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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Google Docs

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Latest podcast episodes about Google Docs

Greeny
Hour 2: Third Base

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 41:25


We listen to the best sound of the weekend in I'm Sorry, What? and Greeny remembers Lee Elder. We check the Google Doc for Nuno's Notes. Plus, Hall of Fame OT & Michigan Radio Announcer Dan Dierdorf joins us to discuss Michigan's win over Ohio State.

Zon Con Podcast
ZC 87 - Top 9 Tips For Cyber Monday and Christmas Season

Zon Con Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 15:13


Top Action Items for Balck Friday, Cyber Monday, and Christmas buying season 9. Know your dates! 8. Do a keyword gap analysis 7. Adjust PPC budgets 6. Add “gifting” keywords to your title and listing copy 5. Add “gifting” images to your listing 4. Create a holiday-themed storefront 3. Make sure your listings and stock are ready for Lighting Deals 2. Blast your audience! 1. Add a >=20% clip coupon. This will qualify you for the BF/CM deals page! Google Doc with 28 more tips! https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AjOLRX7lzMbtl4WH0oceUDr62auNx2JLEQDXoCDSVa8/edit?usp=sharing If you looking to find a group of like-minded entrepreneurs that can take your business to the next level, check out the Titan Mastermind. Andrew is one of the leaders of this mastermind. https://www.titannetwork.com/#a_aid=Andrew&a_bid=f9c3cffa

Radically Loved with Rosie Acosta
Episode 403. Discover Your True Mentor in Integrating Wisdom

Radically Loved with Rosie Acosta

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:01


Discover Your True Mentor in Integrating Wisdom The unpleasant reality of growth may bury our dreams into the depths of despair. Along the way, we might stumble upon multiple failures that hinder us from moving forward. Misunderstandings often arise because we fail to transform errors into our own learning process. In this episode, Tessa and Rosie exchanged ideas on the essence of encapsulating knowledge before relaying them to others. They define the traits of a good mentor and the reasons why we need their guidance. To keep the podcast exciting, Rosie shares her harsh experience and encounters with unexpected people before becoming the person she is now. If you desire to embody your wisdom and search for your true mentorship, this episode is definitely for you!        This Episode is brought to you by... BiOptimizers www.bioptimizers.com/radicallyloved Use Code: radicallyloved10 for 10% OFF your first purchase ISSUU Get started with ISSUU for FREE or if you sign up for a Premium account get 50% OFF using my code below www.issuu.com/podcast Promo Code: ROSIE Tru Niagen www.truniagen.com/rosie 10% OFF your First Purchase Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Discover ways to integrate wisdom into your experiences. Learn how to assess and search for your right mentor. Find out how Rosie and Tessa feel radically loved by listening to the full episode! Resources Subscribe to Tessa Tovar's Newsletter. Integrate your mind, body, and spirit with the Radically Loved Summit. Episode Highlights Integrating Wisdom and Experience Embodying knowledge is key when imparting it to another. Mere pieces of training are inadequate in compensating experiences. Wisdom comes in lived experience. Without the experience, a person would encounter more issues than necessary. We have to be a ‘seasoned captain' with an ‘equipped vessel' to survive the tide. Becoming an expert at something is a ‘marathon', not a ‘sprint'. Process of Applying Knowledge Imitate, integrate, and then innovate from your mentors' learnings. Have a mentor to mimic their teachings. Integrate the knowledge and put it into practice. Lastly, apply the teachings and practices of your own accord when you pursue something. Searching for the Right Mentor When finding your mentor, assess it with the way they integrate their teachings. Utilize your instinct when choosing the right mentor for you. Embody and integrate the teachings of your mentor. First-time Experiences Perfectionism shouldn't stop us from delving into our pursuit. Being uncomfortable when attempting a new vocation is part of the process. First attempts are always the hardest. Some people are born with it, while others need to work harder to catch up. Wearing the beginner's hat is a humbling, yet important experience to have. Signs of a Good Mentor A good teacher tells you the difficulty of being in the learning process. Someone handing you your career on a silver platter won't last you long in the industry. Achieving something substantial in life needs to stand the test of time. Rosie's Meeting with Her Book-Writing Agents Her psychic advised her to participate in a writer's conference. During the conference, she proceeded to book pitch meeting sessions with three different agents. At first, she was unaware that a book proposal was required for the pitch sessions. Immediately, she created the proposal consisting of two pages through Google Docs. Her first rejection left her devastated. An agent told her that the meeting was a waste of both of their respective times. However, she met a person who granted her hope after the embarrassment. Listen to the podcast to find out how finding the right person guided Rosie through her book-writing journey. Rosie's Lessons from Harsh Realities She wouldn't have changed the interaction she had with her first agent. The harshness was exactly what she needed to fuel her passion and proceed. The reality is that people would usually judge a person by their outward success instead of analyzing the work that has led to their current standing. Once you've accomplished your dream, external validation suddenly doesn't even matter anymore. Rosie's Meeting with the Right Mentor You meet mentors at unexpected places. If it wasn't because of her psychic's advice, she wouldn't be who she is right now. The late Michael Stone was also the reason she started her own podcast. Tessa's Closing Thoughts It's never too late to delve into a new pursuit and learn something from it despite the failure. Transform the negative criticisms into a learning experience. 5 Powerful Quotes from This Episode [10:14] “A captain with a well-equipped vessel that's not been seasoned, is dangerous.”   [20:41] “I feel like when we're not having those moments of discomfort, we're getting really settled in our little cozy blanket of staying the same.”   [28:32] “Google is your best friend when you have no idea where to start.”   [45:57] “We encourage you to utilize your own internal experience, use your wisdom, find the people in your life that are going to help you get there.”   [47:51] “What I guess I would say is how I'm feeling is that it's never too late to try again, to pick it up to fail again, and learn something new.” Enjoy the Podcast? If you felt radically loved from listening to this podcast, subscribe and share it with the people you love! Love to give us 5 stars? If you do, we'd love a review from you. Help us reach more people and make them feel loved. Do you want to help others who are grieving a loss in their lives? Then trust your instinct and share what you've learned today on social media! Don't forget to follow and message us on these platforms! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosieacosta Twitter: https://twitter.com/rosieacosta Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/radicallylovedrosie TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@itsrosieacosta To feeling radically loved, Rosie  

Ryan's Method: Passive Income Podcast
How to Make a KDP Coloring Book... LIVE! w/ Gero from Vexels

Ryan's Method: Passive Income Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 58:08


In this episode I'm LIVE with Gero from Vexels to share a tutorial of how you can create Amazon KDP coloring books with minimal effort! His demo includes step-by-step instructions to create high-quality interiors using Vexels & Google Docs, and it couldn't be easier

Podcastification - podcasting tips, podcast tricks, how to podcast better
157: Podcast Show Notes Best Practices and Strategy

Podcastification - podcasting tips, podcast tricks, how to podcast better

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:12


For https://podnews.net/update/consistent-episode-notes (the first time ever), podcast show notes display almost the SAME in all podcasting apps (thanks Apple). That brings up the question... what ARE show notes anyway? And how can I best use them? On this episode of Podcastification, I'm going to explain what show notes are, what they should contain, and how to create and use them in the MOST EFFECTIVE WAYS. Keep reading. What ARE show notes?There are differing opinions or definitions out there for the term "show notes." Some people feel like it's a blog post length summary of a podcast episode, or maybe even a transcript of the audio. Others feel the term should refer mainly to the brief description of an episode you might find in a podcast app. Which is it? From my perspective as the Founder of a company that creates show notes for podcasting clients, it's both. Let me explain... Kill two birds with one stoneTo make the most of every episode of your podcast, you really NEED BOTH the longer blog post content that goes on your website, AND the shorter, abbreviated content that pulls into the podcast apps from your media host. Instead of creating a separate document or post for those two things, I suggest you create one MASTER post that you can use in a variety of ways to fulfill both needs... and social media elements while you're at it. But before we get to that, there's one last thing I want to say... Your listeners won't know what you've created for them if you don't guide them to itYou may follow the steps I'm about to give you and create the best show notes on the planet or within your industry or niche. But if your audience doesn't know they are available, they won't use them. It's YOUR job to ensure they know about the resources you create. I suggest you figure out a way to remind yourself to TELL your audience about your show notes EVERY TIME you record a new episode. Develop a bullet-point list you use when you record that reminds you of all the important stuff you need to say Add references to your show notes to that list WHERE DO YOU INCLUDE IT? Make the mention of your show notes a standard part of your call to action at the end of each episode. When guests share a resource, comment that you'll include it in the show notes or description. Your listeners will become aware of your show notes and become accustomed to looking at them when they need a resource... in time. Just be consistent. MAKE FINDING THE NOTES EASY FOR YOUR LISTENERSThe last stats I saw (early 2021) said that 85% of podcast listeners are listening on a mobile device. So think about that from a show notes perspective... If you're saying, "Check out the website for the show notes to this episode," you're making it HARD for your listeners to find them. Even if you refer to a specific short-link, you're still forcing them to open a web browser and find the show notes. HERE'S A BETTER IDEA... Since you know that the majority of your listeners are listening to your show on a mobile device, then point them to the description on their mobile device. I often say something like this... "That resource can be found in the description for this episode, and you can find that in the listening app you're using to listen right now. Swipe right, left, up, down... something and the description section will be there." Your show notes master documentFirst off, create a Google Doc that you can use as a template for your show notes. That way you don't have to recreate the structure every time you produce a new episode. You'll simply copy the template document, rename it, and away you go. What should your template include? I'm going to give you my suggestions... and I'm going to do so in a specific order, for a specific reason. It will make your creation easier to repurpose and reuse. Basic intro paragraph(s) Picture this intro paragraph section this way... A new potential listener finds your show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Your...

Greeny
Hour 2: Hembo & Nuno Bet?

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:22


We listen to some of the best sound from yesterday and check the Google Doc for Nuno's Notes. Will Nuno bet Hembo on next week's Eagles/Giants game? Plus, we finish with your hot takes as we open the phones.

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast
Episode 85 - FRACTURED!!! w/ Rownin

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 144:18


Welcome to Episode 85 of BORN TO BE WILD, a Wild exclusive Hearthstone podcast where we have fun hanging out with friends, talking about the Wild format of Hearthstone and spotlighting members of the Wild Community! This week Nate, Hydra & Sheep hang out with Legendary Wild streamer and YouTube content creator Rownin! With the announcement of the new expansion Fractured in Alterac Valley, there is SO much to talk about! Check out our complete show notes on Google Docs, which include links to articles and deck codes for you to copy/paste! Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MNqPyqrYQ9S0hlpe1ghoA3pkh9ENQswiotbrziv5UcQ/edit?usp=sharing Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 3:15 - Interview w/ Rownin 13:38 - How Was Your Week? 44:43 - BTBW Listener Series 46:18 - Hearthstone News 1:46:03 - Wild Decks w/ Drek'Thar & Vanndar 2:06:13 - Weekly Listener Challenge 2:13:22 - Wrap-Up & Shout-Outs Find us online at https://www.borntobewildhs.com/

Software Social
Using Jobs to Be Done to Build a Whiteboard That Does Math: A Conversation with Matt Wensing, Founder of Summit

Software Social

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 38:04


Every doctor is concerned about your vital signs, but a good doctor cares about your overall health. Your website deserves the same care, and Hey Check It is here to help- Hey Check It is a website performance monitoring and optimization tool- Goes beyond just core web vitals to give you a full picture on how to optimize your website to give your users an optimal, happy experience- Includes AI-generated SEO data, accessibility scanning and site speed checks with suggestions on how to optimize, spelling and grammar checking, custom sitemaps, and a number of various tools to help youStart a free trial today at heycheckit.comAUTOMATED TRANSCRIPTMichele Hansen  0:00  Hey, welcome back to software social, I am super excited to have a guest with me this week. It is Matt wensing, who is founder of Summit, which is a tool for financial modeling. Previously, he was founder of risk pulse, which was acquired in 2019, which was an enterprise SAS. I'm also the co host of out of beta. Matt, welcome. Thanks, Michelle.Matt Wensing  0:31  I'm really excited to be here, too. I'm a listener. And I just love it. So this is fun.Michele Hansen  0:37  So I have been wanting to talk to you for a really long time. And there is one tweet that you sent out in particular, that made me really want to talk to you. So in January, you tweeted out some notes you had taken from customer research that you did for Summit. And you were working with what the jobs to be done world calls the forces diagram, which is basically this diagram we use to show the different pushes and pulls and anxieties and habits people have around the tools they use, and why they might be looking for something new, but also why they might stay with what they're doing right now. And I am so curious to hear kind of like how this came about, and how you have been using customer research as you explore summits. So can you kind of like take us back in time to when you first started researching Summit?Matt Wensing  1:52  Yeah, absolutely. So it's funny that there's actually an overlap here between even knowing what jobs be done enforces progress is and that initial research. So I attend the business of software conference each year in the States, so there's one in Europe and the States, but every October, in Boston, folks get together, at least pretty COVID and cross fingers soon. And Bob molesta is a regular speaker there as well, who is not sure the godfather of the forces of progress framework in a lot of ways. And I just remember being this is probably Oh, man, time's flying, right. So let's just say five years ago, I wanted to say three and like now, it's not three, it's probably five years ago, I listened to him interview, an audience member, kind of a mock customer interview, live about purchasing a car. And the way that they were able to take a dialogue and really parse it into a framework that you could then take away from that, and then keep doing that with more and more conversation. It just was like, Okay, this is definitely a tool that I need to add to my tool belt like this is, this is amazing. What's interesting is then fast forward into Summit, like by that time in the history of my previous company, I was doing sales, enterprise sales, mostly it wasn't doing a lot of customer research, at least in terms of the early sort of genesis of the product. So I don't know that I got to use it a lot. Back then it was mostly just listening to like we did do enterprise deals where there were custom features involved. But really, I got to use it fresh, you know, when you're second time founder, a lot of times you're like, Oh, I'm gonna do this the right way, this time around and actually use more tools and framework things I've learned. And forces progress is one of those. So I wanted to build this tool to do financial modeling. But that is such an ambiguous target that I knew I needed to figure out the value proposition. What does that really mean? What do people want? So funny enough, I gave a talk at business a software as a lightning talk in 2019. And I kind of use that as a launching point. I didn't frame it as, hey, I'm selling a product. I didn't even have a product. I had a little prototype, basically. But I use that talk to share. Really, the problem, socialize the problem space, if you will talk about, hey, this is this is a challenge, isn't it? Like this is a pain. Here's a little tool I made to kind of deal with that pain. And I really tried to draw some business lessons out of it. But really, at that same time, I started to have conversations with potential customers and prospects. And as they talked to me, I started cataloger file their feedback into these different kind of buckets, right, kind of the tool that I had learned previously and yeah, I just kind of did that every you know a few months would kind of refresh my understanding of what they were saying and built up this. This list organized list of feedback which I guess I'll put a bow on it and say it really think helped me understand the product strategy, like what did the product strategy need to be, for me to go into this space that was otherwise very nebulous? Like, how do I have opinion? Like what should my opinions be about the tool and what it needs to do? Right?Michele Hansen  5:19  Mm hmm. It's really it's really interesting that you use basically that talk as sort of a, I guess, sort of, in a way, sort of what Patrick McKenzie would call a friend catcher, to attract people to you to talk about the problem. But then because you had that experience with the forces of progress and with seeing Bob Maestas speak who, by the way, his his book, demand side sales actually has real customer interviews in it that are all broken down by the forces. And it's like, it's so good, like it should be on everybody's shelf. And then, but you you were able to process that. And I think that's so important, because sometimes there can can feel like there's this gap between for people who are new to research of how do I go from talking to people to actually designing value? And how do I figure out okay, I've talked to these people, I know what these problems are, I know what I'm interested in. But then what is the product? And it sounds like you were able to bridge that? So I'm curious if you can kind of dive into when you went from this point of understanding the problem space socializing the problem space, you kind of had a prototype, but like, how did the prototype sort of snowball with that? And how did you figure out where it was valuable?Matt Wensing  6:48  Yeah, so to put a timeline on this, this was, what you're describing now is essentially the journey from late 20, October 2019, through probably April, May of this year, so you know, almost almost two years, essentially. And during that time, I've released multiple versions of the products, really knowing that this was not going to be it. Now I'm a developer, a full stack developer who can build full, I can build applications top to bottom, not as strong as they used to be on the front end, but like it works. And what I was essentially trying to do was understand, okay, so there are few risks of the business. And funnily enough, Patrick McKenzie was one of the first people I pinged about this idea, because was his work at stripe Atlas and stripe. And just in general, I knew that he would have interesting opinion. And his thoughts were okay, financial modeling is interesting. But it sounds like it could be transactional, like, somebody has a need, they do it. And then they're gone. And I knew I wanted to build a SAS. And so that was like, Okay, that's a great point. Because a lot of times, the use cases that would come up when I talked to people were, oh, yeah, I have this investor meeting, or Oh, yeah, I have this fundraiser. Oh, yeah, I need to figure this thing out. And it sounded like it had a pretty finite shelf life of utility. People come they use it, then they go away. I was like, okay, that's not a great recurring revenue business, you know, because it sounds like something you could just sell for $50 one time, and then people don't ever need to keep paying you anything. So I recognize that pretty early on that engagement was a key risk to the business being a sustaining recurring revenue model. And engagement is tricky, because as much as you want to do, you know, mock ups and kind of smoke tests and things that are not you don't want to over invest in engineering, it's very hard to de risk engagements with a paper mock up or a screenshot or a prototype, like, how do you know that they're gonna come back to it unless they actually get to use something. So I basically spent those 18 to 24 months, releasing, what I knew were really technically debt laden, let's put it that way versions of the product, where all I cared was that the front end was communicating what I wanted it to like, this is what this is, this is what this does for you. If you click this button, this happens, and it works, how it works less important. So I built a lot of basically throw away versions of the product, which was expensive, but I felt like it was the key to knowing would people actually come back and reuse it? And I guess let's pause there. That was my approach. And that was why I took that approach to de risking or, or getting more valuable feedback from people than just like, a conversation or interview right? And then I think I paired that with, do you use Excel to use sheets, you know, how do you do this today? But I learned, I just want to point out, I learned from both the usage of the early versions and the customer conversations.Michele Hansen  10:12  I love how you underscored there, how the customers intrinsic behavior and their intrinsic needs, drive usage of the product, like there's only so many sort of engagement hacks that you can do to make someone come back to a product. But like, if they only need to raise money every 18 months, then there's nothing that you can do that will make them come back daily or weekly, because their fundamental underlying need for the product is infrequent. And I'm reminded of the pain and frequency framework from Dez trainer, which, you know, he said, you know, that that most, you know, painful and frequent is sort of the best quadrant to be in, because people have an underlying need for something and they're annoyed by it. But infrequent and painful, can be kind of a danger zone, it can be a space for good products, you know, I think, you know, I sort of think of like buying a house and getting a mortgage is very expensive. And it's so complicated. And it's, you know, expensive to get it wrong, but it's very infrequent. But other things that are infrequent and painful, you know, can maybe not be a great business, which it sounds like you had some indications that the underlying need for this, what you were originally thinking would not be frequent and and therefore people would not have a subscription. And so rather than staying with that, and going down the path, and then a year from now being like oh my god, I have this churn problem. How do I keep people to stay around? You pivoted towards something that was more frequent.Matt Wensing  11:58  Yeah, that's exactly right. So I often use the metaphor for the first version as like, because I didn't know what else to build. So I just bought, I just built, I built the version that I knew people would use at least that first time, right? Because then I knew it was gonna fail. I felt like it was gonna fail. But I was like, okay, but I have to figure out the bridge from here to there. Like, I have to take a step. And so I'm going to give them at least gonna give them that initial thing and then just see, will they tell me like, you know, what else would be great is if, you know, like, what else could I learn by doing this? And so I built kind of that coin operated version, I call it like a vending machine for a financial forecast. Because my original thought was, yeah, people need a forecast. That was the value proposition, how fast can I get them a forecast that that works. And people use that. But then again, it was the churn problem, it was the going away, it was the it was hard to build, you know, that raving fan base, that you need to get something off the ground? Because it just wasn't sustainable. So I realized that to build a SAS in this space, I was going to have to figure out what did they do regularly? You know, like, Okay, if you only close your books once a month, or even your maybe you don't even do that, because you have a bookkeeper or accountant that does that for you. If you only raise money every 18 months, like what is it that you do? That's close to this that is more frequent? And that's really how I got drawn into more of the modeling space meaning like, Okay, but what, tell me about what you do regularly, and if you look at what these founders made, if I would just have them, show me what you made, show me what you made, I basically got into this thing of like, you are spending time somewhere. Where is that? What are you doing, right? And they would show me, the spreadsheets that they were making, that were very ephemeral, like they were very, they were throwaway products, if you will, they would make this like, I gotta figure out if I can afford this higher. And so they would just come into a G sheet G sheets, not new, right? Create a little spreadsheet and then use it for like a day, and then go away. But then it's like, well, how many of these do you have? Say, Oh, well, I mean, I probably do that, you know, once a once every other week, once a week, twice a month, like sometimes multiple times. And I'm like, wait a minute. So you don't build like a giant, you know, official forecast all the time. But you are using spreadsheets a lot. And you are doing things with money in spreadsheets a lot. Like Tell me about that. And that started to inform our strategy of Wait a minute, you know, there's really two customers here are two potential users. There's the CFO, if you will, or the analyst who builds those. That's the founder, even if it's a founder that's a hat they were where they do it like every once in a while I have to get serious about finance and do this proper thing. And then there's the non CFO founder, I just need something to solve my question or answer my question, person persona, who actually kind of does this work that they don't show to anyone else? They're really embarrassed. They know it's not, you know, they know it's not. Right, like with a capital R, right. But they're doing it a lot. Like they're doing this to make all the little decisions about pricing and metrics and goals. And how much can I afford to pay this person, like, I'm like, wait a minute. Turns out, you're actually doing a lot of modeling, you just don't talk about it. And you don't, you don't show it to anybody because you're embarrassed, right? It's this like dirty little secret almost that you have that you build these things and make decisions. Because of course, you use numbers, nobody doesn't use numbers, but like, you just don't call this some financial model. So that was a key insight, realizing that there were these two personas that were actually living within the same person. And they had compartmentalize those very cleanly, but I was much more interested suddenly in the other person, right.Michele Hansen  16:13  That's so interesting. Like, you know that what you just showed there is, I think it's such a key, a key point and activity based design, which is the idea that we're designing for activities that people do and not for a specific person. And so in my book, for example, I talk about, you know, everything is a process, and everything is an activity. And the activity of you know, for example, one person might both have a Carraig pod coffee machine, and have a French press. But they use the Carib pod coffee machine when they're trying to get the kids to school in the morning, and they're rushed, and they're doing a million other things. And they use the French press on the weekend when they have a friend over to chat. And to them. Those are two very different activities that they're doing. But they're being done by the same person. And so if you design for the person, that wouldn't make sense to you that they would own both, and would try to pigeonhole them into one. But really, they're a person who's doing many different activities with many different goals. And so you have this one activity where I need to create financial models for official purposes, to share them with other people, maybe for compliance reasons, maybe for sort of me in my official capacity reasons where other people are reviewing this. And then there's also this activity of, I need to make a decision that involves numbers. And it's basically this sort of like there's the official activity. And then there's the back of the envelopes activity, which is where this kind of I've heard people describe summit as like a whiteboard that does math. Yes. And that is also where that activity comes in. And that's more so replacing those those millions of spreadsheets and which other really fascinating about this is that so often is the core thing and jobs to be done. So often the competitors to a product is not actually another piece of software or another product product. It's somebody doing it. It's them making a spreadsheet. It's something in Google Docs, it's like them doing it by hand like that is as much a competitor as another piece of software. It's like, there's so many pieces. Yes, this is great.Matt Wensing  18:37  Oh, yeah. And that's why, you know, I try to explain, like, this is such a journey, because you, we joke within the company, like, gosh, we did you know, we were so dumb a week ago, like how we thought we were so smart, but we knew nothing. And when I started this journey, you know, you just so in the dark, and then you take these steps and you realize, wait a minute, wait a minute. And so it is kind of a weird thing that you have this perennial sort of optimism as a founder that there's something here and you can you want to figure out that if you're wrong, you're wrong, but at the same time, people are not telling you. You know, and this is the thing I think so key like this is a skill to develop is people are not what people don't say is as important as what they do say and like learning to find out that wait a minute, we were we were standing in this room, if you will, in your mind talking about financial modeling. And here I am thinking that this is where the gold is, you know, this is trying to get all my answers. And you're telling me next door you've got like 12 spreadsheets with numbers and money in them and you're you didn't tell me about like, how did I How was I so close but yet like you didn't you know, like if I had just if I had given up them right. I would have missed the room that actually had all the gold in it right? But it was literally connected but in their mind at what it was a different room. It's like oh, you're asking Give me about this. But, you know, you're not asking about that. And so that's what's so kind of vexing for like, in hindsight, I just laugh because stumbling across the actual value is is something that you, you partly luck part skill and getting people to. And really I'll cut my rambling short by saying I think observation is more powerful in those cases than just question and answer because the real key for me was when I said, Show me, show me what you have today. And they had to, you know, at that point, they couldn't say, like, Why have nothing. But they did have to say, Oh, well, let me open up the store over here and show you what I have today, because I haven't been through a fundraiser, and I haven't, whatever, but I've got something. And it's only when I said, Show me that I got to see like, wait a minute, there's this whole other room here, that is exactly where I want to be. So we pivoted our strategy towards that other space. And it's been very fruitful.Michele Hansen  21:12  And there's two really important skills for entrepreneurs there, that you just sort of, underscored without really stating them outright, that I want to, I want to hone in on for a second. The first one was basically thinking about how much of an idiot you were a week ago, and thinking about that, and not being embarrassed about it, but kind of being like, delighted that you have learned something, and that you have added to your understanding of customers. And, and kind of being able to like, not laugh at yourself, but almost sort of look at it with like this, this sort of it's almost a pride in a way of being like, man, I was such an idiot six months ago, like, and it's kind of delightful to have those moments of realizing how much you didn't know, but to be delighted by that, and not be embarrassed by that. And kind of as a company being able to say, like, Yeah, we had no idea we're doing. And now we six months from now, we're also gonna say we, you know, we don't know what we're doing. Right? Like, but you know, we are aware of that. And then also the curiosity, the combination of that approach to learning and being excited by learning and looking for surprises, and then allowing yourself to be curious when you talk to the customers, and not just accepting what they're saying at face value. But saying, Well, can you? What's what's in this closet over here, like, and just, but like, you can only get to that point if you have really built trust with them. Because as you said earlier, they were embarrassed by doing this back of the envelope math, they were embarrassed by their legions of spreadsheets of whether they can hire people because it wasn't real official forecasts done by a BI team, like maybe they they're so small, they don't even have a BI team. Right? Like, exactly. So. And so they don't want to show this anyway. But when you did the interviews, they trusted you enough, which tells me that the way you ran the interviews was when you ran them really well, because they were willing to let you in and poke into what you thought was a little closet. But it turned out they were like pulling out a books and a book. And then the whole bookcase like turns around. And it's like their secret lair full of spreadsheets.Matt Wensing  23:36  Exactly, exactly. Was that they had made like yesterday, and then this one from today and that one from a week ago. And I'm like, wait a minute, you're not just doing this, like once every you're doing this, like, this is enough, guys, this is enough, you know? And like, what if you actually enjoy doing this? Like, oh, wow, you know, and so then it was like the opportunity to switch that negative emotion to a positive one and say, let's change embarrassment to fun and joy and just, let's embrace the informality of it by letting you do it this way. But we're going to level you up like we're going to make it better and faster and take out the tedium. So that's where I went back into my forces of progress. And I said, Okay, for this non CFO founder, what are their thoughts? And you know, they say stuff like, I'm embarrassed by my spreadsheet. I'm not very good at this,Michele Hansen  24:29  right. Also, their spreadsheet, like they love playing in the spreadsheet. TheyMatt Wensing  24:33  do love to play exactly. So they like the act of playing with it, right? It's almost like a child who's like, I love to finger paint and create things. But then it's like the kid who's embarrassed to show his parents or teacher whomever like well, you know, this is just for me. And so it was a very, like private activity. And so I was like, wait a minute, so this is an opportunity to say, Don't worry, we've got your back. Like, we'll make sure the math is right. We'll run the team will do the tedious parts for you. We'll make it look really well designed without you having to do the work of making it look professional. And we'll even help you use smarter, you know, building blocks to do this work. So you might not, you still might not use it to do that fundraiser, get that for an evaluation or whatever, like, you're still gonna have to create a spreadsheet, perhaps, for all those little decisions. Like, that's where summit wants to start, like, we want to be your tool for that, right? And I think over time, we can grow into the, oh, hey, you're really, you're really skilled at Excel? Are you really good at G sheets, and you have total, you are like, really confident and proud of your work? We'll get to you, but like this, then give us that shape of adoption that that's okay. Like, there's enough people. And in fact, there's more people. It's a bigger market of people who are a little bit embarrassed, a little shy and a little inexperienced, frankly, with this stuff than the other one. And oh, gosh, guess what team? Like, the feature requirements are completely different. Like, instead of having to build the enterprise, incredible version, that's going to win people away who are like veterans, right? We get to start with, like, the people who need the simplest things, you know, like that was the other exciting part is that, wow, you're just doing addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, basically, right? Like, okay, great. You know, I don't have to like, cuz I will say, you know, I don't want to leave this part out, like there was a pivotal moment in those 18 months where I was, hadn't decided yet that this is where we were going to go. And I found myself torn, trying to build more and more sophisticated tools and analysis for that really confident diehard user. And they were so demanding, and so exacting, and I was just barely getting, like, I'd say a b plus, with them. And it was causing me to almost have to go, Okay, this is going to end up being a consulting business, if I'm not careful, because I'm going to end up having to do a lot of bespoke work a lot of custom work for them, I'm going to end up, you know, having to get into the models that mean, I have to become a data scientist, like it was just so intense, that I realized, okay, this is not the business I want to build either like, this is just a bad fit from a, you know, I want a high margin, self serve SAS business. And I might come back to y'all. But this is not where I'm going to start. I can't I can't start here, because there's only one of me. At that point, there was one of me so. So I made the decision, then, okay, we're going all in on the other side. And that also allowed us to say, wait a minute, you know, all these opinions, we were baking into the product, all these best practices, all these things, we kind of need to like, lower that not come across as so proper and formal and the right way to do things, you know, you can only do things the right way, right? We actually need to be more invited, it changed our whole brand, right? We went through a rebrand where we said, instead of being serious and professional and discipline looking like Wall Street kind of style branding, you know, traditional financial branding, we actually said, what if we were playful and inviting and inclusive, and, you know, just warm and friendly with our branding, that would actually resonate more with these people who treat this stuff as their playground, right, like you said, and so it didn't just affect your product strategy, you know, really changed our whole positioning and brand identity, once we realized that this was the this was the side of the person we wanted to go after. Right?Michele Hansen  28:48  Hmm. It's so interesting that there were multiple inflection points there. Were you really stopped to think like, is this the business we should build? Whether that's from a product perspective? Or from a, you know, like a business perspective? Like, is this the business I want to be in? And when those points came? In sounds like you were quite reflective about them. And, you know, you know what, when you're at that point where you realized, you know, that, you know, that people were not doing the modeling, you initially thought they were on the frequency that you hoped they would be. You could have been threatened by that discovery. And you could have decided to, you know, give up or dig your heels in on it. And you didn't, and I think that it's such an important mental shift that needs to happen in order to really do customer research well, is to be open to what you're going to hear and to follow it wherever it's going to take you. And so you initially thought You were building a serious financial modeling tool for, you know, say startups, CFOs, and founders that is polished and professional, and they can give it to their boards or whatever. Yep. And, and then it turns out, you're actually making this fun private playground for them to make decisions in, in a way that helps them do it faster, and maybe doesn't use all of the skills they have about, you know, you know, decision support systems they learned in business school, but instead, it's somewhere that's like, safe. And yeah, for them. That's a very different business than you thought you were building. And you allowed yourself to be, you know, sort of led by the customer, still applying your own, you know, analysis on top of that, still asking yourself, you know, of all of these different directions that customers leading me in, or I could allow them to lead me in, you know, are those businesses I want to be in? Are those products I want to build? Is that is that the future I want for myself and for this company? And you allow that answer to be No, right? You didn't just force yourself into it. But you said, No, and we're going to do something else. Because there's something else that's interesting here, like there's still something here. Yeah. And maybe that's not it, but there's something else, but allowing yourself to sort of just just sort of to go with it, but still be steering it at the same time. And I don't I don't know if I'm quite conceptualizing that very well.Matt Wensing  31:40  No, yeah, it describes, you know, basically describes, I would say, December of 2020, in January 2021, where we just realized that I realized that this was not the right segments, this is not the right value prop for the right, you know, hats that people were wearing. And we were able to charge more money, but it wasn't going to grow the way I wanted to. So we rebuilt the darn thing, again, for hopefully the last time in April, May and June of this year, and then release the beta version in July. And it's really exciting. Now we've had three months of growth, we've had three months of consecutive growth, which had never happened before. Right. So revenue up each month, and retention. So we've actually had negative net negative retention each month, which has never happened before, either. So it turns out these people love it, it's doing what they want to the prices, right? And there's a lot of them. So I'm like, This is great. You know, you know, we have that we have a business and I will come it's funny, full circle, we now have some of our users who are founders, saying, hey, one of them, it blew my mind, he shared a screenshot of a zoom call with his board, where he did show summit on the call, which he never would have done with the G sheet that he created. Right. But because it looks like rigor, it looks rigorous. It's actually doing justice to his thoughts. Like he's a super smart person. But I think the problem before was like a mismatch between, you know, the tools that he had to express his logic and his thinking and his, his conceptual gifts, right, like, very, very talented, but like, you put them in front of a spreadsheet, and he would, you know, that just wasn't his native tongue. Right. It wasn't where he wanted wasn't the right tool for him to express those thoughts. Now that he and they have that they are starting to share them more on tweets, and with board meetings and like, which is great for us. But I think it's a testament to the fact that they're proud of their work now. Right. And that's really exciting for us. So yeah, it's it's a journey.Michele Hansen  34:01  It sounds like it has been, I mean, an incredible journey so far. I'm I'm super excited to see where this takes you. i You know, I've had a little bit of experience with with you know, with working with analysts myself, because I used to work in sort of the the financial space and I definitely knew a lot of people who love their spreadsheets and, you know, like genuinely reveled in making discounted cash flows and excel and very proud of your macros. Yeah, thing. And, yeah, yeah. Like, just like, and I mean, I feel like I have a little bit of that where I like, you know, genuinely enjoy, like playing in a spreadsheet. Yeah. And it's been so cool to see everything that you're sharing about different kinds of things that you could do with it, but also people doing it for their own personal budgeting and like, you know, founders, like founder financial situations are always so like weird and different and like, figuring out whether, you know, can I? Can I do this? Can I send my kid to this school? Can I, you know, can I buy a house, you know, all of those sorts of different things. Um, really, really exciting stuff. And, and, you know, I noticed you tweeted recently that you feel like you're getting to that, that point where it's really, it's really starting to take off and have that. You know, you know, you feel like you have found the product, you have discovered the products, which is the hardest part, and that you're getting those rabid fans. And actually, I told you this already, but I was at a wedding a couple of weeks ago. And these table I was sitting at like the, you know, there are two guys who work in finance sitting across the table from me. And like one of them was like telling them like about summit and how awesome it was and how he had to get access to it and all this like stuff you've built with it, you know, and I was on the other side of this huge table, and I wasn't really part of that conversation. But I was like, What are they talking about what they think I think, you know, wow, like, Oh, my God, like the internet in real life happening at this table at wedding.Matt Wensing  36:12  Founders delight right there. Yeah, yeah.Michele Hansen  36:16  But I think there's, I think we're gonna be hearing a lot more of people using summit and stuff so you can do with it. It has been an absolute delight talking to you today. Thank you so much for giving us some insights into your customer research and product discovery process. I really appreciate.Matt Wensing  36:38  You're welcome. Thanks for having me, Michelle.Michele HansenThis episode was also brought to you by Tella.Tella is a browser-based screen recorder for videos that showcase your work and share your knowledge.You can capture your screen, camera, and present slides. You can also customise your videos with backgrounds, layouts, and other video clips.Tella makes it easy to record updates for your team mates, launch videos for your followers, and demos for your customers.Record your next product demo with Tella.Visit tella.tv/softwaresocial to get 30% off Tella Pro

Teachers on Fire
209 - My Students Are Actually Thinking About LEARNING TARGETS

Teachers on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 5:40


I first read Ron Berger's Leaders of Their Own Learning in 2018, and I've been sold on the power of learning targets ever since. I believe they're an essential part of successful instruction, assessment, and student learning. I post learning targets on my Google Docs. On Slides. On Classroom. On Seesaw. I try to refer to them often in my instruction. And I ask students to use our targets to assess their own learning. But how much attention do students really give to learning targets? Do they actually mean anything or do they just amount to irrelevant teacher talk and background noise? Welcome to SPARKS: mini-segments intended to spark your thinking and ignite your practice. These short episodes are based on my written reflections, which you can find on the Teachers on Fire Magazine at Medium.com. Read the blog post featured in this episode at https://medium.com/teachers-on-fire/my-students-are-actually-thinking-about-learning-targets-da90d8db352c. My name is Tim Cavey, and I'm proud to contribute to the education conversation through the Teachers on Fire podcast. Make sure to connect with me @TeachersOnFire on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to catch more from me and hear from amazing educators who are bringing growth and transformation to K-12 education today. CONNECT with ME On Twitter @TeachersOnFire (https://twitter.com/TeachersOnFire) On Instagram @TeachersOnFire (https://www.instagram.com/teachersonfire/) On Facebook @TeachersOnFire (https://www.facebook.com/TeachersOnFire/) On YouTube @Teachers On Fire (https://www.youtube.com/c/teachersonfire) On Voxer @TeachersOnFire (https://web.voxer.com/u/teachersonfire) On LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/timwcavey/ Visit the home of Teachers on Fire at https://teachersonfire.net/. SONG TRACK CREDIT Flight to Tunisia by Causmic Tangled by Emmit Fenn Road Tripzzz by Ofshane Fast and Run by Nico Staf *All songs retrieved from the YouTube Audio Library at https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teachersonfire/support

Regular Features
466: Playground Sultan Splinter Cell

Regular Features

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 48:14


Make no bones about it, it's episode 466 of the Regular Features podcast. Hey, you in the back there with the bones, what are you making? A diorama of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand? Oh okay. You're definitely not making bones about this episode are you? No? Oh yes, we see the little motorcade of femurs now, and it's very clever how you've used a scapula to portray Gavrilo Princip. Wow, and this is your hobby is it? It's fascinating. We've just got to write this podcast description, but we'd love to talk to you more about your bone thing later. Maybe over a drink haha. Oh you do this with your girlfriend do you? That's cool, yeah yeah no that's cool she can come too. Anyway. Log unearths ancient Google Doc fan fiction. Matt is ambassador for playground slides. Steve blossoms into a fine young gentleman. Let's go!

Empowered Business
43: How to Make $10k in 5 Days by Pre-selling Your Signature Program

Empowered Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 31:31


Ready to make some real money with your signature program in 5 days? It is possible!   In this episode of the Empowered Business podcast, I am sharing a presentation I did for the Online Business Playground Summit. In this presentation, I explained how you can pre-sell your signature program using nothing but a Google Doc.     With this method, it is totally possible to make $10k in just 5 days with one to three hours of work.   Your signature program can include online courses, group coaching, and memberships and they can all be sold before you even create them.    Why would you pre-sell them? Pre-selling has many benefits that will help you ensure the success of your program before you even make it. It validates your business idea, you'll get paid before you do the work, you can build it alongside your students and receive their valuable feedback, and it helps you refine your marketing message. It also gives you testimonials and reviews which will build up your credibility.    This is truly the best way to create and sell a signature program. Your time and work are valuable, and pre-selling is a way to ensure it pays off.    In this episode, you'll learn more about what a signature program is, how to price it, the importance of pre-selling, and the pre-selling strategy I swear by to ensure the success of my business products. You'll also learn about my brand new mastermind that you can think of as your digital product MBA.  Resources Mentioned:  Get my FREE Google Doc Pre-selling Template Register for my FREE Empowered Business Mastermind Info Session   I would love to connect on Facebook or Instagram! Show notes available at www.monicafroese.com/43

Sarah's Book Shelves Live
Ep. 98: Behind the Scenes of Opening a New Indie Bookstore (with the Founders of The Book and Cover)

Sarah's Book Shelves Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 51:20


Highlights Blaes and Emily talk about balancing this new venture alongside their full-time day jobs. How the COVID-19 pandemic impacted their decision. How their community played an incredible role in the first big steps. Between an Instagram account and a Google Doc, the simple beginnings of this endeavor. Going from their ‘dream space' to their ‘dream location'. The role social media plays in their book buying. How the book-buying experience feels like a first date with publishers. Scarves and enamel pins and notecards, oh my!  How they approached including bookish merchandise at the store. Looking at backlist titles versus new releases. The driving factor behind knowing how many of a particular book to order. The way they were able to get a great sense of the reading tastes of their community. Book Recommendations from Blaes, Emily, and Sarah [36:14] Two OLD Books She Loves Emily: Rules of Civility by Amor Towles | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Bookshop.org [37:22] Emily: The Heart's Invisible Furies by John Boyne | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Bookshop.org [38:28] Other Books Mentioned: A Ladder to the Sky by John Boyne [39:40] Two NEW Books She Loves Blaes: Under the Whispering Door by T. J. Klune | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Bookshop.org [40:27] Blaes: Dear Miss Metropolitan by Carolyn Ferrell | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Bookshop.org [42:02] Other Books Mentioned:The House in the Cerulean Sea by T. J. Klune [41:10] One Book They DIDN'T Love Blaes, Emily, and Sarah are skipping this segment, but there will be a full discussion about their thoughts on this for the November Superlatives episode available to my Patreon subscribers. [44:04] One NEW RELEASE She's Excited About Sarah: A Mirror Mended by Alix E. Harrow (June 14, 2022) | Buy from Amazon[44:19] Other Books Mentioned:  A Spindle Splintered by Alix E. Harrow [44:27] The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow [45:04] The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow [45:05] Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine [45:18] The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman [45:40] Last 5 Star Books They Read [46:34] Emily & Blaes: If We Were Villains by M. L. Rio | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Bookshop.org [46:48] [47:50] Sarah: A Little Devil in America by Hanif Abdurraqib | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Bookshop.org [48:19] Other Books Mentioned:  The Secret History by Donna Tartt [48:11]  Other Links Year of Agatha The Book & Cover's Instagram post of their stocked shelves About the Founders of The Book & Cover Website | Instagram Blaes Green enjoys running, knitting, wrangling kiddos, and sobbing over epic family sagas. In her day job, she manages a team of customer service representatives in manufacturing for her family's 100-year-old Chattanooga printing business. She is running the New York City marathon in a month! Emily Lilley enjoys cooking, playing with her dachshund Bertie, and curling up with a cozy or smart TV comedy. In her day job, she is the Vice President of External Affairs for a statewide education policy and advocacy nonprofit. Emily and her friend Audrey are writing their own mystery series! Sarah Jackson enjoys organizing, Enneagramming, glitter, and getting lost in magical realist tales. In her day job, she is the chief operations officer of her home. In college, Sarah “beta” read fan fiction. Next Episode In two weeks (November 24), Susie Boutry (@NovelVisits) will join me to discuss our choices for the 2021 Best Books of the Year.  

The Your Own Pay Podcast
DM82 – What's that in your ear?

The Your Own Pay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


Damashe And Michael, Just Talking Tech DM82 – What's that in your ear? Followup: We start this episode out explaining why we did not stream to the clubhouse. And a brief suggestion for the Google Docs team. Damashe explores the answer calls with Siri Unicorn We talk about our notification problems, and how we both ... Read more

Greeny
Hour 2: Mojo Risin'

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 42:13


We listen to some of the best sound from yesterday... including Joe Judge and the Giants getting back on track (but Nuno isn't buying it). Greeny enjoyed his weekend at Northwestern. We check the Google Doc for Nuno's Notes and finish with your calls and hot takes.

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast
Episode 84 - Deadmines Lore w/ Goliath the Dwarf (Part 1)

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 108:37


Welcome to Episode 84 of BORN TO BE WILD, a Wild exclusive Hearthstone podcast where we have fun hanging out with friends, talking about the Wild format of Hearthstone and spotlighting members of the Wild Community! This week Nate, Hydra & Sheep hang out with resident Loremaster Goliath the Dwarf! This week's episode is broken into two parts - our normal check-in, news, weekly challenge, etc. The Deadmines Lore section is being posted as a separate episode. Check out our complete show notes on Google Docs, which include links to articles and deck codes for you to copy/paste! Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tZLpLWDDhaucx5q26dlORC31KId3dea8xrg5NUrX3JM/edit?usp=sharing Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 5:04 - How Was Your Week? 47:52 - Hearthstone News 1:25:28 - Weekly Listener Challenge 1:34:38 - Wrap-Up & Shout-Outs Find us online at https://www.borntobewildhs.com/

The Chromebook Classroom Podcast
10 Links you should click (November 2021)

The Chromebook Classroom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 29:34


As part of my daily routine, I scan dozens of blogs, visit a handful of Facebook groups, and skim through Twitter. The goal: find the most helpful resources, tools, and articles that I can share with my teacher friends (that's you!). Here are my favorite links for November 2021: Audio / Video lock for Google Meet New updates to the @ menu in Docs Better Citations in Google Docs   Photoshop on a Chromebook? Easy Student “podcasting”  Create your own “new tab” page  Funkify Video: Google Sites for Students Jamboard Gratefulness Wall Thanksgiving Booksnaps ----------------------------- Thanks for tuning into the Chromebook Classroom Podcast! If you enjoyed today's episode, I would appreciate your honest rating and review! You can connect with me, John Sowash, on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. I would love to hear your thoughts on the show!

Cops and Writers Podcast
041 Best Selling Author And Entrepreneur Dave Chesson On Keyword Utilization, How To Sell More Books And Atticus!

Cops and Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 65:01


On today's show, we have Serial Entrepreneur Dave Chesson returning to the Cops and Writers studio! Dave was my guest back in April on show number 13. Dave is the owner or co-owner of seven different successful companies. His expertise reaches a large and diverse audience. Dave, a veteran of the United States Navy where he served aboard a submarine as a naval officer, was a Navy liaison in South Korea and was an international arms dealer.  In today's episode, we chat about his career in the navy, how and why he created his businesses that help writers sell more books, his own writing career, how writers can maximize their sales utilizing his mostly free writing software, and his brand-new writing software, Atticus. In today's episode you will learn:·      How Dave became an entrepreneur!·      How he sustains seven successful businesses and balances work and family life.·      How Dave's Kindlepreneur, Publisher Rocket, and now Atticus help authors maximize profits and organize their writing.·      How to utilize Publisher Rocket to boost the effectiveness of your keywords in your book description, book title, and subtitle, and the seven lines Amazon gives you for your keywords when publishing your book.·      The importance of keywords and how to use them in advertising and how Publisher Rocket can save you valuable time researching them.·      The new and amazing writing software Atticus, and how it will revolutionize the writing industry.  All of this and more on today's episode of the Cops and Writers podcast.Check out Dave at  Kindlepreneur and get lots of free writing tools and informative videos.Watch Dave explain Atticus in this video!Unlock keywords with Dave's Publisher Rocket!Learn about firearms and write better scenes involving guns at Dave's Gun University.Enjoy the Cops and Writers book series.Please visit the Cops and Writers website.If you have a question for the sarge, hit him up at his email.Come join the fun at the Cops and Writers Facebook groupSupport the show (https://patreon.com/copsandwriters)

Screaming in the Cloud
Making Multi-Cloud Waves with Betty Junod

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:13


About Betty Betty Junod is the Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware helping organizations along their journey to cloud. This is her second time at VMware, having previously led product marketing for end user computing products.  Prior to VMware she held marketing leadership roles at Docker and solo.io in following the evolution of technology abstractions from virtualization, containers, to service mesh. She likes to hang out at the intersection of open source, distributed systems, and enterprise infrastructure software. @bettyjunod  Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/BettyJunod Vmware.com/cloud: https://vmware.com/cloud TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, I like to poke fun at a variety of different things, and that can range from technologies or approaches like multi-cloud, and that includes business functions like marketing, and sometimes it extends even to companies like VMware. My guest today is the Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware, so I'm basically spoilt for choice. Betty Junod, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today and tolerate what is no doubt going to be an interesting episode, one way or the other.Betty: Hey, Corey, thanks for having me. I've been a longtime follower, and I'm so happy to be here. And good to know that I'm kind of like the ultimate cross-section of all the things [laugh] that you can get snarky about.Corey: The only thing that's going to make that even better is if you tell me, “Oh, yeah, and I moonlight on a contract gig by naming AWS services.” And then I just won't even know where to go. But I'll assume they have to generate those custom names in-house.Betty: Yes. Yes, I think they do those there. I may comment on it after the fact.Corey: So, periodically I am, let's call it miscategorized, in my position on multi-cloud, which is that it's a worst practice that when you're designing something from scratch, you should almost certainly not be embracing unless you're targeting a very specific corner case. And I stand by that, but what that has been interpreted as by the industry, in many cases because people lack nuance when you express your opinions in tweet-sized format—who knew—as me saying, “Multi-cloud bad.” Maybe, maybe not. I'm not interested in assigning value judgment to it, but the reality is that there are an awful lot of multi-cloud deployments out there. And yes, some of them started off as, “We're going to migrate from one to the other,” and then people gave up and called it multi-cloud, but it is nuanced. VMware is a company that's been around for a long time. It has reinvented itself in a few different ways at different periods of its evolution, and it's still highly relevant. What is the Multi-Cloud Solutions group over at VMware? What do you folks do exactly?Betty: Yeah. And so I will start by multi-cloud; we're really taking it from a position of meeting the customer where they are. So, we know that if anything, the only thing that's a given in our industry is that there will be something new in the next six months, next year, and the whole idea of multi-cloud, from our perspective, is giving customers the optionality, so don't make it so that it's a closed thing for them. But if they decide—it's not that they're going to start, “Hey, I'm going to go to cloud, so day one, I'm going to go all-in on every cloud out there.” That doesn't make sense, right, as—Corey: But they all gave me such generous free credit offers when I founded my startup; I feel obligated to at this point.Betty: I mean, you can definitely create your account, log in, play around, get familiar with the console, but going from zero to being fully operationalized team to run production workloads with the same kind of SLAs you had before, across all three clouds—what—within a week is not feasible for people getting trained up and actually doing that. Our position is that meeting customers where they are and knowing that they may change their mind, or something new will come up—a new service—and they really want to use a new service from let's say GCP or AWS, they want to bring that with an application they already have or build a new app somewhere, we want to help enable that choice. And whether that choice applies to taking an existing app that's been running in their data center—probably on vSphere—to a new place, or building new stuff with containers, Kubernetes, serverless, whatever. So, it's all just about helping them actually take advantage of those technologies.Corey: So, it's interesting to me about your multi-cloud group, for lack of a better term, is there a bunch of things fall under its umbrella? I believe Bitnami does—or as I insist on calling it, ‘bitten-A-M-I'—I believe that SaltStack—which I wrote a little bit of once upon a time, which tells me you folks did no due diligence whatsoever because everything I've ever written is molten garbage—Betty: Not [unintelligible 00:04:33].Corey: And—so to be clear, SaltStack is good; just the parts that I wrote are almost certainly terrible because have you met me?Betty: I'll make a note. [laugh].Corey: You have Wavefront, you have CloudHealth, you have a bunch of other things in the portfolio, and yeah, all those things do work across multiple clouds, but there's nothing that makes using any of those things a particularly bad idea even if you're all-in on one cloud provider, too. So, it's a portfolio that applies to a whole bunch have different places from your perspective, but it can be used regardless of where folks stand ideologically.Betty: Yes. So, this goes back to the whole idea that we meet the customers where they are and help them do what they want to do. So, with that, making sure these technologies that we have work on all the clouds, whether that be in the data center or the different vendors, so that if a customer wants to just use one, or two, or three, it's fine. That part's up to them.Corey: The challenge I've run into is that—and maybe this is a ‘Twitter Bubble' problem, but unfortunately, having talked to a whole bunch of folks in different contexts, I know it isn't—there's almost this idea that you have to be incredibly dogmatic about a particular technology that you're into. I joke periodically about the Rust Evangelism Strikeforce where their entire job is talking about using Rust; their primary IDE is PowerPoint because they're giving talks all the time about it rather than writing code. And great, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but there are the idea of a technology purist who is taking, “Things must be this way,” well past a point of being reasonable, and disregarding the reality that, yeah, the world is messy in a way that architectural diagrams never are.Betty: Yeah. The architectural diagrams are always 2D, right? Back to that PowerPoint slide: how can I make pretty boxes? And then I just redraw a line because something new came out. But you and I have been in this industry for a long time, there's always something new.And I think that's where the dogmatism gets problematic because if you say we're only going to do containers this way—you know, I could see Swarm and Kubernetes, or all-in on AWS and we're going to use all the things from AWS and there's only this way. Things are generational and so the idea that you want to face the reality and say that there is a little bit of everything. And then it's kind of like, how do you help them with a part of that? As a vendor, it could be like, “I'm going to help us with a part of it, or I'm going to help address certain eras of it.” That's where I think it gets really bad to be super dogmatic because it closes you off to possibly something new and amazing, new thinking, different ways to solve the same problem.Corey: That's the problem is left to our own devices, most of us who are building things, especially for random ideas, yeah, there's a whole modern paradigm of how I can build these things, but I'm going to shortcut to the thing I know best, which may very well the architectures that I was using 15 years ago, maybe tools that I was using 15 years ago. There's a reason that Vim is still as popular as it is. Would I recommend it to someone who's a new user? Absolutely not; it's user-hostile, but back in my days of being a grumpy sysadmin, you learned vi because it was on everything you could get into, and you never knew in what environment you were going to be encountering stuff. These days, you aren't logging in to remote systems to manage them, in most cases, and when it happens, it's a rarity and a bug.The world changes; different approaches change, but you have to almost reinvent your entire philosophy on how things work and what your career trajectory looks like. And you have to give up aspects of what you've considered to be part of your identity and embrace something new. It was hard for me to accept that, for example, Docker and the wave of containerization that was rolling out was effectively displacing the world that I was deep in of configuration management with Puppet and with Salt. And the world changes; I said, “Okay, now I'll work on cloud.” And if something else happens, and mainframes are coming back again, instead, well, I'm probably not going to sit here railing against the tide. It would be ridiculous to do that from my perspective. But I definitely understand the temptation to fight against it.Betty: Mm-hm. You know, we spend so much time learning parts of our craft, so it's hard to say, “I'm now not going to be an expert in my thing,” and I have to admit that something else might be better and I have to be a newbie again. That can be scary for someone who's spent a lot of time to be really well-versed in a specific technology. It's funny that you bring up the whole Docker and Puppet config management; I just had a healthy discussion over Slack with some friends. Some people that we know and comment about some of the newer areas of config management, and the whole idea is like, is it a new category or an evolution of? And I went back to the point that I made earlier is like, it's generations. We continually find new ways to solve a problem, and one thing now is it [sigh] it just all goes so much faster, now. There's a new thing every week. [laugh] it seems sometimes.Corey: It is, and this is the joy of having been in this industry for a while—toxic and broken in many ways though it is—is that you go through enough cycles of seeing today's shiny, new, amazing thing become tomorrow's legacy garbage that we're stuck supporting, which means that—at least from my perspective—I tend to be fairly conservative with adopting new technologies with respect to things that matter. That means that I'm unlikely to wind up looking at the front page of Hacker News to pick a framework to build a banking system in, and I'm unlikely to be the first kid on my block to update to a new file system or database, just because, yeah, if I break a web server, we all laugh, we make fun of the fact that it throws an error for ten minutes, and then things are back up and running. If I break the database, there's a terrific chance that we don't have a company anymore. So, it's the ‘mistakes will show' area and understanding when to be aggressive and when to hold back as far as jumping into new technologies is always a nuanced decision. And let's be clear as well, an awful lot of VMware's customers are large companies that were founded, somehow—this is possible—before 2010. Imagine that. Did people—Betty: [laugh]. I know, right?Corey: —even have businesses or lives back then? I thought we all used horse-driven carriages and whatnot. And they did not build on cloud—not because of any perception of distrust; because it functionally did not exist at the time that they were building these things. And, “Oh, come out into the cloud. It's fine now.” It… yeah, that application is generating hundreds of millions in revenue every quarter. Maybe we treat that with a little bit of respect, rather than YOLO-ing it into some Lambda-driven monster that's constructed—Betty: One hundred—Corey: —out of popsicle sticks and glue.Betty: —percent. Yes. I think people forget that. And it's not that these companies don't want to go to cloud. It's like, “I can't break this thing. That could be, like, millions of dollars lost, a second.”Corey: I write my weekly newsletters in a custom monstrosity of a system that has something like 30-some-odd Lambda functions, a bunch of API gateways that are tied together with things, and periodically there are challenges with it that break as the system continues to evolve. And that's fine. And I'm okay with using something like that as a part of my workflow because absolute worst case, I can go back to the way that my newsletter was originally written: in Google Docs, and it doesn't look anywhere near the same way, and it goes back to just a text email that starts off with, “I have messed up.” And that would be a better story than most of the stuff I put out as a common basis. Similarly, yeah, durability is important.If this were a serious life-critical app, it would not just be hanging out in a single region of a single provider; it would probably be on one provider, as I've talked about, but going multi-region and having backups to a different cloud provider. But if AWS takes a significant enough outage to us-west-2 in Oregon, to the point where my ridiculous system cannot function to write the newsletter, that too, is a different handwritten email that goes out that week because there's no announcement they've made that anyone's going to give the slightest toss about, given the fact that it's basically Cloud Armageddon. So, we'll see. It's about understanding the blast radius and understanding your use case.Betty: Yep. A hundred percent.Corey: So, you've spent a fair bit of time doing interesting things in your career. This is your second outing at VMware, and in the interim, you were at solo.io for a bit, and before that you were in a marketing leadership role at Docker. Let's dive in, if you will. Given that you are no longer working at Docker, they recently made an announcement about a pricing model change, whereas it is free to use Docker Desktop for anyone's personal projects, and for small companies.But if you're a large company, which they define is ten million in revenue a year or 250 employees—those two things don't go alike, but okay—then you have to wind up having a paid plan. And I will say it's a novel approach, but I'm curious to hear what you have to say about it.Betty: Well, I'd say that I saw that there was a lot of flutter about that news, and it's kind of a, it doesn't matter where you draw the line in the sand for the tier, there's always going to be some pushback on it. So, you have to draw a line somewhere. I haven't kept up with the details around the pricing models that they've implemented since I left Docker a few years ago, but monetization is a really important part for a startup. You do have to make money because there are people that you have to pay, and eventually, you want to get off of raising money from VCs all the time. Docker Desktop has been something that has been a real gem from a local developer experience, right, giving the—so that has been well-received by the community.I think there was an enterprise application for it, but when I saw that, I was like, yeah, okay, cool. They need to do something with that. And then it's always hard to see the blowback. I think sometimes with the years that we've had with Docker, it's kind of like no matter what they do, the Twitterverse and Hacker News is going to just give them a hard time. I mean, that is my honest opinion on that. If they didn't do it, and then, say, they didn't make the kind of revenue they needed, people would—that would become another Twitter thread and Hacker News blow up, and if they do it, you'll still have that same reaction.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: It seems to be that Docker has been trying to figure out how to monetize for a very long time because let's be clear here; I think it is difficult to overstate just how impactful and transformative Docker was to the industry. I gave a talk “Heresy in the Church of Docker” that listed a bunch of things that didn't get solved with Docker, and I expected to be torn to pieces for it, and instead I was invited to give it at ContainerCon one year. And in time, a lot of those things stopped being issues because the industry found answers to it. Now, unfortunately, some of those answers look like Kubernetes, but that's neither here nor there. But now it's, okay, so giving everything that you do that is core and central away for free is absolutely part of what drove the adoption that it saw, but goodwill from developers is not the sort of thing that generally tends to lead to interesting revenue streams.So, they had to do something. And they've tried a few different things that haven't seemed to really pan out. Then they spun off that pesky part of their business that made money selling support contracts, over to Mirantis, which was apparently looking for something now that OpenStack was no longer going to be a thing, and Kubernetes is okay, “Well, we'll take Docker enterprise stuff.” Great. What do they do, as far as turning this into a revenue model?There's a lot of the, I guess, noise that I tend to ignore when it comes to things like this because angry people on Twitter, or on Hacker News, or other terrible cesspools on the internet, are not where this is going to be decided. What I'm interested in is what the actual large companies are going to say about it. My problem with looking at it from the outside is that it feels as if there's significant ambiguity across the board. And if there's one thing that I know about large company procurement departments, it's that they do not like ambiguity. This change takes effect in three or four months, which is underwear-outside-the-pants-superhero-style speed for a lot of those companies, and suddenly, for a lot of developers, they're so far removed from the procurement side of the house that they are never going to have a hope of getting that approved on a career-wide timespan.And suddenly, for a lot of those companies, installing and running Docker Desktop just became a fireable offense because from the company's perspective, the sheer liability side of it, if they were getting subject to audit, is going to be a problem. I don't believe that Docker is going to start pulling Oracle-like audit tactics, but no procurement or risk management group in the world is going to take that on faith. So, the problem is not that it's expensive because that can be worked around; it's not that there's anything inherently wrong with their costing model. The problem is the ambiguity of people who just don't know, “Does this apply to me or doesn't this apply to me?” And that is the thing that is the difficult, painful part.And now, as a result, the [unintelligible 00:17:28] groups and their champions of Docker Desktop are having to spend a lot more time, energy, and thought on this than it would simply be for cutting a check because now it's a risk org-wide, and how do we audit to figure out who's installed this previously free open-source thing? Now what?Betty: Yeah, I'll agree with you on that because once you start making it into corporate-issued software that you have to install on the desktop, that gets a lot harder. And how do you know who's downloaded it? Like my own experience, right? I have a locked-down laptop; I can't just install whatever I want. We have a software portal, which lets me download the approved things.So, it's that same kind of model. I'd be curious because once you start looking at from a large enterprise perspective, your developers are working on IP, so you don't want that on something that they've downloaded using their personal account because now it sits—that code is sitting with their personal account that's using this tool that's super productive for them, and that transition to then go to an enterprise, large enterprise and going through a procurement cycle, getting a master services agreement, that's no small feat. That's a whole motion that is different than someone swiping a credit card or just downloading something and logging in. It's similar to what you see sometimes with the—how many people have signed up for and paid 99 bucks for Dropbox, and then now all of a sudden, it's like, “Wow, we have all of megacorp [laugh] signed up, and then now someone has to sell them a plan to actually manage it and make sure it's not just sitting on all these personal drives.”Corey: Well, that's what AWS's original sales motion looked a lot like they would come in and talk to the CTO or whatnot at giant companies. And the CTO would say, “Great, why should we pick AWS for our cloud needs?” And the answer is, “Oh, I'm sorry. You have 87 distinct accounts within your organization that we've [unintelligible 00:19:12] up for you. We're just trying to offer you some management answers and unify the billing and this, and probably give you a discount as well because there is price breaks available at certain sizing.” It was a different conversation. It's like, “I'm not here to sell you anything. We're already there. We're just trying to formalize the relationship.” And that is a challenge.Again, I'm not trying to cast aspersions on procurement groups. I mean, I do sell enterprise consulting here at The Duckbill Group; we deal with an awful lot of procurement groups who have processes and procedures that don't often align to the way that we do things as a ten-person, fully remote company. We do not have commercial vehicle insurance, for example, because we do not have a commercial vehicle and that is a prerequisite to getting the insurance, for one. We're unlikely to buy one to wind up satisfying some contractual requirements, so we have to go back and forth and get things like that removed. And that is the nature of the beast.And we can say yes, we can say no on a lot of those questionnaires, but, “It depends,” or, “I don't know,” is the sort of thing that's going to cause giant red flags and derail everything. But that is exactly what Docker is doing. Now, it's the well, we have a sort of sloppy, weird set of habits with some of our engineers around the bring your own device to work thing. So, that's the enterprise thing. Let me be very clear, here at The Duckbill Group, we have a policy of issuing people company machines, we manage them very lightly just to make sure the drives are encrypted, so they—and that the screensaver comes out with a password, so if someone loses a laptop, it's just, “Replace the hardware,” not, “We have a data breach.”Let's be clear here; we are responsible about these things. But beyond that, it's oh, you want to have some personal thing installed on your machine or do some work on that stuff? Fine. By all means. It's a situation of we have no policy against it; we understand this is how work happens, and we trust people to effectively be grownups.There are some things I would strongly suggest that any employee—ours or anyone else—not cross the streams on for obvious IP ownership rights and the rest, we have those conversations with our team for a reason. It's, understand the nuances of what you're doing, and we're always willing to throw hardware at people to solve these problems. Not every company is like that. And ten million in revenue is not necessarily a very large company. I was doing the math out for ten million in revenue or 250 employees; assuming that there's no outside investment—which with VC is always a weird thing—it's possible—barely—to have a $10 million in revenue company that has 250 employees, but if they're full time they are damn close to a $15 an hour minimum wage. So, who does it apply to? More people than you might believe.Betty: Yeah, I'm really curious to how they're going to like—like you say, if it takes place in three or four months, roll that out, and how would you actually track it and true that up for people? So.Corey: Yeah. And there are tools and processes to do this, but it's also not in anyone's roadmap because people are not sitting here on their annual planning periods—which is always aspirational—but no one's planning for, “Oh, yeah, Q3, one of our software suppliers is going to throw a real procurement wrench at us that we have to devote time, energy, resources, and budget to figure out.” And then you have a problem. And by resources, I do mean resources of basically assigning work and tooling and whatnot and energy, not people. People are humans, they are not resources; I will die on that hill.Betty: Well, you know, actually resource-wise, the thing that's interesting is when you say supplier, if it's something that people have been able to download for free so far, it's not considered a supplier. So, it's—now they're going to go from just a thing I can use and maybe you've let your developers use to now it has to be something that goes through the official internal vetting as being a supplier. So, that's just—it's a whole different ball game entirely.Corey: My last job before I started this place, was a highly regulated financial institution, and even grabbing things were available for free, “Well, hang on a minute because what license is it using and how is it going to potentially be incorporated?” And this stuff makes sense, and it's important. Now, admittedly, I have the advantage of a number of my engineering peers in that I've been married to a corporate attorney for 11 years and have insight into that side of the world, which to be clear, is all about risk mitigation which is helpful. It is a nuanced and difficult field to—as are most things once you get into them—and it's just the uncertainty that befuddles me a bit. I wish them well with it, truly I do. I think the world is better with an independent Docker in it, but I question whether this is going to find success. That said, it doesn't matter what I think; what matters is what customers say and do, and I'm really looking forward to seeing how it plays out.Betty: A hundred percent; same here. As someone who spent a good chunk of my life there, their mark on the industry is not to be ignored, like you said, with what happened with containers. But I do wish them well. There's lot of good people over there, it's some really cool tech, and I want to see a future for them.Corey: One last topic I want to get into before we wind up wrapping this episode is that you are someone who was nominated to come on the show by a couple of folks, which is always great. I'm always looking for recommendations on this. But what's odd is that you are—if we look at it and dig a little bit beneath the titles and whatnot, you even self-describe as your history is marketing leadership positions. It is uncommon for engineering-types to recommend that I talk to marketing folks.s personally I think that is a mistake; I consider myself more of a marketer than not in some respects, but it is uncommon, which means I have to ask you, what is your philosophy of marketing because it very clearly is differentiated in the public eye.Betty: I'm flattered. I will say that—and this goes to how I hire people and how I coach teams—it's you have to be super curious because there's a ton of bad marketing out there, where it's just kind of like, “Hey, we do these five things and we always do these five things: blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.” But I think it's really being curious about what is the thing that you're marketing? There are people who are just focused on the function of marketing and not the thing. Because you're doing your marketing job in the service of a thing, this new widget, this new whatever, and you got to be super curious about it.And I'll tell you that, for me, it's really hard for me to market something if I'm not excited about it. I have to personally be super excited about the tech or something happening in the industry, and it's, kind of like, an all-in thing for me. And so in that sense, I do spend a ton of time with engineers and end-users, and I really try to understand what's going on. I want to understand how the thing works, and I always ask them, “Well”—so I'll ask the engineers, like, “So… okay, this sounds really cool. You just described this new feature and you're super excited about it because you wrote it, but how is your end-user, the person you're building this for, how did they do this before? Help me understand. How did they do this before and why is this better?”Just really dig into it because for me, I want to understand it deeply before I talk about it. I think the thing is, it shows a tremendous amount of respect for the builder, and then to try to really be empathetic, to understand what they're doing and then partner with them—I mean, this sounds so business-y the way I'm talking about this—but really be a partner with them and just help them make their thing really successful. I'm like the other end; you're going to build this great thing and now I'm going to make it sound like it's the best thing that's ever happened. But to do that, I really need to deeply understand what it is, and I have to care about it, too. I have to care about it in the way that you care about it.Corey: I cannot effectively market or sell something that I don't believe in, personally. I also, to be clear because you are a marketing professional—or at least far more of one than I ever was—I do not view what I do is marketing; I view it as spectacle. And it's about telling stories to people, it's about learning what the market thinks about it, and that informs product design in many respects. It's about understanding the product itself. It's about being able to use the product.And if people are listening to this and think, “Wait a minute, that sounds more like DevRel.” I have news for you. DevRel is marketing, they're just scared to tell you that. And I know people are going to disagree with me on that. You're wrong. But that's okay; reasonable people can disagree.And that's how I see it is that, okay, I'll talk to people building the service, I'll talk to people using the service, but then I'm going to build something with the service myself because until then, it's all a game of who sounds the most convincing in the stories that they tell. But okay, you can tell an amazing story about something, but if it falls over when I tried to use it, well, I'm sorry, you're not being accurate in your descriptions of it.Betty: A hundred percent. I hate to say, like, you're storytellers, but that's a big part of it, but it's kind of like you want to tell the story, so you do something to that people believe a certain thing. But that's part of a curated experience because you want them to try this thing in a certain way. Because you've designed it for something. “I built a spoon. I want you to use that to eat your soup because you can't eat soup with a fork.”So, then you'll have this amazing soup-eating experience, but if I build you a spoon and then not give you any directions and you start throwing it at cars, you're going to be like, “This thing sucks.” So, I kind of think of it in that way. To your point of it has to actually work, it's like, but they also need to know, “What am I supposed to use it for?”Corey: The problem I've always had on some visceral level with formal marketing departments for companies is that they can say that a product that they sell is good, they can say that the product is great, or they can choose to say nothing at all about that product, but when there's a product in the market that is clearly a turd, a marketing department is never going to be able to say that, which I think erodes its authenticity in many respects. I understand the constraints behind, that truly I do, but it's the one superpower I think that I bring to the table where even when I do sponsorship stuff it's, you can buy my attention but not my opinion. Because the authenticity of me being trusted to call them like I see them, for lack of a better term, to my mind at least outweighs any short-term benefit from saying good things about a product that doesn't deserve them. Now, I've been wrong about things, sure. I have also been misinformed in both directions, thinking something is great when it's not, or terrible when it isn't or not understanding the use case, and I am thrilled to engage in those debates. “But this is really expensive when you run for this use case,” and the answer can be, “Well, it's not designed for that use case.” But the answer should not be, “No it's not.” I promise you, expensive is in the eye of the customer not the person building the thing.Betty: Yes. This goes back to I have to believe in the thing. And I do agree it's, like not [sigh]—it's not a panacea. You're not going to make Product A and it's going to solve everything. But being super clear and focused on what it is good for, and then please just try it in this way because that's what we built it for.Corey: I want to thank you for taking the time to have a what for some people is no doubt going to be perceived as a surprisingly civil conversation about things that I have loud, heated opinions about. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Betty: Well, they can follow me on Twitter. But um, I'd say go to vmware.com/cloud for our work thing.Corey: Exactly. VM where? That's right. VM there. And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:07].Betty: [laugh].Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Betty: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Betty Junod, Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a loud, ranting comment at the end. Then, if you work for a company that is larger than 250 people or $10 million in revenue, please also Venmo me $5.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Greeny
Hour 2: Anything's Possible

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 40:56


Could Mike White be the starter for the Jets going forward? We hear from Robert Saleh and other coaches in today's edition of "I'm Sorry, What?" and we check the Google Doc to see Nuno's Notes from Sunday. Plus, we open the phones to get your hot takes from the weekend.

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast
Episode 83 - Beware the Mind Goblin w/ Sundy

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 189:17


Welcome to Episode 83 of BORN TO BE WILD, a Wild exclusive Hearthstone podcast where we have fun hanging out with friends, talking about the Wild format of Hearthstone and spotlighting members of the Wild Community! Hydralisk was unable to make this week's show due to a work conflict so we are joined by special guest co-host, Blutrane! This week Nate, Blutrane & Sheep hang out with Wild Legendary Hearthstone player, streamer, and member of Team Wildside, welcome to the show Matsund! We discuss the recent Hearthstone news, including Mercs updates and new cards from the Deadmines Mini-Set! Check out our complete show notes on Google Docs, which include links to articles and deck codes for you to copy/paste! Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AJLtS2AILB_zuMzHSZQTwfXRFHzo7GpfZu1Xqa-K9jo/edit?usp=sharing Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 3:55 - Guest Interview: Sundy 19:18 - How Was Your Week? 38:30 - BTBW Listener Series 55:11 - Mercenaries Discussion 1:31:55 - Looking at New Mini-Set Cards 2:28:38 - Deck Spotlight: Hand Mage 2:36:00 - Weekly Listener Challenge 2:59:58 - Wrap-Up & Shout-Outs Find us online at https://www.borntobewildhs.com/

The Business Journey Podcast
40. Building A Team: What To Do BEFORE You Hire

The Business Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 13:14


I'm so excited today because we're starting our mini series here on the Business Journey Podcast all about building a team. Maybe you're interested in building a team soon - or maybe not, but the information we're sharing in this mini series is going to be super helpful when you're ready to make the leap. Today's episode is all about what to do before you hire a team member, which is the perfect place to start when you're dreaming of a team. Before we dive into building a team, I wanted to share about a http://www.rebeccaricephoto.com/five-ways (new freebie) I've put together. It will show you five ways to grow your email list from 0 to 100 subscribers! Email marketing is SO important for small business owners (learn why I believe that https://rebeccaricephoto.com/2021/04/19/4-reasons-you-should-have-an-email-list-as-a-photographer/ (HERE)). Now, back to building a team. What to Do Before You Hire a Team MemberOver the last year or so, I've built up a team in my business and now, I'm loving the chance to help other business owners build their own teams. One of the most common questions I get asked from other photographers is how to prepare to build a team. They may not be totally ready right now, but they want to get to a place where they are ready in the future. I think that's an amazing question because it's never to early to start preparing to build your team. A lot of these tips I'm sharing today, I wish I had done when I started building my team. Now, it's a breeze to bring on someone new because we know what we're doing! So, here's what you should do before you hire a team member! Write out what you need to do in your business.Think about every single thing that you do (or need to do) to make your business run. Get as micro was you need, but list it all out. We're doing this because I want you to see how much you actually do every day in your business. Once you know all the things you do, it's much easier to determine what you can let someone else do for you! After you've got it all written down, highlight what only YOU can do. If it requires your actual face, voice, or has a direct impact on your revenue, highlight it. In the end, there should be a few things highlighted - now it's clear to see how much you could truly hand over to someone else. With what's on your list, think about what you can automate and mark it with a star! These are things that you don't have to do physically anymore! Document your processes.With anything that isn't highlighted, start documenting your process. One of our favorite programs to do this is with https://www.loom.com (Loom). It's a free recording software and you can literally do a screen recording of whatever you're doing. This is a great way to teach someone how to do something - like a gallery delivery for example! You can also document your process in a Google Doc or a http://www.trello.com (Trello checklist). Our team does a lot of checklists and Loom recordings - but do what works for you. When it's time to onboard a new hire, you can send them the recording and checklist to review instead of having to hold their hand and teach them everything. Make your processes as efficient as possible.As you start to record and document these processes, look at how efficient they are. Are you including unnecessary or redundant steps? If you are, think about how to make it easier. When you hand it off to someone, you want that task to be as streamlined as possible. You may still wind up making changes after someone else comes in to help, but that's not a bad thing! Think about where you want your business to go.Most of these tips are practical, actual things to go. But part of being a team leader is having a vision. Think about where you want to be in a few years and lay out the roles beneath you that you want someday to make it happen. This is a bit of a dream scenario so don't think about costs right now - just where you want to be and who you'll need. Once you know who you might...

How To Citizen with Baratunde
A Podcast-Sized History of Tech (with Scott Galloway)

How To Citizen with Baratunde

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 57:25


Baratunde has been sounding the alarm about the perils of Big Tech for years. In this episode, he breaks down his journey in tech and talks with tech expert and sharp critic, Prof G, otherwise known as Scott Galloway, co-host of the Pivot Podcast. They dive into Scott's summary of what the hell went wrong, his recent argument that corporations need to start acting “as citizens,” and how this idea of corporate citizening informs his investment strategy.  Guest: Scott Galloway Bio: Marketing expert who specializes in critiquing the worlds of tech & business, and how they operate within capitalism. Online: His website; @profgalloway on Twitter; the Pivot podcast Go to howtocitizen.com for transcripts, our email newsletter, and your citizen practice. ACTIONS   - INTERNALLY REFLECT  Feeds and Feelings Take a moment to reflect on your various social media feeds. If your FB or Instagram feed had a personality how would you describe it (ie. sassy with a bit of inspiration or snarky, gossipy, and entertaining)? How do your social media feeds make you feel? Consider training the algorithm by selecting accounts and content that pushes you forward rather than drags you down. A small but perhaps mighty action for your mental and emotional wellbeing.   - BECOME INFORMED Check out Baratunde's Digital Manifesto Read and contribute to an open Google Docs version of the manifesto here. Comment about what's missing, improve it, or add references to work from others. Baratunde may share some of your feedback on his social channels. Also recommended by Scott, the book Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman available in our bookshop.    - PUBLICLY PARTICIPATE Ensure regulation of Big Tech Here are three grassroots efforts you can join to ensure big tech doesn't go unregulated. Join with others to lend your voice and skills. Check out - Freedomfromfacebookandgoogle.com, Athenaforall.org working to free us from Amazon, and The Economic Liberties Project.us. MORE WAYS TO CONNECT & SUPPORT Leave a review and rating. It makes a huge difference with the algorithmic overlords! Find us at @howtocitizen on Instagram and tag us in your actions Visit our non-Bezos bookshop.  Subscribe to Baratunde's weekly Recommentunde Newsletter, his column on Puck, or you can even text him right now at 202-894-8844 Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Educational Duct Tape
Google Earth and other Geo Tools with the Partial Credit Podcast Guys

Educational Duct Tape

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 89:08


Three Google Earth Education Experts, Google Innovators, and Trainers—Jeffery Heil, Jesse Lubinsky, and Donnie Piercey—join me to discuss different tools and features for exposing students to different geographical areas. The guys from the Partial Credit podcast tell us about Google Earth, Google Earth Voyages, Google Earth Engine, and more! Show notes also available at jakemiller.net/eduducttape-episode-66 A Book for a Friend Contest! Submit your book endorsement on Flipgrid or Speakpipe! FlipGrid.com/EduDuctTape Speakpipe.com/EduDuctTape Soapbox Moment: The Zappos EdTech Tool Mindset Barry Schwartz: “All of this choice . . . produces paralysis, rather than liberation. With so many options to choose from, people find it very difficult to choose at all.” Barry Schwartz: “Increased choice decreases satisfaction with matters as trivial as ice cream flavors and as significant as jobs. It [increased choice] requires increased time and effort and can lead  to anxiety, regret, excessively high expectations, and self-blame if the choices don't work out.” Jam study by psychologists Sheena Iyengar and Mark Lepper Barry Schwartz -  “More Isn't Always Better” - hbr.org/2006/06/more-isnt-always-better Barry Schwartz -  “The Paradox of Choice” - ted.com/talks/barry_schwartz_the_paradox_of_choice Today's Guests: Jesse Lubinsky  (@jlubinsky) - Jesse Lubinsky is currently the Chief Learning Officer of Ready Learner One LLC and has nearly 20 years of public school experience as a teacher and administrator. He is co-author of “Reality Bytes: Innovative Learning Using Augmented and Virtual Reality” (January 2020) and "The Esports Education Playbook: Empowering Every Learner Through Inclusive Gaming" (November 2020). He is also co-host of the Partial Credit Podcast and the Ready Learner One Lounge, a virtual reality show focused on innovations in teaching and learning. He is a Google Certified Innovator and Trainer,  a CoSN Certified Education Technology Leader, an Adjunct Professor of Education Technology at Pace University, a member of the Google Earth Education Experts team, and a frequent keynote speaker and presenter who has recently done educational technology presentations across North America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Australia. Jeffery Heil  (@jheil65) - Jeffery has been an educator for 25 years. He has served as a classroom teacher, an instructional technology coach, an adjunct professor of education, and a Google in Education Trainer and Innovator. In this time he has continued to be an advocate for all students, especially those traditionally underserved by the U.S. educational institution.  He sees relationships as the core of education and strives to show all educators meaningful ways to incorporate technology into their curriculum to amplify student learning while not losing sight of the importance of seeing each student as a unique and important member of a classroom or school. Donnie Piercy (@mrpiercEy) - The 2021 Kentucky Teacher of the Year, Donnie teaches fifth grade Lexington, Kentucky. After graduating from Asbury College and earning his master's from Auburn, he has been teaching since 2007. Donnie specializes in using technology to promote student inquiry, learning, and engagement. Over the past fourteen years of teaching, these interests have given him the unique chance to represent Kentucky around the world. Donnie was the recipient of a National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher Fellowship to Antarctica, and he also represents Kentucky on the inaugural National Geographic Education Teacher Advisory Council.  He is the North American lead for the Google Earth Education Experts Network. Donnie has been invited to keynote and present at schools in thirty-three states and on four continents. In 2017, he co-authored The Google Cardboard Book: Explore, Engage, and Educate with Virtual Reality based on virtual experiences he created for his students.  The Bluegrass always calls him home, however, as he regularly leads professional development at school districts around the state. Donnie lives in Lexington with his wife and three children. Check out the Partial Credit Podcast at partial.credit The EdTech Newlywed Game - Favorite 80s song (playlist at the bottom of the show notes!) Educational Duct Tape Question: What is the best tool for a teacher to use for exposing students to different geographical areas? Google Earth - earth.google.com Find your house - shows that it's real places Book settings Overlay images Connect with experiences that you have or they have Voyages - Premade content built right in Layers - weather, clouds, glaciers, tropical storms, timelapse Carmen Sandiego - experiments.withgoogle.com/where-on-earth New Google Earth Projects brings in stuff that used to be in Tour Creator, Tour builder, similar to building custom maps in MyMaps Learn how to create your own Google Earth Projects - google.com/earth/outreach/learn/create-a-map-or-story-in-google-earth-web Collaborative Lit Trips - googlelittrips.org Google Maps Street View - google.com/streetview Pegman - Blue lines and dots. Lines are from Google Map Car. Dots are photospheres that are 360 images uploaded by users. Get the Google Street View App Contribute images to Google Maps Donnie #1, Donnie #2, Donnie #3 Create your own 360 images using your smartphone Google Earth Engine earthengine.google.com Change over time Case studies Data sets Learn more about Google Geo Tools for Education at google.com/intl/en_us/earth/education Other Geo Tools Honorable Mentions: Arts and Culture - experiments, especially AR on phone, primary sources Google Maps Lists - mashable.com/article/google-maps-lists MyMaps - Customizable Google Maps - mymaps.google.com Street view treks - google.com/maps/about/treks/#/grid Thetruesize.com Celebration of the Adjacent Possible Kyle Niemis' tweet about bookmarks and tables of contents in Google Docs - twitter.com/KyleNiemis/status/1451561000499560464 Ways to Support the Show or Connect with Jake and other Duct Tapers! Apple Podcast Reviews FlipGrid.com/EduDuctTape password eduducttape Speakpipe.com/EduDuctTape #EduDuctTape on social media Telling your friends and colleagues The Duct Tapers Facebook Group - facebook.com/groups/ducttapers Stickers! Want to pass some out?  Want some for yourself? JakeMiller.net/SendMeStickers The JakeMillerTech Newsletter – Sign up! jakemiller.net/newsletter   Our Favorite 80's Song Playlist Spotify Podcast link - open.spotify.com/playlist/5Zgzwqp6GKl8XgZIOi3Nrj?si=23d2d5d41f9a4fa5 Phil Collins - In the Air Tonight Van Halen - Jump Michael Jackson - Thriller Huey Lewis and The News - The Power of Love The Smiths - How Soon is Now? Dexys Midnight Runners - Come on Eileen Cindy Lauper - Time After Time Duran Duran - Hungry Like the Wolf Tears For Fears - Everyone Wants To Rule The World Huey Lewis and The News - Hip To Be A Square Joe Jackson - Steppin' Out Huey Lewis and The News - The Heart Of Rock And Roll

Google Workspace Recap
E043: Mark Chat Messages as Unread, Contacts gets more info, New Focus Time Event Type in Calendar, Visual Updates to To, Cc, and Bcc fields in Gmail, New Chrome OS Beta Community, and more!

Google Workspace Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 46:14


Good to be back on our regular schedule at our regular setups bringing you the latest Google Workspace news. Now that Next is behind us, Google continues coming out swinging with 10 updates this week. Enjoy! Silent Releases Drive for desktop support for Apple silicon (M1) devices now generally available Published Releases View more information about your colleagues and stakeholders in Google Contacts Control session length for Google Cloud Console and gcloud CLI now generally available Mark Google Chat messages as unread Integrate Google Chat with a 3rd-party archiving solution Easily add to Google Docs with the new universal @ menu Reminder: Editing in classic Google Sites will no longer be available starting December 1, 2021 and classic Sites will no longer be viewable beginning January 1, 2022 Add a page break before paragraphs in Google Docs Set aside time for focus in Google Calendar Visual updates and improvements for the To, Cc, and Bcc fields in Gmail Google Meet meeting hosts now have more control of participant's audio and video feeds for smoother, more productive meetings Other Topics Introducing the new Chrome OS Beta Community! Apple Says High Power Mode on 16-Inch MacBook Pro With M1 Max Designed for Tasks Like Color Grading 8K ProRes Video. Workspace Recap is the only show dedicated to and discussing all of the changes happening in Google Workspace on a weekly basis, as well as how all these changes affect our users and our businesses. Google Workspace is innovating at a breakneck pace, making it difficult to keep up and keep track. Join us each week as we discuss What's New in Google Workspace, Upcoming Google Workspace releases, and answer your questions. Hit the subscribe button, engage with us on Twitter at @WorkspaceRecap and on our website at workspacerecap.com

Greeny
Hour 2: 12 Men

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 40:46


We check the Google Doc for Nuno's Notes and takes your calls looking for the best "hot takes" of the weekend. We listen to the best sound from yesterday in "I'm Sorry, What?" and talk with FOX Sports NFL Analyst Howie Long.

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast
Episode 82 - Mercenary Madness w/ Ggahsoo

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 132:28


Welcome to Episode 82 of BORN TO BE WILD, a Wild exclusive Hearthstone podcast where we have fun hanging out with friends, talking about the Wild format of Hearthstone and spotlighting members of the Wild Community! This week Nate, Hydra & Sheep hang out with Legendary Hearthstone player, internet troll and Mercs expert Ggahsoo! Since we've all been playing nothing but Mercs, we're dedicating this episode to the new game mode! Check out our complete show notes on Google Docs, which include links to articles and deck codes for you to copy/paste! Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1oOtfpPzoAWg11kVOn55k1Hjxj0ubzFpJCa2eeqqb230/edit?usp=sharing Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 2:30 - Guest Interview: Ggahsoo 22:20 - How Was Your Week? 51:10 - BTBW Listener Series 57:40 - Mercenaries Discussion 2:00:30 - Weekly Listener Challenge 2:05:20 - Wrap-Up & Shout-Outs Find us online at https://www.borntobewildhs.com/

MobileViews.com Podcast
MobileViews Podcast 380: iPod 20th anniversary; iPhone 13 Pro; Google Docs @-menu

MobileViews.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 28:38


Todd Ogasawara and Jon Westfall observe the Apple iPod's 20th anniversary (of its announcement), Jon's initial observations of his new iPhone 13 Pro, and the new Google Docs universal @-menu

Self Worst
Episode 104 - Khalid Rahmaan Has A Google Doc

Self Worst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 92:17


Khalid Rahmann talks about evil stepparents, grudges, financial stress, ethical non-monogamy, and cutting out toxic people KHALID: https://www.instagram.com/khalidsays/https://www.instagram.com/bigbreakstandupME:https://www.instagram.com/selfworsthttps://twitter.com/bradicalpearsonPATREON:https://www.patreon.com/selfworstMUSIC BY SHEA BARTEL:https://sheas.art/

Screaming in the Cloud
Navigating the Morass of the Internet with Chloe Condon

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:32


About ChloeChloe is a Bay Area based Cloud Advocate for Microsoft. Previously, she worked at Sentry.io where she created the award winning Sentry Scouts program (a camp themed meet-up ft. patches, s'mores, giant squirrel costumes, and hot chocolate), and was featured in the Grace Hopper Conference 2018 gallery featuring 15 influential women in STEM by AnitaB.org. Her projects and work with Azure have ranged from fake boyfriend alerts to Mario Kart 'astrology', and have been featured in VICE, The New York Times, as well as SmashMouth's Twitter account. Chloe holds a BA in Drama from San Francisco State University and is a graduate of Hackbright Academy. She prides herself on being a non-traditional background engineer, and is likely one of the only engineers who has played an ogre, crayon, and the back-end of a cow on a professional stage. She hopes to bring more artists into tech, and more engineers into the arts.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChloeCondon Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gitforked/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ChloeCondonVideos TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Somehow in the years this show has been running, I've only had Chloe Condon on once. In that time, she's over for dinner at my house way more frequently than that, but somehow the stars never align to get us together in front of microphones and have a conversation. First, welcome back to the show, Chloe. You're a senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team. It is great to have you here.Chloe: I'm back, baby. I'm so excited. This is one of my favorite shows to listen to, and it feels great to be a repeat guest, a friend of the pod. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yes indeed. So, something-something cloud, something-something Microsoft, something-something Azure, I don't particularly care, in light of what it is you have going on that you have just clued me in on, and we're going to talk about that to start. You're launching something new called Master Creep Theatre and I have a whole bunch of questions. First and foremost, is it theater or theatre? How is that spelled? Which—the E and the R, what direction does that go in?Chloe: Ohh, I feel like it's going to be the R-E because that makes it very fancy and almost British, you know?Corey: Oh, yes. And the Harlequin mask direction it goes in, that entire aesthetic, I love it. Please tell me what it is. I want to know the story of how it came to be, the sheer joy I get from playing games with language alone guarantee I'm going to listen to whatever this is, but please tell me more.Chloe: Oh, my goodness. Okay, so this is one of those creative projects that's been on my back burner forever where I'm like, someday when I have time, I'm going to put all my time [laugh] and energy into this. So, this originally stemmed from—if you don't follow me on Twitter, oftentimes when I'm not tweeting about '90s nostalgia, or Clippy puns, or Microsoft silly throwback things to Windows 95, I get a lot of weird DMs. On every app, not just Twitter. On Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, oh my gosh, what else is there?Corey: And I don't want to be clear here just to make this absolutely crystal clear, “Hey, Chloe, do you want to come back on Screaming in the Cloud again?” Is not one of those weird DMs to which you're referring?Chloe: No, that is a good DM. So, people always ask me, “Why don't you just close your DMs?” Because a lot of high profile people on the internet just won't even have their DMs open.Corey: Oh, I understand that, but I'm the same boat. I would have a lot less nonsense, but at the same time, I want—at least in my case—I want people to be able to reach out to me because the only reason I am what I am is that a bunch of people who had no reason to do it did favors for me—Chloe: Yes.Corey: —and I can't ever repay it, I can only ever pay it forward and that is the cost of doing favors. If I can help someone, I will, and that's hard to do with, “My DMs are closed so hunt down my email address and send me an email,” and I'm bad at email.Chloe: Right. I'm terrible at email as well, and I'm also terrible at DMs [laugh]. So, I think a lot of folks don't understand the volume at which I get messages, which if you're a good friend of mine, if you're someone like Corey or a dear friend like Emily, I will tell you, “Hey, if you actually need to get ahold of me, text me.” And text me a couple times because I probably see it and then I have ADHD, so I won't immediately respond. I think I respond in my head but I don't.But I get anywhere from, I would say, ohh, like, 30 on a low day to 100 on a day where I have a viral tweet about getting into tech with a non-traditional background or something like that. And these DMs that I get are really lovely messages like, “Thank you for the work you do,” or, “I decided to do a cute manicure because the [laugh] manicure you posted,” too, “How do I get into tech? How do I get a job at Microsoft?” All kinds of things. It runs the gamut between, “Where's your shirt from?” Where—[laugh]—“What's your mother's maiden name?”But a lot of the messages that I get—and if you're a woman on the internet with any sort of presence, you know how there's that, like—what's it called in Twitter—the Other Messages feature that's like, “Here's the people you know. Here's the people”—the message requests. For the longest time were just, “Hey,” “Hi,” “Hey dear,” “Hi pretty,” “Hi ma'am,” “Hello,” “Love you,” just really weird stuff. And of course, everyone gets these; these are bots or scammers or whatever they may be—or just creeps, like weird—and always the bio—not always but I [laugh] would say, like, these accounts range from either obviously a bot where it's a million different numbers, an account that says, “Father, husband, lover of Jesus Christ and God.” Which is so [laugh] ironic… I'm like, “Why are you in my DMs?”Corey: A man of God, which is why I'm in your DMs being creepy.Chloe: Exactly. Or—Corey: Just like Christ might have.Chloe: And you would be shocked, Corey, at how many. The thing that I love to say is Twitter is not a dating site. Neither is LinkedIn. Neither is Instagram. I post about my boyfriend all the time, who you've met, and we adore Ty Smith, but I've never received any unsolicited images, knock on wood, but I'm always getting these very bait-y messages like, “Hey, beautiful. I want to take you out.” And you would be shocked at how many of these people are doing it from their professional business account. [laugh]. Like, works at AWS, works at Google; it's like, oh my God. [laugh].Corey: You get this under your name, right? It ties back to it. Meanwhile—again, this is one of those invisible areas of privilege that folks who look like me don't have to deal with. My DM graveyard is usually things like random bot accounts, always starting with, “Hi,” or, “Hey.” If you want to guarantee I never respond to you, that is what you say. I just delete those out of hand because I don't notice or care. It is either a bot, or a scam, or someone who can't articulate what they're actually trying to get from me—Chloe: Exactly.Corey: —and I don't have the time for it. Make your request upfront. Don't ask to ask; just ask.Chloe: I think it's important to note, also, that I get a lot of… different kinds of these messages and they try to respond to everyone. I cannot. If I responded to everybody's messages that I got, I just wouldn't have any time to do my job. But the thing that I always say to people—you know, and managers have told me in the past, my boyfriend has encouraged me to do this, is when people say things like, “Close your DMs,” or, “Just ignore them,” I want to have the same experience that everybody else has on the internet. Now, it's going to be a little different, of course, because I look and act and sound like I do, and of course, podcasts are historically a visual medium, so I'm a five-foot-two, white, bright orange-haired girl; I'm a very quirky individual.Corey: Yes, if you look up ‘quirky,' you're right there under the dictionary definition. And every time—like, when we were first hanging out and you mentioned, “Oh yeah, I used to be in theater.” And it's like, “You know, you didn't even have to tell me that, on some level.” Which is not intended to be an insult. It's just theater folks are a bit of a type, and you are more or less the archetype of what a theatre person is, at least to my frame of reference.Chloe: And not only that, but I did musicals, so you can't see the jazz hands now, but–yeah, my degree is in drama. I come from that space and I just, you know, whenever people say, “Just ignore it,” or, “Close your DMs,” I'm like, I want people to be able to reach out to me; I want to be able to message one-on-one with Corey and whoever, when—as needed, and—Corey: Why should I close my DMs?Chloe: Yeah.Corey: They're the ones who suck. Yeah.Chloe: [laugh]. But over the years, to give people a little bit of context, I've been working in tech a long time—I've been working professionally in the DevRel space for about five or six years now—but I've worked in tech a long time, I worked as a recruiter, an office admin, executive assistant, like, I did all of the other areas of tech, but it wasn't until I got a presence on Twitter—which I've only been on Twitter for I think five years; I haven't been on there that long, actively. And to give some context on that, Twitter is not a social media platform used in the theater space. We just use Instagram and Facebook, really, back in the day, I'm not on Facebook at all these days. So, when I discovered Twitter was cool—and I should also mention my boyfriend, Ty, was working at Twitter at the time and I was like, “Twitter's stupid. Who would go on this—[laugh] who uses this app?”Fast-forward to now, I'm like—Ty's like, “Can you please get off Twitter?” But yeah, I think I've just been saving these screenshots over the last five or so years from everything from my LinkedIn, from all the crazy stuff that I dealt with when people thought I was a Bitcoin influencer to people being creepy. One of the highlights that I recently found when I was going back and trying to find these for this series that I'm doing is there was a guy from Australia, DMed me something like, “Hey, beautiful,” or, “Hey, sexy,” something like that. And I called him out. And I started doing this thing where I would post it on Twitter.I would usually hide their image with a clown emoji or something to make it anonymous, or not to call them out, but in this one I didn't, and this guy was defending himself in the comments, and to me in my DM's saying, “Oh, actually, this was a social experiment and I have all the screenshots of this,” right? So, imagine if you will—so I have conversations ranging from things like that where it's like, “Actually I messaged a bunch of people about that because I'm doing a social experiment on how people respond to, ‘Hey beautiful. I'd love to take you out some time in Silicon Valley.'” just the weirdest stuff right? So, me being the professional performer that I am, was like, these are hilarious.And I kept thinking to myself, anytime I would get these messages, I was like, “Does this work?” If you just go up to someone and say, “Hey”—do people meet this way? And of course, you get people on Twitter who when you tweet something like that, they're like, “Actually, I met my boyfriend in Twitter DMs,” or like, “I met my boyfriend because he slid into my DMs on Instagram,” or whatever. But that's not me. I have a boyfriend. I'm not interested. This is not the time or the place.So, it's been one of those things on the back burner for three or four years that I've just always been saving these images to a folder, thinking, “Okay, when I have the time when I have the space, the creative energy and the bandwidth to do this,” and thankfully for everyone I do now, I'm going to do dramatic readings of these DMs with other people in tech, and show—not even just to make fun of these people, but just to show, like, how would this work? What do you expect the [laugh] outcome to be? So Corey, for example, if you were to come on, like, here's a great example. A year ago—this is 2018; we're in 2021 right now—this guy messaged me in December of 2018, and was like, “Hey,” and then was like, “I would love to be your friend.” And I was like, “Nope,” and I responded, “Nope, nope, nope, nope.” There's a thread of this on Twitter. And then randomly, three weeks ago, just sent me this video to the tune of Enrique Iglesias' “Rhythm Divine” of just images of himself. [laugh]. So like, this comedy [crosstalk 00:10:45]—Corey: Was at least wearing pants?Chloe: He is wearing pants. It's very confusing. It's a picture—a lot of group photos, so I didn't know who he was. But in my mind because, you know, I'm an engineer, I'm trying to think through the end-user experience. I'm like, “What was your plan here?”With all these people I'm like, “So, your plan is just to slide into my DMs and woo me with ‘Hey'?” [laugh]. So, I think it'll be really fun to not only just show and call out this behavior but also take submissions from other people in the industry, even beyond tech, really, because I know anytime I tweet an example of this, I get 20 different women going, “Oh, my gosh, you get these weird messages, too?” And I really want to show, like, A, to men how often this happens because like you said, I think a lot of men say, “Just ignore it.” Or, “I don't get anything like that. You must be asking for it.”And I'm like, “No. This comes to me. These people find us and me and whoever else out there gets these messages,” and I'm just really ready to have a laugh at their expense because I've been laughing for years. [laugh].Corey: Back when I was a teenager, I was working in some fast food style job, and one of my co-workers saw customer, walked over to her, and said, “You're beautiful.” And she smiled and blushed. He leaned in and kissed her.Chloe: Ugh.Corey: And I'm sitting there going what on earth? And my other co-worker leaned over and is like, “You do know that's his girlfriend, right?” And I have to feel like, on some level, that is what happened to an awful lot of these broken men out on the internet, only they didn't have a co-worker to lean over and say, “Yeah, they actually know each other.” Which is why we see all this [unintelligible 00:12:16] behavior of yelling at people on the street as they walk past, or from a passing car. Because they saw someone do a stunt like that once and thought, “If it worked for them, it could work for me. It only has to work once.”And they're trying to turn this into a one day telling the grandkids how they met their grandmother. And, “Yeah, I yelled at her from a construction site, and it was love at first ‘Hey, baby.'” That is what I feel is what's going on. I have never understood it. I look back at my dating history in my early 20s, I look back now I'm like, “Ohh, I was not a great person,” but compared to these stories, I was a goddamn prince.Chloe: Yeah.Corey: It's awful.Chloe: It's really wild. And actually, I have a very vivid memory, this was right bef—uh, not right before the pandemic, but probably in 2019. I was speaking on a lot of conferences and events, and I was at this event in San Jose, and there were not a lot of women there. And somehow this other lovely woman—I can't remember her name right now—found me afterwards, and we were talking and she said, “Oh, my God. I had—this is such a weird event, right?”And I was like, “Yeah, it is kind of a weird vibe here.” And she said, “Ugh, so the weirdest thing happened to me. This guy”—it was her first tech conference ever, first of all, so you know—or I think it was her first tech conference in the Bay Area—and she was like, “Yeah, this guy came to my booth. I've been working this booth over here for this startup that I work at, and he told me he wanted to talk business. And then I ended up meeting him, stupidly, in my hotel lobby bar, and it's a date. Like, this guy is taking me out on a date all of a sudden,” and she was like, “And it took me about two minutes to just to be like, you know what? This is inappropriate. I thought this is going to be a business meeting. I want to go.”And then she shows me her hands, Corey, and she has a wedding ring. And she goes, “I'm not married. I have bought five or six different types of rings on Wish App”—or wish.com, which if you've never purchased from Wish before, it's very, kind of, low priced jewelry and toys and stuff of that nature. And she said, “I have a different wedding ring for every occasion. I've got my beach fake wedding ring. I've got my, we-got-married-with-a-bunch-of-mason-jars-in-the-woods fake wedding ring.”And she said she started wearing these because when she did, she got less creepy guys coming up to her at these events. And I think it's important to note, also, I'm not putting it out there at all that I'm interested in men. If anything, you know, I've been [laugh] with my boyfriend for six years never putting out these signals, and time and time again, when I would travel, I was very, very careful about sharing my location because oftentimes I would be on stage giving a keynote and getting messages while I delivered a technical keynote saying, “I'd love to take you out to dinner later. How long are you in town?” Just really weird, yucky, nasty stuff that—you know, and everyone's like, “You should be flattered.”And I'm like, “No. You don't have to deal with this. It's not like a bunch of women are wolf-whistling you during your keynote and asking what your boob size is.” But that's happening to me, and that's an extra layer that a lot of folks in this industry don't talk about but is happening and it adds up. And as my boyfriend loves to remind me, he's like, “I mean, you could stop tweeting at any time,” which I'm not going to do. But the more followers you get, the more inbound you get. So—Corey: Right. And the hell of it is, it's not a great answer because it's closing off paths of opportunity. Twitter has—Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: —introduced me to clients, introduced me to friends, introduced me to certainly an awful lot of podcast guests, and it informs and shapes a lot of the opinions that I hold on these things. And this is an example of what people mean when they talk about privilege. Where, yeah, “Look at Corey”—I've heard someone say once, and, “Nothing was handed to him.” And you're right, to be clear, I did not—like, no one handed me a microphone and said, “We're going to give you a podcast, now.” I had to build this myself.But let's be clear, I had no headwinds of working against me while I did it. There's the, you still have to do things, but you don't have an entire cacophony of shit heels telling you that you're not good enough in a variety of different ways, to subtly reinforcing your only value is the way that you look. There isn't this whole, whenever you get something wrong and it's a, “Oh, well, that's okay. We all get things wrong.” It's not the, “Girls suck at computers,” trope that we see so often.There's a litany of things that are either supportive that work in my favor, or are absent working against me that is privilege that is invisible until you start looking around and seeing it, and then it becomes impossible not to. I know I've talked about this before on the show, but no one listens to everything and I just want to subtly reinforce that if you're one of those folks who will say things like, “Oh, privilege isn't real,” or, “You can have bigotry against white people, too.” I want to be clear, we are not the same. You are not on my side on any of this, and to be very direct, I don't really care what you have to say.Chloe: Yeah. And I mean, this even comes into play in office culture and dynamics as well because I am always the squeaky wheel in the room on these kind of things, but a great example that I'll give is I know several women in this industry who have had issues when they used to travel for conferences of being stalked, people showing up at their hotel rooms, just really inappropriate stuff, and for that reason, a lot of folks—including myself—wouldn't pick the conference event—like, typically they'll be like, “This is the hotel everyone's staying at.” I would very intentionally stay at a different hotel because I didn't want people knowing where I was staying. But I started to notice once a friend of mine, who had an issue with this [unintelligible 00:17:26], I really like to be private about where I'm staying, and sometimes if you're working at a startup or larger company, they'll say, “Hey, everyone put in this Excel spreadsheet or this Google Doc where everyone's staying and how to contact them, and all this stuff.” And I think it's really important to be mindful of these things.I always say to my friends—I'm not going out too much these days because it's a pandemic—and I've done Twitter threads on this before where I never post my location; you will never see me. I got rid of Swarm a couple [laugh] years ago because people started showing up where I was. I posted photos before, you know, “Hey, at the lake right now.” And people have shown up. Dinners, people have recognized me when I've been out.So, I have an espresso machine right over here that my lovely boyfriend got me for my birthday, and someone commented, “Oh, we're just going to act like we don't see someone's reflection in the”—like, people Zoom in on images. I've read stories from cosplayers online who, they look into the reflection of a woman's glasses and can figure out where they are. So, I think there's this whole level. I'm constantly on alert, especially as a woman in tech. And I have friends here in the Bay Area, who have tweeted a photo at a barbecue, and then someone was like, “Hey, I live in the neighborhood, and I recognize the tree.”First of all, don't do that. Don't ever do that. Even if you think you're a nice, unassuming guy or girl or whatever, don't ever [laugh] do that. But I very intentionally—people get really confused, my friends specifically. They're like, “Wait a second, you're in Hawaii right now? I thought you were in Hawaii three weeks ago.” And I'm like, “I was. I don't want anyone even knowing what island or continent I'm on.”And that's something that I think about a lot. When I post photo—I never post any photos from my window. I don't want people knowing what my view is. People have figured out what neighborhood I live in based on, like, “I know where that graffiti is.” I'm very strategic about all this stuff, and I think there's a lot of stuff that I want to share that I don't share because of privacy issues and concerns about my safety. And also want to say and this is in my thread on online safety as well is, don't call out people's locations if you do recognize the image because then you're doxxing them to everyone like, “Oh”—Corey: I've had a few people do that in response to pictures I've posted before on a house, like, “Oh, I can look at this and see this other thing and then intuit where you are.” And first, I don't have that sense of heightened awareness on this because I still have this perception of myself as no one cares enough to bother, and on the other side, by calling that out in public. It's like, you do not present yourself well at all. In fact, you make yourself look an awful lot like the people that we're warned about. And I just don't get that.I have some of these concerns, especially as my audience has grown, and let's be very clear here, I antagonize trillion-dollar companies for a living. So, first if someone's going to have me killed, they can find where I am. That's pretty easy. It turns out that having me whacked is not even a rounding error on most of these companies' budgets, unfortunately. But also I don't have that level of, I guess, deranged superfan. Yet.But it happens in the fullness of time, as people's audiences continue to grow. It just seems an awful lot like it happens at much lower audience scale for folks who don't look like me. I want to be clear, this is not a request for anyone listening to this, to try and become that person for me, you will get hosed, at minimum. And yes, we press charges here.Chloe: AWSfan89, sliding into your DMs right after this. Yeah, it's also just like—I mean, I don't want to necessarily call out what company this was at, but personally, I've been in situations where I've thrown an event, like a meetup, and I'm like, “Hey, everyone. I'm going to be doing ‘Intro to blah, blah, blah' at this time, at this place.” And three or four guys would show up, none of them with computers. It was a freaking workshop on how to do or deploy something, or work with an API.And when I said, “Great, so why'd you guys come to this session today?” And maybe two have iPads, one just has a notepad, they're like, “Oh, I just wanted to meet you from Twitter.” And it's like, okay, that's a little disrespectful to me because I am taking time out to do this workshop on a very technical thing that I thought people were coming here to learn. And this isn't the Q&A. This is not your meet-and-greet opportunity to meet Chloe Condon, and I don't know why you would, like, I put so much of my life online [laugh] anyway.But yeah, it's very unsettling, and it's happened to me enough. Guys have shown up to my events and given me gifts. I mean, I'm always down for a free shirt or something, but it's one of those things that I'm constantly aware of and I hate that I have to be constantly aware of, but at the end of the day, my safety is the number one priority, and I don't want to get murdered. And I've tweeted this out before, our friend Emily, who's similarly a lady on the internet, who works with my boyfriend Ty over at Uber, we have this joke that's not a joke, where we say, “Hey if I'm murdered, this is who it was.” And we'll just send each other screenshots of creepy things that people either tag us in, or give us feedback on, or people asking what size shirt we are. Just, wiki feed stuff, just really some of the yucky of the yuck out there.And I do think that unless you have a partner, or a family member, or someone close enough to you to let you know about these things—because I don't talk about these things a lot other than my close friends, and maybe calling out a weirdo here and there in public, but I don't share the really yucky stuff. I don't share the people who are asking what neighborhood I live in. I'm not sharing the people who are tagging me, like, [unintelligible 00:22:33], really tagging me in some nasty TikToks, along with some other women out there. There are some really bad actors in this community and it is to the point where Emily and I will be like, “Hey, when you inevitably have to solve my murder, here's the [laugh] five prime suspects.” And that sucks. That's [unintelligible 00:22:48] joke; that isn't a joke, right? I suspect I will either die in an elevator accident or one of my stalkers will find me. [laugh].Corey: It's easy for folks to think, oh, well, this is a Chloe problem because she's loud, she's visible, she's quirky, she's different than most folks, and she brings it all on herself, and this is provably not true. Because if you talk to, effectively, any woman in the world in-depth about this, they all have stories that look awfully similar to this. And let me forestall some of the awful responses I know I'm going to get. And, “Well, none of the women I know have had experiences like this,” let me be very clear, they absolutely have, but for one reason or another, they either don't see the need, or don't see the value, or don't feel safe talking to you about it.Chloe: Yeah, absolutely. And I feel a lot of privilege, I'm very lucky that my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber, and I have lots of friends in high places at some of these companies like Reddit that work with safety and security and stuff, but oftentimes, a lot of the stories or insights or even just anecdotes that I will give people on their products are invaluable insights to a lot of these security and safety teams. Like, who amongst us, you know, [laugh] has used a feature and been like, “Wait a second. This is really, really bad, and I don't want to tweet about this because I don't want people to know that they can abuse this feature to stalk or harass or whatever that may be,” but I think a lot about the people who don't have the platform that I have because I have 50k-something followers on Twitter, I have a pretty big online following in general, and I have the platform that I do working at Microsoft, and I can tweet and scream and be loud as I can about this. But I think about the folks who don't have my audience, the people who are constantly getting harassed and bombarded, and I get these DMs all the time from women who say, “Thank you so much for doing a thread on this,” or, “Thank you for talking about this,” because people don't believe them.They're just like, “Oh, just ignore it,” or just, “Oh, it's just one weirdo in his basement, like, in his mom's basement.” And I'm like, “Yeah, but imagine that but times 40 in a week, and think about how that would make you rethink your place and your position in tech and even outside of tech.” Let's think of the people who don't know how this technology works. If you're on Instagram at all, you may notice that literally not only every post, but every Instagram story that has the word COVID in it, has the word vaccine, has anything, and they must be using some sort of cognitive scanning type thing or scanning the images themselves because this is a feature that basically says, hey, this post mentioned COVID in some way. I think if you even use the word mask, it alerts this.And while this is a great feature because we all want accurate information coming out about the pandemic, I'm like, “Wait a minute. So, you're telling me this whole time you could have been doing this for all the weird things that I get into my DMs, and people post?” And, like, it just shows you, yes, this is a global pandemic. Yes, this is something that affects everyone. Yes, it's important we get information out about this, but we can be using these features in much [laugh] more impactful ways that protects people's safety, that protects people's ability to feel safe on a platform.And I think the biggest one for me, and I make a lot of bots; I make a lot of Twitter bots and chatbots, and I've done entire series on this about ethical bot creation, but it's so easy—and I know this firsthand—to make a Twitter account. You can have more than one number, you can do with different emails. And with Instagram, they have this really lovely new feature that if you block someone, it instantly says, “You just blocked so and so. Would you like to block any other future accounts they make?” I mean, seems simple enough, right?Like, anything related—maybe they're doing it by email, or phone number, or maybe it's by IP, but like, that's not being done on a lot of these platforms, and it should be. I think someone mentioned in one of my threads on safety recently that Peloton doesn't have a block user feature. [laugh]. They're probably like, “Well, who's going to harass someone on Peloton?” It would happen to me. If I had a Peloton, [laugh] I assure you someone would find a way to harass me on there.So, I always tell people, if you're working at a company and you're not thinking about safety and harassment tools, you probably don't have anybody LGBTQ+ women, non-binary on your team, first of all, and you need to be thinking about these things, and you need to be making them a priority because if users can interact in some way, they will stalk, harass, they will find some way to misuse it. It seems like one of those weird edge cases where it's like, “Oh, we don't need to put a test in for that feature because no one's ever going to submit, like, just 25 emojis.” But it's the same thing with safety. You're like, who would harass someone on an app about bubblegum? One of my followers were. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The biggest question that doesn't get asked that needs to be in almost every case is, “Okay. We're building a thing, and it's awesome. And I know it's hard to think like this, but pivot around. Theoretically, what could a jerk do with it?”Chloe: Yes.Corey: When you're designing it, it's all right, how do you account for people that are complete jerks?Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: Even the cloud providers, all of them, when the whole Parler thing hit, everyone's like, “Oh, Amazon is censoring people for freedom of speech.” No, they're actually not. What they're doing is enforcing their terms of service, the same terms of service that every provider that is not trash has. It is not a problem that one company decided they didn't want hate speech on their platform. It was all the companies decided that, except for some very fringe elements. And that's the sort of thing you have to figure out is, it's easy in theory to figure out, oh, anything goes; freedom of speech. Great, well, some forms of speech violate federal law.Chloe: Right.Corey: So, what do you do then? Where do you draw the line? And it's always nuanced and it's always tricky, and the worst people are the folks that love to rules-lawyer around these things. It gets worse than that where these are the same people that will then sit there and make bad faith arguments all the time. And lawyers have a saying that hard cases make bad law.When you have these very nuanced thing, and, “Well, we can't just do it off the cuff. We have to build a policy around this.” This is the problem with most corporate policies across the board. It's like, you don't need a policy that says you're not allowed to harass your colleagues with a stick. What you need to do is fire the jackwagon that made you think you might need a policy that said that.But at scale, that becomes a super-hard thing to do when every enforcement action appears to be bespoke. Because there are elements on the gray areas and the margins where reasonable people can disagree. And that is what sets the policy and that's where the precedent hits, and then you have these giant loopholes where people can basically be given free rein to be the worst humanity has to offer to some of the most vulnerable members of our society.Chloe: And I used to give this talk, I gave it at DockerCon one year and I gave it a couple other places, that was literally called “Diversity is not Equal to Stock Images of Hands.” And the reason I say this is if you Google image search ‘diversity' it's like all of those clip arts of, like, Rainbow hands, things that you would see at Kaiser Permanente where it's like, “We're all in this together,” like, the pandemic, it's all just hands on hands, hands as a Earth, hands as trees, hands as different colors. And people get really annoyed with people like me who are like, “Let's shut up about diversity. Let's just hire who's best for the role.” Here's the thing.My favorite example of this—RIP—is Fleets—remember Fleets? [laugh]—on Twitter, so if they had one gay man in the room for that marketing, engineering—anything—decision, one of them I know would have piped up and said, “Hey, did you know ‘fleets' is a commonly used term for douching enima in the gay community?” Now, I know that because I watch a lot of Ru Paul's Drag Race, and I have worked with the gay community quite a bit in my time in theater. But this is what I mean about making sure. My friend Becca who works in security at safety and things, as well as Andy Tuba over at Reddit, I have a lot of conversations with my friend Becca Rosenthal about this, and that, not to quote Hamilton, but if I must, “We need people in the room where it happens.”So, if you don't have these people in the room if you're a white man being like, “How will our products be abused?” Your guesses may be a little bit accurate but it was probably best to, at minimum, get some test case people in there from different genders, races, backgrounds, like, oh my goodness, get people in that room because what I tend to see is building safety tools, building even product features, or naming things, or designing things that could either be offensive, misused, whatever. So, when people have these arguments about like, “Diversity doesn't matter. We're hiring the best people.” I'm like, “Yeah, but your product's going to be better, and more inclusive, and represent the people who use it at the end of the day because not everybody is you.”And great examples of this include so many apps out there that exists that have one work location, one home location. How many people in the world have more than one job? That's such a privileged view for us, as people in tech, that we can afford to just have one job. Or divorced parents or whatever that may be, for home location, and thinking through these edge cases and thinking through ways that your product can support everyone, if anything, by making your staff or the people that you work with more diverse, you're going to be opening up your product to a much bigger marketable audience. So, I think people will look at me and be like, “Oh, Chloe's a social justice warrior, she's this feminist whatever,” but truly, I'm here saying, “You're missing out on money, dude.” It would behoove you to do this at the end of the day because your users aren't just a copy-paste of some dude in a Patagonia jacket with big headphones on. [laugh]. There are people beyond one demographic using your products and applications.Corey: A consistent drag against Clubhouse since its inception was that it's not an accessible app for a variety of reasons that were—Chloe: It's not an Android. [laugh].Corey: Well, even ignoring the platform stuff, which I get—technical reasons, et cetera, yadda, yadda, great—there is no captioning option. And a lot of their abuse stuff in the early days was horrific, where you would get notifications that a lot of people had this person blocked, but… that's not a helpful dynamic. “Did you talk to anyone? No, of course not. You Hacker News'ed it from first principles and thought this might be a good direction to go in.” This stuff is hard.People specialize in this stuff, and I've always been an advocate of when you're not sure what to do in an area, pay an expert for advice. All these stories about how people reach out to, “Their black friend”—and yes, it's a singular person in many cases—and their black friend gets very tired of doing all the unpaid emotional labor of all of this stuff. Suddenly, it's not that at all if you reach out to someone who is an expert in this and pay them for their expertise. I don't sit here complaining that my clients pay me to solve AWS billing problems. In fact, I actively encourage that behavior. Same model.There are businesses that specialize in this, they know the area, they know the risks, they know the ins and outs of this, and consults with these folks are not break the bank expensive compared to building the damn thing in the first place.Chloe: And here's a great example that literally drove me bananas a couple weeks ago. So, I don't know if you've participated in Twitter Spaces before, but I've done a couple of my first ones recently. Have you done one yet—Corey: Oh yes—Chloe: —Corey?Corey: —extensively. I love that. And again, that's a better answer for me than Clubhouse because I already have the Twitter audience. I don't have to build one from scratch on another platform.Chloe: So, I learned something really fascinating through my boyfriend. And remember, I mentioned earlier, my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber. He's been coding since he's been out of the womb, much more experienced than me. And I like to think a lot about, this is accessible to me but how is this accessible to a non-technical person? So, Ty finished up the Twitter Space that he did and he wanted to export the file.Now currently, as the time of this podcast is being recorded, the process to export a Twitter Spaces audio file is a nightmare. And remember, staff engineer at Uber. He had to export his entire Twitter profile, navigate through a file structure that wasn't clearly marked, find the recording out of the multiple Spaces that he had hosted—and I don't think you get these for ones that you've participated in, only ones that you've hosted—download the file, but the file was not a normal WAV file or anything; he had to download an open-source converter to play the file. And in total, it took him about an hour to just get that file for the purposes of having that recording. Now, where my mind goes to is what about some woman who runs a nonprofit in the middle of, you know, Sacramento, and she does a community Twitter Spaces about her flower shop and she wants a recording of that.What's she going to do, hire some third-party? And she wouldn't even know where to go; before I was in tech, I certainly would have just given up and been like, “Well, this is a nightmare. What do I do with this GitHub repo of information?” But these are the kinds of problems that you need to think about. And I think a lot of us and folks who listen to this show probably build APIs or developer tools, but a lot of us do work on products that muggles, non-technical people, work on.And I see these issues happen constantly. I come from this space of being an admin, being someone who wasn't quote-unquote, “A techie,” and a lot of products are just not being thought through from the perspective—like, there would be so much value gained if just one person came in and tested your product who wasn't you. So yeah, there's all of these things that I think we have a very privileged view of, as technical folks, that we don't realize are huge. Not even just barrier to entry; you should just be able to download—and maybe this is a feature that's coming down the pipeline soon, who knows, but the fact that in order for someone to get a recording of their Twitter Spaces is like a multi-hour process for a very, very senior engineer, that's the problem. I'm not really sure how we solve this.I think we just call it out when we see it and try to help different companies make change, which of course, myself and my boyfriend did. We reached out to people at Twitter, and we're like, “This is really difficult and it shouldn't be.” But I have that privilege. I know people at these companies; most people do not.Corey: And in some cases, even when you do, it doesn't move the needle as much as you might wish that it would.Chloe: If it did, I wouldn't be getting DMs anymore from creeps right? [laugh].Corey: Right. Chloe, thank you so much for coming back and talk to me about your latest project. If people want to pay attention to it and see what you're up to. Where can they go? Where can they find you? Where can they learn more? And where can they pointedly not audition to be featured on one of the episodes of Master Creep Theatre?Chloe: [laugh]. So, that's the one caveat, right? I have to kind of close submissions of my own DMs now because now people are just going to be trolling me and sending me weird stuff. You can find me on Twitter—my name—at @chloecondon, C-H-L-O-E-C-O-N-D-O-N. I am on Instagram as @getforked, G-I-T-F-O-R-K-E-D. That's a Good Placepun if you're non-technical; it is an engineering pun if you are. And yeah, I've been doing a lot of fun series with Microsoft Reactor, lots of how to get a career in tech stuff for students, building a lot of really fun AI/ML stuff on there. So, come say hi on one of my many platforms. YouTube, too. That's probably where—Master Creep Theatre is going to be, on YouTube, so definitely follow me on YouTube. And yeah.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:37:57]. Chloe, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it, as always.Chloe: Thank you. I'll be back for episode three soon, I'm sure. [laugh].Corey: Let's not make it another couple of years until then. Chloe Condon, senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team, also chlo-host of the Master Creep Theatre podcast. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment saying simply, “Hey.”Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Big Boo Cast
The Big Boo Cast, Episode 256

The Big Boo Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:00


This is episode is chock-full-o-fun: a quick recap of our live show in Nashville, plus some reflections on this past weekend's college football activity (we need not speak of the State / Alabama game). Are there Side Eyes and I See Yous? OF COURSE THERE ARE. Also, we have the first installment of our Holiday Gift Guide on this episode - gifts for teenage girls and guys - because we know that in some instances shipping is taking a little longer. AND we have Five Favorites from Melanie - always a treat! Hope y'all enjoy!  - Our Amazon Shop - Become a Patron Show Notes: - Coach O is leaving LSU - Cowboys beat the Patriots in OT - Things got heated in Knoxville Gift Ideas for Teenage Girls: - Kodak Printomatic Instant Camera - AE Offline The Hugger High-Waisted Flare Leggings  - Marleylilly Packing Cubes - can get monogrammed  - Gold initial layering necklace - Olive & June mani system - SPLURGE: Lily & Bean cosmetic straw vanity case - Aerie Kick It High-Waisted Flare Pants  - weighted blanket - Old Navy plaid shacket - Maison Margiela Replica Discovery Set - Shelby Vafanis' scripture calendar (such a great stocking stuffer) - SPLURGE: Aviator Nation striped sweatpants and/or Aviator Nation trucker hats - Grace Upon Grace by Sophie - All in All by Sophie - Fearless Faith (for tween girls) by Melanie - Everyday Holy by Melanie  Gift Ideas for Teenage Guys: - Mission Mercantile bird bags - NFL New Era 39 Thirty Flex hat - 47 Brand sports apparel - Old Navy flannel pajama pants - ENO Trail Flyer outdoor game - Hooded flannel shirt jacket - Duke Cannon Thick gift set - Duke Cannon Big A$$ Brick of Soap 3-pack - Survival Kit (great for a glove compartment) - SPLURGE: Sony Plus wireless headset (only for PlayStation) or Elite wireless headset (for several different platforms) (If you want all your links in a handy Google Doc, here's our working Gift Guide document...and we'll add next week's gifts to this same doc.) - locking magnetic clasp for layering necklaces - Parker & Hyde neoprene camo tote - The Pioneer Woman Cooks Super Easy cookbook - "Easy on Me" by Adele - the Walmart blazer that Melanie wore in the Nashville live show  Sponsors: - Prose (use this link for your free, in-depth hair consultation and 15% off hair supplements) - Thrive Causemetics (use this link for 15% off your first order) - Hello Fresh (use promo code BIGBOO14 for up to 14 free meals)

The Suite Talk
182 Go beyond hyperdocs with these Google Docs tips with Tom Mullaney

The Suite Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 48:43


The Suite Talk sponsors: Helperbird  Alice Keeler, LLC  Texthelp   Slidesmania  Mote   Kami   Streamyard You can check out my website www.thesuitetalk.com for more information about my show.    In this episode of The Suite Talk, Tom Mullaney will showcase how Google Docss updates have made it a better tool for engaging students. Learn seven tips to make multi-modal Google Docs that prevent new tabs and engage students.   Want to be a guest?  Please do so and show off your edtech expertise! Please click here or visit my website to fill out the guest form.  I will get back to you as soon as I can. Stay up to date on the latest episode on my YouTube channel, newsletter or podcast.  My show is available on Podbean, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and Google Podcast. Click on the ‘Episodes' page to read the show notes and watch past or current episodes. Teaching with Google Jamboard book! Both books are co-authored with Alice Keeler and are available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble: Teaching with Google Jamboard, available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble  Stepping up to Google Classroom, available on Amazon.    Thank you for your support

I Hate Green Beans with Lincee Ray
IHGB #238 -- Meet Bachelorette Michelle's Guys

I Hate Green Beans with Lincee Ray

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 43:25


There are so many guys vying for the heart of Michelle Young. And why wouldn't they be? She's adorable, athletic, caring, and looks great in a cocktail dress. But Some Guy in Austin and I narrow down our picks to ten total suitors who should be on your bracket. You know we have a bracket, right? With the folks over at Last Night's Game? Check the link in the show notes and play along. I am one-hundred percent confident that I am going to beat Some Guy this year. And I am not being cocky like Peter the Pizzapreneur. I just know that Some Guy forgets to fill out his bracket on Monday mornings, therefore, I win by default. But it's still a win! EPISODE NOTES: HERE is the link to our bachelor bracket with the folks over at Last Night's Game! And HERE is a link to the Google Doc with the dude's Instagram feeds. Enjoy!

Greeny
Hour 2: Submarine

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:28


What is Joe Judge talking about? Nuno weighs in on the Giants issues... and we go to the Google Doc for Nuno's Notes. We look ahead and preview tonight's MNF... and we open the phones for your hot takes.

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast
Episode 81 - Born to be Murcs w/ Eltinho

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 178:08


Welcome to Episode 81 of BORN TO BE WILD, a Wild exclusive Hearthstone podcast where we have fun hanging out with friends, talking about the Wild format of Hearthstone and spotlighting members of the Wild Community! This week Nate, Hydra & Sheep hang out with Standard and Legendary Hearthstone player and Murloc Paladin expert, all the way from Brazil it's Eltinho! Check out our complete show notes on Google Docs, which include links to articles and deck codes for you to copy/paste! Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nOx8azAJg8ilSROweE061RfNhwlR1mmIREAGDq-SteE/edit?usp=sharing Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 3:35 - Guest Interview: Eltinho 28:45 - How Was Your Week? 1:08:30 - BTBW Listener Series 1:14:35 - Hearthstone News 1:46:00 - Meta and Deck Discussion 2:36:20 - Weekly Listener Challenge 2:43:00 - Wrap-Up & Shout-Outs Find us online at https://www.borntobewildhs.com/

Roll For Enterprise
S2E42: Life, the Universe, and Everything

Roll For Enterprise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 31:11


Our top 5 technologies we wish never were: Bitnet VDI “Modern” Web front-end stack https://twitter.com/govparsonmo/status/1448697768311132160 Web apps (Google Docs in primis) USB 3.0 spec 15 Worst Tech Predictions Of All Time Recommendations Dominic MongoDB.local London — hybrid event, in-person and online https://events.mongodb.com/dotlocallondon 50% discount code: DominicWellington50 Follow the show on Twitter @Roll4Enterprise or on our LinkedIn page. Theme music by Renato Podestà. Please send us suggestions for topics and/or guests for future episodes!

Greeny
Hour 2: Nuno's Notes

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:50


Greeny's team is bad, Nuno's team is bad & Hembo's team is bad... but Bubba is feeling good and still wearing a Cowboys jersey! ESPN Betting Analyst Joe Fortenbaugh checks in with gambling advice for the weekend. We get back to our Question of the Day... and how can we fix baseball? We check out Nuno's Notes from the Google Doc (with a BRAND NEW Open) and finish up with Bubba's Who Ya Got?

Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Greeny
Hour 2: The Moose is Loose

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:11


Could Ben Simmons be returning to Philly? We check the Google Doc and Nuno's Notes. Greeny is becoming a fan of Dan Campbell. 3-time Super Bowl Champion Daryl Johnston joins Greeny to talk Cowboys and the rest of the Week 5 action.

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast
Episode 80 - Lore of the Old Gods Part 1 w/ Goliath the Dwarf

Born to be Wild - A Wild Exclusive Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 161:34


Welcome to Episode 80 of BORN TO BE WILD, a Wild exclusive Hearthstone podcast where we have fun hanging out with friends, talking about the Wild format of Hearthstone and spotlighting members of the Wild Community! This week Nate, Hydra & Sheep hang out with Loremaster Goliath the Dwarf to discuss the lore of the Old Gods part 1, featuring Y'Shaarj! Check out our complete show notes on Google Docs, which include links to articles and deck codes for you to copy/paste! Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/11y-IZcvG3GABa_Tn_cebnjfmjDG8bA0zOrMSe0XRx3M/edit?usp=sharing Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 4:00 - How Was Your Week? 41:20 - BTBW Listener Series 45:15 - Hearthstone News 1:05:10 - Special Topic - Lore of the Old Gods - Y'Shaarj 1:49:20 - Meta and Deck Discussion 2:14:00 - Weekly Listener Challenge 2:24:30 - Wrap-Up & Shout-Outs Find us online at https://www.borntobewildhs.com/

Greeny
Hour 2: The Underhill's Account

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 42:12


ESPN Betting Analyst Joe Fortenbaugh kicks off the hour with some gambling advice heading into the weekend. We review some of Nuno's Notes in the Google Doc. Hembo previews today's MLB Playoffs... and inaccurately says the World Series starts tonight. Plus, Who Ya Got? with Bubba closes it out.

Sideline Judgement
Week 6 Preview & the Sickos Game of the Century (S5,E13)

Sideline Judgement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:10


With Tyler out due to work reason (shoutout to REDACTED 4 or 5, I honestly can't keep track anymore because Tyler is getting that work), Sergio reads Tyler's picks from the Google Doc and shares his own for Week 6 of the 2021 CFB season. Make sure to sign up for the Sideline Judgement Newsletter by sending an email to sidelinejudgement@gmail.com to be put on the mailing list! Don't forget to like, comment, rate, and follow us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Twitter! We're not biased, but Go Gators!

Make Dance Fun
Recital Planning - Part 1

Make Dance Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:12


In episode 33, we are kicking off the first episode in a new series on recital planning! We are in full recital planning mode now, and we just launched the content of our recital planning course: Your Fun Big Show! Purchase by 10/8 and SAVE! If you purchase before that date, not only will you save money, but you will also be invited to a live Q&A Zoom with us on this topic! Here are the top 3 things we are doing right now to get the ball rolling for all things show planning:Announce your theme, create a logo: We love making a big deal out of announcing our theme - which if you have listened to us, you already know this! Once we know the theme, we start dropping hints on our instagram and building lots of excitement. We usually start this on a Monday and announce the theme on Instagram on a Thursday, complete with our logo and hashtag. Our theme this year is inspired by Toy Story. We create a (secret) Pinterest board and a Google Doc to store all our ideas, then we will narrow them down throughout the planning process. Check out #rhythmstory2022 to see what we have done so far!! Figure out who is in what show and concepts: This is the very first thing we do to get everything in place before the fun creative parts start happening. Our studio manager starts this process by working on the breakdown of each show and then presents it to us. We give our input and thoughts, make a few minor changes then we are ready. We take into consideration dancers with siblings or those who take multiple classes and try to accommodate where we can. It also depends on maximum audience size.Next we decide the concept that each class is going to be in our story-based show. We make sure we have all the main characters covered and also any of the “standout” scenes . This way, the flow of our show will not only make sense for our audience because they can follow the storyline, but it will keep things entertaining for all those non-dancers in the audience as the show progresses. Plan your planning: The most productive thing we do all season is our recital retreat! We rent a house, go away for a long weekend and figure out all concepts, choose all music, edit the music, choose the costumes, start our master spreadsheet with so many details, figure out dress rehearsal, tech rehearsal, figure out all our props and sets and backdrops! Our retreat is a little over a month away, but we are planning our planning now! We will start planning our decor for the weekend (because we go full out) and start ordering that! It is great because we can use lots of this decor for the studio and even for the show! We also order items for goodie bags for our staff. We hope these first few steps we've accomplished will inspire you to get going on that planning!Subscribe & ShareYou are officially invited to subscribe to our podcast, and we would love you to leave us a 5 star rating and review! We'd also love for you to share our podcast on social media! Tag us and we'll repost! Join our (FREE) Confetti CircleRequest to join our private (and FREE) Facebook GroupFollow us on Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest

Sync
66 - Almanac Gets $34M to Disrupt Microsoft Office and Google Docs

Sync

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 15:51


Documents today still often begin by copying and pasting, then editing what you don't need. Further, cloud-based doc editors are increasingly slow. The most modern options like Coda and Notion do much more than just documents and aren't focusing their innovation exclusively around documents themselves. Enter Almanac.Almanac is fresh off of receiving $34M from Tiger Global to be your next doc editor. Unlike newer cloud options, they are focused exclusively on docs. Their differentiators include claiming to have the fastest doc editor available, features like branching & merging to avoid copy/pasting docs, 3,000 community-driven templates, advanced workflows, and more. Watch the video version of this episode.Links Docs startup Almanac raises $34 million from Tiger as remote work shift hardens Almanac - A Collaborative Document Editor Episode 25 - Deep Collaboration in the Enterprise Follow newsletter @kenyarmosh /in/kenyarmosh kenyarmosh.com

Signals and Threads
Building a UI Framework with Ty Overby

Signals and Threads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:04


Ty Overby is a programmer in Jane Street's web platform group where he works on Bonsai, our OCaml library for building interactive browser-based UI. In this episode, Ty and Ron consider the functional approach to building user interfaces. They also discuss Ty's programming roots in Neopets, what development features they crave on the web, the unfairly maligned CSS, and why Excel is “arguably the greatest programming language ever developed.”You can find the transcript for this episode  on our website.Some links to topics that came up in the discussion:Jane Street's Bonsai libraryThe 3D design system OpenSCADMatt Keeter's libfive design toolsTry .NET in-browser replJane Street's Incr_dom libraryThe Elm Architecture “pattern for architecting interactive programs”React JavaScript libraryThe Houdini proposalSvelte UI toolkit

Greeny
Hour 2: That's Real

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:45


It wouldn't be an NFL Monday if we didn't get Nuno's Notes from the Google Doc. We listen back to some of the most interesting sound from Sunday... and we still can't figure out what Matt Nagy is talking about. Hembo asks Greeny some lingering questions from Get Up. Plus, we open up the phones and get your hot takes.

Two and a Half Amigos
144 Bad A** NFT's with Sentient Jay

Two and a Half Amigos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 68:09


Join Scott and Mark with their guest, Sentient Jay, as they talk about theNFT's, Block chain& Ethereum network. Sentient Jay is NFT guru and in home crypto miner.NFT:Anon-fungible token(NFT) is a unit of data stored on a digitalledger, called ablock chain, that certifies adigital assetto be unique and therefore not interchangeable.NFTs can be used to represent items such as photos, videos, audio, and other types of digital files. Access to any copy of the original file, however, is not restricted to the buyer of the NFT. While copies of these digital items are available for anyone to obtain, NFTs are tracked on block chainsto provide the owner with a proof ofownershipthat is separate fromcopyright.The NFT market value tripled in 2020, reaching more than $250 million.During the first quarter of 2021, NFT sales exceeded $2 billion.Block Chain:Block chain, sometimes referred to as Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT),makes the history of any digital asset unalterable and transparent through the use of decentralization and cryptographic hashing.A simple analogyfor understanding block chaintechnology is a Google Doc. When we create a document and share it with a group of people, the document is distributed instead of copied or transferred.This creates a decentralized distribution chain that gives everyone access to the document atthe same time. No one is locked out awaiting changes from another party, while all modifications to the doc are being recorded in real-time, making changes completely transparent.Of course, block chainis more complicated than a Google Doc, but the analogy is apt becauseitillustrates three critical ideasof the technology:Ethereum:Ethereumis adecentralized,open-sourceblock chainwithsmart contractfunctionality.Ether(ETHorΞ) is the nativecryptocurrencyof the platform. Amongst cryptocurrencies, it is second only toBitcoininmarket capitalization.Ethereum was conceived in 2013 by programmerVitalik Buterin.In 2014, development work commenced and wascrowdfunded, and the network went live on 30 July 2015.[4]The platform allows anyone to deploy permanent and immutabledecentralized applicationsonto it, with which users can interact.Decentralized finance(DeFi) applications provide a broad array of financial services without the need for typicalfinancial intermediarieslikebrokerages,exchanges, orbanks, such as allowing cryptocurrency users to borrow against their holdings or lend them out forinterest.Ethereum also allows for the creation and exchange ofNFTs, which are non-interchangeable tokens connected to digital works of art or other real-world items and sold as unique digital property. Additionally, many other cryptocurrencies operate as ERC-20 tokens on top of the Ethereum block chainand have utilized the platform forinitial coin offerings.Outline of the Episode: [01:19] Sentient Jay Introduction.[02:21] Block Chain (A Public Ledger)[03:45] Story of the Kid who done some outstanding things in Block chainworld [07:43] How Jay started acquiring cars?[09:30] NFTs & Ethereum network?[22:26] Ethereum Mining[24:01] Is there is any plan to handle extraordinary situations b/w Coins[30:53] NFT's, use cases and values[36:36] Government eyes on the miners and fear of losingdata due to malware[43:13] Hash rateGPU Efficiencywith Mining[46:05] Ethereum & AMD cards[50:15] China Strategy on Mining[54:27] How to find a Financial Freedom? [54:27] What are Jay's favoriteNFT's?[01:00:41] What you have learned about Crypto Currencies and NFT's that is Illegal to know?Catch Sentient Jay!Twitch:http://www.twitch.tv/nft69420Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/nft69420Connect with AmigosPC!Website:https://www.amigospc.netFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/TwoandahalfAmigosInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/amigospc Twitter:https://twitter.com/AmigosPCCheck out Offical AmigosPC Merch at: https://teespring.com/stores/amigospcJoin the conversation with the Amigos by becoming a member of Amigospc get direct access to our discord and other cool free stuff amigospc.supercast.tech

Hard Factor
9/29: Dog The Bounty Hunter Is Now Hunting For Brian Laundrie

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 65:41


New book from Trump's former press secretary talks about all the president quarks, including Trump's “Music Man”, Generals in charge of Afghanistan withdrawal finally turn on President Biden, Euro Soccer news, Dog The Bounty Hunter Is Now Hunting For Brian Laundrie (00:26:05) Cocaine and MDMA in the water near a music festival is endangering eels, Albino family breaks Guinness world record, Turtle delays flights at Japanese airport, man wakes up from meth binge in school concession stand covered in chicken fingers and candy (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:05:05) - Fun Fact: Poland Invented Latex Condom In 1912 (00:08:10) - Holidays: National Coffee Day & World School Milk Day (00:10:45) - This Day in History: Scotland Yard Was Founded & Chief Justice Roberts Sworn In (00:14:20) - Trending News Mentions: Rebel Wilson Shows Off On Instagram & Will Smith Admits Open Relationship (00:18:25) - #3 - Former Trump Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham Releasing Book About Trump's Temper (00:21:35) - #2 - Generals In Charge of Afghanistan Say They DID Warn President Biden To Keep Troops On Ground (00:24:25) - #1 - EURO Soccer News (00:26:05) - Dog The Bounty Hunter Is Now Hunting For Brian Laundrie TikTok International Moment (00:38:40) - UK - Glastonbury Festival is causing water surrounding the festival to have high levels of MDMA & Cocaine (00:38:38) - UK - Family of Albinos claim they have new Guinness World Record for most Albinos in a family (00:47:45) - UK - A White Deer is killed for no reason sparking outrage in the town it was sighted in (00:49:40) - Japan - Turtle delays all flights because it is slowly walking across the runway (00:56:10) - A man is released from jail, but quickly finds himself on a meth, chicken finger & candy binge at a local school concession stand These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Crowd Health - Being in the CrowdHealth community can save hundreds of dollars monthly and put thousands of dollars back in your pocket. Get your first six months for just $99 per month. That's a savings of almost 50% versus their standard pricing and a LOT LESS than one of those crappy high-deductible plans. Go to http://JoinCrowdHealth.com/99 and enter code HardFactor at sign up. Wordtune - Wordtune improves writing efficiency up to four times. Better, faster writing means better business. You can use Wordtune anywhere you're writing online, including Google Docs, Slack, Outlook Web, and Whatsapp. Your team can start writing better right away for fifty percent off, that's half price at - http://wordtune. com/HARDFACTOR Caliper CBD - Caliper CBD powder is the only clinically proven fast-acting CBD. Get 20% off your first order when you use promo code FACTOR at http://TryCaliper.com/Factor Roman - Take care of your ED without leaving your home. Complete an online visit today to connect with a US-licensed healthcare professional and take care of it. Go to http://GetRoman.com/HARDFACTOR today and if you're prescribed, get $15 off your first month of ED treatment. Make sure you're ready to have confidence and control this fall. Roman ready.

Hard Factor
9/28: Crypto Trading Hamster Outearns Warren Buffet Since Launch

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 64:29


A German Hamster named Mr Goxx has an automated crypto trading set-up based on his moves inside the hamster wheel, and the “buy or sell” tubes in his “office” (cage). He's up 20% in just 3 months and on pace to beat all the main stock players, including Warren Buffet (00:34:14). This, and much more... (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:04:25) - Fun Fact: Orcas/Killer Whales are Majestic (00:07:20) - Holidays: Register to Vote and Drink Beer Day (00:08:19) - This Day in History: California Discovered, and Black Sox Indicted (00:10:23) - Trending News Mentions: Google Shows Off, and Gaetz Beefs Up Lawyers (00:13:15) - #3 - Josh Gordon joins the Cheefs (00:15:13) - #2 - Government Shutdown Standoff This Week (and Joe's Hairy Arms) (00:19:37) - #1 - R Kelly Found Guilty on Multiple Horrific Counts in NY (00:22:15) - The tale of an Ohio Haunted House employee of Polish descent who stabbed an 11 year-old for talking shit TikTok International Moment (00:34:14) - Germany - Dr. Goxx, the Hamster, is crushing the crypto trading game with an automated hamster trading setup. He's been out-earning Warren Buffet since June (00:38:38) - Suriname - Vice President and alleged Drug Dealer Ronnie Brunswik played an professional soccer game at the age of 60 (00:42:12) - Beijing - A man kills himself, allegedly with nothing but 1 bottle of soda on a hot day (00:48:51) - A self-described “Shaman” in California has started a wildfire that destroyed over 90 homes so far, and people are talking about demonic possession… These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Crowd Health - Being in the CrowdHealth community can save hundreds of dollars monthly and put thousands of dollars back in your pocket. Get your first six months for just $99 per month. That's a savings of almost 50% versus their standard pricing and a LOT LESS than one of those crappy high-deductible plans. Go to http://JoinCrowdHealth.com/99 and enter code HardFactor at sign up. Wordtune - Wordtune improves writing efficiency up to four times. Better, faster writing means better business. You can use Wordtune anywhere you're writing online, including Google Docs, Slack, Outlook Web, and Whatsapp. Your team can start writing better right away for fifty percent off, that's half price at - http://wordtune. com/HARDFACTOR Caliper CBD - Caliper CBD powder is the only clinically proven fast-acting CBD. Get 20% off your first order when you use promo code FACTOR at http://TryCaliper.com/Factor Roman - Take care of your ED without leaving your home. Complete an online visit today to connect with a US-licensed healthcare professional and take care of it. Go to http://GetRoman.com/HARDFACTOR today and if you're prescribed, get $15 off your first month of ED treatment. Make sure you're ready to have confidence and control this fall. Roman ready. Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480 or or send us a voicememo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com & leave a 5-Star review on Apple Pods to hear it on Friday's show Follow/Subscribe @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, YouTube, Facebook, Apple Pods and Spotify to support the Show!

Hard Factor
9/27: Elon Musk & Grimes Officially Separate Their Operating Systems

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 71:42


On today's episode... Elon Musk was forced to jettison his relationship with Grimes because it was causing too much drag and not giving him enough lift. The singer is still living with their son X Æ A-Xii in Musk's Los Angeles home. That story here: (00:27:52) Other stories include Chris Cuomo being a creep, the UK admitting thousands of foreign truck drivers, and a break down of NY's handjob parlor business. Timestamps: Cup Of Coffee In The Big Time (00:06:05) - Corrections: Rocky 2 (00:10:34) - Holidays & Observances - National Eat Dinner with Your Kids Day (00:13:44) - Today in History - The US Capitol Was once in PA (00:16:25) – Honorable Mentions – German Elected a New Leader, Chuck Grassley Running Again, Fentanyl has ruined Cocaine (00:24:00) – 3 – Chris Cuomo and his Holiday Party Grab Ass (00:27:52) – 2 – Elon Musk + Grimes = No Longer Compute (00:29:55) – 1 – Sports – NFL Week 3 Was Electric (00:43:18) – NY's Hand Job Business is Booming TikTok International Moment (01:03:30) - England - Boris Johnson has Allowed For Thousands of Visas for Foreign Truck Drivers to Curb the Supply Chain Shortage (01:06:47) - India - A Gangster is Gunned Down in Court (01:09:09) - India - In Delhi Ambulance Sirens are Being Replaced by Relaxing Flute Music These stories and more, presented by our wonderful sponsors: Crowd Health - Being in the CrowdHealth community can save hundreds of dollars monthly and put thousands of dollars back in your pocket. Get your first six months for just $99 per month. That's a savings of almost 50% versus their standard pricing and a LOT LESS than one of those crappy high-deductible plans. Go to http://JoinCrowdHealth.com/99 and enter code HardFactor at sign up. Wordtune - Wordtune improves writing efficiency up to four times. Better, faster writing means better business. You can use Wordtune anywhere you're writing online, including Google Docs, Slack, Outlook Web, and Whatsapp. Your team can start writing better right away for fifty percent off, that's half price at - http://wordtune. com/HARDFACTOR Caliper CBD - Caliper CBD powder is the only clinically proven fast-acting CBD. Get 20% off your first order when you use promo code FACTOR at http://TryCaliper.com/Factor Roman - Take care of your ED without leaving your home. Complete an online visit today to connect with a US-licensed healthcare professional and take care of it. Go to http://GetRoman.com/HARDFACTOR today and if you're prescribed, get $15 off your first month of ED treatment. Make sure you're ready to have confidence and control this fall. Roman ready.