Podcasts about Workspace

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  • 1,013PODCASTS
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  • Jan 23, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Workspace

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Latest podcast episodes about Workspace

Infinitum
Kovid fest

Infinitum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 72:44


Ep 174FUp: The most powerful iMac G4 ever made. Modification and Hackintosh (hvala, Jovan LukićFUp: Apple loses second key chip engineer, this time to MicrosoftMicrosoft Releases Office for Mac Update With Full Apple Silicon Support in ExceliOS 15.2.1 and iPadOS 15.2.1 Fix Messages Bug and HomeKit VulnerabilityApple Floated as Potential Buyer of PelotonGruber: Leaker Sinks Peloton Stock With Confidential InformationApple CEO Tim Cook personally lobbying against the American Innovation and Choice Online ActApple submits plan to allow alternative App Store payment systems in South KoreaPUBG developer sues Apple over alleged rip-offs being sold in the App StoreApple Music is second worldwide with 15% market shareGoogle requiring all ‘G Suite legacy free edition' users to start paying for Workspace this yeariCloud+ with custom email domain.TidBITS o prednostima i manamaDruge opcije:ProtonMailFastMailTutanota (hvala, Ivan Jelić)Mark Flider: 15 years ago, Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone. It was probably the best presentation ever made, by anyone.It used custom animations that I wrote just for him.And Keynote (the presentation software he used, and I worked on) hard crashed both the main and backup machine. Oops!ZahvalniceSnimljeno 22.1.2022.Uvodna muzika by Vladimir Tošić, stari sajt je ovde.Logotip by Aleksandra Ilić.Artwork epizode by Saša Montiljo, njegov kutak na Devianartu.Skrivenost/Latency2010.ulje na platnu/oil on canvas80 x 60 cmprivatno vlasništvo/private collection

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Se acabó G-Suite gratuito / El Patreon de Instagram / Viajes turísticos en VTOL / Google Play Games para PC / Garmin Fenix 7 / Wine 7.0 / Bug feo en Android Auto Patrocinador: Cuidado con las Macros Ocultas https://www.cuidadoconlasmacrosocultas.com/ es un podcast de divulgación tecnológica para empresas impulsado por Cuatroochenta que responde a preguntas clave de nuestra época en cada episodio: ¿Cómo es un ciberataque desde dentro?, ¿cuál es el impacto medioambiental de la nube?, ¿qué cambiará realmente la IA? — Suscríbete en Spotify https://open.spotify.com/episode/1IyJTLfo2XlrwNwwm0q2gp?si=2gOAVIqdR3yDHLlRU3CX5g, Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/es/podcast/cuidado-con-las-macros-ocultas/id1582767310?i=1000547511042, Ivoox https://www.ivoox.com/m05-automatismos-robots-avatares-el-nuevo-digital-audios-mp3_rf_80668395_1.html, Google https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9vbW55LmZtL3Nob3dzL2N1aWRhZG8tY29uLWxhcy1tYWNyb3Mtb2N1bHRhcy9wbGF5bGlzdHMvcG9kY2FzdC5yc3M/episode/ZjgxYjg5MDQtODAyYi00MjI5LTk3Y2ItYWUwODAwOTdhZWVi?ep=14, etc. Se acabó G-Suite gratuito / El Patreon de Instagram / Viajes turísticos en VTOL / Google Play Games para PC / Garmin Fenix 7 / Wine 7.0 / Bug feo en Android Auto

THE INTENTIONAL EDIT PODCAST - Simplify your life and home by creating routines, maximizing systems and decluttering!
Episode 24 - How to Organize Your Home Office for Maximum Productivity and an Efficient Workspace

THE INTENTIONAL EDIT PODCAST - Simplify your life and home by creating routines, maximizing systems and decluttering!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 29:34


It doesn't matter if you are working from home or back to the office, the guidelines for an organized workspace are the same.  Learn why a clutter free desk is the best place to get your work done.  Use the tips in this episode to organize your home office to increase your productivity and feel less stressed.  Make sure you subscribe so that you never miss an episode of The Intentional Edit Podcast.  If you are struggling with daily tasks, clutter, organization, and finding any sort of work/life balance, The Intentional Edit Podcast is for you.  It's time to stop the chaos and create a life you love by implementing systems that put an end to the overwhelming, unorganized parts of life and finally, bring simplicity to your life and home. Now is the time to say goodbye to overwhelm, get organized and create systems so that you can live your best life at home and beyond.  Simplify your life and home by creating routines, maximizing systems and decluttering!     Connect with Lauren at www.intentionaledit.com or @intentionaledit on Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook and TikTok

What's the Secret?
3 Tools to Get More Done

What's the Secret?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 14:09


Are you looking to get more done in less time? Well, you're in luck! In today's episode, I'm sharing three of my current favorite tools and a book that has helped me get more done in my business. These are things I'm using each and every day that have drastically changed my workflow and allowed me to get more done in less time. Whether you are an entrepreneur that works alone or someone who works with a team, what I'm sharing with you today is going to open your eyes and make you think a little differently about time productivity. These resources have helped me get a crystal-clear view of how I manage my time, how I view what is productive and unproductive, and what that means to me personally. Tune in this week and learn how to get more done in 2022! “We tend to think of time as just time, but the reality is, it's a construct.” - Tom Gaddis In This Episode: Discover the best way to get things done and achieve success as an entrepreneur.   I share the benefits of time tracking software and how it helps me in my business. Learn how to start thinking differently about productivity and time management.  And much more... Resources mentioned: Four Thousand Weeks - Time Management for Mortals by Oliver Burkeman:https://www.oliverburkeman.com/books ( https://www.oliverburkeman.com/books)  Timing App:https://timingapp.com/ ( https://timingapp.com)   Jarvis AI:https://www.jarvis.ai/ ( https://www.jarvis.ai/) Wordtune:https://www.wordtune.com/ ( https://www.wordtune.com/) Workspace:https://www.citrix.com/en-gb/downloads/workspace-app/mac/workspace-app-for-mac-latest.html ( https://www.citrix.com/en-gb/downloads/workspace-app/mac/workspace-app-for-mac-latest.html) Connect with Tom Gaddis: Join Tom's program here:http://offlinesharks.com/ ( offlinesharks.com) Website:https://tomgaddis.com/ ( https://tomgaddis.com/) LinkedIn:http://linkedin.com/in/tomgaddis/ ( linkedin.com/in/tomgaddis/) Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/tomgbiz/ ( https://www.facebook.com/tomgbiz/) Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/gaddistom/ ( https://www.instagram.com/gaddistom/)

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast
Flexible Workspace and Entrepreneur Network Solutions with Alex Gras, Chief Commercial Officer at The Cannon, ep 157

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:15


Welcome to the Oil and Gas Onshore podcast — brought to you by TechnipFMC on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened-to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. In this episode, Justin sits down with Alex Gras, Chief Commercial Officer at the Cannon to discuss Flexible Workspace and Entrepreneur Network Solutions. Alex also discusses his journey from his successful time at Tenaris to completely switching careers to help the Cannon with their overall mission.  LinkedIn profile link: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandergras/   Website link: http://www.thecannon.com/  We'd like to highlight some fascinating technology provided by our sponsor, TechnipFMC. Their new and integrated iComplete™ ecosystem is digitally enabled and delivers efficiency benefits by dramatically reducing components and connections while simultaneously providing real-time data to operators about the #wellpad operations. TechnipFMC is continuing to push the limits in order to achieve full frac automation. To discover more about all the benefits of iComplete™ click the link in the show notes or check them out on linkedin: https://lnkd.in/eeSVvcc TechnipFMC Giveaway https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/pcEvkKz/OGGN Ogio Dome duffle bag Yeti 20 oz purple tumbler Executive power bank Columbia neck gator AcePods 2.0 - True Wireless Stereo (TWS) Bluetooth Ear Buds More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Justin Gauthier LinkedIn

From Chaos to Peace with Conny
108. Setting Up Your Workspace For Success

From Chaos to Peace with Conny

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 15:03


Part of having solid foundations and supportive structures in place is having a workspace that is setup for success. When I work with my clients, whether it's in person or over Zoom, one thing I always notice is that their office and desk is quite the mess. Now I am not saying you need to strive for an Instagram worthy office space and desk - those photos are staged, nobody works like this. But what I am saying is, your office and desk needs to be set up in a way that you can work effortlessly, that everything is in it's place, no searching required, you are set up for success. Download my handy guide on how to set up your workspace for success.

Wingnut Social: The Interior Design Business and Marketing Podcast
Is a CoWorking Workspace Right For Your Design Firm? with Mara Hauser - Episode 247

Wingnut Social: The Interior Design Business and Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 40:12


The pandemic shutdown sent so many of us home to work but designers were a bit ahead of that curve, generally speaking, since many worked from home already. But regardless how we got there, home can become a bit lonely and distracting when it comes to productivity and accomplishment. How do you deal with it? Mara Hauser says a CoWorking space may be your solution. Mara is a designer herself. She guides her client's big ideas into executable designs that focus heavily on brand-building and high-level analysis, including programming, product and amenities mix, adjacency diagrams, and determining “who you serve.” But she's also CEO of 25 North CoWorking Spaces and understands the powerful benefits a coworking space can be to anyone, including designers and their teams. On this episode we discuss the possibilities, how to make the transition, how to benefit the most from involvement at a CoWorking space, and more. Listen up, Wingnuts! What You'll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:02] This episode's topic: Gettin' out of the house! [2:48] The Mini-News Sesh!: Facebook profiles can become professional profiles [6:51] Who is Mara Hauser? [11:09] Is the trend toward home-working going to continue? [13:12] A hybrid work approach interior designers may be able to use [20:08] How large of a design firm could use this model? [22:20] How important is the design aspect of a coworking or office space? [25:22] Mitigating the sense of anxiety that can occur making this transition [30:15] Reasons you will benefit from utilizing a coworking space [33:20] The WHAT UP WINGNUT? round Connect with Mara Hauser 25 North Coworking Spaces - Mara's company Workplace Studio Interior Design - Mara's design studio Follow Mara on Twitter  Resources & People Mentioned BOOK: Shoe Dog by Phil Knight Wingnut episode with Rex Rogasch - Hospitality Design The Advantages and Disadvantages of Working From Home If you've worked at home, you know the pain. Fido is barking outside your door. The cat walks across your keyboard when you're out of the room. Netflix is right out there in the living room, beckoning you to continue your latest binge. These are some of the irritations but there are also limitations. It's hard to host professional meetings at home, especially with clients. It's also problematic to have your team work out of your home without turning your street into a used car lot every day. Mara says these are exactly the things a CoWorking space is designed to solve. Listen to learn if a CoWorking option is a good fit for you. You might be surprised how adaptable and collaborative it could be for you and your team. Multipurpose spaces are massively important in your working space and the CoWorking space you choose Most designers understand the principles behind good design (of course), so they get the realities around spaces designed to serve specific purposes. That reason alone may have you on the skeptical side of the fence when it comes to using a CoWorking space. But it doesn't have to, especially when it comes to Mara's locations. Being a designer, she's done everything in her team's power to create flexible spaces that can be transformed into what each client needs. They utilize casters to move things around and remake the space. The lighting, HVAC, and amenities are provided with comfort and productivity in mind. They also include outdoor work and meeting spaces to enable teams to make the most of fresh air and natural surroundings. If you were to visit one of her locations you would be impressed with the flexibility and effectiveness of the spaces she's created. Listen to this episode to learn if a CoWorking space is right for you and your team! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla's Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-877-WINGNUT (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

No Rain Date
NRD Ep. 87: Terry Wallace of Venture X Bethlehem (Pt. 1)

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 61:53


The coronavirus pandemic has changed many things, including how many of us work. Due to COVID-19's unprecedented challenges, more companies than ever are moving away from the rigid requirements of America's traditional office-based workspaces to embrace work-from-home and hybrid solutions. On the cutting edge of this evolution in how we work is Venture X Bethlehem, a coworking space on the city's economically diverse South Side (and the home of a satellite Saucon Source office). In our interview with owner Terry Wallace, you'll learn more about why businesses of all sizes--from sole proprietorships to large firms--are discovering that coworking spaces are fantastic incubators for growth. Terry also discusses his diverse employment background, which includes military service, working as a police officer, a career in the pharmaceutical industry and being part of the 2010s coworking revolution in New York City. As always, Josh has a local news roundup, which includes stories about overwhelming demand for COVID tests at local hospitals, a local business owner's plan to seek a state House seat, Hellertown-Lower Saucon Winter Restaurant Week and the winner of our 2021 Holiday Lights Contest & Tour. He also reflects on the year that was in local news, with highlights from our Top 12 Most-Read stories list, and shares a special update for No Rain Date listeners. From all of us at No Rain Date, best wishes for a safe and happy New Year! No Rain Date is conveniently available for listening and download on iTunes, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Deezer, Tunein, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts and other apps, in addition to Saucon Source. To learn more about the podcast, suggest an interview subject or share feedback, please email josh@sauconsource.com. No Rain Date is produced each week by Jonny Hart and is a production of Saucon Source LLC. Love No Rain Date? You can help support it by making a voluntary contribution and becoming a Saucon Source member today. Learn more here. And don't forget to sign up to receive the free Saucon Source newsletter three times a week. You'll enjoy the convenience of having the latest news delivered to your inbox every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, as well as peace of mind of knowing you'll never miss another story.

The 1738 Podcast
Workspace clutter

The 1738 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 17:38


There is always stuff on surfaces such as on your desk. Removing items in your workspace would increase productivity and flow since you are not getting distracted by stuff. It also makes the friction of doing work easier because there are less things in the way from you to doing what you want. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/1738podcast/support

Google Workspace Recap
E52: Last Episode of 2021! Recap of our Recaps, our favorite releases, and 2 last minute ones. 289 updates in total for the year!

Google Workspace Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 32:14


Welcome to the last episode of 2021! It has been another turbulent year as offices continue figuring out work from home and their hopeful return to offices, most of which has not actually happened. Workspace had a monster year with 289 updates, and Workspace Recap was there to help you learn and understand each and every one of them. We look forward to growing our show and expanding into video episodes in the new year, not to worry, these will still be audio-focused shows and you will be able to continue listening on your favorite podcasting platform as well! Check out Steve and Jesse's favorites on the blog post Published Releases Set custom rules for incoming Google Voice calls Quick access to restore recently deleted users from Admin console homepage Other Topics Chromebook Owners are using Android Apps 50% YoY - What does that mean for PWA's? A Year in review: Advancements in infrastructure at Google Cloud Google Meet in 2021: A year of accelerated innovation 2021 Year in Review | The Numbers 289 Updates (20% more than 240 in '20) 67 Q1 Updates 69 Q2 Updates 87 Q3 Updates 66 Q4 Updates 25 Weekly Recap posts Hit the subscribe button, engage with us on Twitter at @WorkspaceRecap and on our website at workspacerecap.com Check out our other shows as well as our weekly newsletter and Slack Community at www.tabgeeks.com!tabGeeks Resources Continue the conversation over in our Slack community! Click here to sign up or go to tabgeeks.com/slack Check out our other shows Supporting IT Support and SaaS Showdown on www.tabgeeks.com

UBC News World
This Washington, DC Workspace Design Expert Plans & Installs Office Furniture

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 2:35


Save thousands on bespoke office furniture with Sumner (703-348-5697). More details at https://www.sumnerfurniture.com (https://www.sumnerfurniture.com)

XenTegra - On The Horizon
On the Horizon: Workspace ONE 2111 and macOS – Freestyle Orchestrator Now Automates Mac Management

XenTegra - On The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 19:57


With the recent release of Workspace ONE version 2111, VMware brings you Freestyle Orchestrator, our game-changing workflow automation engine set to revolutionize the way you manage your organization's Windows and macOS endpoints. The result of countless man hours of legendary VMware innovation, Freestyle Orchestrator enables admins to automate specific tasks by applying designated resources to devices based on granular criteria.That's an accurate description of the technology, and it's all well and good to say, but how exactly can a Mac administrator apply this revolutionary technology to make everyday life easier? How, in other words, does the rubber meet the road? We've created this blog to specifically call out a couple of ways – just starting examples – that admins can use Freestyle Orchestrator to better manage their Mac fleets. Again, this is simply a starting point to help you ideate scenarios within your own organization where this is a fit.Host: Andy WhitesideCo-host: Erik Collett

XenTegra XenCast
The Citrix Session: What's new with Citrix Workspace – October 2021

XenTegra XenCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 28:07


Citrix experts want to ensure that you are ready for anything. That is why we focus on three main pillars within Citrix Workspace: empowering secure and distributed work; boosting worker productivity; and accelerating IT modernization. Earlier this month, during our Citrix Launchpad: Work event, we announced new Citrix and partner innovations that will transform how people work.That transformation is becoming increasingly important as businesses continue to evolve their approach to distributed workforces and implement new work models and technologies to enhance communication and collaboration. Citrix can securely enable hybrid work with practical tools that facilitate the shift to cloud or hybrid cloud computing.Our teams diligently work to provide the most up-to-date product solutions to improve the way work gets done, regardless of device, time, location, or network. Let's take a closer look at the what's new with Citrix Workspace in October.Host: Andy WhitesideCo-host: Bill Sutton

CodigoTecno
#95 - AWS Lo que debo saber de Amazon Web Services

CodigoTecno

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 15:00


Las tecnologías van cambiando, algunas se hacen standard y otras pasan sin penas ni gloria. Amazon pasó de ser una empresa que ofrecía servicios de compra online a ofrecer servicios digitales que día a día se hacen imprescindibles conocer y utilizarlas para mejorar como profesional y no quedar atrasados en el tiempo. Amazon Web Services ofrece servicios como: Cloud computing, Bases de datos, Creación de redes virtuales, Almacenamiento y gestión de contenido, Business Intelligence (BI), IoT (Internet of Things), Herramientas para desarrolladores y seguridad. Algunos nombres que vas a escuchar nombrar : Amazon EC2 o Amazon Elastic , Compute Cloud, Amazon VPC (Virtual Private Cloud), Amazon WorkMail, WorkDocs o WorkSpaces, Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Service). Enterate de la historia de Amazon y su futuro ya que esta empresa de infraestructura en nube es la de mayor éxito en el planeta, obteniendo más del 30 por ciento del mercado. AWS supera (por lejos) la suma combinada de sus tres rivales más cercanos: Microsoft, IBM y Google. Seguinos en las redes sociales y dejanos tus comentarios: - https://www.facebook.com/codigotecno/ - https://www.instagram.com/codigotecno O envíame un email en: codigotecno (arroba) hotmail.com o en Telegram @soleralejandro Si te inspiró deja tu comentario, like o sugerencia en las redes de podcast mas populares: * En Ivoox : https://bit.ly/2JoLotl * En Spotify : https://spoti.fi/31Dp4Sq * En Itunes: https://apple.co/2WNKWHV * En Youtube: https://bit.ly/2JLaKRj Te espero en los comentarios, anímate y buen código para todos. ! Muy buen código para todos y hasta la próxima. !

LINUX Unplugged
436: Hop on Pop

LINUX Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 65:42


We each try out the new Pop_OS! and Carl Richell from System76 joins us to get into the details. Plus why we feel Pop might be the new Ubuntu. Special Guest: Carl Richell.

Google Workspace Recap
E50: 10K Downloads! Start and Join Meetings and Audio Calls from 1:1 Chats in Gmail Mobile, Repeating tasks in Calendar, Meet/Webex Interoperability, Drive Labels, Forms API Beta, and more

Google Workspace Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 69:02


10,000 Downloads, we did it! We have officially passed 10,000 downloads this year since the start of the podcast in January!! Thank you to all our loyal listeners, we appreciate you. We started this just as a fun project to help ourselves and the community keep up with Google Workspace Updates, and now 50 episodes later as we finish up the year I am so grateful for how we have grown! We love hearing from each one of you with your questions, updates, tips when you see new features, and just chatting in our Slack Community. Here's to each and every one of you, and to an amazing year 2! Stay tuned for a video version of the podcast launching on Youtube in January :-D Published Releases Start and join meetings and audio calls from 1:1 chats using Google Chat in Gmail on mobile Lock audio and video during a Google Meet meeting from iOS devices Set tasks to repeat in Google Calendar New built-in interoperability between Google Meet and Cisco Webex New ways to customize tables in Google Docs Enhanced content classification, governance, and DLP with Google Drive labels Google Forms API now available in open beta More details on migration of existing multiple-location Drive files to shortcuts and other improvements for shortcuts Updated user interface for the App Access Control panel in the Admin console Admins can install Google Workspace Marketplace applications for specific groups Set user language programmatically with the Directory API Manage Gmail IMAP controls by group in the Admin console Quicker access to more Workspace integrations in Google Chat Other Releases Drive for Desktop December 2021 - Bug fix release Windows and macOS: Version 54.0 Hit the subscribe button, engage with us on Twitter at @WorkspaceRecap and on our website at workspacerecap.com Check out our other shows as well as our weekly newsletter and Slack Community at www.tabgeeks.com!

Hey Mama! Podcast
#280 - Your Best is Enough with Lizzie Assa

Hey Mama! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 27:29


Laura is joined by Lizzie Assa of The Workspace for Children, a parenting strategist, play expert, and mom of three creative kids. We talk about preparing for and transitioning your family to three kids, sibling dynamics, and the importance of self-care for parents. Find Lizzie on Instagram, check out her 2021 gift guides if you need some inspiration for items to inspire thoughtful play, or consider her ebook on implementing quiet time in your house! Give us 5 stars in Apple Podcasts if you like what you hear! Find us on Stitcher and Spotify too! Check out Hey Mama Kitchen! Promo code: PODCAST  Follow us on Twitter @heymamapodcast, Instagram @heymamapodcast & like our Facebook page Hey Mama Podcast Tell us what your #igotthis and #idontgotthis moments are this week! Have a question or topic you'd like us to discuss? Tweet us @heymamapodcast or email us at heymamapodcast (at) gmail.com. Music: Hanami by Fabian Measures

UBC News World
Best Coos Bay, OR Old Hickory Sheds Supplier Offers Custom Mini Barn Workspaces

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 2:22


Looking for the best custom shed, barn, and backyard storage experts in Coos Bay, OR? Call Oregon Backyard Buildings (541-982-5200) to choose from a full selection of Old Hickory Sheds and find the home workspace solutions you need. Go to ​​https://www.oregonbackyardbuildings.com/coos-bay-oregon (https://www.oregonbackyardbuildings.com/coos-bay-oregon) for more information.

Writer's Routine
Alice Hunter, author of 'The Serial Killer's Wife' - Psychological Thriller writer talks about working in a prison, genre tricks, and a chaotic work space.

Writer's Routine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 37:05


For our last episode of the year, we chat to psychological thriller debutant Alice Hunter. Her book is 'The Serial Killer's Wife', and tells the story of Beth Hardcastle, whose perfect marriage is obliterated when the police show up and report her husband Tom is missing.Alice worked in prisons, part of a team offering rehabilitation courses to in-mates, often those who'd committed violent crimes. That, and her psychology degree, offered her vast experience to write the book. We talk about how conversations with in-mates wives prompted the idea for the book, and then how she streamlined the idea and worked on character.You can hear about Alice's working day, her chaotic work-space, and how lockdown affected her enthusiasm to write.You can support the show at patreon.com/writersroutine.@writerspodwritersroutine.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pursuing HER Purpose
25. The Caffeinated Clean on Decluttering Your Workspace and Pursuing Your Purpose

Pursuing HER Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 30:01


Cassie from The Caffeinated Clean joins today with some decluttering inspiration. A messy workspace can mean a messy mind as we feel flustered and overwhelmed while we work. Finding ways to organize will not only make the space look beautiful but will make everything you do more efficient as functional meets feng shui!Cassie is a great example of how she used her unique gifts and passion to create a business. She gets real on imposter syndrome and where it can hold many people back, especially at the start. But your big ideas matter and deserve to be in the world!In stories today we'll be sharing some before and afters of our mini office makeover. Take these tips if you need to feel more settled in your workspace as well!MEET CASSIELet's connect!Our WEBSITE: https://www.pursuingherpurpose.comINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/pursuingherpurpose/MEET AMY: http://instagram.com/ameskiefer/MEET KAT: https://www.instagram.com/kat.herro/ MEET ABBY: http://instagram.com/abbyrosegreen/

Digital Workspace Tech Zone Podcast
Apply to be a vExpert today & Workspace ONE UEM 2111

Digital Workspace Tech Zone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021


Google Workspace Recap
E049: Control the display of user availability across Workspace with new admin control, New Chromebook Features, Project Starline update, and more

Google Workspace Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 30:55


Another short episode as Google only pushed out one update this week, at least next week is already up to 2 and counting. If you want to receive our show notes and other news in your inbox, please sign up for our weekly newsletter at tabgeeks.com/newsletter Join the conversation in our Slack community at tabgeeks.com/slack Published Releases There were 8 planned this week and only 1 made it to GA. Last week we had 2 planned and both missed Control the display of user availability across Google Workspace products with a new admin control Other Topics Do Even More with your Chromebook Camera Limit Recipients (GCC) IMAP for 3rd party client (GCC) How we're testing Project Starline at Google Google Delays Return To Office Again Question from the audience: Question from the blog: I just read your blog about using Shared Drives to transfer ownership on any Drive Files from an outside domain to yours. I'm helping a small charity in the UK set up their share drive on google workspace because they don't have one and there are files everywhere! They do have a Google basic account via Squarespace so it looks like I can't upgrade unless we cancel Squarespace (who is a reseller). Do you know anything about this? Here is what it says on Squarespace's help page. https://support.squarespace.com/hc/en-us/articles/205812258#toc-about-the-google-workspace-business-starter-plan NFTF: Google Workspace | Migrating Drive Files to another Domain Workspace Recap is the number one show dedicated to and discussing all of the changes happening in Google Workspace on a weekly basis, as well as how all these changes affect our users and our businesses. Google Workspace is innovating at a breakneck pace, making it difficult to keep up and keep track. Join us each week as we discuss What's New in Google Workspace, Upcoming Google Workspace releases, and answer your questions. Hit the subscribe button, engage with us on Twitter at @WorkspaceRecap and on our website at workspacerecap.com Check out our other shows as well as our weekly newsletter and Slack Community at www.tabgeeks.com!

Hashmap on Tap
#101 Core Tenets of a Modern Data Workspace with Prukalpa, Atlan Co-Founder

Hashmap on Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 52:25


Prukalpa is Co-Founder at Atlan, a modern collaborative data workspace that is helping a diverse set of data users in multiple areas including data discovery, data cataloging, data quality and profiling, data lineage and governance, plus some other great capabilities. Prukalpa takes Kelly Kohlleffel through her role at Atlan, the core tenants of a modern collaborative data workspace, what it means to think about data as a product instead of a service, and how prior to Atlan she founded SocialCops. Show Notes: Learn more about Atlan: https://atlan.com/ “We Failed to Set Up a Data Catalog 3x. Here's Why.” blog post by Prukalpa Inspired: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love Book On tap for today's episode: Ceylon cinnamon tea and Republic of Tea Gingerbread with Chai Spice Honey Contact Us: https://www.hashmapinc.com/reach-out

Zone 3 Podcast
Philips Healthcare™ What's New in MRI at RSNA 2021 Exhibit - Zone 3 Podcast

Zone 3 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 11:49


Check it out on Youtube --> HERE https://youtu.be/Z7d9xadr3VMIn this Zone 3 Podcast Clip of RSNA 2021 Reggie and Robert hang out in the Philips booth with Margriet Nijrens, Head of MR Marketing.  Margriet and Reggie Discuss Philips new 1.5T MR 5300 the next revolution in helium-free MR operations,  MR Workspace, SmartSpeed which utilizes our state-of-the-art speed engine Compressed SENSE, and an award-winning AI reconstruction technology and their Pediatric Coaching app. New 1.5T MR 5300MR 5300 is the next revolution in helium-free MR operations. Ramp up your productivity to meet the growing demand for exceptional quality images. This innovative 1.5T MR system, powered by AI1 technology, simplifies and automates the most complex clinical and operational tasks. So you can focus on what matters the most: your patients.MR WorkspaceMR Workspace is our industry-unique control room engine that delivers quality and efficiency without compromise. This intuitive solution is designed to simplify the path from image acquisition to diagnosis and to empower your team to drive productivity and predictability for a smooth-running department.Philips SmartSpeed*SmartSpeed is the next-generation fast imaging technology that delivers speed and image quality without compromise.  It utilizes our state-of-the-art speed engine Compressed SENSE and an award-winning AI reconstruction technology delivered at the source of the MR signal to ensure no data loss.Pediatric CoachingPediatric Coaching, a holistic solution designed to be a less stressful experience for parents and their children undergoing MRI scans. Using gamification and ‘buddy system' techniques to prepare children and their parents beforehand, the solution helps guide young children through the MRI procedure to significantly enhance the patient experience.Thanks for Joining us here in Zone 3. Philips Links : https://www.usa.philips.com/healthcare/resources/landing/mri-innovationsAbout our Sponsor:  Aegys is an innovative leader in the MRI safety industry and the Creator of The TechGate Automatic.Aegys is committed to providing innovative product and process solutions that enhance overall magnet safety and improve efficiency.  TechGate Auto is a Zone 4 Barrier System that keeps patients and MRI technologists safe.  TechGate Auto allows technologists to focus on the care of patients and efficient room turnaround rather than worrying about anyone entering the MRI room behind them. Easy to use and designed for the MRI environment, TechGate Auto is deployed whenever the technologist enters or leaves the MR room or via push button remote control, providing an immediate physical restriction of access to all unauthorized individuals.The use of a “caution” barrier at the entrance to the MR room is now a recommendation of the American College of Radiology MR Safety Committee.Links Aegys' Tech Gate Auto-  https://aegysgroup.com/

On The Bench
OTB 127: Your model bench and work space

On The Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 98:43


The boys talk about installing new model benchers and work spaces as Ian is currently redoing his work space and Dave is in the planning stages of doing the same. The Falcon reports in with a list of new kits and we find out what you have to say in listener mail. 

Google Workspace Recap
E048: No Workspace Updates this week. Wait what?! Don't worry, we still found topics to update you on, 1:1 audio calls in Chat on Mobile, IMAP control by group in admin, Drive for desktop update etc

Google Workspace Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 27:30


It seems the Google Workspace Dev team took a well-deserved break this week as we discovered when we started preparing for this episode, there were no official published releases this week. We dug up some other releases for you and of course relevant Google news of the week. If you want to receive our show notes and other news in your inbox, please sign up for our weekly newsletter at tabgeeks.com/newsletter Join the conversation in our Slack community at tabgeeks.com/slack Published Releases No Blog Updates This Week Other Releases Drive for Desktop November 22, 2021 - Bug fix release Windows and macOS: Version 53.0 Expanded accessibility capabilities including improving keyboard navigation, labels, and more. Resolved an issue when syncing zip files. Improved UI when navigating between preferences and help windows. Users can now navigate to advanced settings when editing a Microsoft Word/Excel/PowerPoint file saved in Google Drive for desktop. Additional bug fixes and performance improvements. Important: Drive for desktop will be ending support for macOS 10.11 and 10.12 in December of 2021. Please upgrade to a supported version of macOS before that date to continue using Drive for Desktop. Important: Windows 7 users must install Microsoft's security update KB4474419 to remain supported and continue receiving updates. Other Topics List view for Insert files using Drive and Chat works again Zoom Chrome App Deprecated Before It's Web App Gains Feature Parity and Stability Illicit coin mining, ransomware, APTs target cloud users in first Google Cybersecurity Action Team Threat Horizons report Alphabet is putting its prototype robot to work cleaning up around Google's offices Google is taking sign-ups for Relate, a voice assistant that recognizes impaired speech Workspace Recap is the number one show dedicated to and discussing all of the changes happening in Google Workspace on a weekly basis, as well as how all these changes affect our users and our businesses. Google Workspace is innovating at a breakneck pace, making it difficult to keep up and keep track. Join us each week as we discuss What's New in Google Workspace, Upcoming Google Workspace releases, and answer your questions. Hit the subscribe button, engage with us on Twitter at @WorkspaceRecap and on our website at workspacerecap.com Check out our other shows as well as our weekly newsletter and Slack Community at www.tabgeeks.com!

Culture Building like a PRO
109: The Value of Creating an Inspiring Workspace with Dorethia Kelly

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 35:05


Now's the perfect time to thoughtfully connect with your team, peers & leaders… especially with Christmas quickly approaching. In this episode, Dorethia Kelly breaks down the value of creating a visually inspiring workspace, how it cultivates team networking, and how personal branding boxes for professionals will help you get started!Dorethia Kelly, MBA is the Founder and CEO of Work • Space • Spark, a monthly subscription and online community for working professionals. Dorethia leads professionals through career training, personal branding, and financial growth in a way that's actionable and builds confidence. An entrepreneur at heart, she has been financially empowering thousands of people for over a decade as the Founder and CEO of #MoneyChat as well. The idea for Work • Space • Spark was an ah-ha moment Dorethia had when she realized the disconnect many in the working world had in understanding how their personal brand was directly related to their career growth and in turn, their financial growth.Dorethia is an author, speaker, and community builder featured in various national media, including Black Enterprise, CNBC, U.S. News, USA Today, Huffington Post, Go Banking Rates, and Experian.Get 50% off your first Work • Space • Spark box for 6 and 12 month subscribers code 50WSSWith this offer you don't pay it all upfront, you get a discounted rate and still pay monthly as a reward for the longer membership!Get your box here: www.workspacespark.comContact Dorethia:https://www.instagram.com/workspacespark/https://www.twitter.com/workspacespark/https://www.twitter.com/workspacespark/https://www.linkedin.com/company/work-•-space-•-spark/aboutQuestions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep109 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPROThe Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Google Cloud's Sandeep Gupta on Driving Fluid Collaboration

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:52


Sandeep Gupta, Lead of Strategic Partnerships at Google Cloud, joins Channelnomics Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to discuss how Google Workspace can help ensure productivity and meaningful connection for everyone during this transitory time.  Spurred by difficult conditions wrought by the pandemic over the past two years, the world's been forced to adopt more flexible, fluid work arrangements. Mobile devices, persistent high-speed Internet, and cloud-based applications make working from home relatively easy, and during this adjustment period, options for collaboration have emerged in ways we didn't think possible before 2020.  While working from home – and from anywhere – has its advantages, the primary goal of today's collaboration solutions is to best enable individuals and teams to stay connected in a meaningful way and maximize productivity.  Everything is about collaboration, regardless of where workers are. Now more than ever, users need a smooth, effortless way to communicate, share, and produce. As the world ventures even further into a hybrid environment, it's imperative to build on what we've learned over these past two years.   One company that's making flexible collaboration and productivity its prime mission is Google with its Google Workspace collection of tools, software, products, and services. Workspace is a solution that caters to everyone – individuals, IT managers, teams, and entire businesses – to ensure that they remain linked securely and on the same schedule.  Channelnomics invited Google, a partner in our recent cloud research, along with Ingram Micro Cloud and Microsoft, to join us for our latest podcast. Sandeep Gupta, Lead of Strategic Partnerships at Google Cloud, spoke with Channelnomics Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to explain how Google Workspace enables fluid collaboration and helps businesses achieve consistent productivity in these uncertain times.   Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe!  Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/   LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli   Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics      Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production  Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics – the voice of thought leadership – we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.      Episode Resources  Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa  Guest Sandeep Gupta: linkedin.com/in/sandeep-gupta-5626bb2    Credits  Production: Changing Channels is produced by Modern Podcasting. For virtual content capture and video-first podcasts, check out http://www.modpodstudio.com.  Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa  Voice-Over: Denise Quan 

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaking the Tech Mold with Stephanie Wong

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:02


About StephanieStephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist. She is a leader at Google with a mission to blend storytelling and technology to create remarkable developer content. At Google, she's created over 400 videos, blogs, courses, and podcasts that have helped developers globally. You might recognize her as the host of the GCP Podcast. Stephanie is active in her community, fiercely supporting women in tech and mentoring students.Links: Personal Website: https://stephrwong.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/stephr_wong TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that makes me a little weird in the universe is that I do an awful lot of… let's just call it technology explanation slash exploration in public, and turning it into a bit of a brand-style engagement play. What makes this a little on the weird side is that I don't work for a big company, which grants me a tremendous latitude. I have a whole lot of freedom that lets me be all kinds of different things, and I can't get fired, which is something I'm really good at.Inversely, my guest today is doing something remarkably similar, except she does work for a big company and could theoretically be fired if they were foolish enough to do so. But I don't believe that they are. Stephanie Wong is the head of developer engagement at Google. Stephanie, thank you for volunteering to suffer my slings and arrows about all of this.Stephanie: [laugh]. Thanks so much for having me today, Corey.Corey: So, at a very high level, you're the head of developer engagement, which is a term that I haven't seen a whole lot of. Where does that start and where does that stop?Stephanie: Yeah, so I will say that it's a self-proclaimed title a bit because of the nuance of what I do. I would say at its heart, I am still a part of developer relations. If you've heard of developer advocacy or developer evangelist, I would say this slight difference in shade of what I do is that I focus on scalable content creation and becoming a central figure for our developer audiences to engage and enlighten them with content that, frankly, is remarkable, and that they'd want to share and learn about our technology.Corey: Your bio is fascinating in that it doesn't start with the professional things that most people do with, “This is my title and this is my company,” is usually the first sentence people put in. Yours is, “Stephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist.” Which is both surprising and more than a little bit refreshing because when I read a bio like that my immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, thank God. It's a real person for a change.” I like the idea of bringing the other aspects of what you are other than, “This is what goes on in an IDE, the end,” to your audience.Stephanie: That is exactly the goal that I had when creating that bio because I truly believe in bringing more interdisciplinary and varied backgrounds to technology. I, myself have gone through a very unconventional path to get to where I am today and I think in large part, my background has had a lot to do with my successes, my failures, and really just who I am in tech as an uninhibited and honest, credible person today.Corey: I think that there's a lack of understanding, broadly, in our industry about just how important credibility and authenticity are and even the source of where they come from. There are a lot of folks who are in the DevRel space—devrelopers, as I insist upon calling them, over their protests—where, on some level, the argument is, what is developer relations? “Oh, you work in marketing, but they're scared to tell you,” has been my gag on that one for a while. But they speak from a position of, “I know what's what because I have been in the trenches, working on these large-scale environments as an engineer for the last”—fill in the blank, however long it may have been—“And therefore because I have done things, I am going to tell you how it is.” You explicitly call out that you don't come from the traditional, purely technical background. Where did you come from? It's unlikely that you've sprung fully-formed from the forehead of some god, but again, I'm not entirely sure how Google finds and creates the folks that it winds up advancing, so maybe you did.Stephanie: Well, to tell you the truth. We've all come from divine creatures. And that's where Google sources all employees. So. You know. But—[laugh].Corey: Oh, absolutely. “We climbed to the top of Olympus and then steal fire from the gods.” “It's like, isn't that the origin story of Prometheus?” “Yeah, possibly.” But what is your background? Where did you come from?Stephanie: So, I have grown up, actually, in Silicon Valley, which is a little bit ironic because I didn't go to school for computer science or really had the interest in becoming an engineer in school. I really had no idea.Corey: Even been more ironic than that because most of Silicon Valley appears to never have grown up at all.Stephanie: [laugh]. So, true. Maybe there's a little bit of that with me, too. Everybody has a bit of Peter Pan syndrome here, right? Yeah, I had no idea what I wanted to do in school and I just knew that I had an interest in communicating with one another, and I ended up majoring in communication studies.I thought I wanted to go into the entertainment industry and go into production, which is very different and ended up doing internships at Warner Brothers Records, a YouTube channel for dance—I'm a dancer—and I ended up finding a minor in digital humanities, which is sort of this interdisciplinary minor that combines technology and the humanities space, including literature, history, et cetera. So, that's where I got my start in technology, getting an introduction to information systems and doing analytics, studying social media for certain events around the world. And it wasn't until after school that I realized that I could work in enterprise technology when I got an offer to be a sales engineer. Now, that being said, I had no idea what sales engineering was. I just knew it had something to do with enterprise technology and communications, and I thought it was a good fit for my background.Corey: The thing that I find so interesting about that is that it breaks the mold of what people expect, when, “If someone's going to talk to me about technology—especially coming from a”—it's weird; it's one of the biggest companies on the planet, and people still on some level equate Google with the startup-y mentality of being built in someone's garage. That's an awfully big garage these days, if that's even slightly close to true, which it isn't. But there's this idea of, “Oh, you have to go to Stanford. You have to get a degree in computer science. And then you have to go and do this, this, this, this, and this.”And it's easy to look dismissively at what you're doing. “Communications? Well, all that would teach you to do is communicate to people clearly and effectively. What possible good is that in tech?” As we look around the landscape and figure out exactly why that is so necessary in tech, and also so lacking?Stephanie: Exactly. I do think it's an underrated skill in tech. Maybe it's not so much anymore, but I definitely think that it has been in the past. And even for developers, engineers, data scientists, other technical practitioner, especially as a person in DevRel, I think it's such a valuable skill to be able to communicate complex topics simply and understandably to a wide variety of audiences.Corey: The big question that I have for you because I've talked to an awful lot of folks who are very concerned about the way that they approach developer relations, where—they'll have ratios, for example—where I know someone and he insists that he give one deeply technical talk for every four talks that are not deeply technical, just because he feels the need to re-establish and shore up his technical bona fides. Now, if there's one thing that people on the internet love, it is correcting people on things that are small trivia aspect, or trying to pull out the card that, “Oh, I've worked on this system for longer than you've worked on this system, therefore, you should defer to me.” Do you find that you face headwinds for not having the quote-unquote, “Traditional” engineering technical background?Stephanie: I will say that I do a bit. And I did, I would say when I first joined DevRel, and I don't know if it was much more so that it was being imposed on me or if it was being self-imposed, something that I felt like I needed to prove to gain credibility, not just in my organization, but in the industry at large. And it wasn't until two or three years into it, that I realized that I had a niche myself. It was to create stories with my content that could communicate these concepts to developers just as effectively. And yes, I can still prove that I can go into an hour-long or a 45-minute-long tech talk or a webinar about a topic, but I can also easily create a five to ten-minute video that communicates concepts and inspires audiences just the same, and more importantly, be able to point to resources, code labs, tutorials, GitHub repos, that can allow the audience to be hands-on themselves, too. So really, I think that it was over time that I gained more experience and realized that my skill sets are valuable in a different way, and it's okay to have a different background as long as you bring something to the table.Corey: And I think that it's indisputable that you do. The concept of yours that I've encountered from time to time has always been insightful, it is always been extremely illuminating, and—you wouldn't think of this as worthy of occasion and comment, but I feel it needs to be said anyway—at no point in any of your content did I feel like I was being approached in a condescending way, where at every point it was always about uplifting people to a level of understanding, rather than doing the, “Well, I'm smarter than you and you couldn't possibly understand the things that I've been to.” It is relatable, it is engaging, and you add a very human face to what is admittedly an area of industry that is lacking in a fair bit of human element.Stephanie: Yeah, and I think that's the thing that many folks DevRel continue to underline is the idea of empathy, empathizing with your audiences, empathizing with the developers, the engineers, the data engineers, whoever it is that you're creating content for, it's being in their shoes. But for me, I may not have been in those shoes for years, like many other folks historically have been in for DevRel, but I want to at least go through the journey of learning a new piece of technology. For example, if I'm learning a new platform on Google Cloud, going through the steps of creating a demo, or walking through a tutorial, and then candidly explaining that experience to my audience, or creating a video about it. I really just reject the idea of having ego in tech and I would love to broaden the opportunity for folks who came from a different background like myself. I really want to just represent the new world of technology where it wasn't full of people who may have had the privilege to start coding at a very early age, in their garages.Corey: Yeah, privilege of, in many respects, also that privilege means, “Yes, I had the privilege of not having to have friends and deal with learning to interact with other human beings, which is what empowered me to build this company and have no social skills whatsoever.” It's not the aspirational narrative that we sometimes are asked to believe. You are similar in some respects to a number of things that I do—by which I mean, you do it professionally and well and I do it as basically performance shitpost art—but you're on Twitter, you make videos, you do podcasts, you write long-form and short-form as well. You are sort of all across the content creation spectrum. Which of those things do you prefer to do? Which ones of those are things you find a little bit more… “Well, I have to do it, but it's not my favorite?” Or do you just tend to view it as content is content; you just look at different media to tell your story?Stephanie: Well, I will say any form of content is queen—I'm not going to say king, but—[laugh] content is king, content is queen, it doesn't matter.Corey: Content is a baroness as it turns out.Stephanie: [laugh]. There we go. I have to say, so given my background, I mentioned I was into production and entertainment before, so I've always had a gravitation towards video content. I love tinkering with cameras. Actually, as I got started out at Google Cloud, I was creating scrappy content using webcams and my own audio equipment, and doing my own research, and finding lounges and game rooms to do that, and we would just upload it to our own YouTube channel, which probably wasn't allowed at the time, but hey, we got by with it.And eventually, I got approached by DevRel to start doing it officially on the channel and I was given budget to do it in-studio. And so that was sort of my stepping stone to doing this full-time eventually, which I never foresaw for myself. And so yeah, I have this huge interest in—I'm really engaged with video content, but once I started expanding and realizing that I could repurpose that content for podcasting, I could repurpose it for blogs, then you start to realize that you can shard content and expand your reach exponentially with this. So, that's when I really started to become more active on social media and leverage it to build not just content for Google Cloud, but build my own brand in tech.Corey: That is the inescapable truth of DevRel done right is that as you continue doing it, in time, in your slice of the industry, it is extremely likely that your personal brand eclipses the brand of the company that you represent. And it's in many ways a test of corporate character—if it makes sense—as do how they react to that. I've worked in roles before I started this place where I was starting to dabble with speaking a lot, and there was always a lot of insecurity that I picked up of, “Well, it feels like you're building your personal brand, not advancing the company here, and we as a company do not see the value in you doing that.” Direct quote from the last boss I had. And, well, that partially explains why I'm here, I suppose.But there's insecurity there. I'd see the exact opposite coming out of Google, especially in recent times. There's something almost seems to be a renaissance in Google Cloud, and I'm not sure where it came from. But if I look at it across the board, and you had taken all the labels off of everything, and you had given me a bunch of characteristics about different companies, I would never have guessed that you were describing Google when you're talking about Google Cloud. And perhaps that's unfair, but perceptions shape reality.Stephanie: Yeah, I find that interesting because I think traditionally in DevRel, we've also hired folks for their domain expertise and their brand, depending on what you're representing, whether it's in the Kubernetes space or Python client library that you're supporting. But it seems like, yes, in my case, I've organically started to build my brand while at Google, and Google has been just so spectacular in supporting that for me. But yeah, it's a fine line that I think many people have to walk. It's like, do you want to continue to build your own brand and have that carry forth no matter what company you stay at, or if you decide to leave? Or can you do it hand-in-hand with the company that you're at? For me, I think I can do it hand-in-hand with Google Cloud.Corey: It's taken me a long time to wrap my head around what appears to be a contradiction when I look at Google Cloud, and I think I've mostly figured it out. In the industry, there is a perception that Google as an entity is condescending and sneering toward every other company out there because, “You're Google, you know how to do all these great, amazing things that are global-spanning, and over here at Twitter for Pets, we suck doing these things.” So, Google is always way smarter and way better at this than we could ever hope to be. But that is completely opposed to my personal experiences talking with Google employees. Across the board, I would say that you all are self-effacing to a fault.And I mean that in the sense of having such a limited ego, in some cases, that it's, “Well, I don't want to go out there and do a whole video on this. It's not about me, it's about the technology,” are things that I've had people who work at Google say to me. And I appreciate the sentiment; it's great, but that also feels like it's an aloofness. It also fails to humanize what it is that you're doing. And you are a, I've got to say, a breath of fresh air when it comes to a lot of that because your stories are not just, “Here's how you do a thing. It's awesome. And this is all the intricacies of the API.”And yeah, you get there, but you also contextualize that in a, “Here's why it matters. Here's the problem that solves. Here is the type of customer's problem that this is great for,” rather than starting with YAML and working your way up. It's going the other way, of, “We want to sell some underpants,” or whatever it is the customer is trying to do today. And that is the way that I think is one of the best ways to drive adoption of what's going on because if you get people interested and excited about something—at least in my experience—they're going to figure out how the API works. Badly in many cases, but works. But if you start on the API stuff, it becomes a solution looking for a problem. I like your approach to this.Stephanie: Thank you. Yeah, I appreciate that. I think also something that I've continued to focus on is to tell stories across products, and it doesn't necessarily mean within just Google Cloud's ecosystem, but across the industry as well. I think we need to, even at Google, tell a better story across our product space and tie in what developers are currently using. And I think the other thing that I'm trying to work on, too, is contextualizing our products and our launches not just across the industry, but within our product strategy. Where does this tie in? Why does it matter? What is our forward-looking strategy from here? When we're talking about our new data cloud products or analytics, [unintelligible 00:17:21], how does this tie into our API strategy?Corey: And that's the biggest challenge, I think, in the AI space. My argument has been for a while—in fact, I wrote a blog post on it earlier this year—that AI and machine learning is a marvelously executed scam because it's being pushed by cloud providers and the things that you definitely need to do a machine learning experiment are a bunch of compute and a whole bunch of data that has to be stored on something, and wouldn't you know it, y'all sell that by the pound. So, it feels, from a cynical perspective, which I excel at espousing, that approach becomes one of you're effectively selling digital pickaxes into a gold rush. Because I see a lot of stories about machine learning how to do very interesting things that are either highly, highly use-case-specific, which great, that would work well, for me too, if I ever wind up with, you know, a petabyte of people's transaction logs from purchasing coffee at my national chain across the country. Okay, that works for one company, but how many companies look like that?And on the other side of it, “It's oh, here's how we can do a whole bunch of things,” and you peel back the covers a bit, and it looks like, “Oh, but you really taught me here is bias laundering?” And, okay. I think that there's a definite lack around AI and machine learning of telling stories about how this actually matters, what sorts of things people can do with it that aren't incredibly—how do I put this?—niche or a problem in search of a solution?Stephanie: Yeah, I find that there are a couple approaches to creating content around AI and other technologies, too, but one of them being inspirational content, right? Do you want to create something that tells the story of how I created a model that can predict what kind of bakery item this is? And we're going to do it by actually showcasing us creating the outcome. So, that's one that's more like, okay. I don't know how relatable or how appropriate it is for an enterprise use case, but it's inspirational for new developers or next gen developers in the AI space, and I think that can really help a company's brand, too.The other being highly niche for the financial services industry, detecting financial fraud, for example, and that's more industry-focused. I found that they both do well, in different contexts. It really depends on the channel that you're going to display it on. Do you want it to be viral? It really depends on what you're measuring your content for. I'm curious from you, Corey, what you've seen across, as a consumer of content?Corey: What's interesting, at least in my world, is that there seems to be, given that what I'm focusing on first and foremost is the AWS ecosystem, it's not that I know it the best—I do—but at this point, it's basically Stockholm Syndrome where it's… with any technology platform when you've worked with it long enough, you effectively have the most valuable of skill sets around it, which is not knowing how it works, but knowing how it doesn't, knowing what the failure mode is going to look like and how you can work around that and detect it is incredibly helpful. Whereas when you're trying something new, you have to wait until it breaks to find the sharp edges on it. So, there's almost a lock-in through, “We failed you enough times,” story past a certain point. But paying attention to that ecosystem, I find it very disjointed. I find that there are still events that happen and I only find out when the event is starting because someone tweets about it, and for someone who follows 40 different official AWS RSS feeds, to be surprised by something like that tells me, okay, there's not a whole lot of cohesive content strategy here, that is at least making it easy for folks to consume the things that they want, especially in my case where even the very niche nature of what I do, my interest is everything.I have a whole bunch of different filters that look for various keywords and the rest, and of course, I have helpful folks who email me things constantly—please keep it up; I'm a big fan—worst case, I'd rather read something twice than nothing. So, it's helpful to see all of that and understand the different marketing channels, different personas, and the way that content approaches, but I still find things that slip through the cracks every time. The thing that I've learned—and it felt really weird when I started doing it—was, I will tell the same stories repeatedly in different forums, or even the same forum. I could basically read you a Twitter thread from a year ago, word-for-word, and it would blow up bigger than it did the first time. Just because no one reads everything.Stephanie: Exactly.Corey: And I've already told my origin story. You're always new to someone. I've given talks internally at Amazon at various times, and I'm sort of loud and obnoxious, but the first question I love to ask is, “Raise your hand if you've never heard of me until today.” And invariably, over three-quarters of the room raises their hand every single time, which okay, great. I think that's awesome, but it teaches me that I cannot ever expect someone to have, quote-unquote, “Done the reading.”Stephanie: I think the same can be said about the content that I create for the company. You can't assume that people, A) have seen my tweets already or, B) understand this product, even if I've talked about it five times in the past. But yes, I agree. I think that you definitely need to have a content strategy and how you format your content to be more problem-solution-oriented.And so the way that I create content is that I let them fall into three general buckets. One being that it could be termed definition: talking about the basics, laying the foundation of a product, defining terms around a topic. Like, what is App Engine, or Kubeflow 101, or talking about Pub/Sub 101.The second being best practices. So, outlining and explaining the best practices around a topic, how do you design your infrastructure for scale and reliability.And the third being diagnosis: investigating; exploring potential issues, as you said; using scripts; Stackdriver logging, et cetera. And so I just kind of start from there as a starting point. And then I generally follow a very, very effective model. I'm sure you're aware of it, but it's called the five point argument model, where you are essentially telling a story to create a compelling narrative for your audience, regardless of the topic or what bucket that topic falls into.So, you're introducing the problem, you're sort of rising into a point where the climax is the solution. And that's all to build trust with your audience. And as it falls back down, you're giving the results in the conclusion, and that's to inspire action from your audience. So, regardless of what you end up talking about this problem-solution model—I've found at least—has been highly effective. And then in terms of sharing it out, over and over again, over the span of two months, that's how you get the views that you want.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: See, that's a key difference right there. I don't do anything regular in terms of video as part of my content. And I do it from time to time, but you know, getting gussied up and whatnot is easier than just talking into a microphone. As I record this, it's Friday, I'm wearing a Hawaiian shirt, and I look exactly like the middle-aged dad that I am. And for me at least, a big breakthrough moment was realizing that my audience and I are not always the same.Weird confession for someone in my position: I don't generally listen to podcasts. And the reason behind that is I read very quickly, and even if I speed up a podcast, I'm not going to be able to consume the information nearly as quickly as I could by reading it. That, amongst other reasons, is one of the reasons that every episode of this show has a full transcript attached to it. But I'm not my audience. Other people prefer to learn by listening and there's certainly nothing wrong with that.My other podcast, the AWS Morning Brief, is the spoken word version of the stuff that I put out in my newsletter every week. And that is—it's just a different area for people to consume the content because that's what works for them. I'm not one to judge. The hard part for me was getting over that hump of assuming the audience was like me.Stephanie: Yeah. And I think the other key part of is just mainly consistency. It's putting out the content consistently in different formats because everybody—like you said—has a different learning style. I myself do. I enjoy visual styles.I also enjoy listening to podcasts at 2x speed. [laugh]. So, that's my style. But yeah, consistency is one of the key things in building content, and building an audience, and making sure that you are valuable to your audience. I mean, social media, at the end of the day is about the people that follow you.It's not about yourself. It should never be about yourself. It's about the value that you provide. Especially as somebody who's in DevRel in this position for a larger company, it's really about providing value.Corey: What are the breakthrough moments that I had relatively early in my speaking career—and I think it's clear just from what you've already said that you've had a similar revelation at times—I gave a talk, that was really one of my first talks that went semi-big called, “Terrible Ideas in Git.” It was basically, learn how to use Git via anti-pattern. What it secretly was, was under the hood, I felt it was time I learned Git a bit better than I did, so I pitched it and I got a talk accepted. So well, that's what we call a forcing function. By the time I give that talk, I'd better be [laugh] able to have built a talk that do this intelligently, and we're going to hope for the best.It worked, but the first version of that talk I gave was super deep into the plumbing of Git. And I'm sure that if any of the Git maintainers were in the audience, they would have found it great, but there aren't that many folks out there. I redid the talk and instead approached it from a position of, “You have no idea what Git is. Maybe you've heard of it, but that's as far as it goes.” And then it gets a little deeper there.And I found that making the subject more accessible as opposed to deeper into the weeds of it is almost always the right decision from a content perspective. Because at some level, when you are deep enough into the weeds, the only way you're going to wind up fixing something or having a problem that you run into get resolved, isn't by listening to a podcast or a conference talk; it's by talking to the people who built the thing because at that level, those are the only people who can hang at that level of depth. That stops being fodder for conference talks unless you turn it into an after-action report of here's this really weird thing I learned.Stephanie: Yeah. And you know, to be honest, the one of the most successful pieces of content I've created was about data center security. I visited a data center and I essentially unveiled what our security protocols were. And that wasn't a deeply technical video, but it was fun and engaging and easily understood by the masses. And that's what actually ended up resulting in the highest number of views.On top of that, I'm now creating a video about our subsea fiber optic cables. Finding that having to interview experts from a number of different teams across engineering and our strategic negotiators, it was like a monolith of information that I had to take in. And trying to format that into a five-minute story, I realized that bringing it up a layer of abstraction to help folks understand this at a wider level was actually beneficial. And I think it'll turn into a great piece of content. I'm still working on it now. So, [laugh] we'll see how it turns out.Corey: I'm a big fan of watching people learn and helping them get started. The thing that I think gets lost a lot is it's easy to assume that if I look back in time at myself when I was first starting my professional career two decades ago, that I was exactly like I am now, only slightly more athletic and can walk up a staircase without getting winded. That's never true. It never has been true. I've learned a lot about not just technology but people as I go, and looking at folks are entering the workforce today through the same lens of, “Well, that's not how I would handle that situation.” Yeah, no kidding. I have two decades of battering my head against the sharp edges and leaving dents in things to inform that opinion.No, when I was that age, I would have handled it way worse than whatever it is I'm critiquing at the time. But it's important to me that we wind up building those pathways and building those bridges so that people coming into the space, first, have a clear path to get here, and secondly, have a better time than I ever did. Where does the next generation of talent come from has been a recurring question and a recurring theme on the show.Stephanie: Yeah. And that's exactly why I've been such a fierce supporter of women in tech, and also, again, encouraging a broader community to become a part of technology. Because, as I said, I think we're in the midst of a new era of technology, of people from all these different backgrounds in places that historically have had more remote access to technology, now having the ability to become developers at an early age. So, with my content, that's what I'm hoping to drive to make this information more easily accessible. Even if you don't want to become a Google Cloud engineer, that's totally fine, but if I can help you understand some of the foundational concepts of cloud, then I've done my job well.And then, even with women who are already trying to break into technology or wanting to become a part of it, then I want to be a mentor for them, with my experience not having a technical background and saying yes to opportunities that challenged me and continuing to build my own luck between hard work and new opportunities.Corey: I can't wait to see how this winds up manifesting as we see understandings of what we're offering to customers in different areas in different ways—both in terms of content and terms of technology—how that starts to evolve and shift. I feel like we're at a bit of an inflection point now, where today if I graduate from school and I want to start a business, I have to either find a technical co-founder or I have to go to a boot camp and learn how to code in order to build something. I think that if we can remove that from the equation and move up the stack, sure, you're not going to be able to build the next Google or Pinterest or whatnot from effectively Visual Basic for Interfaces, but you can build an MVP and you can then continue to iterate forward and turn it into something larger down the road. The other part of it, too, is that moving up the stack into more polished solutions rather than here's a bunch of building blocks for platforms, “So, if you want a service to tell you whether there's a picture of a hot dog or not, here's a service that does exactly that.” As opposed to, “Oh, here are the 15 different services, you can bolt together and pay for each one of them and tie it together to something that might possibly work, and if it breaks, you have no idea where to start looking, but here you go.” A packaged solution that solves business problems.Things move up the stack; they do constantly. The fact is that I started my career working in data centers and now I don't go to them at all because—spoiler—Google, and Amazon, and people who are not IBM Cloud can absolutely run those things better than I can. And there's no differentiated value for me in solving those global problems locally. I'd rather let the experts handle stuff like that while I focus on interesting problems that actually affect my business outcome. There's a reason that instead of running all the nonsense for lastweekinaws.com myself because I've worked in large-scale WordPress hosting companies, instead I pay WP Engine to handle it for me, and they, in turn, hosted on top of Google Cloud, but it doesn't matter to me because it's all just a managed service that I pay for. Because me running the website itself adds no value, compared to the shitpost I put on the website, which is where the value derives from. For certain odd values of value.Stephanie: [laugh]. Well, two things there is that I think we actually had a demo created on Google Cloud that did detect hot dogs or not hot dogs using our Vision API, years in the past. So, thanks for reminding me of that one.Corey: Of course.Stephanie: But yeah, I mean, I completely agree with that. I mean, this is constantly a topic in conversation with my team members, and with clients. It's about higher level of abstractions. I just did a video series with our fellow, Eric Brewer, who helped build cloud infrastructure here at Google over the past ten decades. And I asked him what he thought the future of cloud would be in the next ten years, and he mentioned, “It's going to be these higher levels of abstraction, building platforms on top of platforms like Kubernetes, and having more services like Cloud run serverless technologies, et cetera.”But at the same time, I think the value of cloud will continue to be providing optionality for developers to have more opinionated services, services like GKE Autopilot, et cetera, that essentially take away the management of infrastructure or nodes that people don't really want to deal with at the end of the day because it's not going to be a competitive differentiator for developers. They want to focus on building software and focusing on keeping their services up and running. And so yeah, I think the future is going to be that, giving developers flexibility and freedom, and still delivering the best-of-breed technology. If it's covering something like security, that's something that should be baked in as much as possible.Corey: You're absolutely right, first off. I'm also looking beyond it where I want to be able to build a website that is effectively Twitter, only for pets—because that is just a harebrained enough idea to probably raise a $20 million seed round these days—and I just want to be able to have the barks—those are like tweets, only surprisingly less offensive and racist—and have them just be stored somewhere, ideally presumably under the hood somewhere, it's going to be on computers, but whether it's in containers, or whether it's serverless, or however is working is the sort of thing that, “Wow, that seems like an awful lot of nonsense that is not central nor core to my business succeeding or failing.” I would say failing, obviously, except you can lose money at scale with the magic of things like SoftBank. Here we are.And as that continues to grow and scale, sure, at some point I'm going to have bespoke enough needs and a large enough scale where I do have to think about those things, but building the MVP just so I can swindle some VCs is not the sort of thing where I should have to go to that depth. There really should be a golden-path guardrail-style thing that I can effectively drag and drop my way into the next big scam. And that is, I think, the missing piece. And I think that we're not quite ready technologically to get there yet, but I can't shake the feeling and the hope that's where technology is going.Stephanie: Yeah. I think it's where technology is heading, but I think part of the equation is the adoption by our industry, right? Industry adoption of cloud services and whether they're ready to adopt services that are that drag-and-drop, as you say. One thing that I've also been talking a lot about is this idea of service-oriented networking where if you have a service or API-driven environment and you simply want to bring it to cloud—almost a plug-and-play there—you don't really want to deal with a lot of the networking infrastructure, and it'd be great to do something like PrivateLink on AWS, or Private Service Connect on Google Cloud.While those conversations are happening with customers, I'm finding that it's like trying to cross the Grand Canyon. Many enterprise customers are like, “That sounds great, but we have a really complex network topology that we've been sitting on for the past 25 years. Do you really expect that we're going to transition over to something like that?” So, I think it's about providing stepping stones for our customers until they can be ready to adopt a new model.Corey: Yeah. And of course, the part that never gets said out loud but is nonetheless true and at least as big of a deal, “And we have a whole team of people who've built their entire identity around that network because that is what they work on, and they have been ignoring cloud forever, and if we just uplift everything into a cloud where you folks handle that, sure, it's better for the business outcome, but where does that leave them?” So, they've been here for 25 years, and they will spend every scrap of political capital they've managed to accumulate to torpedo a cloud migration. So, any FUD they can find, any horse-trading they can do, anything they can do to obstruct the success of a cloud initiative, they're going to do because people are people, and there is no real plan to mitigate that. There's also the fact that unless there's a clear business value story about a feature velocity increase or opening up new markets, there's also not an incentive to do things to save money. That is never going to be the number one priority in almost any case short of financial disaster at a company because everything they're doing is building out increasing revenue, rather than optimizing what they're already doing.So, there's a whole bunch of political challenges. Honestly, moving the computer stuff from on-premises data centers into a cloud provider is the easiest part of a cloud migration compared to all of the people that are involved.Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah, we talked about serverless and all the nice benefits of it, but unless you are more a digitally-born, next-gen developer, it may be a higher burden for you to undertake that migration. That's why we always [laugh] are talking about encouraging people to start with newer surfaces.Corey: Oh, yeah. And that's the trick, too, is if you're trying to learn a new cloud platform these days—first, if you're trying to pick one, I'd be hard-pressed to suggest anything other than Google Cloud, with the possible exception of DigitalOcean, just because the new user experience is so spectacularly good. That was my first real, I guess, part of paying attention to Google Cloud a few years ago, where I was, “All right, I'm going to kick the tires on this and see how terrible this interface is because it's a Google product.” And it was breathtakingly good, which I did not expect. And getting out of the way to empower someone who's new to the platform to do something relatively quickly and straightforwardly is huge. And sure, there's always room to prove, but that is the right area to focus on. It's clear that the right energy was spent in the right places.Stephanie: Yeah. I will say a story that we don't tell quite as well as we should is the One Google story. And I'm not talking about just between Workspace and Google Cloud, but our identity access management and knowing your Google account, which everybody knows. It's not like Microsoft, where you're forced to make an account, or it's not like AWS where you had a billion accounts and you hate them all.Corey: Oh, my God, I dread logging into the AWS console every time because it is such a pain in the ass. I go to cloud.google.com sometimes to check something, it's like, “Oh, right. I have to dig out my credentials.” And, “Where's my YubiKey?” And get it. Like, “Oh. I'm already log—oh. Oh, right. That's right. Google knows how identity works, and they don't actively hate their customers. Okay.” And it's always a breath of fresh air. Though I will say that by far and away, the worst login experience I've seen yet is, of course, Azure.Stephanie: [laugh]. That's exactly right. It's Google account. It's yours. It's personal. It's like an Apple iCloud account. It's one click, you're in, and you have access to all the applications. You know, so it's the same underlying identity structure with Workspace and Gmail, and it's the same org structure, too, across Workspace and Google Cloud. So, it's not just this disingenuous financial bundle between GCP and Workspace; it's really strategic. And it's kind of like the idea of low code or no code. And it looks like that's what the future of cloud will be. It's not just by VMs from us.Corey: Yeah. And there are customers who want to buy VMs and that's great. Speed up what they're doing; don't get in the way of people giving you their money, but if you're starting something net-new, there's probably better ways to do it. So, I want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to wind up going through how you think about, well, the art of storytelling in the world of engineering. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, and how you approach things, where can they find you?Stephanie: Yeah, so you can head to stephrwong.com where you can see my work and also get in touch with me if you want to collaborate on any content. I'm always, always, always open to that. And my Twitter is @stephr_wong.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:40:03]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Stephanie: Thanks so much.Corey: Stephanie Wong, head of developer engagement at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me that the only way to get into tech these days is, in fact, to graduate with a degree from Stanford, and I can take it from you because you work in their admissions office.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Podio Solutions Podcast
S2E7 - "Human Centered Workflow Design" - Citrix Converge 2021 Presentation

Podio Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 27:16


Citrix Developer Solutions PodcastSeason 2 Episode 7- "Human Centered Workflow Design"  - Citrix Converge 2021  Presentation This podcast is the audio from Gil Roberts'  speaking session titled "Human Centered Workflow Design" where he covers. This presentation was given during the Citrix Converge 2021 developer conference. NOTE: This episode does not contain the traditional show introduction and the talk will just begin.___Show outlineOpenerBrick Bridge History (short)"We all have a big problem happening""Human Centered Design Layers & Components""Why should we care about Human Centered Design?"Closing___Show Links:Video version of "Human Centered Workflow Design": https://youtu.be/NkZ0dGJTT9EBrick Bridge's Converge 2021 Hackathon Entries: Brick Bridge's Website: BrickBridgeConsulting.com___Upcoming Events:Citrix Field Kickoff 2022 (virtual) - January 18th through 20th, 2022"At Field Kickoff, we'll unite around a common vision to help customers drive better business outcomes in a hybrid, multi-cloud world. Hear from Citrix executives, industry leaders and subject matter experts that will equip you to have a greater impact on our customers' businesses. Learn how Citrix can help you deepen customer relationships, expand your market opportunities, and unlock new capabilities. Together, we can enable hybrid work so you—and our customers—can be ready for whatever comes next."Information Here: https://www.citrix.com/fieldkickoff/Brick Bridge Q1 '22 Webinar - Tenative - Feburary 1st @ 12:15pm EST to  1:00pm ESTRegister Here:  https://www.brickbridgeconsulting.com/webinar-registrationInternational Podio Developer Meetup (in-person & virtual) - Tentative May 2022, date TBDJoin the Podio Developer Community for informative and engaging sessions specific to all things Citrix Podio. More details coming in November 2021.Register Here:  https://brickbridgeconsulting.com/ipdm NOTE: The page is open, registration will be available shortly.___Don't Miss Out:Discount Link for smrtPhone.io (30% off first 90-days):  http://bit.ly/smrtPhone-brickbridge --- Use PROMO CODE, if required: BRICKBRIDGE30Support Nonprofits via our "Support this Show" link: BuyMeCoffee.com --- 100% of all funds paid here will be used for donations to our favorite nonprofits.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/brickbridge)

This Week in Google (Video HI)
TWiG 638: Princess Floppy Wrists - Pixel 6 debate, Icelandverse, Apple self-repair program, investing in people

This Week in Google (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 127:11


Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena. US detains crypto-exchange exec for helping Ryuk ransomware gang launder profits. Stacey hates her Pixel 6! Be your own genius: Apple to Launch Self-Service Repair Program in Early 2022. Google allegedly won't release a new Pixelbook in 2022. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Introducing the Icelandverse. Mark Zuckerberg's Response To Iceland Tourism Ad Mocking Meta. Paperless office back again as print hardware supplies jam. Why you should consider using vFlat for book scanning. Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are infectious in all the wrong ways. Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over 'Pulp Fiction' NFT Auction. Google says it's improving fingerprint scanner performance with a Pixel 6 update. Google's latest Maps features help you avoid the holiday shopping crowds. Google Meet calls hosted by premium Workspace tiers now support up to 500 participants. Android TV apps can be remotely installed from your phone via new Play Store feature. Google Camera 8.4 brings Timer light, disabling Exposure controls, & more to older Pixel phones. Twitter acquires Threader. We Read Twitter for Entertainment, Trust It for News (Unless We Vote Republican) Twitter Makes Big Changes For Devs As It Eyes Decentralized Future. Crypto believers bid on U.S. Constitution. WEB2 VS WEB3. Say goodbye to disappearing tweets. Substack says it has more than 1 million paid subscriptions. Big media strikes back at Substack. JPMorgan sues Tesla for $162m after Musk tweets soured share deal. PICKS: Stacey - Mozilla *privacy not included List Stacey - The writing of the gods Jeff - Logitech POP Keys Wireless Keyboard Ant - Follow David Lei on Instagram. Ant - Lensrentals Keeper Program Announced Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit Command Line Heroes - TWIG stripe.com

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 638: Princess Floppy Wrists - Pixel 6 debate, Icelandverse, Apple self-repair program, investing in people

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 126:35


Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena. US detains crypto-exchange exec for helping Ryuk ransomware gang launder profits. Stacey hates her Pixel 6! Be your own genius: Apple to Launch Self-Service Repair Program in Early 2022. Google allegedly won't release a new Pixelbook in 2022. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Introducing the Icelandverse. Mark Zuckerberg's Response To Iceland Tourism Ad Mocking Meta. Paperless office back again as print hardware supplies jam. Why you should consider using vFlat for book scanning. Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are infectious in all the wrong ways. Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over 'Pulp Fiction' NFT Auction. Google says it's improving fingerprint scanner performance with a Pixel 6 update. Google's latest Maps features help you avoid the holiday shopping crowds. Google Meet calls hosted by premium Workspace tiers now support up to 500 participants. Android TV apps can be remotely installed from your phone via new Play Store feature. Google Camera 8.4 brings Timer light, disabling Exposure controls, & more to older Pixel phones. Twitter acquires Threader. We Read Twitter for Entertainment, Trust It for News (Unless We Vote Republican) Twitter Makes Big Changes For Devs As It Eyes Decentralized Future. Crypto believers bid on U.S. Constitution. WEB2 VS WEB3. Say goodbye to disappearing tweets. Substack says it has more than 1 million paid subscriptions. Big media strikes back at Substack. JPMorgan sues Tesla for $162m after Musk tweets soured share deal. PICKS: Stacey - Mozilla *privacy not included List Stacey - The writing of the gods Jeff - Logitech POP Keys Wireless Keyboard Ant - Follow David Lei on Instagram. Ant - Lensrentals Keeper Program Announced Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit Command Line Heroes - TWIG stripe.com

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Google 638: Princess Floppy Wrists

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 127:11


Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena. US detains crypto-exchange exec for helping Ryuk ransomware gang launder profits. Stacey hates her Pixel 6! Be your own genius: Apple to Launch Self-Service Repair Program in Early 2022. Google allegedly won't release a new Pixelbook in 2022. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Introducing the Icelandverse. Mark Zuckerberg's Response To Iceland Tourism Ad Mocking Meta. Paperless office back again as print hardware supplies jam. Why you should consider using vFlat for book scanning. Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are infectious in all the wrong ways. Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over 'Pulp Fiction' NFT Auction. Google says it's improving fingerprint scanner performance with a Pixel 6 update. Google's latest Maps features help you avoid the holiday shopping crowds. Google Meet calls hosted by premium Workspace tiers now support up to 500 participants. Android TV apps can be remotely installed from your phone via new Play Store feature. Google Camera 8.4 brings Timer light, disabling Exposure controls, & more to older Pixel phones. Twitter acquires Threader. We Read Twitter for Entertainment, Trust It for News (Unless We Vote Republican) Twitter Makes Big Changes For Devs As It Eyes Decentralized Future. Crypto believers bid on U.S. Constitution. WEB2 VS WEB3. Say goodbye to disappearing tweets. Substack says it has more than 1 million paid subscriptions. Big media strikes back at Substack. JPMorgan sues Tesla for $162m after Musk tweets soured share deal. PICKS: Stacey - Mozilla *privacy not included List Stacey - The writing of the gods Jeff - Logitech POP Keys Wireless Keyboard Ant - Follow David Lei on Instagram. Ant - Lensrentals Keeper Program Announced Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit Command Line Heroes - TWIG stripe.com

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 638: Princess Floppy Wrists

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 126:35


Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena. US detains crypto-exchange exec for helping Ryuk ransomware gang launder profits. Stacey hates her Pixel 6! Be your own genius: Apple to Launch Self-Service Repair Program in Early 2022. Google allegedly won't release a new Pixelbook in 2022. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Introducing the Icelandverse. Mark Zuckerberg's Response To Iceland Tourism Ad Mocking Meta. Paperless office back again as print hardware supplies jam. Why you should consider using vFlat for book scanning. Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are infectious in all the wrong ways. Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over 'Pulp Fiction' NFT Auction. Google says it's improving fingerprint scanner performance with a Pixel 6 update. Google's latest Maps features help you avoid the holiday shopping crowds. Google Meet calls hosted by premium Workspace tiers now support up to 500 participants. Android TV apps can be remotely installed from your phone via new Play Store feature. Google Camera 8.4 brings Timer light, disabling Exposure controls, & more to older Pixel phones. Twitter acquires Threader. We Read Twitter for Entertainment, Trust It for News (Unless We Vote Republican) Twitter Makes Big Changes For Devs As It Eyes Decentralized Future. Crypto believers bid on U.S. Constitution. WEB2 VS WEB3. Say goodbye to disappearing tweets. Substack says it has more than 1 million paid subscriptions. Big media strikes back at Substack. JPMorgan sues Tesla for $162m after Musk tweets soured share deal. PICKS: Stacey - Mozilla *privacy not included List Stacey - The writing of the gods Jeff - Logitech POP Keys Wireless Keyboard Ant - Follow David Lei on Instagram. Ant - Lensrentals Keeper Program Announced Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit Command Line Heroes - TWIG stripe.com

Total Ant (Video)
This Week in Google 638: Princess Floppy Wrists

Total Ant (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 127:11


Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena. US detains crypto-exchange exec for helping Ryuk ransomware gang launder profits. Stacey hates her Pixel 6! Be your own genius: Apple to Launch Self-Service Repair Program in Early 2022. Google allegedly won't release a new Pixelbook in 2022. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Introducing the Icelandverse. Mark Zuckerberg's Response To Iceland Tourism Ad Mocking Meta. Paperless office back again as print hardware supplies jam. Why you should consider using vFlat for book scanning. Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are infectious in all the wrong ways. Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over 'Pulp Fiction' NFT Auction. Google says it's improving fingerprint scanner performance with a Pixel 6 update. Google's latest Maps features help you avoid the holiday shopping crowds. Google Meet calls hosted by premium Workspace tiers now support up to 500 participants. Android TV apps can be remotely installed from your phone via new Play Store feature. Google Camera 8.4 brings Timer light, disabling Exposure controls, & more to older Pixel phones. Twitter acquires Threader. We Read Twitter for Entertainment, Trust It for News (Unless We Vote Republican) Twitter Makes Big Changes For Devs As It Eyes Decentralized Future. Crypto believers bid on U.S. Constitution. WEB2 VS WEB3. Say goodbye to disappearing tweets. Substack says it has more than 1 million paid subscriptions. Big media strikes back at Substack. JPMorgan sues Tesla for $162m after Musk tweets soured share deal. PICKS: Stacey - Mozilla *privacy not included List Stacey - The writing of the gods Jeff - Logitech POP Keys Wireless Keyboard Ant - Follow David Lei on Instagram. Ant - Lensrentals Keeper Program Announced Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit Command Line Heroes - TWIG stripe.com

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Google 638: Princess Floppy Wrists

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 126:35


Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena. US detains crypto-exchange exec for helping Ryuk ransomware gang launder profits. Stacey hates her Pixel 6! Be your own genius: Apple to Launch Self-Service Repair Program in Early 2022. Google allegedly won't release a new Pixelbook in 2022. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Introducing the Icelandverse. Mark Zuckerberg's Response To Iceland Tourism Ad Mocking Meta. Paperless office back again as print hardware supplies jam. Why you should consider using vFlat for book scanning. Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are infectious in all the wrong ways. Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over 'Pulp Fiction' NFT Auction. Google says it's improving fingerprint scanner performance with a Pixel 6 update. Google's latest Maps features help you avoid the holiday shopping crowds. Google Meet calls hosted by premium Workspace tiers now support up to 500 participants. Android TV apps can be remotely installed from your phone via new Play Store feature. Google Camera 8.4 brings Timer light, disabling Exposure controls, & more to older Pixel phones. Twitter acquires Threader. We Read Twitter for Entertainment, Trust It for News (Unless We Vote Republican) Twitter Makes Big Changes For Devs As It Eyes Decentralized Future. Crypto believers bid on U.S. Constitution. WEB2 VS WEB3. Say goodbye to disappearing tweets. Substack says it has more than 1 million paid subscriptions. Big media strikes back at Substack. JPMorgan sues Tesla for $162m after Musk tweets soured share deal. PICKS: Stacey - Mozilla *privacy not included List Stacey - The writing of the gods Jeff - Logitech POP Keys Wireless Keyboard Ant - Follow David Lei on Instagram. Ant - Lensrentals Keeper Program Announced Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit Command Line Heroes - TWIG stripe.com

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S27E20 - How Mindful Workspaces are Conducive to Deep Work and Creativity, with Nitin Govila

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 32:44


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Nitin Govila about how mindful workspaces are more conducive to deep work and creativity. See the video here: https://youtu.be/qifNOU8lsnI. Singapore based Nitin Govila (https://www.linkedin.com/in/nitin-govila-5224a3) is a Management Leader, Entrepreneur, engineer and Meditation Trainer. He is the  APAC MENA MD for the French manufacturing group Serge Ferrari, a leader in the flexible composite material  sector. His scope of operations covers: Japan, Korea, China, Hongkong, India, ASEAN, Australia-NZ, Middle-East &  Africa. Born in India, Educated and Worked in France. Based in Singapore.  In addition to overseeing business operations and management of 7 Legal distribution entities (and a newly  acquired Taiwanese company) across the Asia Pacific, Middle East & Africa region, Nitin is a member of the Group  Executive Committee helping define the company's long-term strategy and key decisions for the future growth of  the organization. Nitin manages a 175-member global team.   Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

Digital Workspace Tech Zone Podcast
Workspace ONE UEM Doc Improvement Project and Feedback

Digital Workspace Tech Zone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


HR unConfidential
Workspace 2.0

HR unConfidential

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 75:10


Gina and Turiya are joined by Vicki Bartling & Emily Watkins of unispace, a leader in workspace strategy and design, to discuss how needs, design, and employee expectations of the physical workspace have evolved in recent years. We also discuss the connection between corporate real estate and employee experience and the increased role HR is playing in workspace design decisions. Learn more about unispace at unispace.com.   Please share with us! Facebook - @HRunConfidential | LinkedIn |  Email |

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
What The Workspace Looks Like Post COVID

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:15


Jon and Sande Golgart, President of Zonez, Inc. talk about what the workspace looks like post COVID. Sande is a disruptive technology and business enthusiast. He is passionate about helping companies solve their biggest issues. Prior to his role as President at Zonez, Sande held the roles of Chief Sales Officer at Emagispace, Inc., SVP, Corporate Sales as well as Regional Vice President during his 16-year career at Regus, the world's largest provider of flexible workspace. Sande is often quoted on real estate issues and trends affecting businesses from start-ups to the Global 1000. He has been featured on Fox Business News, ABC News, Los Angeles Times, Sacramento Bee, Seattle Post Intelligencer, Puget Sound Business Journal, and various other media outlets.   Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Sande Golgart: Website: https://zonez.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sande-golgart-3078787/

The Cloud Pod
139: Back to the Future With Google Distributed Cloud

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:55


On The Cloud Pod this week, Jonathan reveals his love for “Twilight.” Plus GCP kicks off Google Cloud Next and announces Google Distributed Cloud, and Azure admits to a major DDoS attack.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

Below the Line with James Beshara
#120 — #DeepDive on The Remote Workspace Utopia — Hiten Shah

Below the Line with James Beshara

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 121:03


Hiten Shah is the Co-Founder and CEO of Nira. A company that specializes in protecting companies documents from unauthorized access. Hiten has been working remotely for close to 18 years. Today he joins James to talk about The Remote Workspace Utopia. James and Hiten start the episode by giving listeners insight into all the technological gadgets used to help complete daily tasks and meetings remotely. James and Hiten also dive deep into the topic of meetings. Hiten explains the detrimental effects of mixing strategy and execution and why each topic should be discussed separately. To conclude the episode, James and Hiten talk about Communication in the remote workspace and what are the best practices in keeping your team on track. https://bit.ly/Go_BelowtheLine Find out more about Hiten Shah: https://www.twitter.com/hnshah https://www.nira.com/ Hit the show hotline and leave a question or comment for the show at 424-272-6640, email James questions directly at askbelowtheline@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/gobelowtheline Support Our Sponsors: Magic Mind https://magicmind.co (Use Code BTL at Checkout for 20% off) AppSumo http://appsumo.com/bff About your host, James: James Beshara is a founder, investor, advisor, author, podcaster, and encourager based in Los Angeles, California. James has created startups for the last 12 years, selling one (Tilt, acquired by Airbnb), and invested in a few multi-billion dollar startups to date. He has spoken at places such as Y-Combinator, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, TechCrunch Disrupt, and has been featured in outlets like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, and Time Magazine. He's been featured in Forbes, Time, and Inc Magazine's “30 Under 30” lists and advises startups all around the world. All of this is his “above the line” version of his background. Hear the other 90% of the story in the intro episode of Below The Line. “Below the Line with James Beshara" is brought to you by Another Podcast Network.

Katie's Crib
Bring Back Independent Play & Break Up With Burnout w/ Lizzie Assa

Katie's Crib

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 50:58


Katie speaks with Lizzie Assa (founder, the Workspace for Children) about teaching kids how to play independently. The parenting strategist outlines the value and importance of independent play, how to end parental burnout, and the difference between close-ended toys and open-ended toys. Plus, have you ever had your child come up to you and tell you “I'm bored?” Tune in to learn how to respond! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com