Podcasts about Dev

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,711PODCASTS
  • 5,615EPISODES
  • 54mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Dev

Show all podcasts related to dev

Latest podcast episodes about Dev

3 and a Possible
Season 2022: Episode 21 NBA Offseason is Here

3 and a Possible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 68:13


Dev, Joe and Will break down the latest offseason gets started. Free Agency around the corner and the Draft has just wrapped up, who is poised to make splash this offseason?

Talking to Ourselves
Episode 58: Devika Bulchandani

Talking to Ourselves

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 62:11


Devika Bulchandani is Global President of Ogilvy, making her the first ever woman of color to run a global agency network. In 2022, Ogilvy won Global Network of the Year at Cannes. Prior to joining Ogilvy in 2021, Dev had a storied 26-year career at McCann, most recently as President of McCann North America. She led Mastercard's Priceless campaign. In 2017, she helped bring to life the iconic Fearless Girl, making Mccann one of the most awarded agencies in the world. In 2019 she was recognized by Campaign Magazine as U.S. Advertising Agency Head of the Year. Dev is also a founding member of Times Up Advertising, where she has tirelessly championed equality for women in advertising. 

Dev Raga Personal Finance
229 how to pick a stock broker

Dev Raga Personal Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 42:10


There are so many stock brokers out there, which do you pick? Dev explains the basics of what a broker does and how to pick one that suits your needs. He covers:

Prof and Dev Play Games
PDPG 343: Roe Overturned and Xenoblade Direct

Prof and Dev Play Games

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 49:41


This week, the Dev, Anthony (@summerspeak), and the Prof, Larry (@ProfPlaysGames), discuss the game industries response to the disastrous Roe v Wade overturning before jumping into happier news with the Nintendo Direct no-one asked for, but its what we get, on Xenoblade Chronicles 3.   We will be donating $1 for each podcast download until the end of July to Reproductive Freedom and Bodily Autonomy focused charities.

UXBS
Qué rayos necesitan los DEVs en un Design Handoff

UXBS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 50:27


Ep 107 | Leonidas Esteban Engineer Manager at Parrot y profe en leonidasesteban.com pasa para charlar sobre el proceso de handoff, porque de nada sirve tirar consejos cuando podemos hablar directamente con un DEV que nos deje su punto de vista y experiencia.

Open Era
148. Wimbledon: Fantasy Draft

Open Era

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:16


It is time for the Open Era Wimbledon Fantasy Draft. Here to make their selections are some friends of the show and members of our Patreon Community. We are thrilled to be joined by Owen, Pog, James, Josh, Luke, and Priyanka.So join Dev and Simon as we dive into the madness of Draft day!Follow @OpenEra on Twitter! While you're there say hello to @DesaiDevang and Simon, who finally joined @SimonBushell2If merch is your thing, be sure to check out the store: http://bit.ly/merchera Or reach out to the show and say hey: podcast@openera.ca If you enjoyed today's show, please rate Open Era 5-Stars on Apple Podcasts.

PurePerformance
DevOps is 80% culture: But what does this really mean with April Edwards

PurePerformance

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 48:46


While this episode started out with a recap of April Edwards (@TheAprilEdwards) keynote called “Putting the Ops into DevOps” we quickly got April talk about what measures Microsoft has set to embrace the cultural change needed for their DevOps transformation: Every service has a public health dashboard, putting the customer in the center, make products open source, eat your own dog food, align your objectives with the team, …Besides this great conversation that finally gave some great input on what cultural change really looks like we learned from her background in Ops, moving to Dev, getting into the cloud and now inspiring Ops teams to have it easier in their job using automation. Tune in, learn and get inspired. We also talked about the late Abel Wang and how Microsoft UK is supporting Girls Who Code.Show Links:April on Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/azureapril/April on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheAprilEdwardsPutting the Ops into DevOps keynotehttps://globalazure.at/sessions/#323994Supporting Girls Who Code in memory of Abel Wanthttps://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/msbuild2022/?WT.mc_id=modinfra-67727-apedward

Perspectives /by FTA
//Dev Patel - Beauty in the Journey E47

Perspectives /by FTA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 46:11


Andy and Chris chat to Dr Dev Patel in this week's episode of Dentology. Dev is a qualified dentist and founder and CEO at Dental Beauty Partners, as well as founder of Dental Circle, the training network for dental professionals. In this episode, Dev reflects on his early days and tells us about his years growing up, training as a dentist and the moment when he first decided to take the step from clinical dentistry into business leadership, and ultimately group ownership. He also tells us about his remarkable success with his business ventures, in particular Dental Beauty Partners, and what makes him different! Dev's story is a great listen for anyone looking for inspiration and motivation to take the leap in their career! Topics: - What was your childhood like? - Was there anyone with entrepreneurial experience in your family for you to learn from? - Was there a specific moment when your mindset shifted from dentist to group ownership? - When did you commit to stepping away from clinical dentistry? - Tell us about your management style - Have your other ventures helped develop Dental Beauty Group? - Who inspires you as a business leader? - What's the future for Dental Beauty Partners?

We Made This
25 - Bound

We Made This

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 53:03


Welcome to CHUCKYVISION, a podcast about the horror franchise Child's Play and the main character, Chucky the Good Guy Doll. Welcome to the monthly specials before the confirmed season 2 of Chucky begins later in 2022! In this bonus offering, Dev and Mark finally tackle the Wachowskis' 1996 lesbian noir thriller Bound! After numerous references through the Chucky franchise, season 2 has shockingly cast both Gina Gershon and Joe Pantoliano so we had to make sure we caught every wink and nod with a bonus episode. With Mark's first viewing(!), we cover the classic film noir tropes updated with modern LGBTQIA+ inclusions and marvel at the two incredibly strong and sharp women who conspire to screw over the mafia. Host: Dev Elson Co-Host: Mark Adams Editor: Dev Elson Executive Producer: Tony Black Twitter: @ChuckyVision We Made This on Twitter: @we_madethis wemadethisnetwork.com Title music: At the Beginning (c) Dark Fantasy Studios

Loose Screws - The Elite Dangerous Podcast
Episode 138 - Which Wych Witch?

Loose Screws - The Elite Dangerous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 101:08


http://loosescrewsed.com Join us on discord! And check out the merch store! https://discord.io/LooseScrews Headlines for this episode: Squad Update: Last days of an expansion from Bumbur to fill an open gap nearby. Operation ScramJet in Lambda Andromedae was a complete success. Thanks CMDR Bloomingwind for taking point on it. We've taken over Myka's Rest in Snoqui Xian. Waiting on Psykit to plan the open house/celebration. Doing some housekeeping/system maintenance around our systems while we wait for the expansion to complete before moving on to our next project. All details in the #standing-orders and/or the #loose-screws-factions channels of the Discord. Thargoid Bug Report: NHSS POIs back in Didio, Novas and Sosong. Intended? No idea! Hunting at megaship in Dulerce http://thargoid.watch https://www.goidhub.com/ Bug Bug Report: Remember to vote up the GPU utilization issue on the tracker! Currently number 8 top voted; keep it going (update from tracks issue) Many cmdrs reporting higher fps, but no Notable change in frame time and many are still seeing frame drops, and hang ups (and also not seeing full gpu usage (per tracks issue)) https://issues.frontierstore.net/issue-detail/48884 In-Game News: Blame The Bard (Galnet Commentary) The Wych which witch Hunt: https://discord.gg/zrAk6EwtMQ Chig chat: Why is Chig such a donkey? Dev news: BREAKING: It's recently been leaked that the game servers were really ran by a farm of weasels running on hamster wheels. Discussion: Zachary Hudson looks so irritated and angry because he is rumored to have a cucumber stuck in his…..*transmission cut-off* Community Corner: Operation: Wych Hunt Discord: https://discord.gg/zrAk6EwtMQ Cheese. Mimolette - French bug cheese. Requested by Louis XIV. Looks like a cantaloupe. Yum? High mite-density! Cheese mites have a Wikipedia page. Flavor? Texture? You decide! Movie anniversaries: 25 years - Face Off 35 years - Space Balls 35 years - Full Metal Jacket If you like the show please rate and review on your podcast app, which helps people find the show. Join us on Discord at discord.io/loosescrews and check out the merch store at loosescrewsed.com for mugs, t-shirts, hoodies, and more.

Screaming in the Cloud
Google Cloud Run, Satisfaction, and Scalability with Steren Giannini

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:01


Full Description / Show Notes Steren and Corey talk about how Google Cloud Run got its name (00:49) Corey talks about his experiences using Google Cloud (2:42) Corey and Steven discuss Google Cloud's cloud run custom domains (10:01) Steren talks about Cloud Run's high developer satisfaction and scalability (15:54) Corey and Steven talk about Cloud Run releases at Google I/O (23:21) Steren discusses the majority of developer and customer interest in Google's cloud product (25:33) Steren talks about his 20% projects around sustainability (29:00) About SterenSteren is a Senior Product Manager at Google Cloud. He is part of the serverless team, leading Cloud Run. He is also working on sustainability, leading the Google Cloud Carbon Footprint product.Steren is an engineer from École Centrale (France). Prior to joining Google, he was CTO of a startup building connected objects and multi device solutions.Links Referenced: Google Cloud Run: https://cloud.run sheets-url-shortener: https://github.com/ahmetb/sheets-url-shortener snark.cloud/run: https://snark.cloud/run Twitter: https://twitter.com/steren TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by Steren Giannini, who is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, specifically on something called Google Cloud Run. Steren, thank you for joining me today.Steren: Thanks for inviting me, Corey.Corey: So, I want to start at the very beginning of, “Oh, a cloud service. What are we going to call it?” “Well, let's put the word cloud in it.” “Okay, great. Now, it is cloud, so we have to give it a vague and unassuming name. What does it do?” “It runs things.” “Genius. Let's break and go for work.” Now, it's easy to imagine that you spent all of 30 seconds on a name, but it never works that way. How easy was it to get to Cloud Run as a name for the service?Steren: [laugh]. Such a good question because originally it was not named Cloud Run at all. The original name was Google Serverless Engine. But a few people know that because they've been helping us since the beginning, but originally it was Google Serverless Engine. Nobody liked the name internally, and I think at one point, we wondered, “Hey, can we drop the engine structure and let's just think about the name. And what does this thing do?” “It runs things.”We already have Cloud Build. Well, wouldn't it be great to have Cloud Run to pair with Cloud Build so that after you've built your containers, you can run them? And that's how we ended up with this very simple Cloud Run, which today seems so obvious, but it took us a long time to get to that name, and we actually had a lot of renaming to do because we were about to ship with Google Serverless Engine.Corey: That seems like a very interesting last-minute change because it's not just a find and replace at that point, it's—Steren: No.Corey: —“Well, okay, if we call it Cloud Run, which can also be a verb or a noun, depending, is that going to change the meaning of some sentences?” And just doing a find and replace without a proofread pass as well, well, that's how you wind up with funny things on Twitter.Steren: API endpoints needed to be changed, adding weeks of delays to the launch. That is why we—you know, [laugh] announced in 2018 and publicly launched in 2019.Corey: I've been doing a fair bit of work in cloud for a while, and I wound up going down a very interesting path. So, the first native Google Cloud service—not things like WP Engine that ride on top of GCP—but my first native Google Cloud Service was done in service of this podcast, and it is built on Google Cloud Run. I don't think I've told you part of this story yet, but it's one of the reasons I reached out to invite you onto the show. Let me set the stage here with a little bit of backstory that might explain what the hell I'm talking about.As listeners of this show are probably aware, we have sponsors whom we love and adore. In the early days of this show, they would say, “Great, we want to tell people about our product”—which is the point of a sponsorship—“And then send them to a URL.” “Great. What's the URL?” And they would give me something that was three layers deep, then with a bunch of UTM tracking parameters at the end.And it's, “You do realize that no one is going to be sitting there typing all of that into a web browser?” At best, you're going to get three words or so. So, I built myself a URL redirector, snark.cloud. I can wind up redirecting things in there anywhere it needs to go.And for a long time, I did this on top of S3 and then put CloudFront in front of it. And this was all well and good until, you know, things happened in the fullness of time. And now holy crap, I have an operations team involved in things, and maybe I shouldn't be the only person that knows how to work on all of these bits and bobs. So, it was time to come up with something that had a business user-friendly interface that had some level of security, so I don't wind up automatically building out a spam redirect service for anything that wants to, and it needs to be something that's easy to work with. So, I went on an exploration.So, at first it showed that there were—like, I have an article out that I've spoken about before that there are, “17 Ways to Run Containers on AWS,” and then I wrote the sequel, “17 More Ways to Run Containers on AWS.” And I'm keeping a list, I'm almost to the third installation of that series, which is awful. So, great. There's got to be some ways to build some URL redirect stuff with an interface that has an admin panel. And I spent three days on this trying a bunch of different things, and some were running on deprecated versions of Node that wouldn't build properly and others were just such complex nonsense things that had got really bad. I was starting to consider something like just paying for Bitly or whatnot and making it someone else's problem.And then I stumbled upon something on GitHub that really was probably one of the formative things that changed my opinion of Google Cloud for the better. And within half an hour of discovering this thing, it was up and running. I did the entire thing, start to finish, from my iPad in a web browser, and it just worked. It was written by—let me make sure I get his name correct; you know, messing up someone's name is a great way to say that we don't care about them—Ahmet Balkan used to work at Google Cloud; now he's over at Twitter. And he has something up on GitHub that is just absolutely phenomenal about this, called sheets-url-shortener.And this is going to sound wild, but stick with me. The interface is simply a Google Sheet, where you have one column that has the shorthand slug—for example, run; if you go to snark.cloud/run, it will redirect to Google Cloud Run's website. And the second column is where you want it to go. The end.And whenever that gets updated, there's of course some caching issues, which means it can take up to five seconds from finishing that before it will actually work across the entire internet. And as best I can tell, that is fundamentally magic. But what made it particularly useful and magic, from my perspective, was how easy it was to get up and running. There was none of this oh, but then you have to integrate it with Google Sheets and that's a whole ‘nother team so there's no way you're going to be able to figure that out from our Docs. Go talk to them and then come back in the day.They were the get started, click here to proceed. It just worked. And it really brought back some of the magic of cloud for me in a way that I hadn't seen in quite a while. So, all which is to say, amazing service, I continue to use it for all of these sponsored links, and I am still waiting for you folks to bill me, but it fits comfortably in the free tier because it turns out that I don't have hundreds of thousands of people typing it in every week.Steren: I'm glad it went well. And you know, we measure tasks success for Cloud Run. And we do know that most new users are able to deploy their apps very quickly. And that was the case for you. Just so you know, we've put a lot of effort to make sure it was true, and I'll be glad to tell you more about all that.But for that particular service, yes, I suppose Ahmet—who I really enjoyed working with on Cloud Run, he was really helpful designing Cloud Run with us—has open-sourced this side project. And basically, you might even have clicked on a deploy to Cloud Run button on GitHub, right, to deploy it?Corey: That is exactly what I did and it somehow just worked and—Steren: Exactly.Corey: And it knew, even logging into the Google Cloud Console because it understands who I am because I use Google Docs and things, I'm already logged in. None of this, “Oh, which one of these 85 credential sets is it going to be?” Like certain other clouds. It was, “Oh, wow. Wait, cloud can be easy and fun? When did that happen?”Steren: So, what has happened when you click that deploy to Google Cloud button, basically, the GitHub repository was built into a container with Cloud Build and then was deployed to Cloud Run. And once on Cloud Run, well, hopefully, you have forgotten about it because that's what we do, right? We—give us your code, in a container if you know containers if you don't just—we support, you know, many popular languages, and we know how to build them, so don't worry about that. And then we run it. And as you said, when there is low traffic or no traffic, it scales to zero.When there is low traffic, you're likely going to stay under the generous free tier. And if you have more traffic for, you know, Screaming in the Cloud suddenly becoming a high destination URL redirects, well, Cloud Run will scale the number of instances of this container to be able to handle the load. Cloud Run scales automatically and very well, but only—as always—charging you when you are processing some requests.Corey: I had to fork and make a couple of changes myself after I wound up doing some testing. The first was to make the entire thing case insensitive, which is—you know, makes obvious sense. And the other was to change the permanent redirect to a temporary redirect because believe it or not, in the fullness of time, sometimes sponsors want to change the landing page in different ways for different campaigns and that's fine by me. I just wanted to make sure people's browser cache didn't remember it into perpetuity. But it was easy enough to run—that was back in the early days of my exploring Go, which I've been doing this quarter—and in the couple of months this thing has been running it has been effectively flawless.It's set it; it's forget it. The only challenges I had with it are it was a little opaque getting a custom domain set up that—which is still in beta, to be clear—and I've heard some horror stories of people saying it got wedged. In my case, no, I deployed it and I started refreshing it and suddenly, it start throwing an SSL error. And it's like, “Oh, that's not good, but I'm going to break my own lifestyle here and be patient for ten minutes.” And sure enough, it cleared itself and everything started working. And that was the last time I had to think about any of this. And it just worked.Steren: So first, Cloud Run is HTTPS only. Why? Because it's 2020, right? It's 2022, but—Corey: [laugh].Steren: —it's launched in 2020. And so basically, we have made a decision that let's just not accept HTTP traffic; it's only HTTPS. As a consequence, we need to provision a cert for your custom domain. That is something that can take some time. And as you said, we keep it in beta or in preview because we are not yet satisfied with the experience or even the performance of Cloud Run custom domains, so we are actively working on fixing that with a different approach. So, expect some changes, hopefully, this year.Corey: I will say it does take a few seconds when people go to a snark.cloud URL for it to finish resolving, and it feels on some level like it's almost like a cold start problem. But subsequent visits, the same thing also feel a little on the slow and pokey side. And I don't know if that's just me being wildly impatient, if there's an optimization opportunity, or if that's just inherent to the platform that is not under current significant load.Steren: So, it depends. If the Cloud Run service has scaled down to zero, well of course, your service will need to be started. But what we do know, if it's a small Go binary, like something that you mentioned, it should really take less than, let's say, 500 milliseconds to go from zero to one of your container instance. Latency can also be due to the way the code is running. If it occurred is fetching things from Google Sheets at every startup, that is something that could add to the startup latency.So, I would need to take a look, but in general, we are not spinning up a virtual machine anytime we need to scale horizontally. Like, our infrastructure is a multi-tenant, rapidly scalable infrastructure that can materialize a container in literally 300 milliseconds. The rest of the latency comes from what does the container do at startup time?Corey: Yeah, I just ran a quick test of putting time in front of a curl command. It looks like it took 4.83 seconds. So, enough to be perceptive. But again, for just a quick redirect, it's generally not the end of the world and there's probably something I'm doing that is interesting and odd. Again, I did not invite you on the show to file a—Steren: [laugh].Corey: Bug report. Let's be very clear here.Steren: Seems on the very high end of startup latencies. I mean, I would definitely expect under the second. We should deep-dive into the code to take a look. And by the way, building stuff on top of spreadsheets. I've done that a ton in my previous lives as a CTO of a startup because well, that's the best administration interface, right? You just have a CRUD UI—Corey: [unintelligible 00:12:29] world and all business users understand it. If people in Microsoft decided they were going to change Microsoft Excel interface, even a bit, they would revert the change before noon of the same day after an army of business users grabbed pitchforks and torches and marched on their headquarters. It's one of those things that is how the world runs; it is the world's most common IDE. And it's great, but I still think of databases through the lens of thinking about it as a spreadsheet as my default approach to things. I also think of databases as DNS, but that's neither here nor there.Steren: You know, if you have maybe 100 redirects, that's totally fine. And by the way, the beauty of Cloud Run in a spreadsheet, as you mentioned is that Cloud Run services run with a certain identity. And this identity, you can grant it permissions. And in that case, what I would recommend if you haven't done so yet, is to give an identity to your Cloud Run service that has the permission to read that particular spreadsheet. And how you do that you invite the email of the service account as a reader of your spreadsheet, and that's probably what you did.Corey: The click button to the workflow on Google Cloud automatically did that—Steren: Oh, wow.Corey: —and taught me how to do it. “Here's the thing that look at. The end.” It was a flawless user-onboarding experience.Steren: Very nicely done. But indeed, you know, there is this built-in security which is the principle of minimal permission, like each of your Cloud Run service should basically only be able to read and write to the backing resources that they should. And by default, we give you a service account which has a lot of permissions, but our recommendation is to narrow those permissions to basically only look at the cloud storage buckets that the service is supposed to look at. And the same for a spreadsheet.Corey: Yes, on some level, I feel like I'm going to write an analysis of my own security approach. It would be titled, “My God, It's Full Of Stars” as I look at the IAM policies of everything that I've configured. The idea of least privilege is great. What I like about this approach is that it made it easy to do it so I don't have to worry about it. At one point, I want to go back and wind up instrumenting it a bit further, just so I can wind up getting aggregate numbers of all right, how many times if someone visited this particular link? It'll be good to know.And I don't know… if I have to change permissions to do that yet, but that's okay. It's the best kind of problem: future Corey. So, we'll deal with that when the time comes. But across the board, this has just been a phenomenal experience and it's clear that when you were building Google Cloud Run, you understood the assignment. Because I was looking for people saying negative things about it and by and large, all of its seem to come from a perspective of, “Well, this isn't going to be the most cost-effective or best way to run something that is hyperscale, globe-spanning.”It's yes, that's the thing that Kubernetes was originally built to run and for some godforsaken reason people run their blog on it instead now. Okay. For something that is small, scales to zero, and has long periods where no one is visiting it, great, this is a terrific answer and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's clear that you understood who you were aiming at, and the migration strategy to something that is a bit more, I want to say robust, but let's be clear what I mean when I'm saying that if you want something that's a little bit more impressive on your SRE resume as you're trying a multi-year project to get hired by Google or pretend you got hired by Google, yeah, you can migrate to something else in a relatively straightforward way. But that this is up, running, and works without having to think about it, and that is no small thing.Steren: So, there are two things to say here. The first is yes, indeed, we know we have high developer satisfaction. You know, we measure this—in Google Cloud, you might have seen those small satisfaction surveys popping up sometimes on the user interface, and you know, we are above 90% satisfaction score. We hire third parties to help us understand how usable and what satisfaction score would users get out of Cloud Run, and we are constantly getting very, very good results, in absolute but also compared to the competition.Now, the other thing that you said is that, you know, Cloud Run is for small things, and here while it is definitely something that allows you to be productive, something that strives for simplicity, but it also scales a lot. And contrary to other systems, you do not have any pre-provisioning to make. So, we have done demos where we go from zero to 10,000 container instances in ten seconds because of the infrastructure on which Cloud Run runs, which is fully managed and multi-tenant, we can offer you this scale on demand. And many of our biggest customers have actually not switched to something like Kubernetes after starting with Cloud Run because they value the low maintenance, the no infrastructure management that Cloud Run brings them.So, we have like Ikea, ecobee… for example ecobee, you know, the smart thermostats are using Cloud Run to ingest events from the thermostat. I think Ikea is using Cloud Run more and more for more of their websites. You know, those companies scale, right? This is not, like, scale to zero hobby project. This is actually production e-commerce and connected smart objects production systems that have made the choice of being on a fully-managed platform in order to reduce their operational overhead.[midroll 00:17:54]Corey: Let me be clear. When I say scale—I think we might be talking past each other on a small point here. When I say scale, I'm talking less about oh tens or hundreds of thousands of containers running concurrently. I'm talking in a more complicated way of, okay, now we have a whole bunch of different microservices talking to one another and affinity as far as location to each other for data transfer reasons. And as you start beginning to service discovery style areas of things, where we build a really complicated applications because we hired engineers and failed to properly supervise them, and that type of convoluted complex architecture.That's where it feels like Cloud Run increasingly, as you move in that direction, starts to look a little bit less like the tool of choice. Which is fine, I want to be clear on that point. The sense that I've gotten of it is a great way to get started, it's a great way to continue running a thing you don't have to think about because you have a day job that isn't infrastructure management. And it is clear to—as your needs change—to either remain with the service or pivot to a very close service without a whole lot of retooling, which is key. There's not much of a lock-in story to this, which I love.Steren: That was one of the key principles when we started to design Cloud Run was, you know, we realized the industry had agreed that the container image was the standard for the deployment artifact of software. And so, we just made the early choice of focusing on deploying containers. Of course, we are helping users build those containers, you know, we have things called build packs, we can continuously deploy from GitHub, but at the end of the day, the thing that gets auto-scaled on Cloud Run is a container. And that enables portability.As you said. You can literally run the same container, nothing proprietary in it, I want to be clear. Like, you're just listening on a port for some incoming requests. Those requests can be HTTP requests, events, you know, we have products that can push events to Cloud Run like Eventarc or Pub/Sub. And this same container, you can run it on your local machine, you can run it on Kubernetes, you can run it on another cloud. You're not locked in, in terms of API of the compute.We even went even above and beyond by having the Cloud Run API looks like a Kubernetes API. I think that was an extra effort that we made. I'm not sure people care that much, but if you look at the Cloud Run API, it is actually exactly looking like Kubernetes, Even if there is no Kubernetes at all under the hood; we just made it for portability. Because we wanted to address this concern of serverless which was lock-in. Like, when you use a Function as a Service product, you are worried that the architecture that you are going to develop around this product is going to be only working in this particular cloud provider, and you're not in control of the language, the version that this provider has decided to offer you, you're not in control of more of the complexity that can come as you want to scan this code, as you want to move this code between staging and production or test this code.So, containers are really helping with that. So, I think we made the right choice of this new artifact that to build Cloud Run around the container artifact. And you know, at the time when we launched, it was a little bit controversial because back in the day, you know, 2018, 2019, serverless really meant Functions as a Service. So, when we launched, we little bit redefined serverless. And we basically said serverless containers. Which at the time were two worlds that in the same sentence were incompatible. Like, many people, including internally, had concerns around—Corey: Oh, the serverless versus container war was a big thing for a while. Everyone was on a different side of that divide. It's… containers are effectively increasingly—and I know, I'll get email for this, and I don't even slightly care, they're a packaging format—Steren: Exactly.Corey: —where it solves the problem of how do I build this thing to deploy on Debian instances? And Ubuntu instances, and other instances, God forbid, Windows somewhere, you throw a container over the wall. The end. Its DevOps is about breaking down the walls between Dev and Ops. That's why containers are here to make them silos that don't have to talk to each other.Steren: A container image is a glorified zip file. Literally. You have a set of layers with files in them, and basically, we decided to adopt that artifact standard, but not the perceived complexity that existed at the time around containers. And so, we basically merged containers with serverless to make something as easy to use as a Function as a Service product but with the power of bringing your own container. And today, we are seeing—you mentioned, what kind of architecture would you use Cloud Run for?So, I would say now there are three big buckets. The obvious one is anything that is a website or an API, serving public internet traffic, like your URL redirect service, right? This is, you have an API, takes a request and returns a response. It can be a REST API, GraphQL API. We recently added support for WebSockets, which is pretty unique for a service offering to support natively WebSockets.So, what I mean natively is, my client can open a socket connection—a bi-directional socket connection—with a given instance, for up to one hour. This is pretty unique for something that is as fully managed as Cloud Run.Corey: Right. As we're recording this, we are just coming off of Google I/O, and there were a number of announcements around Cloud Run that were touching it because of, you know, strange marketing issues. I only found out that Google I/O was a thing and featured cloud stuff via Twitter at the time it was happening. What did you folks release around Cloud Run?Steren: Good question, actually. Part of the Google I/O Developer keynote, I pitched a story around how Cloud Run helps developers, and the I/O team liked the story, so we decided to include that story as part of the live developer keynote. So, on stage, we announced Cloud Run jobs. So now, I talked to you about Cloud Run services, which can be used to expose an API, but also to do, like, private microservice-to-microservice communication—because cloud services don't have to be public—and in that case, we support GRPC and, you know, a very strong security mechanism where only Service A can invoke Service B, for example, but Cloud Run jobs are about non-request-driven containers. So, today—I mean, before Google I/O a few days ago, the only requirement that we imposed on your container image was that it started to listen for requests, or events, or GRPC—Corey: Web requests—Steren: Exactly—Corey: It speaks [unintelligible 00:24:35] you want as long as it's HTTP. Yes.Steren: That was the only requirement we asked you to have on your container image. And now we've changed that. Now, if you have a container that basically starts and executes to completion, you can deploy it on a Cloud Run job. So, you will use Cloud Run jobs for, like, daily batch jobs. And you have the same infrastructure, so on-demand, you can go from zero to, I think for now, the maximum is a hundred tasks in parallel, for—of course, you can run many tasks in sequence, but in parallel, you can go from zero to a hundred, right away to run your daily batch job, daily admin job, data processing.But this is more in the batch mode than in streaming mode. If you would like to use a more, like, streaming data processing, than a Cloud Run service would still be the best fit because you can literally push events to it, and it will auto-scale to handle any number of events that it receives.Corey: Do you find that the majority of customers are using Cloud Run for one-off jobs that barely will get more than a single container, like my thing, or do you find that they're doing massively parallel jobs? Where's the lion's share of developer and customer interest?Steren: It's both actually. We have both individual developers, small startups—which really value the scale to zero and pay per use model of Cloud Run. Your URL redirect service probably is staying below the free tier, and there are many, many, many users in your case. But at the same time, we have big, big, big customers who value the on-demand scalability of Cloud Run. And for these customers, of course, they will probably very likely not scale to zero, but they value the fact that—you know, we have a media company who uses Cloud Run for TV streaming, and when there is a soccer game somewhere in the world, they have a big spike of usage of requests coming in to their Cloud Run service, and here they can trust the rapid scaling of Cloud Run so they don't have to pre-provision things in advance to be able to serve that sudden traffic spike.But for those customers, Cloud Run is priced in a way so that if you know that you're going to consume a lot of Cloud Run CPU and memory, you can purchase Committed Use Discounts, which will lower your bill overall because you know you are going to spend one dollar per hour on Cloud Run, well purchase a Committed Use Discount because you will only spend 83 cents instead of one dollar. And also, Cloud Run and comes with two pricing model, one which is the default, which is the request-based pricing model, which is basically you only have CPU allocated to your container instances if you are processing at least one request. But as a consequence of that, you are not paying outside of the processing of those requests. Those containers might stay up for you, one, ready to receive new requests, but you're not paying for them. And so, that is—you know, your URL redirect service is probably in that mode where yes when you haven't used it for a while, it will scale down to zero, but if you send one request to it, it will serve that request and then it will stay up for a while until it decides to scale down. But you the user only pays when you are processing these specific requests, a little bit like a Function as a Service product.Corey: Scales to zero is one of the fundamental tenets of serverless that I think that companies calling something serverless, but it always charges you per hour anyway. Yeah, that doesn't work. Storage, let's be clear, is a separate matter entirely. I'm talking about compute. Even if your workflow doesn't scale down to zero ever as a workload, that's fine, but if the workload does, you don't get to keep charging me for it.Steren: Exactly. And so, in that other mode where you decide to always have CPU allocated to your Cloud Run container instances, then you pay for the entire lifecycle of this container instances. You still benefit from the auto-scaling of Cloud Run, but you will pay for the lifecycle and in that case, the price points are lower because you pay for a longer period of time. But that's more the price model that those bigger customers will take because at their scale, they basically always receive requests, so they already to pay always, basically.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to chat with me. Before you go, one last question that we'll be using as a teaser for the next episode that we record together. It seems like this is a full-time job being the product manager on Cloud Run, but no Google, contrary to popular opinion, does in fact, still support 20% projects. What's yours?Steren: So, I've been looking to work on Cloud Run since it was a prototype, and you know, for a long time, we've been iterating privately on Cloud Run, launching it, seeing it grow, seeing it adopted, it's great. It's my full-time job. But on Fridays, I still find the time to have a 20% project, which also had quite a bit of impact. And I work on some sustainability efforts for Google Cloud. And notably, we've released two things last year.The first one is that we are sharing some carbon characteristics of Google Cloud regions. So, if you have seen those small leaves in the Cloud Console next to the regions that are emitting the less carbon, that's something that I helped bring to life. And the second one, which is something quite big, is we are helping customers report and reduce their gross carbon emissions of their Google Cloud usage by providing an out of the box reporting tool called Google Cloud Carbon Footprint. So, that's something that I was able to bootstrap with a team a little bit on the side of my Cloud Run project, but I was very glad to see it launched by our CEO at the last Cloud Next Conference. And now it is a fully-funded project, so we are very glad that we are able to help our customers better meet their sustainability goals themselves.Corey: And we will be talking about it significantly on the next episode. We're giving a teaser, not telling the whole story.Steren: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you are. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Steren: Well, if they want to learn more about Cloud Run, we talked about how simple was that name. It was obviously not simple to find this simple name, but the domain is https://cloud.run.Corey: We will also accept snark.cloud/run, I will take credit for that service, too.Steren: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: There we are.Steren: And then, people can find me on Twitter at @steren, S-T-E-R-E-N. I'll be happy—I'm always happy to help developers get started or answer questions about Cloud Run. And, yeah, thank you for having me. As I said, you successfully deployed something in just a few minutes to Cloud Run. I would encourage the audience to—Corey: In spite of myself. I know, I'm as surprised as anyone.Steren: [laugh].Corey: The only snag I really hit was the fact that I was riding shotgun when we picked up my daughter from school and went through a dead zone. It's like, why is this thing not loading in the Google Cloud Console? Yeah, fix the cell network in my area, please.Steren: I'm impressed that you did all of that from an iPad. But yeah, to the audience give Cloud Run the try. You can really get started connecting your GitHub repository or deploy your favorite container image. And we've worked very hard to ensure that usability was here, and we know we have pretty strong usability scores. Because that was a lot of work to simplicity, and product excellence and developer experience is a lot of work to get right, and we are very proud of what we've achieved with Cloud Run and proud to see that the developer community has been very supportive and likes this product.Corey: I'm a big fan of what you've built. And well, of course, it links to all of that in the show notes. I just want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. And thanks again for building something that I think in many ways showcases the best of what Google Cloud has to offer.Steren: Thanks for the invite.Corey: We'll talk again soon. Steren Giannini is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, on Cloud Run. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice. If it's on YouTube, put the thumbs up and the subscribe buttons as well, but in the event that you hated it also include an angry comment explaining why your 20% project is being a shithead on the internet.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Compassionate Samurai Business Hour
The Busy Entrepreneur's Secret Weapon

The Compassionate Samurai Business Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:56


This show is a must listen for anyone who desires to leverage both knowledge and time. Building a business takes time, money, dedication and of course, blood, sweat and tears. Every business reaches that point where you, the business owner, can no longer go it alone. It's time for help. Behind every successful entrepreneur is a team of skilled, dedicated team members aiding and assisting them in reaching and surpassing their goals and dreams. Tracey will enlighten, educate and inspire us with the best methods for working with a virtual assistant.

Wolof Tech
S8E4 - KayDev2021 : les tutos de codage en wolof

Wolof Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 57:57


Dans cet épisode nous allons a la découverte de cette chaîne YouTube KAyDev2021 qui propose des tutos de codage en wolof. Invités Ibrahima NDIAYE (Développeur JAVA sénior) LinkedIn, Twitter, Youtube Programme Q1 : Qui est ibrahima Ndiaye pouvez-vous nous parler un peu de votre parcours ? Q2 : Qu'est-ce qui vous a poussé à créer la chaîne YouTube kaydev221 pour partager tes connaissances en java ? Q3 : Pourquoi avoir choisi le wolof pour faire les vidéos ? Q4 : Quelle pédagogie vous adoptez pour permettre à votre public de bien comprendre le langage Java souvent considéré comme très complexe dans l'apprentissage ? Q5 : En un temps-record (un mois) vous avez pu produire une vingtaine de vidéo. C'est quoi votre secret ? Q6 : Peut-on vous attendre sur d'autres tutos avec d'autres langages de programmation ? Q7 : En tant que développeur senior que pensez-vous de l'avenir du métier en Afrique ? Q8 : Vous avez travaillé au Sénégal et en Europe sur beaucoup de projets de développement, que pouvez-vous nous dire des différences en tant que Dev ? Q9 : Quel conseil vous donnez à tous les jeunes Sénégalais qui veulent embrasser le métier de développeur ? Lien : Chaine KAYDEV221

DevSecOps Podcast
#23 - SDL PT9 - Perform Static Analysis Security Testing (SAST)

DevSecOps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 59:06


No nono episódio da série SDL, você acompanha sobre Static Application Security Testing SAST. O quê? Como? Onde? Quando? E principalmente, para quem? Vamos mergulhar no tema para te ajudar a desenvolver software seguro, da maneira certa.

Tent Theology
Natalia-Nana, decolonisation, disability and misogynoir

Tent Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 62:26


Natasha Beckles sits down with Natalia-Nana, who is a specialist in equity, diversity, inclusion and liberation. They discuss incarnation, the bible and the church, misogynoir and Child Q, as well as their wider work in EDIL, decolonisation and anti-racism and the task advising organisations and supporting leadership in hosting Safe Spaces for People of Colour and marginalised ethnic identities. Natalia-Nana Lester-Bush has been a Trustee of the Anti-Racist Alliance and is now Co-Chair of Women in Dev - a global network and movement of all women in International Development. You can find out more about Natalia-Nana HERE and on Instagram HERE.Download more Tent Courses and Resources HERE. Has anything we make been interesting, useful or fruitful for you? You can support us by becoming a Fellow Traveller on our Patreon page HERE.

All Through a Lens: A Podcast About Film Photography
Season Finale, Anne Brigman (w/ Kate Miller-Wilson)! - Episode 65

All Through a Lens: A Podcast About Film Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 124:00


Welcome to the final episode of the season, our last episode before our summer break. While we are taking a little break, we will still have lots and lots of content for you. There will be Dev parties, updates from the road, and a few special surprises along the way. But today we will be checking back in with Kate Miller Wilson (@katemillerwilson on IG), what's she been up to for the past year? And will also be talking to you about photographer Anne Brigman, fortunately for everyone Kate will be sticking around to help us! Not only that but the film detectives, Charlie and Sara (@casualscience and @thefutureofwhat on IG), we'll be popping in with another case to solve. There's also the zine reviews, the answering machine, and so much more!   Anne Brigman Photographer Anne Brigman is known almost exclusively for her nudes. Much of her known and available work depicts bodies contorted and twisted among the contorted and twisted pines of the high sierra mountains in California. Her photography was unlike almost anything else in the early 1900s. And yet it fit perfectly into Alfred Stieglitz's photo-secessionist movement. Today, with Kate Miller-Wilson, we're going to talk about Anne Brigman and Alfred Stieglitz.  By the turn of the century, Anne had become nearly obsessed with the High Sierras. It was then that she discovered photography. She probably acquired her first camera from her sister, Elizabeth and was immediately smitten. Her first photos, taken when she was 32, were of her family. These were mostly typical portraits rendered in a somewhat impressionistic style. A year later, her work was exhibited by the San Francisco Photographic Salon and printed in Camera Craft, the magazine of the San Francisco Camera Club. She also began a correspondence with Alfred Stieglitz, founder of the Photo Secession movement, who was currently waging a war with both the photography and art communities, insisting that photography be considered an art rather than a science.  Kate, Vania and Eric each picked a few of Anne's photos and discussed them while talking about her life. Here are the photos they discussed (in order)…     Kate Miller-Wilson We talked to Kate last year at this time, so we're just catching up. This is a great opportunity to discuss things we wouldn't normally tackle. Heavy hitting subjects like: Beach Shooting Underwater 4×5? When to shoot color and why we don't do it anyway. 8×10 is just bigger 4×5 How to avoid Aero Ektar Cliches We discuss a few of Kate's photos, of course. Here are some…   Zine Reviews Where We Were (Vol. 2) by Shania Logan. https://www.etsy.com/listing/1181034648/where-we-were-vol-ii-film-photography With this issue, Shania leads us into town by way of closed up corner stores and school buses decaying in the sun. Mobile homes quickly disintegrate once unoccupied, and tar paper shacks are little more than a foundation. Long cold factories with darkened, smashed windows explain the depressing number of houses vacated, and the lines of empty streets.   Happy Together by Federico Quaglino IG: @fedequaglino   PATREON Thank you to everyone who supports us! Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff! patreon.com/allthroughalens THE CREDITS OF ENDING Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers Vania: IG, Flickr, Zines Eric: IG, Flickr, Zines, ECN-2 Kits Sara Murphy: IG Charlie: IG, Web; Themselves Press   All Through a Lens: IG, Website, Patreon, Spotify Playlists

Prof and Dev Play Games
PDPG 342: Final Fantasy Remake Part II and Crisis Core

Prof and Dev Play Games

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:05


This week, the Dev, Anthony (@summerspeak), and the Prof, Larry (@ProfPlaysGames), discuss Square Enix's Final Fantasy presentation and dig into what the heck Crisis Core was. Then they dig into Steam #NextFest games and demos.

3 and a Possible
Season 2022 Episode 19: NBA Finals Check In

3 and a Possible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 60:37


Will, Dev, and Joe check in on the NBA finals with the Warriors up 3-2 to let you know what to expect as the Finals come to a close. 

XrmToolCast
Developer Horror Stories

XrmToolCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 56:08


Daryl and Scott shared horror stories about things that did not go quite as planned and the pranks they have pulled on their colleagues. Some of the highlights: If you were an interviewer, would you hire someone who answers "I have never done anything wrong in my career" Battle scars of Daryl and Scott Two Concurrent Publish All actions could make the server hang in the early days of CRM online Daryl attached a debugger to the process on the on-prem server and everyone complained that the Dev instance was not working Using the same service principal across multiple environments and hitting API limit affects all environments Daryl almost truncated one of the tables in the UAT environment with millions of records Daryl's home renovation horror stories The worst sinking feeling that Scott had Daryl's car buying experience Inheriting a project with JavaScript without namespaces and the web resource files without extensions What do you do when you inherit the project with no source code for the plugin or the source code does not match the functionality? What is worse than having no error message for an error? What is your error handling approach for plugin development? The disadvantage of deploying the PCF Code Component or assembly compiled in debug mode to a Production environment Testing as a system administrator Things to look out for before reparenting the business unit What is the worst auto-numbering solution that you have seen? A bug in Retrieve plugin for systemuser table locked everyone out of the system Pranks that Daryl has pulled on his colleagues Be careful what you encourage by giving badges when you gamify the system Less code, fewer horror stories Got questions? Have your own tool you'd like to share? Have a suggestion for a future episode? Contact Daryl and Scott at cast@xrmtoolbox.com. Follow us on LinkedIn and @XrmToolCast for updates on future episodes. Do you want to see us too? Subscribe to our YouTube channel to view the last episodes. Don't forget to rate and leave a review for this show at Podchaser. Your hosts: Daryl LaBar: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daryllabar | @ddlabar Scott Durow: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottdurow | @ScottDurow Editor: Linn Zaw Win: https://www.linkedin.com/in/linnzawwin  | @LinnZawWin Music: https://www.purple-planet.com

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast
#744: Custom Shopify Development Service

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 5:36


Dev.co. offers a wide range of Shopify development services. Our expert developers help create custom Shopify themes, apps, and much more.  A partnership is a great way to get started on your e-commerce journey without all of the upfront costs! Shopify Store Setups & Integration. Shopify is one of the most popular e-commerce platforms on the market today.  A custom Shopify app developer can be a great asset to your business. With developers in almost every country around the world, we'll work alongside you to make sure your online store looks exactly how you want it to! More info about custom shopify development service:   https://dev.co/shopify/   Connect with us:  SEO // PPC // DEV // WEBSITE DESIGN

Farming Simulator Podcast (Official)
#20 Meet the Dev: Marius

Farming Simulator Podcast (Official)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 23:23


The Community Team comes together to discuss the latest Farming Simulator 22 topics. Today, we have a special guest. One of our integrators shares his  GIANTS Software story in the very first episode of "Meet the Dev"

Loose Screws - The Elite Dangerous Podcast
Episode 137 - Booger Hook

Loose Screws - The Elite Dangerous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 81:13


Heads up! There's a 40 second-or-so gap in the middle of this recording. This was just a recording bot mistake that I didn't catch when exporting the mixed podcast file and I didn't have the time to re-export it. Sorry! -jnTracks http://loosescrewsed.com Join us on discord! And check out the merch store! https://discord.io/LooseScrews Headlines for this episode: Squad Update: Still Easing into a small expansion from Bumbur to fill an open gap nearby. Operation ScramJet proceeding in Lambda Andromedae. CMDR Bloomingwind posting regular updates in #loose-screws-faction channel. Pushing Kolyawa Jet Life into retreat. Still gathering ports in Snoqui Xian in order to capture Myka's Rest, now 7.5% away from a war Election in Tamor (2-1), war starting up in LHS 3877 (0-0). All details in the #standing-orders and/or the #loose-screws-factions channels of the Discord. Thargoid Bug Report: NHSS POIs back in Didio, Novas and Sosong. Intended? No idea! Hunting at megaship in Dulerce http://thargoid.watch Bug Bug Report: Remember to vote up the GPU utilization issue on the tracker! Currently number 8 top voted; keep it going (update from tracks issue) Many cmdrs reporting higher fps, but no Notable change in frame time and many are still seeing frame drops, and hang ups (and also not seeing full gpu usage (per tracks issue)) https://issues.frontierstore.net/issue-detail/48884 A bug Double-O-scotch wants plugged: https://issues.fro ntierstore.net/issue-detail/50230 In-Game News: Blame The Bard (Galnet Commentary) sa Chig chat: Dev news: Console CMDR copy FAQ and expected date https://forums.frontier.co.uk/threads/console-profile-transfers-faq-and-expected-date.603979/ Frameshift Live #9 | Console Transfer FAQs, Interview w/ Narrative Team https://youtu.be/en4TBdzmhfQ Discussion: Community Corner: Cheese. Movie anniversary If you like the show please rate and review on your podcast app, which helps people find the show. Join us on Discord at discord.io/loosescrews and check out the merch store at loosescrewsed.com for mugs, t-shirts, hoodies, and more.

For All Mankind: The Official Podcast
3.2 | Game Changer (With Shantel VanSanten & Edi Gathegi)

For All Mankind: The Official Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 37:06


Krys chats with Shantel VanSanten (Karen Baldwin) and Edi Gathegi (Dev Ayesa) to break down Season 3, episode 2. They discuss how Karen has evolved since Season 1 and the thinking behind the big moves Dev makes. This is an Apple TV+ podcast, produced by AT WILL MEDIA.Watch For All Mankind on Apple TV+, where available.http://apple.co/ForAllMankindTV

DT Radio Shows
City Sounds Radio Vol. 39

DT Radio Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 60:29


Tracklist Summer beach (feat. Freddie dredd)(remix) - von storm Earfquake w/ pandi - legend Straight cap (feat. Uncle murda and Benny the butcher) (radios edit) ID - Scartoon Tesla - Corvad Sleep - One True God Can I - Diplomat Call me - Plenka Oak island - Sabrina and Samantha House call - Boston run Bizcochito - rosalía expanded version S.X.N.D. N.X.D.E.S. - badtrip music, green orxnge, send 1 Engage destruction protocol - hell insight 9 Goosebumps w/ Khoa - pandi Dolce and Gabbana - Nilas Praise the Lord - Chamos Flume sample - Bluf (baauerbopbattle) ID - Scartoon Cunty Tokyo track - Beverly Hills mom 10LEC6 “bone bame” waajeed's bone dub Honey - Salute If I gotta wait - Nilas Late at night - nonoblack Shake it up - Austin Marc Damage - shadxwbxer Murder in my mind - Kordell ID - Scartoon, Dev a good girl, crookedkicker

Software Engineering Unlocked
Using Wordpress to run a profitable developer training business

Software Engineering Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 41:45


This episode is sponsored by Tonic.ai – where your data is modeled from your production data to help you tell an identical story in your testing environments.[00:01 - 07:22] Opening Segment Need to generate fake data that looks, acts, and behaves like production data for your test environments? Check out Tonic.ai!Head over to https://www.tonic.ai/ and sign up today for a free two weeks trial sandbox!From full-time employment to consultancyOn why he calls his business the banana stand“There's always money in the banana stand.”[07:23 - 21:54] Doing His Own Thing and Gaining IndependenceAvdi on the difference between consultancy versus the banana stand modelWriting his e-book and getting into screencastsHow he managed a startup business, consultancy, and being a new father at onceThe reason behind the rebrand: From RubyTapas to Graceful.DevWhy Avdi is done subscribing to the corporate cultureThe unconscious bias in recruitment[21:55 - 31:42] Building on WordPressWhy Avdi chose WordPress as the platform for his businessWhat are the advantages over the other platforms?WordPress plugins: What you need to knowKeeping track of the changes and updates on the platform[31:43 - 41:46] Closing SegmentWhat's next for AvdiHis advice on delegating and building your email listFinal wordsTweetable Quotes“There's always the risk. There are no guarantees in this industry. There are no  guaranteed retirement plans.” - Avdi Grimm“I think a lot of people in software are completely focused on either financial scaling or on like user scaling. The kind of scaling you need to plan for is devolving stuff from yourself, removing yourself as a bottleneck” - Avdi Grimm“Anything that I'm thinking of delegating or automating, always do it manually first, and do it manually for a while first and get a really good idea of what it is that I'm either delegating or automating.” - Avdi GrimmResources Mentionedhttps://www.tonic.ai/ - Sign up now for a two-week free trial!Exceptional Ruby by Avdi Grimm - Get a copy of Avdi's e-book at https://store.avdi.codes/l/NWtnkWordPressConvertKitLearnDashMemberPressWooCommerceConnect with Avdi on his site and on Graceful.Dev! Follow him on LinkedIn, too!Let's Connect! You can connect with me, Dr.  McKayla on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube to look into engineering software, and learn from experienced developers and thought leaders from around the world about how they develop software!LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to know more about the engineering software world. Your ratings and reviews help get the podcast in front of new listeners. _______Transcription[00:00:00] Dr. McKayla: Hello, and welcome to the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. I'm your host, Dr. McKayla and today after pleasure to talk to Avdi Grimm. But before I start, let me introduce you to an amazing startup that's sponsoring today's episode, Tonic.ai, the fake data company. So what does Tonic.ai do? I'm sure you know how complex and cumbersome it is to create quality test data.[00:00:27] Dr. McKayla: It's a never-ending chore that eats into valuable engineering resources. Random data doesn't do it and production data is neither safe nor legal for developers to use. What if you could mimic your entire production database to create a realistic dataset with zero sensitive data? That sounds amazing, right? Tonic.ai does exactly that. [00:00:50] Dr. McKayla: With Tonic.ai, you can generate fake data that looks, acts, and behaves like production data because it's made from production. Yet, Tonic.ai guarantees privacy so your data sets are safe to share with developers, QA, data scientists, heck, even distributed teams around the world. Visit Tonic.ai to sign up today or click the link in the show notes to get a free two weeks trial sandbox.[00:01:14] Dr. McKayla: But now back to Avdi. Avdi has been a developer for over 20 years and runs, similar to me, a training and consulting business. The main difference is that he has been doing this already for over 10 years. So I'm super thrilled to pick his brain today around everything business-related. He's also a consulting pair-programmer and the author of several popular Ruby programming books and has several courses on this subject on his website, Graceful.Dev, formerly RubyTapas.com. So I'm super thrilled that he's here with me today. Avdi, welcome to my show. I'm very excited. [00:01:51] Avdi Grimm: Thank you so much. I'm excited to be here. [00:01:53] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I'm super excited. So I've been following your journey on Twitter and so on for quite some time. Very inspirational as well. And I have a lot of questions around how you run your business and why you're running the business and what we can learn from you, right, a seasoned entrepreneur and self-employed person to also maybe get a little bit more independence in our life, right? So this is probably the main goal for myself, for everything that I do is flexibility and independence. So why are you running your own business and how does this come about? Why are you not a software developer in a company somewhere?[00:02:32] Avdi Grimm: Right, yeah. I mean, to some degree, I feel like it's almost an inevitable career arc for somebody in software. You know, I know people who have avoided it, but a lot of the people that I kind of looked up to over the years went through, you know, they went through the full-time employment phase and then they gradually kind of moved out to becoming consultants and having various other side businesses.[00:02:55] Avdi Grimm: And, you know, come to think of it, I never really thought about this much before. I had the example of my dad who worked in software and hardware design, and he was an independent consultant I was growing up. So that was kind of normalized to me to, like, have your own thing [00:03:08] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, for me was quite different. Yeah. [00:03:11] Avdi Grimm: I think that I, I saw that on the horizon maybe from earlier than some people do, just because it was, it was normalized for me, you know? And it just seemed like that's what a lot of my heroes did in the industry was eventually they became consultants. [00:03:26] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Yeah, it's good if you have like role models. For me, it was quite the difference. I always saw it that I will work at the company for a really long time and, you know, climb the career ladder somewhere. Actually, I started a family that I saw, oh, this is not working out as I expected. And as I would like it to work out, right? And so this was a little bit why I changed the thing. So you call it a banana stand. You don't call it like an enterprise or something. Why do you call it the banana stand? And what's your philosophy for your business? How do you run it? [00:04:00] Avdi Grimm: So, yeah., I've started using the term banana stand recently, especially as I've been kind of reflecting back on, you know, over a decade of doing this and, like, my style of, of running the business and writing a little bit more about that. So the, the term banana stand, it comes from, the show Arrested Development in which one of the characters says to another, this character is trying to save the family business and his dad who is in prison keeps telling him there's always money in the banana stand, which he completely misinterprets the message and winds up, burning down a banana stand that's full of literal money in the walls. I apologize if I've spoiled the show for you, but it's been out for a while. But you know, like, that phrase stuck with me. There's always money in the banana stand and that's kind of the way that I look at it.[00:04:48] Avdi Grimm: So there's kind of two sides to this, this independent business for me. There's the consulting side. And then there's the product side, product being kind of a broad term for selling books, selling courses, selling workshops. It's kind of a loose definition of product, but it's definitely distinct from the consulting side of my business, which is more like, you know, hourly consulting on people's projects.[00:05:12] Avdi Grimm: And I definitely look at the product side as a banana stand as like something that I kind of run casually, even if I'm putting most of my time into it now. I still run it kind of like lazily and you know, and it's my own banana stand to putter around in. I'm not, like, beholden to any, like, schedules and I'm not on any kind of like track of, I have to, you know, make this much money.[00:05:35] Avdi Grimm: I have to, like, make sure that my VCs get a payoff and stuff like that. It's just kind of like, you know, I get the putter around in the banana stand and work on whatever I feel like. And, you know, that phrase there's always money in the banana stand is kind of like that has informed the way I think about employment a lot, because, for me, if I'm in between jobs, I used to think of it as in between jobs, I don't think of it that way anymore, but if I'm in between jobs, quote, unquote, that's not like a time to panic and, you know, and, like, do all the interviews and freak out about how I'm unemployed. That's time to just focus on the banana stand.[00:06:12] Avdi Grimm: And until something comes along, that makes sense. And I think that's been helpful to have that. And, yeah, that side of my business, really like, so we talked about consulting, but that side really came from early on, getting into e-book sales, which we can talk about how that story went if you want. [00:06:28] Dr. McKayla: So if I understand that you would say there's the consulting, which is, you know, it's something that you have continuously to invest in and also make some contracts around that.[00:06:37] Dr. McKayla: I'm also doing some consulting, which means like now I'm dedicating, let's say 30 hours for this project for three months, right? And so you are more or less sold out for that time? [00:06:48] Avdi Grimm: It's kind of like a real job.[00:06:49] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. It's like a real job, only that you have all the risks as well, which is even worse.[00:06:58] Avdi Grimm: But there's a lot more, even there there's a lot more independence. And honestly, you know, one of the things that I value on the consulting side is that, I mean, yeah, you have the risk, but there's always the risk. There are no guarantees in this industry. There are no guaranteed retirement plans.[00:07:13] Avdi Grimm: And what I don't have to do is I don't have to buy into a lot of corporate mission and values BS that I don't believe in. [00:07:22] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. So you have your consultancy and then in between those consultancy gigs, right, when there are no consultancy gigs, you're not freaking out, you're working on your banana stand and you grow that, right? And the good thing it's about the products and, you know, this mindset, I think, is that even a little bit of work on them pays off, right? So it's a little bit like an investment. So you create another free course, maybe, and you have like a, you know, a good lead magnet, have people that are interested in your work.[00:07:53] Dr. McKayla: Then you create a paid course when you have time and so on. And it stays, right? It's something that's there for longer, whereby the consulting, it comes, it brings normally quite good money, from my experience, right? In a very short amount of time, but then it goes away as well. While the banana stand, maybe it's a little bit, it's not this boom, now we have like all this money. But it's also not going away, right? Yeah, exactly. It's a snowball. It's a flywheel somehow, right? Yeah. [00:08:20] Avdi Grimm: Yeah. I mean, you know, a consulting gig is one big blizzard that, you know, that melts the next week and a banana stand is a snowball that you just kind of gradually roll over the years.[00:08:32] Dr. McKayla: And so how long did it take for you to have this banana stand where you could say, well, I have some predictable income that, you know, makes me sleep at night? . [00:08:43] Avdi Grimm: So actually I think, you know, my trajectory there probably was a little different from a lot of people's. I kind of, you know, I put along having the book, the e-book business on the side for a few years, and that really just fell out of speaking.[00:08:58] Avdi Grimm: It happened because I was giving talks at software conferences. And I was pouring a ton of time and energy into researching these talks. And I was like, you know, I wonder if there's a way to kind of recoup. You know, I have all this material that I put together. I can't fit it all into a talk.[00:09:14] Avdi Grimm: And I wonder if there's a way to like recoup the energy that I've been putting into this. And that was really the origin of the first book, which was Exceptional Ruby, which is about error handling and failure management and I made a book out of like the, all the extra material that I put together for that.[00:09:29] Avdi Grimm: And that was that kind of launched things. And so that was kind of a side business. It was a nice little side business for a couple of years. And then what changed was I decided to get into screencasting. I've been doing the books, I've been doing some podcasting and this was around, you know, this was like 20, maybe 2010, 2011, 2012.[00:09:52] Avdi Grimm: A lot of programming screencasts started taking off. And I decided to get into that business. And I had a vision of like, what if we did that only much shorter and more focused? And, you know, just do like five minutes or less. You know, get one idea across at a time. And so, unlike most banana stand efforts, that was really like a do or die, not do or die.[00:10:13] Avdi Grimm: I don't like that terminology that was a go big or go home. That's the phrase I'm looking for, go big or go home because I knew how much energy went into video production and it is a lot. And so it was like, okay, this is a project that I'm going to test the waters. If it does well, I'm going to try, you know, the only way this works is if I can make it into my full-time job, otherwise I'll just stop. And yeah, I got really lucky. I was coming in at a good time. People really liked the format. And so within, I think around a year or two, I was able to say, I don't actually need other jobs right now with the RubyTapas screencasts. [00:10:49] Dr. McKayla: Oh, yeah. That's nice. [00:10:51] Avdi Grimm: Yeah. So that was, that was kind of like line goes up. That was less, you know, slowly rolling snowball.[00:10:56] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. And how much time did you spend in this line goes up phase? You know, because somehow when you're focusing on something, like doing the screencasts, you're not having an income, right? And then if you go to consulting, you don't have the time. So you have to switch between those boats of not having time or not having money. So how did you handle that at that time? [00:11:17] Avdi Grimm: I didn't sleep. I had at least one new baby at the time, too. And, like, I was working consulting gigs. I don't know. It's kind of a blur at this point. I don't think that I could do that kind of thing again, unless it was a great need. 'Cause I was also, at that point at the beginning, I was producing three episodes a week. [00:11:41] Dr. McKayla: Wow. Yeah, that's a lot. [00:11:43] Avdi Grimm: Yeah. I was doing a lot at once and it was kind of nuts. [00:11:46] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. And I actually really liked, with the whole style also, when I look through your blog posts and everything, right, you have your own style. You didn't call it like Professional Ruby screencast, you call it RubyTapas, right? And the tapas probably transport the message of it's small pieces of very digestible, tasty things, right? [00:12:09] Avdi Grimm: And I feel like some of that probably also fell out of just like the Ruby, like, the community has always been super whimsical and kind of silly. And so, you know, I can't take full credit for that approach. [00:12:22] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. But recently, I don't know exactly when, but you rebranded your whole RubyTapas into Graceful.Dev, why is that? For me, it seems like it's now broader and there can be more happening, but what's your strategic vision behind, you know, going from RubyTapas to...[00:12:40] Avdi Grimm: I do not do strategic visions. I used to, but, man, I avoid strategy as much as possible now. I mean, that's okay. That's not true. I do a little, I do a little. But I try not... [00:12:54] Dr. McKayla: You definitely have some reasoning behind it, right? [00:12:56] Avdi Grimm: I try not to have five-year goals. Let's put it that way. I don't do goals. There's definitely some reasoning there. There's a direction there. I mean, the direction was one that I've honestly had in the back of my mind for a really long time. A lot of people don't know that, like, the same day in, like, 2011 or whenever it was that I registered RubyTapas.com and associated addresses. I also registered CodeTapas.com.[00:13:20] Dr. McKayla: Okay.[00:13:21] Avdi Grimm: So like, you know, I never wanted to completely limit myself to Ruby, strictly Ruby content. You know, I've worked in, God, like a dozen languages over the course of my career. And Ruby was just an area that I wound up focusing on a lot and wound up making a lot of money in. And enjoying, I really, really enjoy the language still and the community as well.[00:13:42] Avdi Grimm: But I always had in the back of my mind, you know, that I would expand, but, you know, I didn't wound up not using as you'll notice. I wound up not using CodeTapas as the branding 'cause I was really, like, moving in a different direction, broadening not just in, like, in the technologies that I want to cover, but also I just spend a lot more of my time thinking about broader topics like, the sustainability of the development that we do and systems thinking, understanding the systems in which we work and the systems that cause the work that we have to exist. And yeah, so just, for a lot of reasons, it made more sense to me. And in some of my talks, I've been really focusing on the concept of grace.[00:14:21] Avdi Grimm: So it just made more sense to me to move in that, that branding direction. And then recently I had the opportunity to finally, like, do a lot of the heavy lifting of moving content over. And so I took that. [00:14:33] Dr. McKayla: Where did this opportunity come from? [00:14:35] Avdi Grimm: Well, so I had a point a few years back where I was like, okay, you know what? I've been sort of off on my own, doing my own thing for a long time. I would like to get back into, like, the hustle and bustle of being part of a big team that's making something real in the world. And I spent, I don't know, a year or so interviewing pretty seriously at a bunch of different places. And that did not go as expected.[00:15:00] Avdi Grimm: And I finally decided that I, wasn't going to focus on that anymore after all. And I was just going to get back to the banana stand 'cause there's always money in the banana stand. And that has been actually an immensely satisfying experience, kind of coming back to it with a fresh, fresh, like maybe this is my calling perspective.[00:15:18] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I actually followed this journey a little bit on your Twitter, you were sharing it with us and also the hassle of the whole, you know, getting naked in front of strangers, you know, and really selling yourself. And I mean, you have been in the industry for so long, you have shared your learning.[00:15:38] Dr. McKayla: You know, you have some portfolio online. It's not like somebody comes and has no idea about you, but still, it felt like at least what I got out of the tweets, right. What I read into them was that every interview was a little bit, it wasn't really like keeping your dignity, right? So you had really to get naked in front of them to do all these silly things.[00:16:03] Avdi Grimm: You know, I wouldn't, I actually, I would argue that it's not, it wasn't really about being naked. It wasn't really being, about being transparent. It was about people wanting you to do a very special dance for them that strokes their ego and me being at a point in my career and life where I'm just like, I'm not going to do that. Why would I do that? Looking back I got some actually really nice offers from some, you know, well, large companies anyway, but in the end I was not comfortable taking any of them. And in part, because of what I saw during the interview process.[00:16:39] Dr. McKayla: Okay, what did you see? [00:16:41] Avdi Grimm: Well, you know, so actually, let me tell you about something I just heard recently from a friend of mine, because I hear the same story over and over again. Like my story, what I've realized is my story is not at all unique. So just the other day I heard the story again of like, basically, you know, an extremely senior well-respected brilliant engineer gets asked by a friend that works at a FAANG, you know, works at one of these giant unicorn Silicon valley darlings, gets asked to come interview there. It's like, we'd love, you know, I'd love to work with you here, which is basically what happened to me, a number of different places. And, you know, so they kind of go into the interview silo and then they go through this process where in, you know, in this particular case, like they got interviewed by someone who was totally unrelated to the group that wanted to hire them because this is the way the process works. You know, we don't want bias in the system. There's a lot in these processes that are supposedly about eliminating bias, it's actually creating it.[00:17:42] Avdi Grimm: We can talk about that more in a minute, but, you know, was interviewed by someone totally unrelated to that team. And basically, they were like, you know, show that, you know, by heart, my favorite algorithm,[00:17:55] Avdi Grimm: I happen to have a favorite algorithm. You're going to show me that you can, you can identify that I'm thinking of this algorithm and then you can write it by heart. And like that wasn't an algorithm that this engineer had used before. And so it wasn't one they thought of, you know, I've got a lot of stuff in my background where it's like, I know of algorithms that probably most engineers haven't heard of because they happen to be useful for networking middlewares and I hear this all the time.[00:18:18] Avdi Grimm: Anyway, they got flunked out because they couldn't, you know, reproduce somebody's favorite algorithm from, by heart. And this is somebody with, like, close to my level of experience. It's nuts. And I keep hearing this. It's actually, you know, I've heard this from a lot of people, with my, lot of friends of mine, with my level of experience in the industry, that these systems, they're really tuned to find people that are exactly like the people who designed the system in as many ways as possible. [00:18:47] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. [00:18:48] Avdi Grimm: Like, for me, I don't care. I am a white guy with plenty of opportunities and a banana stand. You know, I can fall out of a process like that and be fine. But what I'm seeing is that these processes are also, I mean, they're very gatekeep-y and they're very clicky. They're very in-crowd, they're very, very, like, we are expecting people that sort of show the secret insignia of a very select group of Silicon Valley insiders, basically. [00:19:18] Dr. McKayla: I think one of the problems is also that they often require a tremendous amount of preparation, right? And if you think you are an experienced engineer, maybe at that point, you have a family, for example, around, right.[00:19:33] Dr. McKayla: And some other commitments, it gets really hard to study some, you know, lead code examples, just to be as fast as, you know, somebody else, right? And I think this is also something that I criticize a lot when I'm thinking, and then you don't even need that, you know, you don't need that knowledge. You could really solve real-world problems.[00:19:51] Dr. McKayla: You have some experience and background, right, that you have worked on. And it's probably also super challenging. So looking really at what that person has already achieved in the last, let's say 15 years would be, you know, and then really let them explain that in-depth, which shows that they probably can learn, you know, whatever problem or solve whatever problem you throw at them. It would be a much better way than, you know, getting back to bubble sort and, you know, and linked list or something, right?[00:20:19] Avdi Grimm: And this, this is a big part of where the bias is in the system, and this is why I get sort of morally outraged by it, you know? I don't do well in these, you know, I might not do well in these because I'm at a point where I just can't be arsed to do that much homework of like learning somebody's arbitrary favorite algorithm.[00:20:36] Avdi Grimm: But what they're implicitly biasing towards is the sort of stereotypical young white dude that has all the time in the world and doesn't have a family to support and doesn't have any disabilities. And, you know, I could list off a lot of, you know, a whole lot of privileges there that go into that sort of their really looking for that person who has nothing else going on in their life.[00:20:59] Dr. McKayla: Exactly. [00:21:00] Avdi Grimm: You know, so that they can then like induct them into the cult of your passion is your software career. And that bugs the heck out of me, you know, and I see this really like, you know, who is really hurting is people that come from backgrounds that aren't like mine and have other stuff. They have people that they're taking care of. They have kids, they have elderly parents, they have families that they're sending money to, and they can't afford a, you know, a break in their income while they spend six months, you know, doing nothing but the interview game. You know, there are so many things, and the people that are, you know, so many minorities in this country already have, in the world or, you know, minoritized people, I shouldn't say have so many other calls on their time because of the way society is already stacked against them. That it makes it impossible to jump through these. [00:21:48] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I totally agree. I totally agree. Yeah. [00:21:51] Avdi Grimm: Sorry, I get worked up.[00:21:53] Dr. McKayla: No, I want to come back a little bit to your banana stand again because this is the way out for, for you. And it's a little bit the way out for me as well, right? So with Graceful.Dev, I don't know if you had that before. You had RubyTapas and you had like the courses, but Graceful.Dev is now a full-fledged membership site, right? So you have different courses and you build it on top of WordPress. Why did you go this route? I mean, you could have like your courses on some third-party platform, right? From, I don't know, Teachable or whatnot, you know, many, many different PODR and so on. But you host it yourself and then you have the membership site as well. And you do that. Why does choice, like, I'm also thinking about right now, awesomecodereviews.Com for example, runs on, I switched from WordPress to Gatsby. So it's a static side and I'm thinking on how to give it a membership capabilities.[00:22:49] Dr. McKayla: And I looked at SurplusCI and so on, but why did you go for WordPress? And are you happy with it? And what's the philosophy behind it? What do people get from this membership? What do you want to build? Probably there's a community behind, right? And some, some visions that you have for that.[00:23:06] Avdi Grimm: This is an opinion I've kind of come to over years of using many different systems. And there's continuum here because you know, a lot of people running, particularly running education sites for developers have rolled their own system from scratch. They've built their own servers or their own applications.[00:23:26] Avdi Grimm: And so, you know, there's that continuum all the way from roll your own to, you know, use a completely hosted service, like Podia, Thinkific, whatever, you know, and I've, I've tried a lot of these different things. I started Ruby topis out on somebody else's platform.[00:23:39] Avdi Grimm: And it was super limiting. You know, there would be things that people were asking for for years and they just, that feature wasn't a priority for the platform because you're competing, you know, you're competing with all the other people who use the platform. And for, you know, whose feature is most important.[00:23:54] Avdi Grimm: So it was very limiting to use a hosted platform, and I've periodically I try them again and they're always, there's always like something pretty early on, it's like, wow, I really need this feature. And I don't have it. But I've also toyed with building my own. I did that for a few years and you know, what I realized was, if I did that, my show was going to become about building an app to support the show, because that's what I was going to be spending all my time on, because it's a lot of work to build.[00:24:23] Dr. McKayla: It's a lot of work, yeah. [00:24:25] Avdi Grimm: People don't realize, you know, how many features are expected in an application that sells content and serves content and keeps track of people's progress in the content, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.[00:24:38] Avdi Grimm: And yeah, I just, that was not the show that I wanted to be doing was, you know, I didn't want to be like here's videos about how to build a place that hosts these videos. So WordPress has turned out to be a really happy medium kind of between those two extremes. WordPress is just incredibly mature software.[00:24:56] Avdi Grimm: There's a lot of people in, particularly, the developer world that are kind of biased against WordPress and sadly against like the PHP ecosystem entirely, which I think is really undeserved. There's a lot of really, really good people working in this space. And the ecosystem is just amazing because you can kind of build anything you want and you can get as little or as much support as you want.[00:25:20] Avdi Grimm: You know, it's easy enough to build your own plugins for WordPress to just do a little tweak here, a little tweak there. You know, the architecture of it really supports the idea of exposing everything it does as hooks. And then you can hook your own stuff into those hooks, which is why it has this great plugin ecosystem.[00:25:36] Avdi Grimm: But one of the really cool things about the plugin ecosystem around WordPress is A, there is a plugin for everything, like, anything you might want to do. Somebody has got a plugin for it. And B, usually they have, like, a premium version, which comes with support. And I have had the best experience with premium plugins for WordPress.[00:25:55] Avdi Grimm: Like, you know, people just like being very responsive to the people that are giving them money and coming back and, you know, with bug fixes or like going into the, you know, going into your site and making, figuring out why it's not working. And so it's like, it's one of the rare places I've seen that people are putting out a ton of open-source software, but also getting paid for their work.[00:26:16] Avdi Grimm: Because all these plugins, like the base version at least, is always open source. And then basically you're paying them for maybe some premium features, but mainly for a support contract and, you know, and so people are making their living, creating open-source software. And I think that's pretty cool. And it's also, it also has done really well for my business. [00:26:32] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, and it's true. And so when I'm thinking about your course software, did you get a plugin for that? Or did you have to write it yourself or do you have like a plugin and then extend that on your own? How does that work? You're hosting your videos, but then they're also like, you know, questionnaires, for example, some quizzes, you know, as you said, you see that people, you know, it somehow tracks the progress of the people. It has to know that you're a member that can access that course, the other course. All of that functionality, does it come out of the box with some plugins for WordPress? Or did you have to implement that yourself or was it a mixture that you're actually getting a plugin and then you can, you know, enhance that with your own code?[00:27:15] Avdi Grimm: Great question. So, there are two to three categories of plugins that go into a site like this. I mean, my website has a lot more plugins than that, but there's sort of maybe three basic pieces. And one is  learning management system LMS, otherwise known as courseware. So that's a category of plugins I could probably reel off maybe six of them off the top of my head, I'm personally using LearnDash, which is one of the older ones and one of the more, probably the most popular one in WordPress right now. And it's very mature. It's a little clunky for me sometimes because it's really targeting in many ways, it's targeting like serious learning institutions where they have like accreditation concerns and certificates.[00:27:59] Avdi Grimm: And like, you can't take this course until you take this other course, lot of stuff that I don't care about. On the flip side, it's very mature. They handle all the things that I might want to put into it. They just also, also a lot of stuff that I don't care about. And then, so you've got, like, there's learning management, that's one. There's membership, which is like another whole category of plugins, which are generally focused around, given this account, what material does this person have access to? And that includes courses, like what courses does this person have access to. [00:28:28] Dr. McKayla: So they work nice together, LearnDash and the membership thing. [00:28:30] Avdi Grimm: Yeah, so generally what you see, so I'm using LearnDash on the LMS side, I'm currently using MemberPress, which is one of the more popular membership management plugins.[00:28:39] Avdi Grimm: Generally these plugins, they work hard to work with each other, you know, different teams usually, but they work hard to work with each other because that's where a lot of the value comes from. And so they have explicit support for each other. And then the third piece often is like your e-commerce, how you sell the thing.[00:28:56] Avdi Grimm: And that is often a separate plugin as well. Like in the WordPress ecosystem, it's usually WooCommerce. Sometimes it's EDD, Easy Digital Downloads. Now I've reeled these off like they are distinctly separate categories, but actually almost everyone in each of these spaces will happily give you like all of the above kind of in one.[00:29:18] Avdi Grimm: Because they all kind of, they'd grow, all gradually expand out to include each other's features. So like LearnDash, you can do a pretty basic membership management using the groups that are built into LearnDash. You can sell courses directly. Like they have Stripe integration and stuff directly from LearnDash if you want to, it's kind of basic, but it's totally there.[00:29:36] Avdi Grimm: MemberPress recently introduced their own courseware plugin for MemberPress. You can just like stick with that company if you want, as long as you're okay with like a more basic courseware offering. They also have the storefront part built in if you want to use it. So there's a lot of blur between these plugins as well.[00:29:54] Avdi Grimm: Yeah. [00:29:55] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Okay, cool. And so are you then enhancing that, is that possible, especially if you have like the paid version, could you just write that? And then how do you keep track of your own changes and new updates that are coming from the team? How do you integrate those things? [00:30:09] Avdi Grimm: So one of the marks of a good industrial strength WordPress plugin is that they have well-defined hooks. You know, I was talking about like, WordPress is built on the concept of hooks. They have well-defined hooks that are documented. And so, like the ones that I work with do, they have good documentation sites and they have all these hooks that you can like, here's how you change this, you know, here's how you hook your own thing into this particular part of the interface or this particular process.[00:30:36] Avdi Grimm: And then, so what I have is what they call a site-specific plugin that I keep under version control, and I have a deployment system for that pushes it out to my way. And my site-specific plugin, basically just very selectively has a few, there's a few hooks where I want to customize something in one of those other plugins.[00:30:54] Avdi Grimm: And it just like hooks its own handler into just the, like the very specific hook that is one tiny piece that I care about changing. It's very small. The site-specific plugin is very small. I try to keep it very small and very focused. [00:31:07] Dr. McKayla: Okay. But so it has a valid defined API or hooks that you can really enhance. You're not going in and hacking in their, in their code base, right? So you're on the outside, whatever they allow you to change. [00:31:18] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. And if you're going to really get into this ecosystem, that's one of the things you want to keep your eye out for is like, does it seem like these people are really supporting that kind of external hooks?[00:31:28] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, it sounds very interesting. And I know quite a couple of people that are running WordPress websites and have a lot of, you know, like you said, WooCommerce, or like a membership sites and they're very, very happy with it. Maybe my last question for you is around, you said you are not going to plan for five years and so on, right? But I think everybody has some, some vision you know, some, some reasons why you'd be doing things like transitioning from RubyTapas to Graceful.Dev, right? What do you see yourself, do you want to do, is there a possibility that Graceful.Dev is really your full time thing and that you're not doing any consulting or do you want to keep doing consulting on the side? Or, you know, where are you heading towards, what's your ideal case?[00:32:16] Avdi Grimm: I wish I had a good answer for you. You know, I want to keep being able to do what feels right at the time, which is kind of what I'm doing right now. You know, Graceful.Dev is supporting me pretty decently along, you know, that alongside of my other, you know, other products and things. You know, I take consulting gigs as they look interesting.[00:32:35] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, and are you a solopreneur or do you have, like, a team that really helps you? [00:32:39] Avdi Grimm: Oh yeah. Good question. I don't have any full-time employees for years and years. I've employed people very part-time here and there, only ever like a handful only ever like maybe three to five at most, at any given time. Actually five is probably more than I have, but like I have somebody that's I've worked with for a long time, that handles kind of first line of support.[00:32:59] Avdi Grimm: So support emails first go to them and then they escalate them to me. I have somebody I'm working with now who's doing a lot of, like, helping me with content, like doing video editing or fixing up blog posts that have become, like their formatting has gone wonky or is out of date or something like that. Yeah. So I have a few people that just like very part-time helpers.[00:33:21] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. I'm currently right now in this position of getting people and I find it really difficult finding the right people because, you know, if you're already in this, okay, I need help now. I don't know how you overcame that stuff, but for me, it's like, I need help now, and I can't grow, you know, without this help. But I also can't really make the time to find the right people and to teach them and do onboarding. [00:33:44] Avdi Grimm: And that is, that is the classic catch-22. And there's no easy way out of it. You know, the point where you absolutely don't have, like, you don't have the overhead space to train somebody, but you need to train somebody in order to get the overhead space.[00:34:00] Avdi Grimm: Yeah, I wish I had an easy answer for that one, like that parts of slog. And eventually you kind of pull your head above it, but it's hard because, yeah, like the effort involved in like getting through that catch-22 is exhausting. I will say this about it. And, and this has informed my work for a long time.[00:34:20] Avdi Grimm: This is the most important kind of scaling to plan for. I think a lot of people in software are completely focused on either financial scaling or on like user scaling, you know, the, your user base scaling up like our, will our code base support unicorn scale. That is by far like the least common form of scaling that you have to support.[00:34:42] Avdi Grimm: The kind of scaling you need to plan for is devolving stuff from yourself. Taking, removing yourself as a bottleneck. That is the most urgent and immediate form of scaling that you're going to face. And so one of the reasons, I have a lot of reasons, but one of the reasons that I use WordPress is because it is the dominant player.[00:35:02] Avdi Grimm: Like, it powers like half the web now, and there is this huge ecosystem. And if I need somebody to do like copy editing, I don't need to teach them how to use GitHub and like commit things, you know, I don't need to find a copy editor, but then teach them how to use my special, precious bespoke system.[00:35:20] Avdi Grimm: They know how to use WordPress, whoever they are, they know how to use WordPress. And you know, if I need to get somebody, you know, if I want some help with my site because I don't have time to diagnose one particular bug, it's really easy to find WordPress consultants, and there's just so many things there where it's easy to find people that can do the thing that you need help with.[00:35:44] Avdi Grimm: And that's just as a general kind of policy. That's one of my biggest considerations when choosing anything is not, you know, not is this going to scale up, but can I scale it away from me? Can, you know, can I remove myself as the bottleneck for this in the future? [00:36:00] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Yeah. That's such a good mindset. And I'm currently learning a lot with it and you know, it takes much more time and much more energy than I thought, but I also see that, you know, if you have already one person, right, so finding this one person, it means that you have to work with six different people. And then you realize, oh, it's, you know, it's, it's making more trouble that what I'm getting out of.[00:36:23] Avdi Grimm: Yeah. And I should say here, like, use my bad example for learning. I hit a crash at one point where I really wasn't like I was, my outgo was bigger than my income. And a big piece of that was that I had, I had tried to devolve too much of myself. You know, I tried to become too big and pay too many people to do too many different things.[00:36:45] Avdi Grimm: And the funny thing about what was happening there was that I was still swamped. I still had too little time. And it was because I had basically, you know, installed myself as a manager and I was spending all of my time helping people get unstuck and managing things. And so, yeah, it's really easy, like once you, once you kind of start going down that delegation road, it's really easy to go too far. [00:37:10] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Yeah. I think, I think one step at a time and keeping the focus like I really would like to create more content, have more of this really quality time doing what I love to do like teaching, thinking about content, writing blog posts, right?[00:37:25] Dr. McKayla: This is really what gives me energy and less about the administrative stuff. But then, as you say, I have to be real careful not to get people adding to my administrative stuff. So, yeah. But yeah, very, very good.[00:37:38] Avdi Grimm: I think it's important to always know that like you can do the thing. One of my personal policies is like, anything that I'm thinking of delegating or automating, always do it manually first and do it manually for a while first and get a really good idea of what it is that I'm either delegating or automating.[00:37:55] Avdi Grimm: And usually what I discover is that I can automate less of it than I was planning. And it's enough. Or I can delegate less of it than I was planning and it's enough, but yeah, as it's always very tempting to be like, man, there's this one aspect of my business. I just don't want to think about at all. And so I want to delegate, delegate that part of it.[00:38:13] Avdi Grimm: And I think that's really dangerous though, that leads down that road of like now I'm just jammed up managing everyone and paying too much, you know, not balancing my books. [00:38:22] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. I think that's true. [00:38:25] Dr. McKayla: Do the thing the hard way for a while, figure out the smallest piece of it that you can automate or delegate.[00:38:31] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, cool. So Avdi, thank you so much for sharing all your insights. Is there something like, if there are developers out there that think, oh, I would like to have some side hustle, you know, get a little bit more independence or maybe even go full in, what do you think what is a, is a good strategy nowadays?[00:38:50] Dr. McKayla: You know, when there are already so many, screencasts, when they're already, you know, so many other things, so many blog posts, so many podcasts and so on. What do you think? How should people start doing it? Is a blog still a good first outlet? [00:39:04] Avdi Grimm: There's no going wrong with blogging. Honestly, like, it really doesn't matter like what your plan is. Get good at writing about things. Like, practice writing. It's just that I feel like that skill has informed, has improved so many other aspects of my business and of my career. I mean, writing about what you learn is such great practice for even if you just stay a regular developer, you're going to be a better developer because you are better at explaining and documenting your work to other developers. And so like, yeah, there's just no downside to getting in the habit of writing all the time about the work that you're doing. [00:39:46] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, that sounds good. Yeah, I think so too. I think that's a such a good advice. There's I think there's so many positive things that can come, be that job opportunities or maybe you have to jump on, you know, you get better as, as you said, in your communication skills, better at communicating with your colleagues and so on. So yeah, I think this is a great, this is really a great insight. Thank you so much, Avdi. [00:40:09] Avdi Grimm: Oh, I have one other thing on that, on that note that I should include. Start building your, your mailing list now. [00:40:16] Dr. McKayla: Mailing list, yeah. Good idea. Independent mailing list, I would say.[00:40:20] Avdi Grimm: You know, do that blog thing and then slap, you know, go with ConvertKit or something and slap a mailing list, subscribe on that thing, and just start collecting that snowball now, because that, it takes a long time, but oh my gosh, the opportunities that come out of having a good mailing list. There's nothing else like it.[00:40:38] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, that's true. Yeah. I think that's a great add, great addition to what you said before. So Avdi, thank you so much for taking the time and talking with me and sharing everything with my listeners and yeah, have a good day.[00:40:53] Avdi Grimm: Thank you so much for this. I really enjoyed it. [00:40:55] Dr. McKayla: I enjoyed it too. Thank you so much. Bye bye. [00:40:58] Dr. McKayla: This was another episode of the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please help me spread the word about the podcast, send the episode to a friend via email, Twitter, LinkedIn, well, whatever messaging system you use. Or give it a positive review on your favorite podcasting platforms such as Spotify or iTunes. This would mean really a lot to me. So thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and I will talk to you in two weeks. Bye.

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast

Unity is a game engine backed by a powerful software environment that's one of the preferred systems for producing beautiful, lifelike 3D games.  The platform supports 27 platforms, including PC, mobile, and web, and can handle graphics and rendering with ease.  The Unity Development Process at DEV.co Developing fun games is serious work, which is why we ensure our development process is top-notch. No application is complete without first conducting some tests to ensure there are no bugs, errors, or mistakes.   More info about unity development services:   https://dev.co/unity/   Connect with us:  SEO // PPC // DEV // WEBSITE DESIGN

The Pre-Order Bonus
E3 (Not Really E3) 2022 Show Reactions!

The Pre-Order Bonus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 56:07


We spent all weekend watching all the showcases and news out of Summer Games Fest, Devolver Digital Show, Day of the Dev, and the Xbox/Bethesda Show. On this episode we're breaking down all the biggest announcements.!***Get more content by signing up for the Digital Deluxe Edition of the podcast on Patreon!: https://www.patreon.com/preordercast?fan_landing=true►  Join our Discord Server!     https://discord.gg/rgmEEUrB2m►  The Pre-Order Cast GG App  https://ggapp.io/preordercast/lists/most-anticipated-games-of-2023-LWclmE0B►  Show Twitter  https://twitter.com/preordercast►  Jake's Twitter  https://twitter.com/jacob_chipdip18►  Cameron's Twitter   https://twitter.com/masssgeneric

Les Cast Codeurs Podcast
LCC 280 - Leçon de géographie

Les Cast Codeurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 81:24


Cet épisode une fois n'est pas coutume parle beaucoup de nouvelles dans la rubrique langage et beaucoup de Java, wouhou ! On parle aussi de sigstore, http/3, Micronaut et de VMWare. Enregistré le 10 juin 2022 Téléchargement de l'épisode LesCastCodeurs-Episode–280.mp3 News Langages Sept raisons pour lesquelles Java a a encore du sens après 26 ans communauté (dans toutes les grandes villes) force du langage et de la plateforme plus de problèmes résolus que non résolus (librairies) stabilité Innovation (Java 9 accélère l'innovation) outillage opportunité d'emploi Les débuts du projet Leyden Mark Reinhold lance le projet Leyden, pour adresser les problèmes de temps de démarrage lent de Java, de lenteur du temps jusqu'à la performance max, et d'empreinte un peu lourde à l'aide d'une image statique de votre application une image statique ne fait tourner qu'une seule et unique application sur son JDK, et est un “monde fermé” (ne peut pas charger de classe externes) mais les ingés de la JVM vont travailler sur une approche assez souple, et voire quelles contraintes peuvent être allégées, par rapport à un monde complètement fermé d'une image statique en espérant avoir des améliorations à différents niveaux, pour un max d'appli et de use case différents Le close world c'est ce qui amène la valeur de GraalVM native image et les avantages pour Micronaut, Quarkus et le autres donc pas de closed world: c'est encore un projet de recherche pour l'équipe de la JVM JFR plus facile à configuer dans Java 17 un wizard en UI ou CLI pour generer le fichier .jfc Proposition de structured concurrency via le projet Loom Targeted status for JDK 19. This incubating JEP, under the auspices of Project Loom, proposes to simplify multithreaded programming by introducing a library to treat multiple tasks running in different threads as a single unit of work. This can streamline error handling and cancellation, improve reliability, and enhance observability RedMonk analyse l'apparition du langage Dart, grâce à Flutter, dans leur top 20 des langages de programmation les plus populaires JavaScript, Python, Java, toujours en tête Mais Rust et Dart sont rentrés récemment L'arrivée de Dart coïncide surtout avec l'émergence de Flutter comme framework d'interface graphique, que ce soit pour Android/iOS, que pour le desktop et le web Sur les applis mobiles, il y a toujours eu beaucoup de développement natif, mais est aussi arrivé React Native, mais aussi Flutter Des applis de Google comme Google Pay et Google Ads sont développées en Flutter, mais aussi le récent SNCF Connect ou des entreprises telles que BMW ou Alibaba (modifié) (cf le talk sur le REX par les développeurs de SNCF Connect à Devoxx France) les investissements initiaux de Dart vs Kotlin ou Ceylon qui ont démarrés en meme temps étaient colossaux Dart en natif pour faire des applis iOS… qui tournent aussi sous Android Kotlin 1.7 est sorti Kotlin K2 compiler pour la JVM em Alpha (les plug ins ne fonctionne pas) amélioration des perf de Kotlin et du compilo pour la JVM build incremental Gradle annotation OptIn et inférence de Builder stabilisés classes implementee par delegation automatique sans consommation mémoire (via inlining) Librairies Sortie de Micronaut 3.5 Passage à GRAALVM 22.1.0 Compilation incrémentale lors des builds, en particulier intéressant pour les métadonnées pour GraalVM, ce qui permet d'éviter de faire tourner les processeurs d'annotation inutilement Inclusion de Micronaut Data 3.4, avec support des enums Postgres pour JDBC, la pagination pour les Reactive Repositories Intégration avec Turbo pour la vue (Turbo Frame et Turbo Views) Nouveau module pour MicroStream (un moteur de graphe d'objet natif Java, intégré à Helidon) Mise à jour de nombreux plugins et extensions (y compris plugins de build) Infrastructure Kubernetes signals massive adoption of Sigstore for protecting open source ecosystem Kubernetes 1.24 (sorti en mai) est la première version utilisant officiellement Sigstore, permettant une vérification transparente des signatures pour protéger contre les attaques de la chaîne d'approvisionnement Sigstore est une nouvelle norme pour la signature, la vérification et la protection des logiciels. Elle se veut être un remplaçant pour GPG par exemple. Sigstore offre une variété d'avantages à la communauté Kubernetes comme: Sigstore's keyless signing donne une grande expérience de développeur et supprime le besoin de la gestion de clé douloureuse. Le journal public et transparent de Sigstore (Rekor) avec ses API permettent aux consommateurs Kubernetes de vérifier les signatures. … Web RFC 9114 - HTTP/3 est validée (+ RFC 9204 - QPACK: Field Compression for HTTP/3 et RFC 9218 - Extensible Prioritization Scheme for HTTP) Basé sur le protocole de transport QUIC qui possède plusieurs fonctionnalités intéressantes telles que le multiplexage de flux, le contrôle de flux par flux et l'établissement de connexion à faible latence. QPACK : un format de compression pour représenter efficacement les champs HTTP à utiliser en HTTP/3. Il s'agit d'une variation de la compression HPACK qui vise à réduire la taille des headers. Extensible Prioritization Scheme for HTTP: schéma qui permet à un client HTTP de communiquer ses préférences quant à la façon dont le serveur en amont priorise les réponses à ses demandes, et permet également à un serveur d'indiquer à un intermédiaire en aval comment ses réponses devraient être priorisées lorsqu'elles sont transmises. Outillage VSCode Java 1.5 est sorti Java 18 support, inlay hints for method parameters, and improvements to class declaration navigation are just a few of the enhancements to expect. Architecture L'architecture Netflix Pas fou fou dans les infos mais ça fait longtemps qu'on a pas eu d'archi analyze the system design in terms of availability, latency, scalability and resilience to network failure basé sur AWS clients via un SDK est intelligent, contrôle le backend utilisé et la bande passante en temps réel Open Connect CDN: là ou les vidéos sont stockées le reste du bon vieux microservice en backend ramène les dix meilleurs points d'accès et le client choisi voire change API Gateway via Zuul: dynamic routing, traffic monitoring and security, resilience to failures at the edge of the cloud deployment etc Loi, société et organisation VMWare racheté par Broadcom 61 milliards de dollars Avec un objectif de passer de 3,5 à 8,5 milliard d'EBITA par an Bouger dans la division cloud avec Symantec VMWare était content de sa liberté retrouvée après la spin off de Dell Apparemment pas d'alignement de tech une expansion de portefeuiille dans le software pour broadcom VMWare a beaucoup changé de mains ces dernières années La strategie d'investissement de broadcom: acheter des franchises avec une bonne position de marcher et un potentiel de profitabilité augmenté sans gros investissements La rumeur un ex de VMWare qui pense que c'est la mort de VMWare Outils de l'épisode GitHub Copilot quand le code s'écrit tout seul … (en fait non, les développeurs ont encore des beaux jours devant eux) A voir aussi: Github Co-Pilot : Addictif ou Efficace ? (Johan Jublanc et Simon Provost) à Devoxx France 2022 Rubrique débutant Conférences Source: Developers Conferences Agenda/List by Aurélie Vache et contributeurs June 14: France API - Paris (France) 15–18: VIVA Technology - Paris (France) 17: Cloud Ouest 2022 - Nantes (FR) + Online 21–22: Voxxed Days Luxembourg - Luxembourg 23: ServerlessDays Paris - Paris (France) 24: SoCraTes Rennes - Rennes (France) 27–1: Hack in Paris - Paris (France) 28: Dev nation Day France - Paris (France) 29–1: BreizhCamp - Rennes (France) 30–1: Sunny Tech - Montpellier (France) 30–1: Agi'Lille 2022 - Lille (France) September 9: JUG SummerCamp - La Rochelle (France) 29: Cloud Nord - Lille (France) October 4–6: Devoxx Morocco - Agadir (Morocco) 6–7: Paris Web - Paris (France) 10–14: Devoxx Belgium - Antwerp (Belgium) 13–14: Volcamp 2022 - Clermont Ferrand (France) 20–21: DevFest Nantes - Nantes (France) 27–28: Agile Tour Bordeaux - Bordeaux (France) November 8–9: Open Source Experience - Paris (France) 15–16: ParisTestConf - Online 15–16: Agile Tour Toulouse - Toulouse (France) 17: Codeurs en Seine - Rouen (France) 18: Devfest Strasbourg - Strasbourg (France) 19–20: Capitole du Libre - Toulouse (France) December 1: Devops DDay #7 - Marseille (France) 2: BDX I/O - Bordeaux (France) 14–16: API Days Paris - Paris (France) & Online Nom de la conf du x au y mois à Ville - CfP jusqu'à y mois TODO: reprendre celles de l'épisode d'avant Nous contacter Soutenez Les Cast Codeurs sur Patreon https://www.patreon.com/LesCastCodeurs Faire un crowdcast ou une crowdquestion Contactez-nous via twitter https://twitter.com/lescastcodeurs sur le groupe Google https://groups.google.com/group/lescastcodeurs ou sur le site web https://lescastcodeurs.com/

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast
#740: C#/.NET Development Services

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 4:55


C#.NET allows C# software developers to build stunning applications that can run on any device. With a robust library and framework, it can handle virtually any task thrown it's way.  C#/.NET is much more intuitive and user-friendly than some of the previous programming languages. The DEV.co C#/.NET Development Methodology Get to know your business and the core objectives and goals you have for your software or application.  We'll work hand in hand to ensure everything aligns with your wants, needs, and expectations. More info about C#/.NET development services:    https://dev.co/c-sharp-dot-net/   Connect with us:  SEO // PPC // DEV // WEBSITE DESIGN

Risky Business
Risky Business #667 -- "Shields Up" for cyber's forever war

Risky Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022


On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss the week's security news, including: “Shields Up” advice is now provably meaningless Russia to ditch offshore comms apps like WhatsApp Evil Corp's Lockbit sanctions evasion attempt backfires Binance is a cesspit of shady financial dealings Apple's passkey release foreshadows FIDO mass adoption Much, much more This week's sponsor interview is about Elastic's teardown on some really interesting APT linux malware called BPFdoor. Jake King and Colson Wilhoit joined the show for that interview. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that's your thing. Show notes US military hackers conducting offensive operations in support of Ukraine, says head of Cyber Command | Science & Tech News | Sky News White House: cyber activity not against Russia policy | Reuters 'Shields Up': the new normal in cyberspace Governors are being contacted - Newspaper Kommersant No. 95 (7296) dated 06/01/2022 «Вы лично отвечаете за инциденты». Почему 1 мая началась новая эпоха в информационной безопасности - Газета.Ru Киев использовал против России новый принцип кибератак - Ведомости Traffic will be sorted into folders - Newspaper Kommersant No. 102 (7303) dated 06/10/2022 FBI cybercrime seizure takes down one-time Ukraine IT Army collaborator To HADES and Back: UNC2165 Shifts to LOCKBIT to Evade Sanctions | Mandiant Risky Biz News: LockBit-Mandiant drama, explained How Binance became a hub for hackers, fraudsters and drug sellers Cryptocurrencies were once seen as an unmitigated boon for criminals. Not anymore. Fed cyber officials detail Chinese state hackers using common exploits against telcos Risky Biz News: Russia orders Google to remove Tor Browser from Russian Play Store Bizbudding, Inc. v. 365 Data Centers Services, LLC, 3:22-cv-00715 – CourtListener.com Business Email Compromise Scams Are Poised to Eclipse Ransomware | WIRED Cybercriminal scams City of Portland, Ore. for $1.4 million - The Record by Recorded Future Apple's Passkey Replaces Passwords With iPhone and Mac Authentication | WIRED MongoDB Debuts ‘Queryable Encryption' to Fight Hacks and Leaks | WIRED Zero-Day Exploitation of Atlassian Confluence | Volexity Microsoft Security Intelligence on Twitter: "Multiple adversaries and nation-state actors, including DEV-0401 and DEV-0234, are taking advantage of the Atlassian Confluence RCE vulnerability CVE-2022-26134. We urge customers to upgrade to the latest version or apply recommended mitigations: https://t.co/C3CykQgrOJ" / Twitter Microsoft Follina Vulnerability in Windows Can Be Exploited Through Office 365 | WIRED (3) Martin Sheppard on Twitter: "@riskybusiness And yes, many orgs can disable Macros in documents with the mark of the web without a lot of impact. Policy can be used to not mark documents from certain internal sites with mark of the web, which is one way to allow certain legitimate macros with this setting in place." / Twitter Blockchain, 'Decentralized' Exchange Taken Offline After Hacker Steals Millions ‘Optimism' Crypto Hack Victim Hopes Thief Will Give Back $15 Million PeckShieldAlert on Twitter: "#PeckShieldAlert Wintermute Exploiter has transferred 17 million $OP to @optimismPBC https://t.co/5PpgeZXaId" / Twitter NFT insider trading charges filed against former OpenSea employee Nate Chastain Detecting BPFDoor backdoor payload | Elastic

Podcasty Aktuality.sk
Múzeum: Dávny hrad Devín. Zničil ho Napoleon (podcast)

Podcasty Aktuality.sk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 22:48


V dnešnej časti podcastu sme sa boli pozrieť na ďalšiu časť výstavy Rimania a Slovensko - a to na devínsky hrad aj v dobe rímskej. „Hrad je výnimočný aj tým, že tu máme doklady najstaršieho osídlenia aj Rimanmi,” vysvetľuje Katarína Harmadyová zo Slovenského národného múzea.  Devín bol hraničnou lokalitou a bol veľmi dobre strategicky situovaný. „Devínske hradné bralo vytváralo polostrov. V podstate z troch strán bol dobre strategický chránený,” opisuje v podcaste kurátorka. Ako vyzeral hrad minulosti? Pod hradom bola v minulosti pláž a neskôr bol zničený „Relatívne nedávno sme zistili, že Napoleon vydal 29. augusta 1809 príkaz na to, aby podmínovaný a vyhodený do povetria.” Viac si o stopách Rimanov na hrade, ale aj samotnej histórii môžete vypočuť v najnovšej časti podcastu Múzeum. Podcast vzniká v spolupráci redakcie Aktuality.sk so Slovenským národným múzeom. Reportáž nahrávala Denisa Hopková.

We Made This
24 - Chucky's Vacation Slides, Chucky Invades & The Halloween Kills Trailer

We Made This

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 55:09


Welcome to CHUCKYVISION, a podcast about the horror franchise Child's Play and the main character, Chucky the Good Guy Doll. Welcome to the monthly specials before the confirmed season 2 of Chucky begins later in 2022! In this month's offering, Mark and Dev discuss some Chucky short film oddities! We cover Chucky's Vacation Slides, Chucky Invades and The Halloween Kills Trailer discussing the quality, the significance of when they were filmed, whether they're canon, and more. Host: Mark Adams Co-Host: Dev Elson Editor: Mark Adams Executive Producer: Tony Black Twitter: @ChuckyVision We Made This on Twitter: @we_madethis wemadethisnetwork.com Title music: At the Beginning (c) Dark Fantasy Studios

The Final Fourcast - WVU Basketball & Everything Else

DEVIN EBANKS IS IN BEST VIRGINIA 2022!! We're super excited our friend Devin is coming to join Best Virginia this summer in The Basketball Tournament! We catch up with Dev, talk about his joining the team, thoughts on last year, and his opinion on strip club dining, and so much more! Use code BX4FINAL4 to save 25% off your order at bookexchangewv.com, or shop safely in-store in Morgantown at their Evansdale or Downtown locations! Advertise with us! Call us at 304-807-9098 or email us at finalfourcast@gmail.com! Let us know you're listening! TWITTER: @FinalFourcast / FACEBOOK: The Final Fourcast / INSTAGRAM: @FinalFourcast  The Final Fourcast is a podcast hosted by WVU basketball alums Kevin Jones, Da'Sean Butler and John Flowers. Fans of West Virginia University won't want to miss this weekly podcast

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast

Thousands of successful websites are built with PHP, including Facebook, Yahoo!, Wikipedia, and MailChimp. The Dev.co PHP development team has a proven track record of building secure eCommerce websites, A.P.I servers, content management systems, and SaaS applications.  At Dev Dot Co, we build custom PHP applications for businesses of all sizes, including startups and enterprises.  We can create custom WordPress themes or edit your existing theme to deliver high-level marketing strategies. Or we can build you a custom eCommerce site from scratch.   More info about PHP development services:    https://dev.co/php/   Connect with us:  SEO // PPC // DEV // WEBSITE DESIGN

Play Some Video Games
Play Some Video Games Ep 40 - On the cusp of E3..ahem Summer Games Fest

Play Some Video Games

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 124:55


Welcome to Play Some Video Games Episode 40! This week we welcome Josh of Board with Video Games fame to the show while Elaine is out fixing the internet for the tri-state area. We start the show as always with what cha been playing and get into a sad tale from the Florida Man himself. Donnie goes full Donnie mode with this week's news leading into Sumer Games Fest tomorrow. Lastly, we answer your questions and learn that none of us especially Dev have any chance in the Wide World of Wrestling. We hope that you enjoy yourself, tell a friend and come back next week for more, but until then Play Some Video Games. Visit our discord!! You can follow us on twitter Follow us on YouTube and follow us on Twitch --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/play-some-video-games/message

Wild Takes
The All-Time Minnesota Wild Hockey Hair Draft (with Danks & Marlow)

Wild Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 54:41


Dev and Zooch are joined by the behind-the-scenes Wild Takes crew of Danks and Marlow to draft the all time best lineup of Minnesota Wild Hockey Hair and FOLKS, it gets contentious. Is this the end of the Wild Takes podcast? Or just good friends yelling at each other over a beer or five? You decide. You can watch the podcast on Spotify or the 10,000 Takes YouTube channel if you want some visual aids. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wild-takes/support

Dave and Dev Podcast
Fatherhood & The NBA Finals

Dave and Dev Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 51:53


Dave and Dev talk about Fatherhood and Warriors v Celtics! Dave mentioned a Jeff Bethke book in the show and the link to check that book out is here: Take Back Your Family: From the Tyrants of Burnout, Busyness, Individualism, and the Nuclear Ideal https://a.co/d/7UNyfph

Radio Sweden Kurdish - ڕادیۆی سوید - Radyoya Swêdê
Zimanê axiftinê yê debata dawîn ya parlemanê req bû. Berpiresekê Sosyaldemokratan dev ji karê xwe ber dide. Doz li hember du parêzeran ...

Radio Sweden Kurdish - ڕادیۆی سوید - Radyoya Swêdê

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 2:42


-- . Nûçeyên giring yên Swêdê. îro 08.06.2022 ji vê podkasta beê kurdî yê Radyoya Swêdê. Derhîner: Besir KavakPêkêkar: Sidki Hirori

Rails with Jason
149 - Seth Tucker, Developer at KNOWiNK

Rails with Jason

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 51:09


In this episode, Seth Tucker and I discuss forms and form builders, the differences between junior and senior developers, reverse proxies and (my apologies) WordPress. Seth Tucker on DEV.toSeth Tucker on TwitterSeth Tucker on GitHub

Crisco, Dez & Ryan After Hours Podcast
After Hours: Rabbits & Habits

Crisco, Dez & Ryan After Hours Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 22:30


Crisco got a Blackstone, but does he have the backbone to keep it? His financial advisor is very upset with him. Plus, more wild stories about the wild animals surrounding Dez and Dev is just weird.

Unapologetic Advice
KevinSamuelsisode

Unapologetic Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 62:45


Are you a Kevin Samuels Supporter? Do you despise that man? Come one, come all for a FUNNY A** episode featuring Dev and Lisa Lee! ...Contact Us Email Us: Unapolopod@gmail.com Our Instagram: www.instagram.com/unapologeticadvicepodcast @UnapologeticAdvicePodcast Trilly's Instagram: www.instagram.com/Plain_Dame/ Gemini Twitter: @AdviceGemini Listen to Us.... We everywhere..... Podcast Republic (FEATURED): www.podcastrepublic.net/podcast/1417043354 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/7sG4GKF6BNsTxJP3LgGaj0 Apple Podcast: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/unapo…d1417043354?mt=2 Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/unapologeticadvicepodcast/ iHeartradio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-unapologetic-advice-29986930/ Stitcher Podcast: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/httpfeedssoundcloudcomuserssoundcloudusers473783073soundsrss/unapologetic-advice-podcast Himalaya: https://www.himalaya.com/comedy-podcasts/unapologetic-advice-podcast-517247

Inside Tech Comm with Zohra Mutabanna
S3E5 Delighting your customers - How to craft meaningful UX as a content developer!

Inside Tech Comm with Zohra Mutabanna

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 63:17


Ellyn Hassel says, "I want to delight the customer, I want to make sure that I'm doing everything that I can to make this a really amazing experience, help them get their job done, move through the task, and move on."In this heart-to-heart conversation, Ellyn shares with us her experience and insights to create a delightful experience for the customer. She is continually striving to elevate our profession and earn a seat at the table with other disciplines. Learn the unique ways in which her efforts have contributed to product success in myriad ways, especially in user experience (UX).Some questions we delve into:How do you collaborate with UX, Marketing, and other teams? What does "success" look like when you are partnering with other disciplines?How can you remove roadblocks and assert yourself as a writer in situations where you are challenged? How can you elevate your status as a tech writer? Some common abbreviations and terms mentioned in this episode:RDO - Research, Delivery, and Operations (RDO) divisionSCD - Strategic Content DevelopmentSME - Subject Matter ExpertsUX - User ExperienceSKY UX - SKY UX is the next generation of Blackbaud's user experience framework that provides a consistent, cohesive user experience for Blackbaud products. UI - User InterfaceTriad - This is a scrum meeting. Triads may vary from organization to organization, but mostly the triad at Blackbaud consists of the Product Owner (or the Product Manager), the UX Designer, and the Dev team.Guest BioEllyn Hassell is a Sr. Principal Technical Writer at Blackbaud. She leads multiple efforts around UX writing and user assistance patterns that promote innovation and consistency. Supporting several development teams, Ellyn collaborates across disciplines to create a meaningful impact throughout Blackbaud. Other interests include internationalization, usability, syntax standards, and accessibility with the end goal of delighting Blackbaud customers. Ellyn is a proud alumna of East Carolina University (Go Pirates!) where she holds a B.A. and M.A. in English with a concentration in technical writing. She's presented at numerous local, district, and international conferences, and served as guest editor of User Experience and several other technical and creative publications. Ellyn lives with her husband and two children on the beautiful Chickahominy River in Williamsburg, VA. You can connect with Ellyn on LinkedIn.Audio Engineer - RJ Basilio

Royski's Club Compassion Podcast & Royski’s Rad 90’s Alternative Podcast
Episode 284: Club Compassion Podcast #284 (EDM Set) - Royski

Royski's Club Compassion Podcast & Royski’s Rad 90’s Alternative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 80:12


1. Marshmello Vs Alice Deejay - Before U vs Better Off Alone (SABER Trap Bootleg)2. ARMNHMR vs Afrojack - Everybody Feels vs Take Over Control (SABER Trap Bootleg)3. Jay-Z ft Rihanna & Kanye West - Run This Town4. Snoop Dogg & Wiz Khalifa ft Bruno Mars - Young, Wild & Free5. Aretha Franklin  - Respect6. Talking Heads - Once In A Lifetime7. The Weeknd - Sacrifice8. Black Box vs Kungs - I Don't Know Anybody Else vs Never Going Home (Rosario Marafini Bootleg)9. Block & Crown - Comin' Out10. Nari - That's The Way11. Duke Dumont vs. Topic ft A7S - Ocean Drive vs. Breaking Me12. Steff da Campo vs. Chico Rose - 5 On It (Extended Club Mix) 13. Shouse vs. Bronski Beat vs. Mike Westwood - Love Tonight In A Smalltown Car14. Dev vs Felguk - Dancing In The Dark vs. Train (Danny Diggz Then & Now Bootleg)15. Tones And I - Cloudy Day (Charlie Lane Remix) 16. Red Hot Chili Peppers - Otherside17. Suzanne Vega vs. Regard - Tom's Diner vs. Hallucination 18. Kungs vs David Guetta  - This Girl vs. Remember (Arman Aveiru Bootleg)19. Sofi Tukker - Drinkee20. Ellis Moss - The Shake21. Montell Jordan - This Is How We Do It (Koltens Remix)22. ACRAZE ft Cherish vs Onderkoffer - Do It To It (PeteDown Hybrid Bootleg)23. Afrojack & Steve Aoki ft Miss Palmer - No Beef (DLMT Remix) 24. Kevin McKay - Move Your Body (Elevation) (Kevin's Extended ViP)www.djroyski.comwww.patreon.com/royskiwww.mixcloud.com/djroyskiwww.facebook.com/djroyskiwww.twitter.com/djroyski

Plus
Názory a argumenty: Poslechněte si všechny sobotní komentáře s Petrem Schwarzem

Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 26:02


Na českých vysokých školách se začínají řešit problémy spojené se sexuálním obtěžováním. Konečně. ANO se dál bije za podnikatelské blaho svého předsedy. Skleněné zámky prezidentských kandidátů. Putin změnil i dánské postoje. Devítieurová jízdenka v Německu táhne. Ale co přijde po ní? Nač jsou stesky nad sankčním kompromisem. Ukrajincům vadí ruská kultura absolutně. Čas to snad změní

Loose Screws - The Elite Dangerous Podcast
Episode 135 - I'm Gonna Get Rammy

Loose Screws - The Elite Dangerous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 116:52


http://loosescrewsed.com Join us on discord! And check out the merch store! https://discord.io/LooseScrews Headlines for this episode: Squad Update: Easing into a small expansion from Bumbur to fill an open gap nearby. Operation ScramJet proceeding in Lambda Andromedae. CMDR Bloomingwind posting regular updates in #loose-screws-faction channel. Still gathering ports in Snoqui Xian in order to capture Myka's Rest All details in the #standing-orders and/or the #loose-screws-factions channels of the Discord. Thargoid Bug Report: Paucuman cleared, no new incursions http://thargoid.watch Bug Bug Report: Remember to vote up the GPU utilization issue on the tracker! Currently number 8 top voted; keep it going https://issues.frontierstore.net/issue-detail/48884 In-Game News: Blame The Bard (Galnet Commentary) sa Chig chat: Dev news: Console CMDR copy FAQ and expected date https://forums.frontier.co.uk/threads/console-profile-transfers-faq-and-expected-date.603979/ Frameshift Live #9 | Console Transfer FAQs, Interview w/ Narrative Team https://youtu.be/en4TBdzmhfQ Discussion: Community Corner: Cheese. If you like the show please rate and review on your podcast app, which helps people find the show. Join us on Discord at discord.io/loosescrews and check out the merch store at loosescrewsed.com for mugs, t-shirts, hoodies, and more.

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast
Ryan Blackburn on His Guys, Going Full Time, and the Booth Era

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 56:42


Blackburn joins Vogt, Dev, and D-Line Eric in studio to take a big picture look at the "most important" offseason in team history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Dev Petty & Mike Boldt