Podcasts about gdc

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Latest podcast episodes about gdc

Canaltech Podcast
Apesar do nome, Meta não é empresa mais reconhecida em metaverso nos games

Canaltech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 13:36


Um novo documento da GDC, maior evento para desenvolvedores de jogos do mundo, tentou entender o que pensam as pessoas que fazem os jogos sobre diversos temas. O quanto trabalham, em que trabalham e, principalmente, o que pensam sobre metaverso. A maioria disse que ainda não tem interesse em desenvolver jogos voltados a metaversos. Além disso, os pesquisadores perguntaram aos entrevistados sobre quais empresas fizeram o melhor trabalho até agora em representar o que, de fato, é o chamado metaverso. Ponto curioso: Mesmo trocando o nome para Meta e basicamente colocando o termo em destaque, a empresa de Mark Zuckerberg não é a mais reconhecida por desenvolvedores. Este é o Podcast Canaltech, publicado de terça a sábado, às 7h da manhã no nosso site e nos agregadores de podcast. Conheça o Porta 101. Entre nas redes sociais do Canaltech buscando por @Canaltech em todas elas. Entre em contato pelo nosso e-mail: podcast@canaltech.com.br Entre no Canaltech Ofertas. Vote no Prêmio Canaltech. Este episódio foi roteirizado, apresentado e editado por Wagner Wakka. O programa também contou com reportagens de Alveni Lisboa, Felipe Demartini, Igor Almenara e Paulo Amaral. A revisão de áudio é da dupla Gabriel Rimi e Mari Capetinga. A trilha sonora é uma criação de Guilherme Zomer e a capa deste programa é feita por Erick Teixeira.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kinda Funny Games Daily
PlayStation VR 2 Launch Lineup Revealed - Kinda Funny Games Daily 01.19.23

Kinda Funny Games Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 57:39


Blessing and Tim tackles PlayStation VR 2's launch lineup, Xbox layoffs, and a confirmeed Ubisoft game cancellation. Time Stamps - 00:00:00 - Start 00:05:00 - Housekeeping A new Xcast is up right now on Youtube.com/KindaFunnyGames. Tomorrow is the Kinda Funny Day Stream. That's going down right here on Twitch and youtube.com/KindaFunnyGames right after Games Daily ATTENTION NEW AND ASPIRING GAME DEVS, there's a really cool program going down at GDC being run by some of our friends!: Amplifying New Voices is a one-day workshop that focuses on professional skill development! The Roper Report  - 00:08:41 - PlayStation has revealed the PS VR 2 full launch lineup with 13 new titles 00:22:46 - Xbox has officially been hit by Layoffs 00:25:42 - Ubisoft CEO Apologizes to Employees Over 'Ball in Your Court' Comments 00:29:10 - Ad 00:30:05 - Ubisoft's Mysterious Project Q Has Been Canceled 00:36:10 - After a year delay, EA's PGA Tour has a release date 00:44:00 - Out today  Reader mail  - 00:48:54 - “Today I just discovered a game called Wanted: Dead…” - ThePortlandKevin 00:51:20 - “WB is copyright striking the leaked Suicide Squad image…” - Nano 00:55:20 - You‘re Wrong Tomorrow's Hosts: Tim & Bless

Nintendo Cartridge Society
Samurai Kirby 100 (News from 1/17/23)

Nintendo Cartridge Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 51:59


Patrick and Mark test their reflexes to prepare for the chaos promised by Samurai Kirby 100 — a new sub-game coming to Kirby's Return to Dream Land Deluxe. Plus, HAL Laboratories at GDC, Mario + Rabbids: Sparks of Hope underperforms, and more. The guys also talk about: Crisis Core Final Fantasy VII Reunion Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Tetris 99 Splatoon 3 Awesome Games Done Quick FRIEND US ON SWITCH Patrick: SW-1401-2882-4137 Mark: SW-8112-0583-0050

Creed of Crypto
35. HEX Conference Recap & Wen PulseChain?

Creed of Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 75:49


On Episode 35 of the podcast, Broke Boi Crypto (@BrokeBoiCrypto) and Crypto Ewok (@CryptoEwok) discuss: - BTC pumping hard into CPI data release, over 18K - Genesis and GDC vs. Gemini - Why the sentiment bear market bottom may be in - HEX conference recap - PulseChain still far off? - Jack Levin vs. Richard Heart Follow the show on Twitter: @CreedOfCrypto Buy Us a Cup of Coffee: https://www.powr.io/checkout_screen?unique_label=e2df0c6e_1623177500

Two Girls One Ship: Reviewing Video Game Romances
61. Shipping Greatness: Shayna Moon Interview

Two Girls One Ship: Reviewing Video Game Romances

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 85:04


Today is a special interview episode where the two girls got to interview games producer and kitten foster parent extraordinaire Shayna Moon. Shayna was a producer for 2018's God of War and 2022's God of War: Ragnarok, and has given a talk at GDC about great audio production. Shayna and the girls had a long talk about making games a better place for everyone, alongside many tangents, of course! Watch live on Fridays at 10:30pm ET: https://www.twitch.tv/twogirlsoneship Follow us on all the socials https://linktr.ee/twogirlsoneship Advertise with us & business inquiries: twogirlsoneship@gmail.com Theme song: TGOS Theme Song by Pipeman Studios Connect with Shayna on Twitter @qorquiq Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crypto Hipster Podcast
Asset Segregation, CBDCs, and Crypto Insights from Brazil with Vinicius P. Dias @ Lbank

Crypto Hipster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 40:01


Vinicius Porazza Dias completely fell in love with the concept of Blockchain, Web3, and the crypto economy. He has been working for two years with Growth Marketing for companies that use Blockchain and are Crypto-related. • Completely in love with the concept of Blockchain, web3, and crypto economy. I have been working for two years with Growth Marketing for companies that use Blockchain and Crypto-related. • Extensive knowledge of the LATAM financial market (especially Brazil) and the evolution of the crypto market. • 16 years of experience in Digital Marketing working in successful companies such as Mercado Bitcoin, Facebook, PagSeguro, UOL, and Lopes Imobiliária. • Business and Data driving (WebAnalytics, ROAS, ROI, EBITDA) • Agile Mindset with certifications in Lean/Kanban, Product Owner, and Management 3.0 • International marketing experience in PagSeguro, working in the Local Payments Business Unity. Building Content Marketing, Lead Generation, and Events in U.S, China, and Europe (Money 20/20, IRCE, ChinaJoy, GDC, Gamescom) • Eight years of experience in advertising agencies working with Strategic Planning, Media, and Conception for major brands such as Café 3 Corações, Wickbold, Cacau Show, Baden Baden, Roche, Hasbro, Natura, Grupo Raia e Drogasil, Uninove, BB Seguros, Uniban. • Multidisciplinary person with macro thinking in all conversion funnel stages while seeking to strengthen the brand as a whole. • Curious and passionate about neuroscience and human behavior • A hands-on professional, always working directly with the team, no matter what. • Experience in managing multidisciplinary and international teams Portfolio: www.cargocollective.com/viniciusporazza --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crypto-hipster-podcast/support

Guardian Down Cast
Episode 178: "Community Take-Over"

Guardian Down Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 201:48


Welcome to Guardian Down Cast: A Destiny Podcast...if you love to play the game Destiny 2, you've come to the right place.  We're a couple of a gamer dads that have played Destiny since that Day 1 release back in 2014 and we're just as passionate about it today as we were back then.  We share the stories of Destiny content creators and community members and also discuss key topics/news within the game and community. This week, members of the GDC community Discord have taken over the show and Hazel and I are put on the hot seat.  Hazel goes over the last TWAB of the year and we answer YOUR questions and at the very end, we have something special, so enjoy! ...join in the conversation in our GDC Discord Follow us on our YouTube Channel... Join our Bungie Clan Want to support the show? Want to leave us a voicemail for the show? GDC Instagram Hazel Get a GDC T-shirt or Mug, Mousepad, etc. thru Designed by Humans Tees ToddtheGatr GDC Spotify Song Playlist Join us on Twitter... Apple Music show song playlist    

Real Estate Investing – Live from New York
Imagining the Possibilities with Will Ingraham

Real Estate Investing – Live from New York

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 56:31


On this week's episode, I am speaking with Will Ingraham, a partner at GDC Properties. Back in my Massey Knakal days we sold Will's company a loft conversion in Brooklyn. I have stayed in touch and have guest lectured for him at Fordham University where he teaches a class on affordable housing. I love how Will is a big picture thinker. When I asked if his knowledge base was his Insider's Edge, he said it was quite the opposite. He said as a generalist his value is knowing who to bring into complex situations whether for entitling land or figuring out how to capitalize affordable development. Will recounts his early days as a house painter in Manhattan, when he stumbled across a development opportunity. As he had followed real estate from an early age, he was able to assemble the site and essentially flip the contract to score a big profit  launching him into the real estate business. He then went on to spec homes in Milford, NY where he ultimately met Martin Ginsburg a founder of GDC properties.  They were not only the largest developer in Westchester, NY but went on to amass 3 million SF of shopping centers nationwide, as well as developing hotel projects. Will's past roles at the company include president and chief investment officer. He has been responsible for developing and implementing the company's strategic vision, overseeing acquisitions and dispositions of property and leading new development activity. Mr. Ingraham is also managing member in the Peregrine Opportunity Zone fund. He holds a master of science degree in real estate development from Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. I know you will get a lot out of this episode especially the students out there. Will's advice is to learn a hard skill so you can add value. He is also a big believer in being a problem solver.

Pillars Of Wealth Creation
POWC #540 – Growing and Scaling Your Business with Kurt Uhlir

Pillars Of Wealth Creation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 48:06


Learn the secrets to building a business from start-up to over $500M annual revenue in today's episode with Kurt Uhlir. Welcome to Pillars of Wealth Creation, where we talk about building financial freedom with a special focus in business and Real Estate. Follow along as Todd Dexheimer interviews top entrepreneurs, investors, advisers and coaches. Kurt Uhlir is a globally-recognized marketer, operator, and speaker. His speaking experience includes speeches across the United States and Europe in addition to presenting at prominent industry events such as PPAI, GDC, the White House, and private company/team workshops. He advises leaders, from startup founders to private-equity backed CEOs to the President of the United States. He's built and run businesses from start-up to over $500M annual revenue, assembled teams across six continents, been part of the small team leading an $880M IPO, and participated in dozens of acquisitions. He is recognized for his proven ability to develop early-stage initiatives into thriving business enterprises and scale growing organizations through the power of B2B storytelling. 3 Pillars 1. Controlled risk 2. I'm always looking for the three things that are wrong in my business today that I'm not aware of 3. I always have people around me who have transparency in my life and authority to speak up to me Books: Profit First by Mike Michalowicz, Love Works by Joel Manby You can connect with Kurt On Instagram, LinkedIn or www.KurtUhlir.com Interested in coaching? Schedule a call with Todd at www.coachwithdex.com Connect with Pillars Of Wealth Creation on Facebook: www.facebook.com/PillarsofWealthCreation/ Subscribe to our email list at www.pillarsofwealthcreation.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/c/PillarsOfWealthCreation

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
"150年的牙科教育与研究 - 伯明翰大学牙科学院 Upen Patel,Kirsty B. Hill,Iain Chapple,Joanna Batt,William M. Palin&Thomas Addison 英国牙科杂志第233卷,第969–971页(2022)引用本文 指标拖网 抽象的 本文

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 27:02


"150年的牙科教育与研究 - 伯明翰大学牙科学院 Upen Patel,Kirsty B. Hill,Iain Chapple,Joanna Batt,William M. Palin&Thomas Addison 英国牙科杂志第233卷,第969–971页(2022)引用本文 指标拖网 抽象的 本文讨论了T" " - 启动AD- #TheMummichogBlogoFmalta Amazon Top和Flash Deals(会员链接 - 如果您通过以下链接购买,您将支持我们的翻译)-https://amzn.to/3cqsdjh 仅在一次搜索中比较所有顶级旅行网站,以在酒店库存的最佳酒店交易中找到世界上最佳酒店价格比较网站。 (会员链接 - 如果您通过以下链接购买,您将支持我们的翻译)-https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “因此,无论您希望别人对您做什么,也对他们做,因为这是法律和先知。”“ #Jesus #Catholic。 “从受孕的时刻,必须绝对尊重和保护人类的生活。从他生存的第一刻起,必须将一个人承认为拥有一个人的权利 - 其中每种无辜者都是无辜的权利。”天主教教堂的教理2270。 堕胎杀死了两次。它杀死了婴儿的身体,并杀死了母亲的科学。堕胎是深刻的反妇女。它的受害者中有三个季节是女性:一半的婴儿和所有母亲。 流畅的马耳他无线电是马耳他的第一号数字广播电台,演奏您的轻松最爱 - Smooth提供了“无混乱”的混音,吸引了35-59个核心观众,提供柔和的成人现代经典。我们操作一个流行曲目的播放列表,并定期更新。 https://smooth.com.mt/listen/ 关注电报:https://t.me/themummichogblogdotcom Tumblr:https://www.tumblr.com/themummichogblogofmalta blogspot:https://themummichogblogofmalta.blogspot.com/ 论坛:https://groups.google.com/g/themummichogblog Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/groups/chinesecommunitymalta 结束广告" "在过去150年中,他从伯明翰牙科学院的角度来看,牙科教育和研究的历史发展。学校于1858年向学生开门,并在教育和研究中看到了许多变化和发展。回顾整个历史,我们作为牙科专业人员的最大能力之一就是适应能力,未来将为我们带来很多机会来证明这一点。在教育和研究方面,我们已经看到了牙科在19日大流行方面的韧性如何;接下来的150年将是在该领域工作的非常激动人心的时刻。 关键点 伯明翰大学牙科学院于1858年向学生开门,并在教育和研究中看到了许多变化和发展。 近来,我们职业的多样性大大扩大。 通过研究重点和经验来培养一种深入的学习方法,对于每个研究与牙科相关学位的学生,促进思维和为专业发展提供必要的基础都是必不可少的。 介绍 伯明翰牙科医院于1858年1月在Temple Street 13号伯明翰的牙科药房开业,据信是世界上最古老的牙科医院。六个动作中的第一个是1863年到上修道院。第二个是在1871年到达布罗德街9号。 1882年至71 Newhall Street的第三个; 1905年至132号大查尔斯街(Great Charles Street)的第四名;第五个是在1964年到圣乍得昆斯威(St Chads Queensway),在那里一直持续了59年,直到搬到当前的建筑物。有趣的是,以前的所有六个位置都在彼此的10-15分钟步行路程内。 Iain Chapple:伯明翰牙科学校的主要发展 自1878年以来,医学和牙科学生就在伯明翰进行了培训。牙科学校于1880年正式构成,其资格获得了1881年皇家外科学院的批准。正式学位是世界上最古老的学位,紧随巴尔的摩牙科学校(接下来是巴尔的摩牙科学校(美国)。 伯明翰大学牙科学生协会(BUDSS)也是世界上最古老的,成立于1886年。伯明翰牙科医院的高级荣誉牙科外科医生查尔斯·西姆斯(Charles Sims)博士是Budss的就职工作人员。第一次会议是1886年11月4日,有14名成员参加了“阅读和讨论有关其成员牙科科学的论文的阅读和讨论”。在1915 - 1919年间,Budss搁置了四年,参加了大战,并在演讲剧院外的一卷荣誉展示了1886 - 2022年的每位Budss员工和学生官员。一位著名的校友是哈罗德·鲁德(Harold Round),他于1899年在1903年担任Budss秘书,然后在1903年担任参谋长。该专利于1919年与原始图纸一起提交,并于2019年3月18日,牙科学校庆祝了100年的安全气囊,这要归功于医学史教授乔纳森·雷纳尔兹(Jonathan Reainarz)教授,当时Chapple教授揭幕了一块蓝牌2019年的学校)和Reinarz教授。该牌匾自豪地坐落在前BBC Pebble Mill Studios的埃德巴斯顿(Edgbaston)5号米尔游泳池之路的牙科学校/医院外面。 目前的建筑于2015年11月19日由女王皇后伊丽莎白二世正式开业,尽管2016年3月31日向患者开了门。它在Leaky Edgbaston占据了一个令人惊叹的遗址,距著名的板球场一杆,并拥有16,456 M1的州立州。 - 艺术诊所,教育和研究设施。这座牙科学校/医院的第七座是其悠久历史上的第一个非城市中心地点。由于1920年3月25日,由于1920年的临床活动,现代设施对于迅速恢复服务至关重要。学生于2020年3月27日被送回家三个月。在此期间,护理院和社区COVID-19测试服务被搬迁到牙科医院,作为运营中心。血液学门诊患者从伊丽莎白女王医院搬迁到开放式学生诊所,供弱势患者使用,我们的牙科护士担任静脉混血症患者。 2020年6月,我们为口腔医疗保健专业人员提供了世界上最大的Covid Seroepidemiology研究,测试了1,500人,并在第一次疫苗接种后遵循其抗体状态9个月。我们的二年级学生能够在短短三个月后将2020年7月的第一周返回临床技能实验室。所有学生都于2020年9月7日返回,在该信托基金投资50万英镑的投资之后,在开放式海湾之间建立分区屏幕后,我们是第一家英国牙科医院,重点是2020年10月1日至11月30日之间的Aerosol生成程序。多亏了这一点。精湛的设施,所有学生毕业于2020年7月。 乔安娜·巴特(Joanna Batt):近期申请人的性质和人口统计的变化 今年(2022年),我们回到面对面的访谈,作为进入伯明翰大学牙科手术学士学位(BDS)学位课程的选拔过程的一部分。在访谈的第一个早晨,我向二十张,非常紧张的蒙面面孔简要介绍了,这让我感到惊讶,与两年前相比,现在有多不同,当我20年前我申请学习牙科时,我毫不介意。这使我考虑了今天的申请过程,而不是20、30,40年前。2未来几年这些情况会如何变化? 该行业中的性别平衡变得越来越平等。 1972年,牙医注册牙医的总牙科委员会(GDC)有12.8%是女性,到2020年,2000.1在2000.1升至32%,在GDC自我识别为男性和51%的女性和51%的牙医中,有49%的牙医和51%的女性。3鉴于历史该行业中的男性多数席位,毫不奇怪的是,在2020年,有62%的牙科入学是女性。4 近来,我们职业的多样性大大扩大。在撰写本文时,我们有27%的注册BDS学生被确定为白人,大多数人将亚洲人识别为亚洲人。 GDC指出,有52%的牙医注册为白人,24%为亚洲或亚洲英国人,但数量较小,标识为黑人或黑人英国。在各个少数族裔群体中,该行业中缺乏代表性,这是我们正在努力促进包容性的领域。 《英国牙科杂志》上的最新文章雄辩地说明了这一复杂问题5,并应努力增加该行业中代表性不足的群体的代表。 那么未来会有什么?我的希望是,我们获得一支代表我们所有人所治疗的患者的劳动力,无论背景如何,我们都可以在牙科专业的旅程中得到支持。是的,这是一项艰巨的任务,但是我们正在努力并取得重大进展。 Upen Patel:牙科教育方法的变化 牙科教育的提供是一种不断发展的实践,并且由于牙科技术成为主流的增强以及传统教学范式的挑战,因此取得了显着的速度。我们的牙科学生热衷于质疑,而不仅仅是接受事实。他们想以自己的速度学习,而不是老师站在他们面前的步伐。他们不接受学习,直到被展示并理解为什么重要的过程很重要。进入现代学位课程的学生期望是在个人级别上获得定制的支持,教学和学习,而不是作为学生团体的一部分。 为了满足不断发展的学习者,我们需要创新我们的学习风格。现在的讲座包括使用受众响应系统,以在熟悉且高效的大组设置中实现积极的个人学习。可以在一个方便的个人学习者中审查记录的讲座。虚拟学习环境为学习者提供了一个定制的资源,该资源被标记并监视他们的学习和进步。 大流行带来了教育各个方面的许多挑战:学习,教学和评估。很快,老师和学习者使用视频会议来提供教育的能力,尽管有明显的优势,但现在显然虚拟接触无法替代核心面对面的活动,这使教育工作者能够提供有效的教学和对学习者进行有效的学习者,以抗学习成果。监测和记录牙科学生的进度至关重要,在整个Covid-19大流行中,以及现在我们在恢复阶段的出现,试图使我们的牙科学生获得与流行前同伙相比的可比性临床经验。伯明翰使用在线记录系统 - 临床

Nice Games Club
Characterization in Pet Management Games (with Sarah Yu and Beth)

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022


Sarah Yu and Beth, developers of Bugaboo Pocket, join us once again in the clubhouse after our chance meeting at GDC! Listen in as we gush about bugs a lot, but also discuss how to present personality traits of your pets in pet management games. There's also a bunch of cool videos of bugs in this episode's show notes! Sarah and Beth were also interviewed by us during GDC in 2022. GDC 2022 Special (Part 2) Characterization in Pet Management Games ArtGame DesignGamingChao World - Chao IslandDo Dogs Smile? What's Really Behind That Adorable Smile? - Joelle Audette, Canine CampusBugaboo Pocket Beta - Bugaboo PocketBugs MentionedWhat is an isopod? - NOAA Ocean Exploration Video of Praying Mantis Video of Jerusalem Crickets (Potato Bugs) Video of Syrphid Fly (Hoverfly) Games MentionedNeko Atsume - Hit-Point Co., LtdWobbledogs - Animal UprisingMerge Dragons - Gram GamesBugaboo Pocket - Bugaboo PocketSarah YuGuest Programmer making games. Currently working on Bugaboo Pocket: a digital pet game where you raise bugs. External link Link to Bugaboo PocketBethGuest Artist/animator currently working on Bugaboo Pocket. External link Link to Bugaboo Pocket

Two Girls One Ship: Reviewing Video Game Romances
55. Advocate and Educate: Narrative Designer Alexandra Lucas

Two Girls One Ship: Reviewing Video Game Romances

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 84:59


Today is a special interview episode where the two girls got to interview researcher, games writer, and intersectional feminist Alexandra Lucas. Alexandra is currently a narrative designer at Stoic Studio and has written on gender equality, video game romance, and pop culture issues at large alongside being a speaker and panelist at many gaming conventions, such as GDC and PAX Dev. Watch live on Fridays at 10:30pm ET: https://www.twitch.tv/twogirlsoneship Follow us on all the socials https://linktr.ee/twogirlsoneship Advertise with us & business inquiries: twogirlsoneship@gmail.com Theme song: TGOS Theme Song by Pipeman Studios Connect with Alexandra on Twitter @silkenmoonlight Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Come Up
Taehoon Kim — CEO of nWay on Raising $90M, Selling to Animoca, and Gaming x Web3

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 56:20


This interview features Taehoon (TK) Kim, Co-Founder and CEO of nWay. We discuss going to arcades with his mom in South Korea, why he wasn't allowed to play console games as a kid in Canada, what he learned from Samsung's work culture, why it's hard for VCs to invest in gaming, finding passion at the intersection of technology and art, the best type of IP for game partnerships, how he ended up selling nWay to Animoca Brands, and how player ownership in games creates attachment and meaning, and prevents gamer exploitation.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.comInterview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:Hi, I'm Chris Erwin. Welcome to The Come Up, a podcast that interviews entrepreneurs and leaders.Taehoon Kim:So I was really upset when Lightspeed thing fell through. I went out drinking with my friends and I got hammered that night. I had another VC pitch the next morning. I was so hungover that during the presentation I threw up three times. During the pitch, I would say, "Excuse me, I'd run to the bathroom." I would throw up, come back, continue the pitch. And I did that three times., And I did the presentation 9:00 AM I came home and I was, "Oh, my God, I totally screwed that up." I fell asleep. I woke up at 4:00 PM, got a call at 5:00 PM saying that he was in. Usually it doesn't happen that way, but it was a really weird period of time in my life.Chris Erwin:This week's episode features TK Kim, CEO of nWay and a serial gaming entrepreneur. So TK was born in Seoul, South Korea to a mom who was a gamer and a lover of arcades. After studying at Cornell, TK started his career at Samsung, where he helped launch their smartphone and next gen mobile gaming businesses. TK then went on to co-found three gaming companies, and raised over $90 million in venture capital. Today he's the CEO of nWay, which is a developer, publisher, and tech platform for competitive multiplayer games across mobile, PC, and consoles. nWay was sold to Animoca in 2020.Some highlights of our chat include why he wasn't allowed to play console games as a kid in Canada, why it's hard for VCs to invest in gaming, finding passion at the intersection of technology and art, why he doesn't mind getting rejected by investors, the best type of IP for game partnerships, and how player ownership in games creates attachment and meaning and prevents gamer exploitation. All right, let's get to it.TK, thanks for being on The Come Up podcast.Taehoon Kim:Hey, thanks for having me. Super excited to be here.Chris Erwin:We have a pretty amazing story to tell about your career, but as always, we're going to rewind a bit and kind of go to the origin story. So it'd be awesome to hear about where you grew up and what your parents and what your household was like.Taehoon Kim:I was born in Seoul, Korea, and then I moved to Vancouver, Canada when I was in fourth grade. I think I was 10 or 11. At the time, growing up in Seoul, a little bit more strict environment. One funny thing is that my mom was a gamer and she would take me to the arcade, I think when I was super young, five or six years old. That's when I got really into gaming and how fun could that could be. But when I moved to Canada, however, she didn't really let me have any consoles, when that switch from the arcade era to the console era happened.I think she was a little bit influenced from the Asian culture and didn't want me to be getting too loose on academics. But when I got the computer, that's when I started really getting back to gaming. She didn't know I was playing games, but I was really into that. And then when Doom came out, that's when I really also started getting into online gaming, which is a big part of the reason why I'm so into PVP and competitive gaming.Chris Erwin:So your mom was a gamer and she would take you to the arcades in Seoul. What were the types of games that you guys liked to play together? And was this just something special that you and your mom did? Or was it a whole family outing that you did with your mom and dad and your siblings?Taehoon Kim:My dad didn't really like games, so it was just me and my mom. And she was really into Galaga and getting on the top of the leaderboard there. Oftentimes, I would watch her play and I would also try, but I wasn't as good as her. So I mean, I would mostly try to beat a record, but I couldn't. That's how I got into it early on.Chris Erwin:Did you also go to the arcade with a lot of your peers growing up when you were in Korea? And did any of your peers parents play? Or was it kind of like, I have the cool mom, she's into gaming, and we'd go do that on the weekends?Taehoon Kim:Oh, later on when I got older and I got in elementary school, yes, I definitely did go to the arcade with my friends. And then later on, in Seoul, arcades turned into PC bang. I'm not sure if you heard of it, but it's like the room full of PCs and it would play PC games there. I mean, I got in earlier than my friends, because of my mom.Chris Erwin:Remind me, what was the reason that you guys came to Vancouver from Korea?Taehoon Kim:I'm not a 100% sure if this is the real reason, but my parents would always tell me it's because I wasn't really fitting well with the type of education in Korea, where it was more, much more strict and less creative. They wanted us, me and my brother, to get a Western education. I think it turned out to be good for me, I guess.Chris Erwin:Do you remember when you were kind of joined the academic and the school system in Vancouver, I know it was at a young age, you were about 10 years old, you said, did you feel that that was like, "Hey, this is immediately different and I really like it and enjoy it"? Or was it nerve-wracking for you to make such a big change in your life to be uprooted at such a young age? What were you feeling at that time?Taehoon Kim:It was immediately different, lot less grinding. Even at third or fourth grade, back in Seoul, it was pretty tough. After school was over at 5:00 PM, I still had to go to all these after school programs until 9:00 PM or something like that. And I didn't do the homework afterwards and everybody was doing it. So there was a lot of peer pressure for parents to also put their kids to the same kind of rigorous program. And when I was in Vancouver, I didn't have to do any of that. So it felt more free and math was a lot easier.Chris Erwin:Math was a lot easier in Vancouver.Taehoon Kim:You know how crazy it is for Asian countries with math early on.Chris Erwin:So you're probably the top of your class. You were such a standout, and I bet at a young age that was pretty fun because it was easy to you too.Taehoon Kim:People thought I was super smart. I wasn't, it was just that I started earlier doing more hard stuff in math. It wasn't necessarily that was smarter. But again, on the other subject, because my English was suffering, I had to get a lot of help. So I would help them in math and they would help me with the other subjects.Chris Erwin:And you mentioned that in Western education there's also probably more emphasis on using the creative part of your brain as well, and balancing that out with the math or the quantitative side. What did that look like to you as you were going through middle school and high school before you went to college? Any specific applications or stories stand out?Taehoon Kim:Yeah, one thing that stood out to me was how a lot of the homeworks and assignments were project based and group based. Where teamwork mattered, and I would have to work with two or three other students to do a project, where we had a lot of freedom to create what we wanted. And the fact that there's no right answers. And it was really weird for me at the beginning, but I got used to it later on. But I think that's kind of a key difference. And at least at that time.Chris Erwin:During your teenage years and coming of age, before you go to Cornell, what was the gaming culture in Vancouver? And what was your role in it?Taehoon Kim:Early '90s when the console wars were happening with Nintendo and Sega, and there was a lot of cool things happening there, but I didn't get to really partake in that. My parents didn't allow me to have consoles. But same things were happening in the PC gaming, especially without modems and the early stage of internet happened. Me and my friends, we got started with Wolfenstein, which was mind blowing.Chris Erwin:Oh, I remember Wolfenstein, it was one of the earliest first person shooters on a PC.Taehoon Kim:It was mind blowing. It was the first game to really utilize 3D spaces in the way it did. But then the real game changer was Doom because you can... Even with the slow modem, I think it was an amazing feat, think about it now, with limited technology and networking, I could dial into, using my modem, and then connect with my friends, and I could play PVP. And that was when the gaming was the most fun for me, actually, playing with friends live. And I would play it late until night early in the morning, over and over again, the same map.Chris Erwin:I remember playing Wolfenstein at my friend's place, shout out, Adam Sachs. And then I also remember playing Doom, and I remember having the cheat codes where I can go into God mode.Taehoon Kim:Oh, right.Chris Erwin:And I was invincible and I could play with five different types of guns, including the rocket launcher. I can specifically remember from my youth some of the different levels. And sitting at my PC station kind of right next to my family's common room. Those are very fun memories. I don't think I was ever doing... I was never live playing with friends. Were you able to do that within the Doom platform? Or were you using a third party application on top of that?Taehoon Kim:I think it was within the Doom platform. It's pretty amazing. Doom was a fast game, so the fact that it worked, it was amazing. When Quake came out, afterwards, that's when I think e-sports was really ended up becoming more serious and people were going to playing at a more higher tier. But that's when I got out of FPS and dove into fighting games.Chris Erwin:Got it. You moved to Vancouver, you're a standout in school, on the math side just because of all your training in Korea. And you're learning about work in these more kind of project based environments or team based work, where there's also a lot of freedom for collaboration. You end up going to Cornell. When you were applying to school, what was your intention? Did you have a very clear focus of, "This is what I want my career to look like, so this is what I'm going to study in undergrad"? Or was it a bit more free flowing?Taehoon Kim:I really wanted to go into a top engineering school. I knew that was what I wanted to do. I wanted to study electrical engineering or computer science, and I was looking at Cornell, MIT, Stanford, they had really good engineering programs. And I knew that the playing online games and doing a lot of mods and all that stuff in the computer, and looking at kind of the early stage of internet, I knew that was going to be a big thing later on. My goal was to kind of get into that sector by studying engineering or information technology.Chris Erwin:Was there any certain moments when you were at Cornell that to help to point you in kind of this gaming leadership, gaming entrepreneurship career path that you've now been on for the last couple decades?Taehoon Kim:Well, a couple things happened. I was good at math. I was good at engineering, and internet was happening. And then one thing I didn't talk about was that I was also really good at art. At one point, I even thought about going to art school. I think it was because of my mom's side of the family, a lot of artists. And I think it was the DNA from my mom's side. What I love about gaming was the fact that you can kind of combine technology and my love for technology and also my love for art.And when I graduated, Cornell, started work at Samsung and there was an opportunity to go into a new gaming. That's when it clicked for me. I was like, "Wow, I really want to get into this industry. It's as both of what I love." But at Cornell, because we had super fast ethernet, a lot of people were playing StarCraft at that time. And that's how I saw the world in terms of, "Wow, these type of massively play online games. I mean, RPGs or games where you can play competitively is going to be a big thing."Chris Erwin:I don't want to date you TK, if that's uncomfortable, but around what time period was this? What year was this around?Taehoon Kim:College was from 1997 to 2002.Chris Erwin:I have to ask, too, when you say that you almost went to art school, and that you had a passion for arts, since it's very early on, what type of art applications? Was it painting? Was it drawing? Was it sculpture? Was it something completely different? What did that look like?Taehoon Kim:Sculpture, I was good, but I didn't excel at it. I was mainly good at sketching, painting, and doing just a lot of creative art, concept art, which is a big part of game development, actually.Chris Erwin:Your first role, what you did for work right after Cornell was you went to Samsung, and there you were a product manager where you helped start Samsung's smartphone business, and you're also a product manager for next-gen mobile gaming. And as you said, this was exciting to you, because you saw gaming as the intersection of technology and art. Tell us how that first role came to be and kind of what you focused on there.Taehoon Kim:I was part of a team called new business development team. Group of 13 people, and our job was to create next-gen businesses. Three businesses that we isolated as something that we should work on was telematics, which is using the map data to help people and navigations and bring new technologies to the car. Second one was smartphone business, taking some of the operating systems from PDAs at the time and then moving that over to the phone. And then third one was gaming, because Nokia was going big with gaming at that time. And Samsung was second to Nokia in market share and someone wanted to do whatever Nokia was doing at that time.So those were three main things. And I got into the gaming side after one of the first business trips was to San Jose, which at that time was hosting GDC, Game Developer Conference. And it was my first time going to GDC. And, yeah, I was just fascinated with the group. It was engineers, artists, players, developers, publishers. And that community really fascinated me, and that's when I decided, "Hey, I really want to be part of this group. I want to get into gaming." So I came back and said, "Hey, I want to take on this project." And a lot of my peers were avoiding the gaming sector, because they knew that was difficult. And Samsung previously tried to do a console and it failed. So they knew it was difficult, but I wanted to get into it. I was super excited to get into it.Chris Erwin:Was it hard to convince your leadership, just based on the past challenges that Samsung had, to do it? Or did they just say, "Hey, TK, sure if you have an idea, see what you can do and then come back to us"?Taehoon Kim:Well, the leadership really wanted to do it mainly because Nokia at the time, that's when they launched their first gaming phone called N-Gage. I'm not sure if a lot of people remember, but it was a really weird device. They launched that business, and it was getting a lot of press. And our CEO was like, "We also have to a quick follow, and we have to get into gaming phones as well." So it was but different from what they did in the past, because it wasn't just a pure console, it's a smartphone plus a gaming device.So it was a completely different type of environment at that time compared to when they were doing console. But nonetheless, because gaming is a [inaudible 00:14:06] driven and also because it's a tough business, my peers were, "Hey, I want to be in another sector." So it was less competitive for me to take on that project.Chris Erwin:So that must have been pretty exciting. Your first role out of school, you work for a very large technology company that essentially gives you as a young in your career a mandate. It's like, "Hey, TK, you know what? You want to go forward and figure out a new gaming business line for Samsung? You got the green light to go and do it." That must have felt pretty good. And I think you were there for a few years. What did you accomplish? And then what was the reason for why you decided to move on from that opportunity?Taehoon Kim:It was a very unique opportunity for me. I think I got lucky being at the right place at the right time, because that's when Samsung was really taking off as a global brand name. That's when they first overtook Sony in brand value. And that's when the consumers were looking at the brand more than as a microwave company, and a major player in the IT space. And that's when they were also hiring a lot of people from overseas.And I did both undergrad and master's program at Cornell. And when I was in my masters, I got to know the founders of Palm, which was also a Cornell EE grad, through my professor. I got really stuck into Palm OS. I was semi expert with the Palm OS. I think that's why they hired me, because Samsung was the first major mobile manufacturer to adopt the Palm OS into their phone. And then the second thing is, because at that time Samsung's culture was still, it wasn't easy for Western certain people to... A lot of people from the US schools starting there, they weren't lasting that long. So it was hard for me as well, but I kind of decided, "Hey, I'm going to really make sure that I can stick around and tough it out."Chris Erwin:I think this is another important point for the listeners is that you are also building another company that you had founded while you were at Samsung called IvyConnection. Is that right?Taehoon Kim:Right.Chris Erwin:I like this because I think this is the beginning of a ongoing theme in your career that you are a builder and you're a founder. You're working at a full-time role, you're also building something on the side. And then this leads to, I think, some other big entrepreneurial ambitions kind of later on that we'll get to. But tell us quickly about IvyConnection.Taehoon Kim:IvyConnection kind of came out of the school project that was doing at Cornell, my master's program. At first, it was supposed to be a platform to connect tutors and students. And then I quickly realized, when I got to Seoul that there were a lot of parents who were looking to send their kids overseas to top schools, and they didn't know that things were different over there in terms how admissions worked. So I kind of created the category, which is a huge category is now it was the first company to do it. And so we did get a lot of demand. I started that right before I started working at Samsung, and it was just continuously growing. I recruited a whole bunch of my friends, and I had them kind of run the company. I was a co-founder, and while working at Samsung, I was advising and helping the growth.Chris Erwin:It's amazing, because you describe at Samsung it was a very brutal work culture at the headquarters. So you're probably working very long hours, very demanding, and then you're also building something on the side. It's like when did you have time to sleep?Taehoon Kim:I was young though, so I didn't need... I was happy to just work, until I was young and single. I was at my early 20s, so it was not problem for me. But, yeah, it was pretty brutal. We had to get to work right at 8:00 AM and the system kind of keeps record of exactly when you get into the company. And then you also had to come out on Saturdays for half a day.Chris Erwin:I did not realize that, that's the expectation across... Is that across all companies in Korea, as part of the work culture and the work norms? Or is that just unique to Samsung?Taehoon Kim:I think what's pretty unique to Samsung. I think at that time chairman wanted us to start early. You basically only have one day weekend.Chris Erwin:And for you, where you're also building another company on the side, it's almost like you never had time that you weren't working or very little bit, most likely. So you're at Samsung for about three years, but then you transition to Realtime Worlds. Explain why did you transition from your Samsung role? And what were you building at Realtime Worlds?Taehoon Kim:As I said, I was a project manager for a new gaming platform, and part of my job was also to source content for the device. And I remember playing Lemmings and I met the creator of Lemons, Dave Jones who just sold DMA Design and created Realtime Worlds. And I try to convince him to create games for my platform, but him and his co-founder, they ended up recruiting me. They're like, "Hey, join us. We just started Realtime Worlds, and we'd love to get your help, because we want to get into online gaming. And you have a lot more exposure to online gaming from Seoul, from Korea. So we wanted to be part of this exciting venture." So I decided to leave Samsung and joined them.Chris Erwin:How was that experience? Was it a similar work culture? Did you feel your past experience was very helpful and so you got in there and you're like you knew exactly what to do? Or was it still a very steep learning curve at that point in your career?Taehoon Kim:It was a steep learning curve for me, in terms of game development, because I have never done game development. Because Realtime Worlds is a game developer and publisher. That's right around when they just signed a contact with Microsoft for a game called Crackdown. It was like a souped up version of GTA. Dave Jones was also the creator and designer of GTA, the original GTA 1 and 2. So it was creating a similar game. And they had ambition to also create an online version of GTA, which is where I got involved.I got one of the large publishers in Korea called Webzen to do a publishing deal to fund portion of development for the GTA online project, and be a publisher for that. So they wanted me to create the Asia branch for Realtime Worlds, they called it Realtime World Korea. I started the studio here in Seoul, recruited some engineers and designers and also did biz dev work to get that publishing deal with Webzen.Chris Erwin:And I think also one of the highlights from your time there is that, did you also help to raise money from NEA, in your role at the company as you guys were growing?Taehoon Kim:Oh, yes. My professor from Cornell, he was friends with the founder of NEA, and he knew a lot of VCs. And Realtime Worlds was based in Scotland, and they knew very little about Silicon Valley. So I told him, "Hey, we're doing something amazing here and online gaming is a new sector, so I think we should be able to raise some money." So I created the deck, which I learned from school on how to do, so created a deck, created a business plan, and then flew over to Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park and pitched to a few VCs including NEA. I was surprised. I was like, it was fairly easy at that time to raise money. NEA decided to, all by themselves, bring $30 million into the company and we didn't even have product launched at that time.Chris Erwin:This is pre-product. Did you go to Sand Hill Road by yourself? Or did you have a support team? Or was the company leadership saying, "Hey, TK, you know what you're doing here, you have the connections, go make this happen by yourself"?Taehoon Kim:It was just me at the beginning. It was just me by myself, just trying it out, because the first meeting is exploratory anyways. So at the beginning it was me. They love what they saw, and then afterwards it was like everybody, all the partners from the NEA side and also everyone from our side. At the beginning, it was just me.Chris Erwin:Wow. Did you enjoy the fundraising process? I mean, it seems like you're wearing so many hats, you're doing business development, you're fundraising, you're also building out different offices as part of the core game development practice. Was there something that you felt like you were gravitating towards more specifically? Or did you like doing it all and having a broad top down view of the company?Taehoon Kim:Yeah, I think the reason I ended up taking the fundraising process is because I actually enjoyed the process. A lot of people hate it, because part of the fundraising process is just being comfortable with getting rejected. But I didn't mind that at all. I'm like, "Fine [inaudible 00:21:57]." And big part of the process is also not only selling, but knowing what they're looking for. So I got really good at researching all the VCs, and instead of having one deck and just one approach for all the VCs, I would custom create the deck for each of the VCs, and only target the top tier ones. I quickly realized that it's actually easier to raise money from the top tier VCs than the second or third tier VCs, surprisingly. And that approach really worked, and I love the process.Chris Erwin:Why is it easier to raise money from top VCs versus tier two, tier three?Taehoon Kim:It's actually simple. The top tier VCs are able to make decisions on their own, even though it seems odd or different or something that doesn't seem intuitive. They are able to say, "Hey, we're going to take a bet on this," and they can make a quick decision. The second and third tier VCs are always looking to see what others are doing. They're always looking for validation. They're always looking to see what the first tier guys are doing.So a lot more due diligence, it takes a lot more work, and they kind of beat around the bush a lot more. They take a lot longer to make their decisions. And a lot of times they bring in other VCs to co-lead or see what they think. So it's actually a lot more work to get them to lead. So if you have a great product and you have a good vision, then just go to the top tier guys. Go straight to top to your guys. They'll be able to make a much quicker and faster decision.Chris Erwin:That's a great insight. TK, though, I do have to say yet again, while you're at Realtime Worlds, I think the same year that you start working there, is 2005, you also are the co-founder of another company called Nurien Software. So yet again, you're working at a company, it's a very big role, you're working across a variety of different company functions, but you're also building something on the side. Is that right?Taehoon Kim:Right. Yeah.Chris Erwin:What was Nurien Software?Taehoon Kim:So Nurien Software was actually a spinoff off of the Realtime Worlds' Korea office. Dave Jones, he introduced me to the guys at Epic Games, and that's when they were launching on Unreal Engine 3. And he also introduced me to another studio who was doing a music game, and that kind of clicked for me. I was like, "Hey, what if we take Unreal Engine 3, which is very high graphics fidelity, which is usually used for like MMORPGs and then create a music game out of it, because the music is to be very visual." And they wanted this to be kind of separate. So I decided to be make it, instead of doing it Realtime Worlds Korea made it into a separate one.And that also started to get momentum. And it turns out music plus gaming was a huge thing, especially in Asia. Just as we were starting the development for, we call it MStar, a music based MMO, another game called Audition just took off massively in China. It was doing a billion a year. It was a tough time for me because Realtime Worlds and Nurien Software, at the same time, was kind of taking off.Chris Erwin:And again, for Nurien Software, you also led a $25 million fundraise from NEA and top VCs.Taehoon Kim:I pitched them on Friday, and they told me they were in on Monday. So it was crazy times. That's when online gaming was really taking off. So it was actually, it's not just me, but it was much easier to raise money at that time.Chris Erwin:Probably, again, working a lot, building, not a lot of sleep. You're running both these companies. And then Nurien Software sells in 2010 to Netmarble CJ E&M. And what was the end result for Realtime Worlds? What happened to that company?Taehoon Kim:I was only running both companies for a short period of time. So right after Nurien Software got funded, the board wanted me to focus on the new VCs, and Nurien Software wanted me to focus on Nurien Software. So I helped Realtime Worlds find a replacement for me, and I left Realtime Worlds, and I was full-time at Nurien.Chris Erwin:Hey, listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of The Come Up. I have a quick ask for you, if you dig what we're putting down, if you like the show, if you like our guests, it would really mean a lot, if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show. It helps other people discover our work, and it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it everybody. Let's get back to the interview.Taking a step back, so, TK, you're part of these very exciting companies. The leadership and the founders clearly, really believe in you, and think you are someone special. So they're giving you the green light to essentially co-found spinoffs, and then go raise additional venture funding for that. Did you feel at this point in your early career that you're like, "I'm exactly where I'm supposed to be. This is an exciting path, These are growing industries. I'm good at it. I have the right international connections. And now it's time where I want to double down on this, and I'm going to be an entrepreneur. I see white space in these gaming markets, and I want to build towards that. And I'm going to go raise capital to make that happen." What was going through your head? Because it feels like the story that you're telling is so exciting for someone to be at your career stage. What were you feeling?Taehoon Kim:That's when I realized that this act of dreaming something up, raising money for it, and actually launching it and seeing it become real and seeing a product go live, and enjoyed by millions of people, is just really fulfilling. And it's something that I knew that I wanted to continue doing. It's something that I really enjoy.So even to this day, that's the main reason that I'm doing this. Well, it's more than financially driven motives. I just love creating new things and bringing it out to people and surprising people and seeing them delighted. It makes all the hard work worthwhile, and it's a very kind of thrilling experience for me. And that's when I realized, "Hey, I want to do this long term. This is what I'm good at. Coming out with new ideas and getting it funded and launching it." Not all of them are successful, but that's fine. The act of doing it is a reward.Chris Erwin:Very well said. So I think, was it that mindset, I think, a company that you did found and you worked at for one to two years before nWay was Pixelberry. What was the quick take on Pixelberry? What was that?Taehoon Kim:So Pixelberry was also a spinoff from Nurien Software. Nurien Software was an MMO company, so, as I said, it was using Unreal Engine 3. It was still very heavy. You had to download a big client, and run it on pc. And back in 2009, 2010, that's when social gaming and hyper-accessible gaming was taken off. So Pixelberry, at the beginning, was an experiment to try to bring over a lot of the core technologies built at Nurien Software and make them more accessible, and make it so that people can just instantly play on a browser.And the first game that we tried to do was a fashion game, because we realized from launching MStar, which was a music MMO, the best way to monetize those games were through, we're making a lot of money by selling clothing for the avatars, selling fashion, in other words. So we wanted to create a game, a social game, focused on creating fashion and selling fashion.Chris Erwin:I didn't realize that Pixelberry was also a spinoff of Nurien Software. So it seems that you had a really good thing going with the founding team of Lemmings that created Realtime Worlds. There was a lot of market opportunity. The founders really believed in you, and you had all these different ways, as you said, to kind of create and innovate as the gaming markets were evolving, and bring these incredible gaming experiences to users. And I think you were part of that team for almost six years, from 2005 to 2011. What was the catalyst that caused you to break off from that, start the venture that you still run today, which is nWay?Taehoon Kim:I was doing Pixelberry and it wasn't doing that well, mainly because, me as a gamer, didn't really enjoy fashion games that much. Maybe that was the reason. Or maybe because the industry was kind of changing rapidly, but it wasn't doing that well. Zynga and a handful of others were kind of dominating the social gaming space. And the co-founders of Realtime Worlds, Dave Jones and Tony Harman, at that time, just sold realtime worlds to GamersFirst. And they're like, "Hey, TK, let's start a new company together." And that's when I kind of jumped at the opportunity, because I really wanted to work with those guys again. And that's when nWay was founded.Chris Erwin:Oh, got it. So Dave and Tony are part of the founding team of nWay?Taehoon Kim:Yes, the three of us that were the founders [inaudible 00:30:16].Chris Erwin:So I think what would be helpful for the listeners is to explain what was the initial vision for nWay, when you, Dave, and Tony were coming together to found the company. What was your vision for what you wanted to build?Taehoon Kim:By that time, I did a lot of different type of games, did [inaudible 00:30:31] mobile gaming at Samsung, I did MMOs, PC MMOs Unreal Engine 3, and then also browser based games at Pixelberry. And the vision at nWay was like, "Hey, a lot of people are becoming gamers now through new technologies, new devices, mobile was really taking off. People were playing games on mobile browsers, smart TVs, and there was new technologies to bring them all together." So the vision was, "Hey, let's go back to the type of games that we love. Let's go back to the days when we were playing Doom online, and playing fighting games with other live players. Let's bring competitive gaming, let's bring real time multiplier gaming to the emerging platforms." So that was the vision.Let's create new technologies to bring console quality, competitive multiplier games that could run on mobile browsers, smart TVs, where people can kind of play together regardless of what device they were on." That turned out to be a big thing, these days with Fortnite and Minecraft, everybody's playing crossplay games. Your friend is on tablet, somebody else is on a Nintendo Switch, and you can play together.Chris Erwin:Okay, so when you start out, that's the vision. So where do you start? What was the first steps? Is it pre-product, we're going to go raise money, and put together a team? Or in the beginning of it self-finance and you were working on a certain game or a certain platform? What were your first early moves?Taehoon Kim:I took a lot of the learnings from the previous products. So by then I knew how to make games that would run on multiple devices. I knew it wasn't easy, but we wanted to do a quick prototype of an action RPG game, where it can have four player co-op and two player PVP mode that would run on a mobile phone and a browser. We were able to create a quick prototype in about six weeks, and the prototype, it did all the selling for us.Because I could just show it to the investors, "Hey, look, I'm over here. There's another guy on a mobile device, there's another guy on another device." And they could see that we're all synchronized, and they could see that it was a very fast action game. A lot of them were blown away at how there was low latency and running so fast just over the internet. And so we were able to raise money from the top tier VCs. But at the same time, 2011, 2012 was a period of time when there were a lot of acquisitions happening, and we were also getting a lot of acquisition offers at the same time, that complicated the process.Chris Erwin:So six weeks into building a prototype, you're fundraising on Sand Hill Road, but you're also getting inbounds from companies that want to buy your business that early.Taehoon Kim:Yeah. They saw the prototype and immediately give us ridiculous offers to buy the company. It was basically VCs and companies trying to buy us competing, which helped the valuation to go up.Chris Erwin:All right. So a couple questions on that. It's really interesting. One, were you at a point, because you've successfully raised money from Silicon Valley investors, you've had exits for them, where you and the investment funds made money. Were you able at that point, where you felt like you could walk into a room, do a product demo, you didn't need to show up with a deck and they would say, "Yeah, this sounds great, TK, we're going to give you money"? Were you at that point or were you still running a formal process? You show up with the business plan and everything?Taehoon Kim:We didn't need the business plan anymore, but we still need a deck. By then, I just became really an expert on how to create a simple deck that walked through the business, and I knew what type of prototype need to be created to fundraise. It was a simple 15 to 20 slides deck plus a quick demo. And simpler story the better, is this basically a storytelling deck walkthrough, why you're able to do what you're doing now. Why it hasn't been done until now. And then you talk about the market and how big the market would get, show a quick prototype, and talk about the technologies involved. And that was pretty much it.Chris Erwin:You're getting these incredible inbounds from companies who want to buy you, plus, you're also raising from venture capitalists. How did you and the two other founders come together to decide, do we sell or do we not sell?Taehoon Kim:The VCs helped us with that as well, maybe because they were trying to convince us to maybe take their deal. But they would let us know what each of the companies are like, and they would connect us to founders who have sold to that company previously. And I was able to pick their brains or interview them. We decided, "Hey, we really want to try this on our own." So we decided to take the VC route. And I think at that time that was, the VC was Lightspeed Ventures, who gave us a good term sheet and we decided to sign that term sheet.And the reason in the beginning I told you why things became complicated is because after we signed the term sheet with Lightspeed, one of their portfolio companies, KIXEYE, they also decided that they wanted to buy us. And they give us an offer we rejected, and then they got really mad at Lightspeed Ventures asking them why they're funding a company that could be a competitor to them. And KIXEYE basically threatened to sue them if they invested in us. So at the last minute it kind of fell apart.Chris Erwin:Oh, so Lightspeed did not end up investing in you at that point.Taehoon Kim:So imagine this Zynga gave us an offer, a pretty good offer to buy us. We rejected Zynga's offer and signed with Lightspeed, but Lightspeed couldn't follow through because of KIXEYE. I'm thankful to them because at that time they actually gave me a check for a million dollars, it was like a loan, with no interest rate.Chris Erwin:Lightspeed gave it to you?Taehoon Kim:Yeah, I was really surprised by this. They were like, "Hey, we need to talk." I met them at a coffee shop, and they like, "Hey, here's a check for million dollars. I'm really sorry to have wasted your time, and take this money and use it to give more time to find another investor, because it's not your fault that this deal kind of fell through." So if we didn't get that, it would've been a lot harder for us. Because we did spend a lot of time, a lot of cycles with them, and that meant we had less time to finish the fundraising. That million dollar check, give us more time.Chris Erwin:Think about that million dollar Check is an incredible marketing for Lightspeed as being a go-to partner, as a tier one VC, right? Because one, for you, TK, in your career, knowing that they did that, that they had your back, they understood the challenging situation that they put you in. And they were very direct with you about how they want to do a make good. Next time you go need to go raise money for the next thing that you found, are you probably going to have a conversation with Lightspeed? I would say the answer is yes.Taehoon Kim:Yeah, became really good friends with them. But isn't that incredible? They don't know if they're going to get the million dollar back. What if we fail, and we just kind of go bankrupt or whatever, and then I have to pay them back? But they were, "Hey, here's a million dollars, there's no interest rate. You can pay us back time."Chris Erwin:I agree, it is amazing. I think what they were putting a price tag on was, we want to be in the TK business. We want to be in business with Dave and Tony. And so this is not the last time that we're going to have a chance to invest in a company that could make them millions, if not billions of dollars. And so they said, "We're going to invest in that relationship," and probably a $1 million check to them was easy money, right?Taehoon Kim:Yeah.Chris Erwin:That's amazing. I've never heard of something like that before, but I totally get why they did it. That's incredible. So I understand that Lightspeed and other venture firms were introducing you to founders who had sold their businesses to these potential acquirers of your business. What was one or two things that you learned that made you decide, "I don't want to sell right now"?Taehoon Kim:They were describing to me the culture of the company, because once you sell, you're basically getting a job at that company. And if there's a culture fit, that's great. But if it's a different type of culture, then maybe you won't enjoy it as much. Again, I was doing it because I love that process because the actual act of creating and launching is what's rewarding for us. So I think that's main reason why we decided, "Hey, maybe we shouldn't sell." But after Lightspeed thing fell through, we were like, "Oh, maybe we should have sold." Right after that million dollar check and that conversation, literally, the next day or two days from then I was able to get another term sheet from another VC. So this one is actually a funny story. So I was really upset when Lightspeed thing fell through. I went out drinking with my friends, and I got hammered that night. I had another VC pitch the next morning. I was so hungover that during the presentation I threw up three times, and I was doing a pitch.Chris Erwin:During the pitch.Taehoon Kim:Yeah, during the pitch, I would say, "Excuse me, I went to the bathroom." I would throw up, come back, continue the pitch. And I did that three times, and whenever I made that trip to the bathroom, people were kind of laughing at me, who were at the front desk. I did the presentation 9:00 AM, I came home and I was, "Oh, my God, I totally screwed that up." I fell asleep. I woke up at 4:00 PM, got a call at 5:00 PM saying that he was in. So I was like, "What the..." Because I told him the story of what happened as well, so he said, "Hey, all that stuff just added more color to your storytelling," and then he was in.But then later I realized that the reason he was able to make quick decision, this is a Baseline Ventures, by the way. Baseline Venture was, it was a very unique firm that they had one partner, so they were able to make decision very quickly. And I pitched to them, I think, two days after Instagram was acquired by Facebook. So Baseline was in a flush with cash and they were very happy about the outcome. And so I think that's one of the reasons why they were also able to make a bet, and make that decision very quickly. I literally made a pitch 9:00 AM, and then got a call 5:00 PM saying, they wanted to put in the money. Usually, it doesn't happen that way, but it was a really weird period of time in my life.Chris Erwin:No incredible in a situation in which you thought that that was probably the worst pitch that you've ever given in your life, because you're running to the bathroom to throw up. It turns out that it was, at least one of the more impressive pitches in converting a VC into someone who has interest within just a handful of hours. So it just goes to show you got to stay resilient. And you're human, you just went through this traumatic event where Lightspeed pulled out at the last minute, so you need to go blow off some steam. You go out boozing with your buddies, but you come back the next morning, you put your game face on, and you do what you got to do. That's an incredible story. Thank you for sharing that.So then you raised the money from Baseline, and a few others, and then when did you feel, "Okay, we turned down some initial inbound offers to buy the company," but when did you feel that you really started to get some real momentum that showed you and the other founders, "Hey, we have something much bigger here"? What did that look like?Taehoon Kim:That's when mobile gaming was becoming more serious and evolving from just casual Match 3 games to a device that could run any type of game. So that's when we really got a lot of momentum. So the first prototype they created, I told you it was a four player co-op plus a PVP action RPG game. So we continued to develop on that prototype. We called the game ChronoBlade, and when we had a much more alpha version of the game, that's when things were really blowing up in Asia for RPG games and mobile.And during GDC, when a lot of the publishers were in San Francisco, we had publishers after publishers lined up, literally, signing offers on a napkin table and presenting us, "Here's how much we were willing to pay for MGM and royalty fees for your game." And we were able to just pick from the top tier ones. So we had offer from Tencent, NetEase, Netmarble, the biggest and the best. That was at the point in the company when we knew that things were becoming really serious.Chris Erwin:What year was that?Taehoon Kim:I think that was like 2013, about a year after fundraising.Chris Erwin:Seven years later you do end up selling the company to Animoca. How did that come to be?Taehoon Kim:Oh, this is a complicated story. So in 2018 there was a company called Tron, it's a big blockchain company, who moved in right above our office space. And that company was just taking off like crazy and they had happy hours, they had events. As neighbors we would show up, and that's how we kind of learned about blockchain space, and merging blockchain with gaming could be a new thing. And at that time it was getting really difficult to monetize competitive games because the game has to be fair. So we can't sell things that's [inaudible 00:42:30] base, it can only sell cosmetics. And we were always trying to find new ways to innovate on how to monetize those type of games.And we quickly realized, "Hey, if we can make items in the games that players can earn into NFTs, and if the players can kind of trade NPS items among themselves, and we don't have to even sell them, they can get them in the game, and then exchange from themselves," which was already happening in the MMORPG space anyways. And if we can charge a transaction fee for each of the trades, that could be a model where we didn't have to do any of the [inaudible 00:43:01] box stuff that the players didn't like, and have a enough steady and viable business model.And that's how we got into the blockchain space. At the same time, Animoca was investing like crazy into anything related to the blockchain. It's when I met Yat Siu, the chairman of Animoca, and we kind of hit it off. But funny thing happened to my board at that time, I've never seen this happen. I had a five member board, and our lead investor, our biggest investor at the time, Bridge Ventures, which was a IDG Ventures US, who renamed themselves Bridge Ventures, and they separated from IDG. And so they had to raise their own LPs, and their LPs looked at their investment portfolio and said, "Hey, you do a lot of gaming, you do a lot of enterprise, maybe you guys should pick one instead doing both."And they decided to pick enterprise and get out of gaming. But the partner at Bridge Ventures who was on our board, basically, said, "Hey, then what am I going to do?" And he ended up leaving with Bridge Ventures to create a new VC fund called Griffin. Now it's like the biggest gaming fund by the way, but he left. And then TransLink Ventures, which was our second biggest investor, partner from TransLink Ventures for another whole separate reason, he ended up leaving TransLink. And so he was gone. And then our third board member, Peter Levin from Lionsgate, he ended up leaving Lionsgate. So he was gone from the board. So three of our biggest board members all left for different reasons around at the same time, and they were all replaced by new people and the mandate was to get out of gaming. All of a sudden, boom, my board was gone.And so they wanted to get out. They wanted to sell the company. So when I went met with Yat Siu, I hit it off with the Yat, and I thought it would be amazing to work together. And that's how the deal went through. If it was the same board and then there wasn't that kind of shake up at the board level, I'm not sure if I'd be able to sell the company, probably would've been the state of independent. But because of that and the special circumstance, the deal was able to go through. So that was a good thing for Animoca.Chris Erwin:Good thing for Animoca. But if it was up to you, you would've stayed independent for at least a few years longer, because you saw a bigger opportunity ahead, right?Taehoon Kim:Yeah. If it wasn't for that shake, I probably would've stayed independent. But looking back now, I'm thinking that it was a good thing to kind of join forces with Animoca. Right after we joined forces with Animoca, Animoca went through a growth phase. I've never seen a company grow that fast. They basically went from a $100 million valuation to the $6 billion valuation in like two years. They were doubling in valuation every three months. It was kind of nuts. It was really fun to be part of that ride. And right now it's an amazing partnership.Chris Erwin:In that sale, was it a cash and equity deal? So are you able to participate in this crazy run that Animoca's had?Taehoon Kim:It was mostly equity, so it was a huge upside for the investors.Chris Erwin:Got it. A final note before we get to the rapid fire section is now that you're partnered up with Animoca, what do you see as the future for nWay and what you're building together? What gets you excited? And what is some recent success that you want to be building upon?Taehoon Kim:I'm super excited about what we're doing. I think that we're still very early stage with about three, and this whole kind of digital ownership revolution that we're going through. I think there are opportunities for companies like us to develop and publish online games where players can truly own things. I don't want to make a game where it's like an instrument for people to just make money, but I do think that there's something special about being able to really own some of the items that you're playing with. I think it adds meaning, and when you have ownership you just get more attached to things. And so our vision right now is to create more meaningful entertainment through real games that players can play and also have ownership in. And we're going to be doing a lot of experiments and try to really bring together the Web3 community and the gamers under one community.Chris Erwin:And I know something that you've talked about is some recent wins and partnerships and games that you've done is the International Olympic Committee you published Sean White NFTs, likely a powerful marketing engine for that. And then also you have a Power Rangers game, and a game with the WWE. Do you have similar type projects that are upcoming that build on top of these?Taehoon Kim:So Power Rangers and WWE, those are just regular free to play games. They don't have any blockchain or NFT components in there. The innovation there was to have a game where people can just quickly pick up and play and immediately play with another player. Power Rangers especially was super successful. We had over 80 millions downloads, and I think it's in two year five now, and it's continuously profitable. So the game's been amazing.With the Olympic game, we were able to meet with IOC right when their decades long exclusivity with Nintendo and Sega was coming to an end. And so they wanted to explore a new type of game partnerships. One thing that they were noticing is that the younger audience, who were not watching TV anymore was caring less about Olympics and they wanted to focus on bringing the younger audience into caring more about their brand. And they also at the same time noticed that the younger audience are on Fortnite and Minecraft and they're playing games that are crossplay.So they were looking for a game developer or game development partnership where they could have their game run on multiple devices at the same time. And a real time game where people can play to have a social experience. And as you know that's like right on our sweet spot. We were able to prove that we have some of the best kind of technology to make that happen. With another Power Rangers game called Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid, I think it's still is the only fighting game in the world where it runs on everywhere, the runs on Xbox, PlayStation, and the Switch. It even ones on a browser through Stadia. And it's a really fast action game and you can play together with anybody on any device, and there's no lag and there's no [inaudible 00:48:45] issues.So they saw that and they were like, "Hey, we want to partner with you guys." I threw them curve ball and said, "We want to partner with you guys, but we also want to add this thing called NFTs. And we think that there's a 100-year-old tradition that's already there with your brand. When people go to the Olympics they still trade the Olympic pins. We want to make the pins into NFTs, also integrate them to the game, so that when people collect these NFT pins, they could use it in the game to give them a boost in the game." To my surprise, even though they are a very conservative organization, we won the RFP, and they wanted to partner with us. And we launched the project and we got a lot of press from that. And that was a really fun project to launch.Chris Erwin:And I just have to ask, this is a minor detail, but this 100-year-old tradition about trading Olympic pins, are these pins like representative? If you're from the United States and you go to the Olympics, you're wearing a US pin, and then the different athletes will trade them amongst themselves. Is that how that works?Taehoon Kim:Well, there's tons of variety of pins created from poster artworks, emblems, mascots, Coca-Cola always creates Olympic pins together. But the tradition got started, I think, in 1932 or something like that, when they had Olympics in Paris, and the officials, for the first time, had badges or pins and they started trading that. But right now there's a really high variety of pins out there.Chris Erwin:Super cool. It sounds like digitizing those pins and converting them into NFTs that can be traded on chain and in an efficient digital manner that seems it's like a perfect application. I had no idea about the underlying tradition behind that, but makes a ton of sense to me.So let's go into rapid fire. Before we do that, I just want to give you some quick kudos. Look, I think we first met two to three months ago over a Zoom call. And so this is literally our second conversation ever. I did research into years story online, but hearing it come to life, there's a few things that really stand out. I think, one, that your willingness to really work hard and also try different things and take bets very early on in your career, but align those bets with things that you are really passionate about.So even if they were risky, you are doing them down these vectors where it was strong, passionate, and meaningful areas to you. And there's almost in a way you were going to will them into existence or make them work. And clearly you took a bet at the intersection of technology and art, which manifested in gaming that has really paid off.Something also stands out is within the category that you've bet on, in contrast to others that would just say, "Hey, I found myself in this unique opportunity. I'm able to open up doors to raise capital, build businesses." And instead of having the goal just be, "I want to make a lot of money," it is. Instead, "I want to bring delight to users. I have a unique expertise of what the gaming ecosystem, where it comes from and where it's going. And I know what users want. And I want to give them delights. And I'm going to enjoy the journey along the way."And I think that's probably something that we didn't get into, but this probably speaks to a reason why you've been able to recruit teams that build alongside you consistently, and investors that want to back you is because you're going to enjoy the journey. And I think when you focus on the end user and the experience and delight, the money is then going to follow versus going about it the other way. So it's clearly worked out incredibly well for you and very excited to see what you continue building next.Taehoon Kim:Thank you.Chris Erwin:Welcome. Let's go to rapid fire. So six questions, the rules are very straightforward. I'm going to ask six questions and the answers can be either one sentence, or maybe just one to two words. Do you understand the rules?Taehoon Kim:Yes.Chris Erwin:All right, here we go. What do you want to do less of in 2022?Taehoon Kim:Less of Zoom meetings, and more of in-person interactions.Chris Erwin:Got it. What one to two things drive your success?Taehoon Kim:I think it's the ability to read the market, ability to raise money, and then having the optimism to try new things and innovate on things that could be deemed risky.Chris Erwin:Got it. What advice do you have for gaming execs going into the second half of this year?Taehoon Kim:The advice would be to focus on making a fun game. There are a lot of game companies who are getting funded going to kind of play to earn or Web3 games, where they're kind of losing that kind of focus. But I think at the end of the day, the game should be fun. And if the games are able to create a community of gamers who really care about the game and their kind of community inside the game, then you can create an economy within the game that's not a bubble, that's sustainable.Chris Erwin:Well said. Any future startup ambitions?Taehoon Kim:I think AR and VR would make a comeback. It's a really difficult business to be in now, but if I kind of look decades into the future, I think that could be something that could be a new space that could be blossoming later on.Chris Erwin:Proudest life moment?Taehoon Kim:I think that would be a tie between when I got married to my wife and also when I had my twin boys in 2011.Chris Erwin:Oh, you're a father of twins. I'm actually a twin myself.Taehoon Kim:Oh, yeah, I have twin boys.Chris Erwin:Oh, that's the best. How old are they?Taehoon Kim:They're both 11.Chris Erwin:Very cool. TK, it's been a delight chatting with you. Thank you for being on The Come Up podcast.Taehoon Kim:Thank you so much. It was definitely a pleasure.Chris Erwin:All right. Quick heads up that our company has a new service offering. We just introduced RockWater Plus, which is for companies who want an ongoing consulting partner at a low monthly retainer, yet, also need a partner who can flex up for bigger projects when they arise. So who is this for? Well, three main stakeholders, one, operators who seek growth and better run operations. Two, investors who need help with custom industry research and diligence. And, three, leadership who wants a bolt-on strategy team and thought partner.So what is included with RockWater Plus? We do weekly calls to review KPIs or any ad hoc operational needs. We create KPI dashboards to do monthly performance tracking. We do ad hoc research ranging from customer surveys to case studies to white space analysis, financial modeling where we can understand your addressable market size, do P&L forecast, ROI analyses, even cash runway projections. We also do monthly trend reports to track new co-launches, M&A activity, partnerships activity in the space. And lastly, we make strategic introductions to new hires, investors for fundraising, and then also potential commercial strategic partnerships. So if any of this sounds appealing or you want to learn more, reach out to us at hello@wearerockwater.com. We can set a call with our leadership.All right. Lastly, we love to hear from our listeners. If you have any feedback on the show or any ideas for guests, shoot us a note at tcupod@wearerockwater.com. All right, that's it everybody. Thanks for listening.The Come Up is written and hosted by me, Chris Erwin, and is a production of RockWater Industries. Please rate and review this show on Apple Podcast. And remember to subscribe wherever you listen to our show. And if you really dig us, feel free to forward The Come Up to a Friend. You can sign up for our company newsletter at wearerockwater.com/newsletter. And you could follow us on Twitter, @tcupod. The Come Up is engineered by Daniel Tureck. Music is by Devon Bryant. Logo and branding is by Kevin Zazzali. And special thanks to Alex Zirin and Eric Kenigsberg from the RockWater team. 

Peer 2 Peer Real Estate's podcast
Show 270 : Digital Marketing For Real Estate Agents With Kurt Uhlir

Peer 2 Peer Real Estate's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 31:49


About Kurt :Kurt Uhlir is a globally-recognized marketer, operator, and speaker.As a dynamic and charismatic speaker on marketing and innovation, Kurt's speaking experience includes speeches across the United States and Europe in addition to presenting at prominent industry events such as PPAI, GDC, the White House, and private company/team workshops. He advises leaders, from startup founders to private-equity backed CEOs to the President of the United States.Kurt is a popular and entertaining commentator and has appeared on national television shows and periodicals including the Wired, TechCrunch, Thrive Global, USA Today, Business 2 Community, WGN Radio, NBC, and ABC. Reach out to him for a guest on marketing, real estate, or growing American based businesses.He's built and run businesses from start-up to over $500M annual revenue, assembled teams across six continents, been part of the small team leading an IPO ($880M), and participated in dozens of acquisitions.He is recognized for his proven ability to develop early-stage initiatives into thriving business enterprises and scale growing organizations through the power of B2B storytelling. Fundamentally, Kurt just wants to help people and create environments where people can flourish as themselves. This continues outside of work too, as he stewards a portion of his evenings and weekends to mentor and coach individuals and groups.Links From The Podcasthttps://www.instagram.com/kurtuhlir/https://www.youtube.com/c/KurtUhlirhttps://www.facebook.com/kurt.uhlirhttps://twitter.com/kurtuhlirhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/kurtuhlir/https://www.peer2peerrealestate.com/@Willliamp2pre (twitter)facebook.com/peer2peerrealestatehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/williemorales/Book(s)RecommendedRich Dad Poor Dad- Robert KiyosakiThank you Kurt for being on the podcast.What did you think about today's subject?Please go to apple podcasts look for us at peer 2 peer real estate podcast, please subscribe and leave a review.Don't give up on your dreams, fight for it and guard it.Keep the momentum going, Good things will happen.Thanks for listening and be safe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Game Dev Advice: The Game Developer's Podcast
Game Jams, Resiliency, Game Dev Resources, The Future, Mentors, Neurodiversity, Bodystorming, Tech Art, Networking, Art Automation, Anxiety, Mixed Reality, and AI with Angel Muniz

Game Dev Advice: The Game Developer's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 86:37


I welcome Angel Muniz, a 3D Generalist and Technical Artist who shares about her transition into the game industry, talking with Bungie, getting her first job, and going back to school. Hear career advice about how the art field is changing, creating automation, learning integration, and getting your first position. Learn about knowing your value, having mentors, passion & curiosity, and advancing your career. We then discuss hackathons, growing your skills, her VR portfolio, and her love of learning. Hear about emotional intelligence, politics, listening, bodystorming, and how we process information. Discover AI machine learning, building an experience to help with anxiety, XR, wearables, aerospace, and NASA.  Learn about integrating XR into education, roles outside of triple-A, different projects she's worked on, challenges around hiring, toxic environments, and thoughts on being neurodivergent. Hear about overwhelming job descriptions, changing skills, the metaverse, wantrepreneurs, reading the room, and not being critical when playing games.  Towards the end we talk about networking, connecting with the IGDA, Global Game Jam, the value of GDC, and the game dev community in Houston. Hear about games like Graveyard Keeper, kind words for this podcast, where to connect online, new tech battles, keeping your skills sharp, her mentor's advice on making progress each day, and info on my YouTube presentation about careers outside of traditional game development. Bio: Angel Muniz is originally from Texas, a former NASA JSC - Animation & Graphics Lab 3D Intern, who worked on growing the game industry in Houston —mainly in the XR field. Angel served as a Co-PI for a National Science Foundation Grant & Adjunct Professor for the Dynamic Reality Technology program (AAS in XR) at Coastal Alabama College. With a background in public speaking for high-performance art/PBR & optimization, she was a keynote speaker for the University of Pennsylvania, a guest lecturer at the University of Houston - Computer Science, Microsoft's HoloAcademy in Redmond, Immersive Tech Conference, IGDA, and more. For over 7 years, Angel has worked as a 3D Generalist and Technical Artist - CGI for Amazon AWS, TenGun, TYM Studio, Practical VR, Ong Innovations, and served as a consultant to many more. She's been a professional mentor for the game developer community co-creating and participating in boot camps, hackathons, and one-on-one sessions with artists and developers. She is currently building an application in XR and plans to apply for her 2nd NSF grant to fund her research in behavioral health, communication, and technology. Angel is an advocate for neurodiverse individuals in the field as she continues her work in the game industry. She is an avid learner and seeks to build and utilize new tools in automation for game art in the industry. Show Links: * Substance Designer website * SMU Guildhall website * Digipen website * NSF Grants website * Rain on Your Parade Steam * IGDA website * Global Game Jam website * GDC website * Graveyard Keeper website * The Survivalists Steam * Detroit: Become Human Wikipedia * Joowon Kim SMU Guildhall * Careers Options Beyond Traditional Game Development me on YouTube   Connect Links: *Angel Muniz LinkedIn *Angel Muniz website Game Dev Advice Links:  * Game Dev Advice Patreon: please help support the show if you find it useful * Game Dev Advice Twitter * Game Dev Advice email: info@gamedevadvice.com * Game Dev Advice website * Level Ex Careers: I'm hiring lots of roles! * Game Dev Advice hotline: (224) 484-7733 * Subscribe and go to the website for full show notes with links Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sounds Of Stadia
Sounds of Stadia #159 - The Stadia Shutdown Breakdown

Sounds Of Stadia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 73:15


In the aftermath that followed last week's Stadia closure announcement we round up all the news from across the industry. Refunds, Developer Stories and behind-the-scenes through Stadia's demise...00:00:24 - Welcome/Housekeeping00:03:09 - The XPass Podcast Reveal Announcement00:12:14 - The News! 00:12:54 - The Stadia Shutdown Fallout00:41:30 - Stadia Pro Billing Problems00:47:25 - Stadia Exclusive GYLT going multi-platform00:50:22 - Stadia Controllers going 3rd Party? 00:53:54 - Bungie Praise Stadia for WFH benefits00:57:36 - Hundred Days Dev working on Save Transfers00:58:33 - Elder Scrolls Online Save Transfers01:02:31 - Need for Speed Unbound had Stadia Code01:04:45  -Stadia's GDC 2019 Exhibit For Sale01:08:45 - Outro/Housekeeping#Stadia #GoogleStadia #NeedForSpeedWant more gaming content from Helix Cloud Games?

The Bobby Blackwolf Show
824 - 10/02/22 Bobby Blackwolf Show - Google Stadia To Shut Down In January 2023

The Bobby Blackwolf Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 57:47


Google Stadia is shutting down in January of 2023. When it was announced, there was a curious display at GDC that foretold this end. That display was auctioned for charity. Ubisoft will transfer purchases of Stadia content to PC. Other developers reported that they were not told about the shutdown - even the day before. Then we talk to Rob about E3 2023 and TwitchCon next week - where I am not going but he is.

Things Fall Apart
MINDFOOD II: Top 5 Cursed Problems in School

Things Fall Apart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 118:36


Welcome to our latest podcast series: MINDFOOD, easily digestible content for education.Enjoy our content? Leave us a review on your favorite podcast player...it makes a huge difference! (Also...one day both of our mic settings will be correct and this will sound just right!)Top 5 Cursed Problems in SchoolHello and welcome to Mindfood: a series of more casual content that's easily digestible. This episode is brought to you by Brad Latzke, Michelle Edwards, and Ann TrapassoSo what do I mean by Cursed Problems? Well…In 2019, Alex Jaffe gave a talk at GDC (that's the Game Developers Conference) called “Cursed Problems in Game Design”. Since the video was released in 2020 it has gotten over 600,000 views on YouTube. In the video he says that a game's essential experiences, why the player came to play, are the player promises. These promises exist both in the heart of the designer and the player: they are the reason a game exists, it's what we care about at a fundamental level.A cursed problem, then, is not merely a problem that is difficult to resolve, but is instead an unsolvable design problem, rooted in a conflict between core player promises. The promise of two things that cannot co-exist. The premises of the promises are fundamentally incompatible, they are in violation of one another. Oil and water. You cannot solve cursed problems, rather you have to innovate around them. The analogy to schools and schooling and the appeal of this discussion to us is if you replace player with student and game with school, it doesn't take much to realize that many of the promises of school are incompatible with one another, both in the minds of the designers - who often have specific objectives in mind - and in the student experience of the systems and mechanics of school. We thought today that we'd try to unpack the cursed problems of school, the promises of school in the minds of students and educators, the difference in the experience and objectives of school, and analyze what the potential solutions to these cursed problems sacrifice along the way. These are the central conflicts of schooling!This podcast is also available on video! See: https://www.youtube.com/c/HumanRestorationProject Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Potato Thumbs Podcast
EP 272: Only one of us is getting paid ft. RodimusPrime

Potato Thumbs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 124:26


This week our buddy RodimusPrime from the GDC Discord/Clan jumped in to say Hi!  It was a ton of fun having a new guest on the show.  Rodimus is a great community member in GDC and we had a ton of fun chatting with him last night.  I highly suggest adding him to your friends list and logging some PvE time with him.   Fitness contest kicks off next week! Private PVP Matches are back! Thanks for supporting the show! Check out our store... https://www.designbyhumans.com/shop/PotatoThumbsPodcast/  OMG we have a Discord! https://discord.gg/SYvh5jvsSH  Email Us PotatoThumbsPodcast@Gmail.com  Twitter https://twitter.com/PotatoThumbs  https://twitter.com/FluffyFingersMD  https://twitter.com/AdmiralNips  IG https://www.instagram.com/fluffyfingersmd  Spotify Playlists Day 1 Playlist https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3u37PzeFv04b3z6Uq5voCO?si=3c52ad41c94348a1  Day 2 Playlist https://open.spotify.com/playlist/65jrMS8NSxNW5I9IG27drM?si=500a009043b74a17  Day 3 Playlist https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2B3PydCdAhKvhdKfqssRIK?si=6d9adeba01d946eb 

Talk to the Internet
Google Stadia Canceled, Devs Screwed - Inside Games

Talk to the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 16:59


Tanks again to Noom for sponsoring this video! Click here https://noom.com/insidegames to take your free Noom Evaluation. Not like this, Google... not like this. Support Inside Games! Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/insidegamesYT YouTube Membership: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFHQlasvjQ0JMOHoKOz4c0g/join Lawrence: http://twitch.tv/sirlarr | Bruce: http://twitch.tv/brucegreene | Charlotte: http://twitch.tv/whatashow Edited by: Matt Peake | http://vimeo.com/mattpeake Written by: Lawrence Sonntag & Brian Gaar | https://www.twitch.tv/briangaar Sources -- [Google Blog] A message about Stadia and our long term streaming strategy - https://bit.ly/3EyXb47 [Eurogamer] Cyberpunk 2077 players request Stadia cloud saves from CD Projekt - https://bit.ly/3CyjJ3n [reddit] so... can CD Projekt Red PLEASE make cloud saving available for stadia as well? I cars more about my save game than a game refund - https://bit.ly/3rtzYIE [Twitter, IO Interactive] https://bit.ly/3fHHkFT [Axios] Google Stadia's shutdown sends blindsided developers scrambling - https://bit.ly/3V1ZYZd [Twitter, Ubisoft Support] https://bit.ly/3C6lP97 [9 to 5 Google] How to export & download your game saves from Google Stadia - https://bit.ly/3M4NVGt [Twitter, Destiny Bulletin] https://bit.ly/3V5Av0Q [Twitter, Tom Vian] https://bit.ly/3V4Zf9y [Twitter, Mike Rose] https://bit.ly/3SEbf03 [Brandon Scheffield] https://bit.ly/3M91y7v [Kotaku] All The Games We Might Lose Forever When Google Stadia Dies - https://bit.ly/3yhb0jy [Q-Games] Google Stadia Closure and the Future of PixelJunk Raiders - https://bit.ly/3C1PEYk [Tequila Works] Terrific news for GYLT fans - https://bit.ly/3CxOxRG [Ars Technica] Stadia controllers could become e-waste unless Google issues Bluetooth update - https://bit.ly/3EyXEDp [Sega Bits] Google Stadia takes shots at SEGA Dreamcast before GDC reveal - https://bit.ly/3fJ0ISF [Kotaku] Google Confirms All The Stuff Stadia Won't Have At Launch - https://bit.ly/3RvFipy [ShackNews] Cyberpunk 2077 player having a great time... on Stadia??! - https://bit.ly/3rxxBEQ [Comicbook] Cyberpunk 2077 Boss Laughs After Being Asked About Sales on Google Stadia - https://bit.ly/3fBpzI5

Dental Leaders Podcast
#152- You Can't Handle the Tooth! Gary Monaghan

Dental Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 77:18


If you've ever feared a call from the GDC or falling foul of today's increasingly litigious working environment, this episode is for you.   Payman sits down for a chat with medical and dental indemnity expert Gary Monaghan about the challenges of covering the profession.   Gary talks about his early experience in plastic surgery and the parallels with dentistry. He reveals how his indemnity service PDI assesses risk, discusses defensive dentistry and describes what happens when the GDC calls.   Enjoy!   02.45 - Backstory 06.40 - The surgical landscape 09.01 - The mutual model 12.34 - Dental Vs surgical indemnity 25.19 - Risk profiles and management 35.20 - A shoulder to cry on 41.55 - Call records 44.28 - Assessing risk and underwriting 48.18 - Iron-manning mutuals 53.30 - On fear 55.40 - The economic climate 57.31 - The future of PDI 59.48 - Educating clients 01.02.15 - Refusing cover and defensive dentistry 01.07.44 - Fantasy dinner party 01.10.41 - Last days and legacy About Gary Monaghan Gary Monaghan has been at the helm of several insured indemnity providers in the medical field. He is the co-founder of Professional Dental Indemnity ( PDI), specialising in cover for dental professionals. Gary has provided cover for thousands of clinicians over a career spanning more than two decades and is widely considered an innovator in the field.

Nice Games Club
Postmortem: "Scrapeboard" (with Frank DeMarco and Blake Andrews)

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


This week, a behind-the-scenes look into the game that uses a skateboard deck as a controller! Scrapebopard combines elements of rhythm, racing, and fighting games to create a unique boss attack experience. What's it like playtesting unique hardware? How much did they learn about electronics and wiring? How difficult was it to demo the game at alt.ctrl.GDC? What's next for the game? We explore these questions and more in this interview. Postmortem: "Scrapeboard" EventsGame DesignHardwareElectric Scrapeboard - Shake That ButtonMakey MakeyAbout formalism - Dario D'Ambra, Game DeveloperGame Dev Tools for Raspberry PiBabycastlesWondervillePlaytest Thursdays - NYU Game CenterCome Out & Play Festival"A Work of Art Is Never Finished, Merely Abandoned" - Quote InvestigatorFrank DeMarcoGuestBlake AndrewsGuest

Koalatea Time: The K.O. Koala Entertainment Podcast
#111 – NEW DEV ALERT: The Nico Goobcast

Koalatea Time: The K.O. Koala Entertainment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 50:33


One fateful Spring San Francisco night, a cold-Naan-breaded Nico ventured out of his hotel room to warm his food. Little did he know that the next few hours would change his life forever.... WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST 3D ARTIST, NICO BOYADJIAN! Join us as we share the story of that fateful GDC evening, Nico's art journey (so far), what he'll be doing at K.O. Koala, and so much more! This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Topic Lords
147. Part-Time Cryptids

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 60:04


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Laura * https://twitter.com/lmichet/ * Nick * http://nicknicknicknick.net/ Topics: * Can the biological function of expelling waste be improved in any way? Should humans expel waste differently? * The Hobbit: Dopesmoker Edition. (it's great) * Gato Gonzales and the Guts Pose * Nick at the Montreal Screwjob: https://imgur.com/a/45Opfxq * The Fish, by Elizabeth Bishop * https://poets.org/poem/fish-2 * Twitter's UI has changed "Top 3" and "Top Fives" into "Top Four" * Every Monday, when you wake up in the morning, you discover that you have grown EXACTLY one millimeter taller. This continues throughout your life, so you will grow about 5.6 centimeters per year for the rest of the time you are alive. In ten years, you will be 1.8 feet taller than you are now. If you are 30 years old right now, you will be 7.3 feet taller when you reach 70. If you are 5.5 feet tall now, you will be 7 feet tall in just over 8 years, at which point you will start to look really weird. How does this change your life? What do you do about it? There is no cure for this condition, because it is caused by magic, not science, and there is no countercurse. Microtopics: * The type of band that has four songs per album. * Creating ambient soundscapes via a series of guitar pedals. * Johnny To. * Interpersonal violence and the right to be perceived as human. * A world where everyone knows Judo for some reason and they fight each other with Judo all the time. * The quality of life edge that birds have over humans (their urine to feces ratio) * A nozzle in your wrist like spider man so you can poop into the tiny hole in the wall that everyone's house has for wrist poop nozzles. * Improving the human condition with a wall hole and maybe a wall tank. * Burying a pile of trash but also putting a photograph and a floppy disk in there so if you ever get in trouble for your pile of trash you can claim it's a time capsule. * How geniuses empty dumpsters. * Everyone taking the first Monday of the month off of work to poop and at 6pm the city's plumbing system explodes. * How to monetize pooping teens. * American poor being condemned to a low quality poop zone whereas in Europe they have luxury poop villas. * Locking your dumpster so it's not filled with old carpet overnight by marauding carpet installers. * A Person on Twitter. * Playing a stoner album at the same time as a stoner movie. * An album/movie combo entirely bereft of revelatory synchronicities. * The most wrinkly hobbit. * Whether Gandalf was actually smoking something or if that's just something people joke about. * Brian Moriarty's multiple GDC talks about looking for secrets where there are none. * Writing a classic rock album intended to be played simultaneously with Boss Baby 2. * Rodolfo "Gato" Gonzales's legacy in Japan. * What the Guts Pose means to you. * Assigning elaborate meaning to each fist in a fist pump. * Henry Cavill reloading his fists. * Playing Rock Paper Scissors with Mario whenever he collects a moon. * A little head tilt to get you in the right mood to pick up rocks. * Whether Guts Berserk is named after Guts. * Elden Ring as Berserk fanfic. * Understanding and enjoying Elden Ring in a new way. * Attending the Montreal Screw-Job but not having any idea what's going on. * Taking a photo to prove you were at a historical event but the flash just reflects off the bald head of the guy in front of you. * A poem describing a fish. * A five-haired beard of wisdom. * A poem with fantastic mouth feel. * Catching a fish while dad is in the bathroom and screaming at him to hurry up because you don't know what to do with a fish. * Downloading a poem to your hard drive. * A good idea or at least a fun idea. * Whether you can believe the web design on this whitehouse.gov. * Killing software like only a 90s dad can. * Eating nachos every night. * Wanting to do things in fours because on Twitter you can attach four images to a post. * Top Four Favorite Sandwiches. * Refusing to share your top anythings. * That time Nintendo burned a hole in the palms of millions of children. * The ways Pokemon Go encourages you to put your phone down. * The kinds of places that society benefits from Pokemon Go not being played. * The Pokestop Review Process. * Two excellent reasons not to ship the Virtual Boy as a helmet. * VR chaperones. * Being okay with growing too tall but only if you have friends who are also growing way too tall. * Small inconvenient things about growing taller. * A cryptic giant living on a mountaintop. * Being 10 feet tall and retired and figuring out how to live in a normal sized house. * Doing CSG with caves and shirts. * Modular clothes that you can reconfigure to cover your changing body. * A wisp of a person with an eternal tube sweater. * Not wanting to become a spaghetti but respecting anybody who wants to become a spaghetti. * Growing to twice your adult height and getting cast as the monster in every horror movie.

The Tyranny of Thumbs
Mutazione

The Tyranny of Thumbs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 111:58


I am in the middle of gardening in my Mutazione game about to close it out, and my shirtless husband brings me a pizza (not asked for) with a beer as I achieve a Euphoric melody in the treetops. So how is your day going?   Hannah Nicklin's GDC talk "Multiple Middles & Mutazione" referenced during this episode: https://youtu.be/OUlwwBNESpU   ________________________________________________________________________ Would you believe it? We've elevated our Instagram to something we actually use!!! Check it out for updates on our latest podcast and some silly screenshots (maybe sorta sometimes at least). We might even use it for other purposes too. How cool is that?   If you have a question or just want to talk some smack about how poorly we did this week you can hit us up on our email: tyrannyofthumbs@gmail.com   Oh! And IF YOU LIKED THE SHOW BUT UNDER NO OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES feel free to drop us a 5 star rating on iTunes (or wherever your local podcasts are sold)    

Crazy Sh*t In Real Estate with Leigh Brown
357 - A Comprehensive Guide To Building A Powerful Brand Identity For Realtors® with Kurt Uhlir

Crazy Sh*t In Real Estate with Leigh Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 24:09


Discover the keys to real estate success with Kurt Uhlir as he shares practical tips for creating a strong personal brand and cultivating positive client relationships. He also tells a bizarre but endearing story of how an agent helped him and his family. Listen in and use the information from this episode to stand out in the fiercely competitive field of real estate professionals!   Key takeaways to listen for Factors that prevent Realtors® from establishing their individual brands Personal branding: Common Realtor® mistakes and solutions  Why Realtors® should avoid sounding overly eager to sell when contacting clients How to easily convince clients to subscribe to listing alerts    Resources mentioned in this episode Keller Williams - Command Compass Real Estate eXp Realty National Association of REALTORS® Zillow   About Kurt Uhlir Kurt is a globally-recognized marketer, operator, and speaker. His speaking experience includes speeches across the United States and Europe and presenting at prominent industry events such as PPAI, GDC, the White House, and private company/team workshops. He advises leaders, from startup founders to private-equity-backed CEOs to the President of the United States. He has built and managed businesses from startup to over $500M in annual revenue, put together teams on six continents, been a member of the small group in charge of an IPO, and taken part in numerous acquisitions. Through B2B storytelling, he has demonstrated the ability to scale growing organizations and transform early-stage initiatives into successful business enterprises.   Connect with Kurt Website: Kurt Uhlir | Showcase IDX Facebook: Showcase IDX Twitter: @KurtUhlir LinkedIn: Kurt Uhlir Email: kurt@showcaseidx.com   Connect with Leigh Please subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or the Podcasts App on your phone, and never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting https://leighbrown.com. DM Leigh Brown on Instagram @ LeighThomasBrown. Subscribe to Leigh's other podcast Real Estate From The Rooftops   Sponsor Leigh Brown University – New On-Demand TrainingHow to Dominate During This Recession! Enroll Now to get ahead of the curve and learn how to manage changing markets, the action steps for what to do, and most importantly, what to say so that you can secure listings, assist more buyers, and grow your business no matter what the market is doing. Link: http://dominatethisrecession.com

Super Switch Headz
The Future of E3 and Fan Conventions - #170

Super Switch Headz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 101:50


Summer Rain joins to talk about E3 returning in 2023 with ReedPop running the show, other gaming conventions, and convention culture in general. As always we cover all the recent Nintendo news and rumors including the Mario Strikers update, new NSO games, wild F-Zero rumors, and much more. We close the episode with the games we've been playing. Listen to Super Switch Headz on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, YouTube or wherever you enjoy podcasts. 0:00:00 Introduction 0:07:53 News and Rumors 0:28:53 E3 and Conventions 1:21:34 Games We're Playing Discord: https://discord.com/invite/CWbF4gb Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/switchheadz Website: http://www.switchheadz.com/

Guardian Down Cast
Ep 156: "Three Years of Destiny Podcasting" ft Hades

Guardian Down Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 232:10


Welcome to Guardian Down Cast: A Destiny Podcast...if you love to play the game Destiny 2, you've come to the right place.  We're a couple of a gamer dads that have played Destiny since that Day 1 release back in 2014 and we're just as passionate about it today as we were back then.  We share the stories of Destiny content creators and community members and also discuss key topics/news within the game and community. This week, we celebrate 3 years of podcasting GDC and we have a real treat this week...we have the boisterous Brit that actually lives in Wales and we have a fantastic Destiny 2 discussion that let's say, Gatr doesn't win...again!  We answer community questions, share the latest news from Bungie and whatever you do, don't miss out on the 3 year celebration at the end of the show...I think you'll love it!   guardiandowncast.com ...join in the conversation in our GDC Discord Join our Bungie Clan Want to leave us a voicemail for the show? Become a Patron Gatr YouTube Channel Hazel GDC Instagram Join us on Twitter...  Help support the show...GDC Designed by Humans Tees, etc. iTunes Music Playlist GDC Spotify Song Playlist      

The Life Of KG
Episode 112. Lisa Johnson. How she scaled her salon 380% within two years.

The Life Of KG

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 42:39


Lisa Johnson, owner of Infinite Beauty Therapy in Kempston, Bedfordshire. Her business has grown by a massive 380% in just 2 years after learning how to delegate and build teams. Her business has blown up and we are looking forward to hearing her story and sharing her hints & tips on growth. . . . July Sponsors L.A Cosmetics Teeth whitening academy allows individuals to successfully build their own teeth whitening business without delving into dentistry and coming under the remit of the GDC. We work completely in line with cosmetic ordinance and allow specialists to have the exclusive rights to our 1 hour teeth whitening product in conjunction with our strong activation light. Our formula consists of the UKs latest whitening agent which has effectively whitened millions of teeth worldwide with no sensitivity or damage, best of all it vegan friendly. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/la_teethwhitening/ Website: www.teethwhiteningtraining.co.uk TNB Skills Training Having owned five incredible successful Hair, Nail, and Beauty Salons between them, Sarah and Julie teamed up to create TNB Skills Training, a training academy with the goal of helping other salon owners to have increased freedom, moving away from the salon floor to have more time to spend on the things they want.  Sarah and Julie promote an honest, fair, and safe environment to work in. Their aim is to promote team spirit as they help their stylists and therapists to grow and reach their full potential. Our funded apprenticeships now come with exclusive access to the High Performance Stylist Platform – learn from industry leading figures who grew their salon business to over 7 figures! Apply now quoting KGPodcast https://tnbskillstraining.co.uk/contact/

Life in Happy Valley - A Community Podcast
007 - Business Spotlight | Good Day Cafe

Life in Happy Valley - A Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 4:42


This episode I get to sit down with Cody and LaRae from Good Day Cafe! We talk about what makes GDC different then other local coffee shops in town, some different items they offer, and some fun things they have coming up this summer! Check out their website - https://www.gooddaycafe.org for more information! #gooddaycafe #coffeewithacause #supportlocal #lifeinhappyvalley #supportourcommunity

The Life Of KG
Episode 111. Sophie Mason. The Power Of Building A Community.

The Life Of KG

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 34:06


We talk all about building a community and how important that is to grow within a business. I'm Sophie and I have been in the beauty industry for over 14 years. I have managed leading medi-spas and built my own successful lash business. After seeing a gap in the business education side of the beauty industry, I decided to create an event and online platform to help ambitious beauty professionals to reach financial independence. Welcome LashFest. I'm also a business mentor for successful beauty pros that are looking to reach the next level in the business. The beauty industry has some of the most entrepreneurial women in it and I want to support as many as I can in reaching their version of success. . . . July Sponsors L.A Cosmetics Teeth whitening academy allows individuals to successfully build their own teeth whitening business without delving into dentistry and coming under the remit of the GDC. We work completely in line with cosmetic ordinance and allow specialists to have the exclusive rights to our 1 hour teeth whitening product in conjunction with our strong activation light. Our formula consists of the UKs latest whitening agent which has effectively whitened millions of teeth worldwide with no sensitivity or damage, best of all it vegan friendly. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/la_teethwhitening/ Website: www.teethwhiteningtraining.co.uk TNB Skills Training Having owned five incredible successful Hair, Nail, and Beauty Salons between them, Sarah and Julie teamed up to create TNB Skills Training, a training academy with the goal of helping other salon owners to have increased freedom, moving away from the salon floor to have more time to spend on the things they want.  Sarah and Julie promote an honest, fair, and safe environment to work in. Their aim is to promote team spirit as they help their stylists and therapists to grow and reach their full potential. Our funded apprenticeships now come with exclusive access to the High Performance Stylist Platform – learn from industry leading figures who grew their salon business to over 7 figures! Apply now quoting KGPodcast https://tnbskillstraining.co.uk/contact/

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine

Microsoft and Nintendo slash prices, Steam enters the game retail business & Germany thinks about banning Counter Strike These stories and many more on this episode of the VGNRTM This episode we will look back at the biggest stories in and around the video game industry in May 2002. As always, we'll mostly be using magazine cover dates, and those are of course always a bit behind the actual events. Get us on your mobile device: Android: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly92aWRlb2dhbWVuZXdzcm9vbXRpbWVtYWNoaW5lLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz iOS: https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/video-game-newsroom-time-machine And if you like what we are doing here at the podcast, don't forget to like us on your podcasting app of choice, YouTube, and/or support us on patreon! https://www.patreon.com/VGNRTM Send comments on twitter @videogamenewsr2 Or Instagram https://www.instagram.com/vgnrtm Or videogamenewsroomtimemachine@gmail.com Links: 7 Minutes in Heaven: Hooter's Road Trip Video Version: https://www.patreon.com/posts/68879534 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooters_Road_Trip https://www.mobygames.com/game/hooters-road-trip Corrections: April 2002 Ep - https://www.patreon.com/posts/april-2002-67235902 Turns out our Department of Corrections got it wrong and F-Zero AX was published by Sega: https://www.mobygames.com/game/arcade/f-zero-ax https://web.archive.org/web/20050909152548/f-zero.jp/f-zero_ax/index.html 2002: GBA to go online Edge 110 pg. 17 https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/54188-gameboy-owners-will-surf-the-web https://web.archive.org/web/20060321032545/http://www.x-trafun.com/home.htm Gameboy gets game downloader Edge 110 pg. 22 Sega licenses ports to THQ Edge 110 pg. 22 https://www.mobygames.com/game/altered-beast-guardian-of-the-realms Nintendo cuts price of GBA https://archive.org/details/gamepro-issue-164-may-2002/page/n31/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_Boy_Advance Microsoft cuts price of Xbox in Europe https://archive.org/details/MicromaniaTerceraEpocaSpanishIssue88/page/n10/mode/1up?view=theater http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/1936791.stm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xbox_(console) Xbox has the force https://archive.org/details/Computer_and_Video_Games_Issue_0246/page/10/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/star-wars-knights-of-the-old-republic GDC subdued Edge 110 pg. 10 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_Developers_Conference Steam starts selling games https://archive.org/details/pcgames200205/page/n9/mode/1up?view=theater Edge 110 pg. 18 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_(service) Sims sales numbers confirmation https://archive.org/details/pcgames200205/page/n10/mode/1up?view=theater https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sims_(video_game) German authorities consider Counter Strike ban https://archive.org/details/pcgames200205/page/n10/mode/1up?view=theater https://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/web/erfurter-schulmorde-killer-spiel-counterstrike-wird-nicht-indiziert-a-196419.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counter-Strike Netflix is growing by leaps and bounds https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netflix#Launch_as_a_mail-based_rental_business_(1997%E2%80%932006) https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_214/page/n44/mode/1up?view=theater Angel of Darkness previewed Edge 110 https://www.mobygames.com/game/lara-croft-tomb-raider-the-angel-of-darkness/mobyrank Software 2000 is no more https://archive.org/details/pcgames200205/page/n27/mode/1up?view=theater https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_2000 Recommended Links: The History of How We Play: https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/ Gaming Alexandria: https://www.gamingalexandria.com/wp/ They Create Worlds: https://tcwpodcast.podbean.com/ Digital Antiquarian: https://www.filfre.net/ The Arcade Blogger: https://arcadeblogger.com/ Retro Asylum: http://retroasylum.com/category/all-posts/ Retro Game Squad: http://retrogamesquad.libsyn.com/ Playthrough Podcast: https://playthroughpod.com/ Retromags.com: https://www.retromags.com/ Sound Effects by Ethan Johnson of History of How We Play. Copyright Karl Kuras Find out on the VGNRTM https://www.patreon.com/posts/68880588  

Triple Click
Story vs. Gameplay

Triple Click

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 61:46 Very Popular


Story or gameplay... WHO WINS? This week, the Triple Click gang dives into an age-old debate and discusses the tension between action and narrative in video games. What does a "video game story" actually mean? What's more important, story or gameplay? And does it even really matter?One More Thing: Kirk: Vampire Survivors Maddy: First KillJason: AI: THE SOMNIUM FILES - nirvanA InitiativeLinks:Clint Hocking's “Ludonarrative Dissonance in BioShock” - https://clicknothing.typepad.com/click_nothing/2007/10/ludonarrative-d.htmlHocking's 2011 GDC talk “Dynamics: State of the Art” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=St2fE049ULIKirk's “Gameplay and Story are Exactly like Music and Lyrics” - https://kotaku.com/gameplay-and-story-are-exactly-like-music-and-lyrics-5885432Stephen Payne's excellent Dicebreaker article about ancient role-playing and strategy games: https://www.dicebreaker.com/categories/roleplaying-game/feature/dnd-influences-roleplaying-games-centuriesSupport Triple Click: http://maximumfun.org/joinBuy a Triple Click t-shirt: https://topatoco.com/collections/maximum-fun/products/maxf-tc-tclogo-shJoin the Triple Click Discord: http://discord.gg/tripleclickpodTriple Click Ethics Policy: https://maximumfun.org/triple-click-ethics-policy/

She Plays Games Podcast
Kelly Wallick (CEO / Founder - Indie Megabooth / Partner / Community Builder - 1Up Fund)

She Plays Games Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 47:13


Kelly is the Founder and CEO of Indie Megabooth as well as a Partner and Community Developer at the 1Up fund which is a Venture fund company setup by former Microsoft VP Ed Fries which works to finance diverse talent in the indie dev scene. This episode we talk about her experience deciding what games get funding, celebrating and HOSTING her last ever Independent Games Festival Event at GDC in April, and helping to shape Glaad's video game division. This is Episode 85 of She Plays Games.

The Life Of KG
Episode 110. Katie talks all about goal setting! We are half way through the year.

The Life Of KG

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 14:03


We are half way through the year. Have you hit your goals you wrote down in January? Are you half way to hitting them goals? If not, then let Katie help you so you end this year on a high and how you planned out. DM katie on kg_katiegodfrey to get your goal setting planner today! ………. ………. June Sponsors. TNB Skills Training Having owned five incredible successful Hair, Nail, and Beauty Salons between them, Sarah and Julie teamed up to create TNB Skills Training, a training academy with the goal of helping other salon owners to have increased freedom, moving away from the salon floor to have more time to spend on the things they want.  Sarah and Julie promote an honest, fair, and safe environment to work in. Their aim is to promote team spirit as they help their stylists and therapists to grow and reach their full potential. Our funded apprenticeships now come with exclusive access to the High Performance Stylist Platform – learn from industry leading figures who grew their salon business to over 7 figures! Apply now quoting KGPodcast https://tnbskillstraining.co.uk/contact/ . . L.A Cosmetics Teeth whitening L.A Cosmetics Teeth whitening academy allows individuals to successfully build their own teeth whitening business without delving into dentistry and coming under the remit of the GDC. We work completely in line with cosmetic ordinance and allow specialists to have the exclusive rights to our 1 hour teeth whitening product in conjunction with our strong activation light. Our formula consists of the UKs latest whitening agent which has effectively whitened millions of teeth worldwide with no sensitivity or damage, best of all it vegan friendly. Quote: kgpodcast for £500 off   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/la_teethwhitening/ Website: www.teethwhiteningtraining.co.uk

Nice Games Club
Nice Thinking: "A Local Indies Tournament"

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


It's a packed episode this week, with birthdays, illnesses, and some Nice Thinking. Stephen, Mark, and Ellen discuss how the group might put on a tournament for local gamers, featuring locally-made indie games. How can one create a competition that involves many different games of widely different genres? Hopefully your nice hosts are up to the challenge. Either way, you're in for a treat! Plus, we get to finally hear Stephen's TRUE feelings about Star Trek.Prehistoric Planet on Apple TV - BBCThe Man Who Fell To Earth - ShowtimeStar Trek: Strange New Worlds - ParamountCOVID 19 Quarantine and Isolation Calculator - Centers for Disease ControlAlternate titles for this episode:"It finally got me""Lil' Baby Stephen"Episode artwork from RODNAE Productions on Pexels. Nice Thinking 0:13:12 Mark LaCroixEventsElemetals: Death Metal Death Match - WALLRIDE, SteamAstral Gunners - Sati Bros, SteamHyperDot - Charles McGregor, SteamSummer Games Done QuickCombo Breaker TournamentEVO Tournament"Challenges and Strategies for Hosting Massive Independent eSports Events" - James Lampkin, GDC

Nice Games Club
Nice Thinking: "A Local Indies Tournament"

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


It's a packed episode this week, with birthdays, illnesses, and some Nice Thinking. Stephen, Mark, and Ellen discuss how the group might put on a tournament for local gamers, featuring locally-made indie games. How can one create a competition that involves many different games of widely different genres? Hopefully your nice hosts are up to the challenge. Either way, you're in for a treat! Plus, we get to finally hear Stephen's TRUE feelings about Star Trek.Prehistoric Planet on Apple TV - BBCThe Man Who Fell To Earth - ShowtimeStar Trek: Strange New Worlds - ParamountCOVID 19 Quarantine and Isolation Calculator - Centers for Disease ControlAlternate titles for this episode:"It finally got me""Lil' Baby Stephen"Episode artwork from RODNAE Productions on Pexels. Nice Thinking 0:13:12 Mark LaCroixEventsElemetals: Death Metal Death Match - WALLRIDE, SteamAstral Gunners - Sati Bros, SteamHyperDot - Charles McGregor, SteamSummer Games Done QuickCombo Breaker TournamentEVO Tournament"Challenges and Strategies for Hosting Massive Independent eSports Events" - James Lampkin, GDC

Non Toxic Environments Home Health & Wellness

It's amazing for me to think about when I started GDC way back in 1992 and what we would have accomplished by now.  Im so lucky to have such wonderful customers, listeners and friends and family who have supported me  and my dream all these years.  For today's show, I spend spme time reflecting on these past 30 years and why I'm so excited about the next 30. 

Nice Games Club
Machine Learning (with Anna-Lena Pontet and Luzia Hüttenmoser)

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


At GDC, your nice hosts met and spoke with this week's returning guests. We were so impressed with their project "[i] doesn't exist," we wanted to have them on a full episode to talk about the unique machine learning system they built for it. Be nice and have a listen!LUAL Games on Twitter"[i] doesn't exist" demo - itch.io[I] doesn't exist - a modern text adventure - KickstarterIf you're in Sweden, Lu and Al and their game will be at Arctic Game Week next week, May 25-28, 2022. We first met Lu and Al and spoke with them for a recent episode: GDC 2022 Special (Part 2)Some meta news: Mark wrote a song for this year's Charity EP Jam, which is actually a double-length album! All proceeds go to Able Gamers. Machine Learning NarrativeProgrammingSimulated AI creatures demonstrate how mind and body evolve and succeed together - Devin Coldewey, TechCrunchWhat is GitHub Copilot? An AI Pair Programmer for Everyone - Daniel Diaz, SitepointGithub Copilot Wants to Play Chess Instead of Code - Ido Nov, DagsHub BlogChat MapperBotpressDocumentation as a gateway to open source - James Turnbull, IncrementMiddle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor Makes AI Meaningful and Menacing - Andy Brice, GamingBoltAnna-Lena PontetGuestLuzia HüttenmoserGuest

Nice Games Club
Machine Learning (with Anna-Lena Pontet and Luzia Hüttenmoser)

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


At GDC, your nice hosts met and spoke with this week's returning guests. We were so impressed with their project "[i] doesn't exist," we wanted to have them on a full episode to talk about the unique machine learning system they built for it. Be nice and have a listen!LUAL Games on Twitter"[i] doesn't exist" demo - itch.io[I] doesn't exist - a modern text adventure - KickstarterIf you're in Sweden, Lu and Al and their game will be at Arctic Game Week next week, May 25-28, 2022. We first met Lu and Al and spoke with them for a recent episode: GDC 2022 Special (Part 2)Some meta news: Mark wrote a song for this year's Charity EP Jam, which is actually a double-length album! All proceeds go to Able Gamers. Machine Learning NarrativeProgrammingSimulated AI creatures demonstrate how mind and body evolve and succeed together - Devin Coldewey, TechCrunchWhat is GitHub Copilot? An AI Pair Programmer for Everyone - Daniel Diaz, SitepointGithub Copilot Wants to Play Chess Instead of Code - Ido Nov, DagsHub BlogChat MapperBotpressDocumentation as a gateway to open source - James Turnbull, IncrementMiddle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor Makes AI Meaningful and Menacing - Andy Brice, GamingBoltAnna-Lena PontetGuestLuzia HüttenmoserGuest

Amplify Your Process Safety
Episode 56 - Implementing EPA's General Duty Clause (GDC)

Amplify Your Process Safety

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 26:08


In a previous episode (#52), Mat Todaro, an attorney who specializes in enforcement defense, talked with us about EPA's General Duty Clause (GDC) at a high level. In this companion episode, Molly and Rob dive into the specific requirements of EPA's GDC, and point out its similarities and differences to OSHA's Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation and EPA's Risk Management Plan (RMP) regulation. Be sure to check out the resources we've gathered below regarding EPA's GDC, or reach out to us with any questions you might have related to your facility and EPA's GDC by sending us an email at info@amplifyconsultants.com. Episode 52 - EPA's General Duty Clause with Guest Mathew Todaro The General Duty Clause Fact Sheet (pdf) (April 2020) Guidance for Implementation of the General Duty Clause: Clean Air Act Section 112(r)(1), May 2000 (pdf) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amplifyyourprocesssafety/message