Podcasts about Napoleon

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French statesman, military leader, and Emperor of the French

  • 2,649PODCASTS
  • 5,951EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 13, 2022LATEST
Napoleon

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Best podcasts about Napoleon

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Latest podcast episodes about Napoleon

Tipsy Tolstoy: Russian Literature for the Inebriated
Ep 53 - Eugene Onegin p.1 by Pushkin

Tipsy Tolstoy: Russian Literature for the Inebriated

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 61:42


Shownotes: This week, Matt and Cameron kick off a mini-series to get the mood up with Chapters 1 through 3 of Eugene Onegin! In it, we'll be following…well, some of Eugene's story as the narrator wanders back and forth between explaining our protagonist's life and the narrator's own lost loves (both in terms of people and passions). Get ready for your soirees tonight, use all 30 brushes in your cabinet, and grab a drink for this entertaining read! Major themes: Terpsichorean foot, Russian Nobility, It's Napoleon all the way down 11:48 - “Russian God” by Piotr Vyazemsky 14:53 - Strasbourg Pie 19:49 “Wholesale Failure/Day Gaunt” by Days N Daze 35:46 - “Dressing Gown Farewell” by Piotr Vyazemsky 53:29 - “Loins” lmao 43:03 - Having trouble tracking this article down, but I'll put it here when I find it. The music used in this episode was “soviet march,” by Toasted Tomatoes. You can find more of their work on Bandcamp and Youtube. Follow us on Instagram, check out our website, if you're so inclined, check out our Patreon!

Istoria României
Ep 96 - Wild-cards

Istoria României

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:34


În acest episod îmi achit restanța de a vorbi despre domnitorii Țării Românești dintre prima și ultima domnie a lui Alexandru Ipsilanti. Apoi, trec la Moldova unde situația nu e deloc una roz, iar domnitorii au probleme grave cu menținerea autorității și sunt maziliți pe bandă rulantă. Dar tocmai în Moldova începe povestea unui wild-card, a unui domnitor rusofil pe nume Constantin Ipsilanti, care visează, pentru scurt timp, la unirea celor două principate. Să fie așa ceva posibil? Nu în timpul corsicanului care își ține mâna între nasturii de la cămașă.Support the show

Tanster
Napoleon To Hortense, June 16, 1807

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 0:43


thetanster.com

Freedom, Books, Flowers & the Moon
Free-thinking Dinners in the Age of Revolutions

Freedom, Books, Flowers & the Moon

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:08


This week, Lucy Dallas is joined by Kathryn Sutherland to tuck into the three o'clock dinners of Joseph Johnson, publisher and friend of Mary Wollstonecraft, Joseph Priestley, Henry Fuseli, Williams Blake and Wordsworth, and many more great minds of that era. And Boyd Tonkin explains that Napoleon's conqueror, the "Iron Duke" of Wellington, had a great and unexpected gift for friendship - with women.'Dinner with Joseph Johnson' by Daisy Hay'Wellington, women and friendship' at Apsley House, London, until October 30Produced by Sophia Franklin See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tanster
Napoleon To Josephine, 26 Floreal

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:48


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Tanster
Napoleon To Hortense, May 20, 1807

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 0:58


thetanster.com

Lead Sell Grow - The Human Experience
The World Needs More Servant Leaders - with Oakland McCulloch

Lead Sell Grow - The Human Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:43


One of the three pillars of the Human Experience is to lead, and today's guest is an outstanding example of what true leadership embodies. Oakland McCullooch spent 23 years in the Army and held numerous leadership positions in the Infantry and Armor branches. He assisted in disaster relief operations for Hurricane Hugo in Charleston, SC and Hurricane Andrew in South Florida. He has also held instructor positions at the US Army Ordnance School, the US Army Command and General Staff College, the Australian Command and Staff College, University of South Alabama and Stetson University. During his most recent position in the Army, he spent 3 years as the Professor of Military Science at the University of South Alabama where he led the training and commissioning of Lieutenants and tripled the size of the program.Oakland retired from the Army in September 2009 and joined the staff at the Bay Area Food Bank as the Associate Director. He left the food bank in December 2010 to become the Senior Military Science Instructor and recruiter for the Army ROTC program at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida. In October 2013, he became the Recruiting Operations Officer for the Eagle Battalion Army ROTC program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University where he has more than doubled the size of the program. In 2019, Cadet Command selected LTC McCulloch as the top recruiting officer, out of 274 others. He received thirty-one military service awards including the Bronze Star, eight Meritorious Service Medals, and the Humanitarian Service Medal.In today's episode of Lead, Sell, Grow: The Human Experience, Oakland shares his experience in the army and the many lessons he learned about true leadership along the way. While many might think that being a leader just means telling others what to do, Oakland emphasizes that leadership is about people and that being a servant leader is what it is all about. People need to know that you have their best interest in mind in order for you to be able to lead them, otherwise you will end up with people that might get work done for you, but passion and motivation are the key pieces that are lacking. Tune in to hear all about Oakland's insight on how you can be a truly effective leader that people want to follow.Key highlights:● Oakland's background in the army leading up to his retirement in 2009● Oakland's reasons for being passionate about leadership● Lessons Oakland learned from being an army officer● Leadership is leadership- it doesn't matter where you practice it● People need to know that you have their best interest in mind to be able to lead them● Leadership is all about people and all about trust, if you lose trust or respect, people won't work very hard for you● The power of showing people you care about them● It is a privilege to being able to lead people- it's not about the title and more pay● Servant leadership is key● Leaders make a difference in people's lives● What can people do to improve their leadership skills?● What do good leaders do?● You need to be good at motivating people by finding a sense of purpose in their lives, a paycheck isn't enough motivation● How to get motivated in your leadership position● Why all leaders need a “Napoleon's corporal”● Why he wrote a book and what opportunities it led to● Our country is in need of good leadershipEpisode resources: ● Get Oakland's book: Your Leadership LegacyQuote from the episode:“It's mission first, people always.”Connect with Oakland: Website: www.ltcoakmcculloch.comLinkedInInstagram @ltcoakmccullochTwitter @LtcOaklandFacebookConnect with Eric: Be sure to connect with us in our Lead Sell Grow – The Human Experience Tribe Facebook group: Pick up your copy of B2B Sales SecretsLearn more about our services: www.TheGoalGuide.comImprove your sales and stay connected – Free Gifts Here https://shor.by/TheGoalGuide

Bliss of the Abyss
85 (ft The Neumarx Brothers) The Airing of Grievances

Bliss of the Abyss

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 100:32


Welcome back to TBOTA! This week on the show Tom & Jem, aka my brothers, come in hot and stay that way as we delve into Napoleon, Alexander the Great, cults of personality, bioavailable protein, pre boiled eggs, rats, dead foxes, rules of arguments, three week stags with beef, trepanning, the Margate grotto, Mithras cult, the silent jazz generation, the kosher hotel circuit, Jem's first standup experience, Drunk judges, back alley surgeons and more! Support the show: Give us a rating & review Become a patron and help me make this show. Bonus episodes every week>> https://www.patreon.com/theblissoftheabyss Like and follow us on Facebook or Instagram Rent the award-winning One Jewish Boy My Webpage © Robert Neumark Jones

Tanster
Napoleon To Josephine, 10 Floreal

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 4:21


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Tanster
Napoleon To Hortense, January 1807

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 0:23


thetanster.com

Tanster
Napoleon To Josephine, 5 Floreal

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 2:47


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The Daily Gardener
May 6, 2022 Jean Senebier, Joseph Joubert, Sigmund Freud, Mirei Shigemori, The Layered Garden by David Culp, and Versailles

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 21:25


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events Compost Awareness Week   1742 Birth of Jean Senebier, a Swiss pastor and botanist. Where would we be without Senebier? We'd still be breathing, but we'd lack the knowledge that carbon dioxide is consumed by plants and, in turn, that plants produce oxygen as part of the process of photosynthesis. In a nutshell, Senebier's work is crucial because he had learned the function of leaves: capturing carbon for food. Before Senebier, the purpose of leaves and what they did for plants and people was unknown. It was Jean Senebier who said, Observation and experiment are two sisters who help each other.   1754 Birth of Joseph Joubert, French moralist and essayist. Remembered mainly for his Pensées ("Pon-see") or (Thoughts), which were published posthumously, he once wrote, All gardeners live in beautiful places because they make them so.   1856 Birth of Sigmund Freud (books about this person), Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Freud once offered this humorous insight: Common sense is a rare flower and does not grow in everyone's garden.   Freud offered up a few dispassionate observations regarding the natural world.  He once wrote,  Beauty has no obvious use, nor is there any clear cultural necessity for it. Yet civilization could not do without it.   And he also wrote, Flowers are restful to look at. They have neither emotions nor conflicts.   Online there are many photos of Freud and his family in the garden of their home in London. The Freuds left their home in Austria to escape the Nazis with the help of Princess Marie Bonaparte (books about this person), known as Princess George of Greece and Denmark. In 1938, there was a photo of Sigmund with his daughter Anna and Martha in the garden of Marie Bonaparte's house in Paris after arriving on the Orient Express from Vienna. Anna looks happy, Martha looks at a flower, and Sigmund has a little snooze in his garden bed. The Freud home in London was much larger and nicer, and there was a large backyard with a garden.  The property still boasts Freud's rose garden and is now the Freud Museum at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, London NW3, England. In 2008, the French botanist and biologist Francis Hallé wrote, Everyone knows that going to the garden does not solve the problems of everyday life, yet it relativizes them and makes them more bearable.  Sigmund Freud had this late regret: 'I lost my time; the only important thing in life is gardening.'   1925 On this day, at the age of 29, the great twentieth-century reformer of Japanese gardens, Mirei Shigemori (books about this person), changed his name from Kazuo ("Kah-zoh") to Mirei (“me-RAY”).  The name change was a tribute to the 19th-century French painter of pastoral landscapes and daily life, Jean Francois Millet (books about this person), who once said, It is the treating of the commonplace with the feeling of the sublime that gives to art its true power.   In 1932, Mirei founded the Kyoto Garden Society. Mirei practiced the art of tea - Chado ("Cha-doe") and the art of flower arranging - Ikebana ("ick-aye-bah-na").  Mirei once advised, People who try to do research on the garden have to very seriously study the way of tea.   Mirei wrote eighty-one books, including the Illustrated Book on the History of the Japanese Garden in 26-volumes, released in 1938. Mother Nature played an important role in shaping Mirei's life when the Muroto Typhoon destroyed much of Kyoto in 1934. Many sacred temples, shrines, and gardens were wiped out in the life-altering storm. In response, Mirei took action.  He used his own money and became one of the first designers to survey every garden in Japan - creating records for restoration if they were ever damaged or destroyed. The tour provided a valuable service to his country and was also a means for Mirei to learn garden design - with a particular focus on incorporating rocks and stone. As a garden designer, Mirei was entirely self-taught. Throughout his fifty-year career, Mirei designed over two hundred gardens, including the checkerboard North Garden/Moss Garden at Tofukuji ("Tofu-kah-gee") Temple, Kyoto (1939), the dry landscape at Zuiho-in ("zwee-ho een" (1961), and the garden at the oldest shrine in Kyoto City, the Matsuo Taisha ("maht-sue-oh Ty-sha"(1975). The shrine is dedicated to the gods of water in western Kyoto and was an important place for sake-brewing families to worship over the centuries. In 2020, the second edition of landscape architect Christian Tschumi's book, Mirei Shigemori - Rebel in the Garden, was released.  In it, Christian breaks down the profound influences and meanings behind Mirei's most iconic gardens. Christian once wrote, Shigemori's body of work is a compelling manifesto for continuous cultural renewal.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Layered Garden by David Culp This book came out in 2012, and the subtitle is Design Lessons for Year-Round Beauty from Brandywine Cottage. Well, I'm a huge David Culp fan, and I feel like I'm telling you about this book just in time for summer because this book can help you set the stage for how you want your garden to look all year long. And since the summer lays entirely before us, this book is just in time for you. If you're planning a new garden or a garden redesign, you could do a lot worse than having David Culp be your guide. Laura Springer Ogden wrote a review that's right on the cover of the book, And it says, Garden-making in its finest form is a celebration of life and love - and David and this book epitomize this. I couldn't agree more. And by the way, you'll probably recognize the photographer's name for David's book as well -  it's Rob Cardillo. Rob always does such a fantastic job photographing gardens, so this book's photos are top-notch. Now David kicks things off in this book with a quote from Francis Bacon, it's from Of Gardens (1625) - and it's one of my favorite garden quotes: There ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which severally things of beauty may be then in season.   Of course, this sets the stage for what David is trying to teach us: how to have a garden that looks good all year long. Now I thought I would share this quick little sweet story that David shares at the beginning of his book. It gives all of us some great ideas - especially if you have young gardeners in your life. David wrote One fall, when I was about nine years old, my grandmother Thorpe gave me a bag of bulbs and said, "you go out and plant them." I felt more than a little trepidation. I had never planted anything without her supervision. But she reassured me. "You can do it. You won't go wrong." Her generosity could have been ruinous to her flower border. But I got the bulbs planted with no mishaps. The next spring, when they bloomed, I almost burst with pride. When she told all her friends, "David did that."  And from that moment, I knew I was a gardener.  And after all these years, it remains the core of how I define myself.   I love that story for a couple of different reasons. Number one, it really does tee up what David is talking about here in The Layered Garden because as a gardener, if you dismiss specific categories of plants out of hand, like the flowers that you get with spring bulbs, then you'll likely miss one of the layers that can help make your garden beautiful all through the year. Now the other reason I like this story is for practical purposes. I hear all the time from new gardeners who are so anxious about planting bulbs, And now I'm going to say, "Hey, if David Culp - as a nine-year-old - can do it, you can too. And then last but not least, I hope this plants a tiny seed with all of us that if we are interacting with kids in the garden, we definitely need to introduce them to planting spring-flowering bulbs because the result in the spring is just so impressive and unique. It also instills that sense of pride that you can get when your garden work goes to plan, and you experience that first flush of color. It's so wonderful. Throughout David's book, he reinforces this concept of the layered garden, but I will give you just a little snippet of how he introduces it here. He goes into much more detail and offers many more tips - wonderful little nuggets and tiny ideas - for making this look work for you. Here's how he introduces the concept in his book. Garden layers are made up of a variety of plants- some with complimentary or contrasting colors, others with interesting shapes or textures. Layers are more than just perennials or annuals or bulbs or ground covers. They're more than just the ground layer of plants. That's the sole focus of many gardens. Beautiful combinations are certainly possible, even in the tiniest scale. Think of dwarf Solomon's Seal underplanted with moss - that makes a precious six-inch-high picture. But to get the most interest from any garden, all the layers need to be considered from the ground level to the middle level of shrubs and small trees up to the canopy trees. Growing plants on vertical surfaces, walls, fences, trellises, arbors, and other supports even climbing up trees, when we can be sure that they will do no harm, adds to the picture by bringing flowers and foliage to eye level and above.   So there you go. An introduction to what David is talking about when he says The Layered Garden. You might be intuitively doing some layering already in your garden as you look for more ways to garden - looking for different plants - or finding and curating other ideas that you can put in your garden. But I think what David adds is his mastery because he knows how to make all of this work in a very cohesive way that's pleasing to the eye. David's book talks about how to do a layered garden and design it - which is probably the key for most of us because we often don't think about that. If we layer the garden, it can just happen organically. But then, sometimes, we can end up with a little bit of a confused look. Next, David talks about maintaining the layered garden, which is very important. Now there are two other aspects of this book that I want to share with you. So the first chapter talks about the layered garden, and it walks you all through that. But The second chapter introduces you to his garden at Brandywine Cottage. This is important because you get a garden tour here, and David shows you how he's put this layered garden technique to work right on his property. By the way, this is not David's first at-bat gardening; he's designed many gardens. So, all of his work is coming together, culminating at Brandywine. And then the last chapter, I think, is one of the most important chapters of the book. Here David shares his signature plants that he advises we consider incorporating into our gardens throughout the seasons. So, this is a great list. This is a list of plants from a garden designer - a garden lover - and someone who works in gardens every day. So right there, that's an invaluable part of this book. This book is 312 pages of layered gardening, the beauty of the garden at Brandywine, and then some of David's most treasured garden design secrets and favorite plants. You can get a copy of The Layered Garden by David Culp and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $18.   Botanic Spark 1682 On this day, Louis XIV (books about this person) of France moved his court to the Palace of Versailles. Originally, Versailles was built as a country house. Nine miles from Paris, Versailles was ideally situated near neighboring forests for hunting. Today Versailles is known for its opulence - the Hall of Mirrors, stunning art, and lush gardens. The massive gardens at Versailles are the most famous in the world. The garden is home to over 1,000 statues, and in the Facebook group for the show, I shared a stunning photo of the garden sculptures at Versailles surrounded by sandbags for protection during WWII. In 2006, Ian Thompson wrote a fantastic book called, The Sun King's Garden: Louis XIV, Andre le Notre and the Creation of the Gardens of Versailles. Ian believes that Louis XIV may also have been history's most passionate gardener. Louis, the absolute monarch, was known as the “Sun King,”  specifically designed the central axis to be east-west to track the sun's path across the garden. Louis worked closely for forty years with the low-born gardener André Le Nôtre to devise the original design and geometrical layout. Temperament-wise, André and Louis could not have been more different. Louis was driven and merciless. André was funny, thoughtful, insightful, and easy-going. In 1979, Versailles, including the garden, was declared a World Heritage Site. And in 2014, Alain Baraton wrote Gardener of Versailles: My Life in the World's Grandest Garden. As the gardener-in-chief, Alain lives on the grounds at Versailles. Alain has worked in the gardens, orchards, and fields for four decades. This memoir reveals Alain's connection to the grandest garden in the world. And in case you're wondering, Alain believes fall is the best time to visit. Alain oversaw the recovery from the worst natural disaster ever to hit Versailles. On Christmas night through the 26th of December in 1999, a monster winter storm with winds of up to 105 mph struck the grounds of Versaille. Alain watched in horror as century trees let go of the earth in response. In a little over an hour, the storm felled 10,000 trees at Versailles, including two tulip trees planted by Marie-Antoinette in 1783 in Trianon and a Corsican pine planted for Napoleon in 1810. Alain said, It was like the apocalypse. In one hour, 200 years of trees were destroyed.   But, miraculously, all of the statues survived unharmed. Although, there was one account that I read of a tree falling on one of the great statues. And as it hit the ground, the branches parted as if to spare that statue. It gave me chills just reading that. It was quite the story.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Tanster
Napoleon To Hortense, 1.9.1806

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 0:27


thetanster.com

Auf den Tag genau
Jessner inszeniert Grabbe am Schauspielhaus

Auf den Tag genau

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 10:09


Der Name Christian Dietrich Grabbe ist, jenseits von Detmold, heute fast nur mehr germanistischen Spezialisten ein Begriff. Seine ambitionierten Dramen wie Herzog Theodor von Gothland oder Don Juan und Faust sind von der deutschen Bühne nahezu vollständig verschwunden. Vor einhundert Jahren sah das noch ein wenig anders aus, sein 1831 vollendetes Stück Napoleon oder Die hundert Tage war freilich auch schon damals in Weimarer Tagen ein eher selten gespieltes Werk. Mit seiner Inszenierung am Staatlichen Schauspielhaus am Gendarmenmarkt wagte Intendant und Regisseur Leopold Jessner also quasi, wie man heute sagen würde, eine Ausgrabung. Das Ergebnis würdigt im Berliner Börsen-Courier vom 6. Mai 1922 dessen Chefredakteur Emil Faktor – und für uns Frank Riede.

Muffy Drake
The World is not Perfect

Muffy Drake

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 14:11


True Story: The Mona Lisa didn't always reside in the Louvre. Before that, Napoleon hung her on a wall in his bedroom. Nightly, he would drink himself to sleep with a bottle of 1958 Chateau Lafite, while pondering the intersection of podcasts and art, music and literature.  He concluded: The Wine was Time out of Mind and it was simply best to fall asleep while reading a good book. Mona smiled...;) Written & Narrated-Xavier Combe   Soundscape Design-Jim Hall       

The First Degree
KILLING TIME: WHAT'S IN THE BAG, NAPOLEON?

The First Degree

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 40:41


This week, the girls and the goth discuss espresso martinis, unsolicited guitar playing, and the magic of dueling piano bars. Also! A short talk about the Napoleon complex. Plus! Oops, we blew up your car!

The Daily Gardener
May 5, 2022 Thomas Edward Brown, Richard Watson Dixon, Christopher Morley, Mavis Batey, The Magical World of Moss Gardening by Annie Martin, and Napoleon Bonaparte

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:52


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events   1830 Birth of Thomas Edward Brown, late-Victorian scholar, schoolmaster, poet, and theologian from the Isle of Man. Thomas was published under T.E. Brown, and here's a little excerpt from his poem called My Garden.  A GARDEN is a lovesome thing, God wot! Rose plot, Fringed pool, Fern'd grot— The veriest school Of peace; and yet the fool Contends that God is not— Not God! in gardens! when the eve is cool? Nay, but I have a sign; 'Tis very sure God walks in mine.   1833 Birth of Richard Watson Dixon, English poet, and clergyman. Richard was the son of the clergyman, Dr. James Dixon. He's most remembered for that lyrical poem that begins. The feathers of the willow Are half of them grown yellow Above the swelling stream; And ragged are the bushes, And rusty now the rushes, And wild the clouded gleam.   But today, I thought I would share an excerpt from his little-known poem called The Judgement Of The May. Come to the judgement, golden threads upon golden hair in rich array; Many a chestnut shakes its heads, Many a lupine at this day, Many a white rose in our beds Waits the judgement of the May.   1890 Birth of Christopher Morley, American journalist, novelist, essayist, and poet. Christopher also produced plays and gave college lectures. And in addition to all of that, He wrote little sayings, like The trouble with wedlock is that there's not enough wed and too much lock.   And he also wrote Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water.   And then finally, here's a Christopher Marley quote on spring. April prepares her green traffic light, and the world thinks: Go.   1921 Birth of Mavis Lilian Batey, English Codebreaker and garden historian. Mavis served as an English Codebreaker during World War II, and her unique skillset broke the German enigma code, which allowed the allied forces to stage their D-Day invasion. Mavis became a champion for forgotten, yet historically significant, English gardens. She also helped establish garden history as an academic specialty. In 1955, Mavis and her Codebreaker husband, Keith, settled on a farm in Surrey. It was this property that sparked Mavis's passion for landscape history. After moving to Oxford, Mavis and her family lived in a fantastic park designed by Capability Brown. The park was also home to a garden designed by William Mason in 1775. Mavis recalled, We lived in the agent's house right in the middle of Capability Brown Park. But it was William Mason's garden that really got me. We had to cut our way into it. It was all overgrown and garden ornaments were buried in the grass. I knew at once it wasn't just an ordinary derelict garden. Someone had tried to say something there.   Mavis Batey used her wit and determination to become a force in numerous conservation organizations and missions. In 1985, Mavis was honored with the RHS Veitch Memorial Medal for her invaluable work, preserving gardens that would otherwise have been lost to time.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Magical World of Moss Gardening by Annie Martin  This book came out in 2015, and Pacific Northwest magazine said this about Annie's book: Instead of eradicating this deer-resistant, pest-resistant, rootless, stemless, wonder of a plant, Annni Martin tells us how to encourage and cultivate it.   Well, mosses are near and dear to many gardeners' hearts, and there have been many gardeners who try to grow and cultivate moss to no avail. And that's because moss has some special requirements. Annie writes, In my own garden, I feel angst when mosses is dry out and I obsessively respond to my compelling desire to give them a rejuvenating drink.  And as they begin the saturation process, I regain my own glowing state. As I watch leaves swiftly unfold and colors, magically intensify.   In addition to being mesmerizing, there are many reasons to pursue moss gardening. There are also many environmental benefits. Moss can be a lawn substitute - depending on where you live and your garden set up. If you have a shady property, you should definitely look into mosses as an option.  Mosses are super carbon sequesters. They're great at erosion control and flood mitigation - and they have a built-in filtration system, which means that moss can help reclaim land in locations where cleanup is needed. Now, if Annie's name sounds familiar, it's because she is a moss expert. Her nickname is Mossin' Annie, and she's the proud owner of Mountain Moss Enterprises. I appreciate books like this because you have a true subject matter expert acting as your guide. Annie will help you identify dozens of Moss species, and she'll teach you how to propagate moss successfully. (This is something most gardeners want to know how to do).  Finally, Annie is a master when designing and installing moss gardens. This book is 240 pages of down-to-earth advice on mosses in the garden. Whether you're an experienced gardener or a newbie, you will feel extra confident about utilizing moss - the tremendous green ground cover - with Annie as your guide.   You can get a copy of The Magical World of Moss Gardening by Annie Martin and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $13.   Botanic Spark 1821 Death of Napoleon Bonaparte, French military and political leader who ended up ruling over much of continental Europe Last year was the 200th anniversary of his death. One account of Napoleon's final moments reported that,  [He died during a terrible thunderstorm that] shook the house to its foundations and would have alarmed everyone but for the all-absorbing tragedy of Napolean's departure.   In 1815 after his stunning defeat in the battle of Waterloo, Napoleon was forced into exile in the south Atlantic on a little island called St. Helena. A few years before his death, Napoleon became convinced that he was dying of stomach cancer. His doctor Francoise Antommarchi ("Ahn-toe-MAR-she"), the man that would take his death mask, prescribed, among other pursuits, gardening - specifically digging in the garden. And so, on the island of St. Helena, Napoleon briefly took up gardening — and he loved it. Naturally, Napoleon wanted everyone around him - except the ladies - to join him in the garden at Longwood. There, he grew every type of vegetable that thrived on the island. Napoleon installed grottoes, alleys, and paths. And he transplanted trees and improved the soil with manure. When he worked in the garden, history tells us that Napoleon wore a loose-fitting dress and a straw hat. And at one point, Napoleon actually shot Count Bertrand's goat because it was eating his plants. In 2021, the historian Ruth Scurr wrote a short but delightful biography of Napoleon told through the lens of his interest in gardening and naturalism, and it's called Napoleon: A Life Told in Gardens and Shadows. Ruth believes that gardens were important to Napoleon all through his life. But at St. Helena in particular, he was especially motivated to garden after his doctor pointed out that he could create sunken paths to avoid the watchful gaze of his guards: British soldiers. Naturally, it was mostly Napoleon's people who did most of the digging. And although Napoleon's experiment with gardening was fleeting, Longwood House still grows a variety of plants planted by the emperor himself. Now in her book, Ruth also tells a touching story about Napoleon's brief return to Malmaison after his defeat at Waterloo. Malmaison was soothing to the emperor, and it was a place full of memories of his beloved Josephine. Her gardens were filled with fragrant roses and colorful blossoms like Dahlia's long after her death. The painter Pierre Joseph Redouté was a favorite of Josephine Bonaparte and Marie Antoinette. Still, Redouté's paintings of Josephine's flowers at Malmaison are among his most beautiful works. In Ruth Scurr's garden biography of Napoleon, she wrote: The 26th of June [1815] was a very hot day. Napoleon spent it at Malmaison reminiscing about the past. He walked up and down with his hands behind his back in what had once been his personal garden, just outside the library. He also lingers among exotic trees that Josephine has always insisted on planting herself. There were honey locusts, cedars of Lebanon, apple trees, and tulip trees. He visited Josephine's grand greenhouse and remembered there how she checked her tropical flowers every day. It was indeed a grand greenhouse.    Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Tanster
Napoleon To Josephine, 18 Germinal

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 3:04


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American Conservative University
George Friedman, Peter Zeihan. Ukraine, Russia, China, Taiwan

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:48


George Friedman, Peter Zeihan. Ukraine, Russia, China, Taiwan Ukraine Draws the Limits of Power to Russia & China | George Friedman China Is Not Russia and Taiwan Is Not Ukraine | Peter Zeihan Ukraine's Geography and Economy Putin's Russia Is Dying in Ukraine, Intelligence | Peter Zeihan, George Friedman   Ukraine Draws the Limits of Power to Russia & China | George Friedman https://youtu.be/dX1N5bce--I 47,258 views Apr 29, 2022 GEONOW While politicians and analysts worry that China might take advantage of the Ukraine war to seize Taiwan, they should consider Beijing's potential windfall from the geopolitical and economic collapse of its closest international partner. Already, China has been served up a rich offering of Russia's distressed companies and trade-sanctioned oil, gas, coal, gold, industrial metals, and food commodities suddenly made illegal to most other countries on world markets. At a time of record food prices, US$100 oil, and raging global inflation, China has been gifted access to this bounty of discounted resources, courtesy of Russia's self-inflicted crisis and the unprecedented level of sanctions imposed on its economy by the West. (India, the other major beneficiary, has already picked up a cargo of Russia's Urals crude at a discount of 20 percent in defiance of Western sentiments and sanctions). The Russians are also pumping hard cash into China's slowing economy. Cut off from the global banking system, desperate Russian companies and individuals are rushing to open accounts with Chinese financial institutions. The capital flight and transfer of wealth from Russia into the world's second-largest economy are likely to be substantial and possibly sustained. Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nb3L... ✅ Subscribe: https://bit.ly/3slupxs https://beacons.ai/GEONOW #Evergrande #Ukrainewar #GeorgeFriedman #Energycrisis #China Ukraine Draws the limits of Power to Russia & China | George Friedman   China Is Not Russia and Taiwan Is Not Ukraine | Peter Zeihan https://youtu.be/DJPfucMsw-o 105,191 views May 1, 2022 GEONOW 22.8K subscribers Russia's invasion of Ukraine — the most consequential military conflict Europe has witnessed since the Second World War — has riveted the attention of the world. Observers have grappled with the meaning of the act of aggression and scrambled to ponder the wider implications of the war. Almost inevitably people look to draw analogies—both historical and contemporary ones. One popular contemporary analogy is between Russia's actions vis-à-vis Ukraine and China's approach to Taiwan. Beyond some broad-brush parallels — the most obvious parallel being that both Ukraine and Taiwan are peace-loving democracies that are the objects of belligerent irredentism on the part of more militarily powerful and threatening neighboring autocracies — there are also significant differences. Xi Jinping's China is not Vladimir Putin's Russia, and Taiwan is not Ukraine. China Is Not Russia Russia under Putin has repeatedly dispatched its armed forces for combat missions overseas to a range of countries, including Georgia, Syria and Ukraine, as well as conducted major military interventions against other states, most recently Kazakhstan (albeit at the invitation of that country's president). Moscow has also actively supported armed groups and militias in some of these same countries and others. Taiwan Is Not Ukraine The fact that Ukraine is not a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was almost certainly a decisive factor in Putin's calculus to invade Ukraine. Russia's commander in chief knew that his invading forces would likely not have to contend with the militaries of any other countries. And if there were any lingering doubts in the Kremlin about the disposition of the most powerful member of NATO, U.S. President Joe Biden stated publicly that the United States would not send military forces to help defend Ukraine. Nevertheless, the Biden administration has taken strong steps to reinforce NATO allies in Eastern Europe and provide robust military assistance to Ukraine. ✅ Subscribe: https://bit.ly/3slupxs https://beacons.ai/GEONOW #China #Ukrainewar #Taiwan #Peterzeihan #energycrisis China Is Not Russia and Taiwan Is Not Ukraine | Peter Zeihan Source: https://twitter.com/PeterZeihan Global Macro Series #12 | feat. Peter Zeihan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYZGl... Here's What Happens If China Invades Taiwan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNZ0s... 古琴Guqin】《初见》---古琴深情獨奏《东宫》主題曲 | 自得琴社 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQZ2U... https://www.usip.org/publications/202...   Ukraine's Geography and Economy https://youtu.be/P6bYve3Ufik 31,018 views Apr 28, 2022 Zeihan on Geopolitics   Putin's Russia Is Dying in Ukraine, Intelligence | Peter Zeihan George Friedman https://youtu.be/u_DLk7HCYYE 179,038 views Apr 29, 2022 GEONOW Russia and its military have lagged considerably behind the Ukrainians in several categories: logistics, communications, and especially in metabolizing and deploying new technology, such as drones. It is especially in this latter instance where Kyiv has shown a remarkable nimbleness over Moscow. But the battle is now shifting to an artillery tit-for-tat in eastern Ukraine, where Stingers and short-range drones will be less useful for the Ukrainians. It is also exactly the kind of battle that the Russians have trained for, and is why I believe my overall assessment will still hold: that the Russians will ultimately overrun the Ukrainians, especially as the conflict moves past May. Russia's lagging technological prowess has several historical analogues. One of the best known is the Battle of Crimea, a battle that Russia ultimately lost. The outcome isn't what I want to highlight here, but rather that Russia spent years and roughly half a million lives until it surrendered. In conflicts that Russia deems necessary to its survival--against Napoleon, the Brits and the French, the Germans, Hitler--the Russians will fight until they simply cannot fight any longer. Do not expect the current war in Ukraine to be any different. The fatality figures reported from Ukraine are staggering. Some 7,000 to 15,000 Russian soldiers, many of them inexperienced conscripts, are already reported dead after a month of fighting, according to NATO estimates. That's already likely higher than the more than 10,000 losses Russia suffered in Chechnya over two campaigns of fighting (1994-1996 and 1999-2000) and on par with the 15,000 losses the Soviet Union took over a decade in Afghanistan—much less the 2,500 U.S. soldiers lost fighting in Afghanistan over two decades. The body bags from Ukraine will only pile up higher as Russian forces move in to fight and capture key urban areas. 00:00:00 Peter Zeihan 00:03:30 George Friedman https://twitter.com/PeterZeihan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLjID... ✅ Subscribe: https://bit.ly/3slupxs https://beacons.ai/GEONOW #PeterZeihan #Ukrainewar #GeorgeFriedman #Energycrisis Putin's Russia Is Dying in Ukraine, Intelligence | Peter Zeihan George Friedman

Tanster
Napoleon To Hortense, 23 Frimaire

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 0:47


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Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Hortense, 16 Germinal

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 2:27


Wargames, Soldiers and Strategy
WSS63 - Do we need another set of Napoleonic rules?

Wargames, Soldiers and Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 51:19


In this episode of the Wargames, Soldiers and Strategy magazine podcast on top of the usual news round-up, Guy has a chat with Warwick Kinrade about his new rule set Soldiers of Napoleon. Links: Warwick Kinrade Strength & Honour Karwansaray Forgotten Battles Castles in the Sky Poldercon Legionary Partizan Britcon

Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Hortense, 19 Fructidor

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 0:43


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Militärhistoriepodden
Främlingslegionens lojalitet från 1830 till nutid (nymixad repris)

Militärhistoriepodden

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 42:49


Den franska främlingslegionens mest legendomspunna krigsinsats var det skoningslösa försvaret av den franska stödjepunkten i nordöstra Vietnam 1954. Slaget vid Dien Bien Puh 13 mars till 7 maj 1954 kommer alltid att förknippas med legionen och blev ett bevis för förbandets kompromisslösa lojalitet. Inte mindre än 1 500 legionärer stupade under slaget. Legionen förlorade inte mindre än 10 500 man i striderna i Vietnam.Legionen skapades som en lösning på de problem man hade i Frankrike 1830 med utländska militära förband som kunde användas av maktmissbrukande diktatorer eller monarker. I legionen samlades alla de utländska militärer som tidigare varit en del av bland annat det rojalistiska schweizergardet.I denna nymixade repris av Militärhistoriepodden samtalar historikern Martin Hårdstedt och idéhistorikern Peter Bennesved om legionens ursprung och utveckling från dess tillkomst under 1800-talet till idag.Den franska främlingslegionen har alltid haft ett speciellt rykte omkring sig. Tusentals unga män har genom legionens nästan tvåhundraåriga historia sökt sig till det legendariska militära förbandet i jakt på äventyr, bort från fattigdom och arbetslöshet eller från rättvisan och hot om fängelsestraff.Legionen fyller i dagens Frankrike en lite annan roll och tillåter till skillnad från tidigare numera soldater med franskt medborgarskap. Legionen är i dagens franska krigsmakt ett tydligt elitförband med särskilda krav. Men så har det inte alltid varit. Största delen av dem som tjänstgjort i legionen har faktiskt varit tyskar och legionen har sitt rykte till trots och sin hårda utbildning inte alltid varit att betrakta som ett elitförband.Inom legionen byggs en särskild sammanhållning. Främlingslegionens medlemmar blir del av en gemenskap som går utanför nationell lojalitet. De blir del av en ny familj. ”Legionen är vårt fosterland!” uttrycker legionärerna saken. Soldaterna förväntas kompromisslös lojalitet mot legionens hederskodex och lojalitet mot andra legionärer. Denna sammanhållning har under legionens historia varit en avgörande tillgång. Men vad innebär det egentligen?Främlingslegionen blev 1961 en del av den franska inrikespolitiken då legionen deltog i en hotande statskupp därför att man motsatte sig att Algeriet blev självständigt. Frågan är om lojaliteten då blev ett problem?Främlingslegionen har satts in under århundraden där franska intressen har varit hotade: Algeriet, Krim, Mexiko, Indokina. Från sin bas i Algeriet kunde legionen sändas ut över i stort sätt hela världen för att tjäna Frankrike.Främlingslegionen och förekomsten av legosoldater är en intressant företeelse som för tankarna till dagens privata militära organisationer som Blackwater som tillhandahåller tjänster militär karaktär. Vilken funktion har dessa organisationer? Vilken lojalitet har dessa organisationers medlemmar?Lyssna också på Napoleons uppgång och fall i det revolutionära Frankrike samt Valmy 1792 – slaget som vände historien. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Josephine, 14 Germinal

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 5:21


The Age of Napoleon Podcast
Episode 90: The New Order

The Age of Napoleon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 57:32


After his stunning victories of late 1805, Napoleon sought to impose a new international order on central Europe. This would mean an all-out diplomatic assault on one of the world's oldest and most venerable institutions: the Holy Roman Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bodice Tipplers
The Sherbrooke Bride by Catherine Coulter

Bodice Tipplers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 54:38


Douglas is a mean-ass, uh, spy? and lord of something or other.  Alex is the plainer sister of The Most Beautiful Woman in England but she's got some knockout knockers.  They throw chairs at each other and get kidnapped.  It's our sixty-ninth episode, The Sherbrooke Bride by Catherine Coulter! By the way, there's some discussion in this about whether a fancy Regency lady would pee in the woods on a long carriage ride - despite Google trying to autocomplete "how did travelling Regency women" with "use the litter box" (???) I did a little "research" and it seems she'd probably have used a bourdaloue, which is like a teacup for your tinkle, and not gotten kidnapped in the first place at all.  Here's a picture of one: The more you know!  Her maid would have had to deal with it, and of course this is one of those books that forgets about maids all the time.  Whatever.  That's not the biggest historical issue with this book and I don't know why it bothered us so much, compared to the ghost who gives GPS directions and weather reports. There's some pretty upsetting content in this book, including but not limited to the truly grotesque (but not graphic) sexual assault of a side character, a graphic (but not grotesque) miscarriage that's actually dealt with in a serious way, some "light ravishing" on the part of the main character and a major secondary character - there's a lot of crying during sex in this one.  There's also a ghost!  Napoleon! Proxy marriages that are also stealth trick marriages!  Magical boobs!  It's a lot!  Happy Episode 69 to us!

The Dissenter
#619 Philip Dwyer The Darker Angels of Our Nature: Refuting the Pinker Theory of History & Violence

The Dissenter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 58:36


------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao This show is sponsored by Enlites, Learning & Development done differently. Check the website here: http://enlites.com/ Dr. Philip Dwyer is Professor in the School of Humanities and Social Science at the University of Newcastle, Australia. He has published widely on the Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras, including a three-volume biography of Napoleon. He is the general editor of a four volume Cambridge World History of Violence, and co-editor of the Cambridge History of the Napoleonic Wars. He is the editor of The Darker Angels of Our Nature: Refuting the Pinker Theory of History & Violence. In this episode, we focus on The Darker Angels of Our Nature. We present Steven Pinker's argument about trends in violence across history. We then define “violence”, and talk about the limitations of historical sources of data. We talk about forms of violence that apparently have been on the rise recently. We discuss how to deal with death tolls in war. We talk about the historical and cultural context of violence, Norbert Elias' “civilizing process”, and the Enlightenment. Finally, we talk about factors identified by historians that play a role in violence trends, and ask if it is possible to objectively say that there has been moral progress. -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, MARK BLYTH, ROBERTO INGUANZO, MIKKEL STORMYR, ERIC NEURMANN, SAMUEL ANDREEFF, FRANCIS FORDE, TIAGO NUNES, BERNARD HUGUENEY, ALEXANDER DANNBAUER, FERGAL CUSSEN, YEVHEN BODRENKO, HAL HERZOG, NUNO MACHADO, DON ROSS, JONATHAN LEIBRANT, JOÃO LINHARES, OZLEM BULUT, NATHAN NGUYEN, STANTON T, SAMUEL CORREA, ERIK HAINES, MARK SMITH, J.W., JOÃO EIRA, TOM HUMMEL, SARDUS FRANCE, DAVID SLOAN WILSON, YACILA DEZA-ARAUJO, IDAN SOLON, ROMAIN ROCH, DMITRY GRIGORYEV, TOM ROTH, DIEGO LONDOÑO CORREA, YANICK PUNTER, ADANER USMANI, CHARLOTTE BLEASE, NICOLE BARBARO, ADAM HUNT, PAWEL OSTASZEWSKI, AL ORTIZ, NELLEKE BAK, KATHRINE AND PATRICK TOBIN, GUY MADISON, GARY G HELLMANN, SAIMA AFZAL, ADRIAN JAEGGI, NICK GOLDEN, PAULO TOLENTINO, JOÃO BARBOSA, JULIAN PRICE, EDWARD HALL, HEDIN BRØNNER, DOUGLAS P. FRY, FRANCA BORTOLOTTI, GABRIEL PONS CORTÈS, URSULA LITZCKE, DENISE COOK, SCOTT, ZACHARY FISH, TIM DUFFY, AND TRADERINNYC! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY PRODUCERS, YZAR WEHBE, JIM FRANK, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK, IAN GILLIGAN, LUIS CAYETANO, TOM VANEGDOM, CURTIS DIXON, BENEDIKT MUELLER, VEGA GIDEY, THOMAS TRUMBLE, AND NUNO ELDER! AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, MICHAL RUSIECKI, ROSEY, JAMES PRATT, MATTHEW LAVENDER, SERGIU CODREANU, AND BOGDAN KANIVETS!

Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Josephine, 10 Germinal, Year 4

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 3:45


Countries That Don't Exist Anymore
Everett Rummage: Principality of Elba

Countries That Don't Exist Anymore

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 45:30


We chat to one-time lost child and now bonafide Bonaparte expert, Everett Rummage - host of The Age of Napoleon podcast. We delve into the psychology of Bonaparte to ask if he could ever have been happy with exile on Elba, plus Everett gives us the sordid details of Bonaparte's spreadsheet love life. On CTDEA, we never shy away from the difficult questions, like what's the best name for a podcast - History on Horseback or Emperors on Surfboards? Find out! Support us on Patreon at patreon.com/ctdeapod. Contact us at ctdeapod@gmail.com or at our website: ctdeapod.com and read the history games article. Follow us @CTDEApod on Twitter and Facebook and never miss another update.

Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Hortense, 27 Thermidor

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 0:58


The Napoleonicist
Armies and Enemies of Napoleon

The Napoleonicist

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 87:41


Alexander Mikaberidze, Kenton White and Philip Ball join me to talk about their contributions to an exciting volume on the armies and enemies of Napoleon. Buy the book: Armies and Enemies of Napoleon, 1789-1815 | From Reason to Revolution 1721-1815 | Helion & Company Twitter: @zwhitehistory | @AMikaberidze | @whitey_boy | @Hindu_Stan You can support this content & get exclusive perks at: www.patreon.com/thenapoleonicist Tips also appreciated: www.ko-fi.com/napoleonicist

Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Josephine, 24 Ventose, Year 4

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:48


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Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Josephine, 24 Ventose, Year 4

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 2:45


thetanster.com

London Review Podcasts
Romantic History: Waterloo to the British Musem

London Review Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 55:17


In the final episode in our series looking at the way history was transformed in the Romantic period, Neil MacGregor joins Rosemary Hill to discuss the circulation of artefacts throughout Europe in the years after Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo, and the growth of public collections. They consider how the questions that museums grapple with today – concerning ownership, restitution and the role ordinary people should play in the stories they tell – were inherent in their creation in the 18th and 19th centuries.Buy Rosemary Hill's book, Time's Witness, from the London Review Bookshop here: https://lrb.me/hillSubscribe to the LRB and get 79% off the cover price plus a free tote bag: https://lrb.me/history See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tanster
Napoleon Letter To Hortense, 22 Prairial

Tanster

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 1:55


thetanster.com

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
PREVIEW: Epochs #51 | The Defeat of Napoleon

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 15:52


Beau and Carl continue their chat about the life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte. In this episode the French Emperor conducts a string of fighting retreats throughout 1813, including the giant ‘battle of the nations' at Leipzig. Then, despite showing his genius during the first months of 1814, his enemies eventually enter Paris and Bonaparte is forced to abdicate. He is permanently exiled to the tiny island of Elba.

WTF Happened To....?!
Stanley Kubrick's Napoleon - WTF Happened to this (Unmade) Movie?!

WTF Happened To....?!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 17:11


In this episode, we take a look at one of the more intriguing, never-made projects, Stanley Kubrick's planned epic, Napoleon. Viewers may be surprised to see just how much work Kubrick had put into his planned masterpiece, with elements from the un-produced film showing up in his BARRY LYNDON. Check it out!

Classic Ghost Stories
The Sandman by E T A Hoffman

Classic Ghost Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 102:21


Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffman E T A Hoffman, as he is known, was born in 1776 in Konigsberg, East Prussia, Germany and died in Berlin, Germany of syphilis, which was extremely prevalent. He was only 46.   He was a romantic author of fantasy and Gothic horror as well as being a composer, music critic and artist. He wrote the Nutcracker and the Mouse King which was the basis of Tchaikovsky's ballet The Nutcracker and Offenbach's opera The Tales of Hoffman is based on E T A Hoffman's works. His parents separated when he was 12. He remained with his mother and aunts. He was very fond of his aunts.  He started work in 1796 for his uncle as a clerk. He visited Dresden and was impressed by the paintings in the gallery there.  He lived and worked for his uncle in Berlin from 1798. From 1800 he lived and worked away from home and took to a dissolute lifestyle. He was promoted and got a job in Warsaw in 1804. He was happy in Warsaw, but went back to Berlin which was occupied by Napoleon's armies. In 1808 he got a job in Bamburg as a theatre manager.  He was given to falling in love, once with a young music student Julia Marc and another time with a married woman 10 years old who had six children.  He also appears to had challenges with alcohol most of his adult life.  The Sandman The Sandman is Hoffman's best loved and most influential story. It was a favourite of Sigmund Freud and we might see some influence of this story on Tim Burton's films.  M. Grant Kellermeyer on his great ghost story site says that the Sandman exists to sow suffering and everything he touches. Coppelius as the Sandman wants to throw hot coals and sparks into the eyes, not the soporific sand. The story begins with a series of letters. This was a common convention and later Hoffman steps in as the author and discusses different ways he had thought of beginning the story. One can't help think that he was amusing himself with this story as he seems to be satirising certain classes of people, notably Romantics.  The Romantic Movement grew up towards the end of the 18th Century and lasted into the 19th Century, dated to end at the crowning of Queen Victoria in England in 1837. I think the first letter from Nathanael setting out his horrified fantasies about the Sandman Coppelius is to establish him as a credulous and impressionable boy given to neurotic terrors. He seems incapable of distinguishing truth from his fantasies and believes his inward passions rather than objective facts. Again, I think Hoffman is poking fun at Romanticism. There is some theme of eyes. Coppelius seems to want to steal Nathanael's eyes, and eyes and optics crop up again and again. When Coppelius and Nathanael's father are working as alchemists, they seem to be building automata.  Clara's letter establishes her (a woman) as level headed and logical and not given to fancies. They are at odds in this and I feel that Hoffman is making fun of the brooding romantics who believed that nature should lead over thinking.  Clara is endlessly forgiving and devoted to Nathanael despite him not really deserving it as he is moody and unfaithful with a robot and then tries to kill her. In the end, we hear that she has found someone more worthwhile to love and have children with. Amusingly, when Clara doesn't love his gloomy poem he calls her a lifeless automaton. The story is filled with little jokes like this. Nathanael does not believe in free will. Clara does. Nathanael believes that we are controlled by mighty powers greater than ourselves. Clara denies this and says we are fooled by our own fancies if we think this. Ironically, that is what kills Nathanael and drives him mad. Some translations use Oh! Oh! Oh! for Olympia's words, but the translation I used uses the original German Ach! Ach! Ach! If You Appreciate The Work I've Put In HereYou could buy me a coffee  https://ko-fi.com/tonywalker (https://ko-fi.com/tonywalker)...

Texas History Lessons
Daily Dose of Texas History - April 22, 1836 - The Capture of Santa Anna

Texas History Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 18:21


On April 22, 1836, the day after the Battle of San Jacinto, modern Harris County near the city of Houston, Texian soldiers captured Santa Anna. The day before, on April 21, Sam Houston's rag tag army attacked Santa Anna's larger army at about 3:30 in the afternoon. Santa Anna was asleep when the Texas soldiers launched the attack. Santa Anna awoke to a chaotic scene of the Texans savagely routing his army. There was nothing to do to change the course of the battle. He chose to escape rather than die. On the morning of April 22, Texian patrols still searched the countryside. One patrol, led by a Kentucky volunteer named James Sylvester, found Santa Anna hiding in the grass. He did not try to flee again. Stephen Harrigan wrote that Santa Anna displayed an instinctive arrogance when “he stood up from the grass and presumed to shake Sylvester's hand.” They asked if he had seen Santa Anna. He told them that Santa Anna was farther ahead and they marched him back to camp. Major John Forbes saw one of the young Texans bringing Santa Anna into camp. Santa Anna stepped forward and said the words “Sam Houston” a couple of times, motioning to where the wounded general lay beneath a tree with a shattered ankle. He pulled out a paper and Forbes looked at it and understood. The salutation read, Don Lopez de Santa Anna.  Santa Anna was then marched to the command tent where Houston lay in pain beneath a large oak tree. The Spanish officers among the prisoners attempted to keep the men quiet but soon across the camp the words, “El Presidente! El Presidente!” could be heard. Forbes remembered that Houston lifted himself up on his elbow to see the prisoner. Forbes said, and this is a quote, “the prisoner immediately addressed him, telling him who he was and surrendering himself to him, a Prisoner of War. General Houston looked at him intensely but made no reply.”  Houston sent for interpreters and people to identify Santa Anna. The exact exchange of words between Houston and Santa Anna was not recorded. Houston recalled that Santa Anna stated, “The conqueror of the Napoleon of the West is born to no common destiny, and he can afford to be generous to the vanquished.”  Houston claimed to have replied, “You should have remembered that, sir, at the Alamo.” Santa Anna claimed that having to storm the Alamo allowed the slaughter and then added that he was acting on the orders of the government. Houston responded, “You are the government yourself, sir.”  The Texan soldiers crowding around wanted Santa Anna to be executed. Houston thought it wiser to keep Santa Anna alive. Days later Santa Anna would order the other branches of the Mexican army to retreat and he eventually signed two treaties.  The Texas History Lessons Theme song, Walking Through History, was written and recorded by Derrick McClendon. Listen to his new album, Interstate Daydreamer! Available everywhere you find good music. Thank you Derrick! Twitter: @dmclendonmusic If you are enjoying Texas History Lessons, consider buying me a cup of coffee by clicking here! Help make Texas History Lessons by supporting it on Patreon. And a special thanks to everyone that already does. Website: texashistorylessons.com email: texashistorylessons@gmail.com Twitter: @TexasHistoryL Texas History Lessons Spotlight Artists Seth Jones Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society
Episode 254: The Pit and the Pendulum

The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 61:15


This week features Appointment with Fear's adaptation of a classic tale of torment and despair by Edgar Allen Poe! “The Pit and the Pendulum” tells the story of a soldier in Napoleon's army who is captured and then sentenced by the Spanish Inquisition to a horrific fate. What torture awaits him in this diabolical prison? Does he have any hope of survival or rescue? What series did Eric start exploring that eventually led him to Appointment with Fear? Listen for yourself and find out! Then vote and let us know what you think!

COMPLEXITY
David Krakauer on Emergent Political Economies and A Science of Possibility (EPE 01)

COMPLEXITY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 52:57


The world is unfair — but how much of that unfairness is inevitable, and how much is just contingency? After centuries of efforts to arrive at formal theories of history, society, and economics, most of us still believe and act on what amounts to myth. Our predecessors can't be faulted for their lack of data, but in 2022 we have superior resources we're only starting to appreciate and use. In honor of the Santa Fe Institute's new role as the hub of an international research network exploring Emergent Political Economies, we dedicate this new sub-series of Complexity Podcast to conversations on money, power, governance, and justice. Subscribe for a new stream of dialogues and trialogues between SFI's own diverse scholastic community and other acclaimed political economists, historians, and authors of speculative fiction.Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I'm your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we'll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.In this episode, we talk with SFI President David Krakauer about the goals of this research theme and what SFI brings to the table. We discuss the legacy of long-standing challenges to quantitative history and mathematical economics, how SFI thinks differently about these topics, and a brief outline of the major angles we'll explore in this sub-series over the next year-plus — including the roles of dimension, causality, algorithms, scaling, innovation, emergence, and more.Subscribe to Complexity Podcast for upcoming episodes with an acclaimed line-up of scholars including Diane Coyle, Eric Beinhocker, Ricardo Hausmann, Doyne Farmer, Steven Teles, Rajiv Sethi, Jenna Bednar, Tom Ginsburg, Niall Ferguson, Neal Stephenson, Paul Smaldino, C. Thi Nguyen, John Kay, John Geneakoplos, and many more to be announced…If you value our research and communication efforts, please subscribe to Complexity Podcast wherever you prefer to listen, rate and review us at Apple Podcasts, and consider making a donation — or finding other ways to engage with us — at santafe.edu/engage. You can find the complete show notes for every episode, with transcripts and links to cited works, at complexity.simplecast.com.Thank you for listening!Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.Follow us on social media:Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedInMentions and additional resources:Emergent Political Economies and A Science of Possibilityby David Krakauer for SFI Parallax Newsletter, Spring 2022 EditionPolicing stabilizes construction of social niches in primatesby Jessica Flack, Michelle Girvan, Frans de Waal, and David Krakauer in NatureConflicts of interest improve collective computation of adaptive social structuresby Eleanor Brush, David Krakauer, and Jessica Flack in Science AdvancesThe Star Gazer and the Flesh Eater: Elements of a Theory of Metahistoryby David C. Krakauer in History, Big History, and Metahistory at SFI PressThe Cultural Evolution of National Constitutionsby Daniel Rockmore, Chen Fang, Nick Foti, Tom Ginsburg, & David Krakauer in SSRNScaling of Hunter-Gatherer Camp Size and Human Socialityby José Lobo, Todd Whitelaw, Luís M. A. Bettencourt, Polly Wiessner, Michael E. Smith, & Scott Ortman in Current AnthropologyW. Brian Arthur on Complexity Podcast (eps. 13, 14, 68, 69)Reflections on COVID-19 with David Krakauer & Geoffrey West (Complexity Podcast)The Dawn of Everythingby David Graeber and David Wengrow at Macmillan PublishersMitch Waldrop speaks on the history of SFI (Twitter excerpts)The Hedgehog and the Foxby Isaiah BerlinWar and Peaceby Leo TolstoyOn the Application of Mathematics to Political Economyby F. Y. Edgeworth in Journal of the Royal Statistical SocietyHow Economics Became A Mathematical Scienceby E. Roy Weintraub at Duke University PressMachine Dreamsby Philip Mirowski at Cambridge University PressAll Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace (TV series)by Adam Curtis for BBCCan't Get You Out of My Head (TV series)by Adam Curtis for BBCThe Collective Computation Group at SFISeeing Like A Stateby James. C Scott at Yale BooksUncertain timesby Jessica Flack and Melanie Mitchell at AeonAt the limits of thoughtby David Krakauer at AeonPreventative Citizen-Based Medicineby David Krakauer for the SFI Transmissions: Reflections seriesThe uncertainty paradox. Can science make uncertainty optimistic?by Stuart Firestein (SFI Seminar)

Drive Fitness
Hafiz Bhuyan: Startups, History, Leadership, and Tech | #35

Drive Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 82:56


Hafiz Bhuyan is the Co-Founder of Drivense a company that creates virtual business cards. Tom knows Hafiz through the society of entrepreneurs at JMU. We discuss his startup, they started off wanting to create a platform for online textbooks before they pivoted to create virtual business cards. Now they do create physical business cards. They are scannable and once scanned will pull up the virtual business card. They have also developed an app for storing virtual business cards.We also talked a lot about history, specifically, Hafiz is interested in Julius Caesar and Napoleon. Then we focused on leadership and made comparisons between historical figures and then certain startups and tech founders. Finally, we discuss the future of technology and how that might impact our lives.SPONSORS:Drive Fitness: https://www.drivefitness.app/ to download the appThe Mod Canna https://themodcanna.com/ use code "drive"Momma Bomma: https://linktr.ee/MommaBommaEPISODE LINKS:Instagram: @hafiz.bhuyanWebsite: https://www.drivense.com/PODCAST INFO:Podcast Website: https://thedriveprogram.comApple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-drive-program/id1504030059Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7Jvfsmf48ft9KX3j1qqx3D?si=3073783906bf42b0RSS: http://feeds.buzzsprout.com/951100.rssYouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6HiQoCw7lfOmGF_waGbUjAInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedriveprogram/FOLLOW TOM: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tom_driver369/Twitter:  https://www.instagram.com/tom_driver369/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@tdriver369

The Jeff Ward Show
Napoleon is Coming for Twitter

The Jeff Ward Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 15:32


Ron DeSantis, governor of Florida and the little Napoleon of the South, is coming for Twitter. DeSantis wants to hold the Twitter board “accountable” for its response to Elon Musk's bid to take the company private. Thanks to Supreme Lending for sponsoring this podcast! https://get.johnmcclellan.com/austin-mortgage-1/ Thanks to Aura for sponsoring this episode! aura.com/jeff Thanks to Spec's Wines, Spirits and Finer Foods for sponsoring this podcast! https://specsonline.com/  Jeff Ward's experience, insight, and unique perspective on football is always in demand. The audience starves for his fearless, agenda-free, and irreverent take on the teams and storylines that matter most. Now, fans can get a steady diet of his football knowledge with regular segments titled “Six Minutes of Football." Follow The Jeff Ward Show on social media: Twitter Instagram Facebook   Jeff Ward is a highly decorated former NCAA football player with extensive ties to the University of Texas. He's been nominated as an Outstanding Young Texas Ex, and while a student at The University of Texas, he was a four-year Letterman in football, a football team captain, a member of the Athletics Director's Academic Honor Roll, a three-time all-conference football player, and a two-time All-American football player. He's among the top five all-time leading scorers at The University of Texas, and he's the NCAA record holder for game-winning field goals. He was selected in the 1988 NFL Draft to play football professionally. The podcast market is oversaturated with NCAA and NFL football content but with Jeff, you get the educated perspective of someone who's lived it.    Jeff has been appearing on both national news and local (Texas-based) news platforms to discuss sports, politics and economics for over 20 years. Jeff's time at The University of Texas provided him with knowledge of worldwide economics, marketing strategies and the economics of sports, particularly with NCAA Football. With the NCAA always finding itself involved in hot-button issues, Jeff Ward explains what's going on behind the scenes.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Uncommon Decency
59. Churchill, Brexit and Europe, with Andrew Roberts

Uncommon Decency

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 52:13


Sir Nicholas Soames, the grandson of Winston Churchill, claimed during the 2016 referendum on Brexit that "the last thing on earth Churchill would have been is an isolationist. "Oui”, I think he would have wanted to stay in the EU”. On the other hand, David Davis, the leading pro-Brexit politician, argued that this vision of Churchill as a remainer was in "defiance of history. Winston Churchill”, Davis went on, "saw a very good argument for some sort of a United States of Europe. But he never wanted us, Britain, to be a part of it. That's the key point.” As part of Uncommon Decency's biographical series on giants of European history, we felt we couldn't shy away from covering Churchill, having covered Napoleon and Henry Kissinger in episodes 22 and 55, respectively. Churchill's passionate plea for a United States of Europe has been duly acclaimed by historians, but just what place did he envision the UK taking in that post-war European order? To answer that question, we are joined by historian Andrew Roberts, who has written Churchill: Walking with Destiny (2018), a best-selling biography of the former Prime Minister. In addition, Mr. Roberts hosts the Hoover Institution's Secrets of Statecraft podcast. As always, please rate and review Uncommon Decency on Apple Podcasts, and send us your comments or questions either on Twitter at @UnDecencyPod or by e-mail at undecencypod@gmail.com. And please consider supporting the show through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/undecencypod.

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
PREVIEW: Epochs #50 | Napoleon - The Beginning of the End

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 17:24


Beau and Carl continue their chat about the life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte. In this episode they discuss the ill conceived and ill fated Russian campaign of 1812 . Napoleon gathers and leads the biggest army Europe had ever seen deep into the Russian steppe. With many adventures and battles along the way, he is eventually forced to turn around and head back; the Russian winter making every step an ordeal. Full Episode: https://www.lotuseaters.com/premium-epochs-50-or-napoleon-the-beginning-of-the-end-17-04-22

In Our Time
Charisma

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 52:38


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the idea of charismatic authority developed by Max Weber (1864-1920) to explain why people welcome some as their legitimate rulers and follow them loyally, for better or worse, while following others only dutifully or grudgingly. Weber was fascinated by those such as Napoleon (above) and Washington who achieved power not by right, as with traditional monarchs, or by law as with the bureaucratic world around him in Germany, but by revolution or insurrection. Drawing on the experience of religious figures, he contended that these leaders, often outsiders, needed to be seen as exceptional, heroic and even miraculous to command loyalty, and could stay in power for as long as the people were enthralled and the miracles they had promised kept coming. After the Second World War, Weber's idea attracted new attention as a way of understanding why some reviled leaders once had mass support and, with the arrival of television, why some politicians were more engaging and influential on screen than others. With Linda Woodhead The FD Maurice Professor and Head of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at King's College London David Bell The Lapidus Professor in the Department of History at Princeton University And Tom Wright Reader in Rhetoric at the University of Sussex Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Philosophy

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the idea of charismatic authority developed by Max Weber (1864-1920) to explain why people welcome some as their legitimate rulers and follow them loyally, for better or worse, while following others only dutifully or grudgingly. Weber was fascinated by those such as Napoleon (above) and Washington who achieved power not by right, as with traditional monarchs, or by law as with the bureaucratic world around him in Germany, but by revolution or insurrection. Drawing on the experience of religious figures, he contended that these leaders, often outsiders, needed to be seen as exceptional, heroic and even miraculous to command loyalty, and could stay in power for as long as the people were enthralled and the miracles they had promised kept coming. After the Second World War, Weber's idea attracted new attention as a way of understanding why some reviled leaders once had mass support and, with the arrival of television, why some politicians were more engaging and influential on screen than others. With Linda Woodhead The FD Maurice Professor and Head of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at King's College London David Bell The Lapidus Professor in the Department of History at Princeton University And Tom Wright Reader in Rhetoric at the University of Sussex Producer: Simon Tillotson

The Marketing Secrets Show
Napoleon Hill's Framework, That He Uses Every Time...

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 11:25


Did you notice this when you were reading any of Napoleon Hill's works? You should be modeling this for your business too. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- What's up, everybody? This is Russell Brunson, welcome back to The Marketing Secrets Podcast. In today's episode, I'm going to talk to you guys about one of the secrets that you should be learning from Napoleon Hill. Alright, so I hope you guys are awesome. Now, you've heard me talk about this not once, not twice, probably a million times. We talk about when you are starting a business, especially an information product business... But in reality, people will fight me on this. It's true for every business, even E-Commerce. Especially E-Commerce. But what you are doing is you are, in any business we are getting somebody a result. So, someone comes to me and they want to be more successful. They want to build a business, they want to lose weight, they want to whatever. You've got some result that you give somebody. And us as entrepreneurs, we make our money by having a framework that gets them that result. The framework could be step one, take these supplements. Step two, go to this course. Step three... it could be something like that. It could be just pure information. It could be pure supplements. It could be pure things to do every day. Whatever it is. But there's a framework that you've got to create to be successful, right? And the framework is basically; step one, step two, step three, step four. This is the path that we go on. This is the map. Someone comes to you, they're looking for a result, which is the destination, and you're giving them the map. And what's interesting... Side note, at Funnel Hacking Live Orlando, Alex and Leila Hormozi spoke about high ticket sales and one of the quotes he said is really interesting. He said that "You sell the destination, you don't sell the journey". Right? Getting to Hawaii is a nightmare, right? You get to go through the airports, and the planes, and all the things. And what, unfortunately, most people do when trying to sell something, is they sell the path. They're selling all the things along the way that you have to go through, but you don't. If you're selling Hawaii, you sell the palm trees, and the luaus, and the white beaches, all that kind of stuff. Right? That's what you sell. You sell the destination and not the path, but what you fulfill is the path. You buy tickets to Hawaii, you're getting airplane tickets, car tickets, hotel, all this stuff to get you to the destination. And so, the framework is the map to the result that you're selling somebody. Hopefully some of you guys had some mm-hmm (affirmative) there, that's number one. Number two now. Right now, I'm recording this again in my Napoleon Hill room so, for those that are watching the video version, you can see behind me. This is all of Napoleon Hill's work. This, right here, is the First Edition Laws of Success. It's actually three years before he published Laws of Success. And this was the first thing he wrote, maybe not first thing he wrote. One of the first things he wrote. But it's the first time he took his philosophy, his framework, his whatever you want to call it, and he wrote it all down. The Laws of Success, and there are 15. 15? 14, 15... Yeah. 15 Laws of Success. And each of these has a different step. Each step is in framework, right? So step number one is defining of purpose. Step number two is to do more than you're paid for. Step number three is The Mastermind. That's not the right word, I'm talking out of my head. But he has the framework. So he created this framework, he wrote The Laws of Success, it was these like 15 or 16 booklets. Each covering one step in the framework to have success. And what's interesting is a lot of people are like, "Oh, Napoleon's written dozens of books". Kind of, but Napoleon only has one framework. Now, I'm saying this from experience, as someone who's literally collected the first editions of everything he's got. From his magazines, to his books, to his courses, to tape sets, his audio, his records. Everything, I'm going through it all. And what's interesting is that every single book, every single course, every single everything is based off of the exact same framework, okay? So, get this. When you go through The Laws of Success, there's the framework. But when if you read Think and Grow Rich, guess what it is? Think and Grow Rich is just that framework and then over the top of that framework he wrote the book Think and Grow Rich. I'm going to walk around the library here. So if you look at other books he wrote, How to Raise Your Own Salary. How to Raise Your Own Salary, guess what it is? It's basically, he took The Laws of Success framework and he wrote a book, which is an interview with him and Andrew Carnegie, after he passed away. Weaving in Andrew Carnegie's philosophies of that framework into the book How to Raise Your Salary. He did the same thing with Outweighing the Devil. Outweighing the Devil is a conversation he has with the Devil and he's taking the framework of Laws of Success and he's laying in this conversation with the Devil on top of that framework. Think and Grow Rich, like I said, is the same thing. Over here I have this home study course called The Science of Success that him and W. Clement Stone did together. And guess what? Him and W. Clement Stone took the framework from The Laws of Success and they created a home study course, and a thing… And one of the colleges there's still... They still teach. Napoleon Hill foundation has a college curriculum at one college, and guess what they teach? They teach these frameworks. Okay, here's a book I have over here called Mental Dynamite. This is the book set that he wrote in 1945, and what's crazy is it's called Mental Dynamite: The Philosophy of American Achievement. And it is 16 booklets, and these 16 booklets literally are the same framework as Laws of Success. They're just... He wrote it again from different lenses, a different framework. A different thing. The magazine's is the same thing. In the magazine's he talks about success and then all he's doing is each month he's picking one of The Laws of Success and going deep into it. It's just him taking his one framework and using it over and over and over and over again. In fact, the guy that I bought most of this stuff from said, essentially, if you read all of Napoleon Hill's works it seems like he's just plagiarizing himself. But he's not plagiarizing himself. What he's doing is what I tell you guys all the time. If you've heard me talk about information marketing or publishing in the past, what'd I tell you. I said that people will spend more money for the exact same content. But I'm going to replace with framework. People will spend more money for the same framework, packaged in a different way. Okay? People will spend more money for the same framework, or content, packaged in a different way. And the way that I learned that, ironically enough that I'm sitting in a Napoleon Hill room. Back when I first was getting into this business somebody at an event said you have to read Think and Grow Rich. So I went and bought Think and Grow Rich for, I think it was 10 dollars at the time off Amazon for the book. And it sat on my bookshelf for months. Right? And every time I'd go back to another event people would talk about Think and Grow Rich and I'd be like, I got to read that, I got this. Finally, after not reading it for six months to a year, I went and bought the CD set on Ebay for 100 dollars. And what's interesting, for this okay? Is there any difference between the book Think and Grow Rich, and the audiobook Think and Grow Rich? No, they're literally the same thing. One's just written format and one's audio. Same thing, packaged in a different way. And I spent 10 times more. 100 dollars for the CD set, versus 10 dollars for the book. 10X. I spent more for the same thing packaged in a different way. Okay, looking at Napoleon Hill's stuff, same thing. Laws of Success, the 16 book set. He sold it for one thing. And then Think and Grow Rich is a smaller thing, same framework, packaged in a different way. But that packaging, that wrapper, that hook for it sold 30 millions copies, right? And then same thing, he wrapped it for How to Raise Your Salary, he wrapped it for... What other books do I have here of his? How to Sell Your Way Through Life. The Magic lottery to success. Succeed through persuasion. Napoleon Hill's Master Key to Riches. Book, after book, after book is literally the same framework packaged in a different way. Okay, the home study courses. Boom. The college courses, the seminars, the certification programs, all based on the exact same 17 principales. I keep saying 17, 16, 15. I can't remember it, top of my head. How many principales? But you guys get the gist, right? And then over here, I went to The Napoleon Hill Foundation the other day and they have a whole bunch of books they've republished. So I went and bought every single one of them. And those you can see, there are probably 80 or 90 books I bought. Here on the shelf over here, these are all of the reprints from The Napoleon Hill Foundation. And what's interesting is Napoleon Hill has a daily journal for everyday men. Guess what this is The Laws of Success framework into a daily journal. Think and Grow Rich: Action Guide. Guess what it is? It's The Laws of Success as an Action Guide. Oh, Napoleon Hill's Millionaire Mindset, guess what it is. It's his framework wrapped around a Millionaire Mindset. Oh, Laws of Success or How to Sell Your Way Through Life, The Gold Standard, Napoleon Hill's Positive Action Plan, Napoleon Hill's Year of Growing Rich, How to Own Your Own Mind. They're literally, book after book. 80, 90 books, they've all been written taking Napoleon Hill's framework that he created and then re-skinning it, re-wrapping it, re-figuring it out. Okay? So, hopefully this gives you guys hope. For those of you guys that are like "Ah, I can't figure this out, I'm not that creative. I can't figure these things out". You don't have to figure out a lot, you have to create one framework. One really good framework that is the map that gets somebody a result. It's your map, you can then give somebody and you can wrap that. You can make a book. You can make an audio course. You can make it a podcast. You could make it a live event. You can make a seminar. You could make it a training system. You can make a certification program. You can make it so many different ways. So that's what I wanted to share with you guys today. I've got someone, this is a top secret. I'm not going to tell you who this person is yet but, there's somebody who's going to be speaking at Funnel Hacking Live this year, who literally has one framework. And it's an amazing framework that this person developed. That's all I'm going to give you guys. And this person has taken that framework, and I think last year did 40 million dollars in their business off of one framework. Alright, that framework's got a book, it's got a membership site, it's got a certification program and that's it. But taking one framework and packaging it in different ways. So anyway, as I'm sitting in the Napoleon Hill room looking at this. 20 years ago I bought Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich for 10 dollars, and then I spent 100 dollars on this thing. I spent, if you guys want to know, multiple seven figures buying all of this stuff. Of the same framework packaged in a different way because we perceive value through different levels for how we're doing. Now for me, I'm getting value by getting the first editions, signed copies. That's where I'm getting value from the same framework and I'm spending a huge premium for them because I'm just a different type of person, right? And you're going to have different people the same way; who come into your world who want to pay a premium. They're going to spend more for the book version, the audio, for a one-on-one consultation. Like, right now, if I could pay Napoleon a million dollars to get on the phone with him for 17 weeks and go through the 17 Laws of Success with me one-on-one I would drop that in a heartbeat. I wouldn't even think twice about it. That would be something I would do instantly, even though conversely you could read all the books, and the courses, I know. But to have him specifically in my situation customize the 17 Laws of Success for myself? That would be insane. And your people would do the same for your framework, right? So anyway. I hope this helps you guys. Make sure you're following live so you can see this in action. Someone who built a 40 million dollar year business doing what Napoleon Hill did, and what I'm doing, and what you should be doing as well. SO, hope it helps. Appreciate you guys, and I will talk to you soon. Bye.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Monday, April 11th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 14:09


Hi, this is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Monday, April 11th, 2022. Today, we’ll hear about Elon Musk, in a surprising reversal, no longer joining Twitter’s advisory board. Steelers quarterback Dwayne Haskins was killed on Saturday after being struck by a truck, the Idaho supreme court blocks ‘Texas Style’ abortion bill from our friends at the Idaho Policy Center, and a congressman introduces a bill, to restart Trump’s border wall! But first, let’s take a look at this day in history. Today is Monday, April 11, the 101st day of 2022. There are 264 days left in the year. Today’s Highlights in History: In 1814, Napoleon Bonaparte abdicated as Emperor of the French and was banished to the island of Elba. (Napoleon later escaped from Elba and returned to power in March 1815, until his downfall in the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815.) In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln spoke to a crowd outside the White House, saying, “We meet this evening, not in sorrow, but in gladness of heart.” (It was the last public address Lincoln would deliver.) In 1899, the treaty ending the Spanish-American War was declared in effect. On April 11, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which included the Fair Housing Act, a week after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Man April 11th sure sounds like an important day in history! You know what else is important? Protecting your family from the dangers of the internet. Using a smartphone or computer opens the door to a host of digital temptations. In a world saturated with pornography and other harmful content, what's a Christian to do? We need to take a proactive approach, welcoming transparency in our digital media choices—and Accountable2You makes that easy. Their accountability software shares detailed activity reports from all your devices, and your kids' devices, in real time to the accountability partners that you choose. With accountability in place, your family can effectively guard against temptations online and live with purity and integrity. Learn more and try it free at Accountable2You.com/FLF Twitter says, that Elon Musk will no longer join its board: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/10/technology/elon-musk-twitter-board.html This is from the NY Times: Elon Musk, the world’s wealthiest man and the biggest shareholder of Twitter, will no longer join the social media service’s board of directors, the company said late Sunday. Twitter had announced on Tuesday that Mr. Musk, 50, would be appointed to its 11-person board in a term that expires in 2024. That followed the revelation on Monday that Mr. Musk had accumulated a 9.2 percent stake in Twitter, making him its largest shareholder. Mr. Musk had agreed not to own more than 14.9 percent of Twitter’s stock or take over the company, which is based in San Francisco. But Parag Agrawal, Twitter’s chief executive, tweeted late Sunday that the situation had changed. On Saturday morning, Mr. Musk told the company he would no longer be joining as a director, Mr. Agrawal said. No reason was given for the change. Twitter’s CEO tweeted out the following: Elon Musk has decided not to join our board. Here's what I can share about what happened. The Board and I had many discussions about Elon joining the board, and with Elon directly. We were excited to collaborate and clear about the risks. We also believed that having Elon as a fiduciary of the company where he, like all board members, has to act in the best interests of the company and all our shareholders, was the best path forward. The board offered him a seat. We announced on Tuesday that Elon would be appointed to the Board contingent on a background check and formal acceptance. Elon's appointment to the board was to become officially effective 4/9, but Elon shared that same morning that he will no longer be joining the board. I believe this is for the best. We have and will alwavs value input from our shareholders whether they are on our Board or not. Elon is our biggest shareholder and we will remain open to his input. There will be distractions ahead, but our goals and priorities remain unchanged. The decisions we make and how we execute is in our hands, no one else's. Let's tune out the noise, and stay focused on the work and what we're building. A spokesman for Twitter declined to comment beyond Mr. Agrawal’s post. Mr. Musk did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Steelers quarterback Dwayne Haskins dead after being struck by dump truck on Florida interstate https://www.foxnews.com/sports/steelers-quarterback-dwayne-haskins-killed-struck-car This is from Fox News: Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Dwayne Haskins was killed early Saturday morning in Florida after being struck by a dump truck in Broward County, authorities said. He was 24 years old. Haskins, who was set to turn 25 next month, was in South Florida training with the team when he tragically died, ESPN’s Adam Schefter reported first, citing Haskins' agent. Haskins was attempting to cross the westbound lanes of Interstate 595 on foot when he was hit by a dump truck, according to the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP). Haskins was pronounced dead at the scene, and authorities said it was "unknown" why he was walking on the interstate. A traffic homicide investigation is ongoing, FHP said. The former Ohio State standout was reportedly in Miami training with Mitch Trubisky, who was signed by the Steelers last month to a two-year deal, Sports Illustrated reported. Haskins was expected to compete for the starting job in Pittsburgh following veteran Ben Roethlisberger’s retirement. After redshirting his freshman year at Ohio State, Haskins served as backup quarterback, throwing for 565 yards, four touchdowns, and one interception. The following season he was named the starter and went on to have a tremendous season, throwing for 4,831 yards, 50 touchdowns, and eight interceptions. He was the second runner-up in the Heisman Trophy voting that year and in 2019 he was drafted 15th overall by the newly named Washington Commanders. Idaho Supreme Court Blocks 'Texas Style' Abortion Law https://townhall.com/tipsheet/madelineleesman/2022/04/09/idaho-supreme-court-blocks-texas-style-abortion-law-n2605688 On Friday, the Idaho Supreme Court blocked a law from going into effect that would outlaw abortions after fetal heartbeat detection, which occurs at roughly six weeks gestation. The law is mirrored after legislation in Texas that was upheld by the Supreme Court of the United States. According to The New York Times, the court issued an order temporarily blocking enforcement of the law until it can further review it. The law was scheduled to take effect on April 22. According to our friends at the Idaho Family Policy Center, the Idaho Attorney General cut a deal with Planned Parenthood, in which both parties agreed to let the court temporarily block the law in exchange for slowing down court proceedings. The Office of the Attorney General – which is statutorily responsible for defending the law in court – says the compromise was necessary because the process was moving too quickly for their team to mount an adequate legal defense. The law allows the father of the unborn child, the grandparents, siblings, aunts and uncles to pursue legal action against a medical provider who performs an abortion. The family members of the unborn child can sue for a minimum of $20,000 in damages within four years after the abortion. Texas’ law, S.B. 8, on the other hand, allows anyone to sue an individual who provides an illegal abortion or aids a woman seeking an illegal abortion. Those who successfully bring lawsuits under S.B. 8 can receive $10,000. When GOP Idaho Gov. Brad Little signed the bill into law, he mentioned that he had concerns regarding this portion of the legislation, noting that other states could utilize the same approach to encroach on gun ownership rights. Rebecca reported how California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) touted that he would use this approach against firearms. Late last year, President Joe Biden’s Department of Justice (DOJ) and abortion clinics in Texas challenged the state’s “heartbeat” abortion ban at the Supreme Court. The Court fast-tracked its decision and did not allow the DOJ’s lawsuit to continue and returned the abortion clinics’ lawsuit back to a federal appeals court. This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets will be available starting in the middle of March. Congressman introduces bill to restart building border wall https://justthenews.com/nation/states/center-square/nc-congressman-introduces-bill-restart-building-border-wall A North Carolina congressman has introduced a bill to require the federal government to restart rebuilding the border wall, which was halted by President Joe Biden. U.S. Rep. Ted Budd, R-NC, introduced the Build the Wall Now Act, which removes all legal impediments to building the border wall. Among other things, it unlocks an additional $2.1 billion that was appropriated in fiscal years 2018, 2019, 2020, and 2021 that weren’t spent. Congress allocated $6 billion for the wall’s construction between fiscal years 2018 and 2021, according to the General Accounting Office. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt sued the administration last fall, asking the court to require the administration to resume building the wall using funds already appropriated by Congress. Within a month of the AGs' lawsuit, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said it was using the money on environmental and cleanup projects in certain areas of Arizona, California and Texas. Funds would be used to “address life, safety, environmental, and remediation requirements for border barrier projects” in the San Diego, El Centro, Yuma, Tucson, El Paso, and Del Rio Border Patrol sectors. As the AGs’ lawsuit makes its way through court and as border communities brace for an estimated roughly 18,000 people expected to come through the southern border after Title 42 is repealed next month, Budd said, “The best way to end the Biden Border Crisis is to finish the border wall now.” Title 42 is a public health authority that allows Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents to quickly process and deport illegal immigrants under a public health emergency. It was used by the Trump administration to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The Biden administration announced it was ending it May 23. As long as Democrats hold a majority in Congress and Biden remains president, the bill isn’t expected to become law. But it’s an example of Republicans increasingly frustrated with the administration’s open border policies filing legislation in Congress as immigration lawsuits remain tied up in courts. Even while Title 42 was being used, in Biden’s first year in office, roughly two million people from over 150 countries were apprehended or encountered by CBP agents entering the U.S. illegally. This number excludes an estimated several hundred thousand who evaded law enforcement. All funding for the border wall was suspended on Biden’s first day in office. It costs taxpayers $3 million a day to not build the wall due to contractual obligations with the construction firm tasked with building it. As the federal wall remains unfinished, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott began building a border wall on Texas soil. “Texas is taking what truly is unprecedented action by any state ever,” Abbott said in December when a section of the wall was erected in Rio Grande City. Texas was building a wall “on our border to secure the sovereignty of the United States as well as our own state,” he said. “And this unprecedented action is needed for one single reason, and that’s because the Biden administration has failed to do its job as required by law as passed by Congress to enforce the immigration laws of the United States of America.” Thanks for tuning in to this CrossPolitic Daily News Brief! If you liked the show, share it! And as always, if you’re a CEO or business owner who wants to partner with CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great rest of your day, and Lord bless.