company, it really becomes situationally dependent.Rachel: I'm just going to gloss over the fact that you buy your underwear on Amazon and really not make any commentary on that. But I mean—Corey: They sell everything there. And the problem, of course, is the crappy counterfeit underwear under the Amazon Basics brand that they ripped off from the good underwear brands. But that's a whole ‘nother kettle of wax for a different podcast.Rachel: Yep. Once again, not making any commentary on your—on that. Sorry, I lost my train of thought. I work in my dining room. My husband, my dog are all just—welcome to pandemic life here.Corey: No, it's fair. They live there. We don't, as a general rule.Rachel: [laugh]. Very true. Yeah. You're not usually in my dining room, all of you but—oh, so uptime downtime, also not such a simple conversation, right? It's not like all of Amazon is down or all of DoorDash is down. It might just be one individual service or one individual region or something that is—Corey: One service in one subset of one availability zone. And this is the problem. People complain about the Amazon status page, but if every time something was down, it reflected there, you'd see a never ending sea of red, and that would absolutely erode confidence in the platform. Counterpoint when things are down for you and it's not red. It's maddening. And there's no good answer.Rachel: No. There's no good answer. There's no good answer. And the [laugh] yeah, the Amazon status page. And this is something I—bringing me back to my Forrester days, availability and resiliency in the cloud was one of the areas I focused on.And, you know, this was once again, early days of public cloud, but remember when Netflix went down on Christmas Eve, and—God, what year was this? Maybe… 2012, and that was the worst possible time they could have had downtime because so many people are with their families watching their Doctor Who Christmas Specials, which is what I was trying to watch at the time.Corey: Yeah, now you can't watch it. You have to actually talk to those people, and none of us can stand them. And oh, dear Lord, yeah—Rachel: What a nightmare.Corey: —brutal for the family dynamic. Observability is one of those things as well that unlike you know, the AWS bill, it's very easy to explain to people who are not deep in the space where it's, “Oh, great. Okay. So, you have a website. It goes well. Then you want—it gets slow, so you put it on two computers. Great. Now, it puts on five computers. Now, it's on 100 computers, half on the East Coast, half on the West Coast. Two of those computers are down. How do you tell?”And it turns in—like, they start to understand the idea of understanding what's going on in a complex system. “All right, how many people work at your company?” “2000,” “Great. Three laptops are broken. How do you figure out which ones are broken?” If you're one of the people with a broken laptop, how do you figure out whether it's your laptop or the entire system? And it lends itself really well to analogies, whereas if I'm not careful when I describe what I do, people think I can get them a better deal on underpants. No, not that kind of Amazon bill. I'm sorry.Rachel: [laugh]. Yeah, or they started to think that you're some kind of accountant or a tax advisor, but.Corey: Which I prefer, as opposed to people at neighborhood block parties thinking that I'm the computer guy because then it's, “Oh, I'm having trouble with the printer.” It's, “Great. Have you tried [laugh] throwing away and buying a new one? That's what I do.”Rachel: This is a huge problem I have in my life of everyone thinking I'm going to fix all of their computer and cloud things. And I come from a big tech family. My whole family is in tech, yet somehow I'm the one at family gatherings doing, “Did you turn it off and turn it back on again?” Like, somehow that's become my job.Corey: People get really annoyed when you say that and even more annoyed when it fixes the problem.Rachel: Usually does. So, the thread I wanted to pick back up on though before I got distracted by my husband and dog wandering around—at least my son is not in the room with us because he'd have a lot to say—is that the standard industry definition of observability—so once again, people are going to write to us, I'm sure; they can write to me, not you, Corey, about observability, it's just the latest buzzword. It's just monitoring, or you know—Corey: It's hipster monitoring.Rachel: Hipster monitoring. That's what you like to call it. I don't really care what we call it. The important thing is it gets us through three phases, right? The first is knowing that something is wrong. If you don't know what's wrong, how are you supposed to ever go fix it, right? So, you need to know that those three laptops are broken.The next thing is you need to know how bad is it? Like, if those three laptops are broken is the CEO, the COO, and the CRO, that's real bad. If it's three, you know, random peons in marketing, maybe not so bad. So, you need to triage, you need to understand roughly, like, the order of magnitude of it, and then you need to fix it. [laugh].Once you fix it, you can go back and then say, all right, what was the root cause of this? How do we make sure this doesn't happen again? So, the way you go through that cycle, you're going to use metrics, you might use logs, you might use traces, but that's not the definition of observability. Observability is all about getting through that, know, then triage, then fix it, then understand.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. If people do want to learn more, give you their unfiltered opinions, where's the best place to find you?Rachel: Well, you can find me on Twitter, I'm @RachelDines. You can also email me, rachel@chronosphere.io. I hope I don't regret giving out that email address. That's a good way you can come and argue with me about what is observability. I will not be giving advice on cloud bills. For that, you should go to Corey. But yeah, that's a good way to get in touch.Corey: Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it.Rachel: Yeah, thank you.Corey: Rachel Dines, Head of Product and Technical Marketing at Chronosphere. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, and castigate me with an angry comment telling me that I really should have followed the thread between the obvious link between art history and AWS billing, which is almost certainly a more disturbing Caravaggio.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Let's Talk Cabling!
Manufacture Warranty Programs Point vs Counterpoint

Let's Talk Cabling!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 48:23


All of the manufacturers have warranty programs. They also have steps to get into the programs and costs associated with the program.  We discuss the good and bad in our unique point vs counterpoint discussion. I will present in favor of manufactures and Don Mangiarelli, owner of  Evergreen State Retail Technology Solutions, an ICT contractor for over a decade will present in favor of Contractors.  Who do you think will win?Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/letstalkcabling)

Radio 4 Quiz
Counterpoint Episode 13

Radio 4 Quiz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 30:34


The music quiz reaches its climax with finalists aiming to win the Counterpoint trophy.

Corked Stats
The Counterpoint, Episode 9

Corked Stats

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 20:11


Big Johnny Stud @MLBMovingAvg responds to his favorite Fantasy Baseball pods:ITL: RPs Are K/DSTDEADPULLHITTER w/Zinkie: Projecting The Field / The Age Of Info vs Age Of Decision MakingDCN: Get Your GuysRotoWire: Setting Queues, Proactive > Reactive

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Counterpoint Panel - March 16 - John Mraz & Bill Hutchison

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 18:57


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Getting Hammered
Counterpoint: No

Getting Hammered

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 46:11


No. Just no. With allergies, with Russia, with gas prices, with poorly designed logos... You get the point. Times 00:12 - Segment: Welcome to the Show 09:55 - Segment: The News You Need to Know 10:04 - An update on Russia's invasion of Ukraine 17:47 - White House invites TikTokers to talk gas prices 22:45 - The View's Ana Navarro. Keith Olbermann says feds should investigate journalists and citizens acting as "Russian assets" 27:26 - Crime spikes in Washington, D.C., Seattle, other big cities 32:51 - Australian government reveals new phallic-shaped logo for women's organization 35:22 - NBA star Kyrie Irving's vaccine controversy takes a turn as restrictions lift 42:11 - Longtime NFL quarterback Tom Brady "unretires," says he'll return to Tampa Bay next season

Radio 4 Quiz
Counterpoint Episode 12

Radio 4 Quiz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 28:57


Paul Gambaccini hosts the third semi-final in the long-running music quiz

Corked Stats
The Counterpoint, Episode 8

Corked Stats

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 26:58


TURNTWO w/Doug Dennis- KenleyROTOSAURUS w/Rob DiP- Weighing ProjectionsS&TB w/TorresTakes- Will This Player Be On Winning Teams?DCN w/John Fish- GroupthinkPLAYERS POD- Mariners Futures Bet