Podcasts about Angular

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Best podcasts about Angular

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Latest podcast episodes about Angular

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
The future of Angular with Minko Gechev

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 28:50


In this episode, we talk to Minko Gechev, Angular Product Lead, about what is new in Angular v15 and what to expect from Angular in the future. Links https://twitter.com/mgechev https://twitter.com/Angular https://blog.mgechev.com https://www.youtube.com/Angular https://angular.io https://guess-js.github.io https://blog.tensorflow.org/2021/05/speed-up-your-sites-with-web-page-prefetching-using-ml.html Tell us what you think of PodRocket We want to hear from you! We want to know what you love and hate about the podcast. What do you want to hear more about? Who do you want to see on the show? Our producers want to know, and if you talk with us, we'll send you a $25 gift card! If you're interested, schedule a call with us (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us) or you can email producer Kate Trahan at kate@logrocket.com (mailto:kate@logrocket.com) Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Minko Gechev.

Talk Cosmos
Astrological Mavericks with Michael Bartlett

Talk Cosmos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 56:03


Special Guest Panel with Michael Bartlett, conversing about his subject of his book, Astrological Mavericks: Do you have what it takes to change world? Jupiter leaves Pisces and enters World Point 0° Aries on the Winter Solstice when the Sun moves into the cardinal angle of 0° Capricorn. “Michael advocates embracing an astrological maverick energy and willing to open meaningful outlets to experience,” said Sue Minahan, founder, and host of the weekly show. “Angular planets operate independently giving opportunities to set new rules with the planet's archetypal engagement. Join Sue Rose Minahan founder host and astrologer of Talk Cosmos with special guest Michael Bartlett residing in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Grab his bios below, and at Talk Cosmos website. Connect! You'll keep up with the changes! Subscribe & follow us on Talk Cosmos YouTube Channel. Or always heard on your favorite podcast and on 1150kknw.com online/radio formats with Talk Cosmos podcast episode library. MICHAEL BARTLETT: Metaphysician, Guide, Traditional and Esoteric Astrologer, Author, Facilitator of the Subtle, Artist and CFO coremichael.com Michael Bartlett focuses on esoteric astrology and traditional while incorporating the depths of the outer planets. His Core Energetic training, highly intuitive nature, three decades of business experience and over two decades of astrological wisdom give him an extensively resourced toolbox. Michael is the author of: -Astrological Mavericks: Do you have what it takes to change the world? A book about individuals with planets on their chart's angles, and -AstroTheatre: A revolutionary approach to the ancient art of astrology. In addition to being a past interim president of Kepler College and offering webinars workshops, through them, he also offers experiential intensives, readings, speaking engagements and workshop intensives. Email: michael@coremichael.com SUE ROSE MINAHAN: is the founder of Talk Cosmos, an eclectic evolutionary astrologer consultant and certified color energy life coach. -Vice President of the Washington State Astrological Association, -member of Kepler Astrology Toastmaster Club. -has a Dwarf Planet University Diploma, and AA with Music degree. -Ardent mythologist. Artist, writer. Student of life. TalkCosmos.com Talk Cosmos is your opportunity to ponder realms of what Carl Jung called the collective unconsciousness that's shared through time to the present…all through the lens of Sue's lifetime of peering into astrology. “Thankfully, I discovered Evolutionary astrology. Its perspective points directly to our unique personal spiritual soul growth…driven by our aligned intentions. Its promising purpose of soul growth ignited an entirely alive Zodiac. Captured, I felt compelled to study the deep significance of astrological application,” said Sue. Sue is your guide to focusing the Cosmos kaleidoscope. In the words of Einstein, “Energy's never destroyed, energy only changes.” Discover the energy that is Talk Cosmos, every Sunday from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. right here on Alternative Talk 1150! Contact https://talkcosmos.com for weekly schedule, blog, and information.

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
Unsubscribing Observables on Component Destroy With Lucas Paganini- AiA 360

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 64:08


Lucas Paganini is a content creator and developer. Together with his team creates educational content about web development through articles and YouTube tutorials. He has been working on Angular since 2017 and is the CEO of a remote company called Unvoid.  He joins Chuck on the show to talk about his article, "Automatically Unsubscribe Observables on Destroy".  About this Episode Managing Observables when your component is destroyed Different roles in the Dependency Injector System Ways in providing Dependency The Unsubscribe Service Sponsors Chuck's Resume Template Developer Book Club starting with Clean Architecture by Robert C. Martin Become a Top 1% Dev with a Top End Devs Membership Links Angular: Automatically Unsubscribe Observables on Destroy - YouTube Angular: Automatically Unsubscribe Observables on Destroy What's New in Angular v14 - A Game Change - YouTube Official Angular docs - The Dependency Injection system Official Angular docs - Platform injector Official Angular docs - Benefits of using providedIn: “root” Official Angular docs - ngOnDestroy for Services Official Angular docs - Dependency Injection resolution modifiers @Self @SkipSelf @Host Official Angular docs - Angular inject() function Official Angular docs - Performance improvements with manual change detection Official Angular docs - ViewRef.onDestroy Official RxJS docs - takeUntil operator Memory leaks, When to Unsubscribe in Angular, by Netanel Basal Unleash the Power of DI Functions in Angular, by Netanel Basal Angular utilities library @lucaspaganini/angular-utils Angular utilities library @lucaspaganini/angular-utils source code - UnsubscriberService.takeUntilDestroy Unvoid Lucas Paganini Twitter: @LucasPaganini Instagram: lucaspaganini Picks Charles - Timpanogos Game Convention Charles - Keeper of the Lost Cities Lucas - Flavio Almeida Angular courses (warning: a lot of content in Portuguese) Lucas - Thoughtram Angular blog Lucas - Overcooked 2 game Lucas - Game Night movie

Adventures in Angular
Unsubscribing Observables on Component Destroy With Lucas Paganini- AiA 360

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 64:08


Lucas Paganini is a content creator and developer. Together with his team creates educational content about web development through articles and YouTube tutorials. He has been working on Angular since 2017 and is the CEO of a remote company called Unvoid.  He joins Chuck on the show to talk about his article, "Automatically Unsubscribe Observables on Destroy".  About this Episode Managing Observables when your component is destroyed Different roles in the Dependency Injector System Ways in providing Dependency The Unsubscribe Service Sponsors Chuck's Resume Template Developer Book Club starting with Clean Architecture by Robert C. Martin Become a Top 1% Dev with a Top End Devs Membership Links Angular: Automatically Unsubscribe Observables on Destroy - YouTube Angular: Automatically Unsubscribe Observables on Destroy What's New in Angular v14 - A Game Change - YouTube Official Angular docs - The Dependency Injection system Official Angular docs - Platform injector Official Angular docs - Benefits of using providedIn: “root” Official Angular docs - ngOnDestroy for Services Official Angular docs - Dependency Injection resolution modifiers @Self @SkipSelf @Host Official Angular docs - Angular inject() function Official Angular docs - Performance improvements with manual change detection Official Angular docs - ViewRef.onDestroy Official RxJS docs - takeUntil operator Memory leaks, When to Unsubscribe in Angular, by Netanel Basal Unleash the Power of DI Functions in Angular, by Netanel Basal Angular utilities library @lucaspaganini/angular-utils Angular utilities library @lucaspaganini/angular-utils source code - UnsubscriberService.takeUntilDestroy Unvoid Lucas Paganini Twitter: @LucasPaganini Instagram: lucaspaganini Picks Charles - Timpanogos Game Convention Charles - Keeper of the Lost Cities Lucas - Flavio Almeida Angular courses (warning: a lot of content in Portuguese) Lucas - Thoughtram Angular blog Lucas - Overcooked 2 game Lucas - Game Night movie

Frontend Weekend
#137 – Владислав Худяков о том, как из фрилансера стать бизнес-партнёром IT-компании

Frontend Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 49:11


Владислав Худяков, техлид и партнер в компании Pragmatica, в гостях у Андрея Смирнова из Frontend Weekend. Выпуски шоу инженерного сообщества AvitoTech «По домам: фронтенд» смотрите на ютуб-канале AvitoTech – https://bit.ly/3fXJdyo 00:00 Начало 00:27 Чем можешь быть известен моей аудитории? 01:02 По домам: фронтенд 01:50 С чего начинал в веб-разработке? 05:16 Как рос вместе с веб-технологиями и попал на первую работу? 11:03 Зачем из техлида стал партнером Прагматики? 15:02 Почему решился на уход в бизнес с учетом отсутствия практики? 17:58 Готов ли отказываться от написания кода и дальше расти в менеджмент? 21:28 Какие навыки приобрел с уходом в бизнес и насколько комфортно они легли? 23:40 Кем бы ты стал, если бы не стал разработчиком? 28:45 React, Angular, Vue или Ember? 34:17 Помогает ли личный бренд и есть ли будущее у no-backend подхода? 36:37 Почему стоит приехать в Екатеринбург? 42:15 Сколько стоит и в чём кайф панорамного дома в Екатеринбурге? 44:36 В чём сейчас главная проблема современного IT? 46:18 Готовим вместе с frontend-разработчиком 47:49 Совет от Влада Ссылки по теме: 1) Телеграм-канал Влада – https://t.me/frontend_lite 2) Статьи Влада про выбор фреймворка – https://habr.com/ru/users/khudyakv/posts/ 3) Запись фронтенд митапа с выступлением Влада – https://youtu.be/WIs74Quvqjg

react angular frontend weekend
All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
Change Detection Method in Angular - AiA 359

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 50:11


Armen comes back to the show to talk about one of his articles, “Change Detection without Change Detection". Change detection functions by helping rerender the UI when data changes. Armen joins Chuck and Subrat as he shares the importance of using his Change Detection technique to improve performance rather than using the built-in one.Topics discussed Change detection and how it works How do you call or trigger a Change Detection Inject Function Proxy Object Sponsors Chuck's Resume Template Developer Book Club starting with Clean Architecture by Robert C. Martin Become a Top 1% Dev with a Top End Devs Membership LinksChange Detection without Change DetectionPicks Armen - House of the Dragon | Official Website for the HBO Series Charles - Board Game Conventions Charles - Clean Architecture Subrat - Atomic Habits

Adventures in Angular
Change Detection Method in Angular - AiA 359

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 50:11


Armen comes back to the show to talk about one of his articles, “Change Detection without Change Detection". Change detection functions by helping rerender the UI when data changes. Armen joins Chuck and Subrat as he shares the importance of using his Change Detection technique to improve performance rather than using the built-in one.Topics discussed Change detection and how it works How do you call or trigger a Change Detection Inject Function Proxy Object Sponsors Chuck's Resume Template Developer Book Club starting with Clean Architecture by Robert C. Martin Become a Top 1% Dev with a Top End Devs Membership LinksChange Detection without Change DetectionPicks Armen - House of the Dragon | Official Website for the HBO Series Charles - Board Game Conventions Charles - Clean Architecture Subrat - Atomic Habits

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Qwik and Qwik City with Miško Hevery

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 37:50


Qwik is a new kind of web framework that can deliver instant loading web applications at any size. Miško Hevery is the creator of Angular and Qwik and CTO of Builder.io. Miško joins us today to talk about Qwik and Qwik's meta-framework, Qwik City. Links https://twitter.com/mhevery https://twitter.com/qwikdev Qwik.new (https://stackblitz.com/edit/qwik-starter?) Tell us what you think of PodRocket We want to hear from you! We want to know what you love and hate about the podcast. What do you want to hear more about? Who do you want to see on the show? Our producers want to know, and if you talk with us, we'll send you a $25 gift card! If you're interested, schedule a call with us (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us) or you can email producer Kate Trahan at kate@logrocket.com (mailto:kate@logrocket.com) Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Misko Hevery.

React Round Up
All Things Voice Recognition and JavaScript with Ian Lavery - RRU 204

React Round Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 49:29


Returning guest, Ian Lavery from Picovice.ai, joins the hosts to talk all things voice recognition. He dives into new languages the company has tackled over the last year (and what languages it plans to tackle next year), how they train their models, and how Picovoice is actually running speech recognition in the browser instead of in the cloud, making things like captioning live streams and real-time chats possible with some of its newer tech Cheetah and Leopard. He also shares how he wrote a simple podcast transcription app using Picovoice and Express.js, in addition to Picovoice boasting specific SDKs for React, Angular and Vue. Listen to Ian's first appearance on RRU here where he and the panel went deep into the specifics of voice recognition like security and privacy, understanding it in general, and using it sans big cloud providers. Sponsors Chuck's Resume Template Developer Book Club starting with Clean Architecture by Robert C. Martin Become a Top 1% Dev with a Top End Devs Membership Links LinkedIn: Ian Lavery Ian Lavery - Medium Twitter: @AiPicovoice Picks Ian - Mixpanel: Product Analytics for Mobile, Web, & More Paige - Star Trek: Lower Decks - Wikipedia TJ - The Great British Bakeoff series

Dev Questions with Tim Corey
127 How Do I Choose the Right Web Framework?

Dev Questions with Tim Corey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 12:09


How do I choose the right web framework for my project? Do I use ASP.NET Core? Do I use Angular? React? Vue? What criteria should I use when deciding what is right for my project? These are the questions we will answer in today's episode of Dev Questions.Website: https://www.iamtimcorey.com/Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IAmTimCoreyAsk Your Question: https://suggestions.iamtimcorey.com/Sign Up to Get More Great Developer Content in Your Inbox: https://signup.iamtimcorey.com/

JPO Podcast
Lit. Update with Heather Kowalski

JPO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 48:53


Heather Kowalski of The University of Iowa joins the show to discuss her recent JPOSNA publications on resident education through state-of-the-art simulation and her efforts to promote diversity and inclusion in our field. She “stirs the pot” on a variety of controversial topics in pediatric trauma and limb length inequality. Your hosts are Josh Holt from University of Iowa, Carter Clement from Children's Hospital of New Orleans, Craig Louer from Vanderbilt, and Julia Sanders from Children's Hospital Colorado. Music by A.A. Aalto.    Main Event Articles:   1) Holt et al. Integrating Simulation for Developing Pediatric Supracondylar Humeral Fracture Reduction and Fixation Skills into an Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program. JPOSNA 2022.   2) Holt et al. Integrating Simulation for Developing Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis Fixation Skills into an Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program. JPOSNA 2022.   3) Thomas et al. A Vision for Using Simulation & Virtual Coaching to Improve the Community Practice of Orthopedic Trauma Surgery. Iowa Orthop J. 2020.   Lightning Round Articles:   1) Georgiadis et al. Motorized Plate Lengthening of the Femur in Children: A Preliminary Report. JPO 2022.   2) Mahan et al. Fully displaced pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures: Which ones need to go at night? JCO 2022.   3) Weinmayer et al. Angular deformities after percutaneous epiphysiodesis for leg length discrepancy. JCO 2022.   4) Miller et al. Unilateral versus bilateral reconstructive hip surgery in children with cerebral palsy: A survey of pediatric orthopedic surgery practice and decision-making. JCO 2022.   5) Vij et al. Ethnic and Sex Diversity in Academic Orthopaedic Surgery: A Cross-sectional Study. JAAOS Glob Res Rev. 2022.

Otherworldly Oracle Official
Angular Aspects in a Natal Chart (Astrology Series)

Otherworldly Oracle Official

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 32:47


Join us for another episode in our Astrology Series where Allorah educates us on the exciting angular aspects in a natal chart. You might find you learn something new about yourself that you never knew before including conflicting personality traits, hidden self's shadows, and past life traumas. Don't forget! We have supplemental BOOK OF SHADOWS pages to go along with this episode for you to download on our Patreon here.

DevTalles
087-Angular vs React - Consideraciones a finales del 2022

DevTalles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 30:44


Aquí una serie de consideraciones para fin de año sobre Angular y React, junto con una comparativa interesante del estado de JavaScript del 2016 al 2021. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fernando-her85/support

Being Freelance
Web Developer Stephen Adams

Being Freelance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 40:47


Stephen wasn't looking to go freelance, but when redundancy came 10 years ago, he took on a contract for a few months. And here is all those years later saying he'd never go back.In between he's evolved specialisms, written a book that became a course and started working remotely. Stephen takes time out on side projects and courses to always stay on top of trends, tech and skills - thinking about what his clients might want now and in the years to come.And what about what he wants? As he nears the end of his 40s, Stephen's now exploring what a future in freelancing will look like for him and his family.You'll find full show notes and transcript for this episode at beingfreelance.com This episode is sponsored by AXA Business Insurance.Get cover for your work, your tools, your reputation. It feels better being protected, being freelance.Work hard, insure easy. Check out their site or Search AXA Business Insurance.AXA Insurance UK plc is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation AuthorityThis episode is sponsored by IPSEThe Association of Independent Professionals and the Self Employed -  support for UK freelancers.Advice, networking, events, perks - and sort your pension, insurance, legal, tax..There's a lot to think about when being freelance, and IPSE have your back. New to freelancing? The Being Freelance course is made for you!Steve's rolled up everything he's learnt from over 6 years of conversations with more than 250 freelancers.There's no ‘one way' to be a successful freelancer, but this course will help you avoid the many mistakes that most of us make. Learn from our experiences.Find out more about the course. FREELANCER MERCHGet Being Freelance merchandise at beingfreelance.com/shopLooking to learn from and connect with other freelancers? Check out the website beingfreelance.com, and be part of the Being Freelance Community!Like VIDEO? - Check out the Being Freelance vlog - YouTube.com/SteveFolland

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
Using the LocalStorage Object in Angular with Dany Paredes - AiA 358

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 34:18


In Angular apps, remembering user-preferred settings is an excellent way to provide a good experience for the users; you can save data in the user's browser using the localStorage object, which provides methods for working the key-value data.  Today on the show, GDE Angular expert Dany Paredes shares his insights about localStorage, how to learn about this API, and knowledge to build in Angular to save background color preferences.   In this episode… How localStorage works and limitations API examples and use cases Possible performance issues Trusting the localStorage and API mock values Complicated use cases Angular content in Spanish Sponsors Top End Devs Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Coaching | Top End Devs Links ng-content Angular Basics: localStorage Object Keeps Data in Browser Twitter: @danywalls Dany Paredes | Javascript / Web Picks Charles- Quartile Charles- Funnel Hacking LIVE 2022 Charles - Angular Remote Conf Dany – Enjoys comparing NBA players to Angular developers

Adventures in Angular
Using the LocalStorage Object in Angular with Dany Paredes - AiA 358

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 34:18


In Angular apps, remembering user-preferred settings is an excellent way to provide a good experience for the users; you can save data in the user's browser using the localStorage object, which provides methods for working the key-value data.  Today on the show, GDE Angular expert Dany Paredes shares his insights about localStorage, how to learn about this API, and knowledge to build in Angular to save background color preferences.   In this episode… How localStorage works and limitations API examples and use cases Possible performance issues Trusting the localStorage and API mock values Complicated use cases Angular content in Spanish Sponsors Top End Devs Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Coaching | Top End Devs Links ng-content Angular Basics: localStorage Object Keeps Data in Browser Twitter: @danywalls Dany Paredes | Javascript / Web Picks Charles- Quartile Charles- Funnel Hacking LIVE 2022 Charles - Angular Remote Conf Dany – Enjoys comparing NBA players to Angular developers

The Angular Show
S4 S8 - Dependency Injection Now with 100% More Coffee! with Maria Korneeva

The Angular Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 53:34


Dependency Injection is one of the most powerful features of the Angular Framework, but a lot of us take it for granted. Maria Korneeva joins us to talk about Angular Dependency Injection, Injection Tokens, and the new features introduced with v14.https://twitter.com/BrowserPersonhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaWRt6pENeohttps://angular.io/guide/dependency-injection-overview

The Angular Show
S4 S7 - Feature Flag Based Routing with NgxFeatureFlagRouter with Mark Thompson from Bitovi

The Angular Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 60:34


Wouldn't it be great if it were easier to use feature flags to determine routing? Wait what's a feature flag? This week we welcome Mark Thompson from Bitovi to talk about all things feature flag and to introduce his new library NgxFeatureFlagRouter which makes Angular routing with feature flags in easy! https://github.com/m-thompson-code/ngx-feature-flag-routerhttps://www.foodnetwork.com/restaurants/photos/crazy-dishes-made-with-flamin-hot-cheetoshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLIZlwhBoq0https://twitter.com/CodeMooCow

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
Weekly Content Development Strategies with GDE Maina Wycliffe - AiA 357

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:25


Maina Wycliffe, Google Developer Expert in Angular, joins the show today to talk about his weekly newsletter called “All Things Typescript” and his various content and production strategies.  Similarly, Charles also shares his perspective about how he has grown TopEndDevs. In this episode… Typescript newsletter Delivering concepts Creating content for posts RSS feeds Resource lists Ideal newsletter lengths Staying current in the industry Paid subscriptions Sponsors Top End Devs Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Coaching | Top End Devs Links All Things Typescript Maina Wycliffe Twitter: @mwycliffe_dev Picks Charles- Irish Gauge Charles- How to Stay Current Charles- Top End Devs |  Coaching Charles - Angular Remote Conf Maina- Learning TypeScript: Enhance Your Web Development Skills Using Type-Safe JavaScript Maina- DevFest | Google Developers

Adventures in Angular
Weekly Content Development Strategies with GDE Maina Wycliffe - AiA 357

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:25


Maina Wycliffe, Google Developer Expert in Angular, joins the show today to talk about his weekly newsletter called “All Things Typescript” and his various content and production strategies.  Similarly, Charles also shares his perspective about how he has grown TopEndDevs. In this episode… Typescript newsletter Delivering concepts Creating content for posts RSS feeds Resource lists Ideal newsletter lengths Staying current in the industry Paid subscriptions Sponsors Top End Devs Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Coaching | Top End Devs Links All Things Typescript Maina Wycliffe Twitter: @mwycliffe_dev Picks Charles- Irish Gauge Charles- How to Stay Current Charles- Top End Devs |  Coaching Charles - Angular Remote Conf Maina- Learning TypeScript: Enhance Your Web Development Skills Using Type-Safe JavaScript Maina- DevFest | Google Developers

The Angular Show
S4 E6 - Level Up Your NgRx Skills With 10 Time-Tested Best Practices with Tomas Trajan

The Angular Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 84:35


Ready to level up your NgRx skills? Tomas Trajan shares with us his top tips for working effectively and conventionally with NgRx. We go in-depth on best practices that help you develop faster with this popular state management library and uncover some drama around the viewModel$ pattern!• https://tomastrajan.medium.com/level-up-your-ngrx-skills-with-10-time-tested-best-practices-6c837fb14877• https://twitter.com/tomastrajan• https://angularexperts.io/• https://omniboard.dev/https://rxjs.dev/guide/testing/marble-testing

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition
Modernize or Die® - CFML News Podcast for September 20th, 2022 - Episode 164

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 47:23


2022-09-20 Weekly News - Episode 164Watch the video version on YouTube at https://youtu.be/qIpbpe852XQ Hosts:Gavin Pickin - Senior Developer at Ortus SolutionsThanks to our Sponsor - Ortus Solutions The makers of ColdBox, CommandBox, ForgeBox, TestBox and all your favorite box-es out there.  A few ways  to say thanks back to Ortus Solutions: BUY A WORKSHOP TICKET for After CF Summit - Learn ColdBox APIs, VueJS and Quasar for exporting to mobile, desktop and the web!!! Like and subscribe to our videos on YouTube.  Help ORTUS reach for the Stars - Star and Fork our Repos Star all of your Github Box Dependencies from CommandBox with https://www.forgebox.io/view/commandbox-github  Subscribe to our Podcast on your Podcast Apps and leave us a review Sign up for a free or paid account on CFCasts, which is releasing new content every week BOXLife store: https://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/shop Buy Ortus's Book - 102 ColdBox HMVC Quick Tips and Tricks on GumRoad (http://gum.co/coldbox-tips)  Patreon Support (IMPECCABLE)Goal 1 - We have 40 patreons providing 100% of the funding for our Modernize or Die Podcasts via our Patreon site: https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutions Goal 2 - We are 33% of the way to fully fund the hosting of ForgeBox.io News and AnnouncementsITB Session Survey Raffle Ali Awan - Amazon Gift Card - $25 Shawn Oden - Modern CFML Book Ryan Hinto - Modern CFML Book 2 more weeks for more survey results - giving away more Modern CFML Books, and a Shirt from the Box Life Store!Ortus hiring another USA DeveloperAlthough we're always looking, we're actively looking to hire that USA developer now. So check the criteria on the Careers page, and email us info@ortussolutions.com today to start the process.https://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/careers CF Summit AMA SessionAsk Dave Ferguson and Matt Gifford anything, literally!Post your questions here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScRgS7UKySpVyf8Q5SAd6_gM3xKgh-D14_TjnZnkpyzo2qYeg/viewform?usp=send_form  and select questions will be answered live on stage by the experts. Only at the Adobe ColdFusion Summit 2022.Register now: https://cfsummit.adobeevents.com/ State of the CF Union Survey - Results - Part 1 - PodcastGavin Pickin talks about “State of CF Union Survey 2022 Results In-Depth Analysis Part 1 (14 cool ColdFusion, Database and Frameworks insights)” in this episode of ColdFusion Alive Podcast with host Michaela Light.“…so far right now, you know, we see 60% of people are using a supported ColdFusion licensed product…”https://teratech.com/podcast/state-of-cf-union-survey-2022-results-in-depth-analysis-part-1-14-cool-coldfusion-database-and-frameworks-insights-with-gavin-pickin Hacktoberfest 2023Registrations begin Sept 26th 2023.https://hacktoberfest.com/ New Releases and UpdatesLucee now has Mail ListenersMail Listeners can be configured to be triggered before and after sending email (only for email sending as async).These follow the same pattern as Query Listeners.This is available as an experimental feature in Lucee 5.3 and is officially supported in Lucee 6.0.https://docs.lucee.org/guides/cookbooks/mail_listeners.html Webinar / Meetups and WorkshopsICYMI - Ortus Webinar - September - Into the Box - RecapFriday, September 16th, 2022: Time 12:30AM Central Time ( US and Canada )Join members of the Ortus team as they discuss Into the Box 2022, with a recap on all the new releases, product updates, happy box, the hallway track, the food, and what's coming for Into the Box 2023 in less than 9 months time!What live on Youtube: https://youtu.be/l4S-UEF8XIw Adobe Workshops & WebinarsJoin the Adobe ColdFusion Workshop to learn how you and your agency can leverage ColdFusion to create amazing web content. This one-day training will cover all facets of Adobe ColdFusion that developers need to build applications that can run across multiple cloud providers or on-premiseWORKSHOP - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 20229:00 AM CESTAdobe ColdFusion WorkshopDamien Bruyndonckxhttps://adobe-coldfusion-workshop-1day.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEBINAR - THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 202210:00 AM PDTBuilding Custom Adobe Connect Pods with CF2021Mark Takatahttps://building-custom-adobe-connect-pods-cf2021.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEBINAR - WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 202210:00 AM PSTBuilding Native Mobile Applications with Adobe ColdFusion & Monaco.ioMark Takatahttps://building-native-mobile-apps-with-cf-monaco-io.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEBINAR - THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 202210:00 AM PSTWinter Holiday Special: A preview of ColdFusion 2023Mark Takatahttps://winter-special-preview-of-cf2023.meetus.adobeevents.com/ FREE :)Full list - https://meetus.adobeevents.com/coldfusion/ CFCasts Content Updateshttps://www.cfcasts.comJust Released Every video from ITB - For ITB Ticket Holders Only - Will be released for Subscribed in December 2022 ForgeBox Module of the Week Series - 1 new Video - https://cfcasts.com/series/2022-forgebox-modules-of-the-week 2022 VS Code Hint tip and Trick of the Week Series - 1 new Video - https://cfcasts.com/series/2022-vs-code-hint-tip-and-trick-of-the-week  Coming Soon - Now that ITB is over we can get back to our Video Series More ForgeBox and VS Code Podcast snippet videos Box-ifying a 3rd Party Library from Gavin ColdBox Elixir from Eric Getting Started with ContentBox from Daniel ITB Videos will be released Dec for those who are not ITB Ticket Holders Conferences and TrainingCF Summit - OfficialAt the Mirage in Las Vegas, NVOct 3rd & 4th - CFSummit ConferenceOct 5th - Adobe Certified Professional: Adobe ColdFusion Certification Classes & Testshttps://cfsummit.adobeevents.com/ https://www.adobe.com/products/coldfusion-family/certificate.html Registrations are now open.Schedule has been announced!!!!Ortus CF Summit Training WorkshopColdBox Zero to MegaHero : REST APIs + VueJS Mobile AppOct 5th and 6th - After CF Summit ConferenceLead by Luis Majano & Gavin PickinPrice: $799 - Early bird pricinghttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/ortus-cf-summit-training-workshop-tickets-375306340367Location: Aria - In the luxurious Executive Hospitality Suite like 2019Free T-ShirtFree Modern CFML BookFree ColdBox Zero to Hero Workshop on CFCasts to help you prepareWe'll even refund you $50 if you bought your ticket and need to change it to stay for the workshop!!!!AWSome Day Online ConferenceTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 20229AM – 12PM PT | 12PM – 3PM ETWe're bringing the cloud down to EarthJoin us for a free virtual 3-hour AWS Cloud training event delivered by our skilled in-house instructors.https://aws.amazon.com/events/awsome-day/americas/ Into the Box Latam 2022Dec 5th or 7thMore information is coming very soon.Dev NexusApril 4-6th in AltantaSuper Early Bird will be on sale until October 9, 2022 (Approx 50% off)If you are planning to speak, please submit often and early. The CALL FOR PAPERS is open until November 15WORKSHOPS WILL BE ON JAVA, JAVA SECURITY, SOFTWARE DESIGN, AGILE, DEVOPS, KUBERNETES, MICROSERVICES, SPRING ETC. SIGN UP NOW, AND YOU WILL BE ABLE TO CHOOSE A WORKSHOP, LATER ON,https://devnexus.com/ Into the Box 2023 - 10th EditionMiddle of May - start planning.Final dates will be released as soon as the hotel confirms availability.CFCampNo CFCAMP 2022, we're trying again for summer 2023TLDR is that it's just too hard and there's too much uncertainty right now.More conferencesNeed more conferences, this site has a huge list of conferences for almost any language/community.https://confs.tech/Blogs, Tweets, and Videos of the Week9/20/22 - Blog - Grant Copley - Ortus Solutions - Prefetching in CBWIREWhen I want to increase the perceived speed of my CBWIRE apps, one tool I reach for is prefetching. Prefetching is a built-in feature of Livewire JS that allows you to invoke an Action's results on mouseOver.https://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/prefetching-in-cbwire 9/20/22 - Blog - Michael Born - Ortus Solutions - How to Get the Version of Any Java Package from CFMLThe Apache POI library is an awesome tool for messing with spreadsheets. You can read spreadsheet data, get header rows, total row count, all sorts of wacky stuff. Julian Halliwell's excellent spreadsheet-cfml library uses it to great effect.https://michaelborn.me/entry/how-to-get-the-version-of-any-java-package-from-cfml 9/17/22 - Blog - Ben Nadel - Adding An Angular 14 Front-End To My ColdFusion Feature Flag ExplorationAbout a month ago, I posted Strangler: Building a Feature Flag System in ColdFusion. That proof-of-concept was constructed in Lucee CFML using a standard post-back workflow wherein each navigation begot a full page refresh. Over the last few weeks, I've been dribbling some effort into creating a thick-client experience using Angular 14. The UI (User Interface) still leaves a lot to be desired; but, I think as a second-stage proof-of-concept, there's enough here to be demoed.https://www.bennadel.com/blog/4323-adding-an-angular-14-front-end-to-my-coldfusion-feature-flag-exploration.htm 9/16/22 - Blog - James Moberg - areBracesValid UDF for ColdFusion/CFMLI was using a version of smartSearch from CFLib.org that I had updated with some simple regex detection for SQLi strings, but it wasn't catching everything. I considered disabling the bracket matching feature and rejecting any query search terms that attempted to use ( or ), but then considered that I should validate so that the feature could still be used since it is beneficial when not being exploited.https://dev.to/gamesover/arebracesvalid-udf-for-coldfusioncfml-21fg 9/16/22 - Gavin Pickin - Ortus Solutions - Into the Box 2022 - Conference RecapThis years Into the Box has just wrapped up, but we are already preparing for 2023's Into the Box, May, Houston Texas! The event was a huge success, we had solid attendance in person, and almost doubled our online viewership from 2021, great feedback from attendees in Houston, and online. So many attendees didn't say goodbye at the end of the conference, they said see you next year, which, as an organizer lets you know you've done things right, and the hard work has paid off.https://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/into-the-box-2022-conference-recap 9/15/22 - David Tattersall - Fusion Reactor - Announcing FusionReactor 9.0We are very proud to announce the release of FusionReactor 9.0, which represents a major milestone for FusionReactor and has been almost 2 years in the making.FusionReactor has always been about helping engineers, support, and DevOps to get to the root of application problems as quickly as possible. As software engineers, the founders of the company wanted to develop a product that would be familiar to us, and which would enable us to resolve performance and stability problems quickly. Up till now, we have focused the product on serving the ColdFusion and Java applications market. Our commitment to these platforms will not change.https://www.fusion-reactor.com/blog/announcing-fusionreactor-9-0/ 9/13/22 - Michael - REVIEW: DEVOPS TOOLS FOR JAVA DEVELOPERSBoth JFrog and O'Reilly sent me a paper copy of DevOps Tools for Java Developers for review (or my reading pleasure, or hopefully both). The copies came with no strings attached and this article is my honest opinion.The book is written by Ixchel Ruiz, Melissa McKay, Stephen Chin and Baruch Sadogursky. 3 of them I met personally and all of them come very much from the developer side of things and are known people in the Java world. All of them work at JFrog these days.https://info.michael-simons.eu/2022/09/13/review-devops-tools-for-java-developers/ CFML JobsSeveral positions available on https://www.getcfmljobs.com/Listing over 132 ColdFusion positions from 73 companies across 62 locations in 5 Countries.6 new jobs listed this weekFull-Time - Lucee/ Coldfusion Developer – Freelance – Belgium at England.. - United Kingdom Sep 20https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-kingdom/Lucee-Coldfusion-Developer-Freelance-Belgium-at-England/11519 Full-Time - Software Developer (m/w/d) at Hannover oder remot (Germany).. - Other Countries Sep 19https://www.getcfmljobs.com/viewjob.cfm?jobid=11518Full-Time - Sr Software Engineer/ColdFusion Developer at Reston, VA - United States Sep 16https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/Sr-Software-EngineerColdFusion-Developer-at-Reston-VA/11517Full-Time - Sr Software Engineer/ColdFusion Developer at Remote - United States Sep 16https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/Sr-Software-EngineerColdFusion-Developer-at-Remote/11516 Full-Time - Enterprise Sales Account Manager, ColdFusion (EMEA Shift) at.. - India Sep 14https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/india/Enterprise-Sales-Account-Manager-ColdFusion-EMEA-Shift-at-Noida-Uttar-Pradesh/11515 Full-Time - Software Engineer 3- ColdFusion at Remote - United States Sep 14https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/Software-Engineer-3-ColdFusion-at-Remote/11514 Other Job Links Ortus Solutions - https://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/careers  Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN: https://jobs.ornl.gov/job/Oak-Ridge-Systems-Engineer-and-Software-Developer-TN-37830/923356000/?fbclid=IwAR3te_Ttc_n69FYUFBVBYM9IJ2K8xMSspL_pL303Qv-vdqYmgVcqEtZPQX0  There is a jobs channel in the CFML slack team, and in the box team slack now too ForgeBox Module of the WeekcbPlaywrightCFML integration with TestBox and Playwright to run tests in actual browsershttps://forgebox.io/view/cbPlaywrightVS Code Hint Tips and Tricks of the WeekVSCode Great IconsA big pack of icons (200+) for your files.Quote from Blog: Slightly less popular than the most common icon extension, vscode-icons. I think the icons here look so much better than the default, and the folder icons make it easier to tell which directory I'm in.https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=emmanuelbeziat.vscode-great-iconsThank you to all of our Patreon SupportersThese individuals are personally supporting our open source initiatives to ensure the great toolings like CommandBox, ForgeBox, ColdBox,  ContentBox, TestBox and all the other boxes keep getting the continuous development they need, and funds the cloud infrastructure at our community relies on like ForgeBox for our Package Management with CommandBox. You can support us on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutionsDon't forget, we have Annual Memberships, pay for the year and save 10% - great for businesses. Bronze Packages and up, now get a ForgeBox Pro and CFCasts subscriptions as a perk for their Patreon Subscription. All Patreon supporters have a Profile badge on the Community Website All Patreon supporters have their own Private Forum access on the Community Website All Patreon supporters have their own Private Channel access BoxTeam Slack Live Stream Access to streams like “Koding with the Kiwi + Friends” https://community.ortussolutions.com/ NEW PATREON EXCLUSIVES - GAVIN CRAZY IDEASVoting in the BoxTeam SlackPatreons John Wilson - Synaptrix Jordan Clark Gary Knight Mario Rodrigues Giancarlo Gomez David Belanger Dan Card Jonathan Perret Jeffry McGee - Sunstar Media Dean Maunder Nolan Erck  Abdul Raheen Wil De Bruin Joseph Lamoree  Don Bellamy Jan Jannek Laksma Tirtohadi Brian Ghidinelli - Hagerty MotorsportReg Carl Von Stetten Jeremy Adams Didier Lesnicki Matthew Clemente Daniel Garcia Scott Steinbeck - Agri Tracking Systems Ben Nadel  Richard Herbet Brett DeLine Kai Koenig Charlie Arehart Jason Daiger Shawn Oden Matthew Darby Ross Phillips Edgardo Cabezas Patrick Flynn Stephany Monge Kevin Wright John Whish Peter Amiri Cavan Vannice You can see an up to date list of all sponsors on Ortus Solutions' Websitehttps://ortussolutions.com/about-us/sponsors Thanks everyone!!! ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Angular Show
S4 E5 - Hold On Hold On I Got This - Live From ng-conf 2022 with Ady Ngom, Phillip Fulcher, & Craig Spence

The Angular Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 39:55


In this special episode taped live at ng-conf 2022, we invite Ady Ngom, Phillip Fulcher, and Craig Spence to our very first Wait Wait Don't Tell Me inspired episode of the podcast. In this Angular themed game show we will discover what really happened to Angular 3, hear some terribly delightful Angular limericks, and discuss Phillip's cereal habits at length. Take caution while listening because you are guaranteed to belly laugh at least once. @ngconf@adyngom@PhilipJFulcher@phenomnominal

Humor en la Cadena SER
Todo por la Radio | La piedra angular del entretenimiento

Humor en la Cadena SER

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 44:26


TodoPorLaRadio con Toni Martínez, Especialistas Secundarios, Lucía Taboada, Pilar de Francisco, Mario Panadero, Juanma López Iturriaga y Cristina del Casar

La Ventana
Todo por la Radio | La piedra angular del entretenimiento

La Ventana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 44:26


TodoPorLaRadio con Toni Martínez, Especialistas Secundarios, Lucía Taboada, Pilar de Francisco, Mario Panadero, Juanma López Iturriaga y Cristina del Casar

JavaScript Jabber
Qwik with Misko Hevery - JSJ 549

JavaScript Jabber

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 71:15


Today we talk with Misko Hevery about solving the loading speed issue for websites constructed using JavaScript frameworks. Such websites are often slow to load, which is detrimental to their ability so succeed. After 16 years at Google, where he created Angular, he now works on the Qwik framework at Builder.io, a headless visual CMS. We learn how Qwik dramatically improves page speed metrics through an innovative architecture that enables resumability instead of hydration. We talk about how this is implemented, and about how you can get started with it. Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links ng-conf 2022 Builder.io and Qwik - JSJ 540 Core Web Vitals and Whatnot - JSJ 537 JSJ 476: Understanding Search Engines and SEO (for devs) - Part  Resumable Frameworks: | Miško Hevery | ng-conf 2022 Webinar Framework reimagined for the edge! Twitter: Miško Hevery  Picks AJ- JULIAN SMITH - Malk AJ- webinstall.dev AJ- Watch The Sandman | Netflix Official Site Charles- JavaScript Remote Conference 2022 Charles- Home Dan- Gentleman Bastard Series Dan - War in Ukraine Misko- Thinking, Fast and Slow Steve - Dad Jokes

COMPRESSEDfm
80 | Learning Modern Frontend Frameworks Better with Corbin Crutchley

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 55:38


Corbin Crutchley joins to talk about how to learn Frontend Frameworks better with his upcoming eBook The Framework Field Guide, https://unicorn-utterances.com/collections/framework-field-guide. SponsorsDaily.devdaily.dev is where developers grow together. It provides a community-based feed of the best developer news, helping you stay up-to-date. daily.dev aggregates hundreds of sources every few minutes and creates a personal feed for you according to your interests, whether it's web dev, data science, or Elixir. Anything you might be interested in, it has the content for you.Check out daily.devHashnodeCreating a developer blog is crucial in creating an online presence for yourself. It's proof of work for your future employer. Hashnode makes it easy to start a blog in seconds on your custom domain for free. It's fully optimized for developers and supports writing in Markdown, rich embeds, publishing from GitHub repository, syntax highlighting, and edge caching with Next.js blogs deployed on Vercel. On top of these, Hashnode is free from paywall, ads, and sign-up prompts.Hashnode is a community of developers, engineers, and people in tech. Your article gets instant readership from their growing community.Check out Hashnode, and join the community.Show NotesUnicorn Utterances - https://unicorn-utterances.com/Framework Guide - https://unicorn-utterances.com/collections/framework-field-guideAccelerating Angular Development with Ivy - https://www.packtpub.com/product/accelerating-angular-development-with-ivy/9781800205215Learning TypeScript from Josh Goldbergy - https://www.amazon.com/Learning-TypeScript-Development-Type-Safe-JavaScript/dp/1098110331Brad Garropy - https://bradgarropy.com/00:00:00 - Welcome and Intros00:02:12 - Awkward Question of the Day and Rants00:07:18 - Background in Writing and Content Creation00:11:19 - Imposter Syndrome as a Writer00:15:01 - Sponsor Daily.dev00:16:02 - The Framework Field Guide - Learning the Core of Frontend Frameworks00:23:36 - Comparing Modern Frontend Frameworks00:27:42 - Sponsor Hashnode00:28:28 - The Tech Stack Behind the Book00:33:36 - Why Create a Free Book00:41:21 - Future Content Goals00:50:55 - Picks and Plugs

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
How to Proxy HTTP Requests in Angular with Maria Korneeva - AiA 356

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 41:08


Maria Korneeva joins the show today to share her approach on how to proxy HTTP requests in Angular, including use cases and various strategies to make proxying simplified and useful to your Angular workflows. In this episode… Use cases examples  Proxying a request from localhost to the remote backend service Using the fake back end before real implementation Effortless switching between environments  Defining endpoints using wildcards Automation scripts and testing Sponsors Top End Devs Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Coaching | Top End Devs Links How to proxy HTTP requests in Angular Twitter: @BrowserPerson LinkedIn: Maria Korneeva Picks Charles- ActiveCampaign - #1 Customer Experience Automation Platform - ActiveCampaign Charles- Community | Personalized Text Message Software & SMS Solution Charles- TopEndDev  | Courses Charles- Virtual Events Platform for Communities & Enterprises Charles- TopEndDev | Coaching Maria- Chrome DevTools - Chrome Developers Maria- Document.designMode - Web APIs | MDN Maria- tweak: mock and modify HTTP requests Subrat- Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind Subrat- Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

.NET Rocks!
Testing Angular Forms with Martine Dowden

.NET Rocks!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 58:33


How do you test Angular forms? While at CodePaLOUsa in Louisville, Carl and Richard talked to Martine Dowden about her approach to building tests that are maintainable, and are best automated because they are tedious to test manually - like forms validation. Martine talks about a mix of automated unit testing and eyes-on manual smoke tests being the most efficient way to have a well-tested web application.

Adventures in Angular
How to Proxy HTTP Requests in Angular with Maria Korneeva - AiA 356

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 41:08


Maria Korneeva joins the show today to share her approach on how to proxy HTTP requests in Angular, including use cases and various strategies to make proxying simplified and useful to your Angular workflows. In this episode… Use cases examples  Proxying a request from localhost to the remote backend service Using the fake back end before real implementation Effortless switching between environments  Defining endpoints using wildcards Automation scripts and testing Sponsors Top End Devs Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Coaching | Top End Devs Links How to proxy HTTP requests in Angular Twitter: @BrowserPerson LinkedIn: Maria Korneeva Picks Charles- ActiveCampaign - #1 Customer Experience Automation Platform - ActiveCampaign Charles- Community | Personalized Text Message Software & SMS Solution Charles- TopEndDev  | Courses Charles- Virtual Events Platform for Communities & Enterprises Charles- TopEndDev | Coaching Maria- Chrome DevTools - Chrome Developers Maria- Document.designMode - Web APIs | MDN Maria- tweak: mock and modify HTTP requests Subrat- Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind Subrat- Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

.NET Rocks!
Testing Angular Forms with Martine Dowden

.NET Rocks!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 58:33


How do you test Angular forms? While at CodePaLOUsa in Louisville, Carl and Richard talked to Martine Dowden about her approach to building tests that are maintainable, and are best automated because they are tedious to test manually - like forms validation. Martine talks about a mix of automated unit testing and eyes-on manual smoke tests being the most efficient way to have a well-tested web application.

The Angular Show
S4 E4 - Questions and Answers from the Angular Team - Live from ng-conf 2022

The Angular Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 40:06


This episode was taped live at ng-conf 2022 with members of the angular team: Simona Cotin, Mark Thompson, Doug Parker, and Kristiyan Kostadinov. Join us as we learn more about some of the exciting new features of Angular 14.2, what's on the roadmap, and get to know the team a little bit better.

Remote Ruby
Benedikt Deicke on Ember.js, Database Optimizations, and more

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 35:59 Very Popular


[00:01:51] Jason and Chris discuss the launching of Hatchbox v2. [00:05:54] Benedikt tells us about himself and what he does.[00:06:55] We learn when Benedikt started using Ember, how long he's been building Userlist, and if he had experience working in Rails API mode with Ember.[00:09:54] Benedikt explains what the process of scaffolding looks like and if ever has to manage and make things happen in sync when he makes a change that affects both sides.[00:11:18] Jason explains what Ember does and we find out if it's in that same vein as React, Vue, and Angular.[00:14:28] We hear what the process is like keeping up to date with things like new Ember releases and new Rails releases.[00:16:40] Benedikt tells us how many developers he has at Userlist, if he's doing more of the Rails side of things, and what it's been like going from a technical Co-founder and the only one developing the application and bringing someone else in to work with it.[00:18:27] Since Benedikt launched Userlist in 2019, he tells us some challenges he faces with building and growing it, as well as any challenges with technical stuff he wanted to build but couldn't to focus on marketing and getting new customers.[00:21:10] Chris asks Benedikt if he picked up an editor that was pre-made, like an Ember plug-in, just to use the first version. He tells us some challenges he ran into as he was building it. [00:24:02] We find out some multiple solutions Benedikt and his team came up with when they tried to update one column in a database that stopped everything. [00:25:30] Jason wonders if Benedikt is doing databases at Heroku or if he's explored another database host.[00:26:46] We hear some other database performance things Benedikt's had to implement solutions for.[00:28:03] Chris wonders how comfortable Benedikt was with SQL before he started, if he had to learn a whole bunch of things on the fly, realizing it may be a challenge, and he explains how he's implementing things with a lot of Arel.[00:30:06] Benedikt talks about what his day looks like for him, how he balances his week to do everything as a Co-Founder, and if he gets to code a decent amount.[00:32:57] Andrew heard Benedikt is really good at Postgres Performance and he wonders if there's any tips he can share for starting out. He tells us about his greatest tool which is pgMustard.[00:35:21] Find out where you can follow Benedikt and Userlist online.Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverAndrew MasonGuest:Benedikt DeickeSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterBenedikt Deicke TwitterBenedikt Deicke WebsiteUserlistSlow & Steady PodcastEmber.jsHatchboxpgMustardRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterRuby for All Podcast

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 54 – Unstoppable Innovator with Shampa Bagchi

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 66:31


Shampa Bagchi comes from a family of entrepreneurs who all value living life to the fullest as well as helping to improve our world. Shampa, born in India, moved to the United States after getting a Masters's degree in computers.   In the mid-1990s she saw a need to improve the way companies worked with customers and developed one of the first easy-to-use and inexpensive customer Resource management systems, CRM. Throughout her career, as she tells us in our episode, she has worked throughout her work life to improve processes and make products and systems to simplify systems.   Shampa's stories are fascinating and insightful. I believe you will come away from this episode realizing more than ever that being unstoppable is really something that is available to all of us if we choose the path to drive ourselves just a bit harder to accomplish goals.   About the Guest: Shampa Bagchi is the Founder and CEO of ConvergeHub (www.convergehub.com), a Customer Lifecycle Management CRM software that powers business growth. Shampa specializes in taking ideas from concept to reality and is passionate about helping businesses grow by utilizing the power of technology to solve complex business challenges.   She also founded Corelynx (www.corelynx.com), a boutique software development and strategy agency providing innovative business solutions to growing organizations.   Shampa holds a Master's degree in Computer Science and has been at the forefront of the technology revolution in Silicon Valley for more than two decades. She has worked with large enterprises such as Cisco Systems, Siemens, etc. as well as hundreds of small and medium businesses to build software products and applications that empower businesses and change lives.   Being a ‘woman in tech' long before #womenintech became a movement, Shampa is passionate about technology education for women. She has founded Onward Academy (www.onwardacademy.in), a software training institute in India, with the goal to increase the participation of women in the tech industry.   Shampa writes a blog called ‘The Spark' (www.thespark.work) where she explores the intersection between business, technology, and people… and the power of little things to make a massive difference in any of these areas.   She also writes and posts videos on a regular basis on LinkedIn and can be followed on https://www.linkedin.com/in/shampabagchi/         About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Yep, it is that time again. Welcome to unstoppable mindset. I am Michael Hingson, your host glad to be here. Hope you are happy to be here probably are because you're here, right. So wherever you are welcome. And we really appreciate you and hope that you enjoy the next hour. We have a fascinating guest. We're actually starting the recording of this podcast 10 minutes late because we've just been sitting here chatting Shampa Bagchi  is a woman very involved in tech, she has formed a company called convergehub. And she, and actually convergehub is a software. Well, not a software product specifically, but it is a customer resource management tool. And she'll tell us about that. So I don't want to mess up my description more than I have. But she's also formed a company called core links, which is a system by which she helps other customers write software and do things that they need to do to make their company work the way it should. And she has a great amount of experience in the world of computer science. She's been involved in Silicon Valley Tech for a while. She has a master's degree in computer science. We're jealous, and lots of other things. So Shampa   Welcome to unstoppable mindset after all of that. And   Shampa Bagchi  02:42 Michael, thank you. Thank you. I'm glad to be here. Thank you so much for inviting me.   Michael Hingson  02:46 And you notice that I didn't use queen to the world, which I said I could use. And   Shampa Bagchi  02:51 then thank you for that too.   Michael Hingson  02:53 You're safe? Well, I really am fascinated to learn. Let's start with more about you and what you did growing up and how you got to the point of being so interested in involved in tech.   Shampa Bagchi  03:04 Yeah, of course, I actually started software programming in college. And like, Well, initially, I always had an interest in science and my initial interest, I wanted to go into nuclear physics. So physics was my first love. And then. And then   Michael Hingson  03:27 my master's degree is in physics. Oh, wow.   Shampa Bagchi  03:30 So I have a bachelor's in physics. And then I went on to do a master's in computer science. So wonderful. Yeah, it's a really great subject. That's   Michael Hingson  03:40 fair. Yeah.   Shampa Bagchi  03:42 And but then in a while, I know when I just started taking some computer courses. And once I wrote my first software program, I was totally hooked. And the main reason I really liked it is because it gave me this ability to take a complex problem. And then kind of, you know, break it down into little bits, and then solve it and kind of put the solution back together again. So I really, really was interested in that. And then that was a time when computers as a career, it was just opening up, it was just beginning. And I wasn't thinking so much as career itself. But more in terms of it was really because in that time when you go into a career, most of the time, you could only influence a certain amount of people, right? Only the people around you. But what I realized is using computers, you could build a program with somebody sitting on the other corner of the world use to solve this problem, which you probably won't even think about. And just that idea of being able to touch people whom you don't even know you know, whom you haven't heard of. It was so fascinating to me that I had to get into that, and I had really to do it so so and even today, even though I don't write software code anymore, but just that idea of building software products, which people all over the world use to solve their problems, it's, it's really interesting to me, I feel like I'm touching their lives.   Michael Hingson  05:14 There you go, Well, what do you do specifically today,   Shampa Bagchi  05:19 but today, I'm the CEO of convergehub. So I check of all trades, really in the company. So I'm handling the product development. I do oversee that I do some marketing, and even the other financial stuff that I have to do on a daily basis. So   Michael Hingson  05:39 not boring stuff. Yeah,   Shampa Bagchi  05:41 exactly. My very necessity.   Michael Hingson  05:44 Yes, yeah. It is part of what has to be done. And at least you Well, I don't know whether you have the patience or not. But you certainly seem to be able to, to put up with it all. Not always. But I tried, Does, does your coding experience help you in doing all the other things that that you have to do in the company? Or maybe a better question would be how does that past experience help you?   Shampa Bagchi  06:14 That's actually very interesting. Now that I think about it, it really does. Because when you are coding, you are taught to kind of look at a problem, I kind of step away from it, and just look at it as a problem and then start breaking it down or tinkering with it, you know that as a challenge itself, you cannot solve the whole thing. But when you break it down, and we address it one by one, you are able to solve it and you without really getting too involved with with taking a step back. So if you take that approach to any other work that you have to do any other experience or challenge that you're going through, I think that really helps you solve it in a better way.   Michael Hingson  06:58 Yeah, that's that's kind of what I was thinking that you would say I remember when I was in undergraduate physics, and of course it it then followed on but an undergraduate physics, oftentimes, professors would say, pay attention to the details. It's all about the details. It isn't just the math, for example, it's the units. And if the units don't work out, right, then you probably are doing something wrong. So you really need to look at the details. And I've always felt that that background in physics, even though I am not doing anything specifically in physics, the background has helped a great deal for me in everything that I do, because I've learned to pay attention to a lot of the details and appreciate the value in doing that.   Shampa Bagchi  07:47 Absolutely, absolutely. I think that's what it is. And I had, I had read somewhere that no education is what survives after what you learned has been forgotten. So I guess that what it is it kind of builds into you and then you know, you keep using it and other experiences in your life.   Michael Hingson  08:05 Yeah, I've talked to a number of people on this podcast who say, the reoccurring theme is you should never stop learning.   Shampa Bagchi  08:14 Absolutely. I totally agree. But yeah, it's   Michael Hingson  08:17 kind of one of those things that that one needs to do. Well, you went off and where do you get your Masters from? By the way?   Shampa Bagchi  08:24 Well, I did my masters from India. Okay. Yeah. And   Michael Hingson  08:28 then you then you came over here at some point. And, and you you started working now, did you code when you first came over? How did what brought you over here?   Shampa Bagchi  08:39 Yeah. So in India, after I did my masters, I started working in a company and that company was then I know, deploying some, you know, software programmers here. So I came as a part of that. And I literally landed in us with what, less than $150 or so. And a job of course, and went from there. So I know after I worked. Initially, I started working with a large enterprises like Cisco Systems, pyramid technologies, which was a part of Siemens. And yes, I was doing programming in Cisco Systems, I was part of the sales, the customer facing side of the software, really, you know, the sales, customer service. And in those days, there was no such thing as customer relationship management software, it didn't even exist. So what we were doing is we were taking Oracle Applications, the ERP package, and we were customizing it to build those pieces in and Cisco eventually, you know, it came it became the first company who did the online ordering the entire online ordering, where an order from a customer would go in and to be fulfilled without the touch of human hands. So and this was Very, very early days, and I was really fortunate to be a part of that big hole team.   Michael Hingson  10:05 What kind of what timeframe was that?   Shampa Bagchi  10:07 So this was kind of mid to late 90s, actually 9099 kind of timeframe. Yeah. So and then after that, I started working on a few startups, but then always wanted to open my own company. So that's when I launched core links. And well as part of callings, what we do is we build custom software. We are a software strategy firm. So we provide like a fractional CTO services, strategy services, software development for both products as well as software applications. So and we did that, and even while we were doing that kind of note, notice that a lot of the requests that we were getting for building the software center around the same thing about New Customer Relationship Management, how do I handle my customers war? How do I support my customers? How do I do lead management? So we were building constantly, we were building software for that for all our clients, and it began to occur to me, you know, I started digging in and found out that really, you know, there was no product in the market which suffice that need for customers, there were really two types of customer relationship products in the market at that time. One was really huge, big blood scale software, you need a PhD to implement that. And other than that, there was these no small little contact management systems really no dumbed down products, which really didn't suffice the need of, you know, small and medium businesses, because they had their complex processes, but at the same time, they can spend that kind of money, you know, to, to implement such a large scale software. So that's why we decided to build convergehub, which would service these kinds of customers. And yeah, so we started building convergehub, and which is right now, complete customer lifecycle management system, it serve right from the beginning of the customer journey, till the end is supported within convergehub.   Michael Hingson  12:18 So is it is a web based system then? Or?   Shampa Bagchi  12:21 Yes, it is. SAS product software as a service product? And yes, it's completely online.   Michael Hingson  12:28 Cool. How does it? Well, so now we have other things like Salesforce and so on, how does it compare with those kinds of products? Which of course didn't exist back in the early days?   Shampa Bagchi  12:40 Yes, no, when I was working in those, Cisco and those other large enterprises, Salesforce didn't exist. By the time I had to know founded convergehub, Salesforce did start up. But Salesforce was in that category of large scale software, which needs a lot of effort to implement, which small businesses didn't necessarily have. So yeah, so convergehub is kind of isn't the same space does similar things, but in a much more simpler way. So that you can get that you are able to, you know, establish you are able to serve your complex business processes, but you really didn't have to put in so much effort to implement them. The implementation is much simpler.   Michael Hingson  13:26 I remember when selling tape backup products for quantum Corporation and others before it, and so on, working with Wall Street, of course, they used both Oracle and Sybase and Sybase was very unformatted fields and so on. But those firms essentially created their own software within those database structures, to do the same kind of work in terms of managing customers, managing orders, managing all of the things related to that. And the Securities Exchange Commission required it of course of Wall Street, because they needed you to have a way where you track all your orders, which Wall Street firms would want to do anyway. And then to keep them for seven years off site. So we provided the tape backup products, and they would work with products like Elgato and other kinds of tools that would communicate between their systems and the backup products that we provided. So a lot of moving parts.   Shampa Bagchi  14:26 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And, yeah, it's come a long way since then, but it's always fun to think back to how quickly we've changed how much   Michael Hingson  14:37 yeah, as I was saying to somebody not too long ago, I remember when a disk crash was a real disk crash. Yes. Where you had a 16 inch platter and they had was micro centimeters above it, and if it fell, it was a very noisy situation and all your data was lost. was pretty amazing. We've come a long way. And we'll continue to that's what kind of makes this technology era fun. On the other hand, even with you starting in India, and so on, tell me a little bit about how women were viewed in tech. And I would think that you were kind of a breakthrough person to deal with some of that.   Shampa Bagchi  15:19 Yeah, actually, when I started, in college, when I went into software, we didn't have that many, you know, women in technology at that time, but it's not like I faced a lot of resistance to it. But there just weren't that many software, it was a very new subject at the time. And, but then I was so fascinated with it, I wasn't really looking at the gender, I just wanted to build software. So I wasn't really looking at, you know, how many you know how easy or hard it would be for me to get in? But yeah, since then, even after coming, you'd be surprised, or even after coming into Silicon Valley, I did face some challenges. There. It's not so much as I don't think people really resist you, because you're a woman. It's not that people say that, okay, you know, she's a woman, I'm not going to listen to what it what she does, I'm not going to give credit or and I'm going to cause resistance, not really, but it's more sort of a mindset, you, there's this assumption kind of a thing, and that you probably aren't as good, you know, you probably won't be able to do it. And then you know, you have to keep proving yourself all the time. So and then, you know, it's when you prove yourself, it's not that people won't accept it, you know, people do. So I would think it's more a matter of just education and getting used to it, rather than you're actively making sure. Women don't get the chance.   Michael Hingson  16:47 But I think that's true of people who are, are different than what is viewed as the norm in general. I mean, in terms of blindness, for example. There's, there's resistance. And the general assumption is that if you're blind, you can't succeed nearly as well as sighted people can. And that that view has been around for a while, it does take a lot of educating. And you do have to continuously prove yourself to be able to accomplish tasks and and grow in the industry. It isn't that you can't, but it certainly tends to be harder, because, as you said, it's the mindset of what people believe you can and can't do. And unfortunately, in the case of well, and in some ways with women, too. But in the case of blind people, for example, the unemployment rate among employable blind people is still in the area around 70%. And it's not because people who are blind, who happen to be blind can't work. It said, others think they can't work in that prejudice still exists.   Shampa Bagchi  17:58 Oh, I totally don't get that. And, you know, interestingly, I had had an encounter, which this was, this was a while ago, I was in college at the time, and I was kind of, you know, I think I had gone down for some internship returning home, got down from the bus. And there was this blind person who had traveled with us who also kind of got on from the past, and there was this road to cross. And He was looking around and he asked for help. He said, Can somebody please help me cross the road? And the house was full of people. So so many people had not on boarded the bus, but it was kind of really strange that although he was asking, and he was asking confidently, but nobody, it's people were hearing it, obviously, they were hearing it, they were sort of pretending not to hear it and going their own way. And it took me by surprise, not just the people's reaction, but even that person's reaction because he was very confident he was not he, there was no kind of he was not submissive. He was not even if although he was asking for help. He was doing it so confidently. I thought it was the other side. The people who should have been more confident probably weren't not confident. They didn't even have the confidence to step forward and just helping him cross the road. So I watched that for a little while. And then I decided to step up. So I went to him. I said, Okay, come on. I took his hand, and I just had to cross the road I want I asked if he wanted help just getting home. And he said, Oh no, I live close by I can manage from here. I just needed help crossing the road and he just went about his way confidently. You couldn't even tell that he was blind unless you actually looked at his stake. So that experience really stayed with me that really, you know, this person was so confident why he was all he needed was a little bit of help, you know, why wouldn't I know anybody do that?   Michael Hingson  19:56 Chris, the other thing that would be helpful is he could You're out how to cross the road. I mean, I used to live in Winthrop, Massachusetts, and every day, both going to the bus and getting off the bus coming home. We had a bus stop that was across the road from the entrance to my apartment complex. And it was just in the middle of the road, right. So there wasn't like a major street that the bus stopped at, there was a bus stop, and it was right in the middle of the street. And there are tools to use it, it was a little bit daunting until I figured out that, hey, one thing I can do to cross the road is to follow other people and listen to them as they are crossing. And the other is to wait until the bus leaves so it's quieter, and then listen to traffic. And when I don't hear traffic coming across in front of me for at least a little bit a period of time, and I don't hear anything that sounds like it's close then to go across the road. But it it is a it is a process. And it can be it can. It can be scary. But it can be daunting if you really don't learn to you know, to do that. So I'm I'm a little bit curious why he had some issues with being able to cross the road. And perhaps he didn't have enough hearing to be able to do that. Who knows?   Shampa Bagchi  21:26 Oh, actually, I think I know, it's probably because of this. Was it India? Yeah, it's so loud and so noisy and so much traffic.   Michael Hingson  21:35 And there was no, no low in the noise.   Shampa Bagchi  21:39 Yes, exactly. Yeah. So that was very, very chaotic and very, very noisy the entire time. So he couldn't use noise as a as a market news   Michael Hingson  21:46 noises. Yeah. So the only thing he could possibly do if he could hear it is to just listen to other people. And as they're going across, stay right behind them. But still it's an issue. Did he use a cane or anything like that? Yeah, he   Shampa Bagchi  21:58 used a cane.   Michael Hingson  22:00 Good that because that would would certainly help. But you know, everyone is different. And certainly the noise factor is a big issue. I've been in New York, on street corners where there are well defined crosswalks and well defined ways to go. But it's so noisy, that it's even here hard to hear the traffic going the way I want to go. And you know, what we do is we listen, and when the traffic is going the way we want to go, then we cross. But sometimes the noise can be so loud around us. And even that's hard to hear. So there are always challenges. But it doesn't mean that we can and that's part of the problem is that sometimes people would go well, you just could never do that. Because you're lying. Well, I can but let's let's talk about the sun being in your eyes, and how well you're able to see when the sun's coming right at you. You know, we all have challenges, of course. So good for you for helping. Thank you. But it is an issue and it is a challenge that we have. Well, so you went off and you got your your master's degree in computer science and you came over to the US. That must have been maybe the the way I would put it is quite an adventure. Just getting here at all. Oh, yes. It was totally new for you.   Shampa Bagchi  23:20 Yes, it was absolutely new for me. And then yeah, getting into tech industry and immigrant brown woman starting to work in the tech industry. It wasn't easy. But then you learn as you go, it was you know, there are challenges, you know, you start looking at? Yeah, and then there are there are challenges. And then there are solutions. And it's, you know, people to help out. And it's just, I think a lot of it is also about how much you like the subject and how hard you're willing to work. And if you have that, I think all other challenges, you know, you're you're proud to be able to work out.   Michael Hingson  23:58 But you had a mindset that you were going to work it out you were going to try to do that as opposed to letting it all overwhelm you.   Shampa Bagchi  24:06 Oh, yeah, absolutely. That's, I think it's also a little bit about being able to know that yes, you will be able to do it. And ultimately, it's going to work out it maybe you can just try to look a little bit into the future and say, you know, here I am going to do it. This is just a process, you know, just a few challenges, which I will have to go through. Everybody has their own challenges. These are mine.   Michael Hingson  24:30 Yeah. And that's the real point, isn't it? Everyone has their own challenges and, and challenges aren't the same for everyone.   Shampa Bagchi  24:40 Absolutely. Yeah. Totally agree.   Michael Hingson  24:42 So you, you made it over you started and you started doing doing technology stuff and, and all that. So how how long was it before you started working essentially for yourself?   Shampa Bagchi  24:56 Oh, I started working for myself or Round, let's say 2000 to 2003, I think timeframe. So that's when I started kind of consulting, no going solo started working on smaller size project and a year or so after that I launched callings. So that's when, yeah, so slowly that grew. And we started getting more projects. And then I started having a team. We formed a team in India too. So, and I started off loading some of my work to them. And slowly the team grew. And yeah, so that's how things took off.   Michael Hingson  25:39 What were some of the early projects like that you started? And that you use core links to develop?   Shampa Bagchi  25:46 Well, we were always working in the beginning, we were mostly working on software applications or so yeah, one of the interesting one was in the insurance industry, I remember this was this was way back. But in a we were kind of, you know, comparing different insurance products. And this was for car insurance, if I remember correctly. And and it was really advanced for its time, too. And we were kind of, you know, giving there was some hundreds of points on which, you know, you could compare insurances. So usually, when you're reading an insurance, you don't even know you don't even look at the fine print. And this was kind of a technology where, which would help you compare insurance without really having to look at the fine print. So. So there's that that was one, there was another one for the FinTech industry that we were building the entire end to end process for fintech. So yeah, some for some very interesting projects. But in the beginning,   Michael Hingson  26:41 what kind of language or coding did you use to develop those?   Shampa Bagchi  26:45 At that time? We were using PHP, and we use MySQL, as a database,   Michael Hingson  26:52 SQL servers and all that. Yeah. What do you use now? How's it evolved over the years?   Shampa Bagchi  26:59 Yeah, now, I'm not coding anymore. But my team user uses Node we use young Angular. So yeah, there's MongoDB, we use. So a lot, it's changed significantly, even the way you code has significantly changed significantly, it's a lot more modular. And at that time used to write 1000s of line, of course, a lot of very, very monolithic kind of code. Now, it's so much more modular, it's a distributed, so things have changed completely. But it's kind of fun to watch my team, although, you know, I don't get fat involved into the day to day process anymore.   Michael Hingson  27:39 You do you have enough and you keep up with it. So you could if you needed to be involved in the process, I would assume?   Shampa Bagchi  27:45 Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And, you know, I still have my, you know, kind of, you know, and in there, I'm have daily meetings with the team. But right now, my perspective is more from that of a user from that offer no customer how the customer experience, what will an user go through. So that's my perspective, rather than Wow, this is cool. You know, this is nice bit of technology, let's use it. I don't think of thinking of it like that anymore.   Michael Hingson  28:10 But it's good to be able to take the user perspective, and it's good to have that in a company, because then you, you really get to understand it from the standpoint of those who are going to be directly involved with an encounter of your products, as opposed to just creating them and pushing them out the door without having that understanding, I would think, Oh, yeah,   Shampa Bagchi  28:29 absolutely. And that's somehow you mature, because, in the beginning, that's how you kind of know, especially from from a tech background, you can do you not think, no, take a school, and, yeah, so just try to use anything, and I see my team, still trying to do that I have to push back on it, just because it's the user who is the most important person here, and you know, whatever that takes, technology is good, as long as it's serving the customer. And really, I would say, you know, we are we are coming up with a new release of convergehub. And what we are trying to do here, you know, I'm really trying to put in the human perspective into it more than anything else, because from my experience in the software industry from a very long time, what I'm seeing is there is really no b2b or b2c, or you know, anything like that anymore. It's really a matter of a human being using a product, it's a person using a product, you know, whatever else, you know, from whomever, to whomever, it's still ultimately your person using it. So that kind of knowledge really comes with experience. And that's what how we are building convergehub. So our idea is that using convergehub, you know, sales and marketing and customer service, all that is wonderful. And our users will be doing all of that the features are there, but more so what we would like our user to do is to be able to use the product to make a difference. So he is able to make a difference right Ah, where he is at, you know, whatever he or she is doing, he should be able to do it better do it in such a way that no maybe do it quicker and do it to build better businesses and I hope, better communities, ultimately,   Michael Hingson  30:13 one would hope. Yes. So when did you if you will graduate from quarter links, and so on to convergehub, although you do both, but when did when did converge on first come into existence?   Shampa Bagchi  30:29 converge jobs release was the first release was somewhere around I think we started getting customers around 2017 or so although it was released a little bit earlier in the market around 2015 2016. But that's when we were it was the very first release, we started ironing out all the bugs, I'm a bit of a perfectionist, so I didn't really wanted to push and sell the product until the bugs burning out the or the features were built in. So then we started getting customers in the 2016 2017 timeframe, and it went from there. And now we are getting into the next release the next version of convergehub.   Michael Hingson  31:06 I will bet however, that no matter how much you did to perfect it, and ironed out all the bugs, that once you actually released it, your users started finding things that you guys didn't discover.   Shampa Bagchi  31:20 Oh, yeah. You would have been that better. So yes, there was our software is basically a work in progress. You know, you can never have 100% Perfect software by the time you have the bugs and there are more features, you're building it and those new features will have some bugs. It's always work in progress. No, no company, no software ever built as an IT person. Everything all bugs ironed out. But you try. And what you really do really hope is that the bugs that you do still have aren't hampering the main activities of your users. So if it's, you know, really hampering their productivity with not letting them do what they would like to do in the software, that's that's when it takes priority. And that's how we prioritize bugs to know which ones to fix versus which ones to kind of put on the backburner.   Michael Hingson  32:14 You're now you're in California, right? You're in the Silicon Valley? Yes. So you watch some of the same TV commercials that I do if you watch TV at all. And actually, I saw it again this morning. There is someone who has been putting out some commercials that are just slamming Tesla, because they say that the autonomous vehicle software in Tesla is dangerous, and Congress should stop it and so on. And he's made that his primary focus in his Senate campaign. It's It's fascinating, not withstanding the fact that Tesla hasn't, as I understand it, at least the last time I checked, released a totally autonomous vehicle version of the software. But the reality is, it's always going to be a work in progress to do what Tesla has already done so much of to make their vehicle work in, in a way to greatly assist drivers. And it's just fascinating to see that kind of a mindset that just wants to put a stop to all of that kind of stuff, when that makes no sense at all.   Shampa Bagchi  33:20 Oh, yeah, absolutely. I totally agree with you there. Because if it's a software, there's always going to be bugs. So that's for sure. But it is true that in certain industries, those bugs have a bigger impact. Because if you are not careful, you know, when you're driving a car about code, you know, injure somebody, or worse. But at the same time, not similar to that is medical profession. And so anything, any software in the medical profession, you have to test very, very thoroughly because there are human lives involved. But at the same time, you at some point, you have to do your best, and you have to completely test thoroughly. And I think incrementally you do have to release the software, otherwise, it just doesn't happen. Right. So and knowing that it is software and there will be bugs, and we just do our level best to make sure that that bug doesn't have the worst kind of impact.   Michael Hingson  34:17 While being an equal opportunity abuser. Of course, my immediate reaction is if we're going to talk about what goes on with Tesla, let's talk about people driving in general, and there's some value in replacing them. Exactly. You know, the I don't know, my I'm amazed at my wife. Now my wife uses a wheelchair. She uses hand controls and she drives really well. We have had one accident in the almost 40 years that well. We've had a couple but there was one accident that we were probably more responsible for than anything else. We had one where we were actually going to anniversary dinner, and we came over a hill and there was a place where a car should not have been stopped on the road and there was no way to see it ahead of time. But this young lady who was a teenage driver had just stopped in the middle of the road. And we we bumped her before we could stop. So it was a brand new car and a dent in the car. But we had a time where we were driving, and actually, we, a gust of wind kind of blew us over. And we brushed against a piece of heavy equipment and then went back across the road. But partly she was also trying to avoid a trailer that had come up on us. We had we had, she saw the truck that was pulling the trailer but didn't see the trailer was in her blind spot. Well, anyway, but she but she dealt with it. But there are so many people on the road that are so impatient drive so aggressively. And I don't know how they survived because they they don't do anything to recognize the courtesy and that what we used to call in the world defensive driving, you know, we don't do that anymore. No. Yeah, yeah. So I'm all for taking the driving away from drivers. And in as soon as we can, putting it into a much more autonomous vehicle kind of environment, because too many crazy people are out there driving on the road.   Shampa Bagchi  36:14 Yeah. And I think you're absolutely right. So when once you know we get into that autonomous driving becomes the main thing. You know, what, what I see here, what kind of the research says that they are way safer than just these crazy people or drunk people is not driving a car, at least the machine want to drive drunk driving? You know,   Michael Hingson  36:35 we are kind of in the forefront of it. And we're new into it. But it's going to happen. It has to absolutely it has to happen. So in so there's a lot of artificial intelligence and machine learning that goes into all that. And speaking of that, how does that play into both you and convergehub, and quarter lengths and so on? Do you use much artificial intelligence to help in the development or testing of your software and so on?   Shampa Bagchi  37:03 Yes, it's not so much in the development itself. But we are planning the new version of convergehub, we are planning to put artificial intelligence in there and have this AI to do a lot of automated stuff, which initially would have to be manual. And then of course, now there is so much data, data analytics, and all of that is going to be built into the new version of convergehub. So all the definite features are not ironed out yet. And what we are going to give, but there is no one thing for sure is that we are going to have a completely channel, less conversations. So regardless of you know, like like today's users, they could be using one channel at one point of times, and you know, completely switch channels, the other point of time. So you know, from email, to phone, to Twitter, to, you know, to texting. So all of these channels should appear as if it's still a conversation as if it's a one conversation thread the whole time. So that's and there is so much insights that you can figure out from those conversations, and you know, many other companies have started working in it on it. It's not perfect, nobody has perfected it. But you know, we are definitely not going to work on that and see, you know, where that leads us. So, for me as a tech person, it's like both ways. And one is, of course, no, this is the latest technology, this is where we are going to be we have to be there. But that ain't the model remain the same, you know. So it's ultimately it's about how the technology will help you do a better job at whatever it is that you're doing. So as long as we can do that, we balance that, you know that that's the ideal way to go. I would say,   Michael Hingson  38:48 again, we're in a bleeding age environment, where so many of these things are new, and we're just learning about the minute you're in 100 years, it's gonna be a totally different world. And then we'll have other things that are new, but But what we're talking about today, as kind of in the formative era will all change. Yeah, yeah.   Shampa Bagchi  39:09 And it's, and the change is coming faster and faster. You know, it's exciting to see a little bit scary, too. But as time goes by, it's just it's the pace is accelerating. You know, you don't even know I mean, why 100 years, we don't really even know what's coming up in the next five or 10 years from now. So that's exciting and scary at the same time.   Michael Hingson  39:30 Sometime in the next 100 years. Somebody's going to probably develop antigravity and maybe we'll even get Star Trek transporters.   Shampa Bagchi  39:38 You know, I'm just waiting for that, you know, beat me up, Scotty.   Michael Hingson  39:42 Yeah, I'm waiting for that. That would certainly take care of a lot of the driving issues.   Shampa Bagchi  39:48 That's it. That's it. No more driving. I'd love that.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Oh, yeah. Well, we could use the roads for other things. Robert Heinlein wrote, a short story called The roads must roll back In the early 1950s, and instead of driving, roads all moved, and were long, almost like conveyor belts and even going from one end of California to the other. It was a it was a fascinating story. It's a it's a really interesting story to read, because everyone used rolling roads to go anywhere and off of the main roads. There were other roles that took you roads that road that took you where you needed to go. It's a fascinating story.   Shampa Bagchi  40:25 Yeah. Wow. That's an interesting concept. So cars don't need to drive. It's the roads that are doing the driving for you.   Michael Hingson  40:32 Right. Yeah. To go hunting. It's called the roads must roll by Robert Heinlein   Shampa Bagchi  40:37 definitely look at it. Yes.   Michael Hingson  40:39 It's a short story. You can read it in 15 minutes.   Shampa Bagchi  40:41 Oh, look it up. Yeah. I was reading about another fascinating concept to somewhere is that you know, a car start charging themselves as they drive. So you know, you have some sort of, you know, I don't even know if that's the real roads are going to be built such that in the cars while they're driving, they get charged. So you really don't need to charge the cars anymore.   Michael Hingson  41:02 I think? Well, I know, somewhere in this area around San Diego, I think it is there was a road that had some sort of cable going through it that helped provide guidance for the car. But I don't remember whether it charged or not. I think it was pre a lot of the electric vehicles. But I wouldn't be surprised if there wouldn't be a way coming along that charge cars could charge themselves. Of course, there's always solar, but you probably need more than what we can do with solar today on a small car.   Shampa Bagchi  41:34 Right, exactly. So yeah, I would say the technology problem getting it out into the world in a more cost effective way building the infrastructure, that would be the challenging part.   Michael Hingson  41:44 That's going to be a lot of what happens with software is it's all about making it more efficient, making a cost efficient and getting things out in an efficient way, isn't it?   Shampa Bagchi  41:53 Yes, yes. That's a hands on. Yeah, how how cost effective we can make it and in callings when our clients come in, that's what we tell them to, you know, we can do it very fast. We can you can build a huge, I don't know, aeroplane for you. But do you really need that? And how much budget do you have? So we have to build according to your needs and your budget, we do our best work, you know, otherwise, everything is possible.   Michael Hingson  42:17 You talk a lot both about convergehub and quarterlies. about efficiency, and the importance of that and what you do and what you're bringing to your customers.   Shampa Bagchi  42:29 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I think efficiency is, especially you know, both in converge I've been calling so although you know, in different ways. But for convergehub, it's a matter of, I would say productivity. So it's it's how it's not just about what you can do, it's, I would say it's a matter of how well you can do it, how quickly you can do it, and what results you can get doing it. You know, that's what I would say no makes the software special. Otherwise, it's not about building a lot of features, a lot of new wonderful tools that nobody uses.   Michael Hingson  43:08 Where do you see, we talked about artificial intelligence? But where do you see that? And what other kinds of things do you see coming along in the next five or 10 years that you can look at and talk about in terms of how some of the ways we think of software, and some of the ways software will interact with our lives are going?   Shampa Bagchi  43:30 Yeah, that's that's an interesting question. I would say, software slowly will stop becoming something that you're kind of, you know, sitting at your desk or even you know, looking at it on the mobile phone, it's going to become everywhere, it's everything is going to be software. So your your and right now we do have that you know, your your TV has software, your Frasier software, but it's just going to become such that, and especially not you are going to be able to like not talk to it and redo it again, it's all there right now. But it's going to become ubiquitous, it's going to be you know, your car, your home, your, your washing machine, and every single thing that you do is going to become software, it's you, we won't call it software anymore, I think you'll just call it Life. So it's just there. And so, in terms of technology, if you will, I think voice as a technology, voice activation talking to your machines, you know, that's going to become you know, more and more important, the insights that it gives you in terms of, you know, sales software, or no customer software that we're looking at, even now, next conversion, that's our aim to, you know, bring about is that looking at your past data or whatever work that you're doing, it's telling you a future direction, and again, that is that efficiency that you talk about the productivity you talk about so there are this hunt 100 200 things that you could do today, but which 10 that you do will bring an impact which 10 of those should you focus on to get the maximum impact the maximum out of your day, so that those kinds of insights are going to become important and are right now, again, you know, everybody's trying to do it. I wouldn't say, you know, we are where we, you know, at where we should be. But we're getting there. And those are the kinds of things that I foresee, you know, happening other than the fact that, you know, we are going to probably have humanoid kind of, you know, robots and we are going to interact with then. Yeah, who knows? So those are on the rise and coming up soon.   Michael Hingson  45:40 We should have Ray Kurzweil who talks about the singularity, the time when computers, if you will, and humans merge, and we through our brains can access all of it directly. Yes.   Shampa Bagchi  45:56 The thought interface that sometimes we don't talk about, and yet those are, I don't know, it's exciting and scary at the same time, right? Just something we can't even think about. But it's slowly creeping upon us. It's happening so slowly, probably, that we are not even noticing. But we are getting there. And we just have to figure out ways and probably even laws to deal with it.   Michael Hingson  46:20 Well, and that's going to be part of it is, is the laws and trying to definitely put a standard to it, do you. But I but it seems to me and I mentioned the senator campaign, and so on, it strikes me that those kinds of, of commercials, and that kind of discussion really represents a fear of change and a fear of what these products are really bringing to us, which shouldn't be there, but it still is.   Shampa Bagchi  46:49 Yeah, absolutely. I would totally agree on that. I think it's more about the fear of the unknown in another form. So you don't really know where this is going, which is true. I mean, it's scary. But at the same time, you cannot ignore the enormous amount of value that is adding to our lives. So I would say that the way to get through this is to you know, not really ignore it, and not to shy away from it and say, hey, you know, Tesla software is buggy, so we never go autonomous, driving way. But to kind of look at it right now and say, what standards should we set to what law should we set? What is it that we need to do to make sure all of this works out? Well, for us, it doesn't end in disaster, it works out such that, you know, rather than, you know, being seen as a flaw it it's seen as something that saves lives? Because autonomous driving ultimately will save lives? If done, right.   Michael Hingson  47:48 How do we get people to go from where they are to recognizing what you just said, which is the value of a lot of these kinds of improvements? It seems like it's an ongoing battle, but how do we get people to move past? No to? Yes, if you will? Yeah, that's   Shampa Bagchi  48:06 an interesting question. I would say the only way to do it is with education, right? So it's always the fear of unknown and education is what's going to make that unknown unknown to you. So the more we can educate people, the more we kind of bring it a little more to the masses. And say that, you know, you bring it such that we can, you know, touch and feel it and see, there's really nothing to be afraid of. I think the more it works, I remember when I was in Cisco, I had, they had this big lab where they were testing out all these different things. And this was very, very initial days of, but I remember they were testing out things like technology, like you could order milk, you could ask your refrigerator to order milk for you. You know, you could turn on the oven while you're driving home, in your car, you could switch on your oven. At that time, that seems like Oh, my goodness, you know, what if my house burns down? Now, it doesn't seem so absurd anymore. So it's just a matter of education, how much we have accepted it. And it's a matter of time and education. I think it's a factor of both of them.   Michael Hingson  49:17 Yeah, and how we can get people educated more quickly, to be more adventurous. And that's what it really is, right? You You came over from India, into a pretty unknown situation. And I've experienced some of those things in my life, going from one side of the country to the other with no family and no support system and developing a whole new thing. But life is an adventure. And all too often we don't we don't think about the fact that it's an adventure and a great learning experience. And if we could get more people to view it that way, we probably would also have a lot less fear. Or at least we would be open to exploring new things even though the fear might be there. You know, again, it would be something that we can start to work to control.   Shampa Bagchi  50:03 Yeah, I would, I would totally agree with that. Because there is always risk. I mean, even in life, I mean, you don't know, you go out of the home, there is stress, you know, there's always a risk of facing. But how do you, it's just that somehow, you know, people think there is more risk in the unknown. But you know, maybe the rewards are greater in the unknown to, you just don't know that you just have to take that risk to find out what it is all about. And, to me, again, I think that's a lot about I call that the entrepreneurial mindset. And I've recently started talking about this too, because I think the entrepreneur mindset has that that thing to, you know, that spark where you can step up, you can take a little bit of risk, you can look at any challenges and say that, I'm going to solve this. It's not just about entrepreneurs, it's not that it's just in entrepreneurs, I think it's in it, regardless of what life situation isn't, whether you're in a business or whether you have are going solo or not, you know, whatever it is that you are doing right now you can bring that mindset into it. And, you know, experiment a little bit, you know, step up into it, take a little bit of risk and learn a little bit more. And that would, I think, would help, like, become a lot more interesting.   Michael Hingson  51:21 Well, tell me more about that you you are an entrepreneur, obviously by kind of any standard. But tell me more about your your thoughts about being an entrepreneur? How do we get more people to do that? How do we get more people to accept that they can possibly do the same sort of thing?   Shampa Bagchi  51:37 Yes, sure, yes, I have always been an entrepreneur, I think because I come from a family of entrepreneurs. And I always wanted to have my own company. And so it's, to me, it's more so because I love to build things, you know, whether it's a product, whether it's a company, I like to kind of you know, see the little bits coming together to form a hole, and then impacting, getting bigger than yourself. It becomes you know, initially when you're looking at it, you know, it's a vision, it's completely within you, and nobody else can see it. But slowly, when it comes out into the world, and then goes out into the world, it becomes so much so many other people get involved in this, start sharing your vision, and it becomes so much bigger than yourself. So I think it's just a matter of if somebody would like to become entrepreneur, and I think they're everyday entrepreneurs who don't necessarily have to, or have a company, they don't necessarily have to have, you know, go solo, or have their own startups raise venture capital, I think entrepreneurs are whoever are willing to step up. I think in there's this book, called I think, if I'm not mistaken, the name is daring, greatly by brainy Brown. And she said, she does really well, where you are kind of into the arena where you're willing to go into the arena, and, you know, face off your challenges. So that thought process I would think is more about becoming an entrepreneur than anything else. So if I think you are ready to take on responsibility, take ready to learn new things. That mindset is what we know people need to bring in   Michael Hingson  53:22 what excites you about going to work every day?   Shampa Bagchi  53:26 That's that's a really nice question. I think, I think what really excites me is that I have the tools to make a difference, that I can structure my day in such a way and build things that someday will probably, you know, touch somebody's life, with an especially probably will touch with somebody's life, even when I don't know about it. So that's why I often love hearing about, you know, convergehub from users, when users reach out to me saying, yeah, how do I solve this problem? Or, Hey, I used it, you know, in this particular case, and it worked for even saying that, you know, if you just improve this thing a little bit, it will help do this. So it's just kind of know people have taken something that we envision visualized, which was this small and they're using it in their own doing their own thing, which is completely different from what we visualized, and it still works. So that's really exciting. You know, how I'm able to touch people's life and improve their livelihood in whatever little bit   Michael Hingson  54:30 you know, a lot of people say, well, it's all about making money, we got to be more very successful because we make more money, but I'm not hearing you say that's the biggest priority. It's really   Shampa Bagchi  54:40 never been that really it's never been that because if so I would probably go out I'm here in the Silicon Valley. We started our company pretty early in the day would have gone out raised a lot of capital, you know, gone IDI pure road and not done that and made a lot of money, but it's a little more are in a complex than that to me. So I would like to go in my own pace, do my own thing and make my own mark in the   Michael Hingson  55:06 world view. You mentioned Brene Brown and her book, have you thought about writing a book?   Shampa Bagchi  55:11 I actually have Yes. I have thought about it. A lot of times haven't found the time yet. But someday, I'm going to read a book,   Michael Hingson  55:23 you have a lot of insights that I think people would like to hear, and which is one of the reasons I thought it would be great to have you on this podcast. But you do have a lot of insights that I think would inspire people and motivate people and the lessons that you have learned. And the things that you teach to your employees and your customers are all valuable insights that I would think, would make a fascinating book. And of course, I have written two books and working on our third now talking about fear. But I am a firm believer in something that you said, which is it's all about telling stories to. So it isn't just preaching at people, it's it's using stories to illustrate what you talked about. And you've done, you've told a number of those stories in what we're doing here, which I think is great, because it really shows in real life examples. What's happening.   Shampa Bagchi  56:20 Great. Yeah, thank you, Michael, I really, really appreciated that. And I'm so thankful you said that, because it's been on my mind for a long time, I would love to share my experiences in a book, I love writing to. So it's one of my passions. And if I find the time when I find the time, I don't have a blog, though. So I write very short blogs, whatever I can manage. But someday, hopefully, I'll be able to sit down and you know, you narrate these experiences,   Michael Hingson  56:48 and do you do videos or any other ways of communicating with people outside?   Shampa Bagchi  56:53 I recently started doing that. I actually yesterday, I put out my first video on LinkedIn. And I'm planning to do that and more and more, because what I'm seeing is, that's another really another different medium for somebody who was not that fond of reading to still be able to go out and, you know, put your ideas forward in front of that person. So I intend to do that more and more.   Michael Hingson  57:17 What was your first video about   Shampa Bagchi  57:18 entrepreneurship? Course I was actually talking about what it means to be an entrepreneur, believe it or not. So that was one topic very fresh. On my mind, when I started talking about Italy, well, it   Michael Hingson  57:29 makes makes perfect sense. And again, I think is you work toward a book, and you can always get people to, to help do some of the writing. But just just to save time, or free up some of yours. But in the books that I've written, I've worked with two writers and I'm working with the third professional writer in the book that we're writing now. And the working title of it is a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, because we're talking about controlling fear, which is of course what happened to me on September 11, being in the World Trade Center in escaping, it was all about for me be knowing in advance what to do in the case of an emergency and being as prepared as one could be, which kept the fear away. I was certainly always concerned about what might happen while we were going down the stairs because there was fire above us. And we had no idea it was an airplane or anything that hit the building at the time. None of us did. It wasn't a blindness issue. But clearly something was very seriously wrong. And at the same time, the preparation that I had made in advance was very helpful until we finally decided during the pandemic to write about that. And so I'm working with a writer Carrie, why can't and we're putting the book together. And what I find is that she does a lot of the writing, I do a lot of the writing. But I also because we want to put it in my story, even then take what she writes in and tweak it some, but it's still a whole lot less time than if if I did it all. So it's another another way to go. But for me, it does help to get the message out there to put it in a book form. And people have appreciated what we've written so far. So I guess it's a good thing.   Shampa Bagchi  59:15 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And your story is is so so inspiring. I read about it and your website, I do plan to get your book and read all about it, you know, in more detail. But you know what you went through and how not with your dog, it's very, very inspiring story.   Michael Hingson  59:33 Yeah, what people often miss is that it's a team effort. The dog has a job to do, and I have a job to do that. The dog doesn't leave the dog guides and there's a big distinct difference between those two. But thunder dog is the title of the book and it it is out there and I think that it helps to teach people a lot about what blindness is really like as opposed to what we think it is. And it's the usual myth that people have Ms. conceptions, whether it's about blindness or technology or whatever, it is all about education and getting people to, to move forward and recognize that maybe we have the wrong idea about what this is about.   Shampa Bagchi  1:00:11 Yeah, I absolutely am going to read your book. And do you know, when your new book is coming out? Did you set a date yet?   Michael Hingson  1:00:20 The tentative date is, by the time all is done, we get it edited, and everything else is going to it's, it's a while away as a way yet, probably in the first, well, probably in the second quarter of 2024. So it's not going to be soon.   Shampa Bagchi  1:00:36 It's been a while. Yeah, it's going to be a while, but I'm looking forward to it already. Definitely going to read that one too.   Michael Hingson  1:00:42 Well, we were blessed to get a contract signed with a publisher. And so we're working with their timeframe. We've we've talked about when to publish it, and why to publish it then. So I think it'll be kind of fun. But we at this point where there's thunder dog and running with Roselle, so definitely get them and running Anthony center dog especially is also available in audio format, which is an easy way to get it if you do much driving here. Yeah, sure. Yeah, in an autonomous vehicle.   Shampa Bagchi  1:01:10 I was very good for that. But I just love reading. So I'm definitely going to get that and your book was bestseller too, right?   Michael Hingson  1:01:19 Yeah, it was the number one New York Times bestseller. Again, we were very blessed with that. So that's impressive. We like that. Well, Shamp, I'm going to let you go back to doing some of the creative things that you do. We've been talking for an hour, and it's been fun. already. I know. Isn't that fun? You are welcome. You are welcome to come back. Anytime. If you want to talk further. I would love to do that. And definitely I want to stay in touch. I love what you had to say about artificial intelligence and so on. And I'm glad that you did check out excessively we talked about that very briefly briefly. It's it's also a bleeding edge type of technology.   Shampa Bagchi  1:01:57 It is it is yes, it was I was very impressed with it. I did take a look at it. And I look forward to talking to them again. Well, we'll   Michael Hingson  1:02:04 help facilitate that and, and anytime that we can be of help them. And if you want to talk more to folks here, don't hesitate. We can even use some of these podcasts to help with your book.   Shampa Bagchi  1:02:17 Oh, yeah, that would be wonderful. Thank you so much, Michael, thank you for that idea. It's been a pleasure talking to you. It's been a lot of fun.   Michael Hingson  1:02:24 I've enjoyed it very much. And I hope all of you who are listening, have enjoyed it. Wherever you are, I hope that you enjoyed the last hour. If you would like I want to hear from you. But before I give you my contact information Shampo how can people find you and maybe learn more about what you're doing and about convergehub and so on?   Shampa Bagchi  1:02:44 Yeah, I have a bl

Adventures in Angular
Why would you use Angular in a Startup? - AiA 355

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:28


Catalin Ciubotaru joins the show today to share his industry insights and the advantages and disadvantages of using Angular in a startup.   In this episode… Main advantages of Angular Moving quickly with Angular Developer experience and templates Disadvantages of using Angular Hiring with a startup mentality Startups defined Micro front ends and monolithic apps Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links Catalin Codes Catalin Ciubotaru - Medium Twitter: @c5n_c8u Picks Catalin- The X-Files (TV Series 1993-2018) - IMDb Catalin- CSS for JavaScript Developers | An online course that teaches the fundamentals of CSS for React/Vue devs Charles- 2000 Mules | Official Site Charles- Project Hail Mary Charles- The Scions of Shannara (Heritage of Shannara, #1) Charles- NCIS (Official Site) Watch on CBS Charles- - Top End Devs

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
Why would you use Angular in a Startup? - AiA 355

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:28


Catalin Ciubotaru joins the show today to share his industry insights and the advantages and disadvantages of using Angular in a startup.   In this episode… Main advantages of Angular Moving quickly with Angular Developer experience and templates Disadvantages of using Angular Hiring with a startup mentality Startups defined Micro front ends and monolithic apps Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links Catalin Codes Catalin Ciubotaru - Medium Twitter: @c5n_c8u Picks Catalin- The X-Files (TV Series 1993-2018) - IMDb Catalin- CSS for JavaScript Developers | An online course that teaches the fundamentals of CSS for React/Vue devs Charles- 2000 Mules | Official Site Charles- Project Hail Mary Charles- The Scions of Shannara (Heritage of Shannara, #1) Charles- NCIS (Official Site) Watch on CBS Charles- - Top End Devs

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
StackBlitz with Tomek Sułkowski

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 45:46


StackBlitz is an online IDE where you can create Angular, React, and Vue projects quickly and easily in your browser. Tomek Sułkowski, Founding Engineer and DevRel at StackBlitz, joins us to talk about WebContainers, running Node in the browser, and more. Links https://twitter.com/sulco https://twitter.com/stackblitz https://stackblitz.com/ https://github.com/stackblitz/core https://blog.stackblitz.com/posts/introducing-collections-and-social-previews https://podrocket.logrocket.com/vite-3 https://blog.stackblitz.com/posts/announcing-viteconf Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us Special Guest: Tomek Sulkowski.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Supper Club × Self Hosted Backend-as-a-service with Brandon Roberts

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 47:28 Very Popular


In this supper club episode of Syntax, Wes and Scott talk with Brandon Roberts about Appwrite, how Appwrite works, who it's for, as well as his thoughts on Angular, Remix, and more. Hasura - Sponsor With Hasura, you can get a fully managed, production-ready GraphQL API as a service to help you build modern apps faster. You can get started for free in 30 seconds, or if you want to try out the Standard tier for zero cost, use the code “TryHasura” at this link: hasura.info. We've also got an amazing selection of GraphQL tutorials at hasura.io/learn. Lightstep Incident Response - Sponsor Streamline on-call, collaboration, incident management, and automation with a free 30-day trial of Lightstep Incident Response, built on ServiceNow. Usage-based pricing on active services promotes collaboration across your entire team to build a culture of service ownership. Listeners of Syntax will also receive a free Lightstep Incident Response T-shirt after firing an alert or incident. Pay for the services you use, not the number of people on your team with Lightstep Incident Response, built on ServiceNow. Streamline on-call, collaboration, incident management, and automation with a free 30-day trial. Fire an alert or incident today and receive a free Lightstep Incident Response t-shirt. Show Notes 00:36 Welcome 01:10 Who is Brandon Roberts? @BrandonTRoberts 02:00 What is Appwrite? Appwrite Getting started with Appwrite 03:17 What database layer does Appwrite use? 08:17 Is this working client side or server side? 09:54 Great docs and examples 12:55 How is deployment handled? Appwrite on Digital Ocean 15:30 Sponsor: Lightstep Incident Response 16:36 Appwrite's focus on developer experience Appwrite to do with Svelte 19:56 Realtime database options with Appwrite 22:40 Cloud functions in Appwrite 26:01 How does Appwrite scale? Docker Swarm 27:28 Who is Appwrite for? Flutter 30:03 What is Ionic? Ionic 32:12 What do you enjoy about working in Angular? Angular 35:08 Sponsor: Hasura 36:30 Supper club questions Night owl Shameless Plugs Guest: React Router Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Real Talk JavaScript
Episode 198: Angular v14 and Beyond

Real Talk JavaScript

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 44:44


Recording date: July 28, 2022John Papa @John_PapaWard Bell @WardBellDan Wahlin @DanWahlinCraig Shoemaker @craigshoemakerMinko Gechev @mgechevBrought to you byAG GridIdeaBladeResources:Minko Gechev on GitHubTools for Faster ApplicationsQuicklinks Angular Prefetching Preloading StrategyAngular 14 release articleAngular CLINextJS frameworkSvelte Kit frameworkGoogle Developer Tools Stack TraceStandalone components in Angularng updateLess Angular Could be More Angular - video from John at ngConf 2021Rx JsNext.js image componentng-conf 2022Dependency injection in AngularInjection Function in Angular 14AxiosHttpClient in AngularAngular on TwitterVite.jsEvan You on TwitterTimejumps00:39 Ward's buzz02:35 Guest introduction06:09 Sponsor: Ag Grid07:04 Who is Angular for in 2022?17:13 Does Angular 14 address the complexity?20:24 What makes components different in Angular?27:36 Sponsor: IdeaBlade28:39 More Angular could be less Angular36:29 Final thoughtsPodcast editing on this episode done by Chris Enns of Lemon Productions.

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
437: Hello Prenup with Sarabeth Jaffe

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 30:40


Sarabeth Jaffe is CTO and Co-Founder at HelloPrenup, the digital prenup platform designed to get couples on the same page. Chad talks with Sarabeth about dogfooding her own product, completely starting over from a technical perspective using Bubble, a low-code/no-code platform, and appearing on the ABC hit series Shark Tank. Hello Prenup (https://helloprenup.com/) Follow Hello Prenup on Twitter (https://twitter.com/HelloPrenup), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/helloprenup/), YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqe-NOs0xV7yEebsg8om27A), Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/HelloPrenup/), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/helloprenup/). Follow Sarabeth on Twitter (https://twitter.com/sarabethjaffe) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarabethjaffe/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Sarabeth Jaffe, CTO, and Co-Founder at HelloPrenup, the digital prenup platform designed to get couples on the same page. Sarabeth, thank you so much for joining me. SARABETH: Thank you so much for having me. CHAD: I can't say that I was aware of your...or that I wanted to think about prenups and seeking out a product around prenups. But it's super interesting to me. And I'm sure that that's part of both the challenge and opportunity with HelloPrenup. So, tell us a little bit about the product. SARABETH: So, as you mentioned, HelloPrenup is really the first of its kind. It's a digital platform that allows couples to create a prenuptial agreement that they're both happy with completely online and for a fraction of the cost of going to an attorney. So why is that interesting for folks these days? Really it's because couples are talking about their finances a lot more before they go into marriage. People are getting married later in life, so they have more assets to protect, or in many couples' cases, they have a lot of existing student loans or other liabilities that they can actually protect their partner from. So I think a lot of couples are becoming more open to prenuptial agreements as a way to kind of start off their marriage with a clean slate. And I can actually speak to our customers because I actually built HelloPrenup after I got engaged. And I was looking into getting a prenup. My fiancé and I we've been together for over seven years; we've known each other for over ten years. And we've always been really transparent about everything and especially our finances. And I love being financially savvy, looking at my investment portfolio, and being really frugal and everything. So to me, getting a prenup was always just the smart move. Being kind of a realistic person whose parents are actually divorced now, I view marriage as a partnership that, if it's working, when it's working, that's amazing. But if things don't work out, I think there should be a different path that you're able to take seamlessly. So when we did get engaged, I started looking into how to get a prenup, and it was a really confusing process. If you want to get a prenup without using HelloPrenup, you have to contact a divorce attorney before you're even married, which kind of starts the precedent of your marital journey off kind of a little weird. And also, hiring a divorce attorney for your prenup can cost a lot of money. The average cost is like $300 an hour. So it kind of depends on how complex your prenup is. But if you're planning your wedding, buying an engagement ring, maybe trying to buy a house soon, you're going to put a prenup on the back burner because of the costs, even though it's a really important financial planning tool. So that's why I came up with the idea. I'm a software engineer. This is something that I think I could build is a platform for couples who want to get a prenup done really conveniently and for a fraction of the cost. So I started working on HelloPrenup on my own in February of 2021, so a little bit over a year ago. And of course, I quickly found out that I don't know all the laws required, [chuckles] and I don't know how to write a good prenup contract. So I need either a legal advisor or an attorney to really help me figure these things out, especially because the law per state actually is different. CHAD: Just so I understand the timeline, did you start it before you got married? Or did you end up doing a prenup through an attorney for yourself? SARABETH: Ah, yes. So actually, we're getting married this Saturday. CHAD: Wow. Okay. Congratulations. SARABETH: Thank you so much. And we are HelloPrenup users. CHAD: Okay, wow. SARABETH: So we did our prenup with our platform. CHAD: So you managed to get the product done before you got married so that you could use it? SARABETH: Yes, yes. I wasn't going to get married without the prenup and going through an attorney. [laughs] I gotta...what is the expression? Like, reap what you sow or something like that. CHAD: Yeah, or eat your own dog food is another one. SARABETH: Yes. Dogfooding our own product has been amazingly beneficial for our team. So that's kind of where I left off in our story so far. I needed to find an attorney. CHAD: I'm curious, you know, I'm a software developer too. I think we all have ideas. How did it become just from an idea to a thing you were really going to do? Where was that sort of switch? When did that switch get flipped? SARABETH: When I came up with the idea for a digital prenup platform, I was actually unemployed. So this was kind of in the middle of the pandemic. I was previously working at a really awesome startup based in Seattle, Washington. But unfortunately, I was actually going through a lot of depression, and I felt really disconnected from my work. So I ended up quitting that job in November. So I took about three months off to recenter myself and figure out what I wanted to do next. So when I thought of the idea for a prenup platform, I had the mental capacity to dig into the problem. And when I figured that it would probably be a profitable business, that's when I started to work on it full time. And I didn't have another job, so I was able to jump into it. CHAD: Okay, so you then needed to find an attorney. You realized that was something you lacked. SARABETH: Yeah, so I started doing some Googling while I was deciding whether this was something I definitely wanted to commit to, to see if there were competitor platforms. And I actually found HelloPrenup at that time. Of course, I wasn't involved with it. And so my co-founder now her name is Julia Rodgers Esquire. So she is a divorce attorney based out of Massachusetts. She actually had been building this product, which was completely aligned with my envisioning of what I was going to build. But of course, she had the legal background of it. So I found her platform, and I noticed when I tried to sign up for the platform that the system was under maintenance. So I was like, huh, maybe they need technical help. So I actually ended up cold emailing her to see whether she needed any software help with the hopes that we could team up. And the next day, we just hopped on a Zoom. It's interesting talking to someone who you've never met before about possibly teaming up on something or potentially being a competitor to them. I made it very clear that I would much rather team up with her rather than try to figure this out on my own. CHAD: That sort of sounds like a threat. [laughter] SARABETH: Oh my God. CHAD: I'd much rather team up with you than have to do this on my own. [laughs] SARABETH: Well, I really respected what she had built at that point. So she had put a lot of time into actually writing a lot of content and blogs around prenuptial agreements. So she had a really good base for the business. But it was really the software that she was running into issues with. So she had been struggling and working with overseas developers. So as an attorney, she didn't have a lot of experience project managing a software project like that. And especially with contract developers, you can't say, "I want this to be built in a sustainable, scalable fashion." So there were a lot of bugs with the platform. The way I saw it was like, hey, she kind of has this MVP. And she's an attorney, so I think we would make an amazing team. I was also really excited at the prospect of being able to work with another woman entrepreneur. And we hit it off really quickly on our Zoom call. And yeah, so we've been working together since about March of 2021. CHAD: Did you end up keeping what she already had from a technical perspective, or did you start over? SARABETH: We completely started over. I tried to salvage the codebase that they had used. It was like Angular, which I actually despise Angular framework in general. I tried my best to clean it up, but they had no tests. They had a bunch of copy and pasted code. It was just kind of a mess. So that's when I really decided that Bubble would be a great option for us. CHAD: Well, for those who don't know, Bubble is like a low-code/no-code platform. SARABETH: Yes. So it's called Bubble.io. It is, as Chad just said, you know, it's a low-code platform which allows you to actually build full-stack web applications. So unlike other website builders like Squarespace or Wix, you actually have a database or a back-end component to your application. And of course, for the majority of applications, that's really a requirement to build something actually useful for people. So I'd been playing around with Bubble.io before we scrapped the codebase. And it was a good starting point because I'm still currently the only full-time developer on our team. And because we are using a low-code platform, we're able to move a lot faster with a lot of our feature development because there are a lot of things that had been done for us. So there are a lot of drag and drop features that we can leverage via different plugins. CHAD: It's an interesting choice to me, not because I don't think it makes sense, but I think a lot of developers...you are a developer; you know how to code. SARABETH: [chuckles] CHAD: And I think a lot of developers, when faced with that choice, can't resist writing custom software. SARABETH: Yeah. [chuckles] You know, I've always been torn between the development and the product world. And for a while, that was really a struggle for me deciding whether I wanted to be a product manager or a software engineer. So I settled on being a product-driven software engineer. So to me, the use case of like, I could write the traditional code, but it'll be a lot slower, or I could build the product a lot faster by using this tooling. That's where I land most of the time, like, the more time-efficient way to do things. CHAD: From deciding to work together and starting to work together to okay, I'm going to rewrite this in Bubble; what point were you back online with the new version? How long did that take? SARABETH: Yeah, so that took us about three months to get it relaunched, and so I was pretty happy with that. I mean, of course, there's still a ton of work that we're doing to build out the product, but to really get it back up and running and also in a more scalable way so that we actually can provide prenups across multiple different states now. So it's a lot more flexible in the way that it was built. So it took about three months to get it relaunched. CHAD: So at what point then did you go on Shark Tank? [laughs] SARABETH: So [chuckles] there were a lot of variables in play. And so, I was really thankful that we chose to use Bubble because the speed at which I needed to develop this was even more reduced. So we started talking to producers pretty quickly after we decided to team up together. It's a really unusual entrepreneur journey, I would say. I knew that it would make a good story because prenups are kind of taboo, as you mentioned. Television loves something a little spicy, a little bit dramatic. So we started talking to producers, I want to say, in June or July, maybe even in May. And at that point, we hadn't relaunched the product. So we were really just pitching the idea. And we were pitching ourselves as founders to the producers and the exciting concept of how will the American public perceive a product that is a little bit taboo talking about prenuptial agreements before you get married? If you're familiar with Shark Tank, you probably see that they have a lot of wedding-related companies that go on. But we were kind of flipping the script on that. So while I was rewriting the entire software, we were also going through the auditioning process of Shark Tank. CHAD: I can imagine that's pretty intense. SARABETH: Yes. CHAD: I think the closest thing I can think of is when you enter into an accelerator or something like that. You might be in it for three months. You're going to have demo day at the end. But with that, you're presenting to a group of people. It's not broadcast on national television. SARABETH: Yes. [laughs] CHAD: It's probably a little bit of a different thing, and there are no producers involved, that kind of thing. SARABETH: Yeah, yeah, exactly. By the time we had gotten on the set of Shark Tank to pitch our products, we'd only really been relaunched for about a month and a half. [laughs] So we were flying...I'm so bad at expressions. CHAD: [laughs] SARABETH: We were pitching... CHAD: By the seat of your pants. SARABETH: Yes, that one. Thank you so much. [laughter] So we were really pitching the potential of our product. And we were just so ecstatic to be there. Mid-Roll Ad: When starting a new project, we understand that you want to make the right choices in technology, features, and investment but that you don't have all year to do extended research. In just a few weeks, thoughtbot's Discovery Sprints deliver a user-centered product journey, a clickable prototype or Proof of Concept, and key market insights from focused user research. We'll help you to identify the primary user flow, decide which framework should be used to bring it to life, and set a firm estimate on future development efforts. Maximize impact and minimize risk with a validated roadmap for your new product. Get started at: tbot.io/sprint CHAD: When you went on Shark Tank, how much of what you said and those kinds of things was all you, or how much is it put together for the show? SARABETH: Really, the only thing that is heavily vetted by producers is your pitch. So when you walk into the tank, and you give your 30-second to 2-minute spiel that's a bit more theatrical, you practice that over and over and over again. And it was really a fascinating experience. Because as a fellow software engineer, you know we're kind of more chill people, [laughs] more realistic. But they kept saying, "Bring more energy to it. Do big movements, maybe even do a dance or something." [laughter] I'm kind of living this double life where I'm writing software, and then I'm -- CHAD: In between rehearsals, you're opening your laptop and making another thing happen on the app, I'm sure. SARABETH: Exactly. It's like, oh, okay, we have pitch practice tonight, and now I'm going to work on this core feature. Without it, we literally don't have a product. So the producers are very involved in your initial pitch. But then when you jump into the Q&A, when the Sharks start asking you questions, that's all you. CHAD: That's really cool. So are you happy that you went on Shark Tank? SARABETH: Yes, I'm so happy that we went on. I've always been a Shark Tank fan. I think it's been on for over ten years. Shark Tank has been something that's kind of kept me interested in being an entrepreneur. When I started learning how to code, I knew that I always wanted to start a business. And just seeing the number of ideas and the variety of businesses that people are able to build and putting that on a show is just a fascinating concept. So I was really happy to go on the show. And, of course, the impact on our business has been tremendous. Really, it changed the trajectory of our business. We gain most of our customers through organic search. So most of our customers come in through Google saying like, how do I get an online prenup? By getting on national television, we are really thankful that news stations were now interested in talking to us. So by linking to our website, that helped boost our search engine optimization rankings. And so now we're actually a profitable business due to Shark Tank. CHAD: That's awesome. So is the tech team still just you? SARABETH: The tech team is me. And I have started working with another Bubble developer on a contract basis. But calling out to any software engineers or low-code developers, if you're interested in joining a legal tech company that's growing a lot, feel free to reach out to me. So I really do need to be hiring another developer. At this point, I am really the main developer working on things for a variety of reasons. The first reason is that Bubble, while it is very quick to develop a product on your own from a technical perspective, it is lacking in features when it comes to collaboration with other developers. So with traditional code, you'll do code reviews on GitHub, and you'll just do like a diff. But the branching and the version control is definitely a little bit lacking. So I'm trying to wait out the Bubble team. They have some stuff coming down the pipeline that will make it easier to do collaboration. But for that reason, it is a little bit easier as an entrepreneur using a low-code platform to be the sole developer because you kind of know exactly how everything works. And then also, developers are really expensive. So we are actually a completely self-funded company at this point. So we're bootstrapped. We haven't actually accepted any investment at this point. We're a really conservative team. If we hire a developer, we want to make sure that we're able to provide them with a competitive salary and competitive package. And we're able to do that now. It's just a matter of finding the right person, which is actually a really interesting space because low-code developers are still on the up and up right now. CHAD: I know you can't see the future. But do you foresee a point where either Bubble doesn't take you where you want to go, or you need to start augmenting it in some way? SARABETH: I would like to push Bubble as far as I can. I think now that Bubble is getting a lot more recognition...and they just got another round of funding that was pretty substantial. I think that they're going to be improving a lot of things, especially when it comes to, like I mentioned, collaborating with other developers on the platform and performance. A lot of pushback that people give with low-code platforms is like, oh, the page won't load as quickly as if I wrote it with pure React or something like that. So I want to try and stay on the platform as long as possible. If we really continue to grow, I would be willing to move back to traditional code. And we'd actually be set up for success in that way because we would have a fully functioning product, and half of development is figuring out what feature to build next. So we'd kind of say, all right, here's how it works. And then, while we're kind of maintaining our Bubble application, we can have a development team build it within our own platform. Does that make sense? CHAD: It does. And I think with Bubble, it doesn't need to be all or nothing, right? SARABETH: Mm-hmm. CHAD: You can use APIs. Or you can basically extend it with custom code if you really needed to using webhooks and that kind of thing, right? SARABETH: Exactly. And that's the way that we've done it. So actually, the contract generation is written in Node.js JavaScript. And the reason I did that is because it's easier to process data in a sequential order with traditional code versus Bubble. And you can also hook into other APIs, like for us, we do a conversion of the HTML of the contract into a Word doc. So we're able to call into a conversion API and then save it on AWS with traditional code, and you can do all that with Bubble. But it's a little bit more straightforward when you know what you're doing with just like JavaScript; you know a few lines here and there. Does that make sense? CHAD: It does, yeah. I'll be super interested to see how far you're able to push it and what those things you need to do outside of Bubble are. SARABETH: Yeah, I'm really excited to try to push Bubble as an option for entrepreneurs. We were actually the first low-code platform to be shown on Shark Tank. So every Bubble developer on Twitter was really excited about it. CHAD: [laughs] SARABETH: So I think it's a really interesting spot to be in right now. CHAD: Yeah, from a technology perspective, I think that that's one thing we've talked about. And you addressed the other thing that sometimes people say is a promise. Like, it is a commercial platform. It's not an open-source platform, and you're building entirely on top of it. And so that presents a certain amount of risk that like, they might go out of business. You know, they're a VC-backed company, and maybe they'll go out of business. And then where would you be? The fact that they've just raised a significant additional round of funding mitigates that somewhat, but it's still a concern, right? SARABETH: Yeah, it's definitely a concern. And it's something that, as a software engineer, it's terrifying to know that you're relying on someone else for your livelihood and now the livelihood of multiple people on our team. So it is really scary. You cannot export your code from Bubble. But I believe they have said that if for some reason they go out of business, they will allow you to do that. I'm sure whatever code you export from it is not going to be very pretty to look at. So it probably makes sense to write it from scratch. But I think at this point, I'm really happy with where we're at. I like remaining a really lean team. And using different tools in simple ways and trying to keep our product as simple as possible has really helped us grow. CHAD: What's next for HelloPrenup? Where are you setting your sights on? What's keeping you up at night now? SARABETH: Ooh, so many things. We do have an exciting investor coming on. I can't say exactly who, but they were really involved in building one of the largest legal tech platforms out there today. So we're really excited to be partnering with them and be building out our network across all 50 states. Right now, we're actually in, I believe, 32 states. You can use our platform to create your prenuptial agreement. And so, we're excited to be starting to onboard attorneys to the platform. So that's one of the things. Another thing that's on our radar is keeping up with, you know, it's hard to say the trends of what's going on with Web3. But we do have some things that are related to Web3 that we'll be tackling in the next probably a year or a couple of years when it comes to financial data. Yeah, so those things are kind of on our radar of our product. And then, on the near term, we are doing a lot of work to try and normalize the entire conversation around prenuptial agreements. We partnered with The Knot, which is one of the largest online wedding registry websites. And we've been writing a lot of blogs on their website that talk about the educational side of prenups. And we're actually going to be launching gift cards. CHAD: [chuckles] SARABETH: So you can list a prenuptial agreement on your wedding registry, and people can help support it. So there are a lot of initiatives that we're going to be doing on the product development side and then also kind of on the marketing education side of the business. As we start to grow, I'm trying to pull my attention away from those things. But sometimes, it's really hard because some parts of the business that aren't technical are fun to get involved in. And I'm sure you run into that or when you were scaling thoughtbot getting distracted by other parts of the business because they were just interesting. But there's a lot going on right now. CHAD: That's exciting. You mentioned earlier that you hadn't taken investors yet. And so is it about that scale that's causing you to take one on now, or what's going on there? SARABETH: So we're profitable. We don't need an investor, which is we're so thankful for that. So it's really a strategic partnership for us. CHAD: Well, that's really cool. I'm excited to hear everything you have going on. And I really wish you luck in everything that you're doing. SARABETH: Thank you so much. CHAD: So if folks want to find out more about HelloPrenup, follow along with you, get in touch with you; where are all the best places for them to do that? SARABETH: You can check us out on helloprenup.com. And we're on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn. Just tweet at us @HelloPrenup, and one of us will respond. It'll probably be myself or Julia. So you're able to get into contact with us if you have any questions. And of course, if you are a developer who is looking to join a really fun, women-led legal tech company, hit me up. CHAD: Awesome. You can subscribe to the show and find notes with links for everything that Sarabeth just mentioned, along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments for me, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thank you so much for joining me, Sarabeth. I really appreciate it. SARABETH: Thank you so much. CHAD: And thank you for listening. See you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Sarabeth Jaffe.

The Angular Show
S4 E1 - Web Security with Angular with Alisa Duncan

The Angular Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 55:11


As Angular developers, we have a lot to be thankful for, including the built-in web security. Web Security is a topic that we could not do justice to in a matter of a single podcast episode. With that said, we welcome Alisa Duncan, a Senior Developer Advocate at Okta, and Google Developer Expert. Alisa loves learning and sharing with the community. In this episode, we dive into the OWASP top 10 list from 2021 that shows the most common vulnerabilities that are exposed in web applications, and then we break down how Angular helps us to avoid these vulnerabilities in our applications. Join us as we learn more about web security with Angular.https://owasp.org/Top10/https://angular.io/guide/security@AlisaDuncan

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
Async Angular Testing and Introducing AG Charts - AiA 352

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 48:44


If you are testing an Angular application, then at some point, you will be required to test asynchronous behavior.  Today on the show, guests Stephen Cooper and Mona Peirov share about how you can validate your internal models with async Angular testing and integrate AG Charts into your workflows. Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links Understanding async tests in Angular JavaScript Charts: Overview Stephen Cooper Twitter: @SCooperDev LinkedIn: Mana Peirov Twitter: @ManaPeirov Picks Charles- Antidote Charles - Top End Devs Conferences Charles - Join a meetup group Mana- Passion fruit is amazing and it's growing in my garden Stephen -  if you have a friend at Google get them to invite you to the office as a guest

Adventures in Angular
Async Angular Testing and Introducing AG Charts - AiA 352

Adventures in Angular

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 48:44


If you are testing an Angular application, then at some point, you will be required to test asynchronous behavior.  Today on the show, guests Stephen Cooper and Mona Peirov share about how you can validate your internal models with async Angular testing and integrate AG Charts into your workflows. Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links Understanding async tests in Angular JavaScript Charts: Overview Stephen Cooper Twitter: @SCooperDev LinkedIn: Mana Peirov Twitter: @ManaPeirov Picks Charles- Antidote Charles - Top End Devs Conferences Charles - Join a meetup group Mana- Passion fruit is amazing and it's growing in my garden Stephen -  if you have a friend at Google get them to invite you to the office as a guest

GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast
Angular and Strange: The 2022 US Classic Preview

GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 87:15


US Classic Preview But first, we're having a live show at US Nationals with Jordyn Weiber! Listen for details. Leanne Wong was a surprise entrant on the US Classic roster. What do we expect? A discussion of the title race: What we're looking to see from Konnor McClain, whether Shilese Jones is the best bars worker in the US, and the current status of Kayla DiCello after just competing at Pan Ams Who isn't competing: Most of the college Olympians, most of the Pan Ams team, and more Plus, a possible Addison Fatta and Ciena Alipio revenge tour and the importance of a Nola Matthews floor routine There are men at this meet now! A lot of them. We discuss some weird scheduling, what we're expecting to see from Donnell Whittenburg and Colin Van Wicklen here, and what Stephen Nedoroscik needs to do to make teams leading up to Paris. Gymternet News We discuss what Greg Marsden and Cecile Landi had to say about Roe, the petitions calling for the NCAA to remove all Championships from Texas (and any state with similar laws) for criminalizing abortion healthcare and anti-trans policies, the current funding freeze for Gymnastics Canada, and the contract extension for Courtney Kupets Carter. Commonwealth Games Preview Is this Australia's moment for women's team and AA gold? Or is England going to rout everyone? Plus, Rhys is competing after all, the return of Claudia Fragapane, a potential breakout competition for Ondine Achampong, the importance of Poppy Stickler, and several sexism alerts. And finally, important feedback about Olga Strazheva's 1989 floor routine and who should compete a tribute version. JOIN CLUB GYM NERD Join Club Gym Nerd (or give it as a gift!) for access to Behind the Scenes episodes. Buy our awesome clothing and gifts here. We have a Ukraine Fundraiser design, all proceeds go to the CARE Ukraine Crisis fund. RELATED EPISODES & RESOURCES Donate grips and tape for Ukrainian gymnasts Donate to family of Alabama volunteer assistant coach in Ukraine To follow the effects of the Russian invasion to Ukraine on gymnastics, go to Gymnovosti The Brazil Era Farewell, All-Around Standings Olga The Judges Go Off The New Era: Alicia Sacramone Quinn and Chellsie Memmel lead USAG TV's Biggest Gymnastics Fails GYMKATA The Leotard Episode: Part Deux

Real Talk JavaScript
Episode 193: Localizing Docs with Aristeidis Bampakos

Real Talk JavaScript

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 25:08


Recording date: 06/23/2022John Papa @John_PapaWard Bell @WardBellDan Wahlin @DanWahlinCraig Shoemaker @craigshoemakerAristeidis Bampakos @AbampakosBrought to you byAG GridNarwhal Visit nx.dev to get the preeminent open-source toolkit for monorepo development, today. Resources:Becoming A Tech Author During The Pandemic with Aristeidis BampakosLocalizing AngularLocalize docsFencing World ChampionshipsLocalization vs InternationalizationAngular docs in Greek languageGreek Angular Docs repositoryGeorge Kalpakas on TwitterTimejumps00:20 Welcome02:20 Guest introduction03:38 Topic introduction07:01 Sponsor: Nrwl07:37 Learning Angular in different languages11:12 How do you deal with images?12:01 What about using Google Translate?14:48 Does crowd sourcing work?19:06 Sponsor: Ag Grid20:06 Angular is a global team23:11 Final thoughtsPodcast editing on this episode done by Chris Enns of Lemon Productions.

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
The Angular Developer's Nx Handbook - AiA 350

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 45:12


Nx is a smart, fast and extensible build system with first class monorepo support and powerful integrations, and it has a powerful core and a rich plugin ecosystem.  Today, Charles interviews Angular expert Lars Gyrup Brink Nielsen to discuss the benefits of the Nx build framework. In this episode… Nx fundamentals Benefits and downsides Nx workspace generation Distributed task execution (DTE) Future feature releases Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links The Angular Developer's Nx Handbook Twitter: @LayZeeDK GitHub: LayZeeDK Picks Charles- Just One Charles - Top End Devs Conferences Charles- Tim McGraw, Faith Hill to Star in 'Yellowstone' Prequel Series '1883' Lars- Westworld | Official Website for the HBO Series | HBO.com Lars – This is Learning

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
The Angular Developer's Nx Handbook - AiA 350

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 45:12


Nx is a smart, fast and extensible build system with first class monorepo support and powerful integrations, and it has a powerful core and a rich plugin ecosystem.  Today, Charles interviews Angular expert Lars Gyrup Brink Nielsen to discuss the benefits of the Nx build framework. In this episode… Nx fundamentals Benefits and downsides Nx workspace generation Distributed task execution (DTE) Future feature releases Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links The Angular Developer's Nx Handbook Twitter: @LayZeeDK GitHub: LayZeeDK Picks Charles- Just One Charles - Top End Devs Conferences Charles- Tim McGraw, Faith Hill to Star in 'Yellowstone' Prequel Series '1883' Lars- Westworld | Official Website for the HBO Series | HBO.com Lars – This is Learning

Software Engineering Unlocked
Mentoring as an engineering manager

Software Engineering Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 49:55


Today's episode is sponsored by Mergify, the faster and safer way to merge your code.[00:01 - 06:24] Opening Segment Start saving time by automatizing your pull requests and securing the code merge using Mergify!Sign up for a demo at https://mergify.com/Get to know Jess Roseher reasons for her helping strangers on the Internet[06:25 - 11:59] Bottom-Up Communication Vs. Top-Down ManagementThe challenges of upward communicationHow to balance personal values at workIt's unique for individual circumstanceManaging the conflict of interest as a manager to upper management[21:00 - 33:33] Level Up Your LearningWhy Jess' started an online learning programIn search of the best tool for virtual and distance learningThe impact of tools on the quality of learningMentorship and organizational rankEstablishing healthy boundariesResilience in an educational setting[33:34 - 44:46] Let's Start Speaking The Same LanguageAcing the basics: Why learning the fundamentals is everythingLet's talk about programming languageHow to improve team communication and having a shared language[44:46 - 49:55] Closing SegmentDr. McKayla talks about her book in progress and her advice to those who would like to write a bookFinal wordsTweetable Quotes“Sometimes changing jobs is easier than making peace with uneasy ethical decisions.” - Jess Rose“Nobody tells you, but you're not going to start managing people and get it right right away.” - Jess Rose“We learn better when we're chill.” - Jess Rose“I think it's really valuable to talk about the culture of the language we use around programming and really the culture of the structures we build because it's not transparent to people.” - Jess RoseConnect with Jess Rose on LinkedIn, Twitter, and her website. Go to Github.com/JessicaRose to check out her 1-1s.Resources MentionedMergify - Sign up for a demo now!freeCodeCampClass CentralWeaving the Web by Tim Berners-LeeThe Intuitive Programmer: Learning How to Learn for Programmers (Barbara Oakley & Zach Caceres)Software Engineering Unlocked Episode with Dr. Cat HicksFelienne HermansDan AbramovLet's Connect! You can connect with me, Dr.  McKayla on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube to look into engineering software, and learn from experienced developers and thought leaders from around the world about how they develop software!LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to know more about the engineering software world. Your ratings and reviews help get the podcast in front of new listeners. _______Transcription[00:00:00] Dr. McKayla Hello, and welcome to the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. I'm your host, Dr. Mckayla and today I have the pleasure to talk to Jess Rose. Jess is a technology professional and keynote speaker specializing in community building outreach and developing better processes for talented technology. She is passionate about fostering more equal access to technical education, and digital spaces.  But before I start, let me tell you about an amazing startup that is sponsoring today's episode Mergify. You know, I'm all about code reviews and pull requests. Having your teammates review your code can be super beneficial, but it also can create a bottleneck and slow down your software development. With Mergify, your team can be way more productive with GitHub. Mergify automates all about merging pull requests, you can specify the merge conditions, and Mergify will take care of the rest. Do you want a specific order for merging the pull requests? Should one PR be prioritized? Or do you need a copy of the PR and another branch for bug fixing? No problem. Mergify can take care of all those situations. By saving time, you and your team can focus on projects that matter. Mergify integrates completely with GitHub and your CI pipeline. They have a startup program that could give your company a 12-month credit up to $21,000 of value. Start saving time, visit Mergify.com to sign up for a demo and get started or just click the link in the show notes.  I'm super, super thrilled to have Jess here with me. Jess, welcome to the show.[00:01:38]  Jess Rose Oh, gosh. And I'm absolutely delighted to be here when you said hey, do you want to come and talk about teaching and learning? Oh, I'm just going to be insufferable. Thank you so much. [00:01:48]  Dr. McKayla I'm really excited because I'm following you on Twitter. And I see that you're creating spaces for people to learn to get better to grow. Right. So there are a couple of things that I want to touch base on today with you. One is the 1-1s that you're offering. So maybe, maybe let's get started with that. Because I see you from time to time you say, you know, I have some time available, why not hop over on a call, and I can help you with some career advice? How's it going? What do you do with people? What kind of people are picking up on that?[00:02:27]  Jess Rose So I've been doing this for about, I looked the other day because I do, I do keep records and privacy-preserving records just like,  oh, what kinds of things am I talking to people about? And I've been doing this for about eight years now. So just broke 1700 folks I've talked to over the years.[00:02:40] Dr. McKayla Wow. [00:02:40]  Jess Rose And you would think oh, it's going to be mostly juniors or mostly people trying to break into tech. But just the absolute vastness of experience is so dazzling and exciting and strange to me. I don't see myself as especially well suited to give great advice. But on these calls, people are almost never asking for actual advice. So a lot, most of it's just, I'd like to be heard and I'd like someone to confirm that my experience is unusual or isn't unusual. Or getting sort of a level check for a different area saying, Hey, I'm based in this region, and I'm looking for work in your region. What's that like? What's the experience like? What's the process like? I actually documented the whole process out because I want, I definitely want other people to be doing this if you feel like it. No pressure. And it's on my GitHub. So GitHub.com/JessicaRose. And it should be right on there as  1-1s.[00:03:37] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I saw that. I saw that on your Twitter feed. So it tells us how to do those 1-1s and how to, what questions to ask, and so on?[00:03:46] Jess Rose  Yeah. And mostly just about the tooling. So how to get it scheduled,  how to get that sorted? And then because I'm a weirdo, how to get the records of who chatted to you deleted if you want to, like, yeah, I wouldn't keep notes on somebody who doesn't want me to keep notes.  [00:04:00] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. And I think it's good for privacy as well, right?. If people I don't know which topics, they are coming to you, but I mean, some of them might be private, and you know, especially if you're having maybe, like, I think if you need advice, you're very often not such a good place, right? Probably more than being in a great place where you think, well, everything figured out, you know, things are going smooth than you're seldomly reaching out to other people. It would be like I'm bragging now to you. You're more probably reaching out if you have some problems with your team maybe or getting a job or something like this. Is that what people talk to you about in the sessions?[00:04:41] Jess Rose  So anything from, Hey, am I getting paid right? To, Oh, I'm getting screamed at a lot at work. Is this normal? So a lot of them are sort of, oh, gosh, but a lot of times folks just want to explore what's going on next. I've managed people a lot in my career. And one of the things that I always, I always have a difficult time with, and I hope other managers do, too, is how do you deal with the conflict? And there's always going to be conflict between what's best to the individual person you're managing, and what's best for the company because those are those, And one of the big things I push when I do manage people is, hey, do you have someone external to the company to give you good advice when I can't? Or I shouldn't give you the advice that's best for you?[00:05:31] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah, it's a conflict, right? Because obviously, you don't want to lose that person. But you see that they're outgrowing, you know, maybe the position?[00:05:42] Jess Rose  Oh, I really just want to chase this up a minute. I'm always like, you don't want to lose somebody, like, you don't want somebody to move on for your team because they were unhappy or mistreated. This is definitely from me being a teacher for too long. I'm always pretty excited when somebody graduates up out of a team I run. Like, of course, you want to make sure that people have space to grow, of course, you want to be actively making sure there's career progression and more things to learn. But and especially in a job market, like right now, sometimes people like oh, cool, I could make a bigger salary jump bracket, they could make your title jump by leaving. And I'm always pretty chill with that.[00:06:24] Dr. McKayla Yeah, yeah. Me too. And my husband is also managing a bunch of people. And but I see tension there, right? So I think he's always really behind the people. But then upper management would be, yeah, but you know.[00:06:38] Jess Rose The business case for retention.[00:06:40] Dr. McKayla  Exactly. Right. And the same for, for example, giving your raise, right. And I think, especially maybe the managers, you know, that are really like first line, they are more for the people because they have like some personal relationship, and then one level up, it's already like, yeah, but you know, we don't have the budget or we don't want or we believe we can still keep that person, you know, for this for this cheaper?[00:06:38] Jess Rose  Oh, well, you know, let's give it another quarter or two and wait and see.[00:07:08] Dr. McKayla Yeah, exactly, right?[00:07:10] Jess Rose Baffling.[00:07:11] Dr. McKayla how do you do that as a manager? How do you speak up for your, for your people, or for your team? And h ow do you deal with that conflict as well?[00:07:22] Jess Rose  So I think that's a really challenging one because I think that the conflict there is still the same. What do you do as an individual manager when the y eah, when your contractual, your fiduciary duties to your company, run counter to your individual ethical responsibilities to the people you manage? And or what happens when there's a conflict between the needs of an individual and the needs of a team? And it's not a good answer. And it's not a reassuring answer. But it depends. If somebody is facing treatment that feels unfair, or targeted, or they're in a position that I, generally, if somebody is in a position, I'm not okay, with being much more lovingly strident around, hey, this is a topic I would really bring to your external mentor A well, and then setting really clear limits internally about what, even as a manager, you are and aren't willing to do. So somebody saying, Oh, you get the idea that, Oh, maybe we want to manage so and so out, go ahead and write them up for stuff that the rest of the team routinely does. You still have consent as a manager. So you could say, like, yeah, no, I won't work in a space that involves maybe this kind of behavior.[00:08:45] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah, I think this is really important that we are standing up for our own ethics and for our own beliefs and value and, you know, also behind our, you know, our people that we, you know, I think we have a responsibility as well for and yeah, so I yeah, I can totally see that. [00:09:05] Jess Rose It's easy to say in this kind of job market in the West as well. I think, a re you based perhaps in Europe as well? [00:09:12] Dr. McKaylaYes. Yeah. [00:09:13] Jess Rose Because, like, these days for many European job markets in tech, finding a new job feels to many people who are established for juniors or people getting your first job,  It is hard. But for folks who've been in for a little while, and folks in different in high demand areas, getting a new job as a junior as a middleweight, or a senior, is not as difficult as it could be these days. Whereas if you're having to engage in management behavior that you're just not comfortable with, yeah, sometimes changing jobs is easier than making peace with uneasy ethical decisions. Yeah, sometimes that's not true for everybody. And it's a very, very privileged take for those of us who have a little bit of wiggle room.[00:09:58] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I think so. And it really depends on where are you located? And what is your personal situation, right? Do you have dependents? Do you have like family or people that you have to take care of? And so on, which I think makes it much harder to say, you know, I'm going to not do that. But I think there, you know, there are boundaries, it's, it's one thing is playing along, and just, you know, or letting the other person also, you know, know, in the space that you have, right? You're also like, as a manager, you also, you can't just go and, you know, give advice directly conflicting with the interests of your upper management because that, you know, is a problem, but you can, you know, talk a little bit about, as you said, maybe asking you an external person, or also I think very well, you can say I'm disagreeing with this decision, right? And I advocated for you, unfortunately, you know, these were my boundaries here, for example, and let them know, I think that's, that's perfectly fine. Yeah. And I think that the problem is that if more of those things come together, people start thinking about leaving, right?[00:11:06] Jess Rose And that's not always a bad thing. As a manager, if you're not able to offer someone, a place that is safe, and productive, and non-traumatic to work, yeah, it's okay, that your people move on, and actually kind of preferable?[00:11:22] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah, I think so, too. So another topic that I wanted to talk with you about, and it's a little bit related to management, but it's more related to teaching. So I don't think you have to be a manager to teach, right? You can be, you can be, you know, Junior Dev, Mid Dev, senior Dev, right, so we can all learn from each other. But I really see you as a teaching, you know, expert here. Yeah. Because you're, you're bringing topics around programming, but also, you know, advice for hiring or you know, how to get hired. And to so many people, right, you're, you're also making these really mass, mass online learning events, right, occur online boot camps. So how is that going? Why did you start that and is that only for really junior people?[00:12:12] Jess Rose So the first thing I want to do is like, I would absolutely love if there was an excuse for me, Oh, yes, I'll just take all the credit. But the free online boot camps that I've started are absolutely not just me. So they started as 12-week boot camps, and they've been collapsed into a reasonably intense but still part-time, six-week boot camp. And this is built off of the freeCodeCamp curriculum. So they're a registered nonprofit. They're amazing. We could not do this without them and without their permission. But also the good people, I'm pointing behind me like they're back there. The good people Class Central built a whole platform that lets us teach on so like, just really, and Ramon is my, my co-teacher. And he's he's just, it's almost disgusting how lovely he is. Like, the learners love him and deservedly so.[00:13:03] Dr. McKayla  Cool. Yeah. So what do you teach there? Is it like really the 101 of programming? Or is it more advanced concepts? Who is your target audience here?[00:13:14] Jess Rose  So this last cohort, which just ended about two weeks ago, I should get back to work on those. We had 15,000 unique learners across two tracks learning either web development, which is HTML, CSS, accessibility, really, really intro level of like first steps of programming, or across JavaScript. And again, that sort of first steps with JavaScript, getting started. So really sort of introductory level. But we added some additional forums for peer support. We've got a very noisy Discord. And then some live stream lessons and question-answer to get people unstuck. We've had such a, so I would have expected oh, these will be beginners. We have back-end devs who wanted to try out web development. We've got folks who don't want to go into tech, but they do want to build a website for their business. And the thing I was, I used to be a teacher and I used to be a linguist. And very selfishly, the thing I was, one of the things I was most excited about was the absolute range of the learners. We've got folks across every regularly inhabited continent. And folks joining us in this massive exciting range of first languages. I was just so, so people who are learning from their phones, people who are learning from the library computers, and I just really really loved this loud, chaotic, and so lovely and so supportive group of learners all helping each other out.[00:14:49] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, that's, that's really exciting. So I actually was thinking a little bit about learning on devices that are not high-end, right. And when I, when I started university, I couldn't afford a really high-end computer not even a normal computer, right? So I was on this, I got, I got one of those really cheap computers from somebody that you know, gave it to me for free. And it was a nightmare. It was a nightmare to work on that. And nowadays, it's obviously not the case anymore. And I'm really happy about that. But I was wondering what about, you know, people that don't want to work on the phone or work to, you know, on a tablet, and I'm pregnant right now. [00:15:32] Jess Rose Oh, congratulations. How exciting, how scary. [00:15:36] Dr. McKayla Yeah. But it's also a really cool experience because I'm thinking, like, this is my third child. So I know a little bit.[00:15:45] Jess Rose  Oh, you're just fine. You're like, duh, this happens.[00:15:46] Dr. McKayla I know what's going to happen, that I can sit here and you know, work on my comfortable devices. And so I tried a little bit to work on my phone and work on the tablet and so on, I still think it's really difficult. What tools do your learners have?[00:16:03] Jess Rose  Did somebody, somebody did one of my friends talk to you about this? I'm deeply suspicious. So I'm going to try really carefully not to say too much. I'm working on a little side project around this problem. Because this is a problem I've been thinking about a lot. So right now, and if our dear listeners aren't your viewers are, oh, gosh, what's the noun? Our beloved audience, your beloved audience has a tool or has something in the space that I haven't seen yet, please come and yell at me. But right now, I'm not seeing really good tooling. I'm not seeing a good way to write to the web from mobile devices. [00:16:46] Dr. McKayla Yeah, it's not there. [00:16:47] Jess Rose And this is an ethical problem for me. Because right now we hear people talking about the next billion users, I love this. But in a lot of cases, we're seeing people who are accessing the web for the first time, and I love it, and I live for it. But they're accessing the web on a lot of constraints. So they're usually on phones, they're usually mobile-only is what we'll call those kinds of learners. They may be accessing it in their third or fourth language, because you're going to see global web primarily in English and French and Spanish. And they're often constrained to really, really challenging limits on their, like their actual access to broadband or to mobile signal. And that's something I've been thinking about a lot on the device level for this problem. If I went, I'm going to date myself terribly. But I got access to the internet, when I was maybe 13, or 14. And the device I use to access the web to read the web, I could also write to the web. And we're effectively giving people this right only access to the web through smartphones. And that just, that doesn't seem like enough to me. So there's nothing great yet. And I don't think I've necessarily cracked it myself. But in the next couple of months, I would like to, I've got a little thing I'd like to launch to see whether or not that might be a good tool.[00:18:10] Dr. McKayla Yeah. Cool. I would be super interested in that. And I also think like, nowadays, I'm actually, I should actually be the whole day on bed rest. But two weeks ago…[00:18:20] Jess Rose What are you doing? You should be doing this lounging.[00:18:23] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I should. Right, yeah. But so now I'm allowed to be up a couple of hours per day, which is, which is great, but because I'm on this bed rest, right, and I only can lie down, I'm not allowed to sit actually, I experienced all these accessibility problems that, you know, couple of, you know, disabled folks also are experiencing and I'm like, right now, I really understand how difficult it is if you can't, you know, type, write, if you have like these mobile devices. And I think there is really there isn't a lot of you know, there's so much space in there. And we should really be much more welcoming to people that can't, you know, sit on this nice computer have their three monitors, right, the keyboard and the mouse. And it's really I mean, it's really frustrating for me to write a blog post to make an update on Git, right, to make a PR.[00:19:12] Jess RoseI'm not ignoring you. I'm just grabbing a book to see, so rude, isn't it? Turning away? Oh, heck, I must have hidden it somewhere. But there's a really fantastic book from the late 90s that Tim Berners Lee wrote about the process of inventing the web. But I've got sort of a tab in the book because he said, Oh, okay, we had to sit down we had to define the bare minimum. What is the minimum viable setup you need to access the web? He said, Oh, you need to, you need some kind of CPU, we need some kind of monitor some kind of display. And one of the things that they specified as necessary for the web was, you're going to need a keyboard. I think that's the point that sticks me again and again, where I think, but we've gotten past the need for keyboard in so many other spaces. Yeah, it seems a bit lazy to have not gotten past it in sort of the ability to do simple web development.[00:20:12] Dr. McKayla Yeah, yeah, it would be so great. Like, I would benefit so much from it. [00:20:17] Jess Rose  Oh, just the guilt I've got right now. I'm just like, yes, yes, I'll get back to work. But we do currently have learned,  well, in the last cohort, we had a number of learners who were accessing the course, all via smartphones. So they would post and we'd love to see them post, screenshots of their code to see, hey, where's this gone wrong, but it's going to be folks screenshotting their phone screen, and just the implication of how challenging it would be to write, I've tried it to write a bunch of CSS on your phone, oh, the absolute, like the strength these people have in their hearts not to throw it across the room.[00:21:01] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, definitely. Definitely. So another question that came to my mind is now you have this experience of, you know, teaching really beginners, and also in a different space, it's a space of you are, you know, like this, this teacher now, and they're doing an online course. But I'm also very interested in how can we actually bring back or coming back to the managing position, right, how can we teach and mentor within a team, right? How can we do that for juniors? How can we do that for mid engineers? Who mentors and teachers, senior engineers? How is that all, you know, the dynamic in a team? And I was wondering if you have like some experience around that and some thoughts around that topic as well.[00:21:47] Jess Rose   So I was really lucky. I was on a team several years ago now out at FutureLearn. With oh, gosh, Nikki, What's your surname? I'm so sorry. I swear I know it. I've just forgotten it, because I'm a bad person. And Belinda Sockington, who are both unreasonably brilliant and fantastic managers. And a lot of that work on that team was around, because I have FutureLearn was that it was a MOOC platform. How do we, how do we encourage learning? How do we incentivize it? How do we balance it? And really, what kind of landed for me is it's an ongoing conversation between the folks running these teams, the individual people, I think it may be one of those issues where there's just no one size fits all. It's a combination of saying, Hey, we have these options. Here are some off-the-shelf learning experiences, with starting a conversation and keeping up a conversation of what do you want to learn, what works for you? What's best for you? One thing that I've encountered a couple of times in my career, which I've had a really, really hard time with and my opinion on it has really radically changed, is every now and again, I'd meet somebody who's sort of mid-level or senior, so they've they've gotten themselves into a secure role. They're feeling okay with it. And they wouldn't be that excited about learning where they said, Yeah, I just want to do my job. But I want to go home. And I think the first couple of times, because nobody tells you, but you're not going to start managing people and get it right right away. I'm going to stay awake late tonight absolutely obsessing over the ways I'm still not doing it right. But back then I was thinking, Oh, how can I, how can I make this person care about their learning? And these days, I think with the, with the world having gotten much more stressful, and me having enough experience to see that I think now that I was wrong. These days, when I meet somebody who's like, well, I'd like to do my job. I'd like to do a good job at my job. And I'd like to go home, I don't really need to move up. I don't really want to stretch and learn more. I've gotten, yeah, like, that seems increasingly chill. I think it might be cultural as well, I think. I'm from the States originally. And I think there's quite a bit more fear around employment in the States. Almost everybody can be fired at any time and that makes everything very exciting. And generally your health care is associated with your employment. So I think I see when I was younger and based in the States, there was a lot more. Of course, you have to keep learning, of course, you have to keep running, you have to progress. Otherwise, something bad could happen. And yeah, I think I've just gotten increasingly excited to see people set boundaries around where they put their learning and where they put their interests. Yeah. Yeah, that's a very strange take for a teacher.[00:24:47] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. So actually, I was talking to Cat Hicks, just a couple of weeks ago. Yeah. And so we were talking about learning debt. And this whole topic brought us to something where I think, you know, learning is often something very externalized, right, where you say, Oh, I'm learning, let's say I'm learning React, or now I'm learning Remix, right? So maybe the newest framework or, you know, a new a new approach for DevOps or whatnot, right? So it's something that's out of what you're doing right now. And it's a new technology, very technology-oriented as well, whereby I think at the company, there are so many, a little bit more how to call it but informal, or, you know, a little bit more tactic, learning experience that you actually have every day, right, which is, how do I communicate with this new person on the team, right? How do I, how do I understand parts of this codebase? Can we change the architecture for that without breaking something? And all of these are also learning experiences, which we are often not declaring as that right, so we are not saying, oh, you know, McKayla, today learned about new ways to do this architecture for us or to refactor that code, or, you know, she did, she learned about how this API works over there that she hasn't worked about, right? This is very often not, I don't think it's so visible in the learning experience than if I would say, Oh, me, hey, let's sit down and learned React. Yeah, you know.[00:26:25] Jess Rose And I think that's really valuable. Because even when you say something, somebody say, I think, oh, you know, I'm just going to chill and do a good job. And it's so easy to generalize about brains and learning to, say, Oh, we know what we know about learning. In so much as we've learned anything about learning like self-assessment's messy, the study of, I'm not nearly clever enough to have a good handle on neuroscience and learning. But there's actually a fantastic researcher and author, Dr. Barbara Oakley, who does a lot of work on learning how to learn. And she's been doing some work with Zack Caceres who's a programmer, and I'm not going to tell, talk out of turn. But I believe they may be launching a project around how we learn programming skills relatively soon.[00:27:11] Dr. McKaylaYeah, nice. Yeah. [00:27:11]Jess Rose But we're primates in changing environments. Even if we don't think about it as learning, we are getting new situations and new stimuli, just like you said, I've got a new teammate, I'm going to learn to work with them. Oh, I've got this API. Oh, I finally understood what's going on under the hood. Regardless of whether or not we've set ourselves a mountain path to hike a declared learning journey, there's still learning happening. Yeah.[00:27:37]  Dr. McKayla  Yeah. And I think that those chill folks, how you call them, right? Maybe they have also more capacity to actually see things that are, you know, people that are very on their journey of, oh, I want to learn React and the latest, you know, whatever, technology comes out right now, maybe don't have the capacity to see, for example, oh, you know, now that the market changed a little bit, budget shifted, we have to work a little bit different with this team, or, you know, how can we make sure that our deadlines are, you know, approachable, and so on? So, yeah, I think learning really happens in so many forms. And, yeah.[00:28:14]  Jess Rose And I, yeah, I've always been really excited about that as well. I think resilience is undervalued in teams often. Sorry, this isn't very confident or it is not very definitive, but I'm going to waffle about my biases as part of this. I really like thinking about resilience in individuals and in teams as a resource available. And I like thinking of people as resources, but like, someone being rested, somebody having the capacity, somebody being ready for a little tiny crisis, or a little weird thing. That feels like a resource right there. But I think often we really lean on productivity so hard. How can we get. what kind of developer experience tooling can we use to get 20% more? How can we make sure people are focused? How can we cycle our meeting? And we're so focused on developer productivity and the productivity of technologists, I think we often sacrifice that flexibility and that resilience of having somebody who's not under these productivity pressures to such a high degree. Like, we learn better when we're chill.[00:29:25] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah. And I think it brings us back also to, there was this blue code, right? People that are taking on responsibilities, right, blue work, sorry, blue work, that was what it was called, right? But people that are taking on some invisible work that are, you know, good for the team. And, and so yeah, I think this also for teaching, mentoring, learning, I think this can be one thing, and obviously, we shouldn't get outdated too much. And, but I also think that it's not changing every minute, you know, like, sometimes we believe, or we were made to believe, or this story lines around time, Oh, my God, you know, if you're not doing every day something and..[00:30:11] Jess Rose What do you mean you're not using blank? I'm like, look, I'm very old, and I'm very tired. Like, I'm good.[00:30:18] Dr. McKaylaI think it's totally fine, right. And there are a lot of technologies, that I mean, if you're working on PHP, you know, a lot of the web runs on PHP, and it's still, you know, a good technology, and it's okay. [00:30:33] Jess Rose  Like, if you want to stretch a little bit, getting into some Laravel is really, really exciting. But if you write PHP, you can hang out and get better at the core stuff of what you do. And do a good job. Like, you don't have to run as hard as you can, as fast as you can forever.[00:30:51] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I think they're, they're, you know, good choices to make. And I'm definitely for growth and for learning. But sometimes people are just burning, you know, mental calories. I learned so much. I mean, I'm actually a learner, right? I love to learn. But most of the stuff that I learn, I never used. It's not very productive, right? [00:31:16] Jess Rose  Yeah, but not sorry, you've invited me on here. And I'm just up here ready to blow you. But yeah, this sort of cult of productivity, not that you're espousing it makes me very, very, and when I talk to new learners, and they say, oh, okay, I need to learn this, and this, and this, and this, and this, and this. And I've heard these words, and I need to learn this. I'm like, Babe, you can, you can show we can all chill. Like, we don't have to learn any frameworks yet. We don't have to learn any ops yet, we can just chill and learn the core stuff. And as these are like, one thing I really like to encourage, especially with new learners, or learners new to a specific space, is to go ahead and get some kind of digital or some kind of physical space where you can dump stuff. Some people like Notion, I hate Notion a lot. I quite like Obsidian. I don't care what you use, as long as you're happy about it. As you're seeing all these terms, just chuck them in a big doc. Okay, well,  I keep seeing Angular, I know Angular is a thing, should I learn it? Don't worry about whether or not you have to learn it next, just go ahead. And when you see an article about it, throw it in the slush pile. I call it my link dump for early learning. And that means once you've got through the foundational stuff, you say, Okay, I've learned enough JavaScript where I can write. And I like setting these little tiny interim goals to say, Well, I've learned enough JavaScript where I'm able to make simple bug fixes in this open source project I was interested in. I've learned enough. And one thing I'm excited about is the The Art of Learning code, or the art of reading code, which is something Felienne... is an academic who's done a lot of work in the space.[00:32:59] Dr. McKayla She's from Leiden University.[00:33:01] Jess Rose  Yes. You've talked to her already. I bet.[00:33:02] Dr. McKayla  I did my PhD with her in the same room. Roommates. Yeah.[00:33:06] Jess Rose  Did you? Did you?[00:33:06] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, we were roommates. Yeah.[00:33:07] Jess Rose  Oh, is she just as delightful to study with?[00:33:10] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, she is wonderful. [00:33:13] Jess Rose  But yeah, so really getting through the basics of well, I set out to do X, I'm doing X. Now it's time for me to go look through my link dump file, and see, wow, it looks like I've got like 40 different articles about Angular. Maybe that was important that that's enough for what I want to learn next. Yeah.[00:33:34] Dr. McKayla Maybe something else that comes to my mind here is also that I think fundamentals are really important, right? So I like for example, the approach of Dan Abramoff, right? He has like this course of chess JavaScript, which it means that you're not starting with React, right? You're starting with JavaScript and with the fundamentals around it, and I wouldn't say it's really a course for really real beginners. But it's like if you got a little bit of your hands dirty around JavaScript, it's really nice to go in and then check. Did I actually really understand what's you know, what's happening here? And then if you have these fundamentals, I think it's so much easier to build upon that dump. And dive into React or whatnot, right? Whatever technology you want to add here.[00:34:21] Jess Rose  I think this comes back to something I've been thinking about a lot in how we learn and teach. But like, where we abstract things out. Soin the boot camp, we're using Free Code Camp to teach, which is a, it's an in-browser sandbox, you don't have, and they've just come out with a new beta curriculum for web development I'm in love with. And it previews that these are files and that you have to link to these files. It is very, very good. But it's still a sandbox, it's still an abstraction. And the places we tend to send learners next are things like, Okay, we're going to head over to CodeSandbox, we're going to head over to Glitch which are still abstracting away a lot of really, and then even when you look in to professional tooling and frameworks, they say, Okay, let's get into React. A lot of the power behind these frameworks are that they abstract away or that they compress, or they obscure or or smooth over some of the fundamentals of how we work with the core technology, maybe JavaScript or the way, Tailwind is a weird abstraction of the things you'd like to do with CSS. And I don't have a problem with, I think it's a teacher, I'd have a hard time having a problem with abstraction. But I think that thinking really carefully about how we do this, when we abstract things , and how we signpost what's been taking, or what's been added gets to be really valuable.[00:34:47] Dr. McKayla Yeah, I think so too. Yeah. When I was starting to learn programming, I struggled a lot with abstractions because I just wanted to know, or not only with abstractions, but also like, there wasn't a lot of abstractions. It was actually very, very raw, right? It was like, Oh, you have an Eclipse IDE open and you're writing Java code. Bbut then you have like, oh, let's say, you know, public wide string, main, whatever, right? And it's just like, you just do it, right. And I'm like, why? What does it mean, don't worry about it. [00:36:22] Jess Rose And then we'll cover this later. And so by the time, we will have covered it, yeah… Having been a linguist, I fear that I mentally map language learning to programming language learning, even when it might not be entirely suitable. But I see this happening in human language education as well, where we say, okay, cool. Here's how, we keep we start people in the present perfect tens for a lot of languages, I see the cat, I drink the water, I walked to the store. And we don't send them into a present perfect world. And I think that's true with programming as well to say, Okay, well, we're going to give you this sandbox, or we're going to give you this framework, which abstracts away a lot of the complexities of the grammar or the the nuance of, and I think it's really valuable to talk about the culture of the language we use around programming and really the culture of, of the structures we build, because it's not transparent to people. I met with a learner in person, what a delight, in person last week. And without thinking about it, I said, yada yada yada bikeshedding. And thank goodness, this learner was confident enough to be like, cool, what the heck are you talking about? I was like, oh, gosh, that's just something we say. We say it as though everyone's going to understand it. And it means to get sidelined to get distracted with little unnecessary details. Just like okay, cool. You should just say that, it's less complicated. [00:37:55] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. I think it's not always that easy to be always aware of how you do it. But I recall the time that I started at Microsoft, and, you know, when you start there, it's full of acronyms. And they mean, they mean something completely else inside Microsoft and what it would mean outside, and it really takes quite some time. And then a lot of people get very blind to it, and you know, just start using it as well. And you know, you start talking this gibberish. Nobody else can understand. Yeah.[00:38:32] Jess Rose  But like, from a linguistic perspective, that's because that's identifies you as a member of the in-group, doesn't it? How fascinating. Yeah, incredibly interesting. Oh, no, no, I absolutely refuse to spend the next three days hyperfocused learning about weird Microsoft acronyms. It's so tempting.[00:38:49] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, there are a lot. But I think it's the same with code reviews, right? And with sometimes how people say, oh, you know, we have this style of giving feedback to each other. And in my code review workshops, I always talk You know, I always try to have people come to an agreement that we need to use language and also, you know, phrase that in a respectful way, that's not only for the internal, you know, internal team to understand. Because there are newcomers, you know, in the team, maybe somebody will look at that, what you wrote two years from now, right, and still should be able to understand it. And so I think it's really good if we be clear about those bridges that we built that, you know, are this internal behavior and language that we are using that it's only, you know, it's an insider joke, and so on.[00:39:47] Jess Rose Yeah. Yeah. And I think we're often really chill about that in tech. Yeah, oh, here's a glossary of technical terms you need to know to do the thing. We're, we're cool about that. There seems to be a bit more resistance around when shared language or shared norms, or shared language structures around things like code reviews are proposed because we don't need that we know how to talk to each other. I hope I'm not putting you on the spot. Are you one of those lucky people who speak like nine languages?[00:40:15] Dr. McKayla No, not nine.[00:40:15] Jess Rose Oh, only five?[00:40:17] Dr. McKayla Maybe, yeah. German is my mother tongue, right? English, Dutch, Italian, and a little bit of Spanish.[00:40:28] Jess Rose  A little bit of Spanish. Look at that. The fantastic thing about chatting to many folks from Europe is, is y'all always have this very, very beautiful, very casual, like humble brag at the end, you like, you know, just a little tiny bit of Croatian. I'm terribly jealous. Yeah, like recognizing that folks aren't going to be coming to, coming to these code reviews. And I really liked that you highlight that they're going to be coming to the uncoupled in time. I love this idea that when you leave a code review, when you leave feedback, when you leave a pull request, when you leave code, you're leaving a little artifact of understanding behind. So to say, Cool, we've standardized how we talk about these, we've created a shared language for them. Because when we go into the far scary future, we want these to still make sense.[00:41:23] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I think this is really important.[00:41:26] Jess Rose  But also making them like giving a shared language around, hey, maybe English, or if we're doing the, if we're doing the code review, in Dutch, I'm in a bit of trouble. But maybe the language this code review is in is your second or third or fifth? Let's go ahead and have some shared language have some shared structures around feedback to lower the cognitive load? Yeah, well, can we talk about cognitive load? I imagine you've done it tons of times on the podcast. I imagine many programmers are familiar with it.[00:42:00] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, we also have to be a little bit careful of the time now. But maybe the last thing that I want to add here is I'm writing a book on code reviews, right? [00:42:10] Jess Rose Are you?[00:42:10] Dr. McKayla Yeah, I'm right now in the middle of the feedback section, right? So how to give feedback, how to give respectful feedback, and how to communicate with each other and also cultural right? So how do we deal with, it gets really hairy there, right? So yeah, what are different cultures are expecting, what's respectful there, you know, how much you know, how harsh should a feedback be? Or can it be or, you know, what is seen as polite and so on? And this is not only, it's not only, it's not one standard thing, right? It depends on who's on the team, what's the background? What's the culture? But I think the expectation, setting the right expectations, and, you know, explicitly stating that, and talking about that, reflecting on that, and, you know, learning how others see those things and learning how, you know, like, if I would talk to you I'm originally from Austria lived in a couple of countries, right? You're from the States you're, you're in the UK now, right?[00:43:12] Jess Rose I am, yeah, everything's just fine here. Very chill. Not weird.[00:43:10] Dr. McKayla Yeah. And then maybe we have another person from Croatia and then somebody from India, right. And so I think it would be really important for us to talk about how we understand different terminologies, how we understand different you know, expressions in my career workshops, sometimes I have discussions about looks good to me. And I love those discussions because, you know, it's just a simple term looks good to me. Most of the time, people just, you know, have the acronym for it, right?[00:43:47] Jess Rose  Like it's the thumbs up emoji in my head.[00:43:50] Dr. McKayla  Exactly or you know, LGTM, right? And then some people are like, oh, yeah, this means you know, that I looked through it and you did a good job. And then the other person has no, you know, looks good to me means that you haven't looked at my code.[00:44:07] Jess Rose You just glanced at it. [00:44:07] Dr. McKayla Yeah, you just want it out of your way. Yeah. And the other person says, Oh, this means, I don't care. [00:44:07] Jess Rose Sometimes, sometimes.[00:44:16] Dr. McKayla And having those discussions in the team, you know, and understanding where everybody is coming from, and that they actually use, you know, one simple terminology. And everybody on the same team understood something else about it, I think it's so valuable, right? And only by these discussions, you know, we can really understand what's behind those terms and the way that we are communicating. But I'm also getting a little bit carried away.[00:44:45] Jess Rose  No, no. So I'm going to ask you about your book. And yeah, I've just had a friend tell me that there are some questions you're not supposed to ask about someone's book. So I won't ask any of those. Instead, I've been told you're supposed to say, I hope it's going well. I'd like and I think it might be useful for hopefully some of the audience as well. I had an idea for a book that sounded really fun in my head. And I've sort of broken it down into chapters into essays and trying to write a couple of chapters. And my goal in writing a couple of essays is I'm trying to talk myself out of writing a book. [00:45:22] Dr. McKayla Yeah, I've heard that. Yeah. [00:45:23] Jess Rose Do you have any advice for not, like, it's the worst. It's the worst idea ever. No one wants to write a book like, please, please, please. [00:45:32] Dr. McKayla No, I don't have.[00:45:32] Jess Rose No, I want to know what you're doing.[00:45:34] Dr. McKayla  But I saw on Twitter that you said that and I thought, like, yeah, you won't be able to not write a book with this approach, right?[00:45:42] Jess Rose I love that it sounds like a th reat, where you're like, you're going to write that book.[00:45:45] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, it looks like. I think if you're breaking it up in essays, that become more manageable. I think you will write this book. Yeah.[00:45:55] Jess Rose But for our beloved audience, for your beloved audience, they shouldn't write a book, they should, they should definitely do things that are not writing a book. Like, it's a terrible idea, isn't it?[00:46:04] Dr. McKayla  I can't, I can't say it's a terrible idea. [00:46:06] Jess Rose Are you enjoying it?[00:46:08] Dr. McKayla I don't think it's a good idea. But I think a lot of people would like to write a book and I would be the last person that would discourage them. Because I was always discouraged to write a book, right? But I think I know what mess I got myself into. [00:46:25]  Jess Rose That's what I'm looking for, there we go.[00:46:26] Dr. McKayla I would just tell the people that you're getting yourself into a big mess. But it's okay. You know, it's okay. I think people can write books, and people should write books.[00:46:36]  Jess Rose The world is messy. It'll be fun. Oh, no, this is the opposite of what I was looking for. But it's so delightful.[00:46:42] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, well, Jess actually, this brings us to the end of our show, I really enjoyed talking with you about all of that. And I think we should talk about cognition and cognitive load, and you know, all of that. So maybe I will invite you again, to another session[00:46:58] Jess Rose  I'd love to come back any time. But I'll also pass you some contacts for folks who are much better at this than I am, I would just go back and be like, so books. And really, your audience deserves better.[00:47:13] Dr. McKayla Okay. And we will both all the things that we talked about down there also, maybe the Twitter handle or LinkedIn profile or whatnot, from the person that you mentioned in the middle, where you forgot the last name, I put it there. So she will be there as well. And then, yeah, so is there something that you want to wrap this episode up? Or?[00:47:36] Jess Rose  Oh, gosh, can I bully your audience? Is that doable? Is it permitted? I've been doing advice calls all this week. And the big thing that I keep coming back to when I chat to people, I do do them just to be mean to people who are smarter than me is right now everything, everything is just so big and so loud and so stressful. One thing I've really enjoyed exploring with people is looking at ways that what they have to do, what they think they have to do can be smaller and softer and quieter. And I think that yeah, I'd love to gently bully folks to consider how what they need to do could be a little less. Maybe you don't have to write that book. It can just be an essay.[00:48:24] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. Yeah. I like that. I actually did that this week with myself and just gave myself permission to let go of a couple of balls that I was juggling. And I think it's delightful. We should really do that. And I think it's it's the time that we are many people needed. Not everybody, right. I think a lot of people needed.[00:48:41] Jess Rose There's going to be one person out there who's having a real good week. I just haven't met him.[00:48:46] Dr. McKayla  Or yeah, or that cat very nicely distracted by all of the work and don't have to think about the stuff that's going on. Yeah. Okay, so Jess, thank you so much. Thank you. It was really a pleasure talking to you.[00:49:01] Jess Rose Thanks so much. I'll let you go and thank you again. I won't get into a thank you loop with you.[00:49:06] Dr. McKayla  Okay, bye-bye. [00:49:06] Dr. McKayla This was another episode of the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please help me spread the word about the podcast, send episode to a friend via email, Twitter, LinkedIn. Well, whatever messaging system you use, or give it a positive review on your favorite podcasting platforms such as Spotify or iTunes. This would mean really a lot to me. So thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and I will talk to you in two weeks. Bye