Podcasts about foreign service

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 440PODCASTS
  • 675EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about foreign service

Show all podcasts related to foreign service

Latest podcast episodes about foreign service

ChinaPower
Analyzing China's Commitment to Climate Change: A Conversation with Joanna Lewis

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:39


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Joanna Lewis joins us to discuss China's commitment to addressing climate change. Dr. Lewis provides an overview of major domestic and international policies that China has implemented to combat climate change, including its dual-carbon goals, newly launched emissions trading scheme, and commitment to end new coal-fired financing abroad. She emphasizes that China is a crucial player not just in international climate negotiations, but also in the global effort to keep warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. Dr. Lewis also assesses China's role in the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow and discusses how China's performance impacted international progress in combating climate change and China's desire to be seen as a global leader on climate issues. Lastly, Dr. Lewis highlights the new joint working group between the U.S. and China as an important step in making meaningful progress on climate change during an era of strategic competition between the two countries. Dr. Joanna Lewis is the Provost's Distinguished Associate Professor of Energy and Environment and Director of the Science, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. Dr. Lewis has two decades of experience working on international climate and clean energy policy with a focus on China. She is also a faculty affiliate in the China Energy Group at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The One Way Ticket Show
Parag Khanna - Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, Best-selling Author & World Traveler

The One Way Ticket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:03


Parag Khanna is a leading global strategy advisor, world traveler, and best-selling author. He is Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. Parag's newest book is MOVE: The Forces Uprooting Us (2021), which was preceded by The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century (2019). He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also the author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). Parag was named one of Esquire's “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century,” and featured in WIRED magazine's “Smart List.” He holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has traveled to nearly 150 countries and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. On this episode, Parag shares his one way ticket to Berlin and reflects how he became enchanted with the city after visiting as a child right after the Berlin Wall fell, and the lessons Berlin has to teach other cities today. Plus, Parag highlights some of the fascinating observations from his latest book, MOVE: The Forces Uprooting Us. And for the man who's been to nearly as many countries on the planet as there are countries, where hasn't he gone that he'd like to visit? Tune in and find out. Parag is just one of the engaging personalities featured on The One Way Ticket Show, where Host Steven Shalowitz explores with his guests where they would go if given a one way ticket, no coming back. Their destinations may be in the past, present, future, real, imaginary or a state of mind. Steven's guests have included: Nobel Peace Prize Winner, President Jose Ramos-Horta; Legendary Talk Show Host, Dick Cavett; Law Professor, Alan Dershowitz; Fashion Expert, Tim Gunn; Broadcast Legend, Charles Osgood; International Rescue Committee President & CEO, David Miliband; Former Senator, Joe Lieberman; Playwright, David Henry Hwang; Journalist-Humorist-Actor, Mo Rocca; SkyBridge Capital Founder & Co-Managing Partner, Anthony Scaramucci; Abercrombie & Kent Founder, Geoffrey Kent; Travel Expert, Pauline Frommer, as well as leading photographers, artists, chefs, writers, intellectuals and more.

War Stories by Preston Stewart
171: Peter Cozzens "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation"

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 71:22


Sayre and Preston are joined today by author Peter Cozzens to talk about his most recent book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation". Peter Cozzens is the international-award winning author or editor of seventeen books on the American Civil War and the American West. Cozzens retired after a thirty-year career as a Foreign Service Officer, U. S. Department of State. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, he served as a captain in the U. S. Army. Cozzens's most recent book, Tecumseh and the Prophet, published by Alfred A. Knopf in October 2020, was awarded the Western Writers of America Spur Award and was a finalist for the George Washington Prize. It has also been published in the United Kingdom, Spain, and Italy. His book The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West was published by Alfred A. Knopf in October 2016. It received the 2017 Gilder Lehrman Prize for the best work in Military History published in the English language, the Caroline Bancroft Prize in Western History, and--in translation--the 2018 HisLibris Award (Spain) for the best non-fiction work of history. The Earth is Weeping was chosen by Smithsonian Magazine as one of the top ten history books of 2016. It also made several other best books of the year lists, including Amazon, the San Francisco Chronicle, the London Times, and Newsday. The Earth is Weeping was also published in Italian, Spanish, United Kingdom, and Dutch editions. All of Cozzens' books have been selections of the Book of the Month Club, History Book Club, and/or the Military Book Club. Cozzens' This Terrible Sound: The Battle of Chickamauga and The Shipwreck of Their Hopes: The Battles for Chattanooga were both Main Selections of the History Book Club and were chosen by Civil War Magazine as two of the 100 greatest works ever written on the conflict. In 2002 Cozzens received the American Foreign Service Association's highest award, given annually to one Foreign Service Officer for exemplary moral courage, integrity, and creative dissent. He has also received an Alumni Achievement Award from his alma mater Knox College, from which he graduated summa cum laude. Peter Cozzens: https://www.petercozzens.net

Angry Americans with Paul Rieckhoff
141. Joe Cirincione. The Marshall Islands, the Western Shoshone Tribe, the Atomic Vets: America's Secret Nuke Past. The Rich and Powerful Test While the Rest of Us Die. Inside the New Series on ViceTV.

Angry Americans with Paul Rieckhoff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:03


Now is still a time to stay vigilant. Especially when it comes to national security. Ukraine says that Russia has amassed 100,000 troops near their border. Along with tanks, armored personnel vehicles and artillery. NATO has issued a warning. America has issued a warning. And Russia is denying they plan to invade Ukraine. War is very possible.  And you were probably focused instead on Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers lying about being vaccinated. Or maybe, understandably, you were focused on getting your kid a COVID shot or getting yourself a booster. But while you and most of America are focused on all that, the Secretary of Defense, and many others tasked with protecting America have their eyes on Russia. They always have their eyes on Russia. And on North Korea. And on Pakistan. And on China. And on five other countries across the globe. Because of one simple reason: they have nukes.  Nine countries in the world possess nuclear weapons capable of destroying the entire globe. And one of them is Russia. And maybe you forgot about that completely until you read this.  Nuke are THE number one threat to the entire world as we know it. Yeah, pandemics can be globe-killers. And of course, climate change is stripping and burning the world bit by bit. But only nukes could destroy the entire world as we know it in a matter of hours. And THAT is worth your focus. And your attention. And your vigilance.  And it's the focus of the newest episode of the groundbreaking television mini-series on Vice TV, While The Rest of Us Die. Our host, Paul Rieckhoff, is Consulting Producer and a Contributor. And he and Righteous Media are bringing you this powerful, urgent Season #2 of the series every Thursday this month at 10PM. Produced by Efran Films, Showrunner Anthony Lappé, and narrated by our friend and past guest on this show, Jeffrey Wright, the series is tearing into the scariest, most deadly, most urgent issues facing us all. And in the newest episode, we're talking nukes. And it features one of the best minds in the world on the issue--and our guest in this pod--Joe Cirincione (@Cirincione). Joe has worked on nuclear weapons policy in Washington for more than 35 years and is one of the top experts in the field. He was the Director for Non-Proliferation at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and author of Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Threats, and co-author of Universal Compliance: A Strategy for Nuclear Security. He was the president of Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation. And now teaches at the Georgetown University Graduate School of Foreign Service. He's one of America's best known weapons experts, appearing frequently in print and on FOX News, MSNBC, CNN, ABC, NBC, PBS, NPR and occasionally on Comedy Central. He joins us to drop knowledge bombs about nukes. And it's an episode you don't want to miss. Hit play now.  You can support this show and join our dynamic community of listeners by joining the IA Patreon community. You'll get exclusive access to events, guests, merch discounts, and special content. And you'll help us keep speaking independent truth to power.  You can also WATCH the full conversation in video with Paul and Joe here. Independent Americans is powered by Righteous Media. Find us on social media or www.IndependentAmericans.us.    Stay vigilant, America.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Scope Conditions Podcast
Why Empires Declared a War on Drugs, with Diana Kim

Scope Conditions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 73:30


Today on Scope Conditions: how the paper-pushers of Empires reshaped colonialism in Southeast Asia. Our guest is Dr. Diana Kim, an Assistant Professor at Georgetown's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and the Hans Kohn member (2021-22) at the Institute for Advanced Studies' School of Historical Studies. In her award-winning book, Empires of Vice, Diana unpacks the puzzle of opium prohibition in the French and British colonies of Southeast Asia. As she traces out the twists and turns of colonial drug policies, Diana asks how states define the problems they need to solve, and how policymakers come to see crisis in the things they once took for granted. For decades, opium was a cornerstone of European colonialism in places like Burma, Malaya, and French Indochina. At their peak, opium taxes made up more than half of all colonial revenues. At the same time, levying a surcharge on what they deemed a peculiarly Asian vice gave the colonizers a sense of moral superiority over their subjects. But over the late 19th and early 20th centuries, colonial governments across Southeast Asia made a sharp reversal toward opium prohibition. Why did the French and British choose to crack down on what they had once seen as a fiscal bedrock of empire? How did empires that had grown up so tightly entangled with the opium trade come to see the drug as so deeply troubling? As Diana contends, this dramatic about-face was driven less by dictates from London and Paris and more by the evolving understandings of low-level bureaucrats on the ground in the colonies. Through the day-to-day work of administering policies and keeping records, these minor functionaries developed pet theories, drew casual causal inferences, and constructed new official realities that filtered up to the highest reaches of government – shaping perceptions, issue frames, and policy debates in the metropoles.We talk with Diana about how imperial drug policies across the region were recast from the bottom-up as rank-and-file bureaucrats puzzled, and often bungled, their way through the everyday challenges of running an empire. We also discuss how Diana pieced together these stories: how she turned troves of archival paperwork, strewn across three continents, into coherent narratives. She tells us how she reconstructed colonial administrators' interpretive struggles and how she connected the dots from ideas developed on the ground to political debates and decisions back in Europe. We also talk with Diana about the unusual portrait she paints of colonial governance: one in which the colonizers assume power before they've really figured out what to do with it. Rather than a confident empire imposing its will on its subjects, we see decision-making processes shot through with misperception, unintended consequences, and inner anxieties. We get Diana to reflect on how her account squares with common understandings of imperialism and of the state itself.For references to all the academic works discussed in this episode, visit the episode webpage at https://www.scopeconditionspodcast.com/episodes/episode-22-why-empires-declared-a-war-on-drugs-with-diana-kim 

The Embassy Wealth Podcast
Turning A Dream into a Brick and Mortar Business with Eurona Tilley

The Embassy Wealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 31:46


As a Foreign Service spouse and young mother with small children living in South America, Eurona found herself passing by a Pilates studio everyday while taking her son to school.  Having never taken a Pilates class, she was intrigued. When she visited the studio in person, however, the instructors initially tried to dissuade her from taking classes, as she wasn't the same build as the other students. Eurona persisted anyway and fell in love with the practice. She had a dream that one day she would find a way to make Pilates an inclusive practice that would welcome all shapes and sizes of students.   With vision, a lot of hard work, and a little bit of serendipity, Eurona first became a certified pilates instructor and then she had the opportunity to open her own studio in Fairfax, Virginia. Inclusivity is one of the studio's core principles, and Eurona has dedicated herself to welcoming all students who attend her classes.   In this interview, Eurona discusses:   how she adapted as a business owner/ fitness instructor during a time when COVID was forcing businesses to close their doors her advice for success (hint: it's as easy as owning a journal) how society has affected female business owners' perspective on their personal and monetary worth her story of how saying yes to coffee changed her world as well as the world of Pilates … and much more! Learn more about all that Epiphany Pilates has to offer here: https://www.epiphanypilates.com.    Music: “Higher Up” by Shane Ivers

American Diplomat
From the Middle East to Rural America

American Diplomat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:11


Dave Harden, formerly of USAID, compares service within AID to the mainstream Foreign Service (where is most of the money and the leadership opportunity, for example?), and connects the economic dimension of international development to American domestic politics.  Harden is running for Congress, using his development experience and lifelong knowledge of rural voters' needs.  

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: The Role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Antonio Flores, president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), leads a conversation on the role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in higher education. FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted and honored to have Dr. Antonio Flores with us today to discuss the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions. Dr. Flores is president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Established in 1986, HACU represents more than five hundred colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Europe. During his tenure as president of HACU, the association has nearly tripled its membership and budget, expanded its programs, and improved legislation for Hispanic Serving Institutions, and increased federal and private funding for HSIs. He previously served as director of programs and services for the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority, and the Michigan Higher Education Student Loan Authority. And, needless to say, he's taught at public and private institutions, conducted research and policy studies on higher education issues. And so it really is wonderful to have him with us today to talk about HACU, how HACU is committed to the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions, and to serving underrepresented populations. Obviously, we are very much looking to develop talent for the next generation of foreign policy leaders, and really look forward to this conversation. So, Antonio, thank you for being with us. It would be great if you could talk about the Hispanic Serving Institutions, their role in higher education, and your strategic vision for HACU broadly. FLORES: Thank you, Irina, for those very flattering remarks and introduction. And of course, we're delighted to be part of the series here today and talk a little bit about what HSIs are doing and how they can do more of the great work they've been doing for the nation, and HACU's role as well in promoting them. And suffice to say that Hispanic Serving Institutions have become the backbone of not only Hispanic higher education, but also the American labor force. Because there are more—there are more than 560 now HSIs across the nation, enroll the vast majority, more than 5.2 million of them, of underserved students who historically have not been adequately served in higher education, including Latinos. And it just happens that this population, the Hispanic population, is contributing more than half of all the new workers joining the American labor force today. And that proportion is likely to continue to increase in the years ahead. In addition, of course, they serve scores of African Americans, of Asian Americans, Native Americans, and all Americans. So they are really a microcosm of American diversity. And for that very reason, going forward as these populations continue to increase demographically, their representation in the labor force will only continue to develop. The latest Census Bureau report for 2010 to 2020 indicates that more than 51 percent of all the population growth in the nation is attributed to Hispanics. So there we have it. It's just the reality of the facts. And therefore, HSIs are now the backbone of America's labor force, because ultimately the demands of the global economy are such that we need to step up to the plate and really educate at a much higher level, and train at a much higher level those underserved populations, particular Hispanics, so that we can remain competitive in that global economy. And that includes the preparation of top-notch leaders for foreign service careers. And so if we were to summarize how we view HSIs with respect to America's challenges today, and opportunities in the future, I would say that there are three dimensions that define HSIs vis a vis the United States of America and its future in the world. Number one is diversity. And I already alluded to some of that. But diversity is not just with respect to the fact that they have the most diverse student population on their campuses. But it's also the diversity across types of institutions because we have community colleges, we have regional universities, and we have research-intensive, or R1 institutions. So we have within campuses tremendous diversity, and we have across campuses nationwide institutionally diversity as well. And so that's the name of the game. And that's the name of the game for America, is diversity. And it's the name of the game for the world. It's a very diverse world out there. And so the more attuned those top-notch leaders that were looking to educate in our institutions are with respect to their diversity, the more not only knowledgeable and experienced and sensitive to that diverse reality of the world and of America, the much better leaders they are going to be. And so diversity, again, is that one unavoidable element of our world and of our country. The second, I think, very important element or dimension of HSIs is the dynamism. They are very dynamic institutions that are really doing a magnificent job with fewer resources than the rest of the field. They don't have the big pockets or big endowments. They don't have the applications they need from the federal government they should get. And yet, they excel at educating those who come to their campuses. Just to give you an idea, Opportunity Insights is a name of an organization that does socioeconomic analysis of graduates from students from colleges across the country. And particularly they focus on how institutions educate and position in careers those who come from the lowest quintile of entering freshmen to college. And they believe that those who graduate, they graduate and see what proportion of those who came in the lowest quintile move to the top quintile in terms of earnings. And in the last report I saw, nine of the ten top institutions in that regard were Hispanic Serving Institutions. Nine of the top ten. It's not the Ivy League institutions, for sure. It is those institutions that I mentioned that are part of our group of HSIs. And in fact, the number one is Cal State LA in that report that I saw. And so, again, because they are very dynamic, creative, innovative, and resourceful with respect to using what little they have to optimize the educational outcomes of those who come to their campuses. And not just educational outcomes, but career outcomes. Once they are in the workforce, their earnings are higher than those of others from the same lowest quintile when they enter college. So dynamism is the second major component. And I would say deliverance. Deliverance for underserved populations is another important quality that HSIs represent, because they are ultimately serving—for the most part, the majority of their students are first-generation college students, many of them from immigrant families who are unfamiliar with the educational system and with the intricacies of going through a college education, because they themselves never had that opportunity to pass down. So they are at a very distinct socioeconomic disadvantage coming from those types of families who are also low income, because to be an HSI not only does an institution have to have more than 25 percent of its enrollment being Hispanic, but also they have to show that the majority of their students are Pell Grant eligible—in other words, needy, low-income students. And the other criterion is that they have to spend on average per student less than the average of their peer institutions. So they are efficient, very cost-effective, and they serve the neediest of our society. So there you have it. Diversity, dynamism, and deliverance for the most needed in our society. That's what HSIs are all about. And so they really are in need of much greater support from the federal government, the state governments, and from the corporate community and the philanthropic community. And our association advocates for that to be the case, with some success but not enough. We have been able to increase the appropriations for them from Congress over the years, but they are way behind other cohorts of minority-serving institutions that get much more money per student than HSIs do, despite the fact that they—for instance, they not only educate 67 percent of all the 3.8 million Hispanics in college today; they also educate three times as many African Americans as all the HBCUs combined. Let me repeat that: More than three times as many African Americans go to HSIs as they go to HBCUs, OK? And more than 42 percent of all the Asian Americans in college today attend HSIs. They also educate more than twice as many Native Americans as all the tribal colleges and universities put together. And then we have other groups of different national origins who come to our campuses. So they are extremely diverse. And so that's, in a nutshell, what HSIs are all about. And they've been growing, about thirty new HSIs per year, because demographically it's how the country's moving. There are more Hispanic young people emerging from high school and going to college than from any other group. And conversely, the non-Hispanic White student enrollment has been declining continually year after year for the last ten years. Look at the numbers. And that's not going to stop. In major states, like California and Texas, for example, the two largest in the nation, more than 50 percent—about 52-55 percent of the K-12 enrollment is Hispanic. If you add the other minority populations, overwhelmingly these states futures are diverse and Hispanic. And so is the country. Other states are moving in the same direction, whether it's Florida, or Illinois, or New York, New Jersey. The main states in the nation are moving in those—in that direction. So that's why it's so essential for Congress, the states, corporate America, and philanthropic America to invest in these institutions much more than they have been doing, because they represent the very future of this nation. To the extent that the new generations of graduates coming out of them are equipped with the right tools to succeed as scientists, as technicians, as professionals in whatever field they choose, our country will thrive. And the opposite will happen if we don't. It's that simple. And so that's what I wanted to just briefly say as an introductory commentary on HSIs. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Thank you very much for that. We're going to go to the group now for their questions. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I'm going to first go to Manuel Montoya, who has raised his hand. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And, Dr. Flores, it's a real pleasure to have you on the call. I appreciate all the work that you do for HACU and for Hispanic Serving Institutions. I am with the University of New Mexico. I'm an associate professor in international management at UNM, but I also do a lot of work with my cohorts on supporting HSI—our HSI designation. We are a Hispanic Serving Institution and an R1 institution as well. All of the things you said are really important. And I had a comment and then a question. I think this question of—this idea of diversity being the name of the game is not to be underestimated. I think that the students that go through HSI-designated institutions, I think that they have the potential to reshape and recalibrate what we mean when we say we are ambassadorial in the world. And the United States needs to upgrade and change its relational dynamics, political and economic, to include diverse voices that come from the learned and lived experiences of people who traditionally come from first-generation families, first-generation students. And HSIs are equipped to do that. So my question becomes, you mentioned wanting to track some people into the foreign service exam. But what other types of experiences or opportunities do you think are best practices for students that are coming out of HSIs to participate in the larger international relations frameworks and careers that are setting the global agenda? FLORES: That's a good question, Professor Montoya. And let me share with you briefly something that I mentioned before we started the webinar to friends at CFR. And that is that HACU has a very robust national internship program that places upwards of five hundred undergraduates, and some of our graduate students, with federal agencies, including the State Department. We signed an MOU with the late Secretary Powell, who at that time was very much committed to increasing the number of Latinos in the Foreign Service, and other underrepresented populations. And that remains in place, although not with the numbers that we would like to see. And yet, there are other agencies that also have a foreign or abroad projection, like Department of Agriculture, for example. And others that have offices across the world. And so we are very much into helping them find the right talent they need, and getting them also as interns experience those agencies, and putting them on the right track to become full-fledged employees once they graduate. So that's one of the things that we've been doing. We need to do much more of that. I accept that the number is, as impressive as they may sound, are very minute when it comes to the populations that we're talking about. And our own association has made it a priority to expand its international reach. And we have, depending on the year, anywhere from forty to fifty universities across Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain that are affiliated with us to do precisely what you suggest, which is student mobility and experience abroad. And so—and in both directions, also that they would come to be in the U.S. And so we have the beginnings, I think, of a major push to make sure that many, many more young people who—they have a kind of an almost organic connection to international affairs, in this case Latinos, because most of them come from families who immigrated or have roots in other countries, and are really very much culturally adept to international roles. So your point is well-taken. And you'll see a lot more activity from our end as an association in that regard. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Shoshana Chatfield. Q: Yes, hello. I wanted to say thank you for such a wonderful presentation and for really exposing me to some of the issues that I wasn't aware of previously. I am the president of the United States Naval War College. And since I've been here over the past two years, I have been actively trying to expand our recruiting effort to make our vacancies on our faculty available to members of the community. And yet, I'm not seeing any appreciable difference in the applicant pool. And I wondered if you could advise me how I might approach this differently to raise awareness about hiring to these war colleges who have not traditionally had a high representation of faculty who come from the same backgrounds that you described. FLORES: Thank you. Thank you for your very timely question, President Chatfield. Let me say that one of the first things that I would suggest is that you join our association as a college. Why would that be helpful to your effort? Because then you will connect with presidents and CEOs of five hundred-plus community colleges, regional university, and so forth, and school districts that are also affiliated with that, that are defined as Hispanic-serving school districts. So that even in high school you will have a presence through our association's outreach to them, and that you also would network with peers of diverse institutions across the country who may have robust pipelines of Ph.D. graduates and others who could fit your own aspirations, in terms of getting some of those faculty on your campus, some of those administrators, and some of those as students. Because, at the end of the day, probably—you probably want to have a much more diverse student body. And that can come from precisely that opportunity to not only interact but formally establish relationships with some of those colleges to transfer, for instance, from community colleges or from high schools that we interact with on a regular basis. So that would be one suggestion. We also have in our association a very, very nimble system called ProTalento. It's online. That is P-R-O-T-A-L-E-N-T-O, ProTalento. And that that—you can go to our website, find it. And we have on that website a very robust database of individuals who are looking for opportunities at different colleges. That are already teaching, or doing research, or both, and are looking for other opportunities. And also, we have institutions that are looking for them. And the system basically matches them. So you can go there and find a goldmine, so to speak, of talent. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Great question. And we have a written question, a couple written questions in the chat. This one comes from Andrea Purdy, who is an associate professor of Spanish at Colorado State University. We are anticipating reaching HSI status. And in talking to my students, a comment they have made to me is that they don't always feel welcomed all over the university. There are niches, but overall the sense of belonging is not felt. They also commented that while they are beginning to see themselves in classrooms, they don't see themselves in the faculty. What suggestions do you have for universities to make sure that the inclusivity is felt at all levels? FLORES: Well, it's similar to the previous question in some—in some regards, because ultimately the first thing you want to do as a college or university, it has to be job number one, is to create a climate—a campus climate of support and welcoming feelings for the students, that they feel not only appreciated but they feel really supported and welcome to the institution. And so the point made is how can we recruit or how can we diversify faculty and staff? Well, again, you go—you know, when you want to catch fish, you go fishing where the fish are. And the fish are in some of the HSIs, those that are already more developed institutions. And many of them are regional universities or R1s or R2s. And those could be a source of talent for institutions like Colorado State, that is lacking some of their representation. And of course, I want to insist that please visit ProTalento. And you may be surprised how much success you could have in getting people from that database to consider your institution. But of course, faculty and staff who look like the students are essential to create that culture, that campus climate of appreciation and welcoming, I would say. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Rosa Cervantes, who has a raised hand. And please unmute yourself and tell us your affiliation. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you for taking my questions. My name is Rosa Isela Cervantes. I'm the director of El Centro de la Raza at the University of New Mexico, and also special assistant to the president on Latino Affairs. And I really interested in what you said, Mr. Flores, about the diversity of students at HSIs, and that we serve three times the amount of—if I heard correctly—of African American students at HSIs than BCUs, is that correct? Is that— FLORES: That is correct, yes. Q: OK. And I wanted to see if you could expand a little bit about that, and also maybe think through or talk to how we can do some coalition building with folks. Because I really feel like HSIs are completely underfunded, right? You've stated it, we've heard it. But yet, they're so robust and they do so many different things for so many different students. I wonder how we might continue—and we're a member of HACU—but I wonder how we maybe think through some conversations to really get out the word about that idea, that HSIs are that robust, that HSIs do served large populations of students. And sometimes some of the most neediest students that require more money, right, for their funding. And so I just think that's very interesting. I think—I don't think a whole lot of people know about it or understand that. I had a faculty member at a different institution actually question me, because I had read that somewhere. And I think we need to talk more about it. So I'm just wondering your thoughts about coalition building and what else we can do, and how other ways that HACU needs our support to make that happen. FLORES: Thank you for your excellent question, Ms. Cervantes. And let me share with you that last week I was in Washington, D.C. most of the week and met with a number of Congress individually, including your great senator, Mr. Lujan. And guess what? There was a lot of good conversation about that point. And I have also talked with a number of African American members of Congress who didn't know that, and who actually had themselves—(background noise)—and who actually have themselves a significant number of HSIs in their districts. And they didn't know that they had all these HSIs in their districts. And so I think the word is getting out there. And, more importantly, the appreciation for the fact that these institutions really are very diverse, and not only do they educate the vast majority of Latinos and Latinas, but they also educate a larger number, as we said, of African Americans and others than the HBCUs, for example. And they didn't know that. And then—so I think that mindset might begin to change, because at the end of the day the funding and support should be focused on the students. And ultimately, if you help the neediest of students you have the more diverse population, but you have the fewest dollars per student coming from Congress. There has to be something wrong there with that equation. So there is an inequity that we are, as an association, trying to remedy. And we need all the help we can get from all—our own Latino organizations and HSIs, but also from others including the HBCUs. It's not about reducing funding for them or anything like that. They can and should be getting even more. But not—but HSIs shouldn't be treated as second-class institutions. They are not. They are the backbone, again, of America's labor force, in terms of training that labor force to be competitive in the global economy. So they have to be treated appropriately and equitably. Basically, it's about equity in terms of funding. And right now, things are not at all equitable, but we're changing that gradually. And thank you for your question. Q: Gracias. FASKIANOS: So we have a written—several written questions. So Sandra Castro, who is assistant dean of the undergraduate programs at Adelphi University says: What recommendations do you have for institutions that are striving to become HSIs in preparing for this designation? What internal changes and institutional infrastructure is necessary to truly serve the Latino student body? FLORES: I will suggest three things. One is, begin to work more closely with institutions that are already HSIs and that are doing a good job being HSIs, that are recognized for having, as they say, best practices with respect to being an HSI. And learn from them. Learn how it is that they do what they do well. And begin to then—and the second point is, educate your own leadership at your institution about how they can be much more effective and receptive to the inevitable demographic change in their student population to become an HSI, and how they can make the most of it in terms of student success, and also learning the ropes of how to get grants and funding to improve services for this population. And the third thing that I would recommend very strongly is that, you know, take a very hard look at all of your outreach and marketing materials, and revise them accordingly so that you reflect that commitment to diversity, in particular to Latino inclusion, in terms of bilingual materials and outreach to families and communities. Because many times the decision about whether to go to college or where to go to college by a student is really influenced very heavily by the family, the parents particularly, because of the tremendous pressure that many of them have in starting to work to contribute to the family income, because they come from low-income families. So working with those families and making them aware of the importance of getting a degree, a college degree, and postponing some of that lower-income—some of the minimum-wage salary that they could get as a high school graduate, and working with those families is very important. Working in their language and culture is even more important for some of them. FASKIANOS: Great. I think this is a good segue to the next question from Eric Hoffman, who got an upvote. He's the dean of the Honors College at Miami Dade College. And his question is: How can we get the Hispanic and Latinx students out of their community and expand their aspirations to colleges and universities in states and areas far from home? FLORES: Well, you know, it's an excellent question, in the sense that historically—because these are first-generation college students for the most part, whose families have not had the opportunity to educate themselves in college. And their temptation is to stay home. Especially sometimes it's worse for female students to move away from home. And my suggestion is that you, again, will work with those families as closely as you can to make them aware of the fact that moving away doesn't mean—moving away physically doesn't mean moving away from the family otherwise, that they will ultimately remain connected to the family. And now with technology it's even easier. You know, we have Facetime. We have all kinds of other ways of interacting that were not available just some years ago. And they ultimately need to consider the best options in terms of financial aid and the quality of education they're going to get, and a few of the studies that they want to pursue. Sometimes all of those things are not available locally, so you have to go where all of those are. And I think that once there is a process of education for the family in that regard, they tend to be much more flexible. We experience some of that with our own national internship program, because we place them primarily in the Washington area, but also in other places. And I personally get to intervene sometimes with some families in their language, in Spanish, to reassure them that the young woman that was going to be placed somewhere else in Washington, D.C. or elsewhere was going to be OK, and she was going to come back home after the ten-week experience, or fifteen-week internship. And, guess what? After they experienced that, their siblings—they were trailblazers for their siblings and for neighbors, and all that. Now we don't have that problem, at least with our internship program. We have thousands of applicants and, unfortunately, we can only place about five hundred a year, annually. And so it does pay off to invest in working with families closely. And again, it's a generational effect, because then younger siblings or relatives will not have that kind of issue going forward. FASKIANOS: You had mentioned that you were in D.C. last week meeting with members of Congress. And we obviously have a new secretary of education, Dr. Cardona. Have you seen a shift from the Biden administration in their approach and what they're doing from a federal level to support the HSIs? FLORES: Oh, absolutely. I mean, there is just no question about that. The shift has been dramatic. And this administration and Congress are—have shifted gears and are actually investing more than anything else in people, investing in the economy to create more jobs, investing in education to prepare the labor force much better, investing in health to protect people from not just the pandemic but from other diseases that we experience. And just in general, the infrastructure, they just passed that bill in the House, is to improve the lives of people across cities, across states, by improving their infrastructure. It is not just about roads and bridges. It is also about water systems that are decaying and are affecting the health of people. It is about the lack of access to broadband connectivity. It is all of those things that will improve the lives of people. And so there, no question. And HSIs have improved—again, not to the extent that they should be supported. But we are in a much better situation now than we were just a couple of years ago. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take Nathan Carter's written question, and then Mike Lenaghan, I know you wrote a comment/question in the chat, but I'd love for you just to raise it and speak it, because I'm afraid I might not get it exactly correct. So Nathan Carter from Northern Virginia Community College in the Washington D.C. metro area. I am the—NOVA's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer. We are an emerging HSI. When we look at our enrollment data here in fall 2021, we see a clear decline in quote/unquote “new” Hispanic students, both male and female. We wish to discuss this growing issue and recognize what may be the current obstacles or community issues happening right now in the Hispanic community that will help us explain what we see and how we can reach out to the Hispanic community to help address what could be a growing problem across various states. So I think if you could comment on that, and how to, you know, have that discussion. FLORES: Well, thank you for that question. It's something that, of course, has been exacerbated by the pandemic. Because a lot of our colleges and universities, HSIs and others, did not have the endowments or the money to immediately make—shift gears in the direction of the technology required to move from in-person to online teaching and learning, and to train faculty and staff to manage all of those new systems. And that's on the institutional side, that there was that kind of reality of not getting all of the necessary resources to make that shift immediately and successfully. On the receiving end you have families and communities that do not always have the connectivity to broadband and the devices at home and the space at home to learn online. And so it was a one-two punch—institutional and students were hit very hard. And therefore, many of them withdrew. And apart from the fact that when it comes to the rate of infection, hospitalization and death, Latinos were worse hit than any other population, so much so that during the pandemic Latinos shrank their life expectancy by three years, compared to two years for Black and 0.68 years, so less than a year, for non-Hispanic Whites. So you do have all of those things. And ultimately, that means that the students served by these institutions come from those very families that were hardest hit in their health as well. So they couldn't go to school. They were trying to survive. And many did not. And so there was a drop in the enrollment, and particularly at community colleges, is where the—they were the hardest hit with respect to that, just like that community that is emerging as an HSI. So we are pushing very hard for that to be remedied, not just for the pandemic, but for the long term. Because I think the hybrid models of teaching and learning should—will remain in place for the long haul. And we need to make sure that those families, those communities that have been historically underserved and underfunded get that necessary technology at home to do that type of educational experience. We also need to make sure that the institutions that are suffering the most get the most help to beef up their infrastructure. And not just in terms of technology, but also in terms of expanding classrooms and also creating labs that are very expensive to create for technology of science or engineering types of degrees, which are the most in demand. And in some states, it's even—it's worse than in others because a lot of students are homeless. A lot of students are homeless. And in a state like California, where we have the largest concentration of Latinos, for example, that problem has been rampant and recognized by the state as a huge priority. So what they need to do is also build affordable housing even on campuses, so that those students have a place to live in a decent, humane way. And so there are many things that come to create this perfect storm against populations like low-income Latinos, and African Americans, and others. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to ask Mike Lenaghan to ask his question live. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And it's a pleasure to see you, Dr. Flores. I am Mike Lenaghan from Miami Dade College, and truly cherish the empowerment we've enjoyed through the vehicle of HACU. It's been my experience, basically with a great deal of labor-intensive and purposeful leadership development, to have my scholars—just me, as one faculty member—successfully transfer to over 139 colleges and universities in the United States, all of whom required financial support and almost all of whom were able to avoid loans. This is over a twenty-year period. My question is: How might I, as a faculty member, also someone who's labor-intensive, be empowered, possibly mediated by HACU, to share basically how to set up my Hispanic students and their families and their relatives for the kind of success my scholars have enjoyed at Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Georgetown, UVA, Duke, UCal Berkeley, and so on? Which, when the right combination of chemistry and self-identification occurs, each of my Hispanic/Latinx scholars basically knows what they uniquely bring and add, as well as what they uniquely can address and engage in each school. I realize I am just a microcosm in a larger macrocosm, but I'm wondering does HACU have a role to play that might mediate some education and sharing, not just a book or a strategy, but something that could be shared, including some of what I like to call my all-stars, who have enjoyed operating in the context of HACU as a launching pad. Thank you, sir. FLORES: Thank you for your very, very important work, Professor Lenaghan. And thank you for your very caring teaching and supporting our students, your scholars. And ultimately, you have a lot to offer to the academic community as a faculty who cares about these students not only doing well but excelling and going to places that perhaps their families never thought of them being able to go. And I think it begins with learning from people like you what is it you've been doing so well to help those that you have helped to excel. And HACU can be a platform for you to share that. We ultimately have annual conferences and other meetings where your expertise and your success can be shared with others to adapt it to their own needs and replicate what you've been doing so well in other places, so that many more can go onto those very selective institutions, and others. And of course, I don't know if we've been connecting—I insist on this point, on connecting with families, because many of the Latino families—and maybe in the Miami area it's a little different because a lot of the Cuban and South American families perhaps come from a more middle-class background than in places like Texas or California. And maybe they had already some collegiate experience in their home countries, and they immigrated there, or whatever. But that helps a lot, OK? When they come with that background. But when they don't, when they are immigrants who come without even a high school diploma from their home countries, and they don't know the language, their highest expectation is at least to get their high school diploma and start working somewhere. And so taking them to the next level, it takes a lot of work. And it takes a lot of work in terms of making sure that they understand that if their child has the talent, and has the persistence and discipline, et cetera, et cetera, to go places, that they can be very helpful to him or her in ensuring that there is a space at home where they can study, that they do concentrate on their studies, and that they really aim for those places that you mentioned and don't settle for second-best of going to some institution, but make that their goal: I'm going to go to X or Y Ivy League or very selective institution because I have with it takes, but it's going to take a lot of nurturing and support. And the parents can be very helpful, even if they don't have an education, by really making sure that their child has the space and the time at home to concentrate and study. That will go a long way. But really, let them flourish. And so HACU can be a platform in three different ways. One is, allowing individuals like yourself, who are excelling in their teaching, to share their best practices with others. Secondly, we also, of course, have to recognize that we have some programs already in HACU that are very effective, especially those that are focused on moving a critical mass into STEM degrees. And we're going to emphasize that even more going forward. And thirdly, that we, as an association, have the ability to influence federal agencies and others—and corporations to invest in the kinds of practices that you may be successful at. And I'll give you a couple examples. We just got a planning grant from NSF, HACU did. And we are almost done with the planning for one year, because we want to submit a multiyear, multimillion grant to NSF with an emphasis on moving as high as possible, to the PhD. in fact, Latinos all the way from community college up to the research one institutions. And we are working on that proposal to be submitted early next year. But we could, I'm sure, learn from what you're doing. And so we could influence agencies to also invest more. We have a new program under NSF for HSIs that you can apply for a grant to expand what you're doing with more students, more parents. And the same thing is true with respect to other agencies. I was just in Washington last week and met with the undersecretary of the Department of Commerce to discuss the technology program, where our institutions will each have a role to play. And so we have the role of advocating and influencing agencies and Congress to invest in institutions like yours, Miami Dade, and professors like you, so that you can do more of exactly what you are doing. So please feel free to send us an email at HACU. You can send it to my attention. And I'll make sure that it finds its way to the right staff in charge of the kinds of programs that you are dealing with. We do have great staff that follows up on situations like yours. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. We will circulate after this an email with some of the resources you've mentioned and the email that we should be sharing, Dr. Flores. So we have another question, and it follows onto Mike's question, from Arturo Osorio, who's an associate professor at Rutgers University. Any advice or programs that you know to help connect the parents of the Hispanic Latino Students to the higher education experience? Many of our students are first-generation Americans and also first-generation college students. This creates a large cultural and experiential gap for parents to bridge on their understanding of what kids are going through and support them. As a result, many of the students have very stressful moments as they navigate away from the family to their college life. FLORES: Yeah. Excellent question. And my suggestion is that please send us an email. We have an office in HACU that is designated to promote pre-K-12 and higher education collaboration. The executive director of that office is Jeanette Morales. Jeanette Morales has a team, and they work with clusters or consortia of colleges, universities and K-12 schools, particularly secondary schools, to move out successfully many more of those underserved students to college and be better prepared to succeed in college. It is more substantive than just a college visitation thing or admissions officers talking with them at an event. They actually have early college interventions for high school students. So they actually earn even college credit when they are creating high school for the most advanced students. But they also have opportunity for professors from some of those universities and community college to teach as visiting teachers in those high schools, where they may not get the resources to hire faculty for advanced courses and for the courses that are required to be successful in especially STEM degrees, like advanced math, advanced science, and so forth. So that office and our association has been in place for the last seventeen years. It was that far back when we first saw that more than half of the battle to succeed in college has to be won in K-12. And it has to be won with families on your side, because first-generation college students do depend largely on families to make decision after high school. So please feel free to contact Jeanette Morales or myself in my email at our San Antonio headquarters. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. We are at the end of our time. I just wanted to ask if you could just do really briefly what you're doing internationally to encourage—you know, and we don't have a lot of time. But I don't want to leave without—you had told me in our pre-call just a little bit. So if I you could just give us a wrap-up on that, that would be fantastic. FLORES: Yeah. We think of international education not as an appendage, not as a luxury, not as an add-on proposition, but as an integral part of a college education, in this case. And we hope that the vast majority of our young people will have a chance to experience a study abroad. And of course, it's like a big dream, because right now if you look at the numbers, only about 5 to 7 percent, max, of all the 350,000 American students going to study abroad are Latino. And the same number, roughly the same percentage, is African Americans and others. And conversely, only about maybe 3 percent of all the students coming from other countries come from Latin America—1.3 percent only from Mexico, which is right next door to us, OK? So that has to change. And it has to change because people who have an international experience ultimately expand their horizons and their vision of the world and are more effective not only professionals but citizens of the world. And we feel that it is very important for our young people to do that, not as a—as a kind of a luxury, or anything like that, but as an integral part of their development as professionals. And so we plan on being even more keen on affecting legislation that will provide more resources for our institutions and international programming, and ourselves as an association being much more engaged in getting more international institutions to affiliate with us to promote that mobility, that experience, independent of whether the government decides to invest or not. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you very much. Antonio Flores, this has been really a great discussion. And thanks to everybody for their terrific questions and comments. We really appreciate it. HACU is lucky to have you. We're fortunate to have you leading this great association. As I mentioned, we will send out a link to this webinar, also some of the resources you mentioned, email addresses and the like. And I'm sure everybody knows it, but it's worth repeating, the HACU website, HACU.net. You can follow them on Twitter at @HACUnews. So go there. You can also follow us at @CFR_Academic. And please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for CFR's resources on international affairs and the like. So I hope you're all staying well. Dr. Flores, thank you again. And we look forward to your continuing involvement in this webinar series. The next invitation will be for December, and we will be sending that out under separate cover. FLORES: Thank you very much, Irina. Thank you, everyone. (END)

Diplomatic Immunity
Global Health and Global Cities with Rebecca Katz and Matt Boyce

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:31


Season 3, Episode 6: ISD Director of Programs and Research Kelly McFarland talks to Rebecca Katz, professor and director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security, who holds joint appointments in Georgetown University Medical Center and the School of Foreign Service, and Matt Boyce, PhD student in the Global Infectious Diseases program at Georgetown, about the COVID-19 pandemic and cities' responses. They discuss the public health and medical responses to COVID-19, vaccine development, the HIV and Malaria pandemics, and the ways in which city, state, and local governments have responded. Rebecca also draws on over 15 years experience working on infectious disease at the State Department.  The Rise of Metropolitanism: The International Order and Sub-National Actors, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (September 2019) The New Weapon of Choice: Technology and Information Operations Today, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (October 2020) Matt Boyce and Rebecca Katz (eds.), Inoculating Cities: Case Studies of Urban Pandemic Preparedness (Elsevier, 2021)  Rebecca Katz, "Case 342 - Global Governance of Disease," ISD Case Studies Library (2017) Episode recorded: October 28, 2021.  Episode image: Peace Through Food (Institute for the Study of Diplomacy)  Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Produced by Alistair Somerville and Kelly McFarland. For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

Decoding Purpose
Parag Khanna: MOVE - The Forces Uprooting Us and Shaping Humanity's Destiny

Decoding Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 57:52


Today's guest is Parag Khanna and he is a leading global strategy advisor, world traveller, and best-selling author. Well, actually he is the author of seven books. He is the Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario-based strategic advisory firm based out of Singapore.When it comes to full-stack humans, Parag is the real deal. He was named one of Esquire's “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century,” and featured in WIRED magazine's “Smart List.” Parag holds a PhD from the London School of Economics, and a Bachelors and Masters degree from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has travelled to nearly 150 countries and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. Impressive right….but one of the most impressive things from my perspective is Parag is kind, wise and so generous in translating a future the rest of us are yet to see. It was a joy to speak with him.Parag's newest book is MOVE: The Forces Uprooting Us (2021) and that will be the focus of today's conversation. This is a compelling look at the powerful global forces that will cause billions of us to move geographically over the next decades, ushering in an era of radical change.In the 60,000 years since people began colonizing the continents, a recurring feature of human civilization has been mobility—the ever-constant search for resources and stability. Seismic global events—wars and genocides, revolutions and pandemics—have only accelerated the process. The map of humanity isn't settled—not now, not ever.So without further delay let's get ready to MOVE. Welcome to the DNA Of Purpose Podcast.

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
45. Learning About the Future Through History with Dr. Brent L. Sterling

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 49:29


Brent L. Sterling has been an adjunct lecturer at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University for the past twenty years, teaching courses on security studies, military strategy, and operations. He is the author of Other People’s Wars: The US Military and the Challenge of Learning for Foreign Conflicts and Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? What History Teaches Us about Strategic Barriers and International Security. Dr. Sterling has spent the past thirty years as a defense analyst, including positions at the Central Intelligence Agency and consulting firms working for the U.S. Department of Defense. In our interview with Dr. Sterling, we discuss how militaries learn (or don’t!) from foreign conflicts, what pitfalls await those trying to learn from historical conflicts, how focusing only on “relevant” observations hampers our creativity in analyzing warfare, and what strategists can do to avoid past mistakes. The following bullet points highlight key insights from our interview: In Other People’s Wars, Dr. Sterling provides a longitudinal evaluation spanning the 19th and 20th centuries on what the U.S. military learned from foreign conflicts. Exploring the Crimean, Russo-Japanese, Spanish Civil, and Yom Kippur Wars as use cases, Dr. Sterlingidentifies how effectively the U.S. assimilated key lessons from each of these conflicts and developed responsive capabilities across doctrine, organization, training and education, materiel, leadership, personnel, facilities, and policy (DOTMLPF-P); drew erroneous conclusions; or failed to act altogether. Importantly, Dr. Sterling compares the success of learning from these wars across the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force. Studying foreign conflicts allows the U.S. military to learn about new technologies, their applications, and novel problem sets, facilitating proactive responsesto problems before they are encountered in the field. For example, at the beginning of the 20th century, the U.S. Army was reconsidering the future of the bayonet. Observations from the Russo-Japanese War, where knife fighting was prevalent — especially in night assaults, given the heightened risk of friendly fire — led Army Leaders to determine that the weapon was still relevant, and should be maintained. Learning from foreign wars can be a challenging endeavor, as it frequently runs counter to deeply-rooted institutional biases.Services’ culture and bureaucratic politics can limit the implementation of lessons learned from other nations’ conflicts. Insufficient access to information can also prevent the Services from fully appreciating the important implications of remote conflicts involving less than peer adversaries. The U.S. military also needs to be mindful that other observers learn from

Diplomatic Immunity
COP26, Climate Change, and Migration with Beth Ferris

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 32:07


Season 3, Episode 5: For our next installment on global commons issues, ISD Director of Programs and Research Kelly McFarland talks to Beth Ferris, research professor in the Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown and non-resident senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, about the impact of environmental change on migration. They discuss the ways in which climate change is driving internal displacement and international migration, the need for new vocabulary to describe this phenomenon and the people who experience it, and recent events in Afghanistan and other migration hot spots. Beth also provides a forecast on what she's hoping for from the forthcoming COP26 climate summit in Glasgow.  We also hear from Jeremy Mathis, professor the Science, Technology, and International Affairs program and the Center for Security Studies in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown, and Bibi La Luz Gonzalez of Eat Better Wa'ik—an anti-hunger NGO in Guatemala. Listen to previous episodes with Bibi and Jeremy on our website, or by searching for Diplomatic Immunity in your podcast app.   New Challenges to Human Security: Environmental Change and Human Mobility, ISD New Global Commons Working Group (April 2017) The New Arctic: Navigating the Realities, Possibilities, and Problems, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (July 2018) Peace Through Food: Ending the Hunger-Instability Nexus, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (August 2021) Groundswell: Preparing for Internal Climate Migration, The World Bank (March 2018)  Report on the Impact of Climate Change on Migration, The White House (October 2021) Episode recorded: Interview with Beth Ferris: Friday, October 22, 2021; Interview with Bibi La Luz Gonzalez: Friday, September 24th, 2021; Interview with Jeremy Mathis: Monday, September 20th, 2021.  Episode image: Peace Through Food (Institute for the Study of Diplomacy)  Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Produced by Alistair Somerville and Kelly McFarland. Production Assistance by Emily Linn.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

Rod Arquette Show
Rod Arquette Show: How Parents Can Shut Down National School Boards Association

Rod Arquette Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 106:23


Rod Arquette Show Daily Rundown – Monday, October 25, 20214:20 pm: Jenny Beth Martin, Honorary Chair of Tea Party Patriots Action, joins the program to discuss how parents collaborate to shut down the National School Boards Association4:38 pm: Ronald Mortenson, a retired Foreign Service officer and a Fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, joins Rod to discuss why he says the experience of downwinders in Southern Utah helps explain the low covid vaccination rates6:05 pm: Representative Rosemary Lesser joins the show to discuss why she will propose legislation during the 2022 session of the Utah Legislature to eliminate the state's portion of sales tax on food6:20 pm: Kat Dwyer of the Property and Environment Research Center joins the show to discuss her piece for National Review in which she states Joe Biden's environmental plans seem to be more about pleasing interest groups than actually helping the environment6:35 pm: Levi Thatcher of the Sugarhouse Community Council joins the show to discuss his op-ed piece for the Salt Lake Tribune in which he says the push to build more highways only makes life in Utah worse

Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley
MOVE: The forces uprooting us, with Parag Khanna

Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 47:57


Dr. Parag Khanna is my guest on Episode 141 of Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley. Parag is a leading global strategy advisor, world traveler, and best-selling author. He is the Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data, and scenario-based strategic advisory firm. Parag's newest book is MOVE: The Forces Uprooting Us (2021), which was preceded by The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century (2019). He is the author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also the author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). Parag was named one of Esquire's “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century,” and featured in WIRED magazine's “Smart List.” He holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics, and a Bachelors and Masters degree from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has traveled to nearly 150 countries and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. https://www.paragkhanna.com/

The Embassy Wealth Podcast
Buying a Travel Business during a Global Pandemic with Mary Stange

The Embassy Wealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:47


Mary Stange left a career as a flight officer with the U.S. Navy to join her Foreign Service husband overseas. Frustrated with long clearance delays for embassy jobs and the lack of employment continuity between posts, Mary dreamed of a job that she could take with her from post to post.  After listening to a podcast about investing in small businesses for passive income, she started researching businesses for sale. That led her to purchasing a boutique travel company, Ponte Travels, right as the global pandemic shut down travel worldwide. In this interview, Mary discusses: her thought process behind purchasing a small business and how she went about evaluating whether the business would be a profitable venture the steps required to purchase a business, including doing due diligence, enlisting experts, and how to navigate Small Business Administration (SBA) loans having the courage and vision to open a business that was severely affected by the pandemic … and much more! You can find out more about Mary and Ponte Travels here: https://www.pontetravels.com/ Music: “Higher Up” by Shane Ivers

Trend Lines
‘America Is Back' Won't Save the U.S.-Led Global Order

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 85:25


After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, the United States and its allies enjoyed a near monopoly on economic, military and ideological power in a suddenly unipolar world. Over the decade and a half that followed, the U.S. emerged as the dominant power atop a liberal international order in large part shaped by its preferences.  But the rise of China and resurgence of Russia as great power competitors has challenged Washington's global leadership role, while offering new options to countries seeking alternatives to the U.S.-led order. That coincides with the emergence within the U.S. and other Western democracies of movements questioning the foundations of that order. Combined, these trends have significantly weakened the United States' ability to maintain its hegemonic position in a rapidly transforming international landscape. This week on a special edition of Trend Lines, Daniel Nexon joins WPR weekly columnist Howard French to discuss the rapidly changing global order and the United States' place in it. Nexon is a professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. With Alexander Cooley, he is the co-author of “Exit from Hegemony: The Unraveling of the American Global Order.” If you would like to request a full transcript of the episode, please send an email to podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com. Relevant Articles on WPR: The U.S. Still Makes for a Tough Competitor Against China   The U.S. and China Are Both Failing the Global Leadership Test   America's ‘Return' Might Not Be Enough to Revive the West The Liberal World Order Is Dying. What Comes Next? Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

Diplomatic Immunity
It's Raining at Summit Greenland: The Geopolitics of the Arctic with Sherri Goodman and Jeremy Mathis

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:47


Season 3, Episode 3: ISD Director of Programs and Research Kelly McFarland talks about the Arctic with Sherri Goodman of the Wilson Center and Jeremy Mathis of the Science, Technology, and International Affairs program in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown. Sherri and Jeremy discuss the deteriorating climate situation in the Arctic, security challenges, defense capabilities, geopolitical competition between the United States, Russia, and China, and the recent death of a Russian official on an exercise in the region. Featured articles: The New Arctic: Navigating the Realities, Possibilities, and Problems, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (July 2018) Sarah Kaplan and Andrew Ba Tran, "Nearly 1 in 3 Americans experienced a weather disaster this summer," The Washington Post, September 4, 2021 Episode recorded: Monday, September 20th, 2021.  Episode image: U.S.-Canada Fourth Joint Mission To Map the Continental Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. Views of the U.S.-Canada fourth joint mission to map the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean in August and September 2011. The 2011 joint mission employed the flagship icebreaker from each country, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St-Laurent (LSSL), with each ship performing different functions and one ship breaking ice for the other [State Department photo/Public Domain]. Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

ChinaPower
The Impact of Covid-19 on China's Economy: A Conversation with Daniel H. Rosen

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 42:34


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, we are joined by Mr. Daniel H. Rosen to examine the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on China's economic power. Mr. Rosen describes the variables that contribute to China's economic power and recounts how China's economy was initially impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. He also discusses the primary measures the Chinese government took to rejuvenate its economy and evaluates which measures were the most significant. In addition, he evaluates the prospects of Chinese economic growth (both quarterly and yearly) and analyzes the various scenarios that may arise. Lastly, Mr. Rosen explains the potential impact of the Chinese Communist Party's “Common Prosperity” political campaign on China's economic growth.     Mr. Daniel H. Rosen is a founding partner of Rhodium Group and leads the firm's work on China, India and Asia. Mr. Rosen has twenty-six years of professional experience analyzing China's economy, commercial sector and external interactions. He is widely recognized for his contributions on the US-China economic relationship. A native of New York City, Mr. Rosen graduated with distinction from the graduate School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University (MSFS) and with honors in Asian Studies and Economics from the University of Texas, Austin (BA). 

The Tea Leaves Podcast
Dr. Michael J. Green on the Quad Summit and Suga’s Successor

The Tea Leaves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


Dr. Michael J. Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Previously, Dr. Green served on the National Security Council staff from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia. Today we are lucky to work with Mike at The Asia Group, where he is a senior advisor. In this episode, Mike and Rexon delved into Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga's resignation, the race for leadership of Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party, the AUKUS security pact, and the first in-person Quad Leaders Summit. You can find a full video of this episode at www.youtube.com/wSvkY8tzvEq21kNOjYILXQ

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books
Pam Jenoff, THE WOMAN WITH THE BLUE STAR: A Novel

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 27:44


Zibby hosted a meeting of the Peloton Moms Book Club where they were joined by Pam Jenoff to discuss her latest novel, The Woman with the Blue Star. Pam answered questions about how her career in the U.S. Foreign Service continues to inspire her books, where she draws the line between the real historical stories she uncovers and the fiction she writes, and how she has found time to write eleven novels (hint: she gets up earlier than she would like).Purchase on Amazon or Bookshop.Amazon: https://amzn.to/38viQsJBookshop: https://bit.ly/3DoVdAi See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Embassy Wealth Podcast
Planning for the Ultimate Foreign Service Retirement with William Carrington

The Embassy Wealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 42:03


William Carrington is the owner of Carrington Financial Planning, a financial planning and wealth management firm that specializes in working with Foreign Service employees. Since founding his firm more than ten years ago, William has worked with more than 500 clients. He is a Certified Financial Planner, a Retirement Management Advisor, a NAPFA-Registered Advisor, and is a fee-only fiduciary. He was also an Eligible Family Member (EFM) for 24 years until his wife retired from the Department. In this dynamite show, William covers a lot of retirement ground, debunking myths about how much money members of the Foreign Service actually need to retire well (hint: it's likely less than you think!)  Hear William discuss: what amount of money Foreign Service Officers actually need to retire comfortably why many FSOs should “live a little more” pre-retirement why borrowing from your TSP can be a favorable money move when you should hire a financial planner why asset class selection can make or break your investment portfolio why risk determines whether you have a lot of money (or not) how Roth vs non-Roth portfolios compare the “wait 24 hours” rule that takes the emotion out of investing the role of real estate in an investment portfolio succeeding as an EFM business owner overseas …..and so much more!   Music: “Higher Up” by Shane Ivers

Live From America Podcast
Episode 206: Never Forget

Live From America Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 89:43


This Weeks Guests: Columnist at foreign policy magazine - Elise Labott Journalist - Walker Bragman Comedian - Boris Khaykin The World's Famous comedy Cellar presents "Live From America Podcast" with Noam Dworman and Hatem Gabr. The top experts and thinkers of the world and the best comics in the Nation get together weekly with our hosts to discuss different topics each week, News, Culture, Politics, comedy & and more with an equal parts of knowledge and comedy! ELISE LABOTT Keynote Speaker and Author Elise Labott is a Journalist-in-Residence at the Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. Elise serves as a global ambassador for Vital Voices, a program to empower women entrepreneurs around the world. Elise is also a contributor to Politico, provides commentary for MSNBC, NPR, BBC and several other broadcast outlets and is a sought-after interviewer and moderator. Elise is a leading journalist covering US foreign policy and international issues, recently as CNN's Global Affairs Correspondent, where she covered stories from the 911 attacks and wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to the Arab Spring and rise of ISIS, to tensions with Iran and North Korea. She has traveled the world with seven secretaries of state -from Madeline Albright to Mike Pompeo - and has reported from more than eighty countries and interviewed many world leaders. Walker Bragman He is Journalist, JD, cartoonist at the DailyPoster Follow Live From America YouTube www.youtube.com/channel/UCS2fqgw61yK1J6iKNxV0LmA Twitter twitter.com/AmericasPodcast www.LiveFromAmericaPodcast.com LiveFromAmerica@ComedyCellar.com Follow Hatem Twitter twitter.com/HatemNYC Instagram www.instagram.com/hatemnyc/ Follow Noam Twitter twitter.com/noamdworman?lang #September11Education #EliseLabott #NeverForget

Tabadlab Presents...
Pakistonomy - Episode 77 - Sri Lanka Outlook: 2021 and Beyond

Tabadlab Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 49:45


Uzair talks to Akhil Bery about ongoing developments in Sri Lanka, which is in the midst of a severe economic crisis, caused in large part by COVID-19. Akhil talked about the overall political economy in the island nation, its geopolitical ties with China, India, and the United States, and what's next. Akhil is currently Director, South Asia Initiatives at the Asia Society Policy Institute, where his research focuses on the US-India relationship and developments in South Asia more broadly. Previously, he worked at Eurasia Group, where he was responsible for the firm's coverage of South Asia, including political and economic developments in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Prior to Eurasia Group, Akhil worked with McLarty Associates, where he led the research for the India & South Asia Team. He has also worked at Fujitsu Research Institute in Tokyo, Japan, as well as at 9.9 Media, a B2B start-up based in New Delhi. Akhil holds a M.A. in International Business and Policy from Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business and Walsh School of Foreign Service and a B.A. in History from Franklin & Marshall College. Reading recommendations: - The Nine Lives of Pakistan by Declan Walsh - India at the High Table by Howard B. Schaffer and Teresita C. Schaffer

Quick to Listen
Drones Have Changed the Moral Calculus for War

Quick to Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 43:44


On August 29, as American troops were accelerating their pullout from Afghanistan, the U.S. military ordered its last drone strike in the 20 year war. The missile destroyed a parked car that military officials said was operated by an Islamic State sympathizer, and contained explosives for a suicide attack on the Kabul airport, where American forces and civilians had gathered for evacuation. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley told a news conference, “We think that the procedures were correctly followed and it was a righteous strike.” Last week, separate investigations from The New York Times and The Washington Post questioned those assertions, reporting that the driver was Zemari Ahmadi, a longtime engineer for the California-based aid group Nutrition and Education International. The supposed explosives, said the Times, were canisters of water Ahmadi was bringing home to his family because Taliban's takeover of the city had cut off his neighborhood's water. The Times also reported that 10 members of the Ahmadi family were killed in the Hellfire missile attack, including seven children. General Milley told reporters, “We went through the same level of rigor that we've done for years. Yes, there are others killed. Who they are, we don't know. We'll try to sort through all that.” The British-based Bureau of Investigative Journalism has counted that the US military conducted more than 13,000 drone strikes in Afghanistan over the years, with at least 4,126 people killed, including at least 300 civilians and 66 children. Drone policies changed over the years under during different presidencies. As did the way the US counted civilian deaths by drone strikes. The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan has a dramatically higher count for civilians killed in Afghanistan by drones: more than 2,000, with more 785 of them children. If accurate, that would mean that about 40 percent of civilians killed by drones in Afghanistan were children. It appears that drone warfare will continue to play a major role in Afghanistan. Earlier this month, President Biden promised Islamic State—or ISIS-K, “We are not done with you yet. … We will hunt you down to the ends of the Earth, and you will pay the ultimate price.” But without troops in the country, that hunting will almost certainly be done mostly through unmanned aircraft. Back in 2011, CT ran a story asking “Is it wrong to kill by remote control?” This week, we want to revisit that question. Our guest this week is Paul D. Miller, is professor of the practice of international affairs at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. He earlier served in the US army, the CIA, and on the National Security Council staff as director for Afghanistan and Pakistan. These days, in addition to his post at Georgetown, he is a research fellow with the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission and is author of Just War and Ordered Liberty, published earlier this year from Cambridge University Press. Among that book's chapters is one one on the ethics of drone warfare. Quick to Listen listeners may also remember Dr. Miller from our January episode on Christian Nationalism. What is Quick to Listen? Read more Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow this week's hosts on Twitter: Ted Olsen and Andy Olsen Follow our guest Paul D. Miller Music by Sweeps. Quick to Listen was produced this week by Ted Olsen and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Faith Ndlovu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Race in America and International Relations

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


Travis L. Adkins, deputy assistant administrator for Africa at USAID and lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service and in the Prisons and Justice Initiative at Georgetown University, and Brenda Gayle Plummer, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, led a conversation on race in America and international relations. FASKIANOS: Welcome to the first session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Travis Adkins and Brenda Gayle Plummer with us to discuss race in America and international relations. Travis Adkins is deputy assistant administrator in the Bureau of Africa at USAID, and lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service, and in the Prisons and Justice Initiative at Georgetown University. As an international development leader, he has two decades of experience working in governance, civil society, and refugee and migration affairs in over fifty nations throughout Africa and the Middle East. Mr. Adkins was a CFR international affairs fellow and is a CFR member. Dr. Brenda Gayle Plummer is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research includes race and gender, international relations, and civil rights. Dr. Plummer has taught Afro-American history throughout her twenty years of experience in higher education. Previously she taught at Fisk University, the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the University of Minnesota. And from 2001 to 2005, Dr. Plummer served on the Historical Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of State. So, thank you both for being with us today. We appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts with us. Travis, I thought we could begin with you to talk about the ways in which you've seen race relations in America influence U.S. foreign policy. ADKINS: Sure. Thank you so much, Irina. And welcome to everyone. Thank you for joining. The first thing I would say is that America's long history of violence, exclusion, and barbarism towards Black people and indigenous people and Asian communities and immigrant communities in the United States have worked to give the lie to the notion of who we say we are in terms of freedom, in terms of democracy, in terms of the respect for human rights. And these are the core messages that we seek to project in our foreign policy. And we've not been able to resolve those contradictions because we have refused to face this history, right? And we can't countenance a historical narrative in which we are not the heroes, not the good guys, not on the right side of history. And the challenge that we've had is that we've seen that play out in so many ugly ways domestically. But it also has resonance and relevance in our foreign policy, because what it ends up doing is essentially producing a foreign policy of platitudes and contradictory posturing on the issues of human rights, on the issues of racial justice, on the issues of democratic governance when the world can see not only this history but this present reality of racial discrimination, of police brutality, of efforts to suppress the political participation of specific groups of people inside of America. They can see children in cages at the Southern border. They can see anti-Asian hate taking place in our nation, and they can hear those messages resounding, sometimes from our White House, sometimes from our Senate, sometimes from our Congress and other halls of power throughout the United States. And that works against the message of who we say we are, which is really who we want to be. But the thing that we, I think, lose out on is pretending that where we want to be is actually where we are. And I think back a couple weeks ago Secretary Blinken came out saying to diplomats in the State Department that it was okay for them to admit America's flaws and failings in their diplomatic engagements with other countries. But I would—I do applaud that. But I also think that saying that we would admit it to the rest of the world—the rest of the world already knows. And who we would have to need to focus on admitting it to is ourselves, because we have not faced this national shame of ours as it relates to the historical and the present reality of White supremacy, of racialized violence and hatred and exclusion in our immigration policy, in our education policy, in our law and customs and cultural mores that have helped to produce ongoing violence and hatred of this nature in which our history is steeped. I think the other part of that is that we lose the opportunity to then share that message with the rest of the world. And so, what I like to say is that our real history is better than the story that we tell. So instead of us framing ourselves and our foreign policy as a nation who fell from the heavens to the top of a mountain, it's a more powerful story to say that we climbed up out of a valley and are still climbing up out of a valley of trying to create and produce and cultivate a multiracial, multiethnic democracy with respect for all, and that that is and has been a struggle. And I think that that message is much more powerful. And what it does is it creates healing for us at home, but it also begins to take away this kind of Achilles' heel that many of our adversaries have used historically—the Soviet Union, now Russia, China, Iran—this notion that democracy and freedom and the moral posturing of America is all for naught if you just look at what they do at home. Who are they to preach to you about these things when they themselves have the same challenges? And so I think that we would strengthen ourselves if we could look at this in that way. And I would just close by saying that we often speak of the civil rights movement and the movement for decolonization in the world, and specifically in Africa where I mostly work, speak of them in the past tense. But I would argue that both of them are movements and histories that are continuously unfolding, that are not resolved, and that haven't brought themselves to peaceful kinds of conclusions. And this is why when George Floyd is killed on camera, choked for nine minutes and loses his life, that you see reverberations all over the world, people pushing back because they are suffering from the same in their countries, and they are following after anti-Asian hate protestors and advocates, Black Lives Matter advocates and protestors, people who are saying to the world this is unacceptable. And so even in that way, you see the linked fates that people share. And so I think that the more we begin to face who we are at home, the more we begin to heal these wounds and relate better in the foreign policy arena, because I think that it is a long held fallacy that these things are separate, right? A nation's foreign policy is only an extension of its beliefs, its policies and its aspirations and its desires from home going out into the world. So I will stop there. And thank you for the question. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Dr. Plummer, over to you. PLUMMER: Well, your question is a very good one. It is also a very book-length question. I'll try to address that. First of all, I would like to say that I find Mr. Adkins' statement quite eloquent and can't think of anything I disagree with in what he has said. There are a couple of things that we might consider as well. I think there are several issues embedded in this question of the relationship between race relations in the United States and it's policies toward other countries. One of them is, I think there's a difference between what policymakers intend and how American policy is perceived. There is also the question of precisely who is making and carrying out U.S. foreign policy. Now there was a time when that question I think could be very readily answered. But we're now in an age where we have enhanced roles for the military and the intelligence community. We have private contractors executing American objectives overseas. And this really places a different spin on things, somewhat different from what we observe when we look at this only through a strictly historical lens. I think we also need to spend some time thinking about the precise relationship between race and racism and what we might call colonial, more of imperialist practices. You might look, for example, at what is the relationship between the essentially colonial status of places like Puerto Rico and the Marianas and the—how those particular people from those places are perceived and treated within both the insular context and the domestic context. Clearly, everybody on the planet is shaped to a large degree by the culture and the society that they live in, that they grew up in, right? And so it is probably no mystery from the standpoint of attitudes that certain kinds of people domestically may translate into similar views of people overseas. But I think one of the things we might want to think about is how our institutions, as well as prejudices, influence what takes place. People like to talk, for example, about the similarities between the evacuation of Saigon and the evacuation of Kabul and wonder what is it called when you do the same thing over and over again and expect different results? We might want to think about what is it, institutionally, which creates these kinds of repetitions, creates situations in which diplomats are forced to apologize and explain continually about race and other conflictual issues in American society. We might also think about what you perhaps could call a racialization process. Do we create categories of pariahs in response to national emergencies? Do we create immigrants from countries south of the United States as enemies because we don't have a comprehensive and logical way of dealing with immigration? Do we create enemies out of Muslims because of our roles in the Middle East and, you know, the activities and actions of other states? There's some historical presence for this—the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, for example. So it seems to me that in addressing I think, you know, some of this very rich question, there are a number of ways and facets that we might want to look at and discuss more fully. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you very much. And now we're going to go to all of you for questions and comments. So you can either ask your question by raising your hand, click on the raised hand icon and I will call on you, or else you can write your question in the Q&A box. And if you choose to write your question—although we'd prefer to hear your voice—please include your affiliation. And when I call on you, please let us know who you are and your institution. So the first question, the first raised hand I see is from Stanley Gacek. Q: Yes, thank you very much. Thank you very much, Professor Plummer and Mr. Adkins, for a very, very compelling presentation. My name is Stanley Gacek. I'm the senior advisor for global strategies at the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, representing 1.3 million working women and men in the United States and Canada in the retail, wholesale, food production, healthcare, and services industries. Practically all of our members are on the frontlines of the pandemic. I also served as deputy director and interim director of the ILO mission in Brazil in 2011 to 2016. And my question is this. I wonder if the speakers would also acknowledge that an issue for the United States in terms of its credibility with regard to racial justice, human rights, and of course labor rights, is a rather paltry record of the United States in terms of ratifying international instruments and adhering to international fora with regard to all of these issues. One example which comes to mind in my area is ILO Convention 111 against discrimination in employment and profession, which could—actually has gone through a certain due diligence process in former administrations and was agreed to by business and labor in the United States but still the United States has failed to ratify. I just wondered if you might comment more generally about how that affects our credibility in terms of advocating for racial justice, human rights, and labor rights throughout the world. Thank you very much. FASKIANOS: Who can address that, would like to address that? PLUMMER: Well, I have very little immediate knowledge of this, and I have to say that labor issues and labor rights have been kind of a missing element in terms of being heavily publicized and addressed. I think it has something to do with the fact that over the course of the decades the United States has been less responsive to the United Nations, to international organizations in general. But in terms of the specifics, you know, precisely what has fallen by the wayside, I, you know, personally don't have, you know, knowledge about that. ADKINS: And I would just say more generally, not to speak specifically in terms of labor, where I'm also not an expert, but there is, of course, a long history of the U.S. seeking to avoid these kinds of issues in the international arena writ large as Dr. Plummer was just referring to. I just finished a book by Carol Anderson called Eyes Off the Prize, which is a whole study of this and the ways in which the U.S. government worked through the United Nations to prevent the internationalization of the civil rights movement which many—Malcom X and Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, and others—sought to frame it in the context of human rights and raise it into an international specter, and that was something that the U.S. government did not want to happen. And of course, we know that part of the genius of the civil rights movement writ large was this tactic of civil disobedience, not just to push against a law that we didn't like to see in effect but actually to create a scene that would create international media attention which would show to the world what these various communities were suffering inside of America, to try to create pressure outside of our borders for the cause of freedom and justice and democracy. And so there is that long history there which you've touched on with your question. Thank you for that. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome. Q: Good afternoon and thank you for your presentation. I just wonder about U.S. foreign policy, how it lines up with the domestic politics, you know, in terms of race relations, because if one was to believe U.S. propaganda, you know, this country is doing good in the world, it's the country to emulate. But you know, the events of—well, I guess the George Floyd case brought into graphic relief what most astute observers of the U.S. know, that race relations of the U.S. do not line up very well with the constitutional aspirations of the U.S. So what's going to change now, you know? And then there's also this pandemic and the way which race and class is showing us about the real serious inequalities in the U.S. So what's going to change in terms of lessons learned? And then moving forward, is also multilateralism going to come back into U.S. foreign policy in some way? That's it. PLUMMER: I think—I'm getting kind of an echo here. I don't know if other people are. I don't think anyone is—you know, who is thinking about this seriously doubts that the United States is in a crisis at the moment—a crisis of legitimacy not only abroad but also domestically. We have a situation in which an ostensibly developed country has large pockets, geographic pockets where there are, you know, 30, 40, 50 percent poverty rates. We have people who are essentially mired in superstition, you know, with regard to, you know, matters of health and science. And you know, I don't think anyone is, you know—is, you know—who is, you know, thinking about this with any degree of gravity is not concerned about the situation. Once again, I think we're talking here about institutions, about how we can avoid this sort of repetitive and cyclical behavior. But one thing I want to say about George Floyd is that this is a phenomenon that is not only unique to the United States. One of the reasons why George Floyd became an international cause célèbre is because people in other countries also were experiencing racism. There—other countries had issues with regard to immigration. And so really looking at a situation in which I think is—you know, transcends the domestic, but it also transcends, you know, simply looking at the United States as, you know, the sort of target of criticism. FASKIANOS: Do you want to add anything, Travis, or do you want to—should we go to the next question? ADKINS: Go on to the next question. Thank you. FASKIANOS: OK, thank you. Let's go to Shaarik Zafar with Georgetown, and our prior questioner was with Brooklyn—teachers at Brooklyn College. Q: Hey, there. This is Shaarik Zafar. I was formerly the special counsel for post-9/11 national origin discrimination in the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division—sorry, that's a mouthful—and then most recently during the Obama years I was a special representative to Muslim communities. So this—I first applaud the presentation. These issues are very near and dear to me. I think it's clear, you know, we have to own up and acknowledge our shortcomings. And I think, you know, I was really sad to hear that we actually worked against highlighting what I think is really an example of American exceptionalism, which is our civil rights movement and our civil rights community. When I was at State during the Obama years, we had a very modest program where we brought together U.S. civil rights leaders and connected them with European civil rights leaders. And the idea wasn't that we had it all figured out but rather that, you know, in some respects the United States has made some advances when it comes to civil rights organizing and civil society development in that respect—and perhaps more so than other countries. I was just thinking, I would love to get the panelists' thoughts on ways that we can continue to collaborate and—you know, on a civil society level between civil rights organizations in the United States and abroad and the way the U.S. government should actually support that—even if it means highlighting our shortcomings—but as a way to, you know, invest in these types of linkages and partnerships to not only highlight our shortcomings but look for ways that we could, you know, actually come to solutions that need to be, I think, fostered globally. Thanks so much. ADKINS: You know, the first thing I would say, Shaarik—thanks for your question—I thought it was interesting, this idea of framing the civil rights movement as a kind of example of American exceptionalism. And I think there's a way in which I would relate to that in the sense that folks did, at least nominally or notionally, have certain kinds of freedom of speech, certain kinds of rights to assembly. But even those were challenged, of course, when we see the violence and the assassinations and all of the machinations of the government against those who were leaders or participants in that movement. And so in that sense, perhaps I would agree. I might push back, though, in terms of American exceptionalism as it relates to civil rights, because these people were actually advocating against the U.S. government, who actually did not want them to have the rights that they were promised under the Constitution. Of course, many of us would not be free or able to speak up without the 13th and 14th and 15th Amendments. And so there's a sense in which we celebrate them, but there's also a sense in which they are actually indictments of the original Constitution which did not consider any of those things to be necessary elements of our society. In terms of civil society and where the U.S. government is engaged, I think that, you know, sometimes when we deal with these problems that are foreign policy related, you know, sometimes the answer is at home. Sometimes the answer is not, you know, a white paper from some high-level think tank. It's not something that starts ten thousand miles away from where we are, because I don't think that we would have the kind of standing and credibility that we would need to say that we believe in and support and give voice and our backing to civil society movements abroad if we don't do the same thing at home. And so everything that we want to do somewhere else, we ought to ask ourselves the question of whether or not we've thought about doing it at home. And I don't mean to suggest—because certainly no nation is perfect, and every nation has its flaws. But certainly, we would be called to the mat for the ways in which we are either acknowledging or refusing to acknowledge that we have, you know, these same—these same challenges. And so I think there still remains a lot of work to be done there in terms of how we engage on this. And you have seen the State Department come out and be more outspoken. You've seen the Biden administration putting these issues more out front. You have now seen the Black Lives Matter flag flying over U.S. embassies in different parts of the world. And some people might view that as co-optation of a movement that is actually advocating against the government for those rights and those respects and that safety and security that people believe that they are not receiving. And others might see it as a way to say, look, our nation is embracing civil society and civic protests in our nation as an example that the countries in which those embassies are in should be more open to doing the same kinds of things. And so it's a great question. I think it remains to be seen how we move forward on that—on that score. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Molly Cole. Q: Hi. My name is Molly Cole. I am a grad student of global affairs at New York University. I was just curious sort of what y'all thought about what the consequences of foreign policy on punishment systems and institutions as it pertains to race relations in the United States would be, also in tandem with sort of this strive for global inclusivity and equity and just sort of, I guess, hitting those two ideas against each other. ADKINS: Can you clarify the ideals for us, Molly? So one sounded like it was about maybe mass incarceration or the death penalty or things of that nature? You're talking about punitive systems of justice? And then the other seemed to be more about diversity, equity, and inclusion in the foreign policy space? But I don't want to put words in your mouth. I just want to make sure I understand the question. Q: You hit the nail on the head. ADKINS: OK. Do you want to go ahead, Dr. Plummer? PLUMMER: Oh. Well, again, a great question but, you know, one of, you know, it's—could write a book to answer. (Laughs.) Well, if you're talking about the sort of international regime of incarceration—is that what you were referring to? Q: Yes, essentially. So when we're—when we're considering, you know, these punitive systems, I'm thinking in terms of, you know, the death penalty, mass incarceration, private prisons, sort of this culmination of us trying to come up with these ideals, but doing it sort of on our own, while also combatting, you know, what the nation is calling for, what the globe is calling for. PLUMMER: Yeah. I think this sort of pertains to what I had mentioned earlier about just, you know, who is making and carrying out U.S. foreign policy, or domestic policy for that matter. There's a whole question of the state and, you know, what parts of the state are involved in this whole question of incarceration and are involved in the whole question of the death penalty. One of the things that we are aware of is that prisons have—some of the prisons are actually not being operated by civil authorities. They're operated by private entities. We saw this again in—you know, particularly in Afghanistan, where a lot of functions which normally, you know, are carried out by civil authorities are carried out by private authorities. And so this really puts a whole different perspective on the question or the relationship of citizens to the state and, you know, to any other particular group of citizens to the state. So I think that, you know, one of the problem areas then is to tease out what in fact are the obligations and privileges of government, and how do they differ from and how are they distinguished from the private sector. Q: Thank you. ADKINS: And I would just add quickly on this notion of hypocrisy and saying one thing and doing another, there was an interesting anecdote around this when President Obama visited Senegal. And he was delivering a fairly tough message about the treatment of members of the LGBT+ community in Senegal. And President Macky Sall got up essentially after President Obama and was essentially saying that, you know, we kind of appreciate this tough love lecture, but I would remind you, you know, that Senegal doesn't have the death penalty, right? And so on one hand we're actually saying something that has a grounding. Of course, people of all human stripes can have dignity, and have respect and be protected. But he is then hitting back and saying, hey, wait a minute, you kill people who break laws in your own country. And we don't have the death penalty. So who should actually be the arbiter of how is the correct way – or, what is the correct way to be? On the second part of your question, quickly, Molly, especially as it relates to the kind of diversity, equity, and inclusion piece, this is why also there has been a big push to look in our State Department, to look at USAID, to look at the face that America presents to the world. And all too often that face has been male, that face has been White. And that gives a certain perception of America, but it also means that we lose the tremendous treasure and talent of people who have language skills, who come from communities in which their own perspective on the world actually is a talent that they have. Specifically, because many of those communities—whether they've immigrated or come to America by different means—are also from groups who've been marginalized, who've been oppressed, who have a certain frame and a lens with which to engage with other nations in the world, either in terms of partnership, either in terms of deterrence. And so we lose out in many ways because we haven't done a great job in that—in that matter. FASKIANOS: I'm going to take a written question from Morton Holbrook, who's at Kentucky Wesleyan College. His question is: How should the United States respond to international criticism to the U.S.'s racial discrimination? And how will that affect the relationship between the U.S. and the international community? PLUMMER: Well, the United States, I think, has—(laughs)—no choice but to acknowledge this. Historically this has been a problem that when pressed on this issue in the past the response was always, well, you know, we know this is a problem and we're working on it. And the most egregious examples of racism are the responsibility of people who are either at the margins of society or who represent some sort of relic past that is rapidly disappearing, right? That was the message about the South, right? OK, the South is, you know, rapidly developing and so soon these vestiges of violent racism will be over. Well, again, the reason why that doesn't work anymore—(laughs)—is because we're always projecting this future, right, that—you know, it's always being projected further and further into the future. And we're never there yet. And it seems to me, again, that this is a problem of institutions. This is a problem of the embeddedness of racism in American life, and a refusal on the part of so many Americans to acknowledge that racism is real, and that it exists. And you know, I think we see many examples of this. I'm thinking of one instance where a George Floyd commemorative mural was painted on a sidewalk and some folks came along with some paint and painted over it, because they said it wasn't a racism corner, you know, while engaged in a racist act. So, you know, there really needs to be, I think, on a very fundamental level, some education—(laughs)—you know, in this country on the issue of race and racism. The question is, you know, who is—who will be leaders, right? Who will undertake this kind of mission? ADKINS: One thing I would say, quickly, on that, Irina, just an anecdote as well that also relates to really in some ways the last question about who our representatives are and what perspective they bring. Several years ago, I was on a trip—a congressional delegation to Egypt. And I was with several members of the CBC. And we met with President Sisi. And they were giving him a fairly rough go of it over his treatment of protesters who were protesting at that time in Tahrir Square, many of whom had been killed, maimed, abused, jailed. And he listened to them kind of haranguing him. And at the end of that speech that they were giving to him he said basically: I understand your points. And I hear your perspective. But he said, can I ask you a question? They said, sure, Mr. President. We welcome you to ask questions. And he said, what about Ferguson? And the day that he said that Ferguson was on fire with surplus military equipment in the streets of America, with, you know, tear gas and armed military-appearing soldiers in the streets of America who were seen, at least optically, to be doing the same thing, right? Not as many people were killed, certainly, but the point is you have this same problem. However, if that had been a different delegation, he might have scored a point in their verbal jousting. But President Sisi had the misfortune of saying this to two-dozen 70-plus-year-old Black people. And no one in America would know better than they what that is like. And so what they ended up replying to him by saying, exactly. No one knows this better than we do. And this is exactly why we're telling you that you shouldn't do it. Not because our country doesn't have that history, but because we do have that history and it has damaged us, and it will damage you. Which takes on a completely different tone in our foreign relations than if it was simply a lecture, and that we were placing ourselves above the nations of the world rather than among them. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go to Ashantee Smith. Q: Hello. Can you guys hear me? ADKINS: We can. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: OK, perfect. Hi. My name is Ashantee Smith. I am a grad student at Winston-Salem State University. In regards to some of the responses that you guys gave earlier, it gave me a question. And I wanted to know how you guys were putting the correlation between racism and immigration. PLUMMER: Well, yeah. The United States has a history of racialized responses to immigrants, including historically to White immigrants. Back in the day the Irish, for example, were considered to be, you know, something less than White. We know, however, that society—American society has since, you know, incorporated Europeans into the category of Whiteness, and not done so for immigrants from Latin America, Asia, and Africa, who remain racialized, who are perceived as being, in some respects by some people, unassimilable. We also have a phenomenon of the racialization of Muslims, the creation of outcast groups that are subjected to, you know, extremes of surveillance or exclusion or discrimination. So immigration is very much embedded in this, is a question of an original vision of the United States, you know, and you can see this in the writings of many of the founding fathers, as essentially a White country in which others, you know, are in varying degrees of second-class citizens or not citizens at all. So this is, I think, an example of something that we have inherited historically that continues to, you know, be an issue for us in the present. Yeah. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Pearl Robinson. Q: Hello. I am just so thrilled to see the two panelists here. I want—I actually raised my hand when you were talking about the labor rights issue. And I'm at Tufts University. And I'm currently working on an intellectual biography about Ralph Bunche. And I actually ran over here from the U.N. archives where I was actually reading about these issues. (Laughs.) And I wanted to just say that the discussion we're having now, it's sort of disjointed because we're dealing with lots of erasures, things that are overlooked, and they are not enough Carol Andersons and Brenda Gayle Plummer professors out there putting these things in press. But even more importantly, they are not sufficiently in our curriculum. So people who study international relations and people who do international relations don't know most of these things. So my quick point I just wanted to say was during World War II when Ralph Bunche was working for the OSS military intelligence, his archives are full of it, he went and he was interviewing our allies at their missions and embassies in the U.S.—the French, the British—asking them: What are your labor relations policies in your colonial territories? And this was considered important military information for the United States, as we were going to be—as Africa was an important field of operation. When you get to actually setting up the U.N., I was struck in a way I hadn't, because I hadn't read archives this way. (Laughs.) But I'm looking at conversations between Bunche and Hammarskjöld, and they're restructuring the organization of the United States—of the United Nations. And there are two big issues that are determining their response to the restructuring—the Cold War as well as decolonization. And I actually think that those two issues remain—they're structuring that conversation we're having right now. And they—we say the Cold War is over, but I love this phrase, of the racialization of the current enemies or people we think of as enemies. So I actually do think that this is a really good program we're having where we're trying to have the conversation. But the dis-junctures, and the silences, and the difficulties of responding I think speak volumes. The last thing I will say, very quickly, that incident about the discussion with President Sisi that Mr. Adkins—that needs to be canned. That needs to be somehow made available as an example that can be replicated and expanded and broadened for people to use in teaching. ADKINS: Well, I always listen when my teacher is talking to me, Dr. Robinson. Thank you for sharing that. And I'm working on it, I promise you. (Laughter.) FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to—we have lots of questions and raised hands, and we're not going to get to all of you. So I apologize right now. (Laughs.) We'll do the best we can. Jill Humphries. Q: Hello. My name is Jill Humphries. And I'm an adjunct assistant professor in the Africa Studies Program at the University of Toledo, and have been doing Africa-based work, I'm proud to say, for about thirty-three years, starting at the age twenty-two, and have used Dr. Plummer's work in my dissertation. And hello, fellow ICAPer (sp). So my question is this: There's an assumption that I believe we're operating in. And that is race and racism is somehow aberrant to the founding of this country, right? So we know that Saidiya Hartman and Frank Wilderson, the Afropessimist, make the argument that it is clearly key that it is fundamental to the development of our institutions. And so my question is this: You know, the—in the domestic scene the sort of abolitions clearly state that unless we fundamentally transform our norms and values, which impact, of course, our institutions, then we will continue to have the exact outcomes that are expected. The killing of George Floyd and the continuing, I think, need to kill Black bodies is essential to this country. And so my question is, in the context of foreign relations, international relations, are we also looking at the way in which, number one, it is not aberrant that racism is a constituent element in the development of our foreign policy and our institutions? And that unless we fundamentally first state it, acknowledge it, and then perhaps explore the way in which we dismantle, right—dismantle those norms and values that then impact these institutions, that we're going to continue to have the same outcomes, right? So for example, when Samantha Powers visited Ethiopia, if you've been following that whole narrative, there was a major backlash by the Ethiopian diaspora—major. My colleagues and friends, like, I've had intense conversations, right, around that. Same thing about the belief about Susan, former—Susan Rice's role, right, in continuing to influence our foreign policy, particularly towards the Horn of Africa. So my question is: What does that look like, both theoretically, conceptually? But more importantly for me, because I'm a practitioner on the ground, what does that look like in practice? And that's where I think Professor Adkins, working for USAID, could really kind of talk about. Thank you. ADKINS: Thank you. Yeah, you know, I think it goes back to Dr. Robinson's question a moment ago. And that is the first the acknowledgement and the calling out and the putting into relief and contrast the context in which we're operating, especially when we think about not even USAID specifically, but the industry of development—aid and development assistance kind of writ large. Because essentially what we have is a historical continuum that starts with the colonial masters and the colonial subjects. And then that because what is called, or framed, as the first world and the third world, right? And then that becomes the developing world and the developed world. Then that becomes the global north and the global south. All of which suggests that one is above, and one is below. That one is a kind of earthly heaven, the other kind of earthly hell. That one possessed the knowledge and enlightenment to lead people into civilization, and the other needs redemption, needs to be saved, needs to be taught the way to govern themselves, right? That this kind of Western notion of remaking yourself in the world, that your language, that your system of government, that your way of thinking and religious and belief and economics should be the predominant one in the world. And so I think, to me, what you're saying suggests the ways in which we should question that. And this is where you start to hear conversations about decolonizing aid, about questioning how we presume to be leaders in the world in various aspects, of which we may not actually be producing sound results ourselves. And thinking again about this notion of placing ourselves among nations rather than above nations in the ways in which we relate and engage. And I think that it's one of the reasons that we continue to have challenges in the realm of development assistance, in the realm of our diplomacy and foreign policy. Because, again, there is a pushback against that kind of thinking, which is rooted in a deep history that contains much violence and many types of economic and diplomatic pressures to create and sustain the set of power relations which keeps one group of people in one condition and one in another. And so it's a huge question. And how to bring that kind of lofty thinking down to the granular level I think is something that we will have to continue to work on every day. I certainly don't have the answer, but I'm certainly answering—asking, I should say—the questions. PLUMMER: I think I might also think about how is in charge. And this is—you know, it goes back to something we talked about before, when U.S. foreign policy is no longer exclusively rooted in the State Department? So in terms of, you know, who represents the United States abroad and in what ways, and how is that representation perceived, we're really looking at, you know, a lot of different actors. And we're also looking at, you know, changes in the way that the U.S. government itself is perceiving its role, both at home and abroad. And one of the questions was previously asked about the system of incarceration speaks to that, because we have to ask ourselves what are—what are—what are the proper roles and responsibilities and burdens of the state, the government and, you know, what is leased out—(laughs)—in some ways, for profit to private concerns? So I think that, you know, some of this is about, you know, a sense of mission that I don't see out there, that I think will in some respects have to be restored and reinvented. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Erez Manela. Q: Thank you very much for this really terrific and important panel. My name is Erez Manela. I teach the history of U.S. foreign relations at Harvard. And my question actually—I don't know if Irina planned this—but it follows on directly from the previous question. Because I kept on wondering during this panel what—I mean, the focus that we've had here, the topic that's been defined, is the way in which domestic race relations, domestic racism, have shaped U.S. foreign policy. But of course, U.S. foreign policy has been shaped—as the previous questioner noted—has been shaped directly by racism and perceptions of racial hierarchy for—well, since the very beginning. And Professor Adkins spoke very eloquently about it. And of course, Professor Plummer has written eloquently about that, including in her books on Haiti and international relations. But I guess I'm wondering if you could speak more about the specifics about the history that needs to be recognized in that realm, and then—and this is maybe self-interested—whether you have any recommendations, in the way that you recommended Carol Anderson's really terrific book—for reading that we can read ourselves or give our students to read, that would really drive that point home, the influence of racism, race perceptions, race hierarchies themselves on—directly on the conduct of U.S. foreign relations historically. PLUMMER: Well, Professor Manela, I appreciate your own work on Wilson. And you know, that in some respects—that would be a book that I'd recommend. (Laughs.) Might also think about Mary Dudziak's work on Cold War civil rights, and her law review article, Desegregation as a Cold War Imperative, which, you know, directly addresses these questions. Again, what I would like to see is some work that will—perhaps not necessarily a historical perspective—but will address this whole question of the sort of growing, I don't know what you'd call it, multiplicity or multivariant character of American policymaking, you know, as we—as we go forward, you know, past the Cold War era. There's an interesting item by a man named Andrew Friedman, who wrote a book called Covert Capital. I think the subtitle is something like Landscapes of Power, in which we discussed the rise of Northern Virginia as what he sees as the true capital of, you know, parts of the U.S. government, in being a center for the military and for intelligence community. And their shaping of that environment at home, as well as their influence in shaping U.S. policy abroad. So, you know, there's a lot of room for work on these—on these issues. ADKINS: And I would also just follow up—and thank you for the question—and add another book that I just finished. Daniel Immerwahr, from Northwestern University, How to Hide an Empire, which deals in many ways with U.S. foreign policy and the way in which it is explicitly racialized and ways in which that goes understudied in our—in our policy circles, and certainly in the world of education. FASKIANOS: I'm going to try to squeeze in one last question. And I apologize again for not getting to everybody's question. We'll go to Garvey Goulbourne as our final question. Q: Yes. Hi. Can you hear me? FASKIANOS: We can. Q: Yeah. My name's Garvey Goulbourne. I'm a student at the University of Virginia, actually studying abroad this semester in Rabat, Morocco. And my question to you both is: What mechanisms do we have to orient the narratives that our foreign policy leaders are brought up with? Thinking particularly of American exceptionalism and how we kind of place ourselves on a pedestal, whether they be foreign affairs schools or various institutions at different levels of American education, what tools do we have to address the foundations of American perspectives of themselves and our nation in relation to the rest of the world, particularly the global south? FASKIANOS: Who wants to go first? An easy question, of course, to close with. PLUMMER: Go ahead, Mr. Adkins. ADKINS: Sure, sure. Thank you for your question, Garvey. And congratulations on the move out to Morocco. Great to see you there. I think the first thing I would say, of course, is our tools, as far as I am concerned, relate certainly to education. And it's one of the reasons that I am in the classroom. But I know what that fight is like, because even education is taken over by these notions of White supremacy, by these notions of singular historical narratives. And this is why there's been such a push against the 1619 Project of the New York Times, why there is this kind of silly season around the misunderstood origins and contexts of critical race theory. There is this battle over who gets to tell the story of what America is, because it is more than—but it is more than one thing, obviously, to a multiplicity of people. And so I am kind of remiss—or, not remiss. There's no way for me to elucidate for you now a series of tools that will resolve these problems, because these are challenges that people have been wrestling with before our mothers' mothers were born. And so we only are continuing that fight from where we sit. And certainly, in the classrooms that I am in, whether they are in prisons or on campuses, we are always digging into the origin of these themes. And the main frame through which I teach is not just for students to understand this history for their health, but for them to understand this history as a lens through which to view the current world and all of the events and challenges that we find ourselves facing, to see if we can come up with new ways to address them. PLUMMER: Well, one of the things that Mr. Goulbourne could do, since he is in Morocco, is to make use of his own insights in his conversations with Moroccans. So, you know, there is still a role, you know, for individual actors to play some part in attempting to make some changes. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we unfortunately have to close this conversation. It was very rich. Thank you, Travis Adkins and Brenda Gayle Plummer or sharing your insights and analysis with us. We really appreciate it. To all of you, for your questions and comments. Again, I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you. You can follow Travis Adkins @travisladkins, and that's on Twitter. And our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday September 29, at 1:00 p.m. (ET) with Thomas Graham, who is a fellow at CFR. And we'll talk about Putin's Russia. So in the meantime, I encourage you to follow us at @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, Thinkglobalhealth.org, and ForeignAffairs.com for new research and analysis on global issues. So thank you all again and we look forward to continuing the conversation. ADKINS: Take care, everyone. Thank you. (END)

Modern American Diplomacy
Amb. Bill Taylor discusses Ukraine, impeachment, Afghanistan and Foreign Assistance

Modern American Diplomacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 38:56


Amb. Bill Taylor -- our first political appointee as a guest -- discusses Ukraine, impeachment, "irregular channels," public diplomacy, the nature of conflict, Afghanistan, foreign assistance and being an interagency team player. *Brought to you as part of an Una Chapman Cox Foundation project on American diplomacy and the Foreign Service.

Civil Defense Radio
100-Plus New Chinese ICBMs

Civil Defense Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 40:33


David Pyne and I discuss the increasing threat of China and their nuclear expansion. The Washington Times news agency reported the Chinese are building a third intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) field, that would be the home of over 100 new missiles. This could put the US and our western allies in a major pickle. The Chinese could effectively conduct nuclear blackmail of a US President, with just a threat of nuclear annihilation. David Pyne currently serves as Deputy Director of National Operations for the EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security, as a Vice President for the Association of the United States Army's Utah chapter and as a West Valley City Police Honorary Colonel. David is a former U.S. Army Headquarters staff officer, as a Consultant for the U.S. Missile Defense Agency and as an International Analyst for both the Office of the Secretary of Defense and for the Department of the Navy. Mr. Pyne served as National Security Policy Director for U.S. Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT), as the founder of Sen. Lee's Military Advisory Committee and as 2nd Vice President of the Salt Lake Total Force Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America. He also served as Chairman/Vice Chairman of the Utah State Legislative Compensation Commission from 2009-2017. David holds a MA degree in National Security Studies from Georgetown University's prestigious School of Foreign Service. He has been interviewed on television, on several talk radio shows and has been quoted in a number of newspapers, magazine articles and books. Mr. Pyne has had his op-eds published in The National Interest, Real Clear History, Deseret News, Salt Lake Tribune, the Provo Daily Herald, WorldNetDaily.com and Military.com. He, along with other EMP Task Force leaders, are available to speak to national or state policymakers and staffers, emergency management professionals or to civic and political groups on the EMP threat and other existential threats facing our great nation. Links Article mentioned in the interview and others by Mr. Pyne can be found here: https://nationalinterest.org/profile/david-t-pyne Article in the discussion: https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2021/aug/12/china-engaged-breathtaking-nuclear-breakout-us-str/?fbclid=IwAR2EHNpYTuLYgF_-qgo7LQCxYGHIlWSe4j9vAirwZzpHBS0QX4uichbVNDQWebsite: https://emptaskforce.us/ Civil Defense Radio Information Website: https://www.civildefenseradio.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CivilDefenseRadio Telegram: Civil Defense Radio ChannelMeWe: Civil Defense RadioResources Links mentioned in showMad Moneyhttps://news.bitcoin.com/mad-moneys-jim-cramer-recommends-5-of-portfolios-in-crypto/Financial Advisory Surveyhttps://news.bitcoin.com/financial-advisor-survey-26-plan-to-recommend-cryptocurrencies/These are the five countrieshttps://dailyhodl.com/2021/08/14/these-are-the-five-countries-paving-the-way-for-crypto-adoption-according-to-binance/Iconic US Magazinehttps://dailyhodl.com/2021/08/13/this-iconic-92-year-old-us-magazine-plans-to-hold-ethereum/Four Institutional Investment Managershttps://dailyhodl.com/2021/08/16/four-institutional-investment-managers-get-btc-exposure-after-purchasing-250204-shares-of-grayscale-bitcoin-trust/Learn more about Crypto terms herehttps://www.coingecko.com/en/glossary?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2020-08-9-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=coingecko&utm_content=+Binance+is+safe%3F&utm_campaign=CoinGecko+Newsletters#AGlobal Partnershttps://prestonschleinkofer.vcardinfo.com/GSTelecom is a blockchain secure email. text, and chat app powered by G999 digital tokensThis video is a short intro to this service: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRtRvjiVZVcGSTelecom Apps (Remember, these apps literally run on the blockchain, and you must have G999 crypto tokens to pay for use. You may purchase the coins from a number of exchanges, or through the Global Partners link above.)Android:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=block.chain.chatiPhone:https://apps.apple.com/tt/app/gstelecom-by-g999-blockchain/id1547577247NOTE: Civil Defense Radio is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This site also participates in other affiliate programs and is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies

Good News For The City's Podcast
Afghanistan Veterans

Good News For The City's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 25:44


Stephen Paul Rodriguez joined us to talk about the importance of praying for the men and women who serve our country in light of the Afghanistan withdrawal.Stephen Paul Rodriguez is the Managing Partner of One Defense and an investor at Refinery Ventures. He began his career at Booz Allen Hamilton shortly before 9/11 supporting their National Security practice. In his capacity as an expert on game theoretic applications, he supported the United States Intelligence Community, Department of Defense, and Department of Homeland Security as a lead architect for the Thor's Hammer, Schriever II/III and Cyber Storm wargames. He subsequently was a Vice President at a artificial intelligence company called Sentia Group and served as Chief Marketing Officer for NCL Holdings, an international defense corporation.Mr. Rodriguez serves as a Board Director or Board Advisor of ten venture-backed companies. He is also Senior Advisor at the Atlantic Council and a Life Member at the Council on Foreign Relations. Mr. Rodriguez received his B.B.A degree from Texas A&M University and an M.A. degree from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. He is published in Foreign Policy, WarOnTheRocks, National Review, and RealClearDefense.Mr. Rodriguez resides in Washington D.C. with his wife, Laura, a venture capitalist with Bulldog Innovation Group and their children, Fletcher, Violet, and Pierce.

American Diplomat
These Are Not My Beautiful Feet

American Diplomat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 39:51


For Pride Month (belatedly posted due to events in Afghanistan and our coverage of those), Austin Richey-Allen recounts his story of gender transition in the Foreign Service.  A trans kid, he discovered in adulthood that there is a term for his experience: gender dysphoria.  From transition to leadership of GLIFA, Austin shares his story for the benefit not only of the LGBT, transgender and non-binary community, but for all of us who value a more inclusive world.

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 109: Terrorism and Afghanistan with Bruce Hoffman and Jacob Ware

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 58:40


"The problem today that we didn't have during the Cold War or twenty years ago is that there's profound disagreement over what are the biggest threats to our national security." On the day the United States is scheduled to end its military presence in Afghanistan, two experts on counterterrorism — Bruce Hoffman and Jacob Ware— join Daniel for a special discussion. On the docket is a deep dive into many issues surrounding the exit. What could the US have done better, or differently? What could happen if ISIS-K and Al Qaeda vie for power in a Taliban-led society? Hoffman makes clear that in his opinion, the US should not be leaving. But what is the alternative? Support Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk. Professor Bruce Hoffman has been studying terrorism and insurgency for over four decades. He is a tenured professor in Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service where from 2010 to 2017 he was the Director of both the Center for Security Studies and of the Security Studies Program. In addition, Professor Hoffman is visiting Professor of Terrorism Studies at St Andrews University, Scotland. He previously held the Corporate Chair in Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and was also Director of RAND's Washington, D.C. Office. Professor Hoffman also served as RAND's Vice President for External Affairs and as Acting Director of RAND's Center for Middle East Public Policy. Appointed by the U.S. Congress to serve as a commissioner on the Independent Commission to Review the FBI's Post-9/11 Response to Terrorism and Radicalization, Professor Hoffman was a lead author of the commission's final report. He was Scholar-in-Residence for Counterterrorism at the Central Intelligence Agency between 2004 and 2006; an adviser on counterterrorism to the Office of National Security Affairs, Coalition Provisional Authority, Baghdad, Iraq in 2004, and from 2004-2005 an adviser on counterinsurgency to the Strategy, Plans, and Analysis Office at Multi-National Forces-Iraq Headquarters, Baghdad. Professor Hoffman was also an adviser to the Iraq Study Group. He has been a Distinguished Scholar, a Public Policy Scholar, a Senior Scholar, and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, D.C.; a Senior Fellow at the Combating Terrorism Center, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, N.Y.; a Visiting Professor at the Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel; and, a Visiting Professor at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He is also a contributing editor to The National Interest and a member of the Jamestown Foundation's Board of Directors; a member of the board of advisers to the FBI Intelligence Analysts Association; and, serves on the advisory boards to the Arms Sales Monitoring Project at the Federation of American Scientists and of Our Voices Together: September 11 Friends and Families to Help Build a Safer, More Compassionate World. Professor Hoffman holds degrees in government, history, and international relations and received his doctorate from Oxford University. In November 1994, the Director of Central Intelligence awarded Professor Hoffman the United States Intelligence Community Seal Medallion, the highest level of commendation given to a non-government employee, which recognizes sustained superior performance of high value that distinctly benefits the interests and national security of the United States. Jacob Ware is a Research Associate in the Counterterrorism and Studies Program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

The Straits Times Audio Features
What the US' Afghanistan exit means for Asia's regional powers: Asian Insider Ep 75

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 25:33


Asian Insider Ep 75: What the US' Afghanistan exit means for Asia's regional powers  25:33 mins Synopsis: Each month, The Straits Times' US bureau chief Nirmal Ghosh presents an Asian perspective of the week's global talking points with expert guests. What the American failure in Afghanistan, India's unrealised political promises and an emboldened China means for dynamics in Asia? Nirmal Ghosh chats with two expert guests. Associate Professor Christine Fair is with the Security Studies Program within the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, Washington DC. Prakhar Sharma is a currently New York-based political analyst who has studied Afghanistan for 15 years and lived in the country for several years prior to 2016.  They discuss the following points: How China & Russia had normalised the Taleban even before the 9/11 attacks (2:30) Why China ignores human rights abuses in favour of a stable Afghanistan under the Taleban (5:50) Pakistan has been a spoiler in Afghanistan's national development (9:19) Why Pakistan will continue to bargain with the US, extracting aid to fight terrorism - and Washington will acquiesce (11:17) What the American failure in Afghanistan, India's unrealised promise, and China's rise means for regional dynamics and relations with the US (18:49) Should friends and allies henceforth doubt the US' staying power? (20:01) Produced by: Nirmal Ghosh (nirmal@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis & Fa'izah Sani Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Subscribe to the Asian Insider Podcast channel and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/Ju4h  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Nirmal Ghosh on Twitter: https://str.sg/JD7r Read Nirmal Ghosh's stories: https://str.sg/JbxG Asian Insider newsletter: https://www.straitstimes.com/tags/asian-insider Asian Insider videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnK3VE4BKduMSOntUoS6ALNp21jMmgfBX --- Discover more ST podcast series: Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Life Weekend Picks Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa2 #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #STAsianInsider See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk
Real Time Report - Afghanistan

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 59:46


Ambassador P. Michael McKinley Ambassador McKinley (Ret.) joined The Cohen Group as a Senior Counselor after a decorated 37-year career at the Department of State. Ambassador McKinley most recently served as Senior Advisor to the Secretary of State until October 2019, covering a wide range of global policy issues. This month he penned the sagacious "We All Lost Afghanistan" — a must-read piece published in Foreign Affairs. As a four-time ambassador, he led some of the largest and most sensitive U.S. embassies in the world as the U.S. Ambassador to Peru (2007-2010), Colombia (2010-2013), Afghanistan (2014-2016), and Brazil (2017-2018). Ambassador McKinley has also had extensive experience with regional conflicts and peace negotiations across three decades on three continents including Afghanistan, where he played a central role in shaping key policy decisions.

 Ambassador Anne W. Patterson is moderating this event. Like Ambassador Mckinley, Ambassador Patterson has led critical U.S. embassies around the world. In addition to being appointed as Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern and North African Affairs at the Department of State (2013-2017), she served as Ambassador to Egypt (2011-2013), Pakistan (2007-2010), Colombia (2000-2003), and El Salvador (1997-2000). Ambassador Patterson recently retired with the rank of Career Ambassador after more than four decades in the Foreign Service. Currently, she is a senior fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs at Yale and a member of the Commission on National Defense Strategy. . . Do you believe in the importance of international education and connections? The nonprofit World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth is supported by gifts from people like you, who share our passion for engaging in dialogue on global affairs and building bridges of understanding. While the Council is not currently charging admission for virtual events, we ask you to please consider making a one-time or recurring gift to help us keep the conversation going through informative public programs and targeted events for students and teachers. Donate: https://www.dfwworld.org/donate

Channel History Hit
What Went Wrong in Afghanistan?

Channel History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 25:54


History is vital for contextualising current events but as Professor Paul Miller argues in today's episode of the podcast it cannot tell us all we need to know about the present especially in the case of Afghanistan. Professor Miller has dedicated much of his working life to Afghanistan. He is an Afghan veteran, he worked for the CIA as an intelligence analyst and served on the National Security Committee for both President Bush and President Obama. He is currently Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. He brings Dan up to speed on events in Afghanistan, why the country fell to the Taliban so quickly, why historical comparisons are not always as useful as they first seem and how a very different outcome might have been achieved. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
What Went Wrong in Afghanistan?

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 25:54


History is vital for contextualising current events but as Professor Paul Miller argues in today's episode of the podcast it cannot tell us all we need to know about the present especially in the case of Afghanistan. Professor Miller has dedicated much of his working life to Afghanistan. He is an Afghan veteran, he worked for the CIA as an intelligence analyst and served on the National Security Committee for both President Bush and President Obama. He is currently Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. He brings Dan up to speed on events in Afghanistan, why the country fell to the Taliban so quickly, why historical comparisons are not always as useful as they first seem and how a very different outcome might have been achieved. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May it Displease the Court
Combating FakeNews at Home and Deepfakes in the Courtroom

May it Displease the Court

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 41:19


In this special episode of May it Displease the Court, a podcast about how unjust the court system has always been, but especially in this age of rampant misinformation, produced specifically for The Big Rhetorical Podcast Carnival. The Carnival runs from August 16-19, 2021. Check out participating podcasts who all produced episodes incorporating this year's theme “Contending with Misinformation in the Community and the Classroom”. The Carnival culminates with the keynote speaker, Dr. Renee Hobbs, Professor of Communication Studies at the Harrington School of Communications and Media and Founder of the Media Education Lab at the University of Rhode Island.  Mary Whiteside, an attorney, is joined by expert guest, Dr. Amanda Cronkhite, an assistant professor at the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies at Fort Leavenworth. Dr. Cronkhite's research focuses on the role of media and information in politics and national security. Her latest published research looks at #FakeNews and the handling of misinformation in the media. This episode looks at how misinformation spreads throughout populations, as well as how easy it has become to create deep or cheapfakes, which may become a problem in courtrooms. Here are the highlights: MAIN POINTS: 1) A small percentage of social media users share an overwhelming majority of the mis/mal or dis-information out there, especially if it confirms their existing prior biases.  2) Strategies for combating misinformation or mal-information include: teach individuals to check for fact-checking articles about a news story trace the source of information  read laterally, that is, check other sources' evaluations of the story's source 3) One type of misinformation, deepfakes, which are videos produced or altered to present content that never occurred in real life and the technology to produce videos has evolved so quickly that now it can be done cheaply even from a single image. Mary and Dr. Cronkite explore weather deepfakes can create a big enough doubt to be reasonable so often that they create a “liar's dividend” as described in (Chesney and Citron 2019) that undercuts the existing legal system? Resources mis/dis/mal-info written: https://rm.coe.int/information-disorder-report-november-2017/1680764666 mis/dis/mal-info video: https://www.weareiowa.com/video/news/local/explaining-the-difference-between-disinformation-misinformation-and-malinformation/524-151c0a53-76d8-4481-842f-116a527f5ad4 Kahneman book https://bookshop.org/books/thinking-fast-and-slow/9780374533557 Peter W. Singer on media literacy https://time.com/5932134/cyber-citizenship-national-priority/ Estonia & media literacy https://www.educationestonia.org/finland-denmark-and-estonia-top-the-media-literacy-index-2021/ Foreign Service https://careers.state.gov/work/foreign-service/officer/ The Conversation is a website where scholars write about their work for the mass public. Some articles from there:How to not become a misinfo spreader https://theconversation.com/7-ways-to-avoid-becoming-a-misinformation-superspreader-157099 How to talk to misinformed family members https://theconversation.com/how-to-talk-to-someone-you-believe-is-misinformed-about-the-coronavirus-133044 https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/05/14/deepfake-cheer-mom-claims-dropped/ https://apnews.com/article/dc-wire-donald-trump-health-coronavirus-pandemic-election-2020-b7e929bb8d49b77d0922eae7ad3794b7 https://www.journalism.org/2020/09/28/many-americans-get-news-on-youtube-where-news-organizations-and-independent-producers-thrive-side-by-side/ https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/10/23/younger-americans-are-better-than-older-americans-at-telling-factual-news-statements-from-opinions/  https://www.npr.org/2021/06/17/1007472092/facebook-researchers-say-they-can-detect-deepfakes-and-where-they-came-from   Need More Access Follow the pod on Facebook, Twitter @courtpod to see what we think about current events and let us know your thoughts. Have compliments, criticisms, or suggestions. Email us at displeasethecourt@gmail.com Subscribe so you don't miss an episode on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podbean, Spotify,  Sticher,  Vurb, or via RSS. Rate and Review (5 Stars!) the show to help people find us. ​​​​

The Opperman Report'
Doug Caddy:: Attorney for Watergate Burglars- JFK Assassination & More

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 70:36


DOUGLAS CADDY is an attorney in Houston, admitted to the Texas and District of Columbia Bars. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and New York University Law School. He is the author of six books, three published by the Texas A&M University Press. His biography appears in Who'sWho in American Law, Who'sWho in America, and Who'sWho in the World.Memoir on Being the Original Attorney for the Watergate Sevenhttp://educationforum.ipbhost.com/ind...

The Opperman Report
Doug Caddy:: Attorney for Watergate Burglars- JFK Assassination & More

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 70:36


DOUGLAS CADDY is an attorney in Houston, admitted to the Texas and District of Columbia Bars. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and New York University Law School. He is the author of six books, three published by the Texas A&M University Press. His biography appears in Who'sWho in American Law, Who'sWho in America, and Who'sWho in the World. Memoir on Being the Original Attorney for the Watergate Seven http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/ind...

The Opperman Report
Doug Caddy:: Attorney for Watergate Burglars- JFK Assassination & More 2,768 views Sep 4, 2015

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 119:54


DOUGLAS CADDY is an attorney in Houston, admitted to the Texas and District of Columbia Bars. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and New York University Law School. He is the author of six books, three published by the Texas A&M University Press. His biography appears in Who'sWho in American Law, Who'sWho in America, and Who'sWho in the World. Memoir on Being the Original Attorney for the Watergate Seven http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/ind...

The Opperman Report'
Doug Caddy:: Attorney for Watergate Burglars- JFK Assassination & More 2,768 views Sep 4, 2015

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 119:54


DOUGLAS CADDY is an attorney in Houston, admitted to the Texas and District of Columbia Bars. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and New York University Law School. He is the author of six books, three published by the Texas A&M University Press. His biography appears in Who'sWho in American Law, Who'sWho in America, and Who'sWho in the World.Memoir on Being the Original Attorney for the Watergate Sevenhttp://educationforum.ipbhost.com/ind...

CNA Talks
4 Types of Innovation

CNA Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 26:50


Ariel Klein and Kaia Haney join John Stimpson to discuss their new framework for the four types of innovation, sustaining, breakthrough, disruptive and comprehensive.  They explain how the Navy and other organizations can use the framework to identify what types of innovation they want and how they can organize to achieve it.   Ariel Klein is a Senior Research Scientist with CNA's Organizational Roles and Mission Operations Program. Kara Haney is a research intern at CNA. She is currently pursuing her master's at Georgetown's Walsh School of Foreign Service. CNA Report: How to Think about Innovation: https://www.cna.org/CNA_files/PDF/How-to-Think-about-Innovation.pdf  

So what you're saying is...
A Journey Across Muslim Britain - Why Prof. Ed Husain Is Worried

So what you're saying is...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 34:16


Islam is the fastest-growing faith community in Britain. Domes and minarets are redefining the skylines of towns and cities as mosques become an increasingly prominent feature. Yet while Britain has prided itself on being a global home of cosmopolitanism and modern civilisation, its deep-rooted relationship with Islam is complex, threatened by rising hostility. There is much media debate about embracing diversity in our communities, but what does integration look like on the ground, in places like Dewsbury, Glasgow, Belfast and London? How are Muslims, young and old, reconciling British values - of individualism, the rule of law, free speech & equality between the sexes - with literalist interpretations of their faith? And how is this tension, away from the public gaze, unfolding inside mosques today? In this episode of #SWYSI, author & academic Prof. Ed Husain discusses how his new book "Among the Mosques: A Journey Across Muslim Britain" took him into the heart of Britain's Muslim communities in a search for answers. Travelling the length and breadth of the country, Husain joins men and women in their prayers, conversations, meals etc. He tells their stories here in an open and honest account that brings the daily reality of British Muslim life sharply into focus - a struggle of identity and belonging, caught between tradition and modernity, East and West, revelation and reason. Ed Husain is an adjunct Professor in the Walsh School of Foreign Service in Georgetown University. He is also a writer and political advisor who has worked with leaders and governments across the world. He has held senior fellowships at think tanks in London and New York, including at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) at the height of the Arab uprisings (2010-2015). While at CFR, his policy innovation memo led to the US-led creation of a Geneva-based global fund to help counter terrorism. Husain was a senior advisor to former British Prime Minister Tony Blair (2015-2018). From 2018-2021 he completed his doctoral studies on Western philosophy and Islam under the direction of the English philosopher Sir Roger Scruton. He is the author of The Islamist (Penguin, 2007), The House of Islam: A Global History (Bloomsbury, 2018), and Among the Mosques (Bloomsbury, 2021). His writing has been shortlisted for the George Orwell Prize. A regular contributor to the Spectator magazine, he has appeared on the BBC and CNN and has written for the Telegraph, The Times, the New York Times, the Guardian and other publications.

The Josh Bolton Show
The LANGUAGE of Global Marketing | Wendy Pease

The Josh Bolton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 43:20


Wendy MacKenzie Pease is the owner and president of Rapport International, a metro-west Boston translation and interpretation services company specializing in marketing, legal, and medical/life sciences translation. Throughout her career, she has worked with hundreds of companies to help them communicate across more than 200 languages and cultures.Wendy is a creative entrepreneur with an MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and a BA in Foreign Service & International Politics from Penn State. Her expertise in international relations grew from working in several international and global marketing roles and spending years living abroad. Wendy is a frequent speaker, writer, blogger, trainer, advisor, master networker, and avid world traveler. She hosts the Global Marketing Show podcast, which features experts on opportunities and challenges in increasing multilingual lead gen and revenuewendy links:https://linktr.ee/wendypeasemy links: https://linktr.ee/JRBolton Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/The_Josh_Bolton_Show)

Books That Make You Podcast
S:03 E:30 How to Become an Ambassador with Thomas Armbruster, former member of the State Department

Books That Make You Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 24:10


We're talking about Books That Make You Learn the Ropes of an Ambassadorship. What's life like for an ambassador? What does it mean exactly to be in the Foreign Service mean? Is it something anyone could get into? How lifechanging is it? With many years spent as a seasoned diplomat, Thomas Armbruster served from 2012-2016 as the United States Ambassador to the Republic of the Marshall Islands under President Barack Obama. His book draws from an active career with the State Department, one that has taken him to Russia, Tajikistan, Finland, Cuba, Colombia, , Denmark, Bangladesh, and elsewhere all over the globe. In addition, he is the only American diplomat to arrive in the Soviet Union by kayak. Find out more on Books That Make You. You can also follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

What Fuels You
S11E9: Tina Tran Neville

What Fuels You

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 44:22


Tina Tran Neville is the Co-founder and CEO of Lana Learn. Born in Vietnam, Tina came to the U.S. as a refugee as a young child. A first-generation college student to the University of Tulsa and Yale University for graduate school, Tina was the first in her family to attend college before joining the U.S. Foreign Service where she worked as a U.S. diplomat in Iraq, Pakistan, and Washington, DC. Tina later became a teacher and education entrepreneur with her first company Transcend Academy that supports education services for high school students. With Lana Learn based in Seattle, Tina now combines her love of service, education, and entrepreneurship to advance the future of work company that supports U.S. multinational companies desiring to train their global workforce in English and workplace skills. From her work, she is the recipient of U.S. Department of State's Superior Honor Award, International Stevie Gold Business Award, and the Puget Sound Business Journal Seattle “40 Under 40.” Near and dear to her heart is also advocating for the advancement of women and people of color in entrepreneurship through Camelback Ventures, American Chamber of Commerce Vietnam, and Home of Grace Orphanage. Tina has lived and worked in Vietnam, Pakistan, Iraq, Thailand, Mexico, and Honduras. She now lives with her husband and two young boys calling both the Seattle area and Southeast Asia home.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tea Leaves Podcast
Dr. Evan Medeiros on Biden's China Strategy

The Tea Leaves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 41:53


Dr. Evan S. Medeiros is Penner Family Chair in Asian Studies at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and a Senior Advisor at The Asia Group. Dr. Medeiros served on the National Security Council for six years under U.S. President Barack Obama, first as Director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolia, and then as President Obama's top advisor for U.S. policy in Asia. Combining expertise as a scholar of Chinese politics with first-hand experience at the height of U.S. China policy, Evan reflected on several critical issues in U.S.-China relations: U.S. President Joe Biden's China strategy, Chinese President Xi Jinping's leadership and rising nationalism in China, balancing interdependence and escalating risks in the bilateral relationship, and the outlook for engagement between U.S. and Chinese leaders.

Modern American Diplomacy
Senior Foreign Service Officer Tim Davis shares lessons learned on leadership, diversity, managing State Department principals, closing the U.S. Consulate in Basra, and navigating Secretary Clinton's email controversy

Modern American Diplomacy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 30:46


Tim "Timmy" Davis is an active duty Foreign Service Officer and career member of the Senior Foreign Service.  In this episode, Tim shares lessons learned on leadership, beginning with his experience as a U.S. Marine.  He also discusses how to develop strong teams, instill a work ethic, promote selflessness, encourage diversity, and increase recruitment.  Mr. Davis also shares lessons learned closing the U.S. Consulate in Basra, Iraq, and take-aways from Secretary Clinton's e-mail controversy.  Interview excerpted from the forthcoming book: Modern American Diplomacy: A Field Guide to Success in The Foreign Service. For those interested in exploring a career in the Foreign Service, please visit Careers.State.Gov. To find out more about this episode's guest or to dig further into the history and practice of U.S. diplomacy, visit ADST.org or 25YearApprenticeship.com. Special thanks to the Una Chapman Cox Foundation, the American Academy of Diplomacy, as well as Harvard's Sama Kubba and Syed Ahmed.

College Matters. Alma Matters.
Sydney Dinenberg on Georgetown: Foreign Service, Ultimate Frisbee, and Joining the Peace Corps.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 64:04


Episode summary introduction: Ever since high school, Sydney had an interest in all things Global. She loved languages and history and enjoyed traveling. Her teachers, counselors told her about Foreign Service program at Georgetown. Sydney Dinenberg is a graduate of Georgetown University with a Bachelor's degree in Foreign Service and International Politics. In particular, we discuss the following with her: Choosing Georgetown University Majoring in Foreign Service Teaching English in Thailand Deciding to Join the Peace Corps Advice to Aspirants Topics discussed in this episode: Introduction to Sydney Dinenberg, Georgetown [] Hi Fives - Podcast Highlights [] Georgetown - Amazing Experience [] Why Georgetown? [] High School Interests [] Transition to Georgetown - Big Change [] Collaborative Peers [] Professors - “Loved My Classes” [] Campus Life [] Ultimate Frisbee, Garba, & more [] Varied Summer Experiences [] Majoring in Foreign Service [] Georgetown's Role in Shaping Career [] Joining the Peace Corps [] Georgetown Redo [] Advice to Aspirants [] Memories: Georgetown Day [] Our Guest: Sydney Dinenberg is a graduate of Georgetown University with a Bachelor's degree in Foreign Service and International Politics. Sydney later earned a Master's degree in International Education Development at the University of Pennsylvania. Memorable Quote: “I played on the ultimate frisbee team. And yeah, that was one of the best decisions that I made at Georgetown...it felt completely random at the time.” Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Digest. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations:, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Breaker, Anchor. For Transcripts of all our podcasts, visit almamatters.io/podcasts.

Noles Abroad
SE04 EP09: From FSU to the Foreign Service

Noles Abroad

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 16:12


On this episode, we talk with D'Juan Sampson, an FSU alum who studied international affairs and political science. D'Juan talks … Continue reading "SE04 EP09: From FSU to the Foreign Service"

Jobscast
Thomas M. Countryman on Foreign Service

Jobscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 59:47


Tom and I discuss Tom's 35 years of service as a U.S. diplomat working under such leaders as Madeleine Albright, Colin Powell, John Kerry, and Hillary Clinton.

C.O.B. Tuesday
C.O.B. Tuesday Ep. 70 What If Putin Was Hit By A Bus: A Discussion with Dr. Angela Stent

C.O.B. Tuesday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 59:36


A few weeks ago, President Biden met with Russian President Putin in Geneva for their first summit. Since then, we have searched for a Russian expert - and wow, did we get lucky! We found Dr. Angela Stent, Director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies and Professor of Government and Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Dr. Stent is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. As excited as we were, it was even better than what we expected. Her background is so extensive (you may read her full biography here) and there is no angle she hasn't seen. Our discussion crossed many borders and we started with Dr. Stent's latest book, "Putin's World: Russia Against the West and With the Rest." From there, we learned about Putin's childhood, how Russia operates, how they might perceive the energy transition, the Tokyo Olympics, and importantly the relationship between the U.S., Russia and China. We had a wonderful time and can't thank Dr. Stent enough for sharing her knowledge with us.Our TPH crew had some topical items to prepare us for our Russian discussion: Mike Bradley opened with an OPEC+ meeting preview and also reviewed what has happened since their last meeting. Matt Portillo chimed in with a look at equity and natural gas outlook and demand through 2022. Colin Fenton summarized current conditions by pulling 5 main headlines over the past few weeks including Russia, solar, nuclear, climate law and geothermal.We want to sincerely thank Dr. Stent for her time and expertise. Thanks to you all! We hope you enjoy.​​​​----------Copyright 2021, Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. The information contained in this update is based on sources considered to be reliable but is not represented to be complete and its accuracy is not guaranteed. This update is designed to provide market commentary only. This update does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities. Nothing contained in this update is intended to be a recommendation of a specific security or company nor is any of the information contained herein intended to constitute an analysis of any company or security reasonably sufficient to form the basis for any investment decision. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co., and its officers, directors, shareholders, employees and affiliates and members of their families may have positions in any securities mentioned and may buy or sell such securities before, after or concurrently with the publication of this update. In some instances, such investments may be inconsistent with the views expressed herein. Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. may, from time to time, perform or solicit investment banking or other services for or from a company, person or entities mentioned in this update. Additional important disclosures, including disclosures regarding companies covered by TPH's research department, may be found at www.tphco.com/Disclosure. Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. (TPH) is the global brand name for Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. Securities, LLC, Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. Securities – Canada, ULC, Perella Weinberg Partners LP, and their affiliates worldwide. Institutional Communication Only. Under FINRA Rule 2210, this communication is deemed institutional sales material and it is not meant for distribution to retail investors. Recipients should not forward this communication to a retail investor.