Podcasts about PHP

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Server-side scripting language originally created in 1994

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Best podcasts about PHP

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Latest podcast episodes about PHP

Pastor Joe Sugrue - Grace and Truth Podcast
Ephesians 6:18; Humility in prayer.

Pastor Joe Sugrue - Grace and Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 60:00


The Son of God humbled Himself under the will of the Father = obedience in everything. The Father then exalted Him. Php 2:1-11 If therefore there is any encouragement in Christ, if there is any consolation of love, if there is any fellowship of the Spirit, if any affection and compassion, 2 make my joy complete by being of the same mind, maintaining the same love, united in spirit, intent... for full notes: https://www.cgtruth.org/index.php?proc=msg&sf=vw&tid=2670

Laravel News Podcast
Redesigning Artisan, tinkering with Vim, and building your own packages

Laravel News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 35:58


Michael and Tim discuss all the latest Laravel releases, tutorials, and happenings in the community.This episode is sponsored by Honeybadger - combining error monitoring, uptime monitoring and check-in monitoring into a single, easy to use platform and making you a DevOps hero. Show links A redesigned Artisan serve command in Laravel 9.22 New Artisan docs command in Laravel 9.23 Statix Server is an object-oriented wrapper for PHP's built-in server Artisan Tinker with Vim in Tinkeray Vite Livewire plugin Build your own Laravel packages Using Laravel model factories in your tests Factories should be the bare minimum SQL is not complex Introducing Laravel security in depth

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Potluck - API Fetching × PDF Creation × tRPC × Stripe vs PayPal

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 62:17 Very Popular


In this potluck episode of Syntax, Wes and Scott answer your questions about middleman for API fetching, when to introduce SvelteKit, generating PDFs serverside, trade offs of being an entrepreneur vs employee, and more! Prismic - Sponsor Prismic is a Headless CMS that makes it easy to build website pages as a set of components. Break pages into sections of components using React, Vue, or whatever you like. Make corresponding Slices in Prismic. Start building pages dynamically in minutes. Get started at prismic.io/syntax. Auth0 - Sponsor Auth0 is the easiest way for developers to add authentication and secure their applications. They provides features like user management, multi-factor authentication, and you can even enable users to login with device biometrics with something like their fingerprint. Not to mention, Auth0 has SDKs for your favorite frameworks like React, Next.js, and Node/Express. Make sure to sign up for a free account and give Auth0 a try with the link below. https://a0.to/syntax LogRocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Show Notes 00:18 Welcome 02:50 Is there a way to create a “middleman” to fetch data from an API once a day? Redis 06:53 Should I wait before introducing team members to SvelteKit? SvelteKit V1 issues 10:28 What options do we have for generating PDFs serverside? WKHTML to PDF Puppeteer PhantomJS html2canvas Generate Invoice Workers 15:47 Sponsor: Prismic 17:08 How do you say thank you to sponsors? 18:32 How would you compare the tradeoffs of working at a tech company vs. an agency vs. freelancing vs. entrepreneurship? 20:47 What's the best way for an oldie like me to catch up? CSS Grid.io Modern CSS Layouts 26:08 I'm wondering what do you think about tRPC? trpc.io Create t3 app 29:00 Sponsor: LogRocket 30:03 PDF creator Cloudflare worker 32:50 How do you feel about keeping separate accounts for things like Twitter? 37:28 Does using prototypes mean you are not doing functional programming? 42:09 PHP vs JavaScript based CMS Ghost Keystone Strapi 45:15 Sponsor: Auth0 46:21 Why do you think this mindset that with age comes an inability to learn? Syntax 44 How to Learn New Things Quickly 51:32 Are there other payment providers you guys recommend or should I stick with Stripe and hope for the best? Stripe Paypal 56:10 SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Literature and History Wes: Kitchen faucet Shameless Plugs Scott: LevelUp Tutorials Wes: Wes Bos Tutorials Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

The Stack Overflow Podcast
The internet's Robin Hood uses robo-lawyers to fight parking tickets and spam calls

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:10


DoNotPay offers more than 250 “automated justice” services in every US state, from suing robo-callers to annulling marriages to fighting eviction. It earned Joshua the title “Robin Hood of the internet.”DoNotPay leverages AI and ML solutions, including GPT-3, to shape and refine its decision trees.Read about how DoNotPay is helping crypto traders who've lost money file suit against fallen leaders.Why PDFs are unfit for human (or computer) consumption.Follow Joshua on Twitter.Today's Lifeboat badge goes to user EM-Creations for their answer to the question The PHP header() function is not redirecting.

Escaping Rock Bottom
From Surviving Childhood Trauma To Creating A Healing Center

Escaping Rock Bottom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 48:23


Tim Westbrook is the founder, owner, and CEO of Camelback Recovery in Phoenix, AZ. He talks about childhood trauma which led him to a life of booze and drugs. From multiple blackouts, losing jobs and relationships, Tim was able to rebuild his life by creating a solid foundation in a 12-Step program. Now, he's helping other addicts heal from their trauma by creating an incredible program that focuses on structured sober living, outpatient & PHP treatment programs. This is Tim's incredible story of hope!

BlogAid Podcast
Tips Tuesday – Money Maker Keywords, Product Review Schema, Cloudflare Tutorials

BlogAid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 16:16


Tips this week include: • New Cloudflare tutorials available for webmasters • PHP error log tutorials • Some theme devs and hosts are way behind on PHP 8 • How to avoid the panic that's coming in Nov when PHP 8 hits • Price increases coming to .com domains • Google adds new product review pros/cons schema support • How product reviews can make you money • DuckDuckGo will now block Microsoft trackers • Why you should target Zero Search Volume keywords to make more money

CodigoTecno
123 - Cómo pasar de 0 a Junior Developer - CodigoTecno

CodigoTecno

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 15:00


Iniciamos una serie: "Cómo pasar de 0 a Junior Developer" En base a mi experiencia como programador en los últimos 20 años, iniciamos el camino de convertirnos en desarrollador web, una de las tantas opciones. En este episodio, el repaso obligado de aprender HTML, CSS y Git. Imprescindibles para algunos, posibles de obviar para otros, la posibilidad de elegir tutoriales gratuitos o pagos que van desde Youtube pasando por Udemy o algunos otros. Hoy además existe la posibilidad de hacer un bootcamp, empezar como aprendíz en alguna empresa o decidirte por empezar un proyecto desde cero siguiendo tutoriales o bien conseguirte un mentor que te vaya guiando. Además existen foros y comunidades donde conseguir ayuda para ir solucionando los problemas con los que te vas a enfrentar en el día a día. Espero que esta serie te anime a entrar en el mundo de la programación, el mundo del desarrollo. Gracias por estar allí como cada semana y por último, si querés aprender a programar web o si buscas acompañamiento de proyectos principalmente con PHP, Laravel, Codeigniter, no dudes en consultarme. - https://www.facebook.com/codigotecno/ - https://www.instagram.com/codigotecno Sumate a la comunidad en Youtube: https://bit.ly/2JLaKRj En Telegram estamos empezando a armar el canal donde compartimos material que puede aportar a tu formación, recursos y cosillas interesantes. Te esperamos en : https://t.me/codigotecno Envíame un email : codigotecno (arroba) hotmail.com Seguinos en las redes de podcast mas populares: * En Spotify : https://spoti.fi/31Dp4Sq * En Ivoox : https://bit.ly/2JoLotl * En Itunes: https://apple.co/2WNKWHV * En Anchor.fm: https://bit.ly/3OiVCsN Te espero en los comentarios, animate y buen código para todos. ! Muy buen código para todos y hasta la próxima. !

PHPUgly
297:PHP Lovewire

PHPUgly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 76:45


Links from the show:Bloomberg - Are you a robot?Getting started | JetBrains FleetWhat's New in Composer 2.4 • PHP.WatchNew composer bump Command in Composer 2.4 • PHP.WatchGitLab plans to delete dormant projects from free accounts • The RegisterGitLab U-turns on deleting dormant projects after backlash • The RegisterState of Laravel 2022 ResultsHow to Optimize Laravel Application Performance | Laravel NewsNewest 'php' Questions - Code Review Stack ExchangeThis episode of PHPUgly was sponsored by:Honeybadger.io - https://www.honeybadger.io/PHPUgly streams the recording of this podcast live. Typically every Thursday night around 9 PM PT. Come and join us, and subscribe to our Youtube Channel, Twitch, or Periscope. Also, be sure to check out our Patreon Page.Twitter Account https://twitter.com/phpuglyHost:Eric Van JohnsonJohn CongdonTom RideoutStreams:Youtube ChannelTwitchPowered by RestreamPatreon PagePHPUgly Anthem by Harry Mack / Harry Mack Youtube ChannelThanks to all of our Patreon Sponsors:Honeybadger ** This weeks Sponsor **ButteryCrumpetFrank WDavid QShawnKen FBoštjanMarcusShelby CS FergusonRodrigo CBillyDarryl HKnut Erik BDmitri GElgimboMikePageDevKenrick BKalen JR. C. S.Peter AClayton SRonny MBen RAlex BKevin YEnno RWayneJeroen FAndy HSeviCharltonSteve MRobert SThorstenEmily JJoe FAndrew WulrikJohn CJames HEric MLaravel MagazineEd GRirielilHermitChampJeffrey D

North Meets South Web Podcast
Migrating from Vapor, green energy, and housing your validation

North Meets South Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 30:49


Jake and Michael discuss migrating thenping.me off of Laravel Vapor and the teething issues that ensued, which somehow segued into provisioning of green energy, and ending on housing your application validation.This episode is sponsored by Workvivo.Show links thenping.me - hands-free scheduled task monitoring for Laravel Where does my validation live? Validating requests

Unboxing Catholicism
Kilalanin ang Oppa ng Old Testament at kung bakit sya binenta sa halagang PHP 350 (Genesis 37 - 50) Part 1 | Unboxing #44

Unboxing Catholicism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 39:02


Sino nga ba ang “oppa” sa Old Testament? At bakit naman sya binenta sa halagang PHP 350? After unboxing the long and interesting love story of Jacob and Rachel, kilalanin naman natin si Joseph the Dreamer, ang kanyang mga kapatid, at bakit nga ba kinainggitan ang kanyang multicolored coat. Sino nga ba siya? Related ba sya kay Joseph the father of Our Lord Jesus? At ano ba ang kahalagahan niya sa kwento ng ating kaligtasan?

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Guarding the House From Our Enemies (2) (Audio) David Eells - 8/3/22 Factious Infiltrators Steal From God's House Samuel Marychurch - 7/30/22 (David's notes in red)   (This teaching from the Lord will be very important to the Church, which is getting ready to go through this same trial of faction in the tribulation.) (We felt this is a warning dream and cast lots to confirm and got 3 heads for a yes.) I dreamed my wife Tiannah (meaning joy, happiness or follower of Christ, representing a disciple of Jesus.) Tiannah and I were staying at a studio apartment. (A studio is a play on words, meaning a place to study the Word.) (We were both in a one room apartment where we shared all things together, in common. This represents one body in Christ.) (Eph. 2:21 in whom each several building, fitly framed together, groweth into a holy temple in the Lord; 22 in whom ye also are builded together for a habitation of God in the Spirit.) The apartment had modern and fancy fixtures throughout. (Modern represents our current time we live in and something to be aware of or pay attention to now.) We had 2 black laptops and many items of value inside the apartment. (This represents our spiritual treasures stored up in heaven [and our “studio" materials.].) (The black laptops represent the treasures of revelations of things hidden in darkness in Isa. 45:3 and I will give thee the treasures of darkness, and hidden riches of secret places, that thou mayest know that it is I, Jehovah, who call thee by thy name, even the God of Israel.)f Our friend Gerald was staying there with us. (Gerald means, "ruler with the spear”. I believe he represents God.) (God's presence is with His people now that our Savior, Emmanuel, meaning, "God with us" has come and reconciled us to God our Father.) Then suddenly this lady appeared. I am not sure who she was but... we didn't invite her. (As we will see, this woman represents the Judas body of antichrist, "sons of perdition” who are thieves, and like their father the devil, they come to steal, kill, and destroy. John 10:10 The thief cometh not, but that he may steal, and kill, and destroy...) Gerald was concerned about her being there because he didn't trust her. Gerald said “I don't know her”. It felt as if he was trying to warn us. (God warns us through His Spirit about people and situations. His Holy Spirit gives us wisdom and discernment, but, as we will see, there's always big trouble when we ignore the warnings and sear our conscience through self-will or evil-reasonings that are against the commands in His Word.)  We went out, came back from grocery shopping and our hands were full carrying the groceries. (Hands being full of groceries represents distractions that feed our flesh. When this is occurring our discernment is so diminished that we are blind to the spiritual dangers right in front of us.)  When we got to the door to go inside, the lady was there and she offered to open the door for us. She seemed genuine and sincere and it seemed like she just wanted to help us.  (2 Co. 11:14  And no marvel; for even Satan fashioneth himself into an angel of light. 15 It is no great thing therefore if his ministers also fashion themselves as ministers of righteousness, whose end shall be according to their works. And Rom. 16:17-18 Now I beseech you, brethren, mark them that are causing the divisions and occasions of stumbling, contrary to the doctrine which ye learned: and turn away from them. 18 For they that are such serve not our Lord Christ, but their own belly; and by their smooth and fair speech they beguile the hearts of the innocent.) So, then I handed her our key chain that had a bunch of different keys on it, along with the door key. (The keys could represent the keys to the Kingdom.) She opened the door and let us in and gave us back the keys. (Mat. 16:19  I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. Jesus has given us the keys to bind and loose. If we are unwise with this authority we can loose the enemy and open doors for him to steal from us.) Later on, we went out again and came back and when we went to open the door, we realized that the key to the front door wasn't on the key chain. When we checked the front door it was unlocked and the key was left in the door. We went inside and all of our items were gone. I felt upset, and I realized that the lady must have taken the key off the keychain that time that I let her open the door for us. I then woke up. (This reminds me of Hezekiah when he showed all his treasures to the Babylonian embassage and they later came and plundered the Temple and all Jerusalem.) (... I felt the Lord is trying to reveal an imposter may be trying to gain access or has snuck in, to steal, kill, and destroy inside the Body of Christ and to be on guard against it.   Don't Climb the Mountain in Your Own Strength  Kit Gioura - 7/22/22 (David's notes in red) In this dream I saw two men who had barricaded themselves in a shopping center. Their main goal was to kill everyone in sight. (This is similar to Samuel's dream above. The enemy, in the Judas, antichrist, factious body, as merchants of Babylon are seeking to prey upon and steal from and kill those who are feeding the desires of their flesh.) These two men were prepared for war and they were armed to the hilt. Many were slain by these two men. (Many are taken out because they refuse to go any further in the kingdom by continuing to carry their cross and sacrifice their flesh on the altar of obedience to the Word of God, which warns us of these people.) As they were taking people out, a call went out to the cops who came and started to attack these two men. I could hear the two men saying, “These cops are different here!" (Meaning, they are well prepared) (God's ministers are supposed to enforce the Word of God which exposes these people. The faction,  uses slander and criticism to kill, and deceive those who disobey God's commands to separate from them. Tit 3:10  A factious man after a first and second admonition refuse.) Then the scene changed and the two men were now in a house on a country side hill which had green, heathy grass. Inside this house it was dark and these two men were hiding in the darkness waiting to ambush those that were climbing the hill. (The enemy is always targeting those who are seeking to conquer their flesh and climb the hill to Mt. Zion. Jas 3:16  For where jealousy and faction are, there is confusion and every vile deed. And Psalm 11:2  For, lo, the wicked bend the bow, They make ready their arrow upon the string, That they may shoot in darkness at the upright in heart.) Many people took up arms and went up the hill hunting for these two. (This represents our prayers and spiritual warfare that will succeed in taking down these enemies and exposing them. We must not fight in the flesh with anger, retaliation or unforgiveness for then, we too, will fall, as we will see. Eph. 6:10 Finally, be strong in the Lord, and in the strength of his might. 11 Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. 12 For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world-rulers of this darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.) One of the men was captured and was taken down. But the other was still hiding out in the corner in the darkness waiting to pounce on people but was later exposed. Many mighty men fell at the hands of these two. (These Judas' have betrayed many and spiritually destroyed and killed many who were weakened through disobedience to the Word and lazy to conquer their flesh and climb the hill to Mt. Zion. Also the devil has authority to come against us, to our own destruction, if we are trying to conquer or fight in our own strength.)           Remember What You Heard from the Beginning       Vanessa Weeks - 4/13/22 (David's notes in red) I dreamed that it was night and I was climbing a grassy hill. (This hill represents climbing Mt. Zion.) (This represents conquering the flesh by putting it under our feet. 1Pe 1:24  For, All flesh is as grass, And all the glory thereof as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower falleth). (We are remembering our promise that in Rom 6:11  Even so reckon ye also yourselves to be dead unto sin, but alive unto God in Christ Jesus.12  Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey the lusts thereof: This faith makes it possible to die to self and conquer our flesh as we climb the hill to Mt. Zion, the Bride.) It was very dark but there was a bright light shining on the area where I was climbing. (Psa. 18:28 For thou wilt light my lamp: Jehovah my God will lighten my darkness.  And Psa. 119:105  Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, And light unto my path). (Jesus and His Word are what lights our way of obedience.) I knew I had to climb to the top of this hill. It was difficult and I was climbing with my hands and feet. (Representing our works and walk of faith. As disciples of Christ we may walk in His steps and have His works to climb to the top of Mt. Zion.) I heard my husband Barry (Representing the Lord our Heavenly Husband) who was standing by me, but I did not see him. (This symbolizes Jesus always being with us even when we don't see Him.) (Heb. 13:5 ... for himself hath said, I will in no wise fail thee, neither will I in any wise forsake thee.) Barry was telling me to remember to do the things he had told me to do or to do the things I said I would do. (I think these were one and the same. 1Jn 2:24  As for you, let that abide in you which ye heard from the beginning. If that which ye heard from the beginning abide in you, ye also shall abide in the Son, and in the Father.)  (Psa. 15:1-5 Jehovah, who shall sojourn in thy tabernacle? Who shall dwell in thy holy hill? 2 He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, And speaketh truth in his heart; (Being truly honest with ourselves on everything the Spirit shows us or speaks to us about not hardening our hearts thus searing our consciences.) 3 He that slandereth not with his tongue, Nor doeth evil to his friend, Nor taketh up a reproach against his neighbor; 4 In whose eyes a reprobate is despised, But who honoreth them that fear Jehovah; He that sweareth to his own hurt, and changeth not; (i.e. they keep their word even if it hurts them to do so. They don't utter rash vows or promises and then reason away why it's okay not to fulfill them if they truly have the means or the time.) He that putteth not out his money to interest, Nor taketh reward against the innocent. He that doeth these things shall never be moved.) Also I heard David (representing the David Man-child reformers) saying something to me to the same effect. I did not see him either. (Php 2:12  So then, my beloved, even as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling; And Php 2:13  for it is God who worketh in you both to will and to work, for his good pleasure.) When I got about half way up the hill, I got very weary and had to rest for a while. (Gal 6:9 And let us not be weary in well-doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.) I remember thinking of Eve at this point in the dream, (Representing the overcoming Bride) and how she has had her trials and was overcoming, and now it was my turn. Then I woke up.    A Rock of Refuge; A Strong Fortress to Save Me Marie Kelton - 7/27/22 (David's notes in red) In the dream, it was night time, and zombies were attacking people. (These zombies, who are the “walking dead" representing those who are possessed with the “stupid demons” of faction.) I got in a car with a couple of other people and we drove to a refuge where the Lord was. (Pro. 18:10 The name of Jehovah is a strong tower; The righteous runneth into it, and is safe.) Then the scene changed and this time I was observing what was happening. The zombies were still attacking people, but then a group of people started using the Word of God. When they used the Word of God, a big square shaped stone came up from under the ground with ancient symbols on it. (This stone is the stone that the builders rejected, which is Christ, who is the ancient Word. The builders became apostate and lost the power of the Word but we must stand on the power of the Word to conquer our enemies. Luk 1:68 Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; For he hath visited and wrought redemption for his people, 69 And hath raised up a horn of salvation for us In the house of his servant David ... 71 Salvation from our enemies, and from the hand of all that hate us; ... 73 The oath which he sware unto Abraham our father, 74 To grant unto us that we being delivered out of the hand of our enemies should serve him without fear.) As the zombies were trying to attack people, they would fall on this square shaped stone that had the ancient symbols on it and couldn't move from it. (These zombies are ministers of the curse of sin and death, which Jesus bore for us. Gal. 3:13 Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us; for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree: 14 that upon the Gentiles might come the blessing of Abraham in Christ Jesus. 1 Pe. 2:4-8  unto whom coming, a living stone, rejected indeed of men, but with God elect, precious, 5 ye also, as living stones, are built up a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. 6 Because it is contained in scripture, Behold, I lay in Zion a chief corner stone, elect, precious: And he that believeth on him shall not be put to shame. 7 For you therefore that believe is the preciousness: but for such as disbelieve, The stone which the builders rejected, The same was made the head of the corner; 8 and, A stone of stumbling, and a rock of offence; for they stumble at the word, being disobedient: whereunto also they were appointed.)   Judgment on the Faction  Marie Kelton - July 30, 2022 (David's notes in red) In the beginning of the dream, there was this black teacher, teaching. (This Black teacher represents the leadership of the faction who have usurped the true leadership and drawn many of the spiritually weak away unto themselves.) I saw this black girl in a bright yellow outfit laying down on a couch. (The black girl represents their followers who are walking in darkness.). (The couch represents a false sense of rest because of their doctrine that, “It's all under the blood.” Also, a couch represents people with psychiatric problems.) When I walked up to her I thought of the spirit of fear because she was wearing all yellow. (The factious followers live in a lot of fear and torments because they are under a curse of separation from the Body through their willful disobedience to the Word.) But when I picked up a card that was next to her, it said, “Depression" in bright yellow like the clothes she was wearing. The card was describing symptoms of depression. (The factious body is in fear and depression because there is no life of Christ living in the darkness of witchcraft [which is rebellion.].) The dream changed and I was now in Debbie Fenske's house looking out the door. There were these big tall evergreens. (Representing the mature disciples in the neighborhood who have eternal life.) In front of the evergreens were huge tigers (Representing factious, predatory leaders seeking to destroy disciples.). They were eating the head of another tiger that was already dead. (This represents Gal. 5:15-16  Select Language Afrikaans Albanian Amharic Arabic Armenian Assamese Aymara Azerbaijani Bambara Basque Belarusian Bengali Bhojpuri Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Cebuano Chichewa Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Corsican Croatian Czech Danish Dhivehi Dogri Dutch Esperanto Estonian Ewe Filipino Finnish French Frisian Galician Georgian German Greek Guarani Gujarati Haitian Creole Hausa Hawaiian Hebrew Hindi Hmong Hungarian Icelandic Igbo Ilocano Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Javanese Kannada Kazakh Khmer Kinyarwanda Konkani Korean Krio Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kurdish (Sorani) Kyrgyz Lao Latin Latvian Lingala Lithuanian Luganda Luxembourgish Macedonian Maithili Malagasy Malay Malayalam Maltese Maori Marathi Meiteilon (Manipuri) Mizo Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Norwegian Odia (Oriya) Oromo Pashto Persian Polish Portuguese Punjabi Quechua Romanian Russian Samoan Sanskrit Scots Gaelic Sepedi Serbian Sesotho Shona Sindhi Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Somali Spanish Sundanese Swahili Swedish Tajik Tamil Tatar Telugu Thai Tigrinya Tsonga Turkish Turkmen Twi Ukrainian Urdu Uyghur Uzbek Vietnamese Welsh Xhosa Yiddish Yoruba Zulu Powered by Translate Printer-friendly version  

BlogAid Podcast
Tips Tuesday – Real Speed Tests, Yoast DB Optimization, PHP 8 Testing, Local Fonts

BlogAid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 23:35


Tips this week include: • New tutorial on how to do the Yoast database optimization after plugin update • The next phase of our PHP 8 testing will start this week • New Cloudflare tutorials are underway for my webmaster designers • Do you know how many bad bots are hitting your site? It's way more than you think! And it is costing you more than you think too. • We lost the battle and WebP by default is coming to WP 6.1 • 5 tips to improve your content strategy • Google delays 3rd party cookie drop for another year • Difference in core web vitals and Google PageSpeed Insights • Where to get a real speed report for your site • WordPress encourages locally hosted Google Fonts • What I'll be doing with fonts for my next theme

API Busters
API Environmentalism with Alexander Karan of Climate Clever

API Busters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 41:08


Mike chats with Alexander Karan, CTO of Climate Clever, where "You can't manage what you don't measure" is a mantra. Climate Clever is an API-first company helping businesses, schools, and homeowners in Australia manage and minimize their carbon footprints.  Climate Clever - https://www.climateclever.org/ Alexander's recent Article on APIs You Won't Hate: Modern API deployment options in the cloud Scope 1 and Scope 2 Inventory Guidance - US EPA Alexander Karan (@alexanderkaran_) on twitter Thank you so much to our sponsors: Lob: https://lob.com/careers Treblle: https://treblle.com/apisyoulove

Ubuntu Security Podcast
Episode 170

Ubuntu Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 11:09


This week we're diving down into the depths of binary exploitation and analysis, looking at a number of recent vulnerability and malware teardowns, plus we cover security updates for FreeType, PHP, ImageMagick, protobuf-c and more.

Lately in PHP podcast
How to Update PHP Version Using Methods and Tools the PHP Community Uses - 3 minutes - Lately in PHP Podcast Episode 92 Part 10

Lately in PHP podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022


How to Update PHP Version Using Methods and Tools the PHP Community Uses - 3 minutes - Lately in PHP Podcast Episode 92 Part 10 By Manuel Lemos Every time you need to solve a problem, you may realize there may be several approaches to solve that problem. Each way has its advantages and disadvantages. This fact shows why it is helpful to learn from other developers what approach they use to solve a problem that you also want to solve. Read this article, watch a 3-minute video, or listen to part 10 of episode 92 of the Lately in PHP podcast to learn about other methods and tools different developers use to upgrade PHP versions.

How To Code Well
167 - Reacts killer feature

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 19:22


Changelog Lots of bitty bugs which have prevented me for progressing on the Kubernetes side of the howtocodewell.net staging deployments Lots of PHP packages on howtocodewell.net have been upgraded I was able to play around with the API platform. News/Articles API platform tutorial with Symfony https://digitalfortress.tech/tutorial/rest-api-with-symfony-and-api-platform/ How to store Symfony sessions in a database https://symfony.com/doc/current/session/database.html What's new with Composer 2.4 https://php.watch/articles/composer-24 Question from Alex regrading the How To Code Well Discord bot https://github.com/howToCodeWell/discord-bot New to the web platform in June by Rachel Andrew https://web.dev/web-platform-06-2022/ Reacts killer feature Components can be shared between React and React Native. Reduces the code size Reduces specialised skill sets Helps create boundaries for mobile and web applications Unifies the code base Reduces pressure on the HR for finding other skill sets Makes T shaped teams that can switch contexts

Laravel News Podcast
Approving models, hot refreshing, and route registrars

Laravel News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 44:51


Jake and Aaron discuss all the latest Laravel releases, tutorials, and happenings in the community.This episode is sponsored by Honeybadger - combining error monitoring, uptime monitoring and check-in monitoring into a single, easy to use platform and making you a DevOps hero. Show links Laravel 9.21 introduces a fresh look for Artisan Laracon Online is now accepting speaker submissions Build APIs in Laravel with the Restify package A package to require approval before persisting model data Create select options from enums, Laravel models, and more Laravel Blade hot refresh with Vite A simple draft and revision system for Laravel Building your website using Jigsaw Working with data in API integrations Logging external HTTP requests with Laravel Telescope Add useful info to the Laravel about command Using route registrars in your Laravel application

CodigoTecno
122 - Mejorar a partir de buenos hábitos - CodigoTecno

CodigoTecno

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 15:00


Los hábitos son la mejor forma para construir de forma progresiva nuestra mejor versión y es en lo que debemos apoyarnos para lograrlo de forma práctica. En este episodio repasamos algunos consejos para construir hábitos que nos permitan mejorar, organizarnos diariamente y hacer que nuestra tarea rutinaria vaya mejorando. Dándonos una mayor productividad y un control en nuestra labor cotidiana. Repasamos algunos consejos de hábitos atómicos del autor James Clear, un librazo recomendado, y algunos tips para tener mayor produtividad como programador o desarrollador de aplicaciones. Estaría bueno leer tus comentarios, tus aportes y sugerencias para seguir haciendo crecer la comunidad y si te gustó lo mejor que podés hacer es compartilo en tus redes. Gracias por estar allí como cada semana y por último, si querés aprender a programar web o si buscas acompañamiento de proyectos principalmente con PHP, Laravel, Codeigniter, no dudes en consultarme. - https://www.facebook.com/codigotecno/ - https://www.instagram.com/codigotecno Sumate a la comunidad en Youtube: https://bit.ly/2JLaKRj En Telegram estamos empezando a armar el canal, sumate en : https://t.me/codigotecno Envíame un email : codigotecno (arroba) hotmail.com o en Telegram @soleralejandro Seguinos en las redes de podcast mas populares: * En Spotify : https://spoti.fi/31Dp4Sq * En Ivoox : https://bit.ly/2JoLotl * En Itunes: https://apple.co/2WNKWHV * En Anchor.fm: https://bit.ly/3OiVCsN Te espero en los comentarios, animate y buen código para todos. ! Muy buen código para todos y hasta la próxima. !

BlogAid Podcast
Tips Tuesday – WPCode Plugin, AI Content Generators, YouTube Integrates Shopify

BlogAid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 13:27


Tips this week include: • BlogAid's Super Summer Sales Event ends this weekend • PHP 8 testing almost complete • Insert Headers and Footers is now WPCode and tests are underway • How to use AI generated content the right way • 10 best AI content generator tools • A report on writing with Yoast SEO and the Bertha AI content generator • New Video Index report in Google Search Console • New text markup for YouTube video descriptions • Where to post video beyond YouTube • YouTube integrates with Shopify • More ways to use livestream video • 13 ways to make money with your site

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Drupal Updates, Zyxel Firewall Patches, Candiru's DevilsTongue, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 3:03


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 22 July, 2022Episode 271 - 22 July 2022Drupal Updates- https://www.securityweek.com/code-execution-and-other-vulnerabilities-patched-drupalZyxel Firewall Patches - https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/zyxel-firewall-vulnerabilities-left-business-networks-open-to-abusePayPal Double Spear Phishing - https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/paypal-used-send-malicious-double/Okta Too Open- https://threatpost.com/risks-okta-sso/180249/ Candiru's DevilsTongue - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/chrome-zero-day-used-to-infect-journalists-with-candiru-spyware/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Friday July 22nd, 2022, and from Victoria one last time, this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From SecurityWeek.com:Drupal has released patches for four vulnerabilities. The most critical flaw affects Drupal 9.3 and 9.4. and it can lead to arbitrary PHP code execution on Apache web servers. The other three vulnerabilities also impact the Drupal core and can lead to cross-site scripting attacks, information disclosure, or access bypass. Get your patch on kids. From PortSwigger.net:Zyxel has released patches for several of its firewall products following the discovery of two security vulnerabilities that left business networks open to exploitation. One is an authenticated directory traversal vulnerability in the Common Gateway Interface, and the other is a local privilege escalation vulnerability that was identified in the command-line interface. You should update to the latest versions as soon as you can. From Infosecurity-Magazine.com:Threat actors are using PayPal to send out phishing invoices. PayPal domains are usually “allow-listed” by organizations' email filters, so cyber-criminals are registering accounts and composing malicious invoices on the platform. Many are spoofing Norton products, but substituting their own information for payments. They even have someone answering the included Customer Service number to continue the charade to extract dollars from their victims. From ThreatPost.com:Four newly discovered attack paths in the products for IAM vendor Okta could lead to PII exposure, account takeover, or even organizational data destruction. Note that the researchers call these “attack paths” and not vulnerabilities. Okta says this is a non issue and all you need to do is tweak up your security profile a little, which is beyond what they offer as their default settings. You can see the details in the article. And last, from BleepingComputer.com:The Israeli spyware vendor Candiru was found using a Google Chrome zero day to spy on journalists and other high-interest individuals in the Middle East with their 'DevilsTongue' spyware. Threat researchers from Avast, who discovered the vulnerability and reported it to Google, revealed that they unearthed the flaw after investigating spyware attacks on their clients. The vuln was patched on July 4. Details and a link to the research in the article. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until next next time, be safe out there.

PHPUgly
295:PHP Live Studio Audience

PHPUgly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 60:13


Links from the show:PHP: rfc:fetch_property_in_const_expressionsPHP: rfc:constants_in_traitsPHP: rfc:dnf_typesPHP: rfc:auto-capture-closureFOSS Coloring Books · GitHubGitHub - FOSS-Coloring-Books/edaEvent-driven architecture explained in a coloring book | Opensource.comThe API Design Platform and API Client - InsomniaHome - Snipe-IT Free open source IT asset management This episode of PHPUgly was sponsored by:Honeybadger.io - https://www.honeybadger.io/PHPUgly streams the recording of this podcast live. Typically every Thursday night around 9 PM PT. Come and join us, and subscribe to our Youtube Channel, Twitch, or Periscope. Also, be sure to check out our Patreon Page.Twitter Account https://twitter.com/phpuglyHost:Eric Van JohnsonJohn CongdonTom RideoutStreams:Youtube ChannelTwitchPeriscopePowered by RestreamPatreon PagePHPUgly Anthem by Harry Mack / Harry Mack Youtube ChannelThanks to all of our Patreon Sponsors:Honeybadger ** This weeks Sponsor **ButteryCrumpetFrank WDavid QShawnKen FBoštjanMarcusShelby CS FergusonRodrigo CBillyDarryl HKnut Erik BDmitri GElgimboMikePageDevKenrick BKalen JR. C. S.Peter AClayton SRonny MBen RAlex BKevin YEnno RWayneJeroen FAndy HSeviChris CSteve MRobert SThorstenEmily JJoe FAndrew WulrikJohn CJames HEric MLaravel MagazineEd GRirielilHermitChampJeffrey D

CodigoTecno
121 - Una comunicación que funciona - CodigoTecno

CodigoTecno

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 15:00


Comunicarnos es esencial en todo tiempo, pero las formas y herramientas van cambiando. Podemos estar pendientes del email, del WhatsApp o de Slack o Teams pero la manera en que los utilices van a determinar tu éxito o no. En este episodio te cuento algunos tips para que estar comunicado no te quite la productividad pero tampoco que te aisle del equipo de trabajo. Estaría bueno leer tus comentarios, tus aportes y sugerencias para seguir haciendo crecer la comunidad y si te gustó lo mejor que podés hacer es compartilo en tus redes. Gracias por estar allí como cada semana y por último, si querés aprender a programar web o si buscas acompañamiento de proyectos principalmente con PHP, Laravel, Codeigniter, no dudes en consultarme. - https://www.facebook.com/codigotecno/ - https://www.instagram.com/codigotecno Sumate a la comunidad en Youtube: https://bit.ly/2JLaKRj En Telegram estamos empezando a armar el canal, sumate en : https://t.me/codigotecno Envíame un email : codigotecno (arroba) hotmail.com o en Telegram @soleralejandro Seguinos en las redes de podcast mas populares: * En Spotify : https://spoti.fi/31Dp4Sq * En Ivoox : https://bit.ly/2JoLotl * En Itunes: https://apple.co/2WNKWHV * En Anchor.fm: https://bit.ly/3OiVCsN Te espero en los comentarios, animate y buen código para todos. ! Muy buen código para todos y hasta la próxima. !

How To Code Well
166 - 5 ways to Speed up Cypress automation tests

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 24:44


Changelog Lots of JavaScript package upgrades have been made to the frontend of howtocodewell.net including TailwindCSS, PostCSS, Webpack and Node itself. I've decided to use PostCSS over Less and I'm seeing much faster results when generating the CSS The plan for next week is to look at composer package upgrades as well as progressing with the staging deployment In my contracting space I have been doing a lot of PHP 5.6, 7.4 and Angular work News/Articles Being on call sucks by Bobbie Chen https://bobbiechen.com/blog/2022/7/20/being-on-call-sucks Testing links in Cypress by Filip Hric https://filiphric.com/testing-links-with-cypress Enabling typescript in Symfony Webpack encore https://symfony.com/doc/current/frontend/encore/typescript.html How to secure applications on Kubernetes (SSL TLS certificates) by AVM Consulting Blog https://medium.com/avmconsulting-blog/how-to-secure-applications-on-kubernetes-ssl-tls-certificates-8f7f5751d788 How to speed up Cypress automation tests by FeldsparTech https://www.feldspartech.com/post/how-to-speed-up-cypress-automation-tests How to speed up Cypress tests In general Discover how slow your tests are to start begin with Don't speed up your tests if you don't need too Work on the tests that take the longest. List all tests that take over x seconds/minutes and work on those A small improvement can give you big gains in the long run Only test what you need too and when you need too Cypress Group similar tests together into a single test Separate tests that don't need state, change of state or require a fixed state Pay attention on the before and beforeEach hooks Disable the video and screenshot creation on automatic builds Enable video and screenshot creation on manual/nightly builds

Pearls of Wisdom for Fathers

In this podcast we begin with these verses from God's word: 1Pe 4:7 But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer. 1Pe 4:8 And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins. Heb 10:24 And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: Heb 10:25 Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching. The theme of this podcast is: THE PRIORITY OF THE BODY OF CHRIST MANIFESTING AGAPE LOVE IN THE LIGHT OF OUR LORD'S RETURN. The following verses are used in explaining this priority: 1 John 3:14, John 13:35, 1 Cor. 13:13, Gal. 5:22,23, 1 John 4:7,8 Rom. 13:8, 1 Tim. 1:5, Matt. 22:34-40 Consider the days God speaks of when "... evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, deceiving, and being deceived." (2 Tim. 3:13) How is the body of Christ to respond in the triumph of Christ's life in such days The priority given in the verses listed above is that the body of Christ would have fervent love one for another. Sincere, authentic, genuine agape love being manifest through the members of the body of Christ is a powerful spiritual weapon to overcome the evil of the world right up until Christ returns (2Co 10:3 For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh: 2Co 10:4 (For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds;) Another spiritual weapon is prayer in the manner of Philippians 1:9,10 Php 1:9 And this I pray, that your love may abound yet more and more in knowledge and in all judgment; Php 1:10 That ye may approve things that are excellent; that ye may be sincere and without offence till the day of Christ; We explain this further in the podcast. We emphasize also in this podcast the critical importance of the one-another ministries of the body of Christ given in the New Testament as to the spiritual health and vitality of God's Church. Eph 4:10 He that descended is the same also that ascended up far above all heavens, that he might fill all things.) Eph 4:11 And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; Eph 4:12 For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ: Eph 4:13 Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ: Eph 4:14 That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive; Eph 4:15 But speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ: Eph 4:16 From whom the whole body fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in love. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/randy-cook/message

Sakura Radio
ふくべ あきひろ作 おおのこうへいイラスト『かぶとむしランドセル』〜7月オススメ絵本 Navi:ケイ

Sakura Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 9:11


7月「今月のオススメ絵本」(Navi:ケイ)はふくべ あきひろ作 おおのこうへいイラスト『かぶとむしランドセル』(PHP研究所)です。主人公の家光くん。通称みっちゃんは、1年生になる男の子。おじいちゃんから みっちゃんに 入学式のお祝いが届きました。箱を開けてみるとそこにはランドセル。でもただのランドセルではありません。喋るかぶとむしランドセルでした!かぶとむしランドセルのおかげで、他のお友達とは違う学校生活を送る事になりましたが、色んなハプニングを乗り越え大きな学びを得たみっちゃん。ローラーコースターのようにテンポのよいコミカルはストーリーの中には、思いやりや学び、愛が溢れています。

BlogAid Podcast
Tips Tuesday – Sales Event, Content Money Maker, PHP 8 Tests, Captcha on Forms

BlogAid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 20:23


Tips this week include: • Super Summer Sales Event is live – and has limited time discounts, so jump on it • Blog Content SEO workshop is this week • New Gutenberg tutorials posted • PHP 8 tests are underway and several things are broken • PHP settings are borked at most hosts • WP 6.0.1 was finally released and update instruction emails went out • What the host caching proposal from the WP Performance Team means • A new plugin I'll be testing to add CAPTCHA to all forms, not just the contact form • 5 tips to write the most clickable headlines and my challenge to you • The difference in hooks and click bait • DDoS attacks are up 109% and how to protect your site • 5 first steps to move from content creator to content entrepreneur mindset

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Elastix VoIP Attack, Botnet Targeting ICS, Blitz.JS Polluted, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 3:09


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 18 July, 2022Episode 267 - 18 July 2022Elastix VoIP Attack- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/elastix-voip-systems-hacked-in-massive-campaign-to-install-php-web-shells/ Botnet Targeting ICS - https://thehackernews.com/2022/07/hackers-distributing-password-cracking.htmlPlay Store Purge - https://threatpost.com/google-boots-malware-marketplace/180241/Juniper Patches- https://www.securityweek.com/juniper-networks-patches-over-200-third-party-component-vulnerabilities Blitz.JS Polluted - https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/prototype-pollution-in-blitz-js-leads-to-remote-code-executionHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Monday July 18th, 2022, and from Port Angeles, this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.com:Threat analysts have uncovered a large-scale campaign targeting Elastix VoIP telephony servers with more than 500,000 malware samples over a period of about three months. The attackers are likely exploiting CVE-2021-45461, a remote code execution vulnerability with a 9.8 severity. The goal is to plant a PHP web shell that could run arbitrary commands on the compromised communications server. Details in the article. From TheHackerNews.com:Industrial engineers and operators are the target of a new campaign that leverages password cracking software to seize control of Programmable Logic Controllers and co-opt the machines to a botnet. Attackers are exploiting a vulnerability in the firmware which allows it to retrieve the password on command. They then drop the Sality malware and turn the host into a peer in Sality's peer-to-peer botnet. More details inside. From ThreatPost.com:Google has removed eight apps from its Play store that were propagating a new variant of the Joker spyware. Unfortunately those apps had already accounted for a total of over 3 million downloads. Those apps are: Vlog Star Video Editor, Creative 3D Launcher, Wow Beauty Camera, Gif Emoji Keyboard, (yes I said gif not jif) Freeglow Camera, Coco Camera, Funny Camera, and Razer Keyboard & Theme. From SecurityWeek.com:Juniper Networks has published 21 security advisories to inform customers about patches for more than 200 vulnerabilities. Six of those advisories impact their own products, including Junos OS, Junos Space, Contrail Networking, and Northstar Controller products. The rest were vulnerabilities affecting third-party components such as Nginx, OpenSSL, Samba, Java SE, SQLite and Linux. Details in the article. And last today, from PortSwigger.net:Blitz.js, a JavaScript web application framework, has patched a dangerous prototype pollution vulnerability that could lead to remote code execution on Node.js servers. The bug allows attackers to manipulate the code in the Blitz.js app to create a reverse shell and run arbitrary commands on the server. You can find all the dirty details in the article. That's all for me. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until next time, be safe out there.

CodigoTecno
120 - Porqué necesito saber MySQL - CodigoTecno

CodigoTecno

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 15:00


MySQL es una herramienta imprescindible de conocer en el mundo del desarrollo, porque es versátil, fácil de aprender y de manejar. La mayoría de los servicios de hosting lo ofrecen y se pueden obtener muchos beneficios al utilizarla en nuestros proyectos, sin importar si es web o de escritorio ya que se puede integrar a diversos lenguajes (desde PHP a VisualBasic por ejemplo), Anteriormente hablamos de MySQL pero debido a varios comentarios de oyentes del podcast entonces y para los recién llegados, volvemos a comentar de los beneficios y de la necesidad de conocerlo o implementarlo en nuestros proyectos. Me gustaría leerte en los comentarios,saber si tenés ideas que puedan sumar valor a los developers juniors o contarnos tu experiencia que te permitieron ingresar a tu primer trabajo. Gracias por estar allí como cada semana y por último, si querés aprender a programar web o si buscas acompañamiento de proyectos principalmente con PHP, Laravel, Codeigniter, no dudes en consultarme. - https://www.facebook.com/codigotecno/ - https://www.instagram.com/codigotecno Sumate a la comunidad en Youtube: https://bit.ly/2JLaKRj En Telegram estamos empezando a armar el canal : https://t.me/codigotecno Envíame un email : codigotecno (arroba) hotmail.com o en Telegram @soleralejandro me encantaría poder ayudarte con tu proyecto o sumarme a tu equipo de desarrollo. Seguinos en las redes de podcast mas populares: * En Spotify : https://spoti.fi/31Dp4Sq * En Ivoox : https://bit.ly/2JoLotl * En Itunes: https://apple.co/2WNKWHV * En Anchor.fm: https://bit.ly/3OiVCsN Te espero en los comentarios, animate y buen código para todos. ! Muy buen código para todos y hasta la próxima. !

North Meets South Web Podcast
Managing integrations, gently improving coding practices, and housing your validation

North Meets South Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 55:41


Jake and Michael discuss using the concepts within Saloon to manage integrations with third party APIs, how a newcomer to a business can help an existing team modernise their development practices, and using Data Transfer Objects to push data validation to your application boundary.This episode is sponsored by Workvivo.Show links Trevor on Lizzo's "Grrrls" lyric controversy API integrations using Saloon in LaravelUsing Saloon to integrate external APIs with Sam Carré Where does my validation live?

Building Livewire
To over-engineer or not to over-engineer

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 10:59


Paul's Security Weekly
PSW #745 - Sam Bowne

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 183:27


This week, we kick off the show with an interview featuring Sam Bowne, the Founder of Infosec Decoded, Inc. Sam joins to discuss why many people think security is too difficult to learn because it is such a big field, and constantly growing. In the Security News for this week: appliances with holes, gamification and its pitfalls, false rocket sirens, PHP strikes again, new laws we may actually agree with, hacking jacuzzis, Icefall and the state of ICS security, Adobe is blocking anti-virus, Mega is Mega insecure, Microcorruption CTF and a DIY NSA playset! Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes! Segment Resources: https://samsclass.info/ https://infosecdecoded.com Visit https://securityweekly.com/acm to sign up for a demo or buy our AI Hunter! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes! Visit https://securityweekly.com/acm to sign up for a demo or buy our AI Hunter! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/psw745

Geeksblabla
#122 - Tech News & AMA #18

Geeksblabla

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 112:10


Tech News & AMA #18 with our community members Ilyas, and Abderrahim. During this episode, we discuss DenoJS's new framework, State of cloud 2022 and AWS EKS. Guests Abderrahim soubai Ilyas Bakouch Notes 0:00:00 - Introduction and welcoming 0:01:30 - Guest Introduction 0:03:00 - Fresh Framework release 0:35:00 - java and other programming languages can be obsolete within the next few years? 0:42:00 - What about .NET ? 0:47:00 - PHP, JS, and Python 0:49:00 - AWS EKS everywhere. 1:14:00 - Future of VueJS 1:26:10 - Geeksblabla Giveaway. 1:30:20 - Thoughts on the state of cloud 2022. 1:38:00 - QA 1:48:30 - Conclusion Links State of Cloud 2022 StateOfDev.ma AWS Graviton Processor AWS Outposts Family AWS Inferentia VueJS core Node.js in Action Prepared and Presented by Meriem Zaid

Paul's Security Weekly (Podcast-Only)
PSW #745 - Sam Bowne

Paul's Security Weekly (Podcast-Only)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 183:27


This week, we kick off the show with an interview featuring Sam Bowne, the Founder of Infosec Decoded, Inc. Sam joins to discuss why many people think security is too difficult to learn because it is such a big field, and constantly growing. In the Security News for this week: appliances with holes, gamification and its pitfalls, false rocket sirens, PHP strikes again, new laws we may actually agree with, hacking jacuzzis, Icefall and the state of ICS security, Adobe is blocking anti-virus, Mega is Mega insecure, Microcorruption CTF and a DIY NSA playset! Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes! Segment Resources: https://samsclass.info/ https://infosecdecoded.com Visit https://securityweekly.com/acm to sign up for a demo or buy our AI Hunter! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes! Visit https://securityweekly.com/acm to sign up for a demo or buy our AI Hunter! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/psw745

Software Engineering Unlocked
Mentoring as an engineering manager

Software Engineering Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 49:55


Today's episode is sponsored by Mergify, the faster and safer way to merge your code.[00:01 - 06:24] Opening Segment Start saving time by automatizing your pull requests and securing the code merge using Mergify!Sign up for a demo at https://mergify.com/Get to know Jess Roseher reasons for her helping strangers on the Internet[06:25 - 11:59] Bottom-Up Communication Vs. Top-Down ManagementThe challenges of upward communicationHow to balance personal values at workIt's unique for individual circumstanceManaging the conflict of interest as a manager to upper management[21:00 - 33:33] Level Up Your LearningWhy Jess' started an online learning programIn search of the best tool for virtual and distance learningThe impact of tools on the quality of learningMentorship and organizational rankEstablishing healthy boundariesResilience in an educational setting[33:34 - 44:46] Let's Start Speaking The Same LanguageAcing the basics: Why learning the fundamentals is everythingLet's talk about programming languageHow to improve team communication and having a shared language[44:46 - 49:55] Closing SegmentDr. McKayla talks about her book in progress and her advice to those who would like to write a bookFinal wordsTweetable Quotes“Sometimes changing jobs is easier than making peace with uneasy ethical decisions.” - Jess Rose“Nobody tells you, but you're not going to start managing people and get it right right away.” - Jess Rose“We learn better when we're chill.” - Jess Rose“I think it's really valuable to talk about the culture of the language we use around programming and really the culture of the structures we build because it's not transparent to people.” - Jess RoseConnect with Jess Rose on LinkedIn, Twitter, and her website. Go to Github.com/JessicaRose to check out her 1-1s.Resources MentionedMergify - Sign up for a demo now!freeCodeCampClass CentralWeaving the Web by Tim Berners-LeeThe Intuitive Programmer: Learning How to Learn for Programmers (Barbara Oakley & Zach Caceres)Software Engineering Unlocked Episode with Dr. Cat HicksFelienne HermansDan AbramovLet's Connect! You can connect with me, Dr.  McKayla on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube to look into engineering software, and learn from experienced developers and thought leaders from around the world about how they develop software!LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to know more about the engineering software world. Your ratings and reviews help get the podcast in front of new listeners. _______Transcription[00:00:00] Dr. McKayla Hello, and welcome to the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. I'm your host, Dr. Mckayla and today I have the pleasure to talk to Jess Rose. Jess is a technology professional and keynote speaker specializing in community building outreach and developing better processes for talented technology. She is passionate about fostering more equal access to technical education, and digital spaces.  But before I start, let me tell you about an amazing startup that is sponsoring today's episode Mergify. You know, I'm all about code reviews and pull requests. Having your teammates review your code can be super beneficial, but it also can create a bottleneck and slow down your software development. With Mergify, your team can be way more productive with GitHub. Mergify automates all about merging pull requests, you can specify the merge conditions, and Mergify will take care of the rest. Do you want a specific order for merging the pull requests? Should one PR be prioritized? Or do you need a copy of the PR and another branch for bug fixing? No problem. Mergify can take care of all those situations. By saving time, you and your team can focus on projects that matter. Mergify integrates completely with GitHub and your CI pipeline. They have a startup program that could give your company a 12-month credit up to $21,000 of value. Start saving time, visit Mergify.com to sign up for a demo and get started or just click the link in the show notes.  I'm super, super thrilled to have Jess here with me. Jess, welcome to the show.[00:01:38]  Jess Rose Oh, gosh. And I'm absolutely delighted to be here when you said hey, do you want to come and talk about teaching and learning? Oh, I'm just going to be insufferable. Thank you so much. [00:01:48]  Dr. McKayla I'm really excited because I'm following you on Twitter. And I see that you're creating spaces for people to learn to get better to grow. Right. So there are a couple of things that I want to touch base on today with you. One is the 1-1s that you're offering. So maybe, maybe let's get started with that. Because I see you from time to time you say, you know, I have some time available, why not hop over on a call, and I can help you with some career advice? How's it going? What do you do with people? What kind of people are picking up on that?[00:02:27]  Jess Rose So I've been doing this for about, I looked the other day because I do, I do keep records and privacy-preserving records just like,  oh, what kinds of things am I talking to people about? And I've been doing this for about eight years now. So just broke 1700 folks I've talked to over the years.[00:02:40] Dr. McKayla Wow. [00:02:40]  Jess Rose And you would think oh, it's going to be mostly juniors or mostly people trying to break into tech. But just the absolute vastness of experience is so dazzling and exciting and strange to me. I don't see myself as especially well suited to give great advice. But on these calls, people are almost never asking for actual advice. So a lot, most of it's just, I'd like to be heard and I'd like someone to confirm that my experience is unusual or isn't unusual. Or getting sort of a level check for a different area saying, Hey, I'm based in this region, and I'm looking for work in your region. What's that like? What's the experience like? What's the process like? I actually documented the whole process out because I want, I definitely want other people to be doing this if you feel like it. No pressure. And it's on my GitHub. So GitHub.com/JessicaRose. And it should be right on there as  1-1s.[00:03:37] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I saw that. I saw that on your Twitter feed. So it tells us how to do those 1-1s and how to, what questions to ask, and so on?[00:03:46] Jess Rose  Yeah. And mostly just about the tooling. So how to get it scheduled,  how to get that sorted? And then because I'm a weirdo, how to get the records of who chatted to you deleted if you want to, like, yeah, I wouldn't keep notes on somebody who doesn't want me to keep notes.  [00:04:00] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. And I think it's good for privacy as well, right?. If people I don't know which topics, they are coming to you, but I mean, some of them might be private, and you know, especially if you're having maybe, like, I think if you need advice, you're very often not such a good place, right? Probably more than being in a great place where you think, well, everything figured out, you know, things are going smooth than you're seldomly reaching out to other people. It would be like I'm bragging now to you. You're more probably reaching out if you have some problems with your team maybe or getting a job or something like this. Is that what people talk to you about in the sessions?[00:04:41] Jess Rose  So anything from, Hey, am I getting paid right? To, Oh, I'm getting screamed at a lot at work. Is this normal? So a lot of them are sort of, oh, gosh, but a lot of times folks just want to explore what's going on next. I've managed people a lot in my career. And one of the things that I always, I always have a difficult time with, and I hope other managers do, too, is how do you deal with the conflict? And there's always going to be conflict between what's best to the individual person you're managing, and what's best for the company because those are those, And one of the big things I push when I do manage people is, hey, do you have someone external to the company to give you good advice when I can't? Or I shouldn't give you the advice that's best for you?[00:05:31] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah, it's a conflict, right? Because obviously, you don't want to lose that person. But you see that they're outgrowing, you know, maybe the position?[00:05:42] Jess Rose  Oh, I really just want to chase this up a minute. I'm always like, you don't want to lose somebody, like, you don't want somebody to move on for your team because they were unhappy or mistreated. This is definitely from me being a teacher for too long. I'm always pretty excited when somebody graduates up out of a team I run. Like, of course, you want to make sure that people have space to grow, of course, you want to be actively making sure there's career progression and more things to learn. But and especially in a job market, like right now, sometimes people like oh, cool, I could make a bigger salary jump bracket, they could make your title jump by leaving. And I'm always pretty chill with that.[00:06:24] Dr. McKayla Yeah, yeah. Me too. And my husband is also managing a bunch of people. And but I see tension there, right? So I think he's always really behind the people. But then upper management would be, yeah, but you know.[00:06:38] Jess Rose The business case for retention.[00:06:40] Dr. McKayla  Exactly. Right. And the same for, for example, giving your raise, right. And I think, especially maybe the managers, you know, that are really like first line, they are more for the people because they have like some personal relationship, and then one level up, it's already like, yeah, but you know, we don't have the budget or we don't want or we believe we can still keep that person, you know, for this for this cheaper?[00:06:38] Jess Rose  Oh, well, you know, let's give it another quarter or two and wait and see.[00:07:08] Dr. McKayla Yeah, exactly, right?[00:07:10] Jess Rose Baffling.[00:07:11] Dr. McKayla how do you do that as a manager? How do you speak up for your, for your people, or for your team? And h ow do you deal with that conflict as well?[00:07:22] Jess Rose  So I think that's a really challenging one because I think that the conflict there is still the same. What do you do as an individual manager when the y eah, when your contractual, your fiduciary duties to your company, run counter to your individual ethical responsibilities to the people you manage? And or what happens when there's a conflict between the needs of an individual and the needs of a team? And it's not a good answer. And it's not a reassuring answer. But it depends. If somebody is facing treatment that feels unfair, or targeted, or they're in a position that I, generally, if somebody is in a position, I'm not okay, with being much more lovingly strident around, hey, this is a topic I would really bring to your external mentor A well, and then setting really clear limits internally about what, even as a manager, you are and aren't willing to do. So somebody saying, Oh, you get the idea that, Oh, maybe we want to manage so and so out, go ahead and write them up for stuff that the rest of the team routinely does. You still have consent as a manager. So you could say, like, yeah, no, I won't work in a space that involves maybe this kind of behavior.[00:08:45] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah, I think this is really important that we are standing up for our own ethics and for our own beliefs and value and, you know, also behind our, you know, our people that we, you know, I think we have a responsibility as well for and yeah, so I yeah, I can totally see that. [00:09:05] Jess Rose It's easy to say in this kind of job market in the West as well. I think, a re you based perhaps in Europe as well? [00:09:12] Dr. McKaylaYes. Yeah. [00:09:13] Jess Rose Because, like, these days for many European job markets in tech, finding a new job feels to many people who are established for juniors or people getting your first job,  It is hard. But for folks who've been in for a little while, and folks in different in high demand areas, getting a new job as a junior as a middleweight, or a senior, is not as difficult as it could be these days. Whereas if you're having to engage in management behavior that you're just not comfortable with, yeah, sometimes changing jobs is easier than making peace with uneasy ethical decisions. Yeah, sometimes that's not true for everybody. And it's a very, very privileged take for those of us who have a little bit of wiggle room.[00:09:58] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I think so. And it really depends on where are you located? And what is your personal situation, right? Do you have dependents? Do you have like family or people that you have to take care of? And so on, which I think makes it much harder to say, you know, I'm going to not do that. But I think there, you know, there are boundaries, it's, it's one thing is playing along, and just, you know, or letting the other person also, you know, know, in the space that you have, right? You're also like, as a manager, you also, you can't just go and, you know, give advice directly conflicting with the interests of your upper management because that, you know, is a problem, but you can, you know, talk a little bit about, as you said, maybe asking you an external person, or also I think very well, you can say I'm disagreeing with this decision, right? And I advocated for you, unfortunately, you know, these were my boundaries here, for example, and let them know, I think that's, that's perfectly fine. Yeah. And I think that the problem is that if more of those things come together, people start thinking about leaving, right?[00:11:06] Jess Rose And that's not always a bad thing. As a manager, if you're not able to offer someone, a place that is safe, and productive, and non-traumatic to work, yeah, it's okay, that your people move on, and actually kind of preferable?[00:11:22] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah, I think so, too. So another topic that I wanted to talk with you about, and it's a little bit related to management, but it's more related to teaching. So I don't think you have to be a manager to teach, right? You can be, you can be, you know, Junior Dev, Mid Dev, senior Dev, right, so we can all learn from each other. But I really see you as a teaching, you know, expert here. Yeah. Because you're, you're bringing topics around programming, but also, you know, advice for hiring or you know, how to get hired. And to so many people, right, you're, you're also making these really mass, mass online learning events, right, occur online boot camps. So how is that going? Why did you start that and is that only for really junior people?[00:12:12] Jess Rose So the first thing I want to do is like, I would absolutely love if there was an excuse for me, Oh, yes, I'll just take all the credit. But the free online boot camps that I've started are absolutely not just me. So they started as 12-week boot camps, and they've been collapsed into a reasonably intense but still part-time, six-week boot camp. And this is built off of the freeCodeCamp curriculum. So they're a registered nonprofit. They're amazing. We could not do this without them and without their permission. But also the good people, I'm pointing behind me like they're back there. The good people Class Central built a whole platform that lets us teach on so like, just really, and Ramon is my, my co-teacher. And he's he's just, it's almost disgusting how lovely he is. Like, the learners love him and deservedly so.[00:13:03] Dr. McKayla  Cool. Yeah. So what do you teach there? Is it like really the 101 of programming? Or is it more advanced concepts? Who is your target audience here?[00:13:14] Jess Rose  So this last cohort, which just ended about two weeks ago, I should get back to work on those. We had 15,000 unique learners across two tracks learning either web development, which is HTML, CSS, accessibility, really, really intro level of like first steps of programming, or across JavaScript. And again, that sort of first steps with JavaScript, getting started. So really sort of introductory level. But we added some additional forums for peer support. We've got a very noisy Discord. And then some live stream lessons and question-answer to get people unstuck. We've had such a, so I would have expected oh, these will be beginners. We have back-end devs who wanted to try out web development. We've got folks who don't want to go into tech, but they do want to build a website for their business. And the thing I was, I used to be a teacher and I used to be a linguist. And very selfishly, the thing I was, one of the things I was most excited about was the absolute range of the learners. We've got folks across every regularly inhabited continent. And folks joining us in this massive exciting range of first languages. I was just so, so people who are learning from their phones, people who are learning from the library computers, and I just really really loved this loud, chaotic, and so lovely and so supportive group of learners all helping each other out.[00:14:49] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, that's, that's really exciting. So I actually was thinking a little bit about learning on devices that are not high-end, right. And when I, when I started university, I couldn't afford a really high-end computer not even a normal computer, right? So I was on this, I got, I got one of those really cheap computers from somebody that you know, gave it to me for free. And it was a nightmare. It was a nightmare to work on that. And nowadays, it's obviously not the case anymore. And I'm really happy about that. But I was wondering what about, you know, people that don't want to work on the phone or work to, you know, on a tablet, and I'm pregnant right now. [00:15:32] Jess Rose Oh, congratulations. How exciting, how scary. [00:15:36] Dr. McKayla Yeah. But it's also a really cool experience because I'm thinking, like, this is my third child. So I know a little bit.[00:15:45] Jess Rose  Oh, you're just fine. You're like, duh, this happens.[00:15:46] Dr. McKayla I know what's going to happen, that I can sit here and you know, work on my comfortable devices. And so I tried a little bit to work on my phone and work on the tablet and so on, I still think it's really difficult. What tools do your learners have?[00:16:03] Jess Rose  Did somebody, somebody did one of my friends talk to you about this? I'm deeply suspicious. So I'm going to try really carefully not to say too much. I'm working on a little side project around this problem. Because this is a problem I've been thinking about a lot. So right now, and if our dear listeners aren't your viewers are, oh, gosh, what's the noun? Our beloved audience, your beloved audience has a tool or has something in the space that I haven't seen yet, please come and yell at me. But right now, I'm not seeing really good tooling. I'm not seeing a good way to write to the web from mobile devices. [00:16:46] Dr. McKayla Yeah, it's not there. [00:16:47] Jess Rose And this is an ethical problem for me. Because right now we hear people talking about the next billion users, I love this. But in a lot of cases, we're seeing people who are accessing the web for the first time, and I love it, and I live for it. But they're accessing the web on a lot of constraints. So they're usually on phones, they're usually mobile-only is what we'll call those kinds of learners. They may be accessing it in their third or fourth language, because you're going to see global web primarily in English and French and Spanish. And they're often constrained to really, really challenging limits on their, like their actual access to broadband or to mobile signal. And that's something I've been thinking about a lot on the device level for this problem. If I went, I'm going to date myself terribly. But I got access to the internet, when I was maybe 13, or 14. And the device I use to access the web to read the web, I could also write to the web. And we're effectively giving people this right only access to the web through smartphones. And that just, that doesn't seem like enough to me. So there's nothing great yet. And I don't think I've necessarily cracked it myself. But in the next couple of months, I would like to, I've got a little thing I'd like to launch to see whether or not that might be a good tool.[00:18:10] Dr. McKayla Yeah. Cool. I would be super interested in that. And I also think like, nowadays, I'm actually, I should actually be the whole day on bed rest. But two weeks ago…[00:18:20] Jess Rose What are you doing? You should be doing this lounging.[00:18:23] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I should. Right, yeah. But so now I'm allowed to be up a couple of hours per day, which is, which is great, but because I'm on this bed rest, right, and I only can lie down, I'm not allowed to sit actually, I experienced all these accessibility problems that, you know, couple of, you know, disabled folks also are experiencing and I'm like, right now, I really understand how difficult it is if you can't, you know, type, write, if you have like these mobile devices. And I think there is really there isn't a lot of you know, there's so much space in there. And we should really be much more welcoming to people that can't, you know, sit on this nice computer have their three monitors, right, the keyboard and the mouse. And it's really I mean, it's really frustrating for me to write a blog post to make an update on Git, right, to make a PR.[00:19:12] Jess RoseI'm not ignoring you. I'm just grabbing a book to see, so rude, isn't it? Turning away? Oh, heck, I must have hidden it somewhere. But there's a really fantastic book from the late 90s that Tim Berners Lee wrote about the process of inventing the web. But I've got sort of a tab in the book because he said, Oh, okay, we had to sit down we had to define the bare minimum. What is the minimum viable setup you need to access the web? He said, Oh, you need to, you need some kind of CPU, we need some kind of monitor some kind of display. And one of the things that they specified as necessary for the web was, you're going to need a keyboard. I think that's the point that sticks me again and again, where I think, but we've gotten past the need for keyboard in so many other spaces. Yeah, it seems a bit lazy to have not gotten past it in sort of the ability to do simple web development.[00:20:12] Dr. McKayla Yeah, yeah, it would be so great. Like, I would benefit so much from it. [00:20:17] Jess Rose  Oh, just the guilt I've got right now. I'm just like, yes, yes, I'll get back to work. But we do currently have learned,  well, in the last cohort, we had a number of learners who were accessing the course, all via smartphones. So they would post and we'd love to see them post, screenshots of their code to see, hey, where's this gone wrong, but it's going to be folks screenshotting their phone screen, and just the implication of how challenging it would be to write, I've tried it to write a bunch of CSS on your phone, oh, the absolute, like the strength these people have in their hearts not to throw it across the room.[00:21:01] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, definitely. Definitely. So another question that came to my mind is now you have this experience of, you know, teaching really beginners, and also in a different space, it's a space of you are, you know, like this, this teacher now, and they're doing an online course. But I'm also very interested in how can we actually bring back or coming back to the managing position, right, how can we teach and mentor within a team, right? How can we do that for juniors? How can we do that for mid engineers? Who mentors and teachers, senior engineers? How is that all, you know, the dynamic in a team? And I was wondering if you have like some experience around that and some thoughts around that topic as well.[00:21:47] Jess Rose   So I was really lucky. I was on a team several years ago now out at FutureLearn. With oh, gosh, Nikki, What's your surname? I'm so sorry. I swear I know it. I've just forgotten it, because I'm a bad person. And Belinda Sockington, who are both unreasonably brilliant and fantastic managers. And a lot of that work on that team was around, because I have FutureLearn was that it was a MOOC platform. How do we, how do we encourage learning? How do we incentivize it? How do we balance it? And really, what kind of landed for me is it's an ongoing conversation between the folks running these teams, the individual people, I think it may be one of those issues where there's just no one size fits all. It's a combination of saying, Hey, we have these options. Here are some off-the-shelf learning experiences, with starting a conversation and keeping up a conversation of what do you want to learn, what works for you? What's best for you? One thing that I've encountered a couple of times in my career, which I've had a really, really hard time with and my opinion on it has really radically changed, is every now and again, I'd meet somebody who's sort of mid-level or senior, so they've they've gotten themselves into a secure role. They're feeling okay with it. And they wouldn't be that excited about learning where they said, Yeah, I just want to do my job. But I want to go home. And I think the first couple of times, because nobody tells you, but you're not going to start managing people and get it right right away. I'm going to stay awake late tonight absolutely obsessing over the ways I'm still not doing it right. But back then I was thinking, Oh, how can I, how can I make this person care about their learning? And these days, I think with the, with the world having gotten much more stressful, and me having enough experience to see that I think now that I was wrong. These days, when I meet somebody who's like, well, I'd like to do my job. I'd like to do a good job at my job. And I'd like to go home, I don't really need to move up. I don't really want to stretch and learn more. I've gotten, yeah, like, that seems increasingly chill. I think it might be cultural as well, I think. I'm from the States originally. And I think there's quite a bit more fear around employment in the States. Almost everybody can be fired at any time and that makes everything very exciting. And generally your health care is associated with your employment. So I think I see when I was younger and based in the States, there was a lot more. Of course, you have to keep learning, of course, you have to keep running, you have to progress. Otherwise, something bad could happen. And yeah, I think I've just gotten increasingly excited to see people set boundaries around where they put their learning and where they put their interests. Yeah. Yeah, that's a very strange take for a teacher.[00:24:47] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. So actually, I was talking to Cat Hicks, just a couple of weeks ago. Yeah. And so we were talking about learning debt. And this whole topic brought us to something where I think, you know, learning is often something very externalized, right, where you say, Oh, I'm learning, let's say I'm learning React, or now I'm learning Remix, right? So maybe the newest framework or, you know, a new a new approach for DevOps or whatnot, right? So it's something that's out of what you're doing right now. And it's a new technology, very technology-oriented as well, whereby I think at the company, there are so many, a little bit more how to call it but informal, or, you know, a little bit more tactic, learning experience that you actually have every day, right, which is, how do I communicate with this new person on the team, right? How do I, how do I understand parts of this codebase? Can we change the architecture for that without breaking something? And all of these are also learning experiences, which we are often not declaring as that right, so we are not saying, oh, you know, McKayla, today learned about new ways to do this architecture for us or to refactor that code, or, you know, she did, she learned about how this API works over there that she hasn't worked about, right? This is very often not, I don't think it's so visible in the learning experience than if I would say, Oh, me, hey, let's sit down and learned React. Yeah, you know.[00:26:25] Jess Rose And I think that's really valuable. Because even when you say something, somebody say, I think, oh, you know, I'm just going to chill and do a good job. And it's so easy to generalize about brains and learning to, say, Oh, we know what we know about learning. In so much as we've learned anything about learning like self-assessment's messy, the study of, I'm not nearly clever enough to have a good handle on neuroscience and learning. But there's actually a fantastic researcher and author, Dr. Barbara Oakley, who does a lot of work on learning how to learn. And she's been doing some work with Zack Caceres who's a programmer, and I'm not going to tell, talk out of turn. But I believe they may be launching a project around how we learn programming skills relatively soon.[00:27:11] Dr. McKaylaYeah, nice. Yeah. [00:27:11]Jess Rose But we're primates in changing environments. Even if we don't think about it as learning, we are getting new situations and new stimuli, just like you said, I've got a new teammate, I'm going to learn to work with them. Oh, I've got this API. Oh, I finally understood what's going on under the hood. Regardless of whether or not we've set ourselves a mountain path to hike a declared learning journey, there's still learning happening. Yeah.[00:27:37]  Dr. McKayla  Yeah. And I think that those chill folks, how you call them, right? Maybe they have also more capacity to actually see things that are, you know, people that are very on their journey of, oh, I want to learn React and the latest, you know, whatever, technology comes out right now, maybe don't have the capacity to see, for example, oh, you know, now that the market changed a little bit, budget shifted, we have to work a little bit different with this team, or, you know, how can we make sure that our deadlines are, you know, approachable, and so on? So, yeah, I think learning really happens in so many forms. And, yeah.[00:28:14]  Jess Rose And I, yeah, I've always been really excited about that as well. I think resilience is undervalued in teams often. Sorry, this isn't very confident or it is not very definitive, but I'm going to waffle about my biases as part of this. I really like thinking about resilience in individuals and in teams as a resource available. And I like thinking of people as resources, but like, someone being rested, somebody having the capacity, somebody being ready for a little tiny crisis, or a little weird thing. That feels like a resource right there. But I think often we really lean on productivity so hard. How can we get. what kind of developer experience tooling can we use to get 20% more? How can we make sure people are focused? How can we cycle our meeting? And we're so focused on developer productivity and the productivity of technologists, I think we often sacrifice that flexibility and that resilience of having somebody who's not under these productivity pressures to such a high degree. Like, we learn better when we're chill.[00:29:25] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, yeah. And I think it brings us back also to, there was this blue code, right? People that are taking on responsibilities, right, blue work, sorry, blue work, that was what it was called, right? But people that are taking on some invisible work that are, you know, good for the team. And, and so yeah, I think this also for teaching, mentoring, learning, I think this can be one thing, and obviously, we shouldn't get outdated too much. And, but I also think that it's not changing every minute, you know, like, sometimes we believe, or we were made to believe, or this story lines around time, Oh, my God, you know, if you're not doing every day something and..[00:30:11] Jess Rose What do you mean you're not using blank? I'm like, look, I'm very old, and I'm very tired. Like, I'm good.[00:30:18] Dr. McKaylaI think it's totally fine, right. And there are a lot of technologies, that I mean, if you're working on PHP, you know, a lot of the web runs on PHP, and it's still, you know, a good technology, and it's okay. [00:30:33] Jess Rose  Like, if you want to stretch a little bit, getting into some Laravel is really, really exciting. But if you write PHP, you can hang out and get better at the core stuff of what you do. And do a good job. Like, you don't have to run as hard as you can, as fast as you can forever.[00:30:51] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I think they're, they're, you know, good choices to make. And I'm definitely for growth and for learning. But sometimes people are just burning, you know, mental calories. I learned so much. I mean, I'm actually a learner, right? I love to learn. But most of the stuff that I learn, I never used. It's not very productive, right? [00:31:16] Jess Rose  Yeah, but not sorry, you've invited me on here. And I'm just up here ready to blow you. But yeah, this sort of cult of productivity, not that you're espousing it makes me very, very, and when I talk to new learners, and they say, oh, okay, I need to learn this, and this, and this, and this, and this, and this. And I've heard these words, and I need to learn this. I'm like, Babe, you can, you can show we can all chill. Like, we don't have to learn any frameworks yet. We don't have to learn any ops yet, we can just chill and learn the core stuff. And as these are like, one thing I really like to encourage, especially with new learners, or learners new to a specific space, is to go ahead and get some kind of digital or some kind of physical space where you can dump stuff. Some people like Notion, I hate Notion a lot. I quite like Obsidian. I don't care what you use, as long as you're happy about it. As you're seeing all these terms, just chuck them in a big doc. Okay, well,  I keep seeing Angular, I know Angular is a thing, should I learn it? Don't worry about whether or not you have to learn it next, just go ahead. And when you see an article about it, throw it in the slush pile. I call it my link dump for early learning. And that means once you've got through the foundational stuff, you say, Okay, I've learned enough JavaScript where I can write. And I like setting these little tiny interim goals to say, Well, I've learned enough JavaScript where I'm able to make simple bug fixes in this open source project I was interested in. I've learned enough. And one thing I'm excited about is the The Art of Learning code, or the art of reading code, which is something Felienne... is an academic who's done a lot of work in the space.[00:32:59] Dr. McKayla She's from Leiden University.[00:33:01] Jess Rose  Yes. You've talked to her already. I bet.[00:33:02] Dr. McKayla  I did my PhD with her in the same room. Roommates. Yeah.[00:33:06] Jess Rose  Did you? Did you?[00:33:06] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, we were roommates. Yeah.[00:33:07] Jess Rose  Oh, is she just as delightful to study with?[00:33:10] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, she is wonderful. [00:33:13] Jess Rose  But yeah, so really getting through the basics of well, I set out to do X, I'm doing X. Now it's time for me to go look through my link dump file, and see, wow, it looks like I've got like 40 different articles about Angular. Maybe that was important that that's enough for what I want to learn next. Yeah.[00:33:34] Dr. McKayla Maybe something else that comes to my mind here is also that I think fundamentals are really important, right? So I like for example, the approach of Dan Abramoff, right? He has like this course of chess JavaScript, which it means that you're not starting with React, right? You're starting with JavaScript and with the fundamentals around it, and I wouldn't say it's really a course for really real beginners. But it's like if you got a little bit of your hands dirty around JavaScript, it's really nice to go in and then check. Did I actually really understand what's you know, what's happening here? And then if you have these fundamentals, I think it's so much easier to build upon that dump. And dive into React or whatnot, right? Whatever technology you want to add here.[00:34:21] Jess Rose  I think this comes back to something I've been thinking about a lot in how we learn and teach. But like, where we abstract things out. Soin the boot camp, we're using Free Code Camp to teach, which is a, it's an in-browser sandbox, you don't have, and they've just come out with a new beta curriculum for web development I'm in love with. And it previews that these are files and that you have to link to these files. It is very, very good. But it's still a sandbox, it's still an abstraction. And the places we tend to send learners next are things like, Okay, we're going to head over to CodeSandbox, we're going to head over to Glitch which are still abstracting away a lot of really, and then even when you look in to professional tooling and frameworks, they say, Okay, let's get into React. A lot of the power behind these frameworks are that they abstract away or that they compress, or they obscure or or smooth over some of the fundamentals of how we work with the core technology, maybe JavaScript or the way, Tailwind is a weird abstraction of the things you'd like to do with CSS. And I don't have a problem with, I think it's a teacher, I'd have a hard time having a problem with abstraction. But I think that thinking really carefully about how we do this, when we abstract things , and how we signpost what's been taking, or what's been added gets to be really valuable.[00:34:47] Dr. McKayla Yeah, I think so too. Yeah. When I was starting to learn programming, I struggled a lot with abstractions because I just wanted to know, or not only with abstractions, but also like, there wasn't a lot of abstractions. It was actually very, very raw, right? It was like, Oh, you have an Eclipse IDE open and you're writing Java code. Bbut then you have like, oh, let's say, you know, public wide string, main, whatever, right? And it's just like, you just do it, right. And I'm like, why? What does it mean, don't worry about it. [00:36:22] Jess Rose And then we'll cover this later. And so by the time, we will have covered it, yeah… Having been a linguist, I fear that I mentally map language learning to programming language learning, even when it might not be entirely suitable. But I see this happening in human language education as well, where we say, okay, cool. Here's how, we keep we start people in the present perfect tens for a lot of languages, I see the cat, I drink the water, I walked to the store. And we don't send them into a present perfect world. And I think that's true with programming as well to say, Okay, well, we're going to give you this sandbox, or we're going to give you this framework, which abstracts away a lot of the complexities of the grammar or the the nuance of, and I think it's really valuable to talk about the culture of the language we use around programming and really the culture of, of the structures we build, because it's not transparent to people. I met with a learner in person, what a delight, in person last week. And without thinking about it, I said, yada yada yada bikeshedding. And thank goodness, this learner was confident enough to be like, cool, what the heck are you talking about? I was like, oh, gosh, that's just something we say. We say it as though everyone's going to understand it. And it means to get sidelined to get distracted with little unnecessary details. Just like okay, cool. You should just say that, it's less complicated. [00:37:55] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. I think it's not always that easy to be always aware of how you do it. But I recall the time that I started at Microsoft, and, you know, when you start there, it's full of acronyms. And they mean, they mean something completely else inside Microsoft and what it would mean outside, and it really takes quite some time. And then a lot of people get very blind to it, and you know, just start using it as well. And you know, you start talking this gibberish. Nobody else can understand. Yeah.[00:38:32] Jess Rose  But like, from a linguistic perspective, that's because that's identifies you as a member of the in-group, doesn't it? How fascinating. Yeah, incredibly interesting. Oh, no, no, I absolutely refuse to spend the next three days hyperfocused learning about weird Microsoft acronyms. It's so tempting.[00:38:49] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, there are a lot. But I think it's the same with code reviews, right? And with sometimes how people say, oh, you know, we have this style of giving feedback to each other. And in my code review workshops, I always talk You know, I always try to have people come to an agreement that we need to use language and also, you know, phrase that in a respectful way, that's not only for the internal, you know, internal team to understand. Because there are newcomers, you know, in the team, maybe somebody will look at that, what you wrote two years from now, right, and still should be able to understand it. And so I think it's really good if we be clear about those bridges that we built that, you know, are this internal behavior and language that we are using that it's only, you know, it's an insider joke, and so on.[00:39:47] Jess Rose Yeah. Yeah. And I think we're often really chill about that in tech. Yeah, oh, here's a glossary of technical terms you need to know to do the thing. We're, we're cool about that. There seems to be a bit more resistance around when shared language or shared norms, or shared language structures around things like code reviews are proposed because we don't need that we know how to talk to each other. I hope I'm not putting you on the spot. Are you one of those lucky people who speak like nine languages?[00:40:15] Dr. McKayla No, not nine.[00:40:15] Jess Rose Oh, only five?[00:40:17] Dr. McKayla Maybe, yeah. German is my mother tongue, right? English, Dutch, Italian, and a little bit of Spanish.[00:40:28] Jess Rose  A little bit of Spanish. Look at that. The fantastic thing about chatting to many folks from Europe is, is y'all always have this very, very beautiful, very casual, like humble brag at the end, you like, you know, just a little tiny bit of Croatian. I'm terribly jealous. Yeah, like recognizing that folks aren't going to be coming to, coming to these code reviews. And I really liked that you highlight that they're going to be coming to the uncoupled in time. I love this idea that when you leave a code review, when you leave feedback, when you leave a pull request, when you leave code, you're leaving a little artifact of understanding behind. So to say, Cool, we've standardized how we talk about these, we've created a shared language for them. Because when we go into the far scary future, we want these to still make sense.[00:41:23] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, I think this is really important.[00:41:26] Jess Rose  But also making them like giving a shared language around, hey, maybe English, or if we're doing the, if we're doing the code review, in Dutch, I'm in a bit of trouble. But maybe the language this code review is in is your second or third or fifth? Let's go ahead and have some shared language have some shared structures around feedback to lower the cognitive load? Yeah, well, can we talk about cognitive load? I imagine you've done it tons of times on the podcast. I imagine many programmers are familiar with it.[00:42:00] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, we also have to be a little bit careful of the time now. But maybe the last thing that I want to add here is I'm writing a book on code reviews, right? [00:42:10] Jess Rose Are you?[00:42:10] Dr. McKayla Yeah, I'm right now in the middle of the feedback section, right? So how to give feedback, how to give respectful feedback, and how to communicate with each other and also cultural right? So how do we deal with, it gets really hairy there, right? So yeah, what are different cultures are expecting, what's respectful there, you know, how much you know, how harsh should a feedback be? Or can it be or, you know, what is seen as polite and so on? And this is not only, it's not only, it's not one standard thing, right? It depends on who's on the team, what's the background? What's the culture? But I think the expectation, setting the right expectations, and, you know, explicitly stating that, and talking about that, reflecting on that, and, you know, learning how others see those things and learning how, you know, like, if I would talk to you I'm originally from Austria lived in a couple of countries, right? You're from the States you're, you're in the UK now, right?[00:43:12] Jess Rose I am, yeah, everything's just fine here. Very chill. Not weird.[00:43:10] Dr. McKayla Yeah. And then maybe we have another person from Croatia and then somebody from India, right. And so I think it would be really important for us to talk about how we understand different terminologies, how we understand different you know, expressions in my career workshops, sometimes I have discussions about looks good to me. And I love those discussions because, you know, it's just a simple term looks good to me. Most of the time, people just, you know, have the acronym for it, right?[00:43:47] Jess Rose  Like it's the thumbs up emoji in my head.[00:43:50] Dr. McKayla  Exactly or you know, LGTM, right? And then some people are like, oh, yeah, this means you know, that I looked through it and you did a good job. And then the other person has no, you know, looks good to me means that you haven't looked at my code.[00:44:07] Jess Rose You just glanced at it. [00:44:07] Dr. McKayla Yeah, you just want it out of your way. Yeah. And the other person says, Oh, this means, I don't care. [00:44:07] Jess Rose Sometimes, sometimes.[00:44:16] Dr. McKayla And having those discussions in the team, you know, and understanding where everybody is coming from, and that they actually use, you know, one simple terminology. And everybody on the same team understood something else about it, I think it's so valuable, right? And only by these discussions, you know, we can really understand what's behind those terms and the way that we are communicating. But I'm also getting a little bit carried away.[00:44:45] Jess Rose  No, no. So I'm going to ask you about your book. And yeah, I've just had a friend tell me that there are some questions you're not supposed to ask about someone's book. So I won't ask any of those. Instead, I've been told you're supposed to say, I hope it's going well. I'd like and I think it might be useful for hopefully some of the audience as well. I had an idea for a book that sounded really fun in my head. And I've sort of broken it down into chapters into essays and trying to write a couple of chapters. And my goal in writing a couple of essays is I'm trying to talk myself out of writing a book. [00:45:22] Dr. McKayla Yeah, I've heard that. Yeah. [00:45:23] Jess Rose Do you have any advice for not, like, it's the worst. It's the worst idea ever. No one wants to write a book like, please, please, please. [00:45:32] Dr. McKayla No, I don't have.[00:45:32] Jess Rose No, I want to know what you're doing.[00:45:34] Dr. McKayla  But I saw on Twitter that you said that and I thought, like, yeah, you won't be able to not write a book with this approach, right?[00:45:42] Jess Rose I love that it sounds like a th reat, where you're like, you're going to write that book.[00:45:45] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, it looks like. I think if you're breaking it up in essays, that become more manageable. I think you will write this book. Yeah.[00:45:55] Jess Rose But for our beloved audience, for your beloved audience, they shouldn't write a book, they should, they should definitely do things that are not writing a book. Like, it's a terrible idea, isn't it?[00:46:04] Dr. McKayla  I can't, I can't say it's a terrible idea. [00:46:06] Jess Rose Are you enjoying it?[00:46:08] Dr. McKayla I don't think it's a good idea. But I think a lot of people would like to write a book and I would be the last person that would discourage them. Because I was always discouraged to write a book, right? But I think I know what mess I got myself into. [00:46:25]  Jess Rose That's what I'm looking for, there we go.[00:46:26] Dr. McKayla I would just tell the people that you're getting yourself into a big mess. But it's okay. You know, it's okay. I think people can write books, and people should write books.[00:46:36]  Jess Rose The world is messy. It'll be fun. Oh, no, this is the opposite of what I was looking for. But it's so delightful.[00:46:42] Dr. McKayla  Yeah, well, Jess actually, this brings us to the end of our show, I really enjoyed talking with you about all of that. And I think we should talk about cognition and cognitive load, and you know, all of that. So maybe I will invite you again, to another session[00:46:58] Jess Rose  I'd love to come back any time. But I'll also pass you some contacts for folks who are much better at this than I am, I would just go back and be like, so books. And really, your audience deserves better.[00:47:13] Dr. McKayla Okay. And we will both all the things that we talked about down there also, maybe the Twitter handle or LinkedIn profile or whatnot, from the person that you mentioned in the middle, where you forgot the last name, I put it there. So she will be there as well. And then, yeah, so is there something that you want to wrap this episode up? Or?[00:47:36] Jess Rose  Oh, gosh, can I bully your audience? Is that doable? Is it permitted? I've been doing advice calls all this week. And the big thing that I keep coming back to when I chat to people, I do do them just to be mean to people who are smarter than me is right now everything, everything is just so big and so loud and so stressful. One thing I've really enjoyed exploring with people is looking at ways that what they have to do, what they think they have to do can be smaller and softer and quieter. And I think that yeah, I'd love to gently bully folks to consider how what they need to do could be a little less. Maybe you don't have to write that book. It can just be an essay.[00:48:24] Dr. McKayla  Yeah. Yeah. I like that. I actually did that this week with myself and just gave myself permission to let go of a couple of balls that I was juggling. And I think it's delightful. We should really do that. And I think it's it's the time that we are many people needed. Not everybody, right. I think a lot of people needed.[00:48:41] Jess Rose There's going to be one person out there who's having a real good week. I just haven't met him.[00:48:46] Dr. McKayla  Or yeah, or that cat very nicely distracted by all of the work and don't have to think about the stuff that's going on. Yeah. Okay, so Jess, thank you so much. Thank you. It was really a pleasure talking to you.[00:49:01] Jess Rose Thanks so much. I'll let you go and thank you again. I won't get into a thank you loop with you.[00:49:06] Dr. McKayla  Okay, bye-bye. [00:49:06] Dr. McKayla This was another episode of the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please help me spread the word about the podcast, send episode to a friend via email, Twitter, LinkedIn. Well, whatever messaging system you use, or give it a positive review on your favorite podcasting platforms such as Spotify or iTunes. This would mean really a lot to me. So thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and I will talk to you in two weeks. Bye

Building Livewire
I'm a builder

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 9:53


If I had to identify with one thing, it'd be that.

Building Livewire
Nothing is static, everything is a wave

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 10:57


Building Livewire
Don't settle

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 10:57


You can produce results greater than your abilities if you simply choose to not settle.

Screaming in the Cloud
Technical Lineage and Careers in Tech with Sheeri Cabral

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 35:50


About SheeriAfter almost 2 decades as a database administrator and award-winning thought leader, Sheeri Cabral pivoted to technical product management. Her super power of “new customer” empathy informs her presentations and explanations. Sheeri has developed unique insights into working together and planning, having survived numerous reorganizations, “best practices”, and efficiency models. Her experience is the result of having worked at everything from scrappy startups such as Guardium – later bought by IBM – to influential tech companies like Mozilla and MongoDB, to large established organizations like Salesforce.Links Referenced: Collibra: https://www.collibra.com WildAid GitHub: https://github.com/wildaid Twitter: https://twitter.com/sheeri Personal Blog: https://sheeri.org TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is Sheeri Cabral, who's a Senior Product Manager of ETL lineage at Collibra. And that is an awful lot of words that I understand approximately none of, except maybe manager. But we'll get there. The origin story has very little to do with that.I was following Sheeri on Twitter for a long time and really enjoyed the conversations that we had back and forth. And over time, I started to realize that there were a lot of things that didn't necessarily line up. And one of the more interesting and burning questions I had is, what is it you do, exactly? Because you're all over the map. First, thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. And what is it you'd say it is you do here? To quote a somewhat bizarre and aged movie now.Sheeri: Well, since your listeners are technical, I do like to match what I say with the audience. First of all, hi. Thanks for having me. I'm Sheeri Cabral. I am a product manager for technical and ETL tools and I can break that down for this technical audience. If it's not a technical audience, I might say something—like if I'm at a party, and people ask what I do—I'll say, “I'm a product manager for technical data tool.” And if they ask what a product manager does, I'll say I helped make sure that, you know, we deliver a product the customer wants. So, you know, ETL tools are tools that transform, extract, and load your data from one place to another.Corey: Like AWS Glue, but for some of them, reportedly, you don't have to pay AWS by the gigabyte-second.Sheeri: Correct. Correct. We actually have an AWS Glue technical lineage tool in beta right now. So, the technical lineage is how data flows from one place to another. So, when you're extracting, possibly transforming, and loading your data from one place to another, you're moving it around; you want to see where it goes. Why do you want to see where it goes? Glad you asked. You didn't really ask. Do you care? Do you want to know why it's important?Corey: Oh, I absolutely do. Because it's—again, people who are, like, “What do you do?” “Oh, it's boring, and you won't care.” It's like when people aren't even excited themselves about what they work on, it's always a strange dynamic. There's a sense that people aren't really invested in what they do.I'm not saying you have to have this overwhelming passion and do this in your spare time, necessarily, but you should, at least in an ideal world, like what you do enough to light up a bit when you talk about it. You very clearly do. I'm not wanting to stop you. Please continue.Sheeri: I do. I love data and I love helping people. So, technical lineage does a few things. For example, a DBA—which I used to be a DBA—can use technical lineage to predict the impact of a schema update or migration, right? So, if I'm going to change the name of this column, what uses it downstream? What's going to be affected? What scripts do I need to change? Because if the name changes other thing—you know, then I need to not get errors everywhere.And from a data governance perspective, which Collibra is data governance tool, it helps organizations see if, you know, you have private data in a source, does it remain private throughout its journey, right? So, you can take a column like email address or government ID number and see where it's used down the line, right? GDPR compliance, CCPA compliance. The CCPA is a little newer; people might not know that acronym. It's California Consumer Privacy Act.I forget what GDPR is, but it's another privacy act. It also can help the business see where data comes from so if you have technical lineage all the way down to your reports, then you know whether or not you can trust the data, right? So, you have a report and it shows salary ranges for job titles. So, where did the data come from? Did it come from a survey? Did it come from job sites? Or did it come from a government source like the IRS, right? So, now you know, like, what you get to trust the most.Corey: Wait, you can do that without a blockchain? I kid, I kid, I kid. Please don't make me talk about blockchains. No, it's important. The provenance of data, being able to establish a almost a chain-of-custody style approach for a lot of these things is extraordinarily important.Sheeri: Yep.Corey: I was always a little hazy on the whole idea of ETL until I started, you know, working with large-volume AWS bills. And it turns out that, “Well, why do you have to wind up moving and transforming all of these things?” “Oh, because in its raw form, it's complete nonsense. That's why. Thank you for asking.” It becomes a problem—Sheeri: [laugh]. Oh, I thought you're going to say because AWS has 14 different products for things, so you have to move it from one product to the other to use the features.Corey: And two of them are good. It's a wild experience.Sheeri: [laugh].Corey: But this is also something of a new career for you. You were a DBA for a long time. You're also incredibly engaging, you have a personality, you're extraordinarily creative, and that—if I can slander an entire profession for a second—does not feel like it is a common DBA trait. It's right up there with an overly creative accountant. When your accountant has done a stand-up comedy, you're watching and you're laughing and thinking, “I am going to federal prison.” It's one of those weird things that doesn't quite gel, if we're speaking purely in terms of stereotypes. What has your career been like?Sheeri: I was a nerd growing up. So, to kind of say, like, I have a personality, like, my personality is very nerdish. And I get along with other nerdy people and we have a lot of fun, but when I was younger, like, when I was, I don't know, seven or eight, one of the things I really love to do is I had a penny collection—you know, like you do—and I love to sort it by date. So, in the states anyway, we have these pennies that have the date that they were minted on it. And so, I would organize—and I probably had, like, five bucks worth a pennies.So, you're talking about 500 pennies and I would sort them and I'd be like, “Oh, this is 1969. This was 1971.” And then when I was done, I wanted to sort things more, so I would start to, like, sort them in order how shiny the pennies were. So, I think that from an early age, it was clear that I wanted to be a DBA from that sorting of my data and ordering it, but I never really had a, like, “Oh, I want to be this when I grew up.” I kind of had a stint when I was in, like, middle school where I was like, maybe I'll be a creative writer and I wasn't as creative a writer as I wanted to be, so I was like, “Ah, whatever.”And I ended up actually coming to computer science just completely through random circumstance. I wanted to do neuroscience because I thought it was completely fascinating at how the brain works and how, like, you and I are, like, 99.999—we're, like, five-nines the same except for, like, a couple of genetic, whatever. But, like, how our brain wiring right how the neuron, how the electricity flows through it—Corey: Yeah, it feels like I want to store a whole bunch of data, that's okay. I'll remember it. I'll keep it in my head. And you're, like, rolling up the sleeves and grabbing, like, the combination software package off the shelf and a scalpel. Like, “Not yet, but you're about to.” You're right, there is an interesting point of commonality on this. It comes down to almost data organization and the—Sheeri: Yeah.Corey: —relationship between data nodes if that's a fair assessment.Sheeri: Yeah. Well, so what happened was, so I went to university and in order to take introductory neuroscience, I had to take, like, chemistry, organic chemistry, biology, I was basically doing a pre-med track. And so, in the beginning of my junior year, I went to go take introductory neuroscience and I got a D-minus. And a D-minus level doesn't even count for the major. And I'm like, “Well, I want to graduate in three semesters.”And I had this—I got all my requirements done, except for the pesky little major thing. So, I was already starting to take, like, a computer science, you know, basic courses and so I kind of went whole-hog, all-in did four or five computer science courses a semester and got my degree in computer science. Because it was like math, so it kind of came a little easy to me. So taking, you know, logic courses, and you know, linear algebra courses was like, “Yeah, that's great.” And then it was the year 2000, when I got my bachelor's, the turn of the century.And my university offered a fifth-year master's degree program. And I said, I don't know who's going to look at me and say, conscious bias, unconscious bias, “She's a woman, she can't do computer science, so, like, let me just get this master's degree.” I, like, fill out a one page form, I didn't have to take a GRE. And it was the year 2000. You were around back then.You know what it was like. The jobs were like—they were handing jobs out like candy. I literally had a friend who was like, “My company”—that he founded. He's like, just come, you know, it's Monday in May—“Just start, you will just bring your resume the first day and we'll put it on file.” And I was like, no, no, I have this great opportunity to get a master's degree in one year at 25% off the cost because I got a tuition reduction or whatever for being in the program. I was like, “What could possibly go wrong in one year?”And what happened was his company didn't exist the next year, and, like, everyone was in a hiring freeze in 2001. So, it was the best decision I ever made without really knowing because I would have had a job for six months had been laid off with everyone else at the end of 2000 and… and that's it. So, that's how I became a DBA is I, you know, got a master's degree in computer science, really wanted to use databases. There weren't any database jobs in 2001, but I did get a job as a sysadmin, which we now call SREs.Corey: Well, for some of the younger folks in the audience, I do want to call out the fact that regardless of how they think we all rode dinosaurs to school, databases did absolutely exist back in that era. There's a reason that Oracle is as large as it is of a company. And it's not because people just love doing business with them, but technology was head and shoulders above everything else for a long time, to the point where people worked with them in spite of their reputation, not because of it. These days, it seems like in the database universe, you have an explosion of different options and different ways that are great at different things. The best, of course, is Route 53 or other DNS TXT records. Everything else is competing for second place on that. But no matter what it is, you're after, there are options available. This was not the case back then. It was like, you had a few options, all of them with serious drawbacks, but you had to pick your poison.Sheeri: Yeah. In fact, I learned on Postgres in university because you know, that was freely available. And you know, you'd like, “Well, why not MySQL? Isn't that kind of easier to learn?” It's like, yeah, but I went to college from '96 to 2001. MySQL 1.0 or whatever was released in '95. By the time I graduated, it was six years old.Corey: And academia is not usually the early adopter of a lot of emerging technologies like that. That's not a dig on them any because otherwise, you wind up with a major that doesn't exist by the time that the first crop of students graduates.Sheeri: Right. And they didn't have, you know, transactions. They didn't have—they barely had replication, you know? So, it wasn't a full-fledged database at the time. And then I became a MySQL DBA. But yeah, as a systems administrator, you know, we did websites, right? We did what web—are they called web administrators now? What are they called? Web admins? Webmaster?Corey: Web admins, I think that they became subsumed into sysadmins, by and large and now we call them DevOps, or SRE, which means the exact same thing except you get paid 60% more and your primary job is arguing about which one of those you're not.Sheeri: Right. Right. Like we were still separated from network operations, but database stuff that stuff and, you know, website stuff, it's stuff we all did, back when your [laugh] webmail was your Horde based on PHP and you had a database behind it. And yeah, it was fun times.Corey: I worked at a whole bunch of companies in that era. And that's where basically where I formed my early opinion of a bunch of DBA-leaning sysadmins. Like the DBA in and a lot of these companies, it was, I don't want to say toxic, but there's a reason that if I were to say, “I'm writing a memoir about a career track in tech called The Legend of Surly McBastard,” people are going to say, “Oh, is it about the DBA?” There's a reason behind this. It always felt like there was a sense of elitism and a sense of, “Well, that's not my job, so you do your job, but if anything goes even slightly wrong, it's certainly not my fault.” And to be fair, all of these fields have evolved significantly since then, but a lot of those biases that started early in our career are difficult to shake, particularly when they're unconscious.Sheeri: They are. I'd never ran into that person. Like, I never ran into anyone who—like a developer who treated me poorly because the last DBA was a jerk and whatever, but I heard a lot of stories, especially with things like granting access. In fact, I remember, my first job as an actual DBA and not as a sysadmin that also the DBA stuff was at an online gay dating site, and the CTO rage-quit. Literally yelled, stormed out of the office, slammed the door, and never came back.And a couple of weeks later, you know, we found out that the customer service guys who were in-house—and they were all guys, so I say guys although we also referred to them as ladies because it was an online gay dating site.Corey: Gals works well too, in those scenarios. “Oh, guys is unisex.” “Cool. So's ‘gals' by that theory. So gals, how we doing?” And people get very offended by that and suddenly, yeah, maybe ‘folks' is not a terrible direction to go in. I digress. Please continue.Sheeri: When they hired me, they were like, are you sure you're okay with this? I'm like, “I get it. There's, like, half-naked men posters on the wall. That's fine.” But they would call they'd be, like, “Ladies, let's go to our meeting.” And I'm like, “Do you want me also?” Because I had to ask because that was when ladies actually might not have included me because they meant, you know.Corey: I did a brief stint myself as the director of TechOps at Grindr. That was a wild experience in a variety of different ways.Sheeri: Yeah.Corey: It's over a decade ago, but it was still this… it was a very interesting experience in a bunch of ways. And still, to this day, it remains the single biggest source of InfoSec nightmares that kept me awake at night. Just because when I'm working at a bank—which I've also done—it's only money, which sounds ridiculous to say, especially if you're in a regulated profession, but here in reality where I'm talking about it, it's I'm dealing instead, with cool, this data leaks, people will die. Most of what I do is not life or death, but that was and that weighed very heavily on me.Sheeri: Yeah, there's a reason I don't work for a bank or a hospital. You know, I make mistakes. I'm human, right?Corey: There's a reason I work on databases for that exact same reason. Please, continue.Sheeri: Yeah. So, the CTO rage-quit. A couple of weeks later, the head of customer service comes to me and be like, “Can we have his spot as an admin for customer service?” And I'm like, “What do you mean?” He's like, “Well, he told us, we had, like, ten slots of permission and he was one of them so we could have have, like, nine people.”And, like, I went and looked, and they put permission in the htaccess file. So, this former CTO had just wielded his power to be like, “Nope, can't do that. Sorry, limitations.” When there weren't any. I'm like, “You could have a hundred. You want every customer service person to be an admin? Whatever. Here you go.” So, I did hear stories about that. And yeah, that's not the kind of DBA I was.Corey: No, it's the more senior you get, the less you want to have admin rights on things. But when I leave a job, like, the number one thing I want you to do is revoke my credentials. Not—Sheeri: Please.Corey: Because I'm going to do anything nefarious; because I don't want to get blamed for it. Because we have a long standing tradition in tech at a lot of places of, “Okay, something just broke. Whose fault is it? Well, who's the most recent person to leave the company? Let's blame them because they're not here to refute the character assassination and they're not going to be angling for a raise here; the rest of us are so let's see who we can throw under the bus that can't defend themselves.” Never a great plan.Sheeri: Yeah. So yeah, I mean, you know, my theory in life is I like helping. So, I liked helping developers as a DBA. I would often run workshops to be like, here's how to do an explain and find your explain plan and see if you have indexes and why isn't the database doing what you think it's supposed to do? And so, I like helping customers as a product manager, right? So…Corey: I am very interested in watching how people start drifting in a variety of different directions. It's a, you're doing product management now and it's an ETL lineage product, it is not something that is directly aligned with your previous positioning in the market. And those career transitions are always very interesting to me because there's often a mistaken belief by people in their career realizing they're doing something they don't want to do. They want to go work in a different field and there's this pervasive belief that, “Oh, time for me to go back to square one and take an entry level job.” No, you have a career. You have experience. Find the orthogonal move.Often, if that's challenging because it's too far apart, you find the half-step job that blends the thing you do now with something a lot closer, and then a year or two later, you complete the transition into that thing. But starting over from scratch, it's why would you do that? I can't quite wrap my head around jumping off the corporate ladder to go climb another one. You very clearly have done a lateral move in that direction into a career field that is surprisingly distant, at least in my view. How'd that happen?Sheeri: Yeah, so after being on call for 18 years or so, [laugh] I decided—no, I had a baby, actually. I had a baby. He was great. And then I another one. But after the first baby, I went back to work, and I was on call again. And you know, I had a good maternity leave or whatever, but you know, I had a newborn who was six, eight months old and I was getting paged.And I was like, you know, this is more exhausting than having a newborn. Like, having a baby who sleeps three hours at a time, like, in three hour chunks was less exhausting than being on call. Because when you have a baby, first of all, it's very rare that they wake up and crying in the midnight it's an emergency, right? Like they have to go to the hospital, right? Very rare. Thankfully, I never had to do it.But basically, like, as much as I had no brain cells, and sometimes I couldn't even go through this list, right: they need to be fed; they need to be comforted; they're tired, and they're crying because they're tired, right, you can't make them go to sleep, but you're like, just go to sleep—what is it—or their diaper needs changing, right? There's, like, four things. When you get that beep of that pager in the middle of the night it could be anything. It could be logs filling up disk space, you're like, “Alright, I'll rotate the logs and be done with it.” You know? It could be something you need snoozed.Corey: “Issue closed. Status, I no longer give a shit what it is.” At some point, it's one of those things where—Sheeri: Replication lag.Corey: Right.Sheeri: Not actionable.Corey: Don't get me started down that particular path. Yeah. This is the area where DBAs and my sysadmin roots started to overlap a bit. Like, as the DBA was great at data analysis, the table structure and the rest, but the backups of the thing, of course that fell to the sysadmin group. And replication lag, it's, “Okay.”“It's doing some work in the middle of the night; that's normal, and the network is fine. And why are you waking me up with things that are not actionable? Stop it.” I'm yelling at the computer at that point, not the person—Sheeri: Right,right.Corey: —to be very clear. But at some point, it's don't wake me up with trivial nonsense. If I'm getting woken up in the middle of the night, it better be a disaster. My entire business now is built around a problem that's business-hours only for that explicit reason. It's the not wanting to deal with that. And I don't envy that, but product management. That's a strange one.Sheeri: Yeah, so what happened was, I was unhappy at my job at the time, and I was like, “I need a new job.” So, I went to, like, the MySQL Slack instance because that was 2018, 2019. Very end of 2018, beginning of 2019. And I said, “I need something new.” Like, maybe a data architect, or maybe, like, a data analyst, or data scientist, which was pretty cool.And I was looking at data scientist jobs, and I was an expert MySQL DBA and it took a long time for me to be able to say, “I'm an expert,” without feeling like oh, you're just ballooning yourself up. And I was like, “No, I'm literally a world-renowned expert DBA.” Like, I just have to say it and get comfortable with it. And so, you know, I wasn't making a junior data scientist's salary. [laugh].I am the sole breadwinner for my household, so at that point, I had one kid and a husband and I was like, how do I support this family on a junior data scientist's salary when I live in the city of Boston? So, I needed something that could pay a little bit more. And a former I won't even say coworker, but colleague in the MySQL world—because is was the MySQL Slack after all—said, “I think you should come at MongoDB, be a product manager like me.”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring. Corey: If I've ever said, “Hey, you should come work with me and do anything like me,” people will have the blood drain from their face. And like, “What did you just say to me? That's terrible.” Yeah, it turns out that I have very hard to explain slash predict, in some ways. It's always fun. It's always wild to go down that particular path, but, you know, here we are.Sheeri: Yeah. But I had the same question everybody else does, which was, what's a product manager? What does the product manager do? And he gave me a list of things a product manager does, which there was some stuff that I had the skills for, like, you have to talk to customers and listen to them.Well, I've done consulting. I could get yelled at; that's fine. You can tell me things are terrible and I have to fix it. I've done that. No problem with that. Then there are things like you have to give presentations about how features were okay, I can do that. I've done presentations. You know, I started the Boston MySQL Meetup group and ran it for ten years until I had a kid and foisted it off on somebody else.And then the things that I didn't have the skills in, like, running a beta program were like, “Ooh, that sounds fascinating. Tell me more.” So, I was like, “Yeah, let's do it.” And I talked to some folks, they were looking for a technical product manager for MongoDB's sharding product. And they had been looking for someone, like, insanely technical for a while, and they found me; I'm insanely technical.And so, that was great. And so, for a year, I did that at MongoDB. One of the nice things about them is that they invest in people, right? So, my manager left, the team was like, we really can't support someone who doesn't have the product management skills that we need yet because you know, I wasn't a master in a year, believe it or not. And so, they were like, “Why don't you find another department?” I was like, “Okay.”And I ended up finding a place in engineering communications, doing, like, you know, some keynote demos, doing some other projects and stuff. And then after—that was a kind of a year-long project, and after that ended, I ended up doing product management for developer relations at MongoDB. Also, this was during the pandemic, right, so this is 2019, until '21; beginning of 2019, to end of 2020, so it was, you know, three full years. You know, I kind of like woke up from the pandemic fog and I was like, “What am I doing? Do I want to really want to be a content product manager?” And I was like, “I want to get back to databases.”One of the interesting things I learned actually in looking for a job because I did it a couple of times at MongoDB because I changed departments and I was also looking externally when I did that. I had the idea when I became a product manager, I was like, “This is great because now I'm product manager for databases and so, I'm kind of leveraging that database skill and then I'll learn the product manager stuff. And then I can be a product manager for any technical product, right?”Corey: I like the idea. Of some level, it feels like the product managers likeliest to succeed at least have a grounding or baseline in the area that they're in. This gets into the age-old debate of how important is industry-specific experience? Very often you'll see a bunch of job ads just put that in as a matter of course. And for some roles, yeah, it's extremely important.For other roles it's—for example, I don't know, hypothetically, you're looking for someone to fix the AWS bill, it doesn't necessarily matter whether you're a services company, a product company, or a VC-backed company whose primary output is losing money, it doesn't matter because it's a bounded problem space and that does not transform much from company to company. Same story with sysadmin types to be very direct. But the product stuff does seem to get into that industry specific stuff.Sheeri: Yeah, and especially with tech stuff, you have to understand what your customer is saying when they're saying, “I have a problem doing X and Y,” right? The interesting part of my folly in that was that part of the time that I was looking was during the pandemic, when you know, everyone was like, “Oh, my God, it's a seller's market. If you're looking for a job, employers are chomping at the bit for you.” And I had trouble finding something because so many people were also looking for jobs, that if I went to look for something, for example, as a storage product manager, right—now, databases and storage solutions have a lot in common; databases are storage solutions, in fact; but file systems and databases have much in common—but all that they needed was one person with file system experience that had more experience than I did in storage solutions, right? And they were going to choose them over me. So, it was an interesting kind of wake-up call for me that, like, yeah, probably data and databases are going to be my niche. And that's okay because that is literally why they pay me the literal big bucks. If I'm going to go niche that I don't have 20 years of experience and they shouldn't pay me as big a bucks right?Corey: Yeah, depending on what you're doing, sure. I don't necessarily believe in the idea that well you're new to this particular type of role so we're going to basically pay you a lot less. From my perspective it's always been, like, there's a value in having a person in a role. The value to the company is X and, “Well, I have an excuse now to pay you less for that,” has never resonated with me. It's if you're not, I guess, worth—the value-added not worth being paid what the stated rate for a position is, you are probably not going to find success in that role and the role has to change. That has always been my baseline operating philosophy. Not to yell at people on this, but it's, uh, I am very tired of watching companies more or less dunk on people from a position of power.Sheeri: Yeah. And I mean, you can even take the power out of that and take, like, location-based. And yes, I understand the cost of living is different in different places, but why do people get paid differently if the value is the same? Like if I want to get a promotion, right, my company is going to be like, “Well, show me how you've added value. And we only pay your value. We don't pay because—you know, you don't just automatically get promoted after seven years, right? You have to show the value and whatever.” Which is, I believe, correct, right?And yet, there are seniority things, there are this many years experience. And you know, there's the old caveat of do you have ten years experience or do you have two years of experience five times?Corey: That is the big problem is that there has to be a sense of movement that pushes people forward. You're not the first person that I've had on the show and talked to about a 20 year career. But often, I do wind up talking to folks as I move through the world where they basically have one year of experience repeated 20 times. And as the industry continues to evolve and move on and skill sets don't keep current, in some cases, it feels like they have lost touch, on some level. And they're talking about the world that was and still is in some circles, but it's a market in long-term decline as opposed to keeping abreast of what is functionally a booming industry.Sheeri: Their skills have depreciated because they haven't learned more skills.Corey: Yeah. Tech across the board is a field where I feel like you have to constantly be learning. And there's a bit of an evolve-or-die dinosaur approach. And I have some, I do have some fallbacks on this. If I ever decide I am tired of learning and keeping up with AWS, all I have to do is go and work in an environment that uses GovCloud because that's, like, AWS five years ago.And that buys me the five years to find something else to be doing until a GovCloud catches up with the modern day of when I decided to make that decision. That's a little insulting and also very accurate for those who have found themselves in that environment. But I digress.Sheeri: No, and I find it to with myself. Like, I got to the point with MySQL where I was like, okay, great. I know MySQL back and forth. Do I want to learn all this other stuff? Literally just today, I was looking at my DMs on Twitter and somebody DMed me in May, saying, “Hi, ma'am. I am a DBA and how can I use below service: Lambda, Step Functions, DynamoDB, AWS Session Manager, and CloudWatch?”And I was like, “You know, I don't know. I have not ever used any of those technologies. And I haven't evolved my DBA skills because it's been, you know, six years since I was a DBA.” No, six years, four or five? I can't do math.Corey: Yeah. Which you think would be a limiting factor to a DBA but apparently not. One last question that [laugh] I want to ask you, before we wind up calling this a show. You've done an awful lot across the board. As you look at all of it, what is it you would say that you're the most proud of?Sheeri: Oh, great question. What I'm most proud of is my work with WildAid. So, when I was at MongoDB—I referenced a job with engineering communications, and they hired me to be a product manager because they wanted to do a collaboration with a not-for-profit and make a reference application. So, make an application using MongoDB technology and make it something that was going to be used, but people can also see it. So, we made this open-source project called o-fish.And you know, we can give GitHub links: it's github.com/wildaid, and it has—that's the organization's GitHub which we created, so it only has the o-fish projects in it. But it is a mobile and web app where governments who patrol waters, patrol, like, marine protected areas—which are like national parks but in the water, right, so they are these, you know, wildlife preserves in the water—and they make sure that people aren't doing things they shouldn't do: they're not throwing trash in the ocean, they're not taking turtles out of the Galapagos Island area, you know, things like that. And they need software to track that and do that because at the time, they were literally writing, you know, with pencil on paper, and, you know, had stacks and stacks of this paper to do data entry.And MongoDB had just bought the Realm database and had just integrated it, and so there was, you know, some great features about offline syncing that you didn't have to do; it did all the foundational plumbing for you. And then the reason though, that I'm proud of that project is not just because it's pretty freaking cool that, you know, doing something that actually makes a difference in the world and helps fight climate change and all that kind of stuff, the reason I was proud of it is I was the sole product manager. It was the first time that I'd really had sole ownership of a product and so all the mistakes were my own and the credit was my own, too. And so, it was really just a great learning experience and it turned out really well.Corey: There's a lot to be said for pitching in and helping out with good causes in a way that your skill set winds up benefitting. I found that I was a lot happier with a lot of the volunteer stuff that I did when it was instead of licking envelopes, it started being things that I had a bit of proficiency in. “Hey, can I fix your AWS bill?” It turns out as some value to certain nonprofits. You have to be at a certain scale before it makes sense, otherwise it's just easier to maybe not do it that way, but there's a lot of value to doing something that puts good back into the world. I wish more people did that.Sheeri: Yeah. And it's something to do in your off-time that you know is helping. It might feel like work, it might not feel like work, but it gives you a sense of accomplishment at the end of the day. I remember my first job, one of the interview questions was—no, it wasn't. [laugh]. It wasn't an interview question until after I was hired and they asked me the question, and then they made it an interview question.And the question was, what video games do you play? And I said, “I don't play video games. I spend all day at work staring at a computer screen. Why would I go home and spend another 12 hours till three in the morning, right—five in the morning—playing video games?” And they were like, we clearly need to change our interview questions. This was again, back when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. So, people are are culturally sensitive now.Corey: These days, people ask me, “What's your favorite video game?” My answer is, “Twitter.”Sheeri: Right. [laugh]. Exactly. It's like whack-a-mole—Corey: Yeah.Sheeri: —you know? So, for me having a tangible hobby, like, I do a lot of art, I knit, I paint, I carve stamps, I spin wool into yarn. I know that's not a metaphor for storytelling. That is I literally spin wool into yarn. And having something tangible, you work on something and you're like, “Look. It was nothing and now it's this,” is so satisfying.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today about where you've been, where you are, and where you're going, and as well as helping me put a little bit more of a human angle on Twitter, which is intensely dehumanizing at times. It turns out that 280 characters is not the best way to express the entirety of what makes someone a person. You need to use a multi-tweet thread for that. If people want to learn more about you, where can they find you?Sheeri: Oh, they can find me on Twitter. I'm @sheeri—S-H-E-E-R-I—on Twitter. And I've started to write a little bit more on my blog at sheeri.org. So hopefully, I'll continue that since I've now told people to go there.Corey: I really want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Sheeri: Thanks to you, Corey, too. You take the time to interview people, too, so I appreciate it.Corey: I do my best. Sheeri Cabral, Senior Product Manager of ETL lineage at Collibra. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice or smash the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes, whereas if you've hated it, do exactly the same thing—like and subscribe, hit those buttons, five-star review—but also leave a ridiculous comment where we will then use an ETL pipeline to transform it into something that isn't complete bullshit.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition
Modernize or Die® - CFML News Podcast for July 12th, 2022 - Episode 156

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 76:41


2022-07-12 Weekly News - Episode 156Watch the video version on YouTube at https://youtu.be/Lon8ghRKRvQHosts:  Gavin Pickin- Senior Developer at Ortus Solutions Dan Card - Senior Developer at Ortus Solutions Thanks to our Sponsor - Ortus SolutionsThe makers of ColdBox, CommandBox, ForgeBox, TestBox and all your favorite box-es out there. A few ways  to say thanks back to Ortus Solutions: BUY SOME ITB TICKETS - COME TO THE CONFERENCE - Have a few laughs! Like and subscribe to our videos on YouTube.  Help ORTUS reach for the Stars - Star and Fork our ReposStar all of your Github Box Dependencies from CommandBox with https://www.forgebox.io/view/commandbox-github  Subscribe to our Podcast on your Podcast Apps and leave us a review Sign up for a free or paid account on CFCasts, which is releasing new content every week BOXLife store: https://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/shop Buy Ortus's Book - 102 ColdBox HMVC Quick Tips and Tricks on GumRoad (http://gum.co/coldbox-tips)  Patreon SupportGoal 1 - We have 36 patreons providing 100% of the funding for our Modernize or Die Podcasts via our Patreon site: https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutions. Goal 2 - We are 43% of the way to fully fund the hosting of ForgeBox.io News and AnnouncementsGithub Co-Pilot works with CFMLWe specifically designed GitHub Copilot as an editor extension to make sure nothing gets in the way of what you're doing. GitHub Copilot distills the collective knowledge of the world's developers into an editor extension that suggests code in real time, to help you stay focused on what matters most: building great software.Adam Tuttle confirmed in this Twitter thread https://twitter.com/gamesover/status/1545098071041724416 https://github.blog/2022-06-21-github-copilot-is-generally-available-to-all-developers/#:~:text=We're%20making%20GitHub%20Copilot,of%20popular%20open%20source%20projects.Working Code Podcast discussed Github Co-pilot: https://www.bennadel.com/blog/4295-working-code-podcast-episode-82-github-charging-for-copilot.htm CommandBox vNext supports enabling basic auth only for certain folders#CommandBox vNext supports enabling basic auth only for certain folders, making it easier to wrap additional security around your administrators and other sensitive folders in production. ortussolutions.atlassian.net/browse/COMMAND… #CFML #ColdFusionhttps://ortussolutions.atlassian.net/browse/COMMANDBOX-1419 AWS Identity and Access Management introduces Roles Anywhere for workloads outside of AWSAWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) now enables workloads that run outside of AWS to access AWS resources using IAM Roles Anywhere. IAM Roles Anywhere allows your workloads such as servers, containers, and applications to use X.509 digital certificates to obtain temporary AWS credentials and use the same IAM roles and policies that you have configured for your AWS workloads to access AWS resources. https://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2022/07/aws-identity-access-management-iam-roles-anywhere-workloads-outside-aws/ INTO THE BOX - UpdatesInto the Box Early Bird ticket pricing is over!We extended it for the 4th of July, but that is now over. ITB In Person Schedule Finalized on the Website New Speaker Added - John Farrar New sessions from Speakers Workshops are starting to fill up - don't miss your chance.https://intothebox.org/ New Releases and UpdatesNew Monitoring Solution? - MonikaMentioned by James Moberg on TwitterA #ColdFusion Taffy API was timing out due to 3rdparty MSSQL table locks. I started using @hyperjump_tech Monika to log performance every 60 seconds to expose impact. monika.hyperjump.tech #CFML Metrics are logged to SQLite DB. #opensource #portable #yaml #notificationsMonika is an open source synthetic monitoring command line application. It is actively developed and completely free!Loads of integrations.https://monika.hyperjump.tech/ ICYMI - Adobe ColdFusion Builder (VS Code) BetaDo you want to help us test and improve our upcoming Adobe ColdFusion Builder Extension for VS Code? Well, the time is nearly here. We are collecting emails of interested users.We are starting with a very small closed beta just to shake any lingering bugs out. This is happening over the weekend.Once we feel comfortable, users who have signed up for this beta (form link below) will slowly begin getting invites for a pre-release forum dedicated to the full closed beta program. This is likely to occur early to mid next week.We need people who are fired up, willing to put in time testing and provide us with solid, informative feedback. The full, open launch of the product is coming shortly after Dev Week but this is your opportunity to get a chance to see it early, test it and help us make it as awesome as possible.Please note: There may be bugs. This should not be used in production during the time of the beta testing. I shouldn't have to tell you that lol. But here we are. I use this tool already in my day to day. But your workflow might be different. We will be adding people slowly, so if you don't get an email early next week, just give it a moment. The earlier you sign up, the more likely you get in.Sign up here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=Wht7-jR7h0OUrtLBeN7O4VmPZrcheetIstWzdVorFtxURjVKSE5KNFZSSzg4MzdHUzRaOTZBQ1Q3SS4u&fbclid=IwAR3eZ4hD9cSXJKuME2mIeOYp8c4j-LT0mr_iCzPnSU52NkBdBxU-Az5abLg Webinar / Meetups and WorkshopsLive Stream Series - Koding with the Kiwi + Friends - Special Guest - Wil De Bruin - Talking about CBValidationFriday July 15th, at 1pm PDTPatreon's check your email, there will be an email sent Wednesday with the registration link for the zoom call… or keep an eye out in the Patreon Only BoxTeam Slack channel or the Ortus Community Forum section.Not a patreon? Sign up today or wait for us to release the recording on CFCasts after the session.Adobe Developer Week is Next week! July 18-22ndThe Adobe ColdFusion Developer Week is back - bigger and better than ever! This year, our experts are gearing up to host a series of webinars on all things ColdFusion. This is your chance to learn with them, get your questions answered, and build cloud-native applications with ease.What are you waiting for? Register now!https://adobe-coldfusion-devweek-2022.attendease.com/registration/form Legacy Migration Follow Up: Using Coldbox with an Existing Code BaseJuly 29th 2022: Time 11:00 AM Central Time ( US and Canada )Dan Card will be presenting a follow up to his June webinar: Getting started with the Legacy Migration. Dan received some good questions, so July's Webinar: Legacy Migration Follow Up: Using Coldbox with an Existing Code Base with Dan Card. If you have a more traditional / legacy codebase, and are wanting to modernize with ColdBox, but don't know where to start, this webinar is just for you!with Dan Cardhttps://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZArde-srjgiGtUVIWhhVRmMpSgang6yqCzA ICYMI - Online CF Meetup - "Planning and Building my Developer Feud Quiz API", with Gavin PickinThursday, July 7, 20229:00 AM to 10:00 AM PDTIn this session, we are going to plan and build our very own Developer Feud Quiz. To do this, we will analyze and plan our app, starting with the User Stories, and then mapping that to Database, Models, and we can start building out our API, using CRUDDY by Design philosophies. We'll shell out our TDD style Tests, and then create a couple of resources and routes.Recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCqxiaR5BWM&list=PLG2EHzEbhy0-QirMKgSxhjkUyTSSTvHjL Slides: https://t.co/NJZbjr3NTRMeetup Link: https://www.meetup.com/coldfusionmeetup/events/286853927/Adobe WorkshopsJoin the Adobe ColdFusion Workshop to learn how you and your agency can leverage ColdFusion to create amazing web content. This one-day training will cover all facets of Adobe ColdFusion that developers need to build applications that can run across multiple cloud providers or on-premiseTUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 20229.00 AM - 4.30 PM AESTColdFusion WorkshopBrian Sappeyhttps://coldfusion-1-day-training.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEBINAR - THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 202210:00 AM PDTMaking Games with Adobe ColdFusionMark Takatahttps://making-games-with-adobe-coldfusion.meetus.adobeevents.com/FREE :)Full list - https://meetus.adobeevents.com/coldfusion/ CFCasts Content Updateshttps://www.cfcasts.comJust Released 2022 ForgeBox Module of the Week Series - 1 new Videohttps://cfcasts.com/series/2022-forgebox-modules-of-the-week 2022 VS Code Hint tip and Trick of the Week Series - 1 new Videohttps://cfcasts.com/series/2022-vs-code-hint-tip-and-trick-of-the-week  Coming Soon Last video for Gavin Pickin - Publish Your First ForgeBox Package LogBox 101 from Eric Peterson Koding with the Kiwi + Friends More ForgeBox and VS Code Podcast snippet videos Box-ifying a 3rd Party Library from Gavin Conferences and TrainingICYMI - Quasar ConfPlease let us know about you and what you'd like to speak about in all things Quasar or Vue!!!Conference Date: Saturday, July 9th, 2022 - 3 p.m. GMTRecording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkHM8VLxuus THAT ConferenceHowdy. We're a full-stack, tech-obsessed community of fun, code-loving humans who share and learn together.We geek-out in Texas and Wisconsin once a year but we host digital events all the time.WISCONSIN DELLS, WI / JULY 25TH - 28TH, 2022A four-day summer camp for developers passionate about learning all things mobile, web, cloud, and technology.https://that.us/events/wi/2022/ Our very own Daniel Garcia is speaking there Easier API Development and Testing - Use PostMan, Webhook.site, and ngrok to Enhance Your Workflowhttps://that.us/activities/sb6dRP8ZNIBIKngxswIt Adobe Developer Week 2022July 18-22, 2022Online - Virtual - FreeThe Adobe ColdFusion Developer Week is back - bigger and better than ever! This year, our experts are gearing up to host a series of webinars on all things ColdFusion. This is your chance to learn with them, get your questions answered, and build cloud-native applications with ease.Speakers have been announcedAgenda has been announcedhttps://adobe-coldfusion-devweek-2022.attendease.com/registration/form VueJS Forge This Week - July 13th-14th Organized by Vue School _The largest hands-on Vue.js Event Team up with 1000s of fellow Vue.js devs from around the globe to build a real-world application in just 2 days in this FREE hackathon-style event. Make connections. Build together. Learn together. Sign up as an Individual or signup as a company Company Deal - $2000 for a team of 5, includes VueSchool annual membership and guaranteed seat at the workshops at VueJS Forge as well… and you can pick your team Project: Project Management SAAS Apphttps://vuejsforge.com/Into The Box 2022September 6, 7 and 8, 2022 in Houston, TexasOne day workshops before the two day conference!Sign up for the workshops before they fill up - couple are almost filledConference Website:https://intothebox.orgITB Blog has new updates!CF Summit - OfficialMirageOct 3rd & 4th - CFSummit ConferenceOct 5th - Adobe Certified Professional: Adobe ColdFusion Certification Classes & Testshttps://cfsummit.adobeevents.com/ https://www.adobe.com/products/coldfusion-family/certificate.html Registrations are now open.For just $99! Grab your early-bird tickets before June 30 - Still open!!!Call for Speakers is now Open - Supposed to close June 30th - Submit now!!!!From Slack re Adobe Certified ProfessionalThe Adobe Certified Professional: Adobe ColdFusion cert is a totally different, MUCH more difficult and comprehensive certification than the CF Specialist previously offered. Mark Takata, Nolan and Dave F + the CF engineering team, Elishia and Kishore all spent a week together building the new one and it is HARD. I highly recommend it as a test of your skills, I guarantee everyone will learn something new.Yes, but there's also over 100 hours of video to go over before the 1 day lecture + cert. So you watch videos, sit in class, then take the exam there. It is no joke, definitely challenging, but super satisfying to pass.Plus you get access to those videos for a year, which is nice for going back and reviewing things down the line.Ortus CF Summit Training WorkshopColdBox Zero to MegaHero : REST APIs + VueJS Mobile AppOct 5th and 6th - After CF Summit ConferenceLead by Luis Majano & Gavin PickinPrice: $799 - Early bird pricinghttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/ortus-cf-summit-training-workshop-tickets-375306340367Location: Aria - In the luxurious Executive Hospitality Suite like 2019The suite doubled it's prices but we're working hard to keep the costs to the attendees the sameInto the Box Latam 2022Dec 5th or 7thMore information is coming very soon.CFCampNo CFCAMP 2022, we're trying again for summer 2023TLDR is that it's just too hard and there's too much uncertainty right now.More conferencesNeed more conferences, this site has a huge list of conferences for almost any language/community.https://confs.tech/Blogs, Tweets, and Videos of the Week7/11/22 - Blog - Grae Desmond - ColdFusion Portal - Don't forget the built in web serverI was reading Mark's CLI Installation blog post and remembered when I was testing ColdFusion 2021. I was doing it on my desktop and I did not have a webserver on my machine. Now I could've tested using CommandBox but I wanted to mirror how I would be...https://coldfusion.adobe.com/?p=11180 7/11/22 - Blog - Grae Desmond - ColdFusion Portal - Sometimes its ok to have trust issuesI was working on an API call recently and everything was humming along till I ran into an edge case with a request and everything just stopped working. Nothing changed except the value I was sending to the API. What did change was that the value I wa...https://coldfusion.adobe.com/?p=11163 7/11/22 - Blog - Grae Desmond - ColdFusion Portal - Letting your non development colleagues update text on your site with a simple JSON fileI previously talked about how I leveraged using variables in queries to help with a site I was recently tasked to build. As a quick refresher each page on this site would look the same with a right sidebar with some definitions and descriptions, then…https://coldfusion.adobe.com/?p=11072 7/11/22 - Blog - Grae Desmond - ColdFusion Portal - Adding an Emergency Shutoff Switch to Your ApplicationsHave you ever been to a gas station and noticed the emergency shut off switch? It's usually near the door to go inside the gas station and bright red to grab your attention. That button is for emergencies, like say a fire, and will shut off all elect...https://coldfusion.adobe.com/?p=11117 7/12/22 - Blog - Charlie Arehart - What's new FusionReactor 8.8.0, just released?Good news for FusionReactor users: a new version, 8.8.0, has just been released. You can see a list of several bullet points about it in the release notes.TLDR: If it's enough for you to know that FR is now updated and those bullets may suffice, you now have what you need to know. :-) In this post, I want to expand on those to give more context. I have no inside info or advanced knowledge of the release: this comes from my own assessment of things as I just applied the update this morning. As such, I could be wrong on some points, or may need to come back to clarify something. But in the meantime, I hope this overview may help folks, as sometimes the single bullets in the release notes can leave you wondering. :-)https://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2022/7/12/whats_new_FusionReactor_8_8_0/ 7/11/22 - Tweet - James Moberg - New Monitoring ToolA #ColdFusion Taffy API was timing out due to 3rdparty MSSQL table locks. I started using @hyperjump_tech Monika to log performance every 60 seconds to expose impact. monika.hyperjump.tech #CFML Metrics are logged to SQLite DB. #opensource #portable #yaml #notificationshttps://twitter.com/gamesover/status/1546662581640876034https://twitter.com/gamesover 7/10/22 - Tweet - James Moberg - encodeForHTMLAttributeHey #ColdFusion & #CFML devs, what function do you use to safely repopulate an INPUT value attribute? I've used htmlEditFormat, but it's deprecated in CF11. Use encodeForHTMLAttribute? Docs state "use in HTML attribute, such as table width or image height". No mention of "value".https://twitter.com/gamesover/status/1546172791652745218https://twitter.com/gamesover 7/10/22 - Blog - Ales Nesetril - commandbox-jasper: the third partA few cool new things have been added thanks to Eric Peterson.It is easy to create a jasper site through the command line. Inside an empty directory, jasper init will create a scaffold of jasper-cli. Tip of the hat to Eric.https://kisdigital.com/post/commandbox-jasper-the-third-part Part 1 - Commandbox-jasper SSG generator - https://kisdigital.com/post/commandbox-jasper-ssg-generatorPart 2 - Commandbox-jasper Part Deux - https://kisdigital.com/post/commandbox-jasper-part-deux 7/10/22 - Tweet - Ben Nadel - Feature Flags for his BlogOver the last 2 weeks, been spending my free time building a Feature Flag system for my #ColdFusion blog. My blog doesn't really need it; but, heck if I don't love finding reasons to play with #CFML (and feature flags for that matter). Will post git repo when a bit more polished.https://twitter.com/BenNadel/status/1546125460840538114https://twitter.com/BenNadel 7/6/22 - Blog - James Moberg - Use Exiv2 to extract GPS data from Images using CFMLI mentioned Exiv2 on a blog post from 2 years ago regarding Supporting ColdFusion with Command Line Programs. Someone in the Adobe ColdFusion Forum recently inquired how to "use ImageGetEXIFMetaData to try to get gps coordinates of an image".https://dev.to/gamesover/use-exiv2-to-extract-gps-data-from-images-using-cfml-3maa 7/7/22 - Blog - Ben Nadel - Building-Up A Complex Objects Using A Multi-Step Form Workflow In ColdFusionEarlier this week, I looked at using form POST-backs to build up complex objects in ColdFusion. That technique allowed for deeply-nested data to be seamlessly updated using dot-delimited "object paths". My previous demo used a single page to render the form. As a fast-follow, I wanted to break the demo up into a multi-step form workflow in which each step manages only a portion of the complex object.https://www.bennadel.com/blog/4296-building-up-a-complex-objects-using-a-multi-step-form-workflow-in-coldfusion.htm CFML JobsSeveral positions available on https://www.getcfmljobs.com/Listing over 106 ColdFusion positions from 58 companies across 49 locations in 5 Countries.3 new jobs listedFull-Time - Senior ColdFusion Developer at Birmingham - United Kingdom Jul 12https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-kingdom/Senior-ColdFusion-Developer-at-Birmingham/11493 Full-Time - Senior ColdFusion Developer at London - United Kingdom Jul 12https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-kingdom/Senior-ColdFusion-Developer-at-London/11492 Full-Time - Frontend Software Developer-ColdFusion/Angular at Memphis, T.. - United States Jul 05https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/Frontend-Software-DeveloperColdFusionAngular-at-Memphis-TN/11491 Other Job Links Ortus Solutions - https://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/careers  John Hopkins University with Brian Klass - https://jobs.jhu.edu/job/Baltimore-Sr_-Programmer-Analyst-MD-21205/905668200/ More Information: https://twitter.com/brian_klaas/status/1544653220244590592  Clear Capital - Carol from Working Code Podcast - https://bit.ly/3Ocu5Zz  Nolan Erck - South of Shasta - Part-time CFML developer wantedSouth of Shasta is looking for a part-time mid to senior level developer that can assist with some projects for our clients over the next few months, possibly longer.https://southofshasta.com/blog/part-time-cfml-developer-wanted/  There is a jobs channel in the cfml slack team, and in the box team slack now too ForgeBox Module of the Weekcommandbox-jasperA static site generator implemented in CommandboxLast year I wrote a static site generator called Jasper. So far I have built Jasper using ColdBox as well as FW1. I am going to take things one step further and I will implement Jasper as a CommandBox module. Apparently I really enjoy writing SSGs.I decided to split the project into two main parts: the jasper-cli blog scaffold and the jasper command that handles generating the static site.Read more on the blog: https://kisdigital.com/post/how-i-use-commandbox-with-my-blog https://kisdigital.com/post/commandbox-jasper-ssg-generator https://www.forgebox.io/view/commandbox-jasper VS Code Hint Tips and Tricks of the WeekEmoji SnippetsEmoji Snippets helps developers to insert emoji on their files. You can use these emoji in PHP,HTML,JS,CSS,React and more !!!https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=devzstudio.emoji-snippetsThank you to all of our Patreon SupportersThese individuals are personally supporting our open source initiatives to ensure the great toolings like CommandBox, ForgeBox, ColdBox,  ContentBox, TestBox and all the other boxes keep getting the continuous development they need, and funds the cloud infrastructure at our community relies on like ForgeBox for our Package Management with CommandBox. You can support us on Patreon here https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutionsDon't forget, we have Annual Memberships, pay for the year and save 10% - great for businesses.Bronze Packages and up, now get a ForgeBox Pro and CFCasts subscriptions as a perk for their Patreon Subscription.All Patreon supporters have a Profile badge on the Community WebsiteAll Patreon supporters have their own Private Forum access on the Community WebsiteAll Patreon supporters have their own Private Channel access BoxTeam SlackLive Stream Access to Koding with the Kiwi + Friendshttps://community.ortussolutions.com/ Patreons John Wilson - Synaptrix Brian Ghidinelli - Hagerty MotorsportReg   Jordan Clark Eric Hoffman Gary Knight Mario Rodrigues Giancarlo Gomez David Belanger Dan Card Jonathan Perret Jeffry McGee - Sunstar Media Dean Maunder Wil De Bruin Joseph Lamoree Don Bellamy Jan Jannek Laksma Tirtohadi Carl Von Stetten Jeremy Adams Didier Lesnicki Matthew Clemente Daniel Garcia Scott Steinbeck - Agri Tracking Systems Ben Nadel  Brett DeLine Kai Koenig Charlie Arehart Jonas Eriksson Jason Daiger Shawn Oden Matthew Darby Ross Phillips Edgardo Cabezas Patrick Flynn Stephany Monge John Whish Kevin Wright Peter Amiri You can see an up to date list of all sponsors on Ortus Solutions' Websitehttps://ortussolutions.com/about-us/sponsors ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★