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Server-side scripting language originally created in 1994

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Latest podcast episodes about PHP

The Perez Hilton Podcast with Chris Booker

Adele ghosts her Vegas shows and we break down everything that happened. Perez addresses his past behavior towards Booker's new bff Avril Lavigne. Britney Spears is still at odds with most of her family. The passing of Meatloaf and some thoughts about his anti-vax stance. Wendy Williams is still MIA. Thanks to our sponsors: Cerebral = Recieve 65% off your first month of medication management and care counseling at Cerebral.com/Perez Geico = Whether you rent or own, GEICO makes it EASY to bundle home and car insurance. Go to GEICO.com today. Wondary = Listen to Even the Rich: Patty Hearst and Rich and Daily on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Spotify, or you can listen ad-free by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery app. Vodacast = Fully immerse the audience in your podcast. Listen to the PHP on the Vodacast App today Follow Perez!FAMILY CHANNEL: http://YouTube.com/ThePerezHiltonWEBSITE: http://PerezHilton.comPEREZ'S INSTAGRAM: http://Instagram.com/ThePerezHiltonWEBSITE'S INSTAGRAM:

North Meets South Web Podcast
New year, new job, new start

North Meets South Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 63:54


In this episode, Jake and Michael discuss Michael's new job, YAGNI, and approaches to working your way into a new codebase and a new industry.This episode is sponsored by Workvivo and Makeable.dk and was streamed live.Show links Laravel Transporter Saloon YAGNI ClickUp Allen Holub on building software better and building better software 

Laravel News Podcast
Building forms, geographical calculations, and migration actions

Laravel News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 52:04


Jake and Michael discuss all the latest Laravel releases, tutorials, and happenings in the community.This episode is sponsored by Hook Relay - gain visibility over your webhooks, guarantee delivery, watch your traffic, inspect each request; like x-ray vision - and was streamed live.Show links Laravel 8.76 released Laravel 8.77 released A look at what is coming to Laravel 9 Livewire form builder Blade component to serve images and download files Laravel geographical calculator Track the health of your application with Laravel Health Laravel migration actions Laravel auto binder: Bind interfaces to implementations automatically GetCandy e-commerce package for Laravel OpenAI SDK for PHP Primitive types in controllers and closure routes Our top 10 Laravel tutorials of 2021

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Build an Ideal Team By Marketing Your Agency's Culture

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 15:57


Are you having a hard time hiring the right talent to build your agency team? Manish Dudhareija first started his journey as an entrepreneur nine years ago when he noticed there was a huge demand for skilled developers trained in the latest technologies and there was a gap in hiring, training that fit his expertise. He created E2M Solutions, a full-service agency that offers website design & development, SEO, copywriting, and content marketing. In this interview, Manish shares how agency owners can address the common struggle of finding and hiring new talent. He also talks about how advertising your culture can help attract the right people, and the creative ways you can make your agency stand out to top talent. Advertising your culture. We've talked about how many agency owners need to do more to market themselves to potential clients. Manish adds another layer to this: marketing aimed at attracting the best people to your team. You're really missing out if you're not marketing your culture to attract the right elements. He likes to use LinkedIn to showcase his agency's values and says he is as interested in candidates' personality traits as he is in their skills. In this regard, he is looking to identify do they have the right kind of attitude? Do they have the willingness to learn? Are they curious? Are they accountable? The answers to these questions will be just as important in the process of selecting a new team member. Be creative in your search. When searching for your ideal team, Manish recommends creating ads that contain some sort of challenge, like code in the case of developers. This will help your agency stand out from the many messages just stating “we're hiring” and is a way to spark the interest of the type of dynamic and curious individuals he wants to attract. On training his team. Manish has a team of senior developers whose main task is to be constantly researching and testing new technologies. Once the agency gets a new project, the team identifies the latest technology that they could work with and try to implement it. Later, when the opportunity arises, they propose that technology to their existing clients to let them know that they are always on the lookout for new developments in their area. This is also a good way to always have someone on the team that can train the rest of the developers and are creating the processes to do so. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Getting Creative in Your Search for New Talent For Your Agency & Advertising Your Culture {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here, I have another amazing episode and we're going to talk about, because look, I've been chatting with so many agency owners over the past months, and one of the big things is hiring the right people and just finding the right talent. On today's episode, we're going to talk about some ways where you can find the best talent, should you hire seasoned pros or train them up? How do you train them up? And it really cool solution at the very end. So make sure you listen to the whole episode. So let's go ahead and jump into it. Hey, Manish. Welcome to the show. Manish: [00:00:38] Hey, Jason. Thank you. Thank you for having me. Jason: [00:00:41] Yeah. I'm excited to have you on. So tell us a little bit about your business. You know, you've been doing this for a while and you have over 110 people, but tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Manish: [00:00:52] Sure. Yeah. So I'm kind of an entrepreneur. I started this journey nine years back, uh, in 2012. So I founded E2M nine years back. And one of the reasons I founded this company is to solve a specific problem. That was kind of seeing, like, there is a huge demand of skilled and trained, you know, people, resources in terms of technology. And there was a gap, you know, I thought we can really feel where my expertise is, uh, strategy, uh, hiring, training people and, you know, injecting the traits like personality traits and how to have the force ready, where someone is looking for, like, you know, Uh, someone is not looking to hire people and they are looking for people who are trained to work with. So that's how I founded E2M. So it started like nine years back and we are kind of a white label, uh, you know, outsourcing company. Uh, we build websites, we do a lot of web development. With WordPress and Shopify and big commerce. And we work with digital agencies, regardless of the size, across the US and the other parts of the world. And yeah, you know, we help them scale their agency business with our white label services. Jason: [00:02:13] Awesome. Well, let's get into it and let's talk about, you know, a lot of agency owners struggle right now because there's a lot of demand for what we're doing, right? But it's really challenging to find the right team members. So what has worked for you? Because you guys have over 110 people what's worked for you to constantly keep getting the best people? Manish: [00:02:36] Yeah. That's a very interesting question. And, um, I think, you know, similar, like the US, we have an adequate role here in India and we are also facing similar challenges hiring people. But one of the things, you know, we are trying to do something is, so we often do a lot of marketing to attend the customers, right? But we never do a marketing to attract the people, right? Because we always think like, okay, you know, uh, that early the marketing has to be only to drive in the sales and leads. But I also feel like, you know, that you should also do a marketing to attract the people, right? So we do a lot of branding our HR team, and we have a social media team, we do a lot of granting on LinkedIn. We expose or culture, you know, more often on LinkedIn and that builds the transparency, that builds the, like, that kind of showcase what we are, what our value is, right? So, we pay a lot of attention in that we, uh, be are vocal and we speak loudly about, you know, what our culture is, what kind of initiatives we have. So it is not just about, uh, like, you know, the team outing lunch, or get together, but it's more than that, right? So one of the things, you know, which I believe is other than the skill, the traits are very important as well. The personality traits, right. We kind of, you know, when we look for the people, we just do not look for the skill, but we also look for the traits, like what kind of traits to the have, right? Do they have right kind of attitude? Do they have the willingness to learn? Are they curious? Are they accountable? Are they responsible? Are they good with working with the people? Are they having an open mindset? That allows us to train people faster, right? So obviously we look for the skill, let's say, if you are looking for a WordPress developer. Yeah. WordPress is something, you know, definitely that's the reason we are interviewing them. But apart from that, we also look for the traits, right? So we are kind of a company where we pay a lot of attention and a lot of importance to the traits. So that's kind of showcase, you know, in LinkedIn. And transparency, right? I think, you know, one of the things that… Where people love to be in a transparent culture, right? So we don't ask them, we don't lock them into the contract that you have to sign bond with us. You have to work for X number of months or years with us. It's kind of a very open culture we have where we explain them the benefits, how we are different. Uh, we showcase and we let our other people speak, right? So we are over… uh, so we are like one hundred people right now. So a lot of our existing, we talk about how we have a higher retention ratio. The other team members, they speak about their experience openly. So these kinds of things, you know, help us attract a really, really good talent and, yeah, happy, happy people. I would say like, you know, we get a lot of, uh, new hires through over existing members. So because they are already happily working with over here, right. So they do a word of mouth. See, it's the concept of like, you know, the customer brings some other customer happy customer will bring another, you know, a customer. The same concept applies when you were hiring people as well, right? That, okay, if you have a happy employees, happy you happy people working with you. Obviously they are going to bring other people, their friends and family members and friends and friends, they are going to bring that right. So I think, you know, there are the companies right now facing two types of challenges. One is hiring new people, as well as retaining existing people. Fortunately, we are only facing one problem, which is like, you know, this is a good problem to have, hiring new people, for which we are also like know, working in a way that we are getting rid of that problem, but we do not have the second problem is retaining the existing people because we have a very transparent culture in a way where, you know, people feel more accountable and responsible and they can end with them the kind of growth they're looking for. So that is helping us a lot to retain existing talent and bringing on the new talent. Jason: [00:07:21] I love that, you know, because I think a lot of agencies are missing out on always be recruiting. And, and be marketing to, you know, the people that you may need, because like you were saying, I think they're focused on, you know, oh, I need to market to the clients. And, and look, if we're all honest here, digital agencies do a pretty crappy job at marketing themselves, let alone marketing to the people that they want. But you know, as, as you guys are listening to this episode, I really want you guys to go, man, this makes total sense. You know, first I need to market to, I need to do a good job of marketing to my clients, because there's a lot of agencies that are built on word of mouth. But I need to commit to, you know, going forward to marketing our culture. Because when you market your culture to people you're trying to hire, it will actually help you with your clients, because they'll be like, oh man, that's pretty cool. Like, I want to work with this, this team. And the one other thing that we did, and you guys may do this as well, especially as, you know, your employees refer other employees to the team. We would do a commission structure or like a little bonus to them if, once we hired someone and they stayed for three months or longer. Manish: [00:08:38] Yeah, that's what we have already done. We already have that in practice. So it's, we also do bounty. So, you know, when you bring, refer to your friends and, you know, uh, any other candidates, if they get selected, you get a bounty of X number of amount once they complete three months. So we already had that in place. The other thing, you know, we are doing differently is something… We know that, okay, the, everyone is using a Facebook and Instagram, right? So generally we do our services and what is meant on Facebook and Instagram. We are also doing our hiding our ads. So we have paid budget, uh, specifically allocated for that on a monthly basis where we do already creative posts, where not… Okay, if you are looking for a WordPress developer, we put a PHP code and we say, okay, no, find an error on this. If you can find an error on this, you know, we are looking for you, right? So generally, you know, we do kind of this kind of creative ads and another example, you know, we, uh, that is kind of like, okay, our QA team is challenging that, okay, you know, if I'm going to review your code and I'm going to find X number of bucks, for sure. If you challenge that, okay. If you, if you do a code where I cannot find a bug at all, then we are looking for you, right? So a lot of this kind of interesting ads we run on Instagram and Facebook that also helps us to be in front of, you know, people who are not even sometimes, no, they are not looking for a change, but the way we present ourselves, it makes them interested to apply for the position and change their mind. So I'm actually reading a book right now, Atomic Habits. I'm sure you must have read. It's a really interesting book. I'm reading, you know, it's Atomic Habits. And, uh, one of the things, you know, that's book I read is see when you sell something, people are not actually interested what you are selling, but they get more curious, how you present it to them, right? So it's like when we have an opening, we just don't say we are looking for a WordPress developer, but we present in a way that, okay, we are looking for WordPress developer when we don't write it very obviously. And that's kind of, you know, attract them. Okay. This company is standing out and that's where we are getting a lot of attractions. Jason: [00:11:07] I love it. And I want to switch focus just a little bit, you know, as we kind of end the, or getting more toward the end of the show. How do you constantly…? Because I see agency owners struggling with constantly training their people with a new skill. So what have you seen work for you guys? Manish: [00:11:30] That's a good question. You know, so we have, you know, different people with different, uh, you know, skill set, right? So we have project managers who just look after the projects team and like that. Then we have technical leads, they are only there to solve developers, technical problems. And then we have a senior developer, some of our developers are just working on exploring the new technologies, right? So what we do is, you know, when we work with agencies and they are looking for, let's say they are hiring a WordPress developer with us, so then we ask them, okay, you know, there is a core vital, which is very important these days. We have started exploring onto headless CMS right now for building a fast-loading website, using react as a front end, WordPress is the backend, right? So we kind of identify what is the latest in terms of technology. And we have a specific people who are just working on, you know, doing research and exploring the new technologies. And then when there is an opportunity, you know, we propose that to our existing clients that, hey, you know, we have been working since long and this is something new. What do you like us to try it out? And they are always open for that. And that gives us a live project to work on. So it, it, it is kind of like, you know, we keep our eyes and ears open and we do a lot of research and we work with a lot of agencies. So we always get to know different problems than we have a technical team with just doing research, what's the latest out? And then, you know, they learn for us because they are highly experienced and then they, you know, teach that they kind of teach that to other developers as well. And that's how we train that. One thing we do when they are doing that, they make sure to have the processes, they make sure to have documentation, right? They make sure to have proper standards, coding standards in place. So there is documentation, there is a checklist. So the other developers who are being trained, they don't have to train on the wheel, they get drained faster. So this is something, you know, this is how we are managing basically Jason: [00:13:41] I love it. I love it. I love that you have dedicated people to, to that, that train the rest of the team. I think that's where, you know, people make a mistake of, especially when they bring in a junior person and they think they're just going to learn up very fast. If you don't have a dedicated person or a dedicated system for training them, it's going to be a challenge and it's going to cost you more than it would of just hiring the more experienced person. Well, this has all been amazing, Manish. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Manish: [00:14:14] Yeah, I think, you know, the one thing is that, uh, we work with a lot of agencies and help them scale and grow with our white label. So this isn't like that. So in case if any agency is facing a problem with management and you know, when you have projects on board, but you do not have anyone to help you executing those projects, then yeah we help agency owners, you know, with our white label services. So we have a special offer for our listeners today. So we are, you know, we have, we are productized our white label services. So we have different monthly plans to choose from. So if you are listening to this podcast, you can go to E2M, to our website we have specifically designed for this audience, which is e2msolutions.com/smartagency. So that's E and 2 is a numeric and M for marketing e2msolutions.com/smartagency. If you go to that, that is so when you, you know, use this link, and if you are going to sign up for any of our plans, you will get an additional 10% discount for first three months. Jason: [00:15:23] Awesome. Well, thanks so much for doing that for the audience. Make sure everyone goes there and, uh, check that out.culture And, uh, I think that will be a great resource tool in helping you all build in 2022, I can't believe it's 2022. That's crazy. So go to the website now go claim that offer and Manish, thanks so much. And until next time have a Swenk day.

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Bless the Seed Planters (2) (Audio) David Eells - 1/5/22   Gathering the Vessels to be Filled Eve Brast - Dec. 15 - 17, 2021 Dreams (David's notes in red) On December 15th in a dream we of UBM were in a warehouse gathering pots and dishes of all kinds and crockpots etc. together and placing them on our white fold-out pot blessing tables that were lined up in a straight row.  There wasn't any food in them we were all just gathering the vessels together in preparation for the food. Then I heard the voice of the Lord from above and to the right of me say, “You must wait 6 weeks.” (The time period would be up on Jan. 26th IF the date of the dream is when the 6 weeks start.) I woke up pondering about what this could mean. (Could it be the anointing upon the food of the Word that we have stored up to serve to the people?) Then on December 16th I had two dreams that were identical back to back in the night. (The dream was doubled) (Meaning as Joseph said that it will surely come to pass.) In these dreams we of UBM were all in a large wooden Ark that was still sitting on dry ground with the big door still down and resting on the ground and opened like a ramp leading up into it. (The Ark is being prepared to "escape all these things” as in Luke 21:36) It was nice weather outside at the moment. I could see the sun shining through the gathering white  clouds. (The light of the Son is shining on us to prepare.) We were, again, gathering many different pots, pans and crockpots in preparation for the food. I wasn't sure how we were going to get all the meals and food but we were getting ready to receive the supplies and dishes of food in order to distribute it to all the people. (We have been told that we are storing up in the grain silos of Joseph for a time of releasing the anointed food to the people.) (This made me think of Elisha and the widow in 2 Ki. 4:1-7 when there was a famine and her husband had died and they were going to take her sons into slavery and bondage because she couldn't pay her debts. So grace came when the prophet told her to go and ask her neighbors for as many vessels as she could gather and begin pouring what little oil she had into them until they were all full. Then he told her to go and sell the oil to pay her creditors and save her boys.) Then on December 17th I dreamed that UBM was again gathering dishes together to be filled with food in a house that belonged to David that had many, many rooms of different sizes all joined together. (The Lord told me that He would build me a house as a type of David Man-child's house which was finished before the House of God. My house in the natural is almost finished. So we are about to start on the temple house which is in the Bride city and they are built by the food which is the Word that has been stored up to create "Christ in you”..) I again heard the Lord's voice from directly above me say, “From beneath the bars of the gates, you shall escape.” (The first fruits Bride escapes Babylon to re-build on their promised land.)  I woke up repeating this phrase to myself and wondering what the Lord was saying. (The thing that came to me was about when Cyrus diverted the Euphrates away from Babylon so that his armies could go under the bars and then through the gates on both banks and conquer Babylon.  This was as the king was receiving the interpretation of the writing on the wall by Daniel who was made the third ruler in the kingdom at that time.) (According to Operation Disclosure: On Sun. 2 Jan. 2022 “Earth Quakes” under Geneva Lake in Switzerland destroyed the Cabal's CIA CERN Headquarters and was considered the Fall of Babylon. These earthquakes were actually bombings or Rods of God. Just as Cyrus did, Trump decapitated Babylon. Many traitorous leaders will be executed. Then the headless enemy will be cleaned up. False flag is already planned by the DS and incoming.)  During my waking hours on these days the Lord brought an old song back to my memory that I hadn't heard or thought about in a very long time. It was called, “Seek ye First”. I couldn't get it out of my head and just kept singing the first verse over and over.  So I looked up the rest of the song so I would be able to sing the whole thing.  And then the Lord put it in my heart to request that Barry lead us to sing it at the Friday night meeting and that we could put it as a permanent addition in our song books. Here's the lyrics below: Seek ye first the kingdom of God And His righteousness And all these things shall be added unto you Allelu, alleluia Man shall not live by bread alone But by every word That proceeds from the mouth of God Allelu, alleluia Ask and it shall be given unto you Seek and ye shall find Knock and the door shall be opened unto you Allelu, alleluia Seek ye first the kingdom of God And His righteousness And all these things shall be added unto you Allelu, alleluia (This is a really good exhortation to Seek first His Kingdom to be prepared for the choosing of the Bride.)   Praying for Latter Rain Isaac Payne -1/1/22 (David's notes in red) I wanted to share this dream I had last night. It was a very direct and quick dream. I'm wondering if there is significance of this being the first dream for me of the new year, 2022.  (Issac has very good dreams on a regular basis, so the Lord could certainly be sending us a message about what to expect as far as timing for the latter rain anointing coming early this year, 2022.) In this dream it was night. (The night time represents the tribulation when gross darkness in over the earth and the peoples. This is the time when the former and the latter rains will be poured out upon God's elect in a great revival as it was when God's people were entering the wilderness, a type of the tribulation.)  There was a couple in their upper 50's holding onto each other in a desolate area. (Representing the wilderness tribulation.) They called out to me and I went to speak with them.  I knew the man's name in the dream was John. (Meaning, “God is gracious or graced by God". John the Baptist was preparing for the anointed One who comes as the latter rain according to Hos. 6:1-3.) The woman he was holding had blonde hair and it was a couple of inches from her shoulders. (The Bride is prepared to be chosen by the anointed One.) (They looked like husband and wife; at least that's what it seemed like.)   They asked me if I would pray for the latter rain with them. We all joined hands and prayed in agreement. I prayed, “Oh Father thank you! We ask for the latter rain anointing, and we claim it done. We thank you for it in Jesus's name. Amen!” Then I woke up. (The anointed One is Jesus in the Man-child body of reformers.)   Psalm 87 and Zion the 'Desert of the Lord' Deborah Horton 9-20-21 (David's notes in red)  I hope I can explain what the Lord revealed to me in these texts below. :0) (As we will see in Deb's revelation, the couple mentioned in Issac's dream who were holding on to one another in a desolate place praying for the latter rain represents those in Zion.) It says in Psa.87:1 His foundation is in the holy mountains. (2) Jehovah loveth the gates of Zion more than all the dwellings of Jacob. (The actual meaning of “Zion" is the Hebrew word tsiyyah meaning "desert, drought, dry, dry places, parched, parched land"! Think about that for a minute.) (She is prepared to soak up the anointing and Word of the Man-child reformers.) It says in Psa.63:1 O God, thou art my God; earnestly will I seek thee: My soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee, In a dry and weary land, where no water is. (So, we are the "dry and weary land”. But why are we seeking Zion if it's a desert? And why would the Lord love a "dry and weary land”?) (Some people are hungry and thirsty for God.) (Psa.87:3) Glorious things are spoken of thee, O city of God. Selah (Glorious things are spoken of a desert?)  (4) I will make mention of Rahab and Babylon as among them that know me: Behold, Philistia, and Tyre, with Ethiopia: This one was born there. (Here in verse 4 notice that Rahab, Babylon, Philistia, Tyre, and Ethiopia were enemies of Zion until they were (re-)born there. (Col.1:21) And you, (speaking of the Gentiles) being in time past alienated and enemies in your mind in your evil works, (22) yet now hath he reconciled in the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and without blemish and unreproveable before him.) (5) Yea, of Zion it shall be said, This one and that one was born in her; And the Most High himself will establish her. (6) Jehovah will count, when he writeth up the peoples, This one was born there. Selah (Look at another place where the location of birth is important: (Luk.2:1) Now it came to pass in those days, there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be enrolled. (2) This was the first enrolment made when Quirinius was governor of Syria. (3) And all went to enrol themselves, every one to his own city. (4) And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and family of David; (5) to enrol himself with Mary, who was betrothed to him, being great with child. (6) And it came to pass, while they were there, the days were fulfilled that she should be delivered.) Back to (Psa.87:7) They that sing as well as they that dance [shall say], All my fountains are in thee. (Well, "fountains" are "living water,” In Joh.3:5 Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except one be born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God! (6) That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. (7) Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born anew. (8) The wind bloweth where it will, and thou hearest the voice thereof, but knowest not whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.) When we come to Zion, we have to come empty, a dry and dead-to-self desert, in order to be filled. It says in (Php.2:5) Have this mind in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: (6) who, existing in the form of God, counted not the being on an equality with God a thing to be grasped, (7) but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men; (8) and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, becoming obedient even unto death, yea, the death of the cross. (9) Wherefore also God highly exalted him, and gave unto him the name which is above every name; (10) that in the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven and things on earth and things under the earth, (11) and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. Also in (Mat.5:6) Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. David Mullinix added this text: (Isa.53:2) For he (Jesus) grew up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him. (So Zion has gone through a crucifixion at the hands of the apostates and God will pour out upon this Bride the a renewal of the former rain as the Man-child ministries receive the latter rain and gives it to the Bride after 3 1/2 years just as it was with Jesus.)     UBM Books Getting Anointed Merlene Laughlin - 12/2/21 (David's notes in red)  I dreamed the sky was getting gray as a storm was coming soon. (In the natural, Trump and the Alliance have said, "The Storm is upon us"; meaning the warfare on the DS in our government that will temporarily bring down the Satanic Cabal and bring God's people a temporary reprieve from the left wing of the Dragon Beast as the right wing rises at the Man-child's return in His Body of Man-child ministers to lead God's people in the first 3 1/2 years of the 7 year tribulation period.) I knew that I was in a white, one story school building. (We are in the school of sanctification learning to walk in holiness. As in Eve's dream when Lion Man came and expounded on David's books but with a greater anointing.) Some of the UBM women, that had been working on the books, were in a huge library trying to take the UBM books out of many boxes and put them in order on the library shelves after they had dusted them. I saw everyone working with happy hands and hearts. (A library is a quiet, restful place where people are able to study and learn. 'Dusting and putting in order' represents cleaning up the spiritual environment so that the knowledge in the materials can be received. Psa. 68:11 The Lord giveth the word: The women that publish the tidings are a great host. ) Then we all heard thunder and saw a mix of swirling gray clouds. It was starting to rain, but only a mist. We hurried so we could get that last pallet done so all the boxes of books would be “shelved and in order.” (The time is short we must get the house in order. Jesus told His disciples in John 9:4 We must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work.) The whole side of the school looked as if it was suddenly gone. One person looked up and said, “Where did the windows go? There were windows there earlier.” (During the latter rain the veil will be taken away from our knowledge and understanding. The windows of Heaven are opened to release revelation knowledge to a hungry and thirsty people.  1 Co. 13:8-12 ...but whether there be prophecies, they shall be done away; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall be done away. 9 For we know in part, and we prophesy in part; 10 but when that which is perfect is come, that which is in part shall be done away. 11 When I was a child, I spake as a child, I felt as a child, I thought as a child: now that I am become a man, I have put away childish things. 12 For now we see in a mirror, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know fully even as also I was fully known.)   I heard the,“splat, splat, splat” of large rain drops falling. Each “splat” was several inches from the other. (Hos. 6:1-3 Come, and let us return unto Jehovah; for he hath torn, and he will heal us; he hath smitten, and he will bind us up. 2 After two days will he revive us: on the third day he will raise us up, and we shall live before him. (This is the 1000 year days and we are on the morning of the 3rd day as it says in the next verse.) 3 And let us know, let us follow on to know Jehovah: his going forth is sure as the morning; and he will come unto us as the rain, as the latter rain that watereth the earth.) Seeing that some stacks of books had a rain splat on them, I took a white towel and started to quickly wipe off the medium, dark blue covers of the remaining books on the table, but the rain would not wipe off! Then I heard some one say, “Merlene, it's the latter rain. It will not wipe off!” (Psa 68:7-12  O God, when thou wentest forth before thy people, When thou didst march through the wilderness; Selah 8 The earth trembled, The heavens also dropped rain at the presence of God: Yon Sinai trembled at the presence of God, the God of Israel. 9 Thou, O God, didst send a plentiful rain, Thou didst confirm thine inheritance, when it was weary. 10 Thy congregation dwelt therein: Thou, O God, didst prepare of thy goodness for the poor. 11 The Lord giveth the word: The women that publish the tidings are a great host. 12 Kings of armies flee, they flee; And she that tarrieth at home divideth the spoil.)    Pray for Good Weather for Building on the UBM Land                  Vanessa Weeks - 12/1/21 (David's notes in red) I dreamed I was listening to an Unleavened Bread Bible Study with my ear buds. Towards the end of the study, David asked all of us who were listening to pray that we would have good weather in the area over the next several days. (The good weather may be the sun/Son shining on us and no storm in the heavens.)  He said that we would be working on or building something that would be shelters for the people. 1Co 3:9  For we are God's fellow-workers: ye are God's husbandry, God's building.) (I asked the Lord for a word about the shelters and received by faith at random Mat. 24:30 and then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven: and then shall all the tribes of the earth mourn, and they shall see the Son of man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory.) (We know that this verse does not fit timing wise but if we just consider the words of the verse, we know that the Lord is coming in His Man-child body of reformers which is a Son of man. So the Son of God is coming in a son of man to repeat History.) As David talked to us about praying for good weather, I saw him hammering some metal frames together and it appeared that it would be a large building. (This reminds me of Eph. 2:20-22  being built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the chief corner stone; 21  in whom each several building, fitly framed together, groweth into a holy temple in the Lord; 22  in whom ye also are builded together for a habitation of God in the Spirit.) I asked the Lord for a word about David hammering and what we were building and received by faith at random Dan 2:19 (In context  19-23)    Then was the secret revealed unto Daniel in a vision of the night. Then Daniel blessed the God of heaven. (Daniel was a type of the Man-child Ministry at the time of the fall of Babylon who was a revealer of these secrets to the people who were coming out of bondage to rebuild the kingdom in the promised land.)  20  Daniel answered and said, Blessed be the name of God for ever and ever; for wisdom and might are his. 21  And he changeth the times and the seasons; he removeth kings, and setteth up kings; he giveth wisdom unto the wise, and knowledge to them that have understanding; 22  he revealeth the deep and secret things; he knoweth what is in the darkness, and the light dwelleth with him. 23  I thank thee, and praise thee, O thou God of my fathers, who hast given me wisdom and might, and hast now made known unto me what we desired of thee; for thou hast made known unto us the king's matter.) David also said the building will be on some land UBM has and I saw it as a park like setting. (God's people were told to conquer the old man and take the land of promise which means to stand on the promises of God. The first land to be taken after the Babylonian falling away was Zion and the Temple ground which represents the new leadership of born again Zion which represents the Bride in whom is the presence of God.) I was thinking in the dream, I did not know UBM had land, but we have had several dreams of this land and us standing on the grass. (Standing on the grass represents conquering our flesh for as Peter said, “All flesh is as grass.”) I asked the Lord for a word for this dream and received by faith at random Luke 9:25 (In context 23-27) 23  And he said unto all, If any man would come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, (for the flesh to die on) and follow me. 24  For whosoever would save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it. 25  For what is a man profited, if he gain the whole world, and lose or forfeit his own self? 26  For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words, of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he cometh in his own glory, and the glory of the Father, and of the holy angels. 27  But I tell you of a truth, There are some of them that stand here, who shall in no wise taste of death, till they see the kingdom of God. (Denying ourselves and taking up our cross to follow Jesus is the land we have in UBM.)   I went to the UBM site and put the word “shelter" in the site search and saw a dream from Eve on 10/10/10 called 'Man-Child & Bride Save  Apostates'  This is the portion that had "shelter " in it and the verse she got is the same Daniel text I received above when I asked what David was hammering on and what we were building. (So here's the portion of Eve's dream…) …She (The Pakistani woman who said to me, “You are the seer right?") then handed me the piece of cardboard she had been writing on. I took it in my right hand (I'm naturally left-handed) and held it up toward the light to my right. She had written the Roman numerals XXVIII (28) on it. As I was doing this, a voice from behind me and up and to my right resonated through my being, asking, "Are you ready for March 28th?" I answered, "Yes”.  After this, the Pakistani woman turned into a child, came around and took shelter under my right arm, which became a wing with white feathers. This is when the dream ended. (Eve had this dream on 10/10/10. The very next March 28th was a significant day. March 28th in Roman Numerals represents the day the Roman Catholic [meaning "universal"] Church attempted, with the Roman beast government, to force the Jews [now also representing the Christians] on threat of death into their one world order religion. This attempt was thwarted by God using an earthquake on what is now March 28th. We are not saying anything will happen on the 28th but the parallel, as symbolism, is unmistakable. I believe the future attempt at the "covenant with many” will bring terrible earthquakes to America? Could something like this be a demonstration for the apostate church's sake. Because of this and more to come, those who have been given discernment among them may come under the authority and protection of the Bride and Man-child, as in the dream above. When Haman, as a type of the antichrist beast, got an edict to destroy the Jews, it was Mordecai the Man-child and Esther the Bride who were used to save them.)  When I asked the Lord about "seer", I opened my Bible and put my finger down on Daniel 2:20. I then went on to read verses 19 above it and 21-23 after it. {Dan.2:19} Then was the secret revealed unto Daniel in a vision of the night. Then Daniel blessed the God of heaven. {20} Daniel answered and said, Blessed be the name of God for ever and ever; for wisdom and might are his... {21} And he changeth the times and the seasons; he removeth kings, and setteth up kings; he giveth wisdom unto the wise, and knowledge to them that have understanding; {22} he revealeth the deep and secret things; he knoweth what is in the darkness, and the light dwelleth with him. {23} I thank thee, and praise thee, O thou God of my fathers, who hast given me wisdom and might, and hast now made known unto me what we desired of thee; for thou hast made known unto us the king's matter. (God has revealed the timing and nature of His judgments to His Bride, represented by Eve, of which the Man-child, represented by Daniel, is the head.) I just thought it was an amazing confirmation when Eve's dream came up and had the same scripture I received for my dream. On 12-14-21 Eve asked for a word to answer David about our promised land last night and she received by faith at random  Neh 9:15  and gavest them bread from heaven for their hunger, and broughtest forth water for them out of the rock for their thirst, and commandedst them that they should go in to possess the land which thou hadst sworn to give them.     UBM Light Workers Reaching Those in Darkness   Deborah Fenske - 12/22/21 (David's notes in red) I had a short dream last night that I want to share after hearing the broadcast about the Bride shining the light on those coming out of the apostate church.  I was in a house like Jeff's house, but it seemed bigger. The layout of the rooms were about the same. It was pretty plain and emptied inside. (We must be emptied inside to be filled with the light of Christ.) I knew there were quite a few people in this house… Then the scene changed, and I was standing out in the front of the house but it didn't look like the front of Jeff's house.  I was standing in front up on the hill, like the way Jeff's house is and it was dark outside. I was looking at a line of several people, far away, down below. But I wasn't looking down a driveway. I was just looking from way above these people, and I could see very sparsely wooded land that they were walking through. (Representing their personal wilderness trials.)  It's amazing that I could see them so clearly, because they were a far distance away.  And since it was dark I knew they needed light. And I could see, even from that far off distance away, that a couple people were using the flashlights on their cell phones. I thought I would give them more light, so I started shining the flashlight of my phone way out there to them, and I could tell it made a little bit of a difference. (All the UBM workers are working on getting the light of the Gospel to people through books and digital means like Debbie's phone. Light represents knowledge of truth which Jesus said would set us free.)  I could even see people turn around and look, wondering where the extra light was coming from. But it still wasn't that much light. They needed more. (Yes, people need more light and truth. The latter rain anointing of the Man-child would open their understanding. I desire that God's people would take the great commission evangelism more seriously. Many will miss the Bride because of this.) So I tried a couple different ways of holding my phone to try to find the best way for my flashlight to give them the most light. I finally raised my arm up higher and let my light shine down on them.  I could see my light shining all over them, from the rear of the line of the people clear to the front of them, and even further out in front of them. And I saw them looking around, again, as I knew they were trying to figure out where that light was coming from. Then I woke up. (UBM is working on shining the light to help people find their way in their wilderness. PTL! A big 'thank you' to all the Light Workers in the Kingdom. :o) Luke 1:76-79 Yea and thou, child, shalt be called the prophet of the Most High: For thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to make ready his ways; (UBM is one of the John the Baptist ministries, preaching repentance in our day to prepare the way for the coming of the Lord in His people.) 77 To give knowledge of salvation unto his people In the remission of their sins, 78 Because of the tender mercy of our God, Whereby the dayspring from on high shall visit us, (This is Jesus in the Man-child ministry by Word and Spirit.) 79 To shine upon them that sit in darkness and the shadow of death; To guide our feet into the way of peace.   Select LanguageAfrikaansAlbanianAmharicArabicArmenianAzerbaijaniBasqueBelarusianBengaliBosnianBulgarianCatalanCebuanoChichewaChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CorsicanCroatianCzechDanishDutchEsperantoEstonianFilipinoFinnishFrenchFrisianGalicianGeorgianGermanGreekGujaratiHaitian CreoleHausaHawaiianHebrewHindiHmongHungarianIcelandicIgboIndonesianIrishItalianJapaneseJavaneseKannadaKazakhKhmerKinyarwandaKoreanKurdish (Kurmanji)KyrgyzLaoLatinLatvianLithuanianLuxembourgishMacedonianMalagasyMalayMalayalamMalteseMaoriMarathiMongolianMyanmar (Burmese)NepaliNorwegianOdia (Oriya)PashtoPersianPolishPortuguesePunjabiRomanianRussianSamoanScots GaelicSerbianSesothoShonaSindhiSinhalaSlovakSlovenianSomaliSpanishSundaneseSwahiliSwedishTajikTamilTatarTeluguThaiTurkishTurkmenUkrainianUrduUyghurUzbekVietnameseWelshXhosaYiddishYorubaZulu Powered by Translate Printer-friendly version

Building Livewire
Getting rich off teenagers

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 10:07


That's my JAMstack
S3E2 - Salma Alam-Naylor on shipping, learning, and rendering in the Jamstack

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:58


Our Guest: Salma Alam-Naylor What she'd like for you to see: Unbreak.tech Her JAMstack Jams: All the amazing rendering options! Her musical Jam: Move On by Emily Vaughn Grant (pay special attention at 1:47 in the track for the double tracked bass!) Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello Hello everyone. Welcome to another JAM PACKED Jamstack episode. This is That's My Jamstack the podcast where we ask the best question since sliced bread. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host Brian Robinson and this week, we have a very special guest. I'm pleased to introduce the winner of the Jamstack community creator award from Jamstack Conf 2021 Salma Alam-Naylor. Salma helps developers build stuff, learn things and love what they do. She does that via her Twitch streams, YouTube channel and blog. One quick update for the episode, we recorded this prior to Salma joining the Netlify team. So while we mentioned Contentful, in various parts of the episode, Sam is now on the DX team at Netlify. Bryan Robinson 1:04 Alright, Salma, well, thanks for joining us on the show today. Salma Alam-Naylor 1:06 Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:08 Awesome. So tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? What do you do for fun, Salma Alam-Naylor 1:13 I am currently a developer advocate for Contentful. I've also got like kind of other stuff that you do. So you might know me on the internet as white Panther. And I help developers build stuff, learn things and love what they do. I write educational blog posts about web development. I do a lot of live streaming on Twitch, I make YouTube content. And I'm an all round Jamstack enthusiast To be honest, for fun, I mean, I kind of do that for fun as well. But if you want to know about non web dev stuff, I actually love interior design. And I'm moving in the next like two months. So hopefully, when people hear this, they would have actually finally moved house. So I can't wait to get my hand stuck in to that little project. I also like to play cerebral puzzle games with my husband on on a computer, most recently, a game called Super liminal, which is all about like perspective and maths and stuff. It's very good. Bryan Robinson 2:19 I'm gonna jump in real fast. I have a six year old and we were playing super limited together. Nothing about it. I was like, this is super fun. And like we were having good time. He that was really cool. And then it gets creepy. I didn't expect they get super creepy. And he's like, I don't want to play this game anymore. Daddy. We never have to play it again. You're fine. Salma Alam-Naylor 2:38 Yeah, it was a good game. It's a good game. I remember this one bit that when you get on like a roof, and there's the moon. And we were like on the roof thinking this you have to we have to get above the roof because of the weird glitch thing when you turn the light on and off. But it wasn't it was an Easter egg. It wasn't a thing. It was fun. And I'm also, you know, my background is in music. I did a music degree. I was a music teacher. I was a musician. So I still try to play music for fun with my family. And I do want to get back into making music. Actually, I missed that a lot. But so when I move into my new house, I'll have a proper studio purposely for the music. So I think I'm looking forward to that a lot. Bryan Robinson 3:21 That's amazing. So what's your instrument of choice or musical talent of choice, I suppose. Salma Alam-Naylor 3:27 So when I was growing up, and when I was a teacher, my main instruments were piano and flute, but and singing, but I also taught kids how to play in rock bands for a few years. So I was a bass player. I don't really do much bass now. And I did some guitar and played some drums and stuff. But making music now I really like making electronic music mainly. I was also a musical comedian for a few years. Interesting. touring the UK, singing weirdly satirical British political songs. We'd get cancelled now so you can't hear any of it. Bryan Robinson 4:14 Out of curiosity. Is there any comedy in Britain? That's not satirical political comedy? I feel like everything kind of falls into it. Salma Alam-Naylor 4:23 Yeah, it's pretty much there's a lot to satirize in the British political system. But I guess that's for another podcast. Bryan Robinson 4:31 Yeah, sure. Awesome. Yeah. Let's let's maybe not talk about about the Jamstack. He's, he said that you're a Jamstack enthusiast. So what was your entry point into this ecosystem philosophy, what have Salma Alam-Naylor 4:45 you it was actually with Jekyll, the first static site generator many, many years ago, and that was the only one that existed you know, like around 2015 2016 and I had no idea what it was doing. But I was experimenting, I had really no idea that it was part of the Jamstack. At the time, I was just building a website, I had no idea that it was a static website, and really what that meant, but I was building something with liquid templates that compiled into a website. And I was hosting it on GitLab Pages at the time, not GitHub Pages. I was because I used to get lab for work. And so I kind of naturally gravitated towards GitLab at that time. But I guess the ecosystem sucked me in. I really don't know how I went from building my first Jekyll site to where I am now. I have no idea how, how this has happened, or what made it happen. But clearly, the Jamstack has, has a good thing going right. Like, it's fantastic. Bryan Robinson 5:51 So what are you doing right before you started playing with Jekyll, you were at some sort of company doing tech stuff he's mentioned you are you are using GitLab. So what was that like? Salma Alam-Naylor 5:59 So I did a variety of different things. Before I ended up here. I was working for some startups, I was working for a global e commerce company that was using like Java, whether bespoke kind of E commerce system with JSP front ends. I was also before that I was building a new e commerce platform in a startup that was JavaScript based what we're even using PHP, we're using PHP with JavaScript front end. But it was a it was a plain JavaScript front end, it wasn't statically generated, it wasn't using a framework or anything like that. After the global e commerce company, I was actually working for another startup building a React Native app. So like my career actually had nothing to do with the Jamstack. It was all my side projects. Until my last job, I was working at an agency, product agency. And we built quite a lot of things in the team. And actually we started gravitating towards next J S for these quick. They were initially proofs of concept, because next JS was pretty young at the time. But it ended up that next JS was a really scalable front end with a lot of capabilities. So we normally have like a dotnet back end and an extra as front end kind of thing with the API layer in the middle. And that was really my intro into the enterprise levels, scalable, robust, we can build whatever we want with the Jamstack kind of thing. Bryan Robinson 7:38 Alright, so let's fast forward a little bit. That was your last thing, right? How today, are you using the Jamstack philosophies professionally, I mean, obviously, Contentful is pretty, pretty big in that world. But also personally with both your educational stuff and anything else you're doing on the side. Salma Alam-Naylor 7:52 So one of the biggest philosophies that I like to promote the Jamstack is that just do it, just build something and get it live, just build it learn some stuff while you do it, and have a good time. Like, I can try things out without having to over commit to anything on the Jamstack I if I've got an idea for a website, a lot of the time I will get the idea or buy the domain, I will go on my Twitch stream for three hours. And I will build it and release it in that three hours. And that is the joy of the Jamstack. Salma Alam-Naylor 8:05 And what I love about that as well as it's so accessible to developers, because you don't have to over commit or pay for anything at that stage of IDEA inception. And so it's so accessible, and it's so in reach for so many people, for example, dot take dotnet I don't want to like hate on dotnet. It's great. It's a fantastic enterprise solution for enterprise products. But as a developer, as a front end developer, even though the dotnet comes with front end or back end stuff, what do I do when I've built an app? Like how do I put it online? So like I can just hook up a Jamstack hosting platform to my GIT repository, do a git push and great, there it is. It's online on a on a URL, I don't have to buy a domain even it's just there. And it's it's just so beautiful. And it's it really embodies the actual kind of agile kind of continuous delivery methodology as well. Salma Alam-Naylor 9:26 Every commit is a release, every commit is an immutable release. So you can roll back, you can have a look at the history you can you have, you can just click in a UI in like Vercel or Netlify or GitLab. Just click Oh, look at that. That's what I mean and week ago, I can compare that with what I've got now. And, and it scales. You don't even have to worry about scaling. If you get like a big hit on your proof of concept or whatever. And you know, it just enables developers to move fast to try things out to experiment and test Have fun without all the nonsense that developers have to deal with, day in, day out. And it's just a joy. Salma Alam-Naylor 10:09 And I've learned so much like, I never would have thought like, when I was building my like first websites maybe 10 10-12 years ago, my first proper websites, I never would have thought that I would be utilizing a CDN at the edge. And all of these different rendering methods, depending on the data that I needed to serve, auto scaling, immutable deploys, Git integration, infrastructure, serverless functions, you know, it's like a whole ecosystem that lets you try stuff, to see if it's gonna work. And if it does work, you can go further and make it robust. Like one of one of my biggest slogans is also build first engineer later. And that I think, is a really like, core part of the Jamstack. Just get it live and see what happens. Bryan Robinson 11:00 And you can get it live in any number of ways too, right? You can if you're making a content driven thing to begin with, you don't need a CMS. But yes, it takes like a few lines of code tweaked. And your next js, your 11ty, your whatever static site generator, right, like just ingest from somewhere else. And it's good to go? Unknown Speaker 11:19 Yes. It's very exciting. It's very exciting. Like imagine. So this has happened in the all in the last like six years since like, 2015, when the Jamstack kind of first came about, like what's going to happen in the next six years, and the next six years, and the next six years, I actually did. At the Contentful, fast forward conference at the beginning of November, I actually did the keynote with Stephan Judas, about the last 10 years of web development and how Jamstack came about to solve the problems of old school monolith solutions where back end and front end were divided, where everyone was reinventing the wheel the whole time. And the Jamstack has really come to like, solve these problems, where as a front end developer, you don't need all this back end nonsense anymore. You're and and because of that, it's like enabled developers, it's increased their skills is giving them the power is empowering developers to to build stuff that they couldn't have even dreamed of before. And I think that's really, really, like wonderful for the future. Salma Alam-Naylor 12:24 Like I have a four year old. And I can't wait to show him the stuff like he could put a website live. That's just an HTML page and JavaScript file, potentially, you know, on the Jamstack, when he's like, eight years old, you know. And imagine us being able to do that when we were eight. Bryan Robinson 12:46 At like 14, I think I had my first website. And it was like Microsoft front page built like graphical UI, it was, it was quite choice. Yeah, my six year old, I built him a website in a day, he happened to have a piece of art that he brought home from school, that instead of writing his name on it, he had to write his his first first name, and last initial, because that was yet another, another kid in his class with that name. And then he wrote.com At the end, and I said, I bet that domain is open. And it was and like, I threw it together, uploaded the artwork. And then he told me, he's like, I want to like button. And I was like, I bet I could do that. But you have to do three pieces of art every week to to make it so that I'll build that for you. And then like, I was able to walk him through what I done. And he had no real understanding. But it was like, okay, I can. This is simple enough, I can show you and it's Yeah, super low bar. Salma Alam-Naylor 13:43 Yeah, I can't wait. I can't wait for that. It's so empowering. And it's so exciting to see what our children could make one day with, how it's being innovated, and the improvements and the things that are being done on the Jamstack. And Bryan Robinson 13:57 how it kind of opens up into like the the kind of natural open web platform. Yeah, walled garden is not something that you have to buy into. And it allowed, like, I used to teach a journalism class on HTML and CSS. And I was like, look, you'll you can you can do this. And if you do this, you don't have to depend on these other platforms anymore. And like, I would talk about the history of the web and how in the 90s, it was a creator focus space. And in the current state, in fact, like anything from like, 2010 on, it's very consumer based. And so it's like, there's this dichotomy of the web, and the more people that can be creators, the better. Yes, yeah. So we've talked about next JS some, obviously, you work at Contentful. We talked about the olden days of Jekyll and all that good stuff. What would you say is your current jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite product? Or maybe it's a philosophy or framework. What makes you love the Jamstack? Salma Alam-Naylor 14:53 It's sounds really nerdy. But what I like about the Jamstack is the different types. Types of rendering that are available. This is like, this is so ridiculous, but it's like. So obviously, I work for Contentful. Right, and I'm dealing with data like data comes from a CMS. But data is not all created equal. And so there are four types of rendering depending on the data your data needs, like, it's not just about like pages and posts and stuff, like there are some bits of data that are very granular, they might need to be more up to date than the others, because obviously, mainly Jamstack is static first, right? And so but not everything can be static. But not everything needs to be client side. And so that what the Jamstack has now is like these four types of rendering. So back in the old, old web days, everything was server side rendered, right, you you your web request, hit a server that went to the backend that generated from all the logic a, an HTML document and gave it back to the client, right. So we still got server side rendering on the Jamstack, which I think right now is really great for personalization for things like E commerce, and other things. Because I especially talk a lot about using query params with get server side props with NextJs. JS, for those kind of personalized experiences, rather than just serving everything statically to the same as same to everyone. But then we've got the static, so there's, the second one is static generation. So you've got a plain site content site, nothing changes, nothing needs to update it, just serve it as quickly as you can statically do your visitors great. But now we've got some fancy stuff, there's incremental static regeneration, which is based on a cache validation strategy called stale while revalidate. And what this does, especially inside next js is you choose when the server re validates your data. And at certain intervals, and if it is out of date, it will rebuild in the background via serverless functions. And then for the next visitor, it will show it up to date. So that's like good for kind of data that it's great if it's up to date doesn't matter if some people see it if it's out of date. And then you've got distributed persistent rendering, which so if you want the Jamstack to scale, you, you might have 1000s, and 1000s, and 1000s of pages, right from your CMS, your E commerce site or wherever. Now we know that with the Jamstack, a site to go live and be deployed, it needs to be pre built and pre rendered, right, but 1000s and 1000s of pages could take hours to build. And if you want to continuously deploy and be agile and move fast and break stuff, you can't have every single bill taking hours and hours and hours. So distributed percentage rendering, what it does, it lets you choose what pages are pre rendered, and then doesn't pre render the other ones, you could pre render like your top 20 pages or wherever at build time. But then when someone goes to visit a page that hasn't been pre rendered, it gets pre rendered at request time, and then cached at the edge for future requests. So we've moved away from like building static pages and static data on the Jamstack blanket to a flexible model where you can choose when your pages rendered, depending on the type of data that you're serving your visitors and how up to date it needs to be. It sounds really weird, but this is my favorite part of the Jamstack. Bryan Robinson 18:19 So it obviously, right? Because like that's a lot. And like when you when you actually said like my favorite parts, the rendering modes like okay, all right, but no, totally. And like, here's my absolute favorite bit of that entire of that entire conversation, right? You don't have to understand any of what Salma just said, if you're listening, right? Because you can start and you can, like we talked about, like the accessibility of the Jamstack earlier, you can start and you can just upload an HTML file and you're Jamstack. But then you can bring on something like a nextjs or an 11ty or a Gatsby or what have you. And then you're doing a different kind of Jamstack. And then you can bring in, like you said, the incremental static regeneration ISR. We love acronyms. And that uses SWR another accurate acronym, and then you've got DPR. But you can learn those things slowly as you go. And like you said before it, you can build stuff and put it live and have no understanding of any of that and then come back and get a little bit of performance boost or a little bit of build boost or these little things. And you can go Salma Alam-Naylor 19:24 When you need it. You know when it's appropriate when your site needs to scale when you've now got a CMS when you've got different types of data when you convert to use this database or something like that. And it's so flexible. It's not just static sites. It's it's a whole ecosystem that is so far removed from the monolithic way. We used to do things with just everything, everything from the server at request time done, or you know, everything from the CDN or request time static done. It's like there's these combinations Have those but then some more clever stuff that makes your workflow more efficient. That means that you don't need to worry about these things. And it's just like whoever thought of these things. I wish I had thought of those things. Oh, yeah. I'd feel pretty accomplished. Bryan Robinson 20:20 Oh, yeah. And I mean, we'd be having a completely different conversation if either of us were there. But But, but in all seriousness, right, like, the fact that I built my son's website, and it has a like button, I have no clue. Like, I've been doing this a long time, I have no clue how 10 years ago, I would have done that, because I would have had to stand up a server, I would have had to learn PHP or Python, or a server side scripting language, I would have had to do all these things, I would have had to do the JavaScript on the fly on the front end, I wouldn't have done it just pure and simple, I would not have done it. And literally, it was two hours of work 2 serverless functions and low clients are JavaScript and I was done. Salma Alam-Naylor 20:56 Do you remember back in the day when front end development involved, like httpd conf files and things like that, and I had no idea what that meant server configuration, get out of my life, I just want to build some front end with JavaScript, I don't care about that stuff is in my way. And the amount of I used to work on the LAMP stack when I was first starting because I was doing PHP at work. And so like to set up a whole PHP server on your on your local machine with PHP, MyAdmin, and blah, blah, blah, like, I'm not hating on PHP is great. But as a front end developer, you don't want to deal with that. Because that's not what you are an expert in, that's not what you want to do. That's not what makes you happy. It's, you know, it doesn't make me happy, like the four different types of rendering on the Jamstack makes me happy. Bryan Robinson 21:51 Well, and I mean, you get further into that. And you have to think about the DevOps. And like I, I pride myself on being able to find all the edge cases and break everyone's DevOps, that's something that I'm incredibly good at. And it comes from, like, I learned about Vagrant, and, you know, virtual machines on my laptop. And I, I haven't installed a vagrant or virtual machine on my laptop in six years now. And it is so refreshing. Salma Alam-Naylor 22:18 Yes, I remember that used to do that was all I did at work on these big monolith systems and deploy systems. I wonder how far those systems are away from that now. But I wonder if that's still the same, but it's just, there's always, there's big pain points between Windows and Mac, as well. And the Jamstack doesn't really have that, because you're just running some Node in a terminal right to develop locally. And then you're just sending it to the CDN. It's just Bryan Robinson 22:46 that like, like between Linux that you might have your server and Mac the Mac flavor versions, then then you got like title case sensitivity. Like no, no, don't make me think about that. Please. Bryan Robinson 22:59 Let's pivot a little bit. You have a music history. And so I'm very excited now that I've learned that for the next question, which is what is your actual musical jam right now? What's your favorite musician or album or what's playing on a day to day basis for you? Salma Alam-Naylor 23:14 So I think whenever you ask a musician this question, they will always say, the classic developer line it depends. Always It depends. I have I like such a varied bag of music because I used to listen to such a varied bag of music when I was learning music and writing music. I like music from progressive metal to EDM to jazz to folk to weird sounds. A solid favorite band that I will always reach for is Architectes, which is a British metal core band. And me and my husband. I actually met my husband when I joined his band. So we've got like a lot of music in common. It was a progressive metal band long story a long time ago. But the song I have on repeat right now is more on the EDM side. It's called probably no one's ever heard of this. It's called move on by Grant and I love it right? Because another weird nerdy thing. This is a music nerdy thing now. You know how often in pop songs your head double tracked guitars like panned left and right. This song for the first time in my life, I have heard double tracked bass guitars, and they're playing slightly different things. One minute 47 into the song is a feast for your ears. It's amazing to listen to, and I can't stop listening to it because of this double bass track thing. Move on by Grant if you want to hear some nerdy stuff, musically. Bryan Robinson 24:42 Now for that you probably need stereo headphones, right? Yeah, exactly. Get the benefit of that. Yes. Wow. Okay, that's I am not disappointed by the answer in any way shape or form. I learned a lot I didn't even know that was the thing double tracked anything so excellent nerding on that Salma Alam-Naylor 25:01 Yeah, great nerding love it. Bryan Robinson 25:04 Alright, so before we go, is there anything that you would like to promote out into the Jamstack ecosystem, anything, you're doing Contentful anything. Salma Alam-Naylor 25:11 So on my Twitch streams, I stream twice a week. Currently, I always build on the Jamstack. And one of the most challenging projects I'm building is something called Unbreak dot tech, where, and sometimes it's weird to bring these stuff. These sometimes it's weird to bring these things up in these kinds of podcasts. But as a woman in tech on the internet, it's very difficult, full stop, to realize. And sometimes it generally falls on the women and the marginalized people to talk about the issues that we face. However, unbraked dot Tech offers a platform for men to talk to other men, about being a better person and treating women and marginalized people better. So I've been working on that on my stream, I am welcoming contributions from men who want to talk on the matter. And we'll see how it goes. It's a complete experiment. I have no idea. You know, again, I'm using the Jamstack to experiment and see how it goes. So it's all good. It's hosted on Netlify using like Netlify forms, it's built with NextJs. JS. And I work on that every now and then and see where it goes, you can now submit videos as well as articles to the site, and they have captioned I've got captions and all sorts of accessibility stuff going on. So that's the thing. Catch me on twitch twitch.tv/white p four, and three are the Bryan Robinson 26:45 one of the hardest screen names in the business. Salma Alam-Naylor 26:48 Yeah, I regret it holy. Bryan Robinson 26:50 Anyway, definitely check out on what was it Unbreak tech it on Unbreak dot tech unbrick break dye Tech because I have heard way too many stories, and everyone should know the stories and again, the women and the marginalized people have had to tell them enough. So men, let's step up and do a little bit more around that. Salma Alam-Naylor 27:09 I appreciate that. Bryan Robinson 27:10 Salma, thanks so much for joining us on the show today. And I hope you keep doing amazing things, especially with Unbreak dot tech, and Contentful and everything in the Jamstack. And we hope to see some really cool stuff in the future. Salma Alam-Naylor 27:21 Thank you, Bryan. Thanks for having me. Bryan Robinson 27:24 Thanks again to our guest, and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoyed the podcast, be sure to leave a review, rating, Star heart favorite, whatever it is, and your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

SCRIPTease
046 | Pipedrive – Jakub Kadlubiec, Head of Engineering & Georgy Marchuk, Senior Developer

SCRIPTease

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 59:04


Pipedrive je inovativní sales & CRM platforma, která původně vznikla v Estonsku, ale od roku 2018 má výraznou českou stopu. Obsluhovat 100 000 zákazníků po celém světě, a to včetně Amazonu nebo SpaceX, totiž není jen tak. Mezi 300 developery proto najdeme početný tým, který „jede bomby“ v pražském Karlíně.Unikátní feature Pipedrive spočívá v přesunu celého sales procesu do Kanban Boardu. Kluci a holky z Prahy na to navázali vývojem v oblasti Lead Generation, který pomohl firmu katapultovat do pozice dolarového jednorožce. Pozvání na tenhle SCRIPTease přijali Jakub Kadlubiec, ostřílený matador v programování, který šéfuje vývojářům v Praze a do Pipedrive přelétl ze skotského Skyscanneru, a jeho nepostradatelná pravá ruka Georgy Marchuk, Senior Developer nabytý zkušenostmi po spolupráci s velkými značkami jako jsou Adidas, Avast, Decathlon nebo český FinTech startup Twisto. Hot Tech Stack: Node.js, TypeScript, Go, PHP, React, GraphQL, Relay, Kafka, RabbitMQ, MySQL, KubernetesChcete se dozvědět, jak spravovat 150 integrací, 500 mikroslužeb a nezabít u toho ani jednoho člena týmu, který v Praze pro Pipedrive tvrdě maká?

Choose Joy with Tisa
Prayer for Mental Strength | Prayers of Protection

Choose Joy with Tisa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:33


Prayer for Mental Strength In order to strengthen our minds, we have to exercise it. Dream bigger. Let's pray this prayer that our minds grow stronger in the Lord.

API Busters
Seeing the forest and the trees in 2022

API Busters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 55:29


Thanks to Lob.com for sponsoring APIs You Won't hate - join the lobster pod at https://www.lob.com/careers

NosillaCast Apple Podcast
NC #869 PhpStorm, Microwave Experiments, Let's Get Small, Show Notes Explained, Ōura Ring

NosillaCast Apple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 51:39


LTA 100: December 2021 – Let's Talk Podcasts PhpStorm - An IDE Not Just for PHP – by William Reveal Center or Edge – Which Cooks Hotter in a Microwave? Let's Get Small – by Frank Petrie Dumb Question Corner - How do the Show Notes Work? Ōura Ring (Generation 3) Review – by Ron Burch Join the Conversation: allison@podfeet.com podfeet.com/slack Support the Show: Patreon Donation PayPal one-time donation Podfeet Podcasts Mugs at Zazzle Podfeet 15-Year Anniversary Shirts Affiliate Links: Parallels Toolbox Affiliate - get 3 mos free Learn through MacSparky Field Guides Backblaze One Free Month

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Bless the Seed Planters (Audio) David Eells -12/29/21 Many people believe that they have arrived, and that's a sad thing. There's always a goal, and the goal is Christ and Christ-likeness, and they don't know it. For that reason, “the backsliding of the simple shall slay them.”  (Pro.1:32) For the backsliding of the simple shall slay them… When the Scripture talks about “falling away” as in (2 Thessalonians 2:3; Jude 1:24), it's talking about “backsliding” (Isaiah 57:17; Jeremiah 2:19; etc.) because both the Greek apostasia and the Hebrew meshubah have the same meaning. Apostasy, backsliding or falling away. When we are in this state our “hard drive” is infected with this world and its ways and its thinking, and it has to be renewed. We must be “transformed by the renewing of our minds”.  I know many people believe that the beginning and the end of Christianity is to “just accept Jesus as your personal Savior,” but that cannot be found written in the Word. What is written in the Word is “repent and believe,” which means to “change your mind and believe what I say”  as in (Matthew 21:32; Mark 1:15). Yet, too many people think they've stepped over some magic line and now they can just sit down and rest in the flesh, but then they can't and don't, bear fruit as in (Matthew 17:17-19; Luke 6:43).  Without bearing fruit, we are not being “born from above” (John 3:3,7). Let's go back to verse 20 and look at Who wrote “For the backsliding of the simple shall slay them.” (Pro.1:20) Wisdom crieth aloud in the street… So we see Wisdom is the One speaking here. Scripture also says, (1Co.1:24) … "Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God". This is Jesus speaking; He is the Wisdom of God. And from John, we know that He's also the Word of God. (Joh.1:1) In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. Therefore the Word of God is the Wisdom of God, and the Word gives you very clear directions to seek Him, not once, not by just shaking a preacher's hand or anything like that, but to seek Him and put that Wisdom into your heart.  Putting that Wisdom in your heart is what will protect and deliver you from this falling away because, as the Bible warns us, (Psa.58:3) The wicked are estranged from the womb: They go astray as soon as they are born, speaking lies. Let's continue reading. (Pro.1:20) Wisdom crieth aloud in the street; She uttereth her voice in the broad places (That's the broad road where the “many” are {Matthew 7:13}.); (21) She crieth in the chief place of concourse; At the entrance of the gates, In the city, she uttereth her words: (22) How long, ye simple ones (The Hebrew word there is pthiy and it means “foolish; silly, as in ‘able to be seduced'; naive.” These people are “simple” for lack of the knowledge of God.).  How long, ye simple ones will ye love simplicity? And scoffers delight them in scoffing, And fools hate knowledge?   Do you know how we know that people hate knowledge? It's because they don't choose to seek it out; they choose the world and the worldly. They let someone just “tell them how it is,” or letting some false god tell them instead of seeking out their own salvation (Php.2:12) …with fear and trembling. They would rather pay some preacher to give them the “truth.” Well here's the truth, (Mat.22:14) For many are called, but few chosen. Paul said to Timothy, (2Ti.1:8) Be not ashamed therefore of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me his prisoner: but suffer hardship with the gospel according to the power of God; (9) who saved us, and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before times eternal. Notice “Who saved us, and called us”:  You don't get called until you get saved. This “calling” is the Greek word klésis and it means “invitation.” We are being invited to partake of the things of the Kingdom of God, yet many people are not partaking of these, although it's written in there plainly. You can show it to them, but they've been inoculated by dead religion to not believe what is written and that's why many are the called and few are the chosen.  Now when you go out into a field that you have planted, which is what God has done in parables (Genesis 49:2; Isaiah 3:14,5:7,17:10,27:2; Amos 5:11; etc.), you're looking for the fruit. You're going to pick the fruit. You don't care about the plant. You plow the plant under and it goes back to the soil, just like the old body.  Jesus, in the Parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:3-8,18-23; Mark 4:2-9,13-20; Luke 8:4-15) pointed out to us four different types of people, and three of the four, when they heard the Good News, fell away, even though they were the ones, at least the last three, were the ones who were called. (Mar.4:14) The sower soweth the word. (15) And these are they by the way side, where the word is sown; and when they have heard, straightway cometh Satan, and taketh away the word which hath been sown in them. (16) And these in like manner are they that are sown upon the rocky [places], who, when they have heard the word, straightway receive it with joy; (17) and they have no root in themselves, but endure for a while; then, when tribulation or persecution ariseth because of the word, straightway they stumble. (18) And others are they that are sown among the thorns; these are they that have heard the word, (19) and the cares of the world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful. (20) And those are they that were sown upon the good ground; such as hear the word, and accept it, and bear fruit, thirtyfold, and sixtyfold, and a hundredfold.  Again, three of the four types, when they heard the Good News, fell away. Only one bore fruit, thirty-, sixty-, and a hundred-fold. These are the true Kingdom people. So if you “love simplicity,” (In the way the Bible refers to it negatively) and you love the very simple lie that all you need to do is shake some preacher's hand and then go sit on a pew and wait for the rapture, well, you're one of these fools who hates knowledge. If that's all you do, you're hating knowledge.  You need to seek out your own salvation with fear and trembling (Philippians 2:12). (Pro.1:23-30) Turn you at my reproof: Behold, I will pour out my spirit upon you (Many reject the Spirit of God, the Spirit of Wisdom. If you don't seek out your own salvation, you are rejecting the Spirit of God and the Spirit of Wisdom as it was given in the book of Acts.); I will make known my words unto you. (24) Because I have called, and ye have refused; I have stretched out my hand, and no man hath regarded; (25) But ye have set at nought all my counsel, And would none of my reproof: (26) I also will laugh in the day of your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh; (27) When your fear cometh as a storm, And your calamity cometh on as a whirlwind; When distress and anguish come upon you. (28) Then will they call upon me, but I will not answer; They will seek me diligently, but they shall not find me: (29) For that they hated knowledge, And did not choose the fear of the Lord (The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, is it not? {Proverbs 9:10}), (30) They would none of my counsel, They despised all my reproof.  It's much simpler to let a preacher who is walking in the flesh tell you how easy it is to be in the Kingdom, and that you really don't have to lose your life as Jesus said, in order to gain your life (Matthew 16:24-25; Mark 8:34-38; Luke 9:23-24; John 12:25). “You don't really have to do that, that's the hard way, just accept Jesus as your ‘personal Savior,' sit on a pew, pay your tithes and everything will be okay.” (Pro.1:31) Therefore shall they eat of the fruit of their own way, And be filled with their own devices. Oh, the “devices” that are out there now! “Unconditional eternal security” is a particularly deadly one. It teaches that you don't have to do anything after receiving salvation, but look at what Scripture teaches. (Eph.2:8) For by grace have ye been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, [it is] the gift of God; (9) not of works, that no man should glory. (10) For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God afore prepared that we should walk in them.  Those who don't have “good works” are obviously not the people of God, and they will speak against “works,” although the Bible says just the opposite. The Bible says that you're going to be judged according to your works, and it says it very clearly, over and over and over (Hebrews 11:8-30; James 2:14-26; etc.) (I'm not referring to the self-works of justification here.) So how do we bear the fruit of good works? First of all, we have to put goodness in our heart, because it is that Wisdom of God, the Word of God, that re-programs our hard-drive to think, walk, talk, and bear the fruit of Jesus Christ.  (Pro.1:32) For the backsliding (Again, the “backsliding” is the “falling-away.”) of the simple shall slay them, And the careless ease of fools shall destroy them. (33) But whoso hearkeneth unto me shall dwell securely, And shall be quiet without fear of evil. (Pro.2:1) My son (This is still Wisdom speaking.), if thou wilt receive my words, And lay up my commandments with thee; (2) So as to incline thine ear unto wisdom, And apply thy heart to understanding; (3) Yea, if thou cry after discernment, And lift up thy voice for understanding… The Bible promises that if you ask the Lord for wisdom, He will give it to you. If you ask Him for understanding, He will give it to you. Don't be double-minded, but ask Him and seek Him (James 1:5-8). Ask Him even to put it in your heart to desire it.  When I first came to the Lord, I didn't have any foundation in Scripture whatsoever, but when I started reading it, a supernatural desire fell over me to seek after wisdom, to seek after knowledge. A supernatural desire fell over me to find out about this God. I had been lied to about this God when I was in the Catholic church and I had to look in the Scriptures for myself to find out the truth. Everything else fell by the wayside as God kept on leading me through this desire for truth. Nothing else was important. All of my hobbies that I loved before fell by the wayside because, suddenly, this was the important thing. If you don't have that gift, you need to ask God for that gift. (Pro.2:4) If thou seek her (If you seek Wisdom.) as silver, And search for her as for hid treasures: (5) Then shalt thou understand the fear of the Lord (Yes, you must have the fear of the Lord. Many people hear the Scriptures, but totally ignore what they've heard because they don't have the fear of the Lord.), And find the knowledge of God. (6) For the Lord giveth wisdom; Out of his mouth [cometh] knowledge and understanding:  (7) He layeth up sound wisdom for the upright; [He is] a shield to them that walk in integrity; (8) That he may guard the paths of justice, And preserve the way of his saints. (9) Then shalt thou understand righteousness and justice, And equity, [yea,] every good path. (10) For wisdom shall enter into thy heart, And knowledge shall be pleasant unto thy soul; (11) Discretion shall watch over thee; Understanding shall keep thee: (12) To deliver thee from the way of evil, From the men that speak perverse things; (13) Whoso forsaketh the paths of uprightness, To walk in the ways of darkness (Which is what so many people do: they get saved, and then continue to walk in the same way they've always walked, not seeking out the knowledge and wisdom of God to know even what is the Will of God.); (14) Who rejoice to do evil, And delight in the perverseness of evil; (15) Who are crooked in their ways, And wayward in their paths: (16) To deliver thee from the strange woman, Even from the foreigner that flattereth with her words. The “strange woman” is the “harlot” of Revelation 17, but that harlot is the “mother of the harlots” of the earth (Revelation 17:5). All of those sects that came out of the mother are also called “harlots” because every one of those denominations received their own seed, the seed that wasn't the seed of the Husband. That makes them harlots. They received their own wisdom and their own knowledge. The knowledge of the Gospel is being ignored. They've reduced it to nothing more than moralizing and there is no hope for moralizing. Those apostate preachers may get up and give a Scripture verse or two on Sunday morning, but the rest of the time, it's all their knowledge and their wisdom.  Folks, there's nothing more important than the Word of God! The Word going into your heart re-creates Jesus Christ in you. He is the Word. It's the Word that does this; nothing else can do it. No moralizing can do it. You can go to some church and get moralized every Sunday and maybe even every Wednesday, if you're really diligent to go after moralizing, but moralizing won't give you the knowledge of the Gospel. Moralizing won't give you the knowledge of how you can receive, freely, the Nature of Jesus Christ. It won't give you that confidence that this is your gift from God, that this is the reconciliation that He gave you at the Cross (Romans 5:10-11; 2 Corinthians 5:18-20; Colossians 1:21-22).  He took your life, nailed it on the Cross, and gave you His Life. As Paul proclaimed, (Gal.2:20) I have been crucified with Christ; and it is no longer I that live, but Christ living in me: and that [life] which I now live in the flesh I live in faith, [the faith] which is in the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself up for me. In other words, “Now it's no longer I that live, it's Christ that lives in me.” (Pro.2:16 ) To deliver thee from the strange woman, Even from the foreigner that flattereth with her words (Those apostate preachers will make it easy for you. They will invite you to believe in ‘once saved, always saved.' You won't have to do anything; just believe it.” They will lead you in their crooked ways and in their wayward paths.); (17) That forsaketh the friend of her youth (That's the One Who saved you in the beginning, Jesus, the One you loved in the beginning. Now they want to give you another “Jesus” and another “gospel” and another “spirit.”), And forgetteth the covenant of her God… Some people don't even get to know that Covenant before they're led astray from the Bible by the teachings of men.  As Jesus said to the Pharisees of His day, (Mar.7:6) … Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written, This people honoreth me with their lips, But their heart is far from me. (7) But in vain do they worship me, Teaching as their doctrines the precepts of men. (8) Ye leave the commandment of God, and hold fast the tradition of men. (9) … Full well do ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your tradition… (13) making void the word of God by your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things ye do.  There's no difference in the nature of man from the time Jesus said that until now. We must repent and believe what He says; this is how we are re-programmed to walk the straight walk. (Pro.2:18) For her house inclineth unto death, And her paths unto the dead. It's true; every one of those harlots' houses “inclineth unto death.” A sister I once knew shared this dream with me. She said, “I went to three doors and knocked on them, and every time, a harlot answered the door. Then the fourth time, I went and knocked on your door, and I saw you. What do you think that means?” So I asked, “How many religions have you gone to?” She answered, “Three.” I told her, “Yeah, that's what I thought.” (Pro.2:19) None that go unto her return again, Neither do they attain unto the paths of life: (20) That thou mayest walk in the way of good men, And keep the paths of the righteous. (21) For the upright shall dwell in the land…  This is the land of God's people, the Promised Land, and each promise that we read in the Word will become ours if we are bold to stand on it. (Deu.11:24) Every place whereon the sole of your foot shall tread shall be yours… God is saying, “Every place you put your foot, I will give it to you.” God has given us this “land” that we walk in, which is this flesh that comes from the earth, in order for us to conquer it. And those tribes that originally inhabited the land, the Girgashites, Amorites, Canaanites, and so on (Deuteronomy 7:1-3), all represent the lusts of the “old man” that had to be conquered in order to take that land for the spiritual man, Jesus Christ, Who is (Col.1:27) … Christ in you, the hope of glory. He's growing in you like a little baby. You must feed Him; don't feed the flesh, feed Him.  (Mat.12:46) While he (Jesus) was yet speaking to the multitudes, behold, his mother and his brethren stood without, seeking to speak to him. (47) And one said unto him, Behold, thy mother and thy brethren stand without, seeking to speak to thee. (48) But he answered and said unto him that told him, Who is my mother? and who are my brethren? (49) And he stretched forth his hand towards his disciples, and said, Behold, my mother and my brethren! (50) For whosoever shall do the will of my Father who is in heaven, he is my brother, and sister, and mother. Those who do the Will of the Father are those who are bringing forth the fruit of Jesus Christ in their life.  (Pro.2:21) For the upright shall dwell in the land, And the perfect shall remain in it. There is a great falling-away because there is a broad road to destruction, as Jesus said. (Mat.7:13) Enter ye in by the narrow gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many are they that enter in thereby. (14) For narrow is the gate, and straitened the way, that leadeth unto life, and few are they that find it. We don't know the narrow road unless we study the wisdom of God, which is all through the Bible. (2Jn.1:9) Whosoever goeth onward and abideth not in the teaching of Christ, hath not God: he that abideth in the teaching, the same hath both the Father and the Son.  It's not who starts out with you; it's who continues. There are lots of people who think they know the teaching, but they're getting it second-, third-, fourth-, fifth-hand. The only way you're going to know the teaching and the wisdom of God is to study the Word and seek out the wisdom of God for yourself. Don't go into a dead church and be leavened the rest of your life. We just read that people go there and they don't ever come out! They're wasting their life, never coming to know the wisdom of God. (Pro.2:21) For the upright shall dwell in the land, And the perfect shall remain in it. (“Perfect” is a word that also means “mature.” Those who come into the Image of Christ are mature.) (22) But the wicked shall be cut off from the land, And the treacherous shall be rooted out of it. This is still talking about the same people; the wicked are the treacherous. (Mat.22:14) For many are called, but few chosen.  You see, the wicked may start out with you, but they don't finish with you. (1Jn.2:19) They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us: but [they went out,] that they might be made manifest that they all are not of us. The wicked will be cut off from the land, which is the Land of Promise. They will not know the promises, they will not live by the promises. Paul exhorted God's people to not be sons of the “handmaid,” but to be sons of the “freewoman,” because it's going to be proven that not everyone who is a son of Abraham is chosen. Many are called, but few are chosen. (Gal.4:22) For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, one by the handmaid, and one by the freewoman. (23) Howbeit the son by the handmaid is born after the flesh; but the [son] by the freewoman [is born] through promise.  The promise is what begets you again unto Jesus Christ and everything that He is and all that He does and thinks. It's the promise that does this. It is not being moralized; it is not joining a religion. The son of the free-woman is born through promise. Abraham so badly wanted Ishmael to be chosen by God, and I, too, have wanted people to be chosen by God, and I, too, have “sown seed” in both the “freewoman” and the “handmaid.” And when the sons of the handmaid begin to fall away, I cry for them, but they are manifesting who they are. (Gal.4:24) Which things contain an allegory: for these [women] are two covenants; one from mount Sinai, bearing children unto bondage, which is Hagar. If you're born of “Hagar” then you're in bondage. Even while you're in religion, you can be in bondage just as the Israelites were. They were in so much bondage that when Jesus came to bring them to the higher order, they refused to come out of bondage.  (25) Now this Hagar is mount Sinai in Arabia (It was the Israelites who went to Mount Sinai and so Paul is applying this to them, because they were in bondage and they didn't know it.) and answereth to the Jerusalem that now is (That's the physical Jerusalem over there in the Middle East that's in bondage.): for she is in bondage with her children. (26) But the Jerusalem that is above is free, which is our mother. Praise the Lord! We are being born of the Word from above, first spirit, then soul, and then body.  The “soul” is the mind, the will, and the emotions. Your soul has to walk after the Spirit to receive the nature of that Spirit in order for you to bear His fruit in your soul. (Rom.8:13) For if ye live after the flesh, ye must die; but if by the Spirit ye put to death the deeds of the body, ye shall live. (14) For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God. When you were first saved, you received a born again spirit, but now you have to go on to bear fruit in your soul. Only if you bear the fruit, which is Christ-likeness, will you get that new body, the born-again body, like His Body.  Now those harlots' houses tell you to just “step over the line” and that all you need to be is born-again in your spirit. No, that's not enough because you haven't borne fruit in your soul yet. So how do you bear fruit? The way you bear fruit immediately is that you believe you have received. Jesus said, (Mar.11:24) … All things whatsoever ye pray and ask for, believe ye received (The Greek word there lambanó is past tense in the original.) them, and ye shall have them. You walk by faith for them until you see them. This way you are accounted as righteous until you are righteous, which is bearing fruit. Everything that the Lord offers will be nothing to the person who doesn't reach out and receive the promises by faith. They will not come to pass, and Paul tells us why. (Heb.4:2) … The word of hearing did not profit them, because it was not united by faith with them that heard. You see, they didn't mix faith with the words. (Escape the Falling Away PDF)   Jesus Chooses the Meal Planners for His Bride Anonymous - 12/24/21 (David's notes in red) I dreamed I was in an apartment with white walls. Many were in the apartment with me and I knew we all had to share the space. (Eph. 2:19-22 So then ye are no more strangers and sojourners, but ye are fellow-citizens with the saints, and of the household of God, 20 being built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the chief corner stone; 21 in whom each several building, fitly framed together, groweth into a holy temple in the Lord; 22 in whom ye also are builded together for a habitation of God in the Spirit.) There were men sitting around the dining table talking and discussing ministry plans and kingdom matters. (I believe these are the apostate ministers who talk the talk but don't walk the walk. They are not interested in serving the food to the people. They are living high off the hog but feeding left over scraps to the people.) There were women standing around and talking in small groups. They all seemed to have grouped together according to their traits or commonalities and the things they enjoyed or thought were important. There was one woman in the kitchen area who was on the phone all the time. She was sort of a busy body and liked to gossip about all the latest happenings and what was going on with different people. (These represent the denominations and sects of Christianity.) At first, I was in the living room organizing and getting rid of clutter. This was a challenge for me because sometimes I didn't know what was important to keep and what was needing to be thrown out. I was dealing with some issues myself, but I kept my focus and continued, as best I could, to clean and organize the place to make it nice for the others. (As we grow and mature in Christ, He helps us to discern what we need to get rid of in our lives so that we can be better ambassadors for Christ to others.) I was keeping my nose to the grindstone, so to speak, and not allowing myself to be distracted with the different groups of women even though I overheard occasionally what they were saying. (If we stay focused on living the Word in our lives every day, we will not get distracted and off course with the sects.) I ended up in the kitchen with a meal planner book on top of the stove and a notepad. I was working hard to plan meals every week and preparing to go to the store with my list to buy the items that I needed to make the meals when Jesus appeared in front of me. (Representing prioritizing my own spiritual food needs so that I would be healthy to be what the Kingdom and its people need.  I.e. to hear the Gospel and be an example of discipleship that others be edified.) He was very tall with broad shoulders and dressed like I imagine he would have been dressed when he walked with His disciples the first time He came to earth. David was filling the inside of Jesus. I.E Jesus was filled with David. (This is the make up of the David Man-child body of reformers.  2Co 3:18  But we all, with unveiled face beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are transformed into the same image from glory to glory, even as from the Lord the Spirit.   1Jn 2:4-6  He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him;  5  but whoso keepeth his word, in him verily hath the love of God been perfected. Hereby we know that we are in him:  6  he that saith he abideth in him ought himself also to walk even as he walked.) David in Jesus looked for me right away and came into the kitchen. He had passed by the other groups of women and found me diligently planning the meals and He held out His hand to me. (Song 6:8-9 There are threescore queens, and fourscore concubines, And virgins without number. 9 My dove, my undefiled, is but one; She is the only one of her mother; She is the choice one of her that bare her. The daughters saw her, and called her blessed; Yea, the queens and the concubines, and they praised her.) I looked up from my lists and the meal planner and noticed Jesus standing in front of me with His hand extended. I was surprised to see Him and I took His hand. (Pro. 31:13-31 She seeketh wool and flax, And worketh willingly with her hands. 14 She is like the merchant-ships; She bringeth her bread from afar. 15 She riseth also while it is yet night, And giveth food to her household, And their task to her maidens. 16 She considereth a field, and buyeth it; With the fruit of her hands she planteth a vineyard. 17 She girdeth her loins with strength, And maketh strong her arms. 18 She perceiveth that her merchandise is profitable: Her lamp goeth not out by night... 20 She stretcheth out her hand to the poor; Yea, she reacheth forth her hands to the needy... 25 Strength and dignity are her clothing; And she laugheth at the time to come. 26 She openeth her mouth with wisdom; And the law of kindness is on her tongue. 27 She looketh well to the ways of her household, And eateth not the bread of idleness. 28 Her children rise up, and call her blessed; Her husband also, and he praiseth her, saying: 29 Many daughters have done worthily, But thou excellest them all. 30 Grace is deceitful, and beauty is vain; But a woman that feareth Jehovah, she shall be praised. 31 Give her of the fruit of her hands; And let her works praise her in the gates.) He announced to me in everyones hearing, “I choose you.” (When the Man-child comes abiding in Christ he will do what Jesus did, chose who John the Baptist said was the Bride.)  I was surprised because I knew all of my own struggles. I looked around to all the other groups of women and asked Him, “Why not them?” They also seemed to be busy and belong to the kingdom. They had gifts the Lord had given them. But they did not seem impressed or even aware of the Lord's presence. (Many won't recognize Christ in the Man-child ministers when He appears again because this is history repeating.) He said, "They put on outward shows of importance and busyness but they were not about My Father's business.” I began to look around at the different groups of women. One group was talking about shopping trips, hobbies and superficial things and the Lord said, “They have no depth” (Meaning of relationship with Him.  Mark 4:5-6 And other fell on the rocky ground, where it had not much earth; and straightway it sprang up, because it had no deepness of earth: 6 and when the sun was risen, it was scorched; and because it had no root, it withered away.  I looked at another group who seemed, at least outwardly, to put on a good show of piety and gifts and good works but they were doing these things to impress the others and to gain the approval of men but they were idle when no one was looking. The Lord said of this group, “They think they are deserving of the position because of what they have done and the praise they receive from one another and from men. But they are idle with most of their time and not good stewards with what they've been given. They justify themselves and prate their time away.” (Mat. 23:28 Even so ye also outwardly appear righteous unto men, but inwardly ye are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.) Then I looked at the woman who had been standing in the kitchen behind me on the phone and said, “What of her?” The Lord said, “She is least of all; a gossip and a busy body. She and her works are not pleasing to My Father.” She had filled up all her time with unprofitable words; many times under the guise of concern and prayer requests for others and their situations, but in reality this fueled her fleshly desire to gossip and know everybody else's business. (1Ti. 5:13 And withal they learn also to be idle, going about from house to house; and not only idle, but tattlers also and busybodies, speaking things which they ought not.) I asked Him, “Well, why me? I also have struggled and am not perfect. It's hard for me to organize and know what to throw out and get rid of so that your house is not cluttered, although I do the best I can.” He said, “When I came, you were the one I found diligently working. My Father is pleased with your planning of the meals.” Then I woke up. I thought of this text in Mat 24:42-46  Watch therefore: for ye know not on what day your Lord cometh. 43 But know this, that if the master of the house had known in what watch the thief was coming, he would have watched, and would not have suffered his house to be broken through. 44 Therefore be ye also ready; for in an hour that ye think not the Son of man cometh. 45 Who then is the faithful and wise servant, whom his lord hath set over his household, to give them their food in due season? 46 Blessed is that servant, whom his lord when he cometh shall find so doing. 47 Verily I say unto you, that he will set him over all that he hath.   Select LanguageAfrikaansAlbanianAmharicArabicArmenianAzerbaijaniBasqueBelarusianBengaliBosnianBulgarianCatalanCebuanoChichewaChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CorsicanCroatianCzechDanishDutchEsperantoEstonianFilipinoFinnishFrenchFrisianGalicianGeorgianGermanGreekGujaratiHaitian CreoleHausaHawaiianHebrewHindiHmongHungarianIcelandicIgboIndonesianIrishItalianJapaneseJavaneseKannadaKazakhKhmerKinyarwandaKoreanKurdish (Kurmanji)KyrgyzLaoLatinLatvianLithuanianLuxembourgishMacedonianMalagasyMalayMalayalamMalteseMaoriMarathiMongolianMyanmar (Burmese)NepaliNorwegianOdia (Oriya)PashtoPersianPolishPortuguesePunjabiRomanianRussianSamoanScots GaelicSerbianSesothoShonaSindhiSinhalaSlovakSlovenianSomaliSpanishSundaneseSwahiliSwedishTajikTamilTatarTeluguThaiTurkishTurkmenUkrainianUrduUyghurUzbekVietnameseWelshXhosaYiddishYorubaZulu Powered by Translate Printer-friendly version

That's my JAMstack
S3E1 - Sean C. Davis on the Jamstack philosophy, NextJS, and more

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello, and welcome back to season three of That's My Jamstack. It's amazing that we've been going this long. I know it's been quite a bit since our last episode, but to jog your memories, That's My Jamstack is the podcast asks that time honored and tested question. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host, Bryan Robinson and we've got a lot of great guests lined up for this season. So without further ado, let's dive in. On today's episode, we talk with Sean C. Davis. Sean is a passionate tinkerer and teacher. He's currently working as a developer experience engineer at stack bit. Bryan Robinson 1:04 All right, Shawn. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show and talking with us today. Sean C. Davis 1:07 Thanks for having me, Brian. Excited to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:09 Awesome. So first and foremost, tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? And what do you do for fun outside of work Sean C. Davis 1:15 For for work, I am currently the developer experience engineer for stack bit. I've been in the web development space for about a decade or so the first nine years, were all in agency space building agency freelancing, building websites for folks. And just this last year, took a shift into the product space and spending some time with stack bid. And that's that's been so that's super exciting. That's what I've been doing every day. And I'm sure we'll we'll dig into that a bit. For fun on the side. Well, I feel like I'm the I'm the classic developer in the sense that there's always some, there's always some technical thing that's happening on the side. Right now that thing is, it's it's my personal site I've had, I've had a couple of different blogs that I've maintained over the years. And within the last two years or so I've been trying to focus that content, bringing it all into my personal site. But right now, it's still kind of just like a, it's just a, it's a blog, most of most folks who come there, Googled some problem, they get the solution, and it serves those folks really well. But I'm in this transition of trying to make it more of a learning hub. So that's, it's kind of a side project now. But that's but it's still like it's fun, but it's still I don't know, it's where it could still be in a developer. I'm so like, the the other part of me, I've got two little kids at home and like a lot of folks when the pandemic hits kind of focused a lot of energy and attention into the home. So it's various projects around the house or like like many people I am part of the reason you couldn't find flour at the grocery store because I got really into baking for a while and still doing that a little bit to some like some gardening kind of just fun fun stuff around the house. Bryan Robinson 3:06 In your in your baking exploits. Are we talking like bread, baking, pastry baking, but what kind of baking Sean C. Davis 3:13 where I spend most of my time and still doing a little bit today is the classic sourdough loaf. So mostly bread, mostly bread, at least I'm better at the bread. I've done a bit of the Sweet Treats and trying to learn a little bit about the decorating but it's just the presentation isn't my strong suit. So the flavor might be there. I've got a ways to go in the inner desert department. Bryan Robinson 3:37 Yeah, I've got I've got my own sourdough starter and all that. So I definitely feel I actually, I like a time I can be a hipster about something. And so when my son was born, actually so that was six years ago now. So pre pandemic, my wife my birthday that year, two months after he was born he got me a sourdough starter from King Arthur baking and amazing. I lapsed right because obviously like infant and all that and I baked for a little bit but yeah, then started back up during the pandemic as well. Because who, who doesn't want to do that? We're gonna do Yeah, exactly. You got something to focus on. Anyway, I actually love your site. I'm sure that when we do shout outs at the end, we'll talk about that Sean C. Davis calm but one things that came up on the little repeating thing on your homepage is you're afraid of bears and Bs. Is that Is that a thing? Or is that just a funny thing? Sean C. Davis 4:21 Oh, yeah, it's a it's a funny thing. I mean, I I I love both of them, but also am terrified of both that I do. I do. I guess I didn't mention this in the fun thing. I really enjoy hiking and camping. haven't done much camping since having little kids. We're gonna eventually get them out there. But we do a fair amount of hiking. And so yeah, I've had a number of run ins with both bears and bees. And it's terrifying every time but I also very much appreciate and respect them for what they do for us. Yes. Bryan Robinson 4:54 All right. So let's talk a little bit about the Jamstack. So what was your entry point into this space? It seems this idea of Jamstack or static sites or whatever it was at the time. Sean C. Davis 5:03 It that's an interesting question. Because Okay, so if you say, Yeah, entry point into Jamstack, or static sites, if you broke that apart and said, What's your entry point into Jamstack? And what's your entry point into static sites? I have two different answers. So I'll tell you a little bit about the the journey from one to the other. It's, I find it kind of interesting. So it static sites were was the first thing before I knew anything about Jamstack. In fact, before Jamstack was coined, because the gens Jamstack term comes from I think, later in 2015, I believe. So the first agency job, I had built a few sites with middleman, they were originally a PHP shop, and about the time I joined, were transitioning into becoming a Rails shop. And so Ruby was the bread and butter programming language. And there were a few clients that would come on, who didn't want to pay for a CMS or just like they needed something real quick, and it could be static and totally fine. And so we, we were building middleman sites, but deploying, deploying them to like a digital ocean or equivalent, it's still running on a web server still serving up these pages in real time, even though they're just HTML files city like kind of silly, but But there weren't great solid patterns at that time. And about that time, 2013 or so is also when I started building custom content management systems. I built it, I evolved, and I iterated on it. And I think I was looking at this recently, I believe there were four major, different versions that I built over the series, or course of about three or four years in there. And so I'll come back to that. But as I was, so set, this first agency working on middleman, I built a few middleman sites is when I switched to freelancing. And then at this at the last Agency, also, a few middleman sites like middleman kept kept popping up when I was when I was freelancing there. Actually, that's when I built the fourth and final version of that CMS. And at that time, this is probably I think we're talking about 2016, maybe 20. Yeah, I think that seems right 2016. And so the Jamstack term exists, the term headless CMS exists, but I had no idea that these things were things that people were doing. But I had this need, where I had a client who wanted a mobile native application, and a, also a website. And it seemed like a lot of the content was going to overlap. And I was like, Well, I'm building this next version of a CMS, what should it look like? Maybe it should be able to serve both of these. And so I was like, Oh, brilliant, decoupled architecture like this is this is gonna be great. And so that that last CMS I built was API driven. And, and I believe, I believe the website was a middleman site, it, it may have been some other framework, but it was like this Jamstack pattern, but again, still deployed, still using a web server to serve every request. So like missing that, that final piece that that Netlify gives us in the CDN in that instant cache invalidation. So fast forward to this last agency, and we're also a rail shop Sean C. Davis 8:40 and built a few middleman sites. But what happened was, why I think that the 2017, I believe, the the CTO, late 2017, early 2018, our CTO gets wind of the Jamstack. And so this is pre Jamstack. Conference, still really small kind of tight knit community. And we're like, and everything just kind of aligned because we won this work. For a company where it was going to be building them a new marketing website, it was gonna be a fairly big site. But this company also had a product and an internal product team. And that team had already switched to building that product with React. And so and we had heard a little bit about Jamstack. We heard about Gatsby and we're like, Oh, perfect, perfect time. Gatsby is the cool kid in town. Like we can jump all in on the Jamstack we think we can reduce development costs over time. You know, all the all the classic Jamstack benefits like we can get those and so we took a leap. We jumped all in and so that was like that was the real introduction to Jamstack and I find it I find it kind of funny looking back on it now because I spent all those years with Jamstack like patterns and using tool and middleman was part of all of those and then we're like, oh Jamstack, but also switched to JavaScript based frameworks at the same time, which I think a lot of folks went through that pattern. But I don't know if funny to reflect on. Bryan Robinson 10:11 Yeah, definitely. And like that that kind of journey is really interesting. Like in that agency world, the fact that, like you were having defined these patterns on your own, and then this community kind of sprang up next to what you were doing, and then look like we can do those things, maybe even slightly better than than kind of where we are now that we see kind of this broader scope, and there are products out there. That's really, really interesting. And it kind of mirrors on my own journey. I was at an agency when I discovered all this as well and never really implemented at the agency that we had a customer we had a full fledge, like custom content management system that like the agency had built, so never got a big we Sean C. Davis 10:49 did we did too, I don't it was like it was a compelling enough idea to our CTO, that he's like, we're throat, like we're throwing it all out where we're, I, we had a lot of, I mean, you know, there's issues with you, you have to maintain your own software. And it's it's another piece of the stack. And he's like that we were just getting bogged down with this site went down. And there's a bug in this CMS. And I think the crux was, there was one site where we didn't protect the slash admin route, like, should have done that. And we're like, Okay, well, let's, this is a way to never make that mistake. Again. I'm not Bryan Robinson 11:27 gonna speak for you on this. But my advice to anyone listening out there is if you think you should build a content management system, don't just don't do it. Sean C. Davis 11:38 Yes, yes. I don't know if I may have written a post about this at one point, or maybe it was just an idea in my head, but it was gonna be ashes, I should see if I can find it. The idea was, here's how you can build a content management system and my journey and exactly why you shouldn't do it. Like it's, it's, I think the the lesson I have baked in there is, it can be a really powerful experience for learning about content schemas and know how to organize pages and components and like structured data. But it's also just not a good idea to do it. Because there's there are how many dozens or hundreds of companies that are focusing on that problem every single day. Bryan Robinson 12:20 And let's be fair to our past selves, right, like in 2012 2013 weren't as many companies do, and they weren't as fully featured as they are today. I think it's kind of the same thing. A lot of people have probably created their own, like, custom static site generator in the past, like, Oh, I just made a couple include stuff like that. Let's just, oh, but we have them now. From from the middleman and Jekyll times all the way through to all the fancy ones today. Let's fast forward to now. How are you using Jamstack philosophies professionally? And personally? And obviously, you're at stack bet. So probably quite a bit professionally nowadays. Sean C. Davis 12:54 Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. So Stackbit is, I mean, if the Netlify is the Jamstack tool, but also when you think stack bit like stack bit is, exists, because the Jamstack exists. And it's, I know, the, the Jamstack pattern was really powerful and felt like a great entry point for newer developers. But it, it turned out that it was it was kind of difficult, because it's like you could get started really, really kind of simple to get started. Really difficult to go to the next level, which requires stitching together all of these decoupled services. And so stack bit pops up originally three years ago, as a solution to basically say, well, your start, here's the starting point. And it's Netlify and Jekyll and some markdown files or you know, in some styles, something like that, and it has evolved and now as a full fledge visual editor, what's, what's interesting is, we're in a transition where we're just about to release a new version, or the beta version of a new version. And it's still largely following that pattern. It's a really powerful visual editing experience. But the the Jamstack I feel like Jamstack is kind of in this identity crisis sort of mode or, or maybe not like figuring out where they where they fit. You know, what Jamstack actually means and knowing that the web is going to continue to evolve. And so if you, depending when, when this episode gets released, it's like what we, if we look before this release, and what happens after it right now you go to the website, so pre pre release, and like Jamstack is plastered all over it real big, top of the homepage. And I I'm seeing that this, this language is going to shift a little bit and so we're still very much Jamstack tool. Websites are going to get deployed. They're going to be built with next they're going to be static by default. They're going to be deployed To Netlify using Marco. So it's like still, it's still very much Jamstack pattern. But I think how we, how we talk about that might change a little bit. That's, that's professionally and personally, I mentioned, the, the project I'm spending most of time on now is my personal site, that site is built with eleventy. and deploy to Netlify. And using Mark, just local markdown for content. I, I've been thinking a lot about like, well, what's the future of this? For me, if I really want to make this a hub, and I want to make it a content engine? And I'm thinking well, okay, well, eventually, I'm going to have to go to like a next or something like that. But honestly, I every change that I make, I say, Well, okay, well, can I get this done with eleventy? And I consistently finding that the answer is yes, like it has, there's probably a limit to this some point in my future. But right now, I'm in love with, but eleventy is giving me and so I've kind of have this classic Jamstack pattern happening on the side and loving that Bryan Robinson 16:08 perfectly. And then I mean, I can go on and on about love. And it is it is kind of where I'm at in the last of two and Zach Leatherman, the creator of 11. D, recently just even showed like gated content with 11, D serverless. And so like the, the line is blurring about what 11 D can and can't do, it used to be pretty solid, like there was a pretty solid point where like 11 D didn't serve you anymore. Little little iffy. Now, Sean C. Davis 16:30 I think that the big question for me was, oh, there were two. So one is that I'm I built my own kind of component system using nunchucks shortcodes in and so like, you have this smart transformers that make it nice and easy to work with. But it's I mean, it's still a little clunky, I would love to be able to use something like reactors felt and then hydrate them on the fly as needed. And fortunately, we have been homes and slinky, working on that exact problem. So that's really exciting to follow that. And then the second question I had, and second hurdle I thought I was going to run into was authentication, I don't need it now. But my plan is to start to build out some courses, and some of them will be free, and you don't have to track them. And other ones, you know, I feel like well down the road, I'm going to want people to people are gonna want to sign in, they're gonna want to track their progress, maybe some of them are paid. And just this last week, a video came out where Zach was going through the process of showing authentication with 11. D. And now I'm like I, I mean, I feel like the wall I'm going to hit now has less to do with features, and is probably going to have more to do with how many files can we read from the file system? And but I also think that it's getting smarter in terms of incremental builds. And so maybe I don't hit that. Well, I don't know. I'm gonna keep pushing it. We'll see what happens. Bryan Robinson 17:58 Yeah, that wall becomes smaller and further and smaller and further. Yeah, that's right. That's right. All right. So we've talked about a few technologies. We've talked about a few methodologies. But what would you say currently? Is your jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite service? Maybe its stack, but are your favorite framework or philosophy? What what makes you love working in the Jamstack? Sean C. Davis 18:19 Yeah, talk philosophically for a minute, I suppose. Yeah. So what I really loved about the Jamstack, especially in the early days of me discovering it, I'm thinking pre NextJs. JS blowing up. So like 2019. And before? Is that it? To me, it was it's, well, it's still very much this way like you. It's a methodology. It's not a prescription say this all the time. And there's something really powerful in that in that if here's a pattern that we think is a really strong way to build websites that it's it improves the developer experience, and delivers great experience for end users. But you can use whatever tool you think is best for your particular project. And I what I've realized is as the web continues to evolve, is that the there were more kind of guardrails on what Jamstack is than I originally thought, like there, there are more opinions baked in than I originally was, was seeing. However, it's still within within those guardrails and within that pattern, very open and, and not not prescriptive in terms of tooling. And I think what that has led to that even though the community is led by a product in in Netlify, that it's very open in talking about what tools you can use in the space. It's really everyone's really respectful in that space and empowering and so just like the My Favorite I'd love to philosophy itself, the community that came out of that philosophy. It's is like a really, really great thing to be involved in. But I think in terms of tooling, yeah, I can't. I mean, I love stack. But that's why it's why I'm at stack, but I think it's a, it's a great, I do think it's a great entry point into the Jamstack. space. And it it's, it's a such a unique tool that it can serve. The personal blogger, especially someone who isn't super technically savvy, wants to learn a little development. But it can also serve a serve enterprises that have hundreds 1000s of pages, but are storing those in Contentful, or Sanity, some other headless CMS. But really, I keep coming back to eleventy. Especially, there was some news in the last couple of weeks where Rich Harris, the creator of spelt joined, we joined Vercel. Right, so so it's he gets to work on it full time. It's still community driven, but it still also kind of feels a little bit like funding from Vercel. And with that, I, I don't Okay, I don't know if this is entirely accurate. But it's, I think of the group of static site generators or front end frameworks, popular front end frameworks today. The vast majority of them are funded by or have some ulterior motive for where they're there. The people are working for some particular company. And so even though they're open source, they're, I mean, I don't I'm not saying that they've done their communities to services in any way. But eleventy what I love about eleventy is that it is it for now. I mean, today, it's all about the community it is it is very much driven by the community. And it is. And I just I love the way that Zach leads that project. It's, it's really exciting. And similar to what I said about a stack bit and what we just mentioned about eleventy, it's, it's great, because you can get started and know if you know HTML, like you can, you're good, you can build a website, and you can just you can fly. And then you can you can piece together things a little bit at a time, like learn a little bit of nunchucks. Or eventually if we have if when slinky gets to version one, and maybe it's like maybe you just dip your toes into React and, and, but that it also seems like it's going to it's scaling well for a handful of folks. And so it's not like you learn it as an entry level tool. I think that's that's where it was for a while, like a great entry level tool. And then our I don't want to build a serious site. So I'm going to go get a serious framework. It's starting to become a serious framework, and, but without necessarily raising the barrier to entry. And I think that's, that's really cool. So that's, yeah, I just, I feel like I'm just gonna keep talking about stack bid and 11. D all day. Bryan Robinson 23:07 Yeah, no, that doesn't that that's a great combo. Anyway. Um, I also think it's entering you said, like, you know, rich, rich chains go into Vercel. And, I mean, Zack Letterman's at Netlify. But he's building sites for Netlify. And so I think the interesting thing that's happened there is that he's learned what a company the size of Netlify needs out of some of what it's doing. And that's what's been kind of powering is not that Netlify has been prescribing what he needs. But Zack as a developer using 11. D to build sites for an enterprise level company now knows more about what what 11 D needs for that area. I think that's an interesting bit of information that he's kind of feeding back into the the 11 D framework. That's Sean C. Davis 23:51 a great point. Absolutely. Bryan Robinson 23:53 All right, so let's shift gears a little bit. Let's go away from technology and let's let's find out what is your actual jam right now? What's your favorite song or musician? Or what are you listening to day in day out? Sean C. Davis 24:04 Alright, so I had I had to look this up because I'm I am all over the board in terms of music and I haven't hadn't been listening to as much recently as I have in the past it you know, excluding like, all the all the Disney soundtracks that are on all the time, kids. Okay, so just to tell you how weird my, my taste in music is. I was like, alright, well, what are what are a few of the what are a few of the albums that have been on in the last week or two? Okay, so I've had gone all the way back to the Beatles revolver. I love that one. Okay, then what I'm almost like chronologically What have I done? I put on I put on Jay Z's Black Album. I had. I forget what it's called is Sturgill. Simpson. He released a couple blue grass albums, I think I think they're called cutting grass. Maybe not. Do you know? I do not know. Okay. Blue Grass. And then what did I have? I've had the newer Lord and Taylor Swift albums on as well. So I'm like, all over all over the place all over the Bryan Robinson 25:18 place. Yeah. That's awesome. That's I mean, it's variety is the spice of life, right? Sure. Yes. Yes. I love that. Now, it's kind of open forum, right? Is there anything that you that you are doing right now you stack that whomever that you want to promote and get out into the Jamstack. Community. Sean C. Davis 25:34 I mentioned a little bit earlier, this this idea of the the Jamstack identity crisis. And I try to talk about this without sounding disparaging or critical, because I actually think it's a good thing. And I think there's a lot to come in come from being from the community being introspective and figuring out who we are. And so I had, I've had lots of conversations around this topic throughout the year. And in, in doing so what a few of us realized is that the, it? You know, I think we all kind of have a little bit of different opinion of like, well, where's the line? What exactly does Jamstack mean, but maybe it doesn't, maybe it doesn't totally matter. But it's still, like, like we talked about earlier, like, there's still a there's still that the the guardrail is in a sense, like, there, there is an established pattern, in a way to build websites, the web is going to continue to evolve, and it won't necessarily be the cool thing on the cool kid on the block forever. But that, that that community can still exist. So what what a few of us have done is we said, Okay, well, what if we step outside of that? And to say, What if we created a space where folks could talk about all sorts of different patterns and ways to build websites, and Jamstack and all of the tools and variations within within that community is part of that discussion, but it's not the only part of that discussion. So there's also folks who are building rail sites and are choosing rails for a good reason or choosing full stack WordPress for for a good reason. I'm sure there's a good reason in there somewhere. Maybe. And so it's it's goofy, and it's brand new, but it's called good websites club. And it's at you can visit the bare bones website. It's good websites dot club. And so we're there's, it's just a tiny discord community with a little bit of chatter now, but there are there are some grand visions for it. There's someone who's talking about conference and 20, to 23, maybe some, maybe some various meetups throughout there. Personally, I am starting a show that I'm calling the the good websites show, and I don't know exactly what it's gonna be, it's gonna, it'll evolve. But it's, it's gonna start as a live just like a live interview show. And in kind of, we'll talk about, yeah, grab various folks from around different communities and talk about problems they have solved on the web, all kind of in a way to help inform developers or even marketers, content editors just have different different patterns, different ideas that are out there, and kind of kind of help them hone in on what exactly they are. They're going after, and I think we'll see, my prediction is we're gonna see it largely be, there's, there's gonna be this huge fear to draw a Venn diagram, like a lot of overlap with Jamstack in the beginning, and maybe it evolves, I don't really know. But that's, I'm kind of excited to see where that goes, while also being really heavily invested in Jamstack. And seeing how that evolves, because this, this recent announcement of Netlify got got their next series of funding, and they're gonna pump $10 million investing in the Jamstack. And that is really exciting. I cannot wait to see what that means for the community. So that's, I'm working on Yeah, like, websites club, but but, but also really excited for the Jamstack at same time, Bryan Robinson 29:25 absolutely cool. I'm now a member of the discord as of two months ago. So I'm really excited to see that everyone else listening should go go sign up as well. And then keep an eye out for Shawn doing good websites show in the future as well. So Shawn, thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us today. And we look forward to seeing more amazing stuff you in the future. Sean C. Davis 29:46 Alright, thanks for having me, Bryan. Bryan Robinson 29:48 Thanks again to our guest and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review rating star heart favorite whatever it is in your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

Ask Kati Anything!
Why is it hard for me to take a compliment? AKA ep. 94

Ask Kati Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 83:30


Ask Kati Anything episode 94Audience questions:1. Hey Kati, why is accepting any sort of praise or compliments so hard for me to do? I genuinely do appreciate them, but I don't know if it's that I don't believe they are true and don't deserve it, or if I just don't like the attention...2. Is there a way to tell the difference between real memories and things imagined in your dreams? Sometimes I need to imagine bad things happening to me to fall asleep. I don't want these things to actually...3. Can you talk about passive suicidal ideation? Also, how is it that I encourage/support the fight to live for others but I can't seem to provide that same thought for me? I just recently lost an immediate family member back in August due to...4. I've always wanted to be a therapist or a counselor, but I have one big issue with that: I get frustrated when people don't see what's right in front of them! Which is basically what therapy is all about: Gently nudging...5. Have you had any clients explore their sexuality with you? If so, what did the process look like? I know I'm maybe interested in doing more work with that, but I'm also hesitant. What if I find out it's not something I want ? 6. Recently we've started inner child work in therapy. I don't know if there's a universal way of doing this, but my therapist likes to work with an empty chair that represents my younger self. Sometimes he asks me to talk to my inner child who is...7. I was wondering how do you push past the therapy hangover? I find that after sessions I tend to stay in my head a little too much lately to the point that it usually wastes the day. Sometimes it's replaying parts of the...8. I loved your last conversation about shame. I was wondering if you could talk more about what I think could be called “chronic shame” and how to break through it with your therapist? Much love from Scandinavia.9. Why does treatment sometimes make us worse? I've been in PHP and inpatient. Both of them made my mental health so much worse. I know other's who constantly cycle through. They get discharged and end up back in the hospital....--------------BooksTraumatized   https://geni.us/Bfak0jAre u ok?  http://bit.ly/2s0mULyOnline TherapyI do not currently offer online therapy.  My sponsor BetterHelp can connect you with a licensed, online counselor, please visit: https://betterhelp.com/katiPatreonHelp support the creation of mental health content? https://www.katimorton.com/kati-morton-patreon/Opinions That Don't Matter! (my afterhours podcast)https://opionstdm.buzzsprout.com/Business ContactLinnea Toney  linnea@underscoretalent.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/katimorton)

The Perez Hilton Podcast with Chris Booker
Garbage Calls |The Perez Hilton Podcast - Listen Here!

The Perez Hilton Podcast with Chris Booker

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:00


Our end of the year calls episode where we answer your questions and spread our holiday cheer! We talk some Kanye West, Kim Kardashian, Dua Lipa, Britney Spears and so much more! Happy Holidays from the PHP. Thanks to our sponsors: TrueBill = Don't fall for subscription scams. Start cancelling today at Truebill.com/PEREZ. Hi-Chew = Visit www.hi-chew.com/win and enter to win an exclusive bucket full of HI-CHEW candy and swag. Follow Me!FAMILY CHANNEL: http://YouTube.com/ThePerezHiltonWEBSITE: http://PerezHilton.comPEREZ'S INSTAGRAM: http://Instagram.com/ThePerezHiltonWEBSITE'S INSTAGRAM: http://Instagram.com/PerezHiltonGET A PERSONALIZED VIDEO FROM ME HERE:

How To Code Well
EP 141 - Web Development Guide for 2022

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 58:59


Web Development Guide for 2022 Web assembly won't replace JavaScript. TypeScript won't replace JavaScript. GitHub actions won't replace you. Next.JS won't replace PHP. PHP won't replace Python. AWS will continue to build more stuff that you don't need but will be require you to use it for unrelated but coupled tasks. Google Cloud will keep playing catchup. Docker will continue to be the containerisation tool of choice. Podman will not replace Docker. Microsoft will sell developer focused laptops. Dell has done this but Microsoft could bundle the laptops with pre installed developer software tools. Microsoft will attempt to by a Linux laptop manufacturer. Kubernetes will continue to dominate the cloud. Web 3 will not replace web 2. Web services that offer subscriptions will introduce their own block chains and wallets. A games manufacturer will release their own wallet and coins/tokens which can be exchanged for in game purchases or game expansions. Open source could be funded by crypto. A Spotify like company that focuses solely on podcasts could pay artists/creators based on the number of listeners or listen time. This could be done via the blockchain. We will see more JavaScript frameworks with "meta" and "web 3" buzzwords their titles. More NPM hacks. More developers will try and downsize their dependancies using micro frameworks. GraphQL won't replace REST. NoSQL won't replace relational databases. Job requirements will start to require experience with the blockchain and dapps. Serverless won't replace servers but serverless technology will become more popular and it will be a sought after skill. CI/CD will become the norm. In the next Covid lockdown or the next set of restrictions, the job market will be better then it was during the first lockdown Remote working will become the default for all levels of developer. VR will improve but we won't need to put a helmet on to go to a meeting. FaceBook or Twitter will start selling promoted adverts with crypto currencies. API's will still be king. Headless CMS's will become more popular. Let me know your thoughts or get something read out on air. My web development courses ➡️ Learn How to build a JavaScript Tip Calculator ➡️ Learn JavaScript arrays ➡️ Learn PHP arrays ➡️ Learn Python ✉️ Get my weekly newsletter ⏰ My current live coding schedule (Times are BST) Thursdays 20:00 = Live Podcast YouTube Sundays 14:30 - Live coding on Twitch

Pursuing HER Purpose
28. Behind The Scenes (BTS) - Making Hard Decisions for Big Plans to Come to Life

Pursuing HER Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 23:52


Month three was a big one as we made some impactful decisions and moved our first big offer forward. We have been working hard over here on the course that will be launching next month and we can't wait to help others make their big idea a reality in 2022! If you have been wanting to take action but don't know how to get there, we got you covered.This week we dive into the PHP ascension plan, give details around moving down to one episode a week, and provide a nice preview of what to expect from our business next month.Let's connect!Purposeful Week Planner: https://www.pursuingherpurpose.com/shopCourse waitlist: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/615b95bff88d548e68f5c1f2 BetterHelp: www.betterhelp.com/herpurpose for 10% off your first monthOur WEBSITE: https://www.pursuingherpurpose.comINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/pursuingherpurpose/MEET AMY: http://instagram.com/ameskiefer/MEET KAT: https://www.instagram.com/kat.herro/ MEET ABBY: http://instagram.com/abbyrosegreen/

Building Livewire
If the solution is big and gnarly, sit on it till it's not

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 11:08


About to solve a hard problem in a really complex way? Wait. (a Livewire feature story)

North Meets South Web Podcast
A Christmas Extravaganza

North Meets South Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 94:35


Jake and Michael are joined by No Plans To Merge's Caleb Porzio and Daniel Coulbourne, as well as TJ Miller (not the actor), and Chris Gmyr to look back at 2021, forward to 2022, and a very one-sided end of year game of Family Feud.This episode is sponsored by Makeable, WorkVivo, and for the first (and last) time, White Cheddar Cheez Its.This episode was streamed live.Show links David Hemphill Andrew Del Prete Caleb Porzio Daniel Coulbourne No Plans To Merge TJ Miller Chris Gmyr Curology Laravel Beyond CRUD

Building Livewire
Browser focus management woes

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 11:38


Twenty Percent Time
Andrew Morgan: Train Your Keyboard

Twenty Percent Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 43:46


Andrew Morgan (Lead Programmer at Tighten) joins us this week to tell us all about why you should be training your keyboard, how to get started, and a lot more.https://tighten.co/blog/how-to-train-your-keyboard/ 

PHPUgly
266:PHP For Kids

PHPUgly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 56:09


Links from the show:async & await at the edge with ReactPHP — Cees-Jan Kiewiet's blogIntroducing Docker support (Symfony Blog)Grinch Game!Second Log4j vulnerability discovered, patch already released | ZDNetTrino | Distributed SQL query engine for big data Chrome Users Beware: Manifest V3 is Deceitful and Threatening | Electronic Frontier FoundationUS government to offer up to $5,000 'bounty' to hackers to identify cyber vulnerabilities - CNNPoliticsVisual Studio Code November 2021This episode of PHPUgly was sponsored by:Honeybadger.io - https://www.honeybadger.io/PHPUgly streams the recording of this podcast live. Typically every Thursday night around 9 PM PT. Come and join us, and subscribe to our Youtube Channel, Twitch, or Periscope. Also, be sure to check out our Patreon Page.Twitter Account https://twitter.com/phpuglyHost:Eric Van JohnsonJohn CongdonTom RideoutStreams:Youtube ChannelTwitchPeriscopePowered by RestreamPatreon PagePHPUgly Anthem by Harry Mack / Harry Mack Youtube ChannelThanks to all of our Patreon Sponsors:Honeybadger ** This weeks Sponsor **ButteryCrumpetShawnDavid QKen FTony LFrank WJeff KShelby CS FergusonBoštjan OMatt LDmitri GKnut E BMarcusMikePageDevRodrigo CBillyDarryl HBlaž OMike WHolly SPeter ABen RLuciano NElgimboWayneKevin YAlex BClayton SKenrick BR. C. S.ahinkleEnno RSeviMaciej PJeroen FRonny M NCharltonF'n SteveRobertThorstenEmilyJoe FAndrew WulrickJohn CJames HEric MLaravel Magazine

How To Code Well
EP 140 - Code Iteration time is critical to web development success

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 33:26


Change log We've almost finished the first pass of the documentation for the new PHP course. I have 1 / 2 lessons to go. There are two more passes that I want to do before recording any of the lessons. The next pass will be to create the project from start to finish using the documentation but on a Ubuntu VM. The last pass will be to do the same bu on a Windows VM Last weeks show that was on shopping carts went live earlier this week. I had some internet issues last week so I couldn't do the live stream Your feedback 1) Eric writes in on my hack to check if PHP is working YT short and asks if the next video will be on the PHP 8 match expression and when to use it. I can't promise that it will be the next YT short but I can say that It is on the schedule. 2) Keral writes in on my PHP array sum tutorial and asks how do we sum fields in a database. There is a SUM function in MySQL. It takes one argument and that is the expression that you want to calculate. You can use it to find the sum of a field from several records by suppling the field name as the expression. Then add the reset of the query as usual. For example, To get the sum of a shopping basket you could do something like this; Let's say you had a table of order items with a foreign key linking to an orders table. Each order item record would also have a price field. You could get the sum of the orders price like so: select sum(order_item.price) from order_item where order_item.order_id = 4; Obviously change the table name of order to something else as order is a reserved keyword in MySQL. If you have a comment that you want read out on the show then either write a message on a YouTube video or send me a message on our contact form. Code Iteration time is critical to web development success I want to talk about a blog posted titled 3 lines of code shouldn't take all day https://devtails.xyz/3-lines-of-code-shouldnt-take-all-day by Adam Berg. In the post Adam talks about his time developing video games at Electronic Arts. He mentions that due to the testing tools and development requirements it could take up to a day to write 3 lines of code. This iteration time was greatly reduced when he used 'test beds'. Adam mentions in his article that the test beds focused on particular areas of code which meant the tooling was slimmed down. This allowed him to laser in to the code that needed to be tested and as a result made the code iteration far quicker. He goes on in the post to talk about using unit testing which also made his life a lot easier. These test packages only contained the code which was specific to his teams requirements. Again, this was a slimmed down portion of a game. He mentions that these test packages took less than a second to compile and run. This made him less distracted and he could focus on the task at hand.

Voices of the ElePHPant
Ep#366 – Interview with The PHP Foundation

Voices of the ElePHPant

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:40


About Listen as hosts Cal Evans and Khayrattee Wasseem talk with Sara Golemon, Joe Watkins, and Sebastian Bergmann about the newly formed PHP Foundation. Transcript Ep#366-Interview-PHP-Foundation @ThePHPF Show Notes The PHP Foundation on Twitter PHP Foundation on Open Collective Avoiding Busses 2 – 1 Who pays for PHP? Sebastian Bergmann on Twitter Joe Watkins on […] The post Ep#366 – Interview with The PHP Foundation appeared first on Voices of the ElePHPant.

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP55: Systematising User Generated Content UGC that activates Authentic Communities w/ Adam Dornbusch

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 44:27


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Adam Dornbusch, Founder and CEO of  Entribe, an all-in-one CRM platform that simplifies creator management and the process of acquiring high-quality, brand-approved UGC at scale.It is common knowledge that good quality user generated content outperforms all other types of content by some distance. Yet most brands struggle to create a steady flow of UGC that can be leveraged. The common “fix” is to give away big rewards hoping that luck out with good UGC, or simply pay an influencer. But neither of these methods offer consistent results. But then what can brands do?Spoiler Alert: generating brand-appropriate UGC on a consistent basis requires a LOT of work. You need to start with building a real community of your fans and having the right tech to help you stay on top of things.In this episode, Kunle and Adam talk about the ingredients you need to start generating UGC. You will get to hear about what builds a sense of community, how to source brand-appropriate content, importance of rewards, and much much more. This is a great episode for marketers and social media geeks.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Curses of Modern Medicine (Audio)  David Eells - 12/15/21  NIH and Fauci Hospital Protocols are Killing Covid -19 Patients (Video) COVID-19 is NOT a “Pandemic of the Unvaccinated.” The most appropriate term is “Pandemic of Medical Malpractice.” Hospital protocols, and not COVID-19, have accounted for a significant portion of deaths. One of the biggest culprits is the drug Remdesivir. The antiviral drug manufactured by Gilead Sciences has remained a central component of the standard hospital protocol for COVID-19 patients. But the toxic drug is responsible for catastrophic side effects like multi-organ-dysfunction syndrome and kidney failure. None other than Anthony ‘Fraudci' and his NIH cronies were behind pushing the dangerous drug for COVID-19 patients. Remdesivir Background To understand the severity of this scandal, let's briefly review some background of how Remdesivir came into use for COVID-19. Remdesivir is a nucleotide analogue prodrug originally developed for the treatment of Ebola virus. A New England Journal of Medicine study claimed that a single United States COVID-19 patient showed improvement after taking Remdesivir. Coincidentally, the Wuhan Institute of Virology sought a patent for the use of Remdesivir. But at the height of COVID-19, the NIH picked Remdesivir as the gold standard treatment for COVID-19. Anthony Fraudci cited the drug's effectiveness against Ebola as the reasoning for its use against this novel coronavirus. Fraudci used this New England Journal of Medicine study to back his claims. A closer look at this study below: Remdesivir was pulled from the study due to 53.1% of recipients dying from the drug. Who supported that study? The NIH & NIAID. Another New England Journal of Medicine study Fraudci used to push Remdesivir as a COVID-19 treatment analyzed 53 patients from the United States, Canada, Europe, and Japan. This is what the study found: Seven of the 53 patients (13%) died after the completion of Remdesivir treatment, including 6 of 34 patients (18%) who were receiving invasive ventilation and 1 of 19 (5%) who were receiving noninvasive oxygen support ... The median interval between remdesivir initiation and death was 15 days (interquartile range, 9 to 17). A total of 32 patients (60%) reported adverse events during follow-up. The most common adverse events were increased hepatic enzymes, diarrhea, rash, renal impairment, and hypotension. In general, adverse events were more common in patients receiving invasive ventilation. A total of 12 patients (23%) had serious adverse events. The most common serious adverse events — multiple-organ-dysfunction syndrome, septic shock, acute kidney injury, and hypotension — were reported in patients who were receiving invasive ventilation at baseline. Despite these alarming studies, Remdesivir was pushed on the general public as the standard hospital protocol for COVID-19 patients. Cheap, off-label drugs like Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and Ivermectin were targeted in a vicious smear campaign. The patents for HCQ and Ivermectin expired decades ago, meaning they don't line the pockets of pharmaceutical companies and hospital executives. The toxicity and catastrophic kidney damage caused by Remdesivir provided the ultimate setup to blame deaths caused by the drug on COVID-19 and the federal health agencies made a fortune buying the stock of Remdesivir, an experimental drug at the time. The Blaze highlighted how Remdesivir is the greatest scandal of the “pandemic:” ... why would we run the risk of spending $3,000 a person on a therapeutic that doesn't work anyway if it may create immune escape? Which raises the question: Why are we not treating everyone early with therapeutics like Regeneron, ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine, and other proven safe, cheap, and effective drugs that don't case renal failure like remdesivir and don't run the risk of inducing mutations? This is particularly important for those who are immunocompromised. The last thing people who already have fragile organs should be taking is remdesivir. In many respects the fact that remdesivir was ever approved and is still the only standard of care, as it kills patients and lines the pockets of both hospitals and the maker, Gilead, is possibly the worst scandal of this entire ordeal. On Feb. 5, Reuters reported that none other than the Wuhan Institute of Virology of the China Academy of Sciences sought a patent on Gilead's remdesivir, a failed drug repurposed from treatment of Ebola, based on the alleged improvement of a single individual COVID patient reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. Incidentally, the only drug ever approved for COVID was developed by Dr. Ralph Baric's lab at UNC Chapel Hill, the same lab that applied for the coronavirus spike protein gain-of-function research and is suspected by many to be behind the creation of this virus.    Minnesota Doctor Blasts ‘Ridiculous' CDC Coronavirus Death Count Guidelines  (VIDEO) Fox News - 4/9/20 Dr. Scott Jensen, a Minnesota family physician who is also a Republican state senator, told "The Ingraham Angle" Wednesday that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) guidelines for doctors to certify whether a patient has died of coronavirus are "ridiculous" and could be misleading the public. Host Laura Ingraham read Jensen the guidelines, which say: "In cases where a definite diagnosis of COVID cannot be made but is suspected or likely (e.g. the circumstances are compelling with a reasonable degree of certainty) it is acceptable to report COVID-19 on a death certificate as 'probable' or 'presumed.'”  In response, Jensen told Ingraham the CDC's death certificate manual tells physicians to focus on "precision and specificity," but the coronavirus death certification guidance runs completely counter to that axiom. "The idea that we are going to allow people to massage and sort of game the numbers is a real issue because we are going to undermine the [public] trust," he said. "And right now as we see politicians doing things that aren't necessarily motivated on fact and science, their trust in politicians is already wearing thin." Jensen gave a hypothetical example of a patient who died while suffering from influenza. If the patient was elderly and had symptoms like fever and cough a few days before passing away, the doctor explained, he would have listed "respiratory arrest" as the primary cause of death. "I've never been encouraged to [notate 'influenza']," he said. "I would probably write 'respiratory arrest' to be the top line, and the underlying cause of this disease would be pneumonia ... I might well put emphysema or congestive heart failure, but I would never put influenza down as the underlying cause of death and yet that's what we are being asked to do here." Jensen then told Ingraham that under the CDC guidelines, a patient who died after being hit by a bus and tested positive for coronavirus would be listed as having presumed to have died from the virus regardless of whatever damage was caused by the bus. "That doesn't make any sense," he said. Jensen also reacted to Dr. Anthony Fauci's response to a question about the potential for the number of coronavirus deaths being "padded," in which the NIAID director described the prevalance of "conspiracy theories" during "challenging" times in public health. "I would remind him that anytime health care intersects with dollars it gets awkward," Jensen said. "Right now Medicare has determined that if you have a COVID-19 admission to the hospital you'll get paid $13,000. If that COVID-19 patient goes on a ventilator, you get $39,000; three times as much. Nobody can tell me, after 35 years in the world of medicine, that sometimes those kinds of things [have] impact on what we do. "Some physicians really have a bent towards public health and they will put down influenza or whatever because that's their preference," Jensen added. "I try to stay very specific, very precise. If I know I've got pneumonia, that's what's going on the death certificate. I'm not going to add stuff just because it's convenient.”   Past Statistics: Deaths by medical mistakes hit records HealthcareITNews - By Erin McCann - 7/18/14  Update: Since this article below was written, accidental medical deaths have reached 440,000 a year: In July of 2014 senate hearing exposed 400,000 people each year die of medical mistakes, over a thousand a day. This is the third largest killer in U.S. Between 210,000 and 440,000 patients each year who go to the hospital for care suffer some type of preventable harm that contributes to their death. How Many Die From Medical Mistakes in U.S. Hospitals? Keep this in mind as you read the article below. All the percentages of danger below have risen dramatically. "Witchcraft" or "sorcery" in the New Testament is from the Greek word "pharmakeia"; English "pharmacy" - Healing through the use of drugs. [See etymonline.com and dictionary.com.] Of Babylon it was said: (Rev.18:23)... for with thy sorcery were all the nations deceived.    It's a chilling reality – one often overlooked in annual mortality statistics: Preventable medical errors persist as the No. 3 killer in the U.S. – third only to heart disease and cancer – claiming the lives of some 400,000 people each year. At a Senate hearing Thursday, patient safety officials put their best ideas forward on how to solve the crisis, with IT often at the center of discussions.  Hearing members, who spoke before the Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging, not only underscored the devastating loss of human life – more than 1,000 people each day – but also called attention to the fact that these medical errors cost the nation a colossal $1 trillion each year.   "The tragedy that we're talking about here (is) deaths taking place that should not be taking place," said subcommittee Chair Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in his opening remarks. [See also: EHR adverse events data cause for alarm.] Among those speaking was Ashish Jha, MD, professor of health policy and management at Harvard School of Public Health, who referenced the Institute of Medicine's 1999 report To Err is Human, which estimated some 100,000 Americans die each year from preventable adverse events.  “When they first came out with that number, it was so staggeringly large, that most people were wondering, 'could that possibly be right?'" said Jha.  Some 15 years later, the evidence is glaring. "The IOM probably got it wrong," he said. "It was clearly an underestimate of the toll of human suffering that goes on from preventable medical errors." It's not just the 1,000 deaths per day that should be huge cause for alarm, noted Joanne Disch, RN, clinical professor at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing, who also spoke before Congress. There's also the 10,000 serious complications cases resulting from medical errors that occur each day.  Disch cited the case of a Minnesota patient who underwent a bilateral mastectomy for cancer, only to find out post surgery a mix-up with the biopsy reports had occurred, and she had not actually had cancer...       "Why is it when a death happens one at time, silently, it warrants less attention than when deaths happen in groups of five or 10?" he asked. "What these numbers say is that every day, a 747, two of them are crashing. Every two months, 9-11 is occurring…we would not tolerate that degree of preventable harm in any other forum.”   In the hearing's closing questions, when Sanders inquired as to why this crisis was not constantly splashed across front page news, he was met with this: "When people go to the hospital, they are sick. It is very easy to confuse the fact that somebody might have died because of a fatal consequence of their disease, versus they died from a complication from a medical error," Jha said. "It has taken a lot to prove to all of us that many of these deaths are not a natural consequence of the underlying disease. They are purely failures of the system. Journal of The American Medical Association declared there was 450,000 deaths a year from iatropic causes. Iatropic means doctor related causes. This is from years ago. So what is it now after 750,000 people have died in the US for the same reason. But as we're going to see, it's a lot worse than this.   Recent: 40+ Jaw Dropping Medical Malpractice Statistics Etactics: By Butterfly Meltzer - 7/29/21 Medical malpractice happens more often than most might think and when it does, it's not a “cried wolf” scenario. Doctors do make mistakes, but sometimes the actions classified as malpractice are intentionally taken. Naive, inexperienced, and/or simply bad physicians, unfortunately, exist in all fields of medicine. Whether they're a surgeon, psychologist, primary care physician, or therapist, malpractice can occur across any specialist role. The result can lead to permanent injury and even death. The consequences can be severe and victims often have no choice but to take legal action. Here are over 40 statistics about medical malpractice: General Malpractice Malpractice can occur in many forms across different segments of the healthcare industry. To get a true understanding though, you need to look at healthcare as a whole.  You should probably start with the reputation of the doctor in question. Maybe previous patients have sued that doctor in the past. Maybe they have a high rate of misdiagnosis or other medical errors. From nursing homes to outpatient therapy, billing errors to misprescribing, malpractice can happen anywhere.  The average person who files medical malpractice claims is 42 years old. (University of California) 10% of all U.S. deaths are now due to medical error. (Johns Hopkins) 99% of physicians face at least one lawsuit by age 65. (New England Journal of Medicine) New York had the highest amount of medical malpractice in the US (16,688 reports) from 2009 to 2018. (NPDB) North Dakota had the lowest amount of medical malpractice in the US. (126 reports) (NPDB) 37% of malpractice claims reviewed resulted in payments (The Doctors Company) It's estimated that 7,000 to 9,000 patients die every year from medication errors. (My Medical Score) 5-10% of all physicians have had sexual contact with patients. (American Medical Association) Medical Overuse Many people agree that doctors tend to overprescribe medicines. There have been countless stories that link the opioid pandemic to overprescribing. Patients are often given too much medicine that ends up doing more harm than good. As a result, the overuse of medical practices can lead to medical malpractice. If a patient receives tests, treatment, and medication that they don't need, the patient will most likely have unnecessary expenses. 15-30% of 2000 physicians surveyed in a study believe most medical care is not needed. (Johns Hopkins) 22% of prescription medications are unnecessary 24.9% of medical tests do not need to happen 11.1% of procedures do not need to take place 30% of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary. (CDC) 20% to 50% of antibiotics prescribed in US acute-care hospitals are unnecessary or inappropriate. (CDC) 27% of doctors say that patients receive antibiotics when drugs won't help. (WebMD) Medical Misdiagnosis So maybe you have certain symptoms that are easily confused between those of several different issues. As a result, your doctor misdiagnoses you and gives you medicine that you don't actually need. But does that count as medical malpractice? As with most situations in healthcare, it depends.  Misdiagnosis can lead to surgeries you don't need, medicines that negatively affect your health, and treatment that can lead to permanent damage. In severe cases, medical malpractice that involves misdiagnoses can lead to death. Roughly 12,000,000 American misdiagnoses happen each year (My Medical Score) Over more than 100,000 Americans die or are permanently disabled each year due to medical diagnoses that initially miss conditions or are wrong or delayed. (Johns Hopkins) Nearly ¾ of all serious harms from diagnostic errors occur around vascular events, infections and cancers. (Johns Hopkins) 37.8% are cancers  22.8% are vascular events 13.5% are infections 21% of patients receive an outright wrong diagnosis on their first visit to a doctor. (Mayo Clinic) 66% of patients get a diagnosis that may be on the right track but isn't quite accurate or complete. (Mayo Clinic) 12% of all patients who seek second opinions end up with the same diagnosis they started with. (Mayo Clinic) 22% of malpractice claims filed by hospitalized patients were diagnosis-related. (University of Michigan) 38% of malpractice claims against physicians involving the treatment of children involved a misdiagnosis. (The Doctors Company) Around 5% of outpatients receive misdiagnosis. (BMJ Journal) Surgical Malpractice Any kind of surgery can be terrifying. That's why you should always ask questions before giving consent for surgery. When medical malpractice happens during surgery, feelings of confusion overwhelm patients. They may feel that their doctors abused their trust. Not to mention they could also be in serious pain if something during the operation went wrong. From the patient perspective, they should arm themselves with knowledge in case something goes wrong. 85% of surgeons are likely to get into a lawsuit  (The High Court) About 16.7% of 2000 physicians surveyed said that they performed unnecessary procedures for profit (John Hopkins) A little more than 4,000 surgical errors occur each year (My Medical Score) 39 surgeries per week end up with a surgical tool, like a sponge, left inside patients  20 operations per week occur on the wrong body part 20 wrong surgical procedures occur on a patient per week 59% of surgical errors only resulted in temporary injuries (My Medical Score) 40% of surgical errors resulted in permanent injuries or death (My Medical Score) Mental Health Malpractice There are many myths surrounding mental health but medical malpractice isn't one of them. Surgery usually can't fix mental health issues. Diagnosis can really only occur through the evaluation of symptoms, and many mental health issues have similar symptoms. This is especially true for children. If doctors overprescribe opioids and antibiotics, it's safe to say that that carries into mental health. Doctors also prescribe medicines that don't actually help the illness, so naturally, this can happen in the mental health world as well.   41% of US psychiatrists faced a malpractice lawsuit at least once (Medscape) ⅓ of psychiatrists managing their legal risk between 2015 and 2016 had claims involving incorrect treatment. (Sommers Schwartz) 20% were for medication issues 15% involved suicides or suicide attempts 6% percent were for misdiagnosis. More than 60% of people who receive a diagnosis of major depression don't actually have it (Johns Hopkins) Of 706 people surveyed, only 15% received a prompt diagnosis, while 85% experienced diagnostic delay (Bridges to Recovery) Among the 85% delayed, 71% said that their symptoms had become worse as a result of receiving inappropriate treatment 47.3% of 50,000 patients were correctly identified with depression by general practitioners (Bridges to Recovery)   A 2008 study found that 57% of adults diagnosed with bipolar disorder did not meet diagnostic criteria upon more comprehensive diagnostic review. (Brown University School of Medicine)  According to the table of Iatrogenic Deaths In The United States linked here , We could have an even higher death rate by using Dr. Lucien Leape's 1997 medical and drug error rate of 3 million. (14) Multiplied by the fatality rate of 14% (that Leape used in 1994 (16) we arrive at an annual death rate of 420,000 for drug errors and medical errors combined. If we put this number in place of Lazorou's 106,000 drug errors and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) 98,000 medical errors, we could add another 216,000 deaths making a total of 999,936 deaths annually.   CDC - Iatrogenic Deaths “Disappeared" in 2020, COVID-19 Took Their Place  For decades up until 2020 CDC annual reports listed medical error (iatrogenic) deaths as the third-leading cause of death in the US. The only change in that annual "ranking" of deaths was in the last 5 years cancer sometimes overtaking heart disease as a leading cause of death in the US and most other Western ("developed") countries.  Now, the latest CDC report has completely removed the iatrogenic category  and COVID-19 deaths have taken that third place. If the CDC had simply moved the iatrogenic deaths up or down the list, it would have been at least a debatable issue. However, the complete disappearance of medical error deaths exposes directly the fraud. Iatrogenic deaths can't just vanish in a single year.  In fact, if the hospitals were full to brim with patients in 2020 then iatrogenic deaths would be much higher than prior years. Btw, the "unintentional injury" category on 4th place covers "life accidents". They are counted separately from iatrogenic deaths, so one cannot argue that iatrogenic deaths moved to 4th place. Unless I am missing something, this may be the most direct admission yet by the powers that be that the COVID-19 death numbers are completely fake. Either no COVID-19 deaths occurred in 2020 or all of them were iatrogenic in nature so one can swap the names on 3rd place. So, either we have a blatant, public, demonstrable and irrefutable lie or public admission by CDC of genocidal medical interventions for all COVID-19 patients who died in hospitals in 2020.   Attorney Thomas Renz – All New Whistleblower Information Rumble — Attorney Thomas Renz Releases Stunning Data from Never Before Seen Vaccine Injury/Death Tracking System Thanks to a Whistleblower that came forth to Attorney Thomas Renz, the public is now seeing, for the first time ever, hard data from the largest database available in the U.S. to study the COVID-19 impact including deaths & injuries; The CMS Medicare Tracking System.  During an extraordinary speech at Clay Clark's ReAwaken America Tour, Attorney Thomas Renz shocked the crowd of thousands in attendance and millions watching via livestream as he revealed: That data from the Medicare Tracking System reveals that 19,400 people less than 80 years old have died within 14 days of receiving the COVID-19 Vaccine. In addition, 28,065 people have died that are over the age of 80 within 14 days of receiving the Covid-19 vaccine. The Total number of American Citizens that died within 14 days of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine is 48,465 according to hard data revealed in the Medicare Tracking System. In July attorney Renz's whistleblower, under penalty of perjury, stated that she estimated at least 45K people had died from the Covid-19 Vaccine. USA Today Fact Checkers and other fact checking services claimed that to be “mis-information.” Today's revelations solidify that the “Trusted News Initiative” is actually the source of mis-information and propaganda, and that Attorney Thomas Renz's whistleblower was correct all along. After proving that over 45K people have died from the COVID-19 vaccine, Attorney Renz then moved his attention to focus on the amount of people that are being killed in American hospitals by Dr. Anthony Fauci's instituted protocol of Remdesivir. Attorney Renz is also in possession of Remdesivir death data from the Medicare Tracking System that has been withheld by the government from our citizens. The Remdesivir data reveals of the 7,960 beneficiaries prescribed Remdesivir for Covid-19,  2,058 died. That is 25.9%. 46% of people died within 14 days of the Remdesivir Treatment. The Remdesivir Treatment was established in U.S. Hospitals at the direction of Dr. Anthony Fauci. Serious adverse events were reported in 131 of the 532 patients who received Remdesivir. That is 24.6%. Attorney Renz says ” This begs the question… Why is this the protocol in American Hospitals? Does this appear “Safe and Effective” to you?” RENZ's NURSE WHISTLEBLOWERS REVEAL TWO TIER SYSTEM OF CARE DEPENDING ON YOUR VACCINE STATUS During Attorney Thomas Renz speech at Clay Clark's ReAwaken America Tour in Colorado Springs, Colorado Renz also talked about 2 Whistleblower nurses that revealed to him that they have seen a 2 tier system of health care depending on the patients “vaccination status.” “The nurses revealed to me that patients that are vaccinated are getting Ivermectin, which is proven to heal people. But if you are unvaccinated, they put you on Remdesivir in the hopes that you will die” said Attorney Thomas Renz. THE FDA IS TRACKING VACCINE DEATHS, ALL THE WHILE CLAIMING THE COVID VACCINE IS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE Also during Attorney Renz' speech he revealed that the FDA is actively working with CMS real-time data ( CMS Medicare database ) to gather weekly reports on Covid-19 adverse events, despite the fact that the US population is told repeatedly this vaccine is “safe and effective.” Attorney Renz says “This information has never been given to the public, and you will see why they have kept it hidden and never published. It's very damning, and this data reveals that the FDA knew what was coming, let it happen, and thousands and thousands have died or been injured.” During his speech Renz revealed in one state alone ( New York ) that the amount of people who experienced adverse events after the Covid shot were in the thousands. Adverse events experienced by people who got the Covid-19 shot in New York State included thousands of cardiovascular events, thousands of cases of people getting Covid, and thousands of deaths. At least 13 side effects are reported in the system. “Remember, these are “side effects” that the government, media, and social media continue to tell the public that are not happening. The mantra of “safe and effective” must stop after today's information” says Attorney Renz. A copy of Attorney Renz entire speech along with data from the hidden vaccine tracking system will be posted on his website at www.Renz-Law.com    Proof That They Knew! Renz said, Our data comes from a whistleblower with access to CMS data. CMS data includes billing, prescribing, treatment, and all other information related to beneficiary treatment – that is how the government knows how much money to send healthcare providers. This info was all recognized by the US Department of Defense in the presentation we found and reposted on www.renz-law.com  Our whistleblowers have searched this data to provide these numbers. This data is being hidden from be public but would be easily searchable for government analysts using the same searches we did. Our question – why aren't our elected officials and bureaucrats searching for this information and sharing it? Percentage of Americans covered by Medicare in 2019: 18.1% 59.4 Million People. 18% of 330 Million is: 59,400,000 Total Medicare Budget: $899 Billion (2020) Largest data base available in the U.S. to study COVID-19 trends. It includes all claims: vaccine dates, treatment dates, death dates, adverse events, hospitalizations. It is not self-reporting like VAERS. As you can see in the information that was excerpted from a presentation by the FDA, they are tracking the data we are presenting here. In other words they know or should know this info. The number of CMS beneficiaries who died within 14 days* of a COVID-19 vaccine are: Under 80 years old - 19,400 + Over 80 year old - 28,065 = 47,465  (*within 14 days of 1st or 2nd dose, whichever difference was lower PER THE CDC – YOU ARE NOT CONSIDERED VACCINATED UNTIL TWO WEEKS AFTER YOUR SECOND SHOT OR FIRST SHOT OF JANSEN SO THESE DEATHS DO NOT COUNT ‐ https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019‐ncov/vaccines/fully‐vaccinated.html) The FDA planned (all along) to monitor CMS data for side effects in nearly real time to watch for the safety of the COVID vaccines:   See all the adverse events including deaths from 9 different states in the latter half of this PDF: COVID Vaccine Cover Up PDF – Renz Law and COVID Pfizer Whistleblower Data – Renz Law   Dr. David Martin Explains 7 Felonies that Could Prosecute Dr. Fauci/ Felony Crimes End Big Pharma Immunity from Lawsuits Dr. David Martin has been spending the past year and a half fighting to unravel what he says is the global criminal conspiracy of coronavirus. Parties include the American and Chinese governments, the International Monetary Fund, and Blackrock. Martin says these groups are guilty of criminal conspiracy in a terrorist plot against the American people.    A brand new VAERS data analysis from 11/16/21 found hundreds of serious adverse events that were completely missed by the CDC that should have been mentioned in the informed consent document that is given to patients.  VAERS Analysis: Over 150,000 Americans killed by covid vaccines   The first half of this link below shows the hospitals are the killing fields following DS protocols. This is not for Christians who believe the Word but for those who dont. As you know we need to trust the Word. It is more dangerous for us, as believers and followers of Christ to "trust in the arm of flesh". Now you know why.  Dr. Bryan Ardis - TheRevealReport - Emergency Broadcast - Oct 12 2021  Roots of Modern Medicine David Eells  The Physicians' Original Hippocratic Oath: I swear by Apollo the Physician, and Asklepios and Hygieia, (We will discuss these three god's and godess as we go on.) and all the Gods and Goddesses that, according to my ability and judgment, I will keep this oath and this syngraphe ('contract'): to consider him who taught me this Art as dear to me as my parent, to share my substance with him, and to relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring as equivalent to my own brothers, and to teach them this Art, if they wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and every other form of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients and abstain from whatever is harmful and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any such advice; likewise, I will not give a pessary to a woman to induce abortion. I will live my life and practice my art with purity and holiness. I will not cut persons suffering from 'the stone', but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this skill. Whatever houses I enter, I will enter for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption, and especially from the seduction of females or males, of free persons or slaves. Whatever I see or hear in connection with my professional practice or not in the life of men, which should not be made public, I will not divulge, considering that all such knowledge should remain secret. As long as I continue to keep this Oath inviolate, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the Art, respected by all men, at all times. But if I should trespass and violate this Oath, may the opposite be my lot. www.csun.edu   Apollo in Greek Mythology Apollo is in many respects the paradigm of a Greek god. He represents order, harmony, and civilization in a way that most other Olympian deities cannot quite equal. One only has to compare him with Dionysos to understand how Apollo is depicted as a bright, rational counterpart to the chaotic and frenzied god of wine and women. Indeed, Apollo is most often associated with the cultivated arts of music and medicine, and his role as the leader of the Muses establishes him as a patron of intellectual pursuits. Pronunciation - {a-pol'-lo} Etymology - "Destroy or excite" Other names - Apollon (EDITOR'S NOTE: The angel of the abyss is Apollyon, meaning destroyer.) (EDITOR'S NOTE: Witchcraft or Sorcery in the New Testament is from the Greek word Pharmakia; English Pharmacy; Healing through the use of drugs. Of Babylon it was said, (Rev.18:23)... for with thy sorcery were all the nations deceived.)  In Greek mythology, Asklepios (Asclepius) was the god of healing. He was the son of the Olympian god Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis.    Asklepios (Roman Aesculapius) The Hesiod places Aesculapius' origin in Thessaly where he lived in a subterranean cleft with both a serpent and a hound as companions. Born of the god Apollo and the mortal woman Coronis (a "former" virgin of the Lapithae), Aesculapius was raised by the centaur Chiron, from whom he learned the art of healing and became a physician. (EDITOR'S NOTE: This healer God is an imitation of Jesus. This god is supposedly born of an earthly mother and a god (Son of God) he supposedly raised the dead etc. The physicians symbol, the serpent on a rod, was an imitation of Moses serpent that was lifted up in the wilderness, which pointed to Christ the healer. This god is clearly a false Christ.)  According to Greek legend, patients seeking healing would sleep the night in the temple of Aesculapius. During the night, Aesculapius would appear to the patient in a dream, accompanied by his daughter, the goddess Hygieia, and by a serpent who followed Aesculapius wherever he went. At that point, Aesculapius would treat the patient in the dream, often by having the serpent lick his or her wounds. In the morning, the patient would awaken healed. As a result, throughout history, the symbol of the physician has been, and continues to be, the Staff of Aesculapius, a wooden staff with a SINGLE serpent entwined. Many readers, however, are probably more familiar with the Caduceus, which is the winged staff of Hermes, the messenger of the gods, with TWO intertwined serpents. His followers established temples called Asclepions, temples of Asklepios, temples of healing. The greatest asklepion was in a grove of trees south of Corinth, Greece where the sick had to spend a night while the proper remedies were revealed during a dream to the priests of the temple and the cured had to make a suitable sacrifice (usually a rooster) to the god. According to mythology, Asculapius had a number of children including Hygieia, the goddess of health (from whose name comes the word "hygiene") and Panaceia, the goddess of healing (from whose name comes the word "panacea" for a universal remedy). Today, the staff of Aesculapius is a commonly used symbol of medicine. It is the symbol of the American Medical Association (AMA) and many other medical societies. Chiron taught Asclepius the art of healing. According to Pindar (Pythian Odes), Asclepius also acquired the knowledge of surgery, the use of drugs, love potions and incantations. www.loggia.com   Physician Humor.........or is it? Original Author unknown - David's notes in red These statistics are very outdated but are far worse now and they do prove a point. Think about this: Statistically, doctors are approximately 9,000 times more dangerous than gun owners. (These numbers have now skyrocketed) a. The number of physicians in the US is 700,000. b. Accidental deaths caused by Physicians per year is 120,000. (We just proved that this number, as of the early 2,000's, is closer to 1 million.) c. Accidental deaths per physician is 0.171. (US Dept. of Health & Human Services) Then think about this: a. The number of gun owners in the US is 80,000,000. b. The number of accidental gun deaths per year (all age groups) is 1,500. c. The number of accidental deaths per gun owner is .0000188. Statistically, doctors are approximately 9,000 times more dangerous than gun owners. FACT: NOT EVERYONE HAS A GUN, BUT ALMOST EVERYONE HAS AT LEAST ...ONE DOCTOR! Please alert your friends to this alarming threat. We must ban doctors before this gets out of hand! As a public health measure I have withheld the statistics on lawyers for fear that the shock could cause people to seek medical attention.    Man's Methods or God's Glory What we've seen so far has proven that the curse of God is in trusting in man. Jer 17:5  Thus saith Jehovah: Cursed is the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from Jehovah. (God has a method that never fails but it is foolishness to man.)  But God chose the foolish things of the world, that he might put to shame them that are wise; and God chose the weak things of the world, that he might put to shame the things that are strong; and the base things of the world, and the things that are despised, did God choose [yea] and the things that are not, that he might bring to naught the things that are: that no flesh should glory before God (1 Cor.1:27-29). God's methods will always be considered foolish, weak, base, and despised by the world and the worldly church… In my past experiences, at the end of all of my works to save myself by man's methods, God gave me faith to see His works. God's method was faith in Him combined with my own weakness. He said, "[my] power is made perfect in weakness" (2 Cor.12:9). Faith is foolish, weak, and base to the world but it brings God's power... Worldly methods failed me, but faith in the promises brought the most awesome deliverance. Glory to God! Recently, I watched a report on antibacterial soaps on the national news. They reported that the net effect was that they were not wiping out bacteria, but making them resistant. What did penicillin do but make antibiotic resistant bacteria for which there is no medical cure on the horizon? Poisons on the crops, to try to destroy the curse, go into the water supply and cause a multitude of diseases. Read your toothpaste tube; fluoride is a deadly poison. The Journal of the American Medical Association Vol. 284, July 26, 2000, reported that doctors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., causing 250,000 deaths every year from iatrogenic causes! (Now over 450,000 and this does not including the medical murders being committed because of CV-19.) Iatrogenic is defined as induced in a patient by a physician's activity, manner, or therapy, used especially of a complication of treatment. If this is what their organization admits, what is the truth? The numbers are much higher. If, as some believe, this is God's preferred method of healing today, He is surely making a lot of mistakes. I have a good doctor friend who prefers to not use drugs. He has told me how he prays for patients who will believe, with results. The problem is that most are not interested in deliverance from their curse if it takes repentance and faith so he does what he can. My mother took a drug for years. One day she was reading an article by Reader's Digest on the side effects of medicines. The side effects of the drug she was on were breast cancer and glaucoma, and she had them both. That was a terrible trade. My father's favorite doctor told him after an examination, "One thing I am sure of, you are not going to die of a heart attack. You have the heart of a much younger man". About a month later, he had a serious heart attack. I became convinced it was because of a drug he was taking to put oxygen into his blood because he lost a lung to smoking. Two close friends took a drug that had a side effect of damaging their kidneys. Their doctors admitted this in both cases. Man shifts the curse around and sometimes multiplies it, but he cannot deliver by his own efforts. If he could, then Jesus' death was for naught. I believe it is God's purpose that we understand that there is no permanent deliverance from the curse except God's deliverance through Jesus Christ. The world's deliverance is a deception, because, ultimately, their gods fail them. God wants us to see through that. We have been told that God now uses modern methods for delivering us from the curse. God's method is always free. It is salvation by grace, which is the unmerited, unpaid for, favor of God. Neither Jesus nor His disciples charged anything for healing, deliverance, provision, or any other form of salvation. The world's method always cost. The poor often go untreated until they die. In God's kingdom, all are treated on condition of faith. God desires to use the same method He used in the Scripture, the word of faith, because it is the only one that does not give glory to man. If a Christian receives a recovery from some disease while under the care of doctors and medicine, everyone wants to know what the medicine was or who the doctor was. God will not share His glory with another. I am not condemning those who use doctors or medicine. I offer the good news that Jesus has already healed you almost 2,000 years ago. Reading the New Testament once shows that God did not use the methods of man. In the coming wilderness we will need to understand this. Soon God's people will not be able to buy or sell with the world. Then all will be forced into a wilderness experience where there will be no idolatry with the gods of this world. For the people of God in the wilderness there will be a great lack of doctors, medicine, lawyers, bankers, psychiatrists, insurance, food, clean water, and public assistance of all types. Then we will see God's power in man's weakness (2 Cor.12:9-10). The churches' methods of obtaining provision today are the same as the world's methods and are therefore acceptable to it. God has a peculiar method for ministering deliverance from the curse that costs nothing, gives no glory to man, and proves His sovereignty. (1 Cor.1:28) And the base things of the world, and the things that are despised, did God choose, [yea] and the things that are not, that he might bring to nought the things that are: (29) that no flesh should glory before God We see here that God chose to use something that does not exist in the physical realm in order to destroy the things that do. The "things that are not" are the promises in the Word that we do not see fulfilled. The "things that are" are the cursed things of sin, sickness, and lack, which God wants to "bring to nought". For example, if you are sick, that is a thing that is; but "by whose stripes ye were healed" is a thing that is not in the physical realm. God chose faith in His promises "that are not" in order to bring to naught the sickness. Jesus and the disciples used God's method for dealing with the curse by calling "the things that are not, as though they were" (Rom.4:17). They just commanded it done according to the promises. They did not choose "the things that are", like doctors, medicine, psychiatrists, banks, and such to "bring to naught the things that are", like sin, sickness, torment, lack, debt, etc. The things that appear in this realm are the things that are and are all under the curse. (Heb.11:3) By faith we understand that the worlds (Greek: "ages") have been framed by the word of God, so that what is seen hath not been made out of things which appear. God's method is to use the Word and not the physical things that appear, just as in the Gospels and Acts. In anointing with oil, it is obviously not the oil but the faith that heals. Oil is just a symbol of the Holy Spirit. Paul's handkerchief did not heal; it was the power from his faith (Acts 19:12). Some might think that once Jesus also used things such as when He made clay with His spit to heal a blind man in John 9:6-7. It was not the clay that healed his eyes, but the washing it out of his eyes; clay symbolizes the Adamic nature and the things that are (Job 10:9; 33:6; Isa.29:16; 45:9) just as man was made from clay. In other words, our eyes must be cleansed of seeing through eyes of clay. We need the spiritual eyes to see the promise as done by faith. (2 Pet.1:3) Seeing that his divine power hath granted unto us all things that pertain unto life (Greek: zoe, "God's life") and godliness.... To have spiritual eyes, we must see that Jesus has already given us His life and blessings. We need to be cleansed of fleshly eyes that keep us from God's blessings. ... The natural man (of clay) receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him; and he cannot know them, because they are spiritually judged (Greek: "examined" or "seen") (1 Cor.2:14). By the way, the spit from Jesus' mouth symbolizes that which comes out of the mouth of the Lord that gives life to man, the Word or manna (Dt.8:3; Jn.1:13; 6:33,51). I once knew a preacher who said, "The reason Paul did all those miracles was because Luke the physician was with him". Wrong! Not in one verse do we see Luke using physician skills, which could never result in a miracle. The Greek word iatros is falsely translated "physician" but it just means "healer". Iatros is also used of Jesus as "healer". Translators put their modern ideas here. "Physician" means "one who practices medicine", which Jesus and the apostles never did. The term used for drugs or medicine in the Greek is pharmakia (English: "pharmacy") and is translated "witchcraft" or "sorcery", which Paul called a work of the flesh in Galatians 5:20. The nations are deceived with pharmakia (Rev.18:23). Luke was a healer in the same way Jesus and the other disciples were. It should seem strange to these people that Jesus and his disciples did not use "the things that are" to administer healing or deliverance. If Paul's handkerchief had the power to heal, why could it not heal before he touched it? It only acted as a medium to carry the healing anointing to the sick by faith. I have prayed over handkerchiefs, water, or people as mediums and seen healings. A brother, whose wife was very sick, came into our meeting. He was very troubled and on the edge of tears about this. The brother was not yet convinced that he needed to be filled with the Holy Spirit. Asking the Lord in my thoughts what to do, it came to me to pray over him to impart healing power to him, which we did. Then I said, "Now brother, go lay hands on your wife, and she will be healed". He was not convinced that healing was our right today, but he went home to lay hands on his wife. When he did, she was healed, and he came back excited. You see, it is not the medium; it is the healing power manifested through it, or in this case him, by faith. Jesus imparted authority to the disciples to heal before they received the Holy Spirit. So how do we use God's method of "the things that are not"? By calling "the things that are not, as though they were" (Rom.4:17). In other words, agree with the promise and call it done. God chooses to use "the things that are not, that he might bring to nought the things that are: that no flesh should glory before God" (1 Cor.1:28-29). God does not desire to use man's inventions so that only He can brag. God's salvation is not by our works. It is by getting our eyes off the problem and on the promise. 2 Corinthians 4:17-18 teaches that our affliction will be temporary if "we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen". When the Israelites got their eyes off the snake bite (curse) and on the serpent on the pole (Christ who became our curse [Jn.3:14]), they were healed (Num.21:49). As we saw, Paul's "thorn in the flesh" had nothing to do with sickness but a demon that was bringing him into humbling circumstances where he was weak to save himself so God's power was present to save him. His advice to Timothy puts a question in some concerning the use of remedies. In the text we can see that sin is the subject before and after the verse in question. (1 Tim. 5:22) Lay hands hastily on no man, neither be partaker of other men's sins: keep thyself pure. (23) Be no longer a drinker of water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities (Greek: asthenia; meaning "weaknesses"). (24) Some men's sins are evident, going before unto judgment; and some men also they follow after. (25) In like manner also there are good works that are evident; and such as are otherwise cannot be hid. The word sometimes translated "infirmities" is actually "weaknesses" and is clearly seen in other texts where the same word is correctly translated. (1 Cor.1:25) ... The weakness of God is stronger than men. Now we know that God is not infirm or sick so this word has to be "weakness". (2 Cor.13:4) For he was crucified through weakness, yet he liveth through the power of God. For we also are weak in him, but we shall live with him through the power of God toward you. We know that Jesus Christ was not crucified through infirmity, but weakness because He would not defend Himself when He was brought before Pilate and the Jewish leaders. Timothy had spiritual weaknesses for which the only cure was the spiritual wine of the nature of Jesus. The stomach or belly was spiritually considered the seat of rulership for the carnal man. It represented being driven by the lusts (Greek: "desires") of the flesh, driven by sin. (Php.3:19) Whose end is perdition, whose god is the belly, and [whose] glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things. Peter called those who returned to their sins, "the sow that had washed to wallowing in the mire". The sow best identifies those who are servants to their flesh's appetites. On the other hand, wine was considered the cure for bondage to sin. Wine represents the blood of Jesus. (Mt.26:27) And he took a cup(of wine), and gave thanks, and gave to them, saying, Drink ye all of it; (28) for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many unto remission of sins. (29) But I say unto you, I shall not drink henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom. Through our own blood we have inherited the lusts of the sinful flesh and through Jesus' pure blood that nature is destroyed. (Lev.17:11) For the life of the flesh is in the blood; and I have given it to you upon the altar to make atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh atonement by reason of the life. His blood is in us to the extent that we repent and partake of the life of His Word. (Jn.6:53) Jesus therefore said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood (wine), ye have not life in yourselves. (54) He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood hath eternal life: and I will raise him up at the last day. Partaking of the blood or wine is a matter of walking in His Word by faith in His blood that was given to us. (1 Jn.1:7) But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanseth us from all sin. The combined fruitful faith that resides in the true body of Christ is the answer to the question of why Isaiah commanded a cake of figs for Hezekiah's boil. (Isa.38:21) Now Isaiah had said, Let them take a cake of figs, and lay it for a plaster upon the boil, and he shall recover. The figs here represent the Body of Christ or Israel as in Jesus' warnings about bearing fruit. (Lk.13:6)And he spake this parable; A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came seeking fruit thereon, and found none. (7) And he said unto the vinedresser, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why doth it also cumber the ground? (Rev.6:13) and the stars of the heaven (Abraham's seed) fell unto the earth, as a fig tree casteth her unripe figs when she is shaken of a great wind. Jesus identified the righteous as being under the fig tree when He saw Nathanael there as an Israelite without guile (Jn.1:47 50). Notice that in the verse before the "cake of figs" was laid on the boil, faith was expressed to God by the body for Hezekiah's healing as the saints in the "house of the Lord" were praising God for this. It was the figs' faith that sucked the poison out of the boil. (Isa.38:20) The Lord is [ready] to save me: Therefore we will sing my songs with stringed instruments All the days of our life in the house of the Lord. The cake of figs was a natural parable that represented a spiritual happening just as in Jesus' parables of planting wheat and corn, etc. See God's Vaccine   Please read our book Faith for all Things    

western new york canada reading japan europe university art chinese california american americans man drink greece parties god republicans congress english doctors wine gods single greek human united states safe sanders medicine oil prevention bridges lord incidentally spirit jewish notice michigan acts journal his word father rom ridiculous body institute sciences christians senate defense medicare minnesota fda holy spirit surgery diagnosis methods patients virology us department cheap gospel sorcery healing apollo chiron goddesses cor pandemic ebola btw nursing poison hermes cdc witchcraft corinth scripture lay ds behold rev destroy corinthians galatians jesus christ new testament bernie sanders digest colorado springs cv jehovah verily new england journal md physicians public health new york state nih gilead num vaccines billion pilates mt heb oath lev php dt curses jha disappeared hospitals johns hopkins naive etymology centers translators roughly disease control rn china academy pronunciation whistleblowers israelites percentage olympians cms subcommittee mayo clinic jn harvard school minnesota school largest accidental unc chapel hill worldly us dept adverse blackrock statistically david martin american medical association iom hygieia niaid international monetary fund 45k caduceus preventable medscape medical malpractice american medical association ama gilead sciences regeneron ingraham to err million people felonies iatrogenic clay clark renz lk scott jensen asclepius aesculapius thessaly partaking brown university school american citizens pharmakia ivermectin adamic asklepios panaceia unvaccinated american hospitals covid-19 wuhan institute
WordPress Radio
234. PHP 8.1, PHP 8.0 y PHP 7.4

WordPress Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:43


Openverse ya es una realidad, y también una larga lista de versiones de WordPress, Gutenberg, BuddyPress y, también, de PHP.

PHP Town Hall
Here lies dynamic properties. They were good properties Brent.

PHP Town Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:37


Matt and Ben are joined by Colin O'Dell, staff engineer at Wayfair and supporter of the twitter dividing Dynamic Properties RFC to discuss what this RFC really means for PHP going forward and if its really a good idea. They also talk to Colin about what its like to change jobs after a long tenure (13 years) at his previous job, what he likes and doesn't like about using a Mac for a daily work computer and also managing one of the biggest OSS libraries for PHP: CommonMark.Show Notes:Deprecate Dynamic Properties RFCColin on TwitterColin's blogReference to the good dogs big

Laravel News Podcast
Filaments, banning models, and parameter stores

Laravel News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 50:04


Jake and Michael discuss all the latest Laravel releases, tutorials, and happenings in the community.This episode is sponsored by Honeybadger - combining error monitoring, uptime monitoring and check-in monitoring into a single, easy to use platform and was streamed live.Show links Laravel 8.74 released Laravel 8.75 released Filament TALL stack admin panel v2 released Tailwind CSS v3 is now released Laravel Holiday Giveaway Laravel and Vue translation package Badgers Ban Eloquent models with the Laravel Ban package Managing secrets in Laravel with AWS Parameter Store ScoutSuite A bash function to run tests for both PHPUnit and Pest A package for adding more type safety to your PHP projects Using semantic elements to improve your HTML A conversation on the future of PHP

How To Code Well
139 - Shopping carts are hard

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 28:00


Changelog No live stream tonight, My internet has been super patchy today so I'm not even going to try. Unfortunately no PHP 8 short this week. It has been recorded, I just haven't had the chance to upload and do the thumbnail yet. We documented the 7th lesson of the new PHP course. This included some TDD, some array nesting and some PHP 8 array shapes Shopping carts are hard A shopping cart needs to be frictional-less to the end user (Customer). The quicker a customer can purchase a product the better. There are many questions that need to be answered when designing the user flow of a shopping cart These are just some things to think about: Shipping Will you be shipping a physical good and if so will the shipping cost be dependent on user location? Will shipping be based on the item(s) weight? Will shipping be discounted in certain regions? Will you require shipping information to make a payment (Security checks)? Will there be discounted shipping based on quantity? Will there be a quantity limit based on different regions? Currency What currency will you be offering? What is the conversion rate? How will you track that? What are the tax implications for you versus the customer? How are you going to calculate tax? Users Will you require an actual user to login before and order is created? Can someone make a guest account? Will there be teams or individual accounts? Will you require the customer to be verified before making a purchase. Some places like Stripe require a user email address? Product Is it a digital good? Will there be stock? How will the stock be recorded/monitored? How will an out of stock product be displayed? Can products be bundled? Do bundled products get a discount? How are products removed from the cart? How are products updated on the cart? How are quantities updated on the cart? Checkout What happens when a logged out user access the checkout page? What happens to abandoned carts? What defines an abandoned cart? At what point does the cart get created in the database? At what point does the cart get associated with the user? Other items to consider Refunds Subscriptions Cancelations

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
Serverless Java on AWS

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 63:31


An airhacks.fm conversation with Mark Sailes (@MarkSailes3) about: the BBC micro computer with a cassette, the PRINT 10, 386, 486 and a Pentium with an internet connection, learning Apache, using Mandrake Linux at university, a first web page - a huge experience, PHP, MySQL and "we don't need transactions", the fantastic phpMyAdmin, using Java, C++ and Python at the university, the great JavaDoc, Eclipse and NetBeans, the great Java collection JavaDoc, migrating from java.util.Vector to java.util.List, working as backend junior Java developer, from junior over senior to team lead, 3% improvement with 97% rewrite, working for AWS, "Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less" book, the WebLogic build engineer, pre pooling EJBs, Hey Enterprise EJB Developers Now Is The Time To Go Serverless, Lambda with API Gateway is a transition to Event Driven Architectures, Using AWS Lambda with an Application Load Balancer, cloud native, event driven architectures with AWS Lambda and Java, testable, asynchronous AWS Lambda, the serverless Kafka on AWS, archive and replay with Amazon Event Bridge, fast cold starts with AWS Lambda, milliseconds invocations with AWS Lambda, testing asynchronous AWS Lambda with JUnit, the limitations of mocking, AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) and AWS SAM CLI, swapping out Lambdas with SAM, describing AWS infrastructure with CDK, no YAML deployments with CDK, shareable infrastructure with compilable Java code, AWS CDK constructs--reusable cloud pieces Mark Sailes on twitter: @MarkSailes3, Mark's blog: mark-sailes.medium.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Building Distributed Cognition into Your Business with Sam Ramji

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 39:56


About SamA 25-year veteran of the Silicon Valley and Seattle technology scenes, Sam Ramji led Kubernetes and DevOps product management for Google Cloud, founded the Cloud Foundry foundation, has helped build two multi-billion dollar markets (API Management at Apigee and Enterprise Service Bus at BEA Systems) and redefined Microsoft's open source and Linux strategy from “extinguish” to “embrace”.He is nerdy about open source, platform economics, middleware, and cloud computing with emphasis on developer experience and enterprise software. He is an advisor to multiple companies including Dell Technologies, Accenture, Observable, Fletch, Orbit, OSS Capital, and the Linux Foundation.Sam received his B.S. in Cognitive Science from UC San Diego, the home of transdisciplinary innovation, in 1994 and is still excited about artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology.Links: DataStax: https://www.datastax.com Sam Ramji Twitter: https://twitter.com/sramji Open||Source||Data: https://www.datastax.com/resources/podcast/open-source-data Screaming in the Cloud Episode 243 with Craig McLuckie: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/innovating-in-the-cloud-with-craig-mcluckie/ Screaming in the Cloud Episode 261 with Jason Warner: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/what-github-can-give-to-microsoft-with-jason-warner/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access to anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers! Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor. List and see all SSH servers, kubernetes clusters or databases available to you. Get instant access to them all using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open source and a pleasure to use.Download Teleport at https://goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and recurring effort that this show goes to is to showcase people in their best light. Today's guest has done an awful lot: he led Kubernetes and DevOps Product Management for Google Cloud; he founded the Cloud Foundry Foundation; he set open-source strategy for Microsoft in the naughts; he advises companies including Dell, Accenture, the Linux Foundation; and tying all of that together, it's hard to present a lot of that in a great light because given my own proclivities, that sounds an awful lot like a personal attack. Sam Ramji is the Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax. Sam, thank you for joining me, and it's weird when your resume starts to read like, “Oh, I hate all of these things.”Sam: [laugh]. It's weird, but it's true. And it's the only life I could have lived apparently because here I am. Corey, it's a thrill to meet you. I've been an admirer of your public speaking, and public tweeting, and your writing for a long time.Corey: Well, thank you. The hard part is getting over the voice saying don't do it because it turns out that there's no real other side of public shutting up, which is something that I was never good at anyway, so I figured I'd lean into it. And again, I mean, that the sense of where you have been historically in terms of your career not, “Look what you've done,” which is a subtext that I could be accused of throwing in sometimes.Sam: I used to hear that a lot from my parents, actually.Corey: Oh, yeah. That was my name growing up. But you've done a lot of things, and you've transitioned from notable company making significant impact on the industry, to the next one, to the next one. And you've been in high-flying roles, doing lots of really interesting stuff. What's the common thread between all those things?Sam: I'm an intensely curious person, and the thing that I'm most curious about is distributed cognition. And that might not be obvious from what you see is kind of the… Lego blocks of my career, but I studied cognitive science in college when that was not really something that was super well known. So, I graduated from UC San Diego in '94 doing neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and psychology. And because I just couldn't stop thinking about thinking; I was just fascinated with how it worked.So, then I wanted to build software systems that would help people learn. And then I wanted to build distributed software systems. And then I wanted to learn how to work with people who were thinking about building the distributed software systems. So, you end up kind of going up this curve of, like, complexity about how do we think? How do we think alone? How do we learn to think? How do we think together?And that's the directed path through my software engineering career, into management, into middleware at BEA, into open-source at Microsoft because that's an amazing demonstration of distributed cognition, how, you know, at the time in 2007, I think, Sourceforge had 100,000 open-source projects, which was, like, mind boggling. Some of them even worked together, but all of them represented these groups of people, flung around the world, collaborating on something that was just fundamentally useful, that they were curious about. Kind of did the same thing into APIs because APIs are an even better way to reuse for some cases than having the source code—at Apigee. And kept growing up through that into, how are we building larger-scale thinking systems like Cloud Foundry, which took me into Google and Kubernetes, and then some applications of that in Autodesk and now DataStax. So, I love building companies. I love helping people build companies because I think business is distributed cognition. So, those businesses that build distributed systems, for me, are the most fascinating.Corey: You were basically handed a heck of a challenge as far as, “Well, help set open-source strategy,” back at Microsoft, in the days where that was a punchline. And credit where due, I have to look at Microsoft of today, and it's not a joke, you can have your arguments about them, but again in those days, a lot of us built our entire personality on hating Microsoft. Some folks never quite evolved beyond that, but it's a new ballgame and it's very clear that the Microsoft of yesteryear and the Microsoft of today are not completely congruent. What was it like at that point understanding that as you're working with open-source communities, you're doing that from a place of employment with a company that was widely reviled in the space.Sam: It was not lost on me. The irony, of course, was that—Corey: Well, thank God because otherwise the question where you would have been, “What do you mean they didn't like us?”Sam: [laugh].Corey: Which, on some levels, like, yeah, that's about the level of awareness I would have expected in that era, but contrary to popular opinion, execs at these companies are not generally oblivious.Sam: Yeah, well, if I'd been clever as a creative humorist, I would have given you that answer instead of my serious answer, but for some reason, my role in life is always to be the straight guy. I used to have Slashdot as my homepage, right? I love when I'd see some conspiracy theory about, you know, Bill Gates dressed up as the Borg, taking over the world. My first startup, actually in '97, was crushed by Microsoft. They copied our product, copied the marketing, and bundled it into Office, so I had lots of reasons to dislike Microsoft.But in 2004, I was recruited into their venture capital team, which I couldn't believe. It was really a place that they were like, “Hey, we could do better at helping startups succeed, so we're going to evangelize their success—if they're building with Microsoft technologies—to VCs, to enterprises, we'll help you get your first big enterprise deal.” I was like, “Man, if I had this a few years ago, I might not be working.” So, let's go try to pay it forward.I ended up in open-source by accident. I started going to these conferences on Software as a Service. This is back in 2005 when people were just starting to light up, like, Silicon Valley Forum with, you know, the CEO of Demandware would talk, right? We'd hear all these different ways of building a new business, and they all kept talking about their tech stack was Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. I went to one eight-hour conference, and Microsoft technologies were mentioned for about 12 seconds in two separate chunks. So, six seconds, he was like, “Oh, and also we really like Microsoft SQL Server for our data layer.”Corey: Oh, Microsoft SQL Server was fantastic. And I know that's a weird thing for people to hear me say, just because I've been renowned recently for using Route 53 as the primary data store for everything that I can. But there was nothing quite like that as far as having multiple write nodes, being able to handle sharding effectively. It was expensive, and you would take a bath on the price come audit time, but people were not rolling it out unaware of those things. This was a trade off that they were making.Oracle has a similar story with databases. It's yeah, people love to talk smack about Oracle and its business practices for a variety of excellent reasons, at least in the database space that hasn't quite made it to cloud yet—knock on wood—but people weren't deploying it because they thought Oracle was warm and cuddly as a vendor; they did it because they can tolerate the rest of it because their stuff works.Sam: That's so well said, and people don't give them the credit that's due. Like, when they built hypergrowth in their business, like… they had a great product; it really worked. They made it expensive, and they made a lot of money on it, and I think that was why you saw MySQL so successful and why, if you were looking for a spec that worked, that you could talk through through an open driver like ODBC or JDBC or whatever, you could swap to Microsoft SQL Server. But I walked out of that and came back to the VC team and said, “Microsoft has a huge problem. This is a massive market wave that's coming. We're not doing anything in it. They use a little bit of SQL Server, but there's nothing else in your tech stack that they want, or like, or can afford because they don't know if their businesses are going to succeed or not. And they're going to go out of business trying to figure out how much licensing costs they would pay to you in order to consider using your software. They can't even start there. They have to start with open-source. So, if you're going to deal with SaaS, you're going to have to have open-source, and get it right.”So, I worked with some folks in the industry, wrote a ten-page paper, sent it up to Bill Gates for Think Week. Didn't hear much back. Bought a new strategy to the head of developer platform evangelism, Sanjay Parthasarathy who suggested that the idea of discounting software to zero for startups, with the hope that they would end up doing really well with it in the future as a Software as a Service company; it was dead on arrival. Dumb idea; bring it back; that actually became BizSpark, the most popular program in Microsoft partner history.And then about three months later, I got a call from this guy, Bill Hilf. And he said, “Hey, this is Bill Hilf. I do open-source at Microsoft. I work with Bill Gates. He sent me your paper. I really like it. Would you consider coming up and having conversation with me because I want you to think about running open-source technology strategy for the company.” And at this time I'm, like, 33 or 34. And I'm like, “Who me? You've got to be joking.” And he goes, “Oh, and also, you'll be responsible for doing quarterly deep technical briefings with Bill… Gates.” I was like, “You must be kidding.” And so of course I had to check it out. One thing led to another and all of a sudden, with not a lot of history in the open-source community but coming in it with a strategist's eye and with a technologist's eye, saying, “This is a problem we got to solve. How do we get after this pragmatically?” And the rest is history, as they say.Corey: I have to say that you are the Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax, and I pull up your website quickly here and a lot of what I tell earlier stage companies is effectively more or less what you have already done. You haven't named yourself after the open-source project that underlies the bones of what you have built so you're not going to wind up in the same glorious challenges that, for example, Elastic or MongoDB have in some ways. You have a pricing page that speaks both to the reality of, “It's two in the morning. I'm trying to get something up and running and I want you the hell out of my way. Just give me something that I can work with a reasonable free tier and don't make me talk to a salesperson.” But also, your enterprise tier is, “Click here to talk to a human being,” which is speaking enterprise slash procurement slash, oh, there will be contract negotiation on these things.It's being able to serve different ends of your market depending upon who it is that encounters you without being off-putting to any of those. And it's deceptively challenging for companies to pull off or get right. So clearly, you've learned lessons by doing this. That was the big problem with Microsoft for the longest time. It's, if I want to use some Microsoft stuff, once you were able to download things from the internet, it changed slightly, but even then it was one of those, “What exactly am I committing to here as far as signing up for this? And am I giving them audit rights into my environment? Is the BSA about to come out of nowhere and hit me with a surprise audit and find out that various folks throughout the company have installed this somewhere and now I owe more than the company's worth?” That was always the haunting fear that companies had back then.These days, I like the approach that companies are taking with the SaaS offering: you pay for usage. On some level, I'd prefer it slightly differently in a pay-per-seat model because at least then you can predict the pricing, but no one is getting surprise submarined with this type of thing on an audit basis, and then they owe damages and payment in arrears and someone has them over a barrel. It's just, “Oh. The bill this month was higher than we expected.” I like that model I think the industry does, too.Sam: I think that's super well said. As I used to joke at BEA Systems, nothing says ‘I love you' to a customer like an audit, right? That's kind of a one-time use strategy. If you're going to go audit licenses to get your revenue in place, you might be inducing some churn there. It's a huge fix for the structural problem in pricing that I think package software had, right?When we looked at Microsoft software versus open-source software, and particularly Windows versus Linux, you would have a structure where sales reps were really compensated to sell as much as possible upfront so they could get the best possible commission on what might be used perpetually. But then if you think about it, like, the boxes in a curve, right, if you do that calculus approximation of a smooth curve, a perpetual software license is a huge box and there's an enormous amount of waste in there. And customers figured out so as soon as you can go to a pay-per-use or pay-as-you-go, you start to smooth that curve, and now what you get is what you deserve, right, as opposed to getting filled with way more cost than you expect. So, I think this model is really super well understood now. Kind of the long run the high point of open-source meets, cloud, meets Software as a Service, you look at what companies like MongoDB, and Confluent, and Elastic, and Databricks are doing. And they've really established a very good path through the jungle of how to succeed as a software company. So, it's still difficult to implement, but there are really world-class guides right now.Corey: Moving beyond where Microsoft was back in the naughts, you were then hired as a VP over at Google. And in that era, the fact that you were hired as a VP at Google is fascinating. They preferred to grow those internally, generally from engineering. So, first question, when you were being hired as a VP in the product org, did they make you solve algorithms on a whiteboard to get there?Sam: [laugh]. They did not. I did have somewhat of an advantage [because they 00:13:36] could see me working pretty closely as the CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation. I'd worked closely with Craig McLuckie who notably brought Kubernetes to the world along with Joe Beda, and with Eric Brewer, and a number of others.And he was my champion at Google. He was like, “Look, you know, we need him doing Kubernetes. Let's bring Sam in to do that.” So, that was helpful. I also wrote a [laugh] 2000-word strategy document, just to get some thoughts out of my head. And I said, “Hey, if you like this, great. If you don't throw it away.” So, the interviews were actually very much not solving problems in a whiteboard. There were super collaborative, really excellent conversations. It was slow—Corey: Let's be clear, Craig McLuckie's most notable achievement was being a guest on this podcast back in Episode 243. But I'll say that this is a close second.Sam: [laugh]. You're not wrong. And of course now with Heptio and their acquisition by VMware.Corey: Ehh, they're making money beyond the wildest dreams of avarice, that's all well and good, but an invite to this podcast, that's where it's at.Sam: Well, he should really come on again, he can double down and beat everybody. That can be his landmark achievement, a two-timer on Screaming in [the] Cloud.Corey: You were at Google; you were at Microsoft. These are the big titans of their era, in some respect—not to imply that there has beens; they're bigger than ever—but it's also a more crowded field in some ways. I guess completing the trifecta would be Amazon, but you've had the good judgment never to work there, directly of course. Now they're clearly in your market. You're at DataStax, which is among other things, built on Apache Cassandra, and they launched their own Cassandra service named Keyspaces because no one really knows why or how they name things.And of course, looking under the hood at the pricing model, it's pretty clear that it really is just DynamoDB wearing some Groucho Marx classes with a slight upcharge for API level compatibility. Great. So, I don't see it a lot in the real world and that's fine, but I'm curious as to your take on looking at all three of those companies at different eras. There was always the threat in the open-source world that they are going to come in and crush you. You said earlier that Microsoft crushed your first startup.Google is an interesting competitor in some respects; people don't really have that concern about them. And your job as a Chief Strategy Officer at Amazon is taken over by a Post-it Note that simply says ‘yes' on it because there's nothing they're not going to do, or try, and experiment with. So, from your perspective, if you look at the titans, who is it that you see as the largest competitive threat these days, if that's even a thing?Sam: If you think about Sun Tzu and the Art of War, right—a lot of strategy comes from what we've learned from military environments—fighting a symmetric war, right, using the same weapons and the same army against a symmetric opponent, but having 1/100th of the personnel and 1/100th of the money is not a good plan.Corey: “We're going to lose money, going to be outcompeted; we'll make it up in volume. Oh, by the way, we're also slower than they are.”Sam: [laugh]. So, you know, trying to come after AWS, or Microsoft, or Google as an independent software company, pound-for-pound, face-to-face, right, full-frontal assault is psychotic. What you have to do, I think, at this point is to understand that these are each companies that are much like we thought about Linux, and you know, Macintosh, and Windows as operating systems. They're now the operating systems of the planet. So, that creates some economies of scale, some efficiencies for them. And for us. Look at how cheap object storage is now, right? So, there's never been a better time in human history to create a database company because we can take the storage out of the database and hand it over to Amazon, or Google, or Microsoft to handle it with 13 nines of durability on a constantly falling cost basis.So, that's super interesting. So, you have to prosecute the structure of the world as it is, based on where the giants are and where they'll be in the future. Then you have to turn around and say, like, “What can they never sell?”So, Amazon can never sell something that is standalone, right? They're a parts factory and if you buy into the Amazon-first strategy of cloud computing—which we did at Autodesk when I was VP of cloud platform there—everything is a primitive that works inside Amazon, but they're not going to build things that don't work outside of the Amazon primitives. So, your company has to be built on the idea that there's a set of people who value something that is purpose-built for a particular use case that you can start to broaden out, it's really helpful if they would like it to be something that can help them escape a really valuable asset away from the center of gravity that is a cloud. And that's why data is super interesting. Nobody wakes up in the morning and says, “Boy, I had such a great conversation with Oracle over the last 20 years beating me up on licensing. Let me go find a cloud vendor and dump all of my data in that so they can beat me up for the next 20 years.” Nobody says that.Corey: It's the idea of data portability that drives decision-making, which makes people, of course, feel better about not actually moving in anywhere. But the fact that they're not locked in strategically, in a way that requires a full software re-architecture and data model rewrite is compelling. I'm a big believer in convincing people to make decisions that look a lot like that.Sam: Right. And so that's the key, right? So, when I was at Autodesk, we went from our 100 million dollar, you know, committed spend with 19% discount on the big three services to, like—we started realize when we're going to burn through that, we were spending $60 million or so a year on 20% annual growth as the cloud part of the business grew. Thought, “Okay, let's renegotiate. Let's go and do a $250 million deal. I'm sure they'll give us a much better discount than 19%.” Short story is they came back and said, “You know, we're going to take you from an already generous 19% to an outstanding 22%.” We thought, “Wait a minute, we already talked to Intuit. They're getting a 40% discount on a $400 million spend.”So, you know, math is hard, but, like, 40% minus 22% is 18% times $250 million is a lot of money. So, we thought, “What is going on here?” And we realized we just had no credible threat of leaving, and Intuit did because they had built a cross-cloud capable architecture. And we had not. So, now stepping back into the kind of the world that we're living in 2021, if you're an independent software company, especially if you have the unreasonable advantage of being an open-source software company, you have got to be doing your customers good by giving them cross-cloud capability. It could be simply like the Amdahl coffee cup that Amdahl reps used to put as landmines for the IBM reps, later—I can tell you that story if you want—even if it's only a way to save money for your customer by using your software, when it gets up to tens and hundreds of million dollars, that's a really big deal.But they also know that data is super important, so the option value of being able to move if they have to, that they have to be able to pull that stick, instead of saying, “Nice doggy,” we have to be on their side, right? So, there's almost a detente that we have to create now, as cloud vendors, working in a world that's invented and operated by the giants.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: When we look across the, I guess, the ecosystem as it's currently unfolding, a recurring challenge that I have to the existing incumbent cloud providers is they're great at offering the bricks that you can use to build things, but if I'm starting a company today, I'm not going to look at building it myself out of, “Ooh, I'm going to take a bunch of EC2 instances, or Lambda functions, or popsicles and string and turn it into this thing.” I'm going to want to tie together things that are way higher level. In my own case, now I wind up paying for Retool, which is, effectively, yeah, it runs on some containers somewhere, presumably, I think in Azure, but don't quote me on that. And that's great. Could I build my own thing like that?Absolutely not. I would rather pay someone to tie it together. Same story. Instead of building my own CRM by running some open-source software on an EC2 instance, I wind up paying for Salesforce or Pipedrive or something in that space. And so on, and so forth.And a lot of these companies that I'm doing business with aren't themselves running on top of AWS. But for web hosting, for example; if I look at the reference architecture for a WordPress site, AWS's diagram looks like a punchline. It is incredibly overcomplicated. And I say this as someone who ran large WordPress installations at Media Temple many years ago. Now, I have the good sense to pay WP Engine. And on a monthly basis, I give them money and they make the website work.Sure, under the hood, it's running on top of GCP or AWS somewhere. But I don't have to think about it; I don't have to build this stuff together and think about the backups and the failover strategy and the rest. The website just works. And that is increasingly the direction that business is going; things commoditize over time. And AWS in particular has done a terrible job, in my experience, of differentiating what it is they're doing in the language that their customers speak.They're great at selling things to existing infrastructure engineers, but folks who are building something from scratch aren't usually in that cohort. It's a longer story with time and, “Well, we're great at being able to sell EC2 instances by the gallon.” Great. Are you capable of going to a small doctor's office somewhere in the American Midwest and offering them an end-to-end solution for managing patient data? Of course not. You can offer them a bunch of things they can tie together to something that will suffice if they all happen to be software engineers, but that's not the opportunity.So instead, other companies are building those solutions on top of AWS, capturing the margin. And if there's one thing guaranteed to keep Amazon execs awake at night, it's the idea of someone who isn't them making money somehow somewhere, so I know that's got to rankle them, but they do not speak that language. At all. Longer-term, I only see that as a more and more significant crutch. A long enough timeframe here, we're talking about them becoming the Centurylinks of the world, the tier one backbone provider that everyone uses, but no one really thinks about because they're not a household name.Sam: That is a really thoughtful perspective. I think the diseconomies of scale that you're pointing to start to creep in, right? Because when you have to sell compute units by the gallon, right, you can't care if it's a gallon of milk, [laugh] or a gallon of oil, or you know, a gallon of poison. You just have to keep moving it through. So, the shift that I think they're going to end up having to make pragmatically, and you start to see some signs of it, like, you know, they hired but could not retain Matt [Acey 00:23:48]. He did an amazing job of bringing them to some pragmatic realization that they need to partner with open-source, but more broadly, when I think about Microsoft in the 2000s as they were starting to learn their open-source lessons, we were also being able to pull on Microsoft's deep competency and partners. So, most people didn't do the math on this. I was part of the field governance council so I understood exactly how the Microsoft business worked to the level that I was capable. When they had $65 billion in revenue, they produced $24 billion in profit through an ecosystem that generated $450 billion in revenue. So, for every dollar Microsoft made, it was $8 to partners. It was a fundamentally platform-shaped business, and that was how they're able to get into doctors offices in the Midwest, and kind of fit the curve that you're describing of all of those longtail opportunities that require so much care and that are complex to prosecute. These solved for their diseconomies of scale by having 1.2 million partner companies. So, will Amazon figure that out and will they hire, right, enough people who've done this before from Microsoft to become world-class in partnering, that's kind of an exercise left to the [laugh] reader, right? Where will that go over time? But I don't see another better mathematical model for dealing with the diseconomies of scale you have when you're one of the very largest providers on the planet.Corey: The hardest problem as I look at this is, at some point, you hit a point of scale where smaller things look a lot less interesting. I get that all the time when people say, “Oh, you fix AWS bills, aren't you missing out by not targeting Google bills and Azure bills as well?” And it's, yeah. I'm not VC-backed. It turns out that if I limit the customer base that I can effectively service to only AWS customers, yeah turns out, I'm not going to starve anytime soon. Who knew? I don't need to conquer the world and that feels increasingly antiquated, at least going by the stories everyone loves to tell.Sam: Yeah, it's interesting to see how cloud makes strange bedfellows, right? We started seeing this in, like, 2014, 2015, weird partnerships that you're like, “There's no way this would happen.” But the cloud economics which go back to utilization, rather than what it used to be, which was software lock-in, just changed who people were willing to hang out with. And now you see companies like Databricks going, you know, we do an amazing amount of business, effectively competing with Amazon, selling Spark services on top of predominantly Amazon infrastructure, and everybody seems happy with it. So, there's some hint of a new sensibility of what the future of partnering will be. We used to call it coopetition a long time ago, which is kind of a terrible word, but at least it shows that there's some nuance in you can't compete with everybody because it's just too hard.Corey: I wish there were better ways of articulating these things because it seems from the all the outside world, you have companies like Amazon and Microsoft and Google who go and build out partner networks because they need that external accessibility into various customer profiles that they can't speak to super well themselves, but they're also coming out with things that wind up competing directly or indirectly, with all of those partners at the same time. And I don't get it. I wish that there were smarter ways to do it.Sam: It is hard to even talk about it, right? One of the things that I think we've learned from philosophy is if we don't have a word for it, we can't be intelligent about it. So, there's a missing semantics here for being able to describe the complexity of where are you partnering? Where are you competing? Where are you differentiating? In an ecosystem, which is moving and changing.I tend to look at the tools of game theory for this, which is to look at things as either, you know, nonzero-sum games or zero-sum games. And if it's a nonzero-sum game, which I think are the most interesting ones, can you make it a positive sum game? And who can you play positive-sum games with? An organization as big as Amazon, or as big as Microsoft, or even as big as Google isn't ever completely coherent with itself. So, thinking about this as an independent software company, it doesn't matter if part of one of these hyperscalers has a part of their business that competes with your entire business because your business probably drives utilization of a completely different resource in their company that you can partner within them against them, effectively. Right?For example, Cassandra is an amazingly powerful but demanding workload on Kubernetes. So, there's a lot of Cassandra on EKS. You grow a lot of workload, and EKS business does super well. Does that prevent us from working with Amazon because they have Dynamo or because they have Keyspaces? Absolutely not, right?So, this is when those companies get so big that they are almost their own forest, right, of complexity, you can kind of get in, hang out, do well, and pretty much never see the competitive product, unless you're explicitly looking for it, which I think is a huge danger for us as independent software companies. And I would say this to anybody doing strategy for an organization like this, which is, don't obsess over the tiny part of their business that competes with yours, and do not pay attention to any of the marketing that they put out that looks competitive with what you have. Because if you can't figure out how to make a better product and sell it better to your customers as a single purpose corporation, you have bigger problems.Corey: I want to change gears slightly to something that's probably a fair bit more insulting, but that's okay. We're going to roll with it. That seems to be the theme of this episode. You have been, in effect, a CIO a number of times at different companies. And if we take a look at the typical CIO tenure, industry-wide, it's not long; it approaches the territory from an executive perspective of, “Be sure not to buy green bananas. You might not be here by the time they ripen.” And I'm wondering what it is that drives that and how you make a mark in a relatively short time frame when you're providing inputs and deciding on strategy, and those decisions may not bear fruit for years.Sam: CIO used to—we used say it stood for ‘Career Is Over' because the tenure is so short. I think there's a couple of reasons why it's so short. And I think there's a way I believe you can have impact in a short amount of time. I think the reason that it's been short is because people aren't sure what they want the CIO role to be.Do they want it to be a glorified finance person who's got a lot of data processing experience, but now really has got, you know, maybe even an MBA in finance, but is not focusing on value creation? Do they want it to be somebody who's all-singing, all-dancing Chief Data Officer with a CTO background who did something amazing and solved a really hard problem? The definition of success is difficult. Often CIOs now also have security under them, which is literally a job I would never ever want to have. Do security for a public corporation? Good Lord, that's a way to lose most of your life. You're the only executive other than the CEO that the board wants to hear from. Every sing—Corey: You don't sleep; you wait, in those scenarios. And oh, yeah, people joke about ablative CSOs in those scenarios. Yeah, after SolarWinds, you try and get an ablative intern instead, but those don't work as well. It's a matter of waiting for an inevitability. One of the things I think is misunderstood about management broadly, is that you are delegating work, but not the responsibility. The responsibility rests with you.So, when companies have these statements blaming some third-party contractor, it's no, no, no. I'm dealing with you. You were the one that gave my data to some sketchy randos. It is your responsibility that data has now been compromised. And people don't want to hear that, but it's true.Sam: I think that's absolutely right. So, you have this high risk, medium reward, very fungible job definition, right? If you ask all of the CIO's peers what their job is, they'll probably all tell you something different that represents their wish list. The thing that I learned at Autodesk, I was only there for 15 months, but we established a fundamental transformation of the work of how cloud platform is done at the company that's still in place a couple years later.You have to realize that you're a change agent, right? You're actually being hired to bring in the bulk of all the different biases and experiences you have to solve a problem that is not working, right? So, when I got to Autodesk, they didn't even know what their uptime was. It took three months to teach the team how to measure the uptime. Turned out the uptime was 97.7% for the cloud, for the world's largest engineering software company.That is 200 hours a year of unplanned downtime, right? That is not good. So, a complete overhaul [laugh] was needed. Understanding that as a change agent, your half-life is 12 to 18 months, you have to measure success not on tenure, but on your ability to take good care of the patient, right? It's going to be a lot of pain, you're going to work super hard, you're going to have to build trust with everyone, and then people are still going to hate you at the end. That is something you just have to kind of take on.As a friend of mine, Jason Warner joined Redpoint Ventures recently, he said this when he was the CTO of GitHub: “No one is a villain in their own story.” So, you realize, going into a big organization, people are going to make you a villain, but you still have to do incredibly thoughtful, careful work, that's going to take care of them for a long time to come. And those are the kinds of CIOs that I can relate to very well.Corey: Jason is great. You're name-dropping all the guests we've had. My God, keep going. It's a hard thing to rationalize and wrap heads around. It's one of those areas where you will not be measured during your tenure in the role, in some respects. And, of course, that leads to the cynical perspective as well, where well, someone's not going to be here long and if they say, “Yeah, we're just going to keep being stewards of the change that's already underway,” well, that doesn't look great, so quick, time to do a cloud migration, or a cloud repatriation, or time to roll something else out. A bit of a different story.Sam: One of the biggest challenges is how do you get the hearts and the minds of the people who are in the organization when they are no fools, and their expectation is like, “Hey, this company's been around for decades, and we go through cloud leaders or CIOs, like Wendy's goes through hamburgers.” They could just cloud-wash, right, or change-wash all their language. They could use the new language to describe the old thing because all they have to do is get through the performance review and outwait you. So, there's always going to be a level of defection because it's hard to change; it's hard to think about new things.So, the most important thing is how do you get into people's hearts and minds and enable them to believe that the best thing they could do for their career is to come along with the change? And I think that was what we ended up getting right in the Autodesk cloud transformation. And that requires endless optimism, and there's no room for cynicism because the cynicism is going to creep in around the edges. So, what I found on the job is, you just have to get up every morning and believe everything is possible and transmit that belief to everybody.So, if it seems naive or ingenuous, I think that doesn't matter as long as you can move people's hearts in each conversation towards, like, “Oh, this person cares about me. They care about a good outcome from me. I should listen a little bit more and maybe make a 1% change in what I'm doing.” Because 1% compounded daily for a year, you can actually get something done in the lifetime of a CIO.Corey: And I think that's probably a great place to leave it. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you think about these things, how you view the world, where can they find you?Sam: You can find me on Twitter, I'm @sramji, S-R-A-M-J-I, and I have a podcast that I host called Open||Source||Datawhere I invite innovators, data nerds, computational networking nerds to hang out and explain to me, a software programmer, what is the big world of open-source data all about, what's happening with machine learning, and what would it be like if you could put data in a container, just like you could put code in a container, and how might the world change? So, that's Open||Source||Data podcast.Corey: And we'll of course include links to that in the [show notes 00:35:58]. Thanks so much for your time. I appreciate it.Sam: Corey, it's been a privilege. Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Likewise. Sam Ramji, Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me exactly which item in Sam's background that I made fun of is the place that you work at.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP54: SWIMINISTA - How Andréa is Building an Eco-Conscious Brand from Ground-Up

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 50:23


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Andréa Bernholtz, Co-Founder of the eco-conscious Swiminista brand, a collection of ultra-comfortable swimwear featuring a soft, luxurious nylon fabric made from post-consumer plastics.As the effects of climate change become more and more prevalent, awareness around sustainable and eco friendly products is on the rise. So much so that for many businesses these buzzwords have become a marketing strategy. But what does it really mean to build an eco-conscious or eco-friendly business? It is more than just planting a tree for every order you get, it is a lifestyle.  In this episode, Kunle and Andréa talk about building and growing an eco-conscious brand. You will get to hear about what the supply chain for such a business looks like, how to package and market such products, balancing sustainability with profit. This is a great episode for entrepreneurs.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

WP Builds
This Week in WordPress #188

WP Builds

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 79:07


This week's WordPress news for the week commencing Monday 29th November 2021

North Meets South Web Podcast
Industrial shifts, polymorphism, and single table inheritance

North Meets South Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 51:05


In this episode, Jake and Michael discuss Michael's change in job (again), and when you might choose single table inheritance over polymorphism.This episode is sponsored by Workvivo and Makeable.dk and was streamed live.Show links No Compromises Laravel test generator Parental Pushing polymorphism to the database

New Hope Daily SOAP - Daily Devotional Bible Reading
Philippians 4 - December 6, 2021

New Hope Daily SOAP - Daily Devotional Bible Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 5:43


Welcome to Daily SOAP from New Hope! Today's Reading: Philippians 4 - December 6, 2021 - Read Here: https://www.bible.com/en-GB/bible/111/PHP.4.NIV . . . . . Our staff and leadership employ what's called the “S.O.A.P. Method”. It stands for Scripture, Observation, Application, and Prayer. Each day, we read one or two chapters of Scripture and focus on one particular verse. We make some observations about how that verse touches us, discern how it applies to our lives, and offer a prayer related to what we have read. - Rev. Vicki Harrison -- Donate via PayPal to support the podcasts and the Technical Arts Ministry of New Hope! https://goo.gl/o2a9oU Subscribe at: http://www.findnewhope.com/soap (813) 689-4161 keywords: devotional, bible study

New Hope Daily SOAP - Daily Devotional Bible Reading
Philippians 3 - December 5, 2021

New Hope Daily SOAP - Daily Devotional Bible Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 5:23


Welcome to Daily SOAP from New Hope! Today's Reading: Philippians 3 - December 5, 2021 - Read Here: https://www.bible.com/en-GB/bible/111/PHP.3.NIV . . . . . Our staff and leadership employ what's called the “S.O.A.P. Method”. It stands for Scripture, Observation, Application, and Prayer. Each day, we read one or two chapters of Scripture and focus on one particular verse. We make some observations about how that verse touches us, discern how it applies to our lives, and offer a prayer related to what we have read. - Rev. Vicki Harrison -- Donate via PayPal to support the podcasts and the Technical Arts Ministry of New Hope! https://goo.gl/o2a9oU Subscribe at: http://www.findnewhope.com/soap (813) 689-4161 keywords: devotional, bible study

No Plans to Merge
Aeropress and ADHD

No Plans to Merge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 99:49


We talk about coffee mechanisms, some alpine news, and a big segment on ADHD. Also Daniel is very bullish on those Dapper Ducks.

Twenty Percent Time
Kristin Collins: My Favorite Dev Tools

Twenty Percent Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 30:29


Kristin Collins (Lead Programmer at Tighten) joins us this week to talk about some of her favorite tools & apps to use as a developer, from the everyday favorites to the surprise ones you might not have known you ever needed.Links for this episode:colormind.ioWhimsicalAvocodeShiftPhpStormLaravel ShiftSamuel L Jackson Ipsum

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP53: Accurate eCommerce Analytics in a First Party Data Era w/ Edward Upton

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 41:27


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Edward Upton, Founder of Little Data, a platform that helps eCommerce merchants automatically connect Google Analytics with platforms such as Shopify and apps like ReCharge and Facebook Ads.Making data-based decisions is a goal for many-a-business. But getting a unified picture of data from multiple platforms is a major challenge to say the least. Add to that the many privacy related changes in the industry, and you're looking at an almost impossible jigsaw puzzle. Data is getting more fragmented and harder to tie into creating a bigger picture. This is the problem that companies like Littledata are helping solve by providing a connector that enables companies to get better raw data which leads to better decisions.In this episode, Kunle and Edward talk about the importance of and challenges around eCommerce Analytics. You will get to hear about what types of events you should be tracking, the biggest hurdles to data tracking, impact of iOS 14 and much much more.  This is a great episode for business operators and marketers.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

The Laracasts Snippet
Be the Tortoise

The Laracasts Snippet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:50


If you've worked in programming spaces for any period of time, you will surely have heard the advice, "It's better to go slow than fast." We all instinctively knows this, and, yet, we're simultaneously obsessed with optimizing every facet of our workflow. 

Pursuing HER Purpose
22. Passive Income: How To Make Money While You Sleep with Pat Flynn

Pursuing HER Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:32


Today Abby and Kat interview @patflynn on the podcast. Pat is the king of creating passive income and multiple revenue streams and gives our listeners tangible ways to pull this into your business if you haven't already. PHP is the FIRST audience to get a peek at a brand new framework Pat has created to help streamline the process if you are just getting started on your idea.He gives a fresh take on entrepreneurship while raising children and how losing his dream job as an architect was the best thing that happened for his career. As a leader in the podcast space with over 65 million downloads to date, this interview will leave you with steps you can take today to hit your financial goals. MEET PATAffiliate Link to Our Favorite Podcasting Course: Power Up Podcasting https://courses.smartpassiveincome.com/courses/power-up-podcasting?affcode=30425_l-ukxeqbLet's connect!Our WEBSITE: https://www.pursuingherpurpose.comINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/pursuingherpurpose/MEET AMY: http://instagram.com/ameskiefer/MEET KAT: https://www.instagram.com/kat.herro/ MEET ABBY: http://instagram.com/abbyrosegreen/

No Plans to Merge
Max is not well-liked at school

No Plans to Merge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 129:35


Max is a misunderstood good boy. Where is Daniel's passport? React. Dom. Collections just feel heavy....

Laravel News Podcast
Strong foundations, modern Laravel apps, and logging to database

Laravel News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 43:47


Jake and Michael discuss all the latest Laravel releases, tutorials, and happenings in the community.This episode is sponsored by Honeybadger - combining error monitoring, uptime monitoring and check-in monitoring into a single, easy to use platform.Show links Laravel 8.71 released Laravel 8.73 released PHP 8.1 is here Announcing the PHP Foundation The hottest Black Friday deals Laravel Livewire calendar component Laravel cache helper package Log route statistics for users and teams Learn how to build modern Laravel apps using Inertia.js Laravel showsql: Giving attention to that one SQL Swoole vs Roadrunner for Laravel Octane How to integrate Sentry with Laravel Nova Laravel database log channel How to get notified when Laravel Horizon stops running