Podcasts about Unreal

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,334PODCASTS
  • 2,309EPISODES
  • 1hAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Unreal

Show all podcasts related to unreal

Latest podcast episodes about Unreal

Bachelor of Hearts
129. Bachelorette Bolognese (Bachelorette AU S7 E11?-12?)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 134:42


Brooke Blurton's season of The Bachelorette has come to a close, and the BoH boys are here to break down a fantastic finale week in rigorous detail. We talk about how these episodes subverted our expectations by not subverting our expectations, while still providing space for some incredible moments that are unlike anything we've ever seen before. We heap praise on guests Amy Thunig and Abbie Chatfield for broadening the conversation, and grapple with the nuances of the decisions that led to Brooke's happy ending. Can you tell I'm trying not to put spoilers in the episode description? Also, stay tuned for a little announcement at the end of the episode.

NBA Straya
Thurs Nov 25: Chaos Thanksgiving Day Eve + Patty Mills Is A Flamethrower, Suns Win 14th Straight & LeBron Kicks Out Some Fans (Ep 706)

NBA Straya

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 65:30


Absolutely CHAOS day of NBA today, with Thanksgiving Day Eve delivering 13 games of wildly fun hoops - we saw Patty Mills continue to be an absolute FLAMETHROWER for the Nets, the Suns win their FOURTEENTH STRAIGHT - 14th straight! - while the Rockets snapped THEIR 15 game LOSING streak... the Kings-Blazers played one for the ages, and LeBron got some fans kicked out amid reminding everyone he's absolutely AMAZING at basketball. Still. In year 19. Unreal. SO! We discuss all the latest NBA news & wrap ALL THIRTEEN THANKSGIVING EVE GAMES in the NBA STRAYA GAME WRAPS!! Plus, THAT'S NOT A KNIFE, OLD MATE NO MATES, SPUD OF THE NIGHT, PANTSING OF THE EVENING and BETTER THAN LONZO BALL!! PLIS: YEAH NAHs, -- yesterday was the PG experience in a nutshell, and should the NBA bring in the 'take foul' unsportsmanlike foul rule RIGHT NOW!? -- UNPOPULAR OPINION OF THE DAY and an OUTBACK TAKEHOUSE... As well as the STRAYAN PLAYER WATCH, and a KIWI KORNER!! There's even a sneaky bonus SHANE HEAL SHOOTERS SHOOT SHOOT YOUR SHOT LIGHT EM UP AWARD! And of course... NO PICKS OR PREVIEWS fo tomorrow... cos it's THANKSGIVING and no games! it's okay though, we'll still do a preview show on Friday! Great show today - enjoy!

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Finding & Funding Real Estate Deals with Anson Young | EP80

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:53


Anson Young is a Real Estate Agent and Investor with Hundreds of Transactions Completed in Each Category of Real Estate. Anson and his team Specialize in Marketing directly to Sellers for Off-market Deals, Using Many of the Methods that can be Found in his Book Finding & Funding Great Deals. When not Working, Anson can be Found Exploring the Wilds of Colorado's Rocky Mountains with his family, Reading Favourite Books to his Son, and Attending Loud Rock Concerts. In this episode we talked about:  • Anson's Bio & Background  • Anson's First Steps in Real Estate Business  • Becoming a Real Estate Agent   • Anson's Main Focus in Real Estate  • Raising capital   • Private Landing  • Sourcing Deals   • Building an Off-Market List  • Prospecting and finding  Opportunities  • Anson's Thoughts on Inflation and Interest Rates  • Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: https://www.instagram.com/younganson/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ansonyoung Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in real estate or business that you wish you knew when you started out.   Anson (31m 43s): So I kind of, I definitely always traded just short-term money for, you know, not worrying about long-term things and, you know, it's like, oh, you're in your twenties. You know, you don't really care too much about it, but once you get up into your forties and you're kind of still doing the same thing, it's probably not the best idea. And so I would, I would go back and tell myself for sure, just like, Hey, keep like even a third of the amount of houses that you're doing, and then you won't have to work when you're 40.   So   Jesse (32m 17s): There you go. That's a, that's a good point. Okay. In, in terms of, for that person, that's getting into our industry, what do you tell them in terms of your view on mentorship?   Anson (32m 32s): Yeah, that's a really, really good question. I'm a big fan of mentors, whether it's kind of formal mentors and informal mentors, you know, people who were willing to help you up. And I would say, just find somebody who aligns with your values and then see how you can provide value to them so that they can help you get to where you want to go. And then once you're at a place where, you know, a few years along the line, I think that mentorship works both ways where you should have a hand up and a hand down.   So you're, you know, you'll graduate through mentors that you're working with and every step along the way, you should be helping bring people up as well. And that teaches you a lot of things too, as you're teaching and working through things with other investors as well. So you've kind of learned by teaching and then obviously you learn by learning from somebody who's where you want to be.   Jesse (33m 31s): Yeah. That's great. Great answer as well. Okay. In terms of, let's put a pin in rich dad, poor dad. So put that one aside, but what is a book that you find yourself just recommending over and over again?   Anson (33m 45s): Yeah. So my, that is, it was a book that I also give about the most as well. And it's obstacle is the way by Ryan holiday and it's a book on stoicism and it's, it's really helped me in my personal life and also through business as well. And so it's just an, and an outlook on life and on business and situations that I wasn't exposed to until I kind of started getting into it. And that book definitely hammered it home for me.   So   Jesse (34m 19s): That's cool. I don't think we've ever had that book recommended on the show, but I've, I've definitely had people say it's a, it's a killer book. Yep. Okay. Last question. First car, make and model.   Anson (34m 32s): I had a 1979 tan VW rabbit. That is   Jesse (34m 38s): Unreal.   Anson (34m 39s): Two door.   Jesse (34m 40s): Yeah. That's pretty good, man. Like 79. I just looking at you. I would've, I would've assumed it'd be the eighties or nineties, but that's, that's quite the car.   Anson (34m 50s): That's the same year I was born. It just happened to be, my dad's always worked on VWs my whole life. And so my step-mom drove like a Cabriolet and my dad's had like dozens and dozens of bugs and, and yeah, when it came time to me, for me to start driving, you know, he bought this 79 tan rabbit that he's like, this is yours. If you get your grades up. And it took me a little while, but finally got my grades up enough to, to drive it. So   Jesse (35m 20s): I love how they're bringing back the seventies and eighties, the retro stitching for a, for a lot of their, their new models. So it got kind of that vintage look.   Anson (35m 29s): I'd love to see it. I'd love to see a new rabbit. Yeah.   Jesse (35m 32s): Oh yeah. Bring it back. Awesome. All right. Answered for those of you that want to connect or reach out or have any questions. I know you're doing work with bigger pockets. Maybe you could tell, tell listeners where they can go on the Google machine.   Anson (35m 47s): Yeah. If you go to the Google machine and if you want to connect with me bigger pockets, this is probably the easiest way to do it. It's just, if you just search my name on the site, you'll find my, my, my profile. Think I'm the only answer on the young, on there still. So that's good. Yeah. And then yeah, if you want to find me on Instagram at young Anson, and if you want to find me on YouTube, I do do videos for bigger pockets and starting to do more videos for myself as well. And so you can find me there.   Jesse (36m 16s): My guest today has been aunts and young aunts and thanks for being part of working capital.   Anson (36m 21s): Thanks, Jesse. Thanks so much.   Jesse (36m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in

Workin' On It with Meghan Trainor & Ryan Trainor

This week, Meghan and Ryan are joined by Relationship Expert and Licensed Clinical Social Worker Dr. Darcy Sterling! Dr. Darcy breaks down why Ryan's single, how Meghan needs to leave him alone about it, and how Meghan and Daryl's relationship is UNREAL. Plus, we get two special drop-ins featuring baby Riley and your favorite, GT.  Sponsors: Chime- Chime is giving away $10 within 30 days of enrolling at chime.com/enroll promo code: TRAINOR ZipRecruiter- ziprecruiter.com/TRAINOR and sign up for FREE Just Thrive- Get 15% off your order at JustThriveHealth.com promo code: TRAINOR Wondery- Follow Country Heat Weekly on Amazon Music or wherever you get your podcasts. Ana Luisa- Get 60% off your second piece if you go to shop.analuisa.com/TRAINOR Follow, Follow, Follow! Workin' On It @workinonitpod Meghan Trainor @meghan_trainor Ryan Trainor @ryan.trainor Ryan's Twitch: https://m.twitch.tv/ryantrainor Dr. Darcy @drdarcysterling Dr. Darcy's Website askdrdarcy.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Shameless Mom Academy
600: 6 Life Lessons Learned Over 600 Episodes

The Shameless Mom Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:27


600 EPISODES! Unreal. 600 times I have hit record.  300 incredible guest interviews.  300 solo shows.  WOW. Having a podcast is like having a child.  It's like the podcast just started yesterday and it also feels like she's been a part of my life forever.  I have learned a lot over the course of 600 episodes.  So many deeply impactful life lessons that I didn't see coming - and could have never anticipated when I started out.    In this episode, I share 6 life lessons I've learned over the course of 600 episodes.  I am sharing these lessons because I know many of you are learning right alongside me.  With each lesson, I share a tip and the “secret sauce” behind making the tip work in a simple and consistent way in your everyday life. I want to take a minute to make a few Thank You's, as I've only made it to 600 episodes because I walk through every episode with so many special people by my side.  Thank you to my teammates over the last almost 6 years: Christy, Allison, Christie, Katie and Nikita.  Your constant and unflinching support means so much to me. Thank you to every single guest who has shown up so openly and generously to be in conversation with me.  You have touched and expanded my heart in more ways than I can count. Thank you to my loudest cheerleaders, Vince and Sheila (hi Mom!)  You believe in me and build me up even when I'm tired and cranky.  And you are the first ones who want to celebrate with me.  Thank you to Vinnie, who makes me more of a Shameless Mom #everydamnday.  Without you, there would be no Shameless Mom Academy.  I can't say more about you because the tears will most certainly damage my keyboard. Lastly, most importantly, thank you to every single listener - whether you have listened to 6 episodes or all 600.  Thank you for trusting me.  I know many of you have invited me into your ear for every single episode.  It means so much to me that we have had the chance to spend time together 600 times.  I'm beyond humbled and honored.  People always ask if I'm worried I'll run out of things to talk about. Never.  Here's to 600 more. Link mentioned: Apply for my Tenacious Mamas Business & Leadership Mastermind: info@shamelessmom.com

Bachelor of Hearts
128. Comrade Konrad w/ Katie Kendall! (Bachelorette AU S7 E8-10?)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 187:44


This week, we welcome back special guest & previous longest-episode record-holder Katie Kendall (Not Making Lemonade) to the pod, for an exhaustive rundown of a massive triple-episode week of The Bachelorette! We engage in some art criticism, discuss some interesting family dynamics, and eulogise some beloved fan faves. Plus, we rip into some pretty big topics - how important is having a career plan? Is this season's focus on bisexual representation leaving other queer groups out of the conversation? And why has the show taken so long to talk about Brooke's foot fetish? Give Katie the BoH Bump: Follow @bachiebitching for Bachie live-tweets, and check out @not.making.lemonade on IG for art, poetry, zines and mental health advocacy!

Mac on sports podcast
NFL week 11 recap, Ohio State is unreal, loaded week of sports preview

Mac on sports podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 45:05


- Chiefs take down a wounded Cowboys team - Rodgers gets hurt  - Eagles are on fire  - Herbert magic on Sunday night  - Ohio State ends Michigan State  - Bama survives  - Stroud and Young with Video game numbers  - Loaded week of college hoops  - Maui, Battle for Atlantis, Zags vs UCLA and Zags vs Duke  its a good one tune in!!

Unreal Irish Folklore
RE-RELEASE: Giants and Causeways

Unreal Irish Folklore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:48


A re-release of the second ever episode of Unreal, while I recover from illness. A new episode will come soon once my voice is back at full strength!   Giants sculpted our landscape. They are strong, and fierce, and can be terrifying if you're unprepared. But anyone can defeat a giant – if you are clever enough to trick them…   READ THE PODCAST SCRIPT   SOURCES AND FURTHER READING The Story of Fionn and the Giant

Rideshare Rodeo Podcast
#92 | AB5 Destroyed this NON-profit Opera House

Rideshare Rodeo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 68:36


Uber Lyft Drivers and Gig Economy Workers Weekly News & Interviews:   Today I have Gail Gordon on the podcast.  Gail owns and operates a non-profit Opera Company in Los Angeles.   I had Gail on the podcast in October 2020 and we discussed what had happened.   Today, a year later, I have her back for an update on the effects of California AB5 on her NON-profit business.   Unreal the damage this law has done! *SEE DETAILS ON EXACTLY HOW THIS EFFECTS GAIL BELOW* Ready... Set... Rodeo!!!!! Rideshare Rodeo is sponsored by Curri.com Drive for Curri: https://drivecurri.app.link/fom2uFMcCib Sign up for PARA: https://withpara.com/ **READ BELOW TO UNDERSTAND ABC TEST** ABC test – B prong is impossible to justify for musicians. (A) The person is free from the control and direction of the hiring entity in connection with the performance of the work, both under the contract for the performance of the work and in fact. (B) The person performs work that is outside the usual course of the hiring entity's business. (C) The person is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business of the same nature as that involved in the work performed Section 2775 and the holding in Dynamex do not apply to the relationship between a referral agency and a service provider, as defined below, under the following conditions: (A) A person who utilizes a referral agency to contract for services from a service provider  ex:  Opera company using a “Contractor” to hires an orchestra for performances. (a)Section 2775 and the holding in Dynamex do not apply to the relationship between two individuals wherein each individual is acting as a sole proprietor or separate business entity formed as a partnership, limited liability company, limited liability partnership, or corporation performing work pursuant to a contract for purposes of providing services at the location of a single-engagement event, as defined below, under the following conditions: (1) Neither individual is subject to control and direction by the other, in connection with the performance of the work, both under the contract for the performance of the work and in fact. (2) Each individual has the ability to negotiate their rate of pay with the other individual. (3) The written contract between both individuals specifies the total payment for services provided by both individuals at the single-engagement event, and the specific rate paid to each individual. (b) “Single-engagement event” means a stand-alone non-recurring event in a single location, or a series of events in the same location no more than once a week. (A) The musical group is performing as a symphony orchestra, the musical group is performing at a theme park or amusement park, or a musician is performing in a musical theater production.             (F) “Single-engagement live performance event” means a stand-alone musical performance in a single venue location, or a series of performances in the same venue location no more than once a week. This does not include performances that are part of a tour or series of live performances at various locations. https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200AB2257  

The Retro Hour (Retro Gaming Podcast)
302: Agony (Psygnosis), Unreal & Outcast with Frank Sauer - The Retro Hour EP302

The Retro Hour (Retro Gaming Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 82:05


Frank Sauer: http://francksauer.com/ Please visit our amazing sponsors and help to support the show: Bitmap Books https://www.bitmapbooks.co.uk/ Retro Gamer Magazine - Get 6 months of Retro Gamer, with a retro controller absolutely free at: https://www.magazinesdirect.com/retropod Monster Joysticks: https://monsterjoysticks.com/theretrohour We need your help to ensure the future of the podcast, if you'd like to help us with running costs, equipment and hosting, please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://theretrohour.com/support/ https://www.patreon.com/retrohour Get your Retro Hour merchandise: https://bit.ly/33OWBKd Thanks to our amazing donators this week: Nicolò Pittoni, Christopher Tuckwell, Filipe Gomes, Antti Liha-vainen, Action Retro  Join our Discord channel: https://discord.gg/GQw8qp8 Website: http://theretrohour.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theretrohour/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/retrohouruk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/retrohouruk/ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/theretrohour Show notes:    GTA trilogy receives terrible scores: https://bit.ly/3oHY7JT Duke Smoochem 3D: https://youtu.be/h10pd7vDytg Play as The Hoff on retro arcade beat 'em up: https://bit.ly/3qRedTZ Unrealsed Dune GBA game is coming: https://bit.ly/3x0wVK6

SuperFeast Podcast
#142 Honouring Masculine Strength and Spirit with Aaron Schultz

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:06


Today's episode is one of the most important conversations we've had on the podcast all year. In this first of our Brovember episodes, Mason chats with Aaron Schultz, the founder of Outback Mind, A mental health and wellbeing programme that helps men from regional Australia manage anxiety and develop the right skills to stay healthy in the body, mind, and spirit. Growing up in regional Australia himself, experiencing the downward spiral of mental health issues, unfulfillment, and toxic environments, Aaron knows first hand the challenges men can face. A healing journey ignited by an introduction to Buddhism and self-love, Aaron has spent the past 20 years building a career around helping men to become more conscious and connected to their true selves. Today, Aaron is a leading Anxiety Management teacher, meditation/yoga teacher, and a specialised mind/body coach, with a great ambition to help others; Particularly men from regional areas. Aaron works to bring about a level of consciousness and understanding to a whole collective of men, born into an environment where a natural trajectory is to work for the economy and serve the colonial system; With little to no cultural ideologies in place that nurture them connecting to their true purpose. His organisation, Outback Mind; Focuses on creating a culture and lifestyle that gives these men the tools and solid foundation needed to deal with emotions and realise their heart purpose. In this soul-centred conversation, Aaron talks a lot about untying the embedded emotion of fear in society. An emotional response instilled in most of us; Fear permeates the colonial structure and has become a default operating system for so many. Fear of judgment, being different, or being vulnerable inhibits a lot of men from discovering their true purpose and potential. This is a beautiful conversation about masculinity, vulnerability, and the destructive cultural ideologies placed upon men. Mason and Aaron dive into Men's holistic health, the changes we need to make in society so men can thrive, and why we can't wait for a system that's not serving us to bring about the changes we need. If we want to change, we have to activate it ourselves by supporting each other and our communities in the areas that matter. This episode honours the strength, spirit, and wellbeing of men and is a much larger conversation about humanity. Tune in.     "It's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others, because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever. I believe my job here is to try and create light so these men can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves". -Aaron Schultz     Host and Guest discuss:   Men's circles Yin Yoga for men. Men's mental health Self love and acceptance. Resources for a purposeful life. Processing anger in a healthy way. Learning from indigenous cultures. Using physical exercise to process anger. Compassion for ourselves and each other. The prison system as an industry to make money. Developing a relationship with the masculine and feminine. The power of daily routine for a purposeful and productive life. Getting in flow with the seasons, cycles and our circadian rhythm.   Who is Aaron Schultz? Aaron Schultz is a leading anxiety management teacher, speaker, and private coach. He focuses on practical solutions to help individuals improve mental wellbeing and overcome anxiety. Aarons vision is to empower people to take a proactive approach to wellbeing, feel safe and supported, and become free of physical and mental illness by building healthy lifestyle behaviours that help individuals become self-aware, live more consciously, and thrive. Aaron is the founder of Outback Mind, a yoga, and meditation teacher (with over 5000 hours of practical teaching experience) specialising in Yin, Hatha, and Kundalini Yoga and transcendental meditation. Aaron also has extensive experience training individuals and groups in high-stress industries to manage anxiety in and out of the workplace. Aaron was recently awarded the People's Choice Award at the Queensland Men's Health Awards for his work creating a healthier future for men and boys.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Shen blend Cordyceps Deer Antler Ashwagandha Eucommia Bark Outback Mind website Outback Mind podcast Yin Yoga with Anatomist Paul Grilley     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Aaron, thanks so much for joining me, mate.   Aaron Schultz: (00:02) Pleasure, Mason. Thank you for having me.   Mason: (00:03) Yeah, well, yeah, my pleasure. My pleasure. Good. Do you want to just like give everyone a little up to date, little download on what you're doing at the moment, where you're focused at the moment is, and what the grander vision is for yourself and likewise, Outback Mind.   Aaron Schultz: (00:19) Yeah, thank you. I guess I come from a rural background in country Victoria. I was brought up traditionally, getting all the trauma that the education system sort of laid upon me, and that took me into poor lifestyle behaviours and believing what the TV told me. So, I started drinking and doing all the wrong things, and I disconnected from my real purpose and my soul pretty early because of the way society was sort of gearing me. So, sort of went into those poor lifestyle behaviours, and I knew underneath all that there was something greater, but I had to follow the breadcrumbs society had sort of laid out for me and worked hard, did all the things, bought the houses, and had the material stuff, and all that too.   Aaron Schultz: (01:15) And yeah, basically ended up a bit of a mess in my thirties and had to redirect myself. But following that, I've sort of had a real vision to be able to help guys like myself from rural communities to be able to find out who they really are and follow that. Everyone's got something inside them that maybe they haven't had the courage to dive into. So, I've been able to help others through my own experience to fast track that basically by giving them some tools and some guidance and advice around following their true purpose in this lifetime, I guess, at the end of the day, and not having to go through all the shit that I went through, but that's also beautiful in its own essence because we do learn from that sort of stuff. But to be able to help a young man or to help someone get some direction, I think's my real purpose here, and to be able to explore all the beautiful things that humanity has to offer without going into all the negative stuff that takes us away from our true alignment at the end of the day.   Mason: (02:27) With this young, colonised Australian culture that we've got here, I mean, especially in the tribe, what do you see as the biggest thing? You are a part of that culture, and you and others are emerging to fill these gaps that are allowing such big mental health challenges, or just generally not being able to get onto your purpose and everything that kind of comes with that. If you look overall at our culture, what do you think is the biggest thing that we're yearning for, or that's lacking, or there's a blockage around that's enabling all these things that you're solving? What's enabling it to become an issue to start with?   Aaron Schultz: (03:11) Yeah, really. I always say to people "What are traps that are holding you back?" And it's primarily the underlying fact that is fear. We get put into fear early and that pretty much becomes our default. You always keep going back to fear all the time. But to be able to help people understand what helps them feel calm, I need to be able to create a culture and a lifestyle around that because that's really the heart purpose and the soul journey, I guess, at the end of the day which a lot of guys, including myself, never understood or don't understand, and I don't like seeing people go through the whole lifetime without having that connection.   Aaron Schultz: (03:58) I think we've all got something within us which is our true purpose and our true calling. We've got a job here to do, many of us, and to be able to find what that is, to be able to direct your life around that I think's really, really important to be able to make it simple to people. I go back to my own sort of journey. I was sort of messed up in my thirties, and I went to a doctor, and all he wanted to do was tie me up in knots. But I basically just had to take direction for myself and then start to work on myself again and get back to that little boy that was never really nourished, I suppose, at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (04:35) So, that sort of resonates with guys when you talk to them because they sort of see that within them when you're done, and to be able to give them real-life experiences and stories about it but to do it vulnerably I think's really important. I was never courageous enough to be vulnerable about the way I felt as a human, come from a very judgemental environment which most rural communities are. It can be very much like that. And you touch on the colonial model. The colonial model is pretty much all about fear, force, and control, and ourselves are really penetrated with that early on. To be able to release that I think is really important. It's our birthright to feel that freedom, I guess, at the end of the day.   Mason: (05:23) When you work, so especially, I mean this isn't just going to be rural community, but that's where you are predominantly working, when you're working in rural communities with the lads and you start looking at purposefulness, soul journey, I'm sure there's different for them, they resonate with different ways of the connecting with that, and talking about that, I'm sure you've got lots of ways of approaching, what's the outcome? Do you find that it's different where you go? Everything's going to be unique, but for some people, is that purposefulness something that's a big life goal? Are you seeing at the moment, is it just them dealing with some inner turmoil so that they can just do their job purposefully and enjoy where they're at? What do you see the biggest outcome of how they actually feel their purpose, and what does it look like? I'm just thinking for some blokes and women, but blokes that are listening that are like, "What is that?" Is that, all of a sudden, I know my purpose is ABC or how does it look?   Aaron Schultz: (06:23) Yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (06:25) Men are confused, to be perfectly honest to you. We're educated to support the economy really at the end of the day. We come out of school, we go into uni or work, and we sort of have lost that real connection with our true self. That takes us into poor lifestyle behaviours, getting into relationships which we aren't aligned with. Really, once you start to explain this to people in a men's circle or one on one or whatever it is, people start to actually realise that not so much that they're fucked up, but they've actually taken themselves away from their true alignment to be able to do what society's expected of them or what their community's expected of them, and I was very much like that. I was always trapped in this thing of what other people thought about me and a lot of guys are the same.   Aaron Schultz: (07:21) They're very much at that entrapment of expectation of others. To be able to start to give them tools, to unpack that so they can feel safe within themselves because a man very, very rarely feels safe with who he actually is, to be able to develop a relationship with this masculine, feminine energy too, which took me a lot of work to be able to understand that as well, to be able to release anger, but then also to be comfortable with that anger too so you can develop a relationship with both sides of you and humanity, I guess, at the end of the day. But I think we have this lack of awareness within ourselves about who we truly are, and we're not just put in on this planet to be able to work, pay taxes, get a super, and die, and to be able to bring that back into real-time for people so they can start to work towards their true alignment.   Aaron Schultz: (08:24) One thing that really changed me a few years ago was going and talking to old men at the end of their life about had they had a successful life and nine out of 10 said no because they were never able to reach not so much their potential, but who they really wanted to be and be able to follow their passions because of expectation of fear, judgement , all that type of stuff in these rural communities where I come from. So, that's been said to me. I'm not going to wait. I want to try and fulfil my life well and truly before then, but also to help others do the same. We've all got that ability within us. It's just about sort of untying the knots and the tangles to be able to get some structure on how we live our lives a bit more functionally and freely moving forward, I guess, yeah.   Mason: (09:11) You brought up men's circles. It's an offering. It's an ancient happening. It's something logical, and to be honest, something I've been engaged in a lot, but have kind of just a bit, I think, steered clear of a little bit, while especially the Byron Bay scene kind of figures out without the political correctness, just open a space where you can truly explore what it is for you as a man, without dictating the outcomes and trying to say what a man is necessarily. But just how important are these, not just in rural communities, in metropolitan cities? Is this just a novelty, something we're doing in Bali and Byron? Just how important is this to the emerging and evolving culture of Australia and around the world?   Aaron Schultz: (10:10) Yeah, and you think about it because I had a good core group of friends in primary school, right? It's just been high school, the egos and everything open up, right? You just become cynical, critical, judgemental, all those sorts of things, right? But at the end of the day, strip everything away, you've got a heart connection with your brotherhood, I guess. When you see the egos of others and their judgements and opinions of the mind and all those sort of things, but once you strip away that, all the work's got to be done in the privacy of their own heart.   Aaron Schultz: (10:47) I start a men's circle with a meditation, and I take them on a journey for 11 minutes, and I stripped them away from big citation of the mind and all the things that are going on. We get back to this true purpose again. Okay. After that 10 minutes, we're de-escalated and we're right, and then we can start to open up about what's going on here. So, what I'll do is I'll talk, I'll bring a topic in. I'll pair people up. They'll go and talk about that topic, come back, then they're de-escalated even further. Then we go into a circle and we talk about what's going on in our lives to be able to unpack that and have that support of others as well. So, the vulnerability is the biggest thing for a man actually be able to be vulnerable. As I said, it was a tough thing for me.   Aaron Schultz: (11:33) When new people come along, I'll talk about that sort of stuff so they actually feel safe. That's the thing with a man. We're in this protection mode consistently. We're in this fight and flight, this fight mode. Once we can be free of that protection and start to open up, that's when we can start to unload and start to unpack some of the challenges that we have going on within ourselves, and a great way to do that is to express that around other men, to be able to be vulnerable, but also to be able to tap into the feminine side which we don't understand, which can really help us create great levels of self-awareness at the end of the day which many of just don't have.   Aaron Schultz: (12:13) As I said, we're constantly on chasing the bread crumbs and all the material things that society now thinks that we need to help us feel good. But once we sort of get away from that and start to talk about the way things are and the way things are going on with us, I just think we can start to be more conscious about the way we live our lives at the end of the day.   Mason: (12:36) I mean, it is quite simple. It's amazing, but when you dip in, when you sink into that space, even just that intention, and you can just see. Sometimes, yes, whether it's a group of mates that we have, or if you have a partner, it's incredible to be able to be vulnerable to that partner and share. There's sometimes so much to unpack, it doesn't feel like it's overly appropriate for your lover to be that person that has to cop all of it and hold it, and that's the biggest thing. Having a group of men, strong men, men that can be soft as well just to feel supported in that, that you don't have to bottle it in to protect the people around you as well.   Mason: (13:21) Then also, you mentioned anger. I think it went from that culture where men are just aggressive and angry to that's bad and that's toxic, and then to this point now where no, it needs to be felt. If you've bottled it up that long, it's going to be raging and wanting to come out, and to know that you're in a space of other men that understand it, and ideally a space where you feel you're not going to get judged for it, it feels, yeah, it's obviously very sacred. And just going through your website, I've just gone, "You know what? That's really something that could be healthy for me right now."   Aaron Schultz: (14:01) Yeah, yeah. I appreciate that. I just share a bit about my own journey. I had these little traumas going on in my childhood which I've never dealt with, and that sort of took me into drinking and masking all that sort of stuff. When I hit 37, I was at the stage where I could take my life or I could change and move through that. So, I had that seesaw going on, and the easy thing was to go, "Okay, I've had enough of this. I'm out of here." And that's what happens to lot of guys. I lost my job and I felt worthless because I was attached to that title and that outcome, and yeah, as I said, I've never got to know myself.   Aaron Schultz: (14:51) So, put my foot into the gym and fitness, and a lot of that anger came out with the fitness and lifting more and more chin-ups, and all that sort of stuff, and I went from an average body into a pretty strong, fit body, and all the accolades and everything that came with that. Then I started to win things, and then I started to do these unbelievable athletic pursuits. And I had this moment where I could have went further and went to America and done all this sort of great stuff, or I could have said to myself, "Okay, Aaron, you've done well here. You don't need to do that anymore." That's what I did. I didn't keep pushing.   Aaron Schultz: (15:32) So, that took me into Buddhism, and Buddhism taught me to be kind to myself and be vulnerable. That's where the healing started to happen. With men, we'll keep pushing. That masculine side is very strong. That was the opportunity and the learning curve for me to be able to retreat from that, and then start to find that side of myself which had never been explored or never understood. To fast track things a bit, yin yoga was the thing for me which basically helped solve a lot of problems that I had because it just taught me to settle down, slow down, be accepting of myself, and then to be able to, yeah, learn how to use the body to settle the mind at the end of the day, to be able to develop a relationship with yin and the yang of life.   Aaron Schultz: (16:32) So, if I hadn't kept pushing fitness, that would've pushed me into this yang space, and the ego would've been dominant. To be able to understand the ego and become teammates with the ego, rather than just living that mindset consistently because I think that's what a lot of us try to do. We just think we've got to be a performer consistently to be able to have the vulnerability which was very hard for me with yin yoga because my body was so tight and that. But over time, I just had to keep showing up, and now I teach others, but also, it's part of my daily practise to be able to use the yang and use the yin together and have that harmony to develop that neutrality, I guess, at the end of the day and a high level of awareness.   Aaron Schultz: (17:22) Your mind, the way you are feeling on a basis changes, but if you can provide yourself with the practical tools to manage that better, I think you're not only going to be a better individual personally, but that's going to help spread light to others as well.   Mason: (17:41) How does that go down when you... I know we were talking just before we jumped on the podcast and when you're working in the prison system. Are you still working in the prison systems?   Aaron Schultz: (17:49) Oh, well not really. I don't work for the government, but I was going and teaching yoga in the prisons and doing some self-awareness training for prisoners. That may change now that we've got to be double jabbed so I'm not too sure about that one. Yeah. So, what we do is I'll just talk or the guy from WA will go and help guys come out, put them into a job, and then give them that pathway so they haven't got that vulnerability when they're out. The whole system is about bringing people from punishment or trauma, giving them more punishment, and then they're on their own when they get out. That doesn't work. We actually are able to go in, help identify the right people to match them up with the right employer, give them stability, but my role is to be able to keep them self-aware through mindfulness practises before they're released, so they come out and they've got a daily practise they can tap into so they can keep their job, don't get caught up with all the old belief systems and stay on track.   Aaron Schultz: (18:54) So, we don't get funding for any of this. We're trying to create something here which is going to help humanity in many ways, and that's something I'm really passionate about. That's primarily helping guys that have got lots of issues. We're punishing people consistently for trauma that's not their fault. To be able to help guys identify that, to help them feel safe, and it's okay, they can start to rebuild their lives again, this is something that's groundbreaking, that hasn't been explored before. So, to be able to take a young 25-year-old that's had a terrible life to help them reinvert that or a 55-year-old which has had this constant cycle of incarceration to be able to feel sacred in themselves, to learn some of the life skills which can keep them balanced is really beautiful at the end of the day because everyone's got a purpose in this lifetime and be able to help them become more stable and self-aware about their emotions, I think it's really important, and that's something that I want to try and do more of over the next period.   Aaron Schultz: (20:06) But I've got higher things that I want to do later on. It's just the stepping stone, and I keep getting downloads about this when I do my meditation in the morning that this is my journey and this is my purpose for this time. So, trying to be true to that, I guess, at the end of the day, rather than chasing money and all those sorts of things because I think if you're working in alignment with yourself, then everything else will take care of itself.   Mason: (20:33) What do you see is the biggest consequence here with the trauma? Obviously, the same is happening in various ways for women, but sticking to men, this lack of capacity or want or willingness or ability of our culture, the system, especially the corporate system to identify with a lack of initiations, a lack of support to identify traumas, having men being comfortable in themselves, what's the biggest... When you look at our country and our world, what do you see is the consequences that are rolling out of this being the case of us having this unwillingness and deficiency to support men to get in touch and on that path?   Aaron Schultz: (21:19) Yeah, yeah. Yeah, look, I just think that the whole system is working against this at the end of the day. You say, for example, that someone is experiencing self-doubt consistently. Well, as soon as they drive around a corner, they're seeing a billboard to drink beer. It's going around the other side, they're seeing a billboard to eat junk food, all this type of stuff. So, we're getting mixed messages consistently. Your body is smarter than you. Your body's always trying to give you the truth, but we're blocking that consistently because of the domination of the mind. We haven't been taught how to read what's going on below the shoulders and the message that that's consistently sending us.   Aaron Schultz: (22:06) So, yeah, to be able to find ease within yourself and ease with that trauma, some of the things that have held you back, this has happened for a reason, whether it be good or bad, and then to be able to accept that, and self-acceptance is such a hard thing because we are so geared to keep consistently beating ourselves up. We're consistently beating ourselves up, and I have that issue, not so much now, but I know it pops in every now and then. That is not a bad thing because it's there to protect me and keep driving me in some ways, but sometimes I really need to recheck myself and be kind to myself at the end of the day, and that's a skill that we're lost that ability to be able to nurture ourselves and be kind of to ourselves I think's so important because we've got the foot on the pedal consistently where we're not actually taking that off.   Aaron Schultz: (23:03) So, yeah, to be able to dive into some of those traumas, through my meditation practise now, I'll go into some things that happened to me when I was younger which gave me trauma, and then I'll be able to say thank you to that because it actually helps me move forward. That's a big thing for a guy that's new to this sort of stuff to learn, but you can give them simple things that actually help them on a journey of self-acceptance, then all of a sudden, they're on a pathway to transformation rather than being stuck in the old patterns all the time, if that makes sense.   Mason: (23:39) I mean, it completely makes sense. I mean, it's funny. I know I can go really sinister right now and talk about the motives of a keeping a culture this way and keeping everyone kind of huddled down, and kind of like a commodity, as long as they're just designed and as long as it's all working to design, just working, being in the workforce, and doesn't matter. We can deal with all the issues. And then you add the confusion of there's a lot, and some of it kind of rightfully, some that's gone absolutely too far is the bastardization of men and masculinity kind of thrown in there at the moment, and I'm not sure what your position is around this. It's something that's been obviously going on for years and super prevalent at the moment.   Mason: (24:29) I'm just saying with that perfect storm, for the efficiency's sake, for the resources's sake of our country and our culture, it makes complete sense to put energy in into this, and I guess I can just say for people listening as well, I get the sinister intentions and also get the fact that you're looking, I don't know, looking through the matrix and being like... Even if you guys can't see that this is the greatest thing to bring love, getting people on purpose, men on purpose, better for families, better for women, better for everyone yet you're fighting for funding.   Mason: (25:08) I mean, it always perplexes me, but then it doesn't because I go, "I know if I can have a..." I don't know why it's surprising, but it does still. It's baffling because the yield of benefit from... You imagine rolling out what they've done with PCR testing and vaccination, what they've done in such a small amount of time, if they rolled out with half of that, a quarter of that resource and intention towards let's get everyone properly rehabilitated, feeling purposeful, and getting over the traumas, the amount of efficiency that would be put into our culture, the amount of stress that would come off our medical system from all these mental health... Suicide comes off. All of a sudden, you got all the stress that goes into families when that happens. It really kind of brings it. It makes me really quite emotional. With the work you're doing, I'm sure you feel the gravity of it. Just how much, the utopia, that we're knocking on the door of?   Aaron Schultz: (26:20) I don't get angry about it. I see with compassion because I know there's such a better way. So, the whole government model is keeping people DDC which is dumb, docile, and compliant. Right? The whole system is around keeping people unhealthy because it's good for the economy. We've actually fucking become topsy-turvy here with the way that we really should be directing humanity. You're right. Giving people the tools and skills to be able to deal with those things rather than pushing it the other way is really the key to that.   Aaron Schultz: (26:54) Now, I believe that there's going to be a moment in time over the next, maybe 10, 20 years where there will be a real shift. We can't keep going down this role of basically pushing people away from what we're meant to be doing here as humans. You think about it. At the end of the day, it's only been the last 20, 30, 40 years that we've had so much domination. People were living in those days where they were sharing. Things were much more aligned with the way we're meant to be functioning here as humans, but they've taken away our vegetable gardens, our fruit trees, all those sorts of things to direct us to go to the supermarket. Convenient has become so much more common these days because really, at the end of the day, what it is mostly is it's the economical support and stimulus that goes with it.   Aaron Schultz: (27:49) So, if you look at a person that's incarcerated, that's an industry. The prisons have become an industry. The junk food has become an industry. All these different things have popped up. When I was a young fellow, pubs closed at 10 o'clock. Now, they're free for all because they realise they can keep more people employed. There's emergency services that are going to be employed to compliment all the pisspots, all those sorts of things. So, keeping people mentally unbalanced and physically unwell has become an industry, an entity of its own so that's continually stimulating the economy. But you're right, the counterbalance that is to be able to create a wellness culture which is going to be so much more beneficial at the end of the day, they can't see that at that level. The whole draconian thinking and the draconian model is really wrong.   Aaron Schultz: (28:45) My job here and I believe your job here is to try and create light so people can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves so they can actually start to think, "Well, maybe what I've been fed is bullshit. Now, I'm going to put some decent fertiliser onto my body, and around me that's going to help nourish me," rather than sort of punishment at the end of the day because we're really directed into a world now of self-punishment. Most people are feeling like a shithouse on a daily basis, physically and mentally, and that's the only way that they know. So, where I live, there's a coffee cart. People are lining up there consistently to get their energy. I'm going down and I'm doing meditation on the beach and getting energy from the earth and the sun. People don't see that because the TV's telling them to go and get their fill of coffee, and then at the end of the day, drink beer to find that balance, and I was brought up in that.   Aaron Schultz: (29:42) So, I understand what it's like, but I see that with compassion. I see these people that are making decisions with compassion. I spend time in Parliament House in Canberra, and I've been around the government, and I understand how it all works. I have people that are in fairly high-level roles come to me consistently because they're actually empty and lost with themselves. They're putting energy into all the stuff that they think is real and right, but at the end of the day, it's taking away from their true alignment, and I don't want to see them get to the end of their lives and think what if. We can actually create a culture of self-autonomy and well-being now for them. That's why it's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever.   Mason: (30:38) I mean, you brought up again, getting to the end of your life, whether or not there's regret or whatever. I always like to sprinkle in that it's going to be diverse, I imagine very diverse in terms of little regrets and tweaks, or was I on track or not. It's not just black and white. But I was just thinking, for everyone listening, especially the boys listening, tracking to the end of their life which I think you've been with your meditation practise. I'm sure there's a lot of work in acknowledging your death and the impermanence, and I always find that most of the time, ultimately, my most rewarding and favourite part of my own inner practise is facing my own mortality and always going into that darkness and seeing what emerges.   Mason: (31:32) But I always love thinking about that, either that deathbed or my 80-year-old self, and using that as a lighthouse, and that always gives me insights, and can I map somewhat or an understanding of the terrain. Well, I can feel it. I can feel the terrain and how many things are going to change in all those years. For you in your work, for the guys listening, when they think about themselves kind of on that deathbed, or when they're an elder, hopefully an elder, and they're tracking back, what resources would you recommend for them to have in place which would be the fertiliser to give the capacity for that rich garden of a purposeful life to come about?   Aaron Schultz: (32:15) Absolutely. Look, we're only on this journey in this body for a period of time, but primarily, if you can keep yourself in routine on a daily basis, you will not age. Physically, you may change, but mentally and spiritually, you will stay coherent. So, to be able to utilise a physical body in a manner where it's being nourished on a daily basis, externally by movement, those types of things, to be able to nourish it with the right nutrients externally that come into the body to be able to help it survive and thrive really well.   Aaron Schultz: (32:57) But also, to be conscious and connected to nature and all the things that are beyond that, I think that that will hold you in high regard so you don't leave this life feeling unfulfilled because every day for me is an opportunity to have an opportunity that I've ever had before and I've got to remind myself consistently that every day has been different, and I'm grateful for the days that have gone before because yeah, once you've got that, you will not have any regrets, and every opportunity, every moment is unique, and it's something that we've actually become disconnected with because we're so dominated by the mind and what we think is real.   Aaron Schultz: (33:45) Humans are the only creatures on this planet which are working away from our alignment. Look around at everything else and they know what they're doing. They're sourcing the food. They're doing all the things that nature intended and provided for them, but humans have become disconnected and lost from that. There's so much we can learn from our indigenous cultures that can give us that connection again. You and I are on this land through other entities, by people that have come from other lands that have come here and created us so we've actually lost a sense of purpose as men as well because we haven't got that connection with something.   Aaron Schultz: (34:27) I've learned so much of indigenous people from when I was a young boy, but to also what I'm doing now to be able to really connect and learn from them, and I'm helping indigenous guys connect back to their culture because that's the most powerful gift that they could have while they're in these bodies in these times primarily at the end of the day because that is human, isn't it? You know where you're living, you're living in a community, you're sharing, you're in a tribe, all that type of stuff. This is what I believe we're meant to be doing as humans. We're actually just lost touch with that at the end of the day. To be able to be grounded on a daily basis is so important.   Mason: (35:06) Yeah, I think it's kind of one of those things. I've done a few podcasts lately with some... I just did one with Jost. So, I don't know if Jost from-   Aaron Schultz: (35:17) No.   Mason: (35:17) He's a German Daoist and acupuncturist and can go in all kinds of direction. And again, in this podcast, we just came back to sleep in terms of the ultimate thing to bring that armour in terms of what's going on in the world at the moment and love. It's so often, and that racing part of my mind is like, "All right. So, what's that thing?" And asking you that question, you're like, "All right," that consistency through your day, that routine through your day so that you're grounded. It just landed again. I've tightened it up so much this year, and I'm one of those people that I'm like, "Oh no," if I've got that scheduled dialled and I'm refining it and it's all scheduled and locked in, it means I'm not free, and I've got that little Peter Pan syndrome kind of going on.   Mason: (36:03) But I've just watched what happened to my mental health this year when I just dialled in to that calendar and not really respecting, when I have a meeting, respecting the clock, respecting that I've put that in my schedule for a reason, and keep on refining, don't get down on myself. I can't believe what's happened to my mental health and stability just through that, with movement, with breathwork, with meditation. And again, I'm one that stumbles a lot in that and it quite often doesn't go well, but then just to not give up and just remember, that is the key. You've just given us that that's the key for when you're an old codger. That's what will get you feeling really purposeful when you get there. I find that potent.   Aaron Schultz: (36:48) Yeah, absolutely. It's called [inaudible 00:36:53] on a daily basis if you can do something for 10% of your day. I like to do it early in the morning so you can get connected. If you can have a practise every morning which grounds you, then you get rid of all the uncertainty, the fears, the worries, all that sort of stuff, and get back to okay, this is what it's all about, and then you start to live more from your heart. Yeah, I just think that is ancient wisdom which is much needed in modern times. All the ancient traditions talk about it. And in Kundalini yoga, we talk about juts, so just repeat. You repeat on a daily basis., you've got that foundation for your life. It's so important. It's so easy to get up in the morning and go to the coffee machine and get stimulated straightaway. The average man's going to the TV or the radio, and they're putting the fear in the first five minutes of their day, But if you can say, "No, I'm disconnecting from that. I'm going to do something which nourishes myself." That's turning inward primarily to be able to connect.   Aaron Schultz: (37:56) Physical movement is a great way of doing that. I had to do it through fitness to really push my body and learn to connect with myself again. But really, that took me into meditation. It took me into okay, now I've got rid of all my anger, now I can be still. That stillness, it's come from yin yoga now to be able to help the mindset also. I used to be really rigid on a daily basis with regards to what I had to do, but now I wake up and I have all these tools that I can use. So, I wake up and okay, this is how I feel. This is what I'm going to do, and my practise every morning goes for a couple of hours or more, depending on what's happening on that particular day. But that's my rock and my foundation that I've worked on over the last sort of 10 or 12 years.   Aaron Schultz: (38:48) It's a journey because most guys, they want to get to the end of the marathon before they start. The whole thing is to be really in love with the journey. Don't worry about the outcome. Really be in love with the journey and what's happening because every day is unique, and it's a new opportunity to learn about yourself and others. You've got new experiences going on in your day on a daily basis. So, to be able to be in love with that, rather than the outcome, we're so attached to the outcome. I want the beautiful wife. I want this and that and the other, but just be in mind and love with yourself and work within your own truth, and everything else will take care of itself I guess at the end of the day.   Mason: (39:35) And quite often, I mean, in my experience, it's still those things which you perceive to be superficial in terms of your wanting. They're still there. They are created in your life with substance. Beautiful partner, the ability to get on purpose, get some cash in the bank, build some assets, maybe be a provider, maybe not fall into... Whatever it is, it's still that superficial stuff. From what I could see, it's still there. It's just got something in the middle of it.   Aaron Schultz: (40:09) Oh, a hundred percent. It's really interesting. I'm not huge with social media, but I have these memory popups come up, right? And what I was doing three years ago, five years ago, eight years ago, it's amazing. This is one thing that we don't understand as men, right? I believe that we have this cyclic thing going on within us that we're actually engaged in this type of stuff at particular times of the year. I looked at these popups that have been coming out recently. They're exactly how I'm feeling now. These are just reminders of what's happened at the same time throughout a year in years gone. So, these seasons and cycles that we're going through, we actually don't have any awareness and consciousness around that to be able to be in alignment with that.   Aaron Schultz: (41:00) I think that is something that's really powerful and next level with regards to reaching our potential as humans, but also to be able to be more responsive and conscious of what's going on within our lives at any particular moment throughout the calendar year or whatever that may be. It's been a real light bulb for me to actually observe that. That's been a gift as a reminder to show me those sorts of things. And when your emotions and so forth are out of check, it's usually probably a lot to do with what's going on in nature which we don't really understand that much. The mental health industry doesn't probably understand that much about either because it's all about interventions rather than proactive solutions I guess at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (41:50) So, they're the things I want to try and help people understand. Maybe you're feeling like this because of this reason. How many men know about moon cycles and how that works? None. That's the feminine side of them that they don't want to have anything to do with, but if we could start to educate guys more about this sort of stuff, and how this might be affecting their sleep and their circadian rhythm, and all those types of things which we're unconscious of, I think that's really, really important. That's how we can start to be proactive about mental health rather than being reactive like the whole model is currently because that model is about making money out of people.   Mason: (42:34) Isn't it just? So, you've just touched a lot on circadian rhythm connecting to the land. Something I've been, yeah, saying for a few years now is that it's just very obvious and has been obvious for many people for a long time, and there's somewhat many diversions, but there's especially a diversion. I can see a diversion in the genetics and the way that people want to live right now. One I see is those communities wanting to keep at least a foot but two feet grounded on the earth, and then those that I think I kind of see more going up into the cloud, and wanting to plug into a smart city in a technological way of living that doesn't abide by any connection to nature and circadian rhythm.   Mason: (43:20) I mean, we don't have too much longer. I'm sure you've got some resource, or if you want to quickly share your practises for staying tuned in to that natural rhythm so that you can stay tuned into reality, and maybe the reality of what's going on with you. But I also just wanted to touch, and you mentioned mob indigenous culture, any indigenous lads listening, you've already recommended, it's the number one thing. It's kind of in the faces, connect back to culture, connect back to the song and your dance and language. For the Western lads listening because I kind of find it still a little bit icky around here in terms of still a little bit of spiritual just taking of indigenous culture.   Mason: (44:08) Have you got recommendations or just a reminder of how we can also, through connecting with the land, also connect or respect or learn about indigenous culture in a way that... It's energetically. You can feel it's still like a hive there. There's karmic stuff there. Obviously, there's a lot of developing and forming that energetic relationship where we're living harmoniously together. It's still unravelling. Have you got any tips for guys to how approach it, how approach that?   Aaron Schultz: (44:43) Yeah, definitely. A lot of us have had no connection with spirituality because it's combined with religion, and a lot of us have had religious trauma. So, a lot of this stuff that we believed was right about connection is probably not really filling us anymore. So, to be able to, I wouldn't say disregard that, but just to let go of that now what your beliefs probably were, to be able to be more aware of the universal consciousness is key. What's in this life and what's beyond this life is taking your awareness and dimension to another level.   Aaron Schultz: (45:26) And for me, that came from pushing my body really hard and going running early in the morning before the sun come up because I had no noise. It was no life. All you heard or all you saw was the sky and silence. So, I'd go running at 4:00 in the morning, and lot of the ancient traditions talk about the ambrosial hours as being the best time to connect with yourself because you've got no domination from anything. Yeah, so for me as an individual, it was actually using that time in the day to get grounded. You hear a kookaburra wake up at five o'clock, and then all of a sudden, life starts to evolve. You start to realise that life's so much bigger than yourself, once you actually have got that time for connection.   Aaron Schultz: (46:18) So yeah, if anyone's wanting to challenge themselves, let's say get up in the ambrosial hours. Get outside. Do some meditation, whatever it may be. Get connected with the land somehow so that it can actually give you an appreciation of the gift that we've actually in this lifetime. To be human in this lifetime's a pretty unique opportunity and a unique gift. As I mentioned before, we're going about life incoherently to what was really expected of us or what we're meant to be doing here. So, to be able to connect with the fundamental things I think are really key because that'll keep you grounded on a daily basis, and once you've got that foundation, then the rest of your life will evolve around that.   Aaron Schultz: (47:04) We have this innate connection with ourselves, but also humanity. Once you start to get out of the lower levels of consciousness of fear, shame, guilt, greed, and get into the higher levels of consciousness of gratitude, love, kindness, compassion, all those sorts of things, if you can start to tune into those sorts of things on a daily basis early, then that will spread, and you'll have that connection with yourself but also connection with others as well. I think that's really key, and they're the skills that we don't know as men, we don't understand as men because we've been pushed the other way to be sort of in those lower levels of consciousness of society, as I mentioned.   Aaron Schultz: (47:45) But we think that happiness comes from greed and all those sorts of things where really the happiness comes from love and kindness and compassion and all the things that we're meant to be doing here as humans. We're not meant to be in fear all the time. It's a small part of our life, rather being a major part of our life. That fear's here protect us occasionally, but we're not meant to be living in it consistently. So, use the time you have early in the morning if you can to be able to become connected to what's really important. Then, you do this consistently, and over time, you'll develop these habits which become part of your foundation, part of your strength moving forward.   Mason: (48:26) I love it, man. The little simple reminders that are just how profound the outcomes are there. It's just a beautiful, beautiful reminder.   Aaron Schultz: (48:38) Yeah.   Mason: (48:39) For everyone listening. I mean, outbackmind.com.au is your website. Where are you currently at with your offerings and how people can engage with you, besides your podcast, Outback Mind podcast, is that right? Yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (48:55) Yeah. You know, mate, there's not much really. It's something I'm not really strong at. I probably need to be able to do more in this space to offer up things for people. So, really at the moment, we're trying to set up the Outback Minds and foundation side to be not for profit. What we want to do, I've got a friend here that's helping set up a training platform. So, we want to be able to develop men's circles in regional communities throughout all Australia to be able to train guys in those communities so they can run these heart-based circles of men's circles for many years. And I ran them in Victoria and Tassie, and a lot of them are very ego-driven. It's very much in the masculine which is okay, but I just think if we can actually start to build capacity for people through these things, rather than using it as a tool to get things off our chest, to actually be okay to explore what's been going on with their own lives, but also to be able to build our capacity, and that helps us as a man, but also helps us as a family member and members of our community at the end of the day, and that's a proactive way that we approach mental wellbeing, I guess, to be able to provide people with tools.   Aaron Schultz: (50:09) So, yeah, I bring meditation. I bring yin yoga into the men's circles. So, to be able to train guys with some of the simple tools on how to do this, and that I think's really important to be proactive in that space, yeah, so to do that. And I guess I want to get out into regional communities and talk more, try and get into places where they don't have access to great advice or help. The online stuff's been really good for that, but hopefully, once things open up more, I can get out and start to connect with more people out there.   Aaron Schultz: (50:51) Yeah, as I mentioned to you earlier, my real vision is to be able to set up a Vipassanā centre where I can help people come and be still inside for three and 10-day retreats so they can reconnect with themselves because I believe that's a functional thing for humans. It's just to be silent and still for parts of our year. If we can do that twice, three times a year, that's got to be good for our mental wellbeing. We've got to be able to give our mind a rest, and the mind isn't king here. The heart is king. If you can reconnect with the heart, that's really what it's all about. That's how we can improvements health in Australia rather than be too dominated by what's going on above the shoulders.   Mason: (51:30) I love it, man, and I love your work. Encourage everyone to go and at least subscribe to the podcast, stay tuned in on that way, and yeah, it looks like you've got lots of things kind of planned. I can see there's little life experience, adventures there, and workplace wellbeing, all kinds of things. So, yeah, exciting to see the rollout.   Aaron Schultz: (51:51) Yeah. That's the other thing. The workplace has got such a strong opportunity to be able to help people. We're not just going there to get a paycheck. I want to try and engage more with more of our better employers that are ethical to be able to help people, particularly men in their workplace to feel safe, feel secure, feel supported and really valued in the workplace because that's a problem that a trap we've had as humans is to be able to use people by paying them money, but not really give them any care and support, and that's a huge problem with regards to understanding ourselves and our mental health because if we're not feeling good about ourselves in the workplace, then we take that home with us and that creates issues with domestic violence and drinking, and all that sorts of things.   Aaron Schultz: (52:45) So I just think the more employers that I can engage with to be able to help builds a culture I think's really important. My background, I ran labour hire companies. So, I worked with lots of organisations and industries throughout Australia, and I didn't see many employers that were doing it well. So, now, starting to connect with more employers and give them platforms on how to be able to develop a culture which is coherent in the workplace and starting their day with meditation, and all these sorts of things so people can feel grounded before they start their work, rather than just going there, and working to lunchtime, and then going and finishing their day off just to get home, but you actually feel part of something I think's really important. That's [crosstalk 00:53:33] improved capacity for sure.   Mason: (53:36) Yeah. Integrating the workplace back into cultivating a society and a culture that isn't just... Yeah. It's a funny dynamic. I'm an employer, and the amount of energy that needs to go in at each new evolution of the business, all of a sudden, it's not the same as when you were just a small little crew where all your values and these principles just seem automatically known. There needs to start being an unravelling of some structure so that there can be that flow of humanity and that flow of purposefulness, and there needs to be little checks in place. It needs to be integrated into a HR department. For a lot of people, it's beyond what they can handle. I don't endorse it, but I definitely can see how companies get to that point, and they go, "You know what? There's no actual cultural requirement of me to do this. So I'm just going to go to the efficiency route or the easiest route and just do the whatever culture thing." And you just end up using people. It's crazy.   Aaron Schultz: (54:48) Yeah. That's what it's all about. The whole model to do with MBA and human resources, and that's really about what can you get out of people, all the fear you can put into them, all that type of stuff. Oh, there's an EAP at the end of that. If we fuck them up. I'm saying organisations, and I have been for years, that is a last resort. You've got to be really proactive rather than reactive. If you're fair dinkum about what you're doing, if you can look after people, the results will take care of itself.   Aaron Schultz: (55:17) It's the same as with our wellbeing. If we can show up at a value basis as individuals and do things which nourishes, then the results will take care of itself. So, don't worry about the outcome. You worry about the journey. Help people on the journey and then things will evolve. That's where I believe at sports clubs. I've done a lot of work with sports clubs as well to be able to help them become successful, but not worrying about the outcome. If this is the process that we've got to do, so you can start to tune in with what's really real here, and enjoy the process of the journey rather than the outcome at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (55:51) I've worked for businesses. It's all about KPIs and budgets and all that type of stuff. If people are really in flow and intuitive and enjoying what they're doing, then everything will take care of itself because they're engaged, and the output is significant that way rather than sort of worrying about the results so much, you know?   Mason: (56:13) Yeah, and what I've experienced is when the culture is put in place, all of a sudden, something like a KPI or a budget doesn't have that disciplinary... This is a very hard line. To have optics through the business, like a KPI, have them available so that everyone in the team can see what's going on in other departments and for the benefit of the person who's in that, say, my position as a CEO to have those things be present and then to have it entrenched, not just say it, but so it's felt this isn't about making me wrong or bad. This is genuine feedback loop and genuine neurofeedback so that I'm aware of what my team is doing. I'm aware of whether I'm in a place where I'm flowing or not.   Mason: (57:07) And if, this is the hard one, if there's enough trust that you're not getting in trouble, but if there's something starts not going well, it's really great for us to know it so that we can all rally and be like, "What's happening here? Do you need some support?" It seems simple, but my goodness, it's a bit of a difficult task, I think just because we're all so programmed to be like, "I'm being judged. If I don't get the answer right, I'm marked wrong, and I don't get given other opportunities." It's a pretty insidious little parasite of the culture.   Aaron Schultz: (57:54) Get excited, and if you can get rid of that competition or that competitive nature, and give back more compassion, that's where you can grow. I've worked with business. It's all about achievements on a monthly basis and you're competing against others and all those sorts of things. It's really wrong. Yeah, being able be supportive and nourishing of yourself and nourishing your others, I think that's work.   Mason: (58:17) Because when you don't enlist them, them, me, people, whatever in competition, for me, this competitiveness from this jovial place and this playful place, and often, quite a serious place for me, I can drop into the gravity of which I enjoy around, look, in terms of my life vision, this is what's actually on the cards right now in terms of whether I get this project done in time or not. I've only got a certain amount of time here, but that's an emergence, that competitive charge. I'm not trying to beat down anyone else. That's something I think we've got wrong. We try and project something which is going to get us the result, like competition onto a company structure which then brings about reprimanding kind of culture, therefore for fear verse hey, it's really takes a lot of vulnerability to get this feedback and be vulnerable to your team and how you're performing and how you're doing.   Mason: (59:15) But if you come from a place of trust and you give trust willingly or have conversations to get yourself there to where you give trust, all of a sudden, that natural and organic, that's the fertiliser, then that competitive edge, appropriate for you and your nervous system, can rise up and then go back down as well when it starts getting a little unhealthy. It's a hell of a thing, business culture. I'm aware of the time though. I think we'll go on with this for ages.   Aaron Schultz: (59:46) Just remember, it's a friendly universe and everything's trying to work for us, not against us. If we can just work with that, the flow of everything, then everything will be okay, will take care of itself. When we're forcing where we're getting forced against and that's what competition does, it really does put us into a short-term fix, but really the long-term outcome is not great, but the more you can be able to work with the universal charge, if you've got a product, you let products go without any attachment. You've got something great. You're not producing it because you want to get these outcomes. You're producing because it's something which is going to help people. If you've got that belief, that energy goes into that product, and then it goes out and expands.   Mason: (01:00:40) Yeah. That faith, I mean, I've got a bit of trauma around religion, going to a Catholic school as well, but then when I've reconnected to the natural state of faith for me versus institutional faith, as you said, I'm like, "Oh wow. What freedom." I've got an intention and I trust my intention around herbs and education, and I'm sure you have the same experience, and watch it open up as long as you give it... When you keep on turning up and staying consistent within it. Yeah. It's fun. It is fun. It's a great reminder. And I love your work. I really appreciate you coming on and chatting to all of us during Brovember.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:26) Thank you, mate. I've given a listen to it and we really appreciate what you've done and what you've created here and the great products that you have. I've only started using Mason's Mushrooms and I'm not consistent. I'm only using them every few days. Maybe I need to have it more up, but I like it with cold water rather than hot.   Mason: (01:01:46) In a smoothie. You got the tropical fruit up there I think coming on at the moment. Yeah, it's all good, goes with it. Whatever, a bit of mango, a bit of mango sorbet.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:57) They'll be out in a couple months so I be into there, I reckon for sure. So, appreciate it.   Mason: (01:02:00) Yeah, well, yeah. It is that consistency with the mushies and the tonic herbs and even do a little bit more than you think you should be doing. Go up the dose a little bit. With your meditation practise, You'll definitely have a greater capacity for the dose.   Aaron Schultz: (01:02:18) Yeah. Yeah, awesome, mate. I appreciate that. I haven't used any drugs for 25 years, marijuana, or any of that sort of stuff. I've never used magic mushrooms and everyone else around the same seems to. Yeah, this sort of stuff is new to me. I was a raw vegan guy for a long time. So, I know it's like to feel dialled in. It felt amazing consistently, but I just couldn't get the product to keep myself sustained. So, I have to find different things now that can help me, I give it a stab.   Mason: (01:02:51) Nice one. Yeah. That was me. I was raw vegan basically, and a yin yoga teacher, funnily, when I was like, yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:01) Unreal.   Mason: (01:03:03) Yeah. So, I definitely relate to what you're saying. My wife is a yin yoga teacher and goes over and studies with Paul and Suzee Grilley, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:10) Yeah, yeah. Cool. It's interesting. I was to go over there in 2019, but that got stuffed up, and I've done training with four, five other teachers that have all studied with Paul, but I haven't actually gone and studied with him myself. So, yeah. It'll happen at some stage, I reckon, but yeah.   Mason: (01:03:32) For sure.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:32) Yeah. [inaudible 01:03:33]. It's been something like I come from Bikram yoga to hatha to Kundalini to yin so I've gone through all those journeys. The Kundalini yoga is very powerful as far as creating connections and that type of thing. It's amazing what the energy that comes from the practise actually can do for you. Yeah, so I was really grateful to sort of fall into that too, but it's all these tools that have sort of popped up over the journey.   Mason: (01:04:03) Yeah, they all fit into a piece of the puzzle.   Aaron Schultz: (01:04:06) That's true. Clearly.   Mason: (01:04:09) Beautiful mate. Well, I look forward to chatting to you on your podcast, and yeah. I'll keep an eye up for everything you're up to. Thanks for coming on.   Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

Bachelor of Hearts
127. Hets at the Gras w/ Abby Butler! (Bachelorette AU S7 E7)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 102:48


This week, we're joined once again by Friend Of The Pod Abby Butler (triple j! social media superstar!) for a recap of a single-episode week, which, despite its lack of content, gave us quite a lot to chew on. A Mardi Gras At The SCG group date, a bewildering Paramount sponcon single date, and a couple of intruders (one small and very cold, one very loud and with a big orange wig). Plus, we wildly speculate on some real-life goss involving Konrad and Abbie Chatfield, and share a powerful ballad about the importance of straight people. Give Abby the BoH Bump: find her on Instagram @abbzbutler and TikTok @flabbygutler! BIBLIOGRAPHY: Defining Moments: First Gay Mardi Gras, National Museum of Australia Mardi Gras Parade returns to the Sydney Cricket Ground in 2022, published 14/10/2021 by Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Mardi Gras Cancels Oxford Street Parade, Will Return to Sydney Cricket Ground in 2022, by Emilie Schäfferling, published 14/10/2021 in Star Observer The Bachelorette's Taje Fowler On Her Move To Quash 'Homogenous' Perception Of First Nations People, by Alicia Vrajlal, published 09/11/2021 in Refinery29

Spiritual Teachings With Shunyamurti
The Situation is Hopeless, But Unreal - Shunyamurti Teaching

Spiritual Teachings With Shunyamurti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 11:23


Shunyamurti offers a koan on consciousness and the logic of the transcendence of worlds; reading again from The Supreme Source, this class reminds us to let go of the mind, let go of all methods, to let go of the desire for Liberation, and ultimately to let go of the you who thinks there's anything to let go of--and just be in your natural state (before you had an ego).   This is an excerpt from a longer teaching posted on our Members Section.  Sign up for your free 10-day trial: https://bit.ly/3oqFcCe 

Building the Open Web
Building Rawbots - A Sandbox Robot Crafting MMORPG w/ CEO Neil Haran

Building the Open Web

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 20:19


Neil Haran is CEO of Rawbots, an online sandbox game where players can build and enhance their own robots as they explore the online universe. More than that, the game will enable players to learn concepts as they create and figure how to venture out into different planets and environments as a new category of "play-to-learn". In this episode Neil talks with Sasha about: • Originally wanting to be a pilot• Building a game with educational value• The most important thing to focus on when building compelling gaming experiences• Can you build a sandbox game together with a community?• Making education more personalized with web3 gaming• The Unreal engine and the features and capabilities it enables• Words of wisdom he'd give someone who's thinking of joining web3Episode links:Rawbots: https://www.rawbots.org/Neil Haran: https://twitter.com/realneilharanRawbots Discord: https://discord.gg/KZXqDAfDbv[Textbook] Game Programming Gems by Mark DeLoura: https://www.amazon.ca/Game-Programming-Gems-Mark-DeLoura/dp/1584500492[Textbook] Multiplayer Game Programming by Todd Barron: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/multiplayer-game-programming-wcd-prima-techs-game-development_todd-barron/772443/[Textbook] Black Belt C++ by Bruce Eckel: https://www.amazon.ca/Black-Belt-C-Masters-Collection/dp/1558513345

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

La escasez de componentes se hace más real que nunca / Huobi se instala en Gibraltar / Ratifican multa a Google / Surface Laptop barata / Seda tecnológica para reducir el calor / YouTube oculta los votos negativos Patrocinador: Pásate a TotalEnergies https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares y reduce tu factura de la luz y del gas. En su web https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares podrás ver directamente cuánto podrás ahorrar. Tienen un servicio de atención al cliente gratuito y con personas que te entienden. Si te apuntas estos días te ahorrarás un 10% extra en el precio de tu factura https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares. La escasez de componentes se hace más real que nunca / Huobi se instala en Gibraltar / Ratifican multa a Google / Surface Laptop barata / Seda tecnológica para reducir el calor / YouTube oculta los votos negativos

The Going Up Cast
Ep. 150 - Wait, This Is Episode 150?!

The Going Up Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 65:51


This week we talk about Owl House Season 2, the Chernobyl mini-series, Critical Role Season 3 Ep 3, Elden Ring gameplay, Unpacking the game and I went camping in the snow! Also, 150 episodes of The Going Up Cast!! Unreal! Enjoy! :D

Bachelor of Hearts
126. Bachelor in Paranoia (Bachelorette AU S7 E5-6)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 97:02


This week, pure good faces off against pure evil as Steve The Human Lie Detector returns to the show, wreaking chaos and leaving suffering in his wake. How is pure, innocent Kurt meant to react? Plus, the forthcoming sequel to a 40-year-old movie sponsors this show populated by 25-year-olds, and we dive deep into the discourse of queer identity, Top Gun, and The Bachelorette. Plus, we attempt the world's longest podcast kiss. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Top Gun and the End of the Homoerotic Action Movie, by Nico Lang, published May 15, 2016 in Consequence Top Gun, Bottom Gun, or Vers Gun?, by Rich Juzwiak, published June 30, 2020 in Jezebel 40+ Australia Gambling Statistics for 2021, by Andriana Moskovska, published July 31, 2021 in Take A Tumble

Bachelor of Hearts
Ancient Kisstory #7 - Pizza Or Chinese Food? (Bachelor US S1 E7)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 78:14


This week, it's the thrilling finale of this chapter of Ancient Kisstory, and our excavation of The Bachelor US Season 1! What high-concept fantasy dates did the producers select for the apex of the season? Who did Alex pick to spend the rest of his life with - and how much of the rest of his life did he spend with her? What became of the happy couple, and what of the scorned cast-off? Why am I pretending nobody has ever Googled any of this information before?

History of Japan
Episode 413 - Between Real and Unreal

History of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 32:36


This week, we're looking at the legacy of Chikamatsu Monzaemon, the most famous playwright in Japanese history. During his career, which spanned the zenith of Japan's Edo period, he produced some 130 plays and was enormously influential in terms of his approach to drama. How did he do it, and what is his legacy for Japan today? Show notes here.

CanadianGameDevs.com
Ep 199 - A Day Old Pod <3

CanadianGameDevs.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


Jobs:Jean Leggett will be looking for a part-time producer soon!Archipelago of DesignGame DesignerJoydrop is looking for Unreal and Unity DevelopersEvents:Fri OCT 22 - Gamedev Atlantic (Online - Halifax, NS) by NSIS“A day-long conference, celebrates and fosters the growth of the game development industry in Atlantic Canada.”Oct 26th - Canada - Melbourne digital games webinar: LEADERSHIP & SCALING YOUR STUDIOReleases This Week x2:RC Rush from Tea Monster GamesNews and Announcements:Toronto, ON: Echo Generation Coming October 21 Exclusively on Xbox Series, Xbox One & Win PC Game Pass on Day 1Québec: Moonglow Bay Delayed to October 26Montréal, QC: Rumour: Bioshock 4 is still in pre-productionMontréal, QC: Avengers get second chance on Xbox Game PassWishlist This:Beyond the Oaks by Dragon Fly Games Studio (@games_dragonfly) in Saskatoon, SK. Releasing TBD, Follow on GameJoltPace Chasers by Studio BackPack (@studio_backpack) in Clarksburg, ON. Releasing TBD, Follow on itchioMother's Little Helper by Squeezebotjam (@jay_clipperton & @lostmercenary) in Toronto, ON. Releasing TBD, Follow on itchio

Beale Street Bullies: A Memphis basketball podcast
Taliek Brown on beating Duke on the Final Four, Adama Sanogo's development and an UNREAL Jim Calhoun story

Beale Street Bullies: A Memphis basketball podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:25


UConn legend Taliek Brown, the program's all-time assist leader and a current member of Dan Hurley's coaching staff, was today's guest on the TOP DOGS podcast. Taliek discussed his role in UConn's come from behind win over Duke in the 2004 Final Four, the shot he hit against Pitt in the 2002 Big East tournament and an incredible Jim Calhoun story that you are going to want to hear. TOP DOGS is presented by Bet Rivers SUBSCRIBE to the Field of 68 THE FIELD OF 68 IS POWERED BY BET RIVERS FOLLOW: Rob Dauster Twitter Instagram Youtube https://thefieldof68.com U C O N N

Bachelor of Hearts
125. Haunted By Feminism w/ Matilda Boseley! (Bachelorette AU S7 E3-4)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 117:44


This EEK on the Bachelor of Hearts podcast - it's our annual arbitrary Halloween special! We're joined by journalist & Bachie expert Matilda Boseley to discuss Week 2 of Brooke's season of The Bachelorette - which included a few pretty incredible milestones for representation of queer communities, a rare moment of passionate, slow-burning tenderness, and a Single Date with a contestant who continues to break down traditionally-held ideas of gender roles and toxic masculinity. So, to celebrate another big week in this landmark season, we of course tried to cram our podcast with as many spooky references as the holiday demands. Give Matilda the BoH Bump: Find her on Twitter @MatildaBoseley! BIBLIOGRAPHY: "The Bachelorette's Ritu Chhina Says She Felt 'Tokenised' At Times During Filming", by Alicia Vrajlal, published in Refinery29 27 October 2021.

BAMB BAMB NEWS
Range of topics Answer a few question from LGBTQ community and the derangement of the democrats

BAMB BAMB NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 16:19


Unreal i speak the truth the left can't handle in 2021 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bambbambnews/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bambbambnews/support

Flippin' Bats with Ben Verlander
POSTGAME LIVE REACTION GAME 3 WORLD SERIES + AUSTIN RILEY INTERVIEW + BRAVES HOME FIELD ATMOSPHERE

Flippin' Bats with Ben Verlander

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 38:21


LIVE from Game 3 of the World Series at Truist Park in Atlanta! Ben catches up with Brett Phillips after the game before giving a FULL Game 3 recap as Ian Anderson throw 5 no-hit innings before interviewing Braves rising star Austin Riley, breaking down the decision to pull Ian Anderson after 5 sensational innings, the youth movement in MLB, UNREAL atmosphere in Atlanta, battling the bad elements and of course answering ALL of your fan questions! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast
65 - Unreal Estate Part 4

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 83:06


Now for the stunning finale of this tale of homeownership horror, preceded by a seasonal challenge from your crypt-keeping host with the most (Andy). Also in attendance: Jane and an off-brand Luigi costume.   Check out Scooby-Doo: Escape From the Haunted Mansion at theop.games and use promo code OXVENTURE for 10 percent off.  Selling trading cards? Get the eBay app to list them in a snap at  ebay.com/scantolist. Discover the full Outside Xbox and Outside Xtra Hallowstream schedule at twitter.com/outsidexbox. To watch all the original Oxventure Dungeons & Dragons videos, visit us on YouTube at youtube.com/outsidexbox and youtube.com/outsidextra.  With thanks to Johnny Chiodini, Oxventure Dungeon Master and Literally Everyone Else in the World. 

Bachelor of Hearts
Ancient Kisstory #6 - Tell Me More (Bachelor US S1 E6)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 95:36


This week on Ancient Kisstory, we're looking back at the first ever Women Tell All special, to get all the behind-the-scenes gossip straight from the horses' mouths. But since nothing really happened on that episode, we're also presenting an exhaustively researched investigation into Where They Are Now. Was one of the women from this season in Spider-Man? Who was Cyndi Lauper's makeup artist? Who's going to be on the next season of The Apprentice UK? Plus - we conduct a detailed investigation into how many standard drinks of champagne were drunk by each person in season 1, read an excerpt from the Grease Wiki, and urge our listeners to Give Beef To The Boy. BIBLIOGRAPHY "Singles answer show's casting call", by Gary C.W. Chun, published in Honolulu Star-Bulletin December 17, 2001 "Reality TVs reach for the stars: Bachelor finds one in Seattle psychologist", by Mark Rahner, published in Seattle Times March 25, 2002 "'The Bachelor's' LaNease Adams: 'I Was Depressed After Racist Backlash From Alex Michel's Season'", by LaNease Adams, as told to Lindsay Geller, published in Women's Health, July 6, 2020 "What does reality TV owe Black women?", by Bethonie Butler and Emily Yahr, published in Washington Post Oct 14, 2021 "Q&A: Shannon Oliver of "The Bachelor", by whoever runs Super-Hair.net, published in Super-Hair.net December 2002

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 532 | UNREAL: Did New Zealand PM Reveal the NWO Agenda?

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 46:58


New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern ADMITS that blah blah policies will create “two different classes of people.” Did the New Zealand PM REVEAL the NWO agenda? Are we going to see more blah blah lockdowns as we head into the winter? San Francisco Marina District residents have turned to private security to patrol the streets due to a HIGH crime spree. Is this the new normal? A drag show at public high school football game turns heads, and the schools supports the “drag ball” in order to be more inclusive. Censorship continues as Christian rapper Bryson Gray's song “Let's Go Brandon” got BANNED from social media due to “medical misinformation.” When did we become communist China? Today's Sponsors Now you can see the difference yourself today. Get 50% off their most popular packages. Go to http://lovegenucel.com/WATCHCHAD for 50% off. Design like a pro with Canva Pro! Right now, you can get a FREE 45-day extended trial when you use my promo code! Just go to http://Canva.me/WATCHCHAD to get your FREE 45-day extended trial. I urge all of my listeners to enroll with SCOREMASTER right away…to add credit score points fast… and MOST IMPORTANTLY…to get your privacy back! Go to http://ScoreMaster.com/CHAD Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bachelor of Hearts
124. Making History w/ Nat Tencic! (Bachelorette AU S7 E1-2)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 115:08


It's a groundbreaking week for the Bachelor franchise - the first episodes starring the first bisexual and first Indigenous Australian lead in the franchise's history have just aired, and believe it or not - they were really good. We're joined by the great Nat Tencic (triple j, The Hook Up), who shares her perspective as a broadcaster who discusses sex, love and relationships on the regular; as a new Bachie viewer, as a bisexual woman, and as someone who recently got to speak to Brooke about her season. We discuss how Brooke is approaching this season head-on, our impressions of the dynamics forming in the cast during the first two episodes, and how (at least so far) the show is rising to the challenge. Plus, did you realise they're actually making history this season?

Behar On The Block
Jenny Goldfarb - CEO Unreal Deli

Behar On The Block

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:41


Jenny Goldfarb, aka Mrs. Goldfarb, is the founder of Unreal Deli. She grew up on the Standard American Diet (SAD), and in her early 30s, learned about the plight of animals on factory farms, which led her to adopt a plant-based diet. After much trial and error she became a whiz in the plant-based kitchen and realized the thing she missed most after becoming vegan was premium NY-style deli meat. She sought to recreate a corned beef made from beets, chickpeas, tomatoes and high protein wheat. The recipe became such a hit that it encouraged her to produce her Corn'd Beef Reubens for Delis, Whole Foods, even Shark Tank, where she took on Mark Cuban as primary investor. The company then developed Unreal Roasted Turk'y followed by Unreal Steak Slices. With no experience in the food sector, let alone launching a company, she gave birth to this rapidly expanding business in her tiny kitchen while pregnant with her 3rd child. The Unreal Deli product line can now be found in thousands of restaurant and grocery locations nationwide with more to come.

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast
64 - Unreal Estate Part 3

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 72:25


The saga of the haunted manor at Necropolis-on-Sea continues as the Oxventurers do battle against a series of paintings come horribly to life. I don't know much about art, but I know what I intensely dislike, and it's paintings of clowns trying to kill me. Check out Scooby-Doo: Escape From the Haunted Mansion at theop.games and use promo code OXVENTURE for 10 percent off.  Selling trading cards? Get the eBay app to list them in a snap at  ebay.com/scantolist. Get MCM tickets and come see us live here! Discover the full Outside Xbox and Outside Xtra Hallowstream schedule at twitter.com/outsidexbox. To watch all the original Oxventure Dungeons & Dragons videos, visit us on YouTube at youtube.com/outsidexbox and youtube.com/outsidextra.  With thanks to Johnny Chiodini, Oxventure Dungeon Master and Literally Everyone Else in the World. 

Bachelor of Hearts
Ancient Kisstory #5: Yikes (Bachelor US S1 E5)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 72:13


This week on Ancient Kisstory, we do our best to reckon with the psychosexual gauntlet of The Bachelor's first ever 'Fantasy Suites'. That's right: it's Fuck Week for Alex Michel and his three finalists. How does the show convince us for the first time that this is Going To Be A Thing? How does Alex break it to three women that he's planning to fuck all of them? And can he make it through this week without puking? (no)

Action Sports Jax On ESPN690
10-20-21 HOUR 1: The Smoot Story is Unreal, Forgotten NFL Players from the Offseason

Action Sports Jax On ESPN690

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 42:25


Brent and Austen discuss the Smoot story, and forgotten NFL Players from the offseason

Bachelor of Hearts
123. Johann or Go Home (Bachelorette S7 Preview)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 67:36


We are SO excited that Brooke Blurton's gamechanging season of The Bachelorette is about to begin! Mere hours after the contestants' profiles went live on 10play, we sat down to pull apart what we could glean from them: both the traditional interview questions and night 1 photos, and also from their linked Instagram pages. We make our predictions for who will win, what kind of characters we're likely to see on the show, and who's likely to be Australia's next big anti-vax influencer. Also - a much-needed sidebar for some important chat about a breakfast cereal commercial from 2004.

Castology
The Something Scary Podcast, Edith!, The Oyster

Castology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 24:44


Liz Recommends - The Something Scary PodcastDo you wanna hear something scary? Join Markeia every week as they bring you the creepiest ghost stories, urban legends, and folktales.Creepy music and really evocative storytelling.They also choose a story each week to animate and post on youtube.https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/something-scary/id1438162222Nick Recommends - Edith! After President Woodrow Wilson suffered a massive, paralyzing stroke in the White House, Edith Wilson did the unthinkable: she told no one. And for almost a year following the end of World War I, Edith Wilson acted as the de facto unelected President. She would issue orders as him. She would fire people as him. She would even cause international incidents as him. And all along the way, enemies both internal and external, inched closer to finding out her secret.https://crooked.com/podcast-series/edith/Zane Recommends - The Oysterhttps://www.theparagoncollective.com/In a not-so-distant future, due to overwhelming carbon emissions, The Earth is on the brink of becoming uninhabitable. These conditions are made far more horrifying because the available housing shelters (that can produce sustainable air quality) will only be able to house 80% of the world's total population. To try and save the human race, every person has a government-mandated microchip implanted in their brain to attempt to facilitate the migration of a portion of the population to an underground shelter. In order to decide who gets to be protected and who must stay above ground, the government implements a value scale they have determined based on “usefulness” to future society. If you are valued at a 50 or above, you will be chosen to enter the bunker, and, if not, you must stay above ground and face the end of days. “Neuron” (which acts as both a prestigious brain implant and also a software company) is folded into a sanctioned branch of the government called, “The Ministry of Experience.” Their job now is to develop technologies and software that can replicate the human experience above ground. But what is far more pressing is The Ministry must find a way to reduce the use of resources, or they will run out of all survivable assets before being able to relocate to “Eden” - the one place above ground that might be salvageable in a few years time. Whether Eden will be ready in time remains to be seen, but its existence is literally the last hope for the human race surviving. In a drastic effort to cut emissions and resource usage, “The Oyster” is created. The Oyster is Nirvana - A state absent from the mind while being filled with complete pleasure and bliss. What, then, happens when reality begins to fade and The Oyster is all that remains?The Oyster stars Logan Browning (Dear White People and the Perfection), Mamoudou Athie (Jurassic World), Carla Gugino (Haunting of Hill House), Keith David (Greenleaf), Giancarlo Esposito (Breaking Bad), Constance Zimmer (House of Cards, UnReal), Andrew Santino (Dave) and more.Created by Alex Aldea and Adrienne Schafflerhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1538224217 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Unreal Irish Folklore
Mid Season Break

Unreal Irish Folklore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 0:33


Hi everyone, Ruth here, and apologies for the slightly sporadic uploads to Unreal this season – I've just been having quite a busy time outside of podcasting. I'm actually going to take mid-season break and come back in two weeks with a special Halloween episode, and finish out the second half of the season then, hopefully with more regular uploads for those last few episodes. I hope that sounds ok, and wishing you a folklore-filled few weeks in the meantime. Go n-éirí an bóthar leat.

Vention
#0026 - Wyatt Thomas: Get Unreal

Vention

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 52:20


Wyatt Thomas and I go over the basics and mechanics of Unreal Engine, most importantly we talk about why it is regarded as one of the best videogame design software in the world. While Wyatt focuses his efforts on animating and worldbuilding, he will continue to mature in the craft to reveal his growing efforts in the near future. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vention/support

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
What You Need to Know to Understand All This Bannon Business

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:20


RUSH: The Steve Bannon interview… I've been getting emails all day from people who want my take on this, so I'm gonna go ahead and get into this now. I got to tell you again up front, I don't know the guy. I haven't even… He's been in a room twice when I have been with the president, but I've never been formally introduced even, and I've never spoken directly to him. So none of this is, to me, based on any personal knowledge I have of Bannon or the arrangement that Trump and Bannon have. All I can do is speculate hire, which I'll be happy to do. Now, the reason that Washington's in a tizzy today is because Bannon called Robert Kuttner at The American Prospect for an exclusive interview. This would be like Reagan calling Pravda. Unreal, of all the people Bannon could call, he calls Kuttner at The American Prospect. He calls somebody that hates Trump as much as anybody hates Trump, and it was not off the record. He wanted it known. Whatever was in this interview, Bannon wants out there, and it's out there. I watched Karl Rove react to it today and he was beside himself. He just could not believe any of this. He couldn't believe any aspect of it, thought it was the craziest, strangest, oddest, dumbest thing he's ever seen from any administration. https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2017/08/17/what-you-need-to-know-to-understand-all-this-bannon-business/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Dermot & Dave
Dermot & Dave's Best Of Podcast-15/10

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 117:45


Dermot & Dave's 'Ah Sure Lookit Wasn't That It' podcast is the perfect thing to keep you company over the weekend, whether you're out and about in the car, getting stuck into jobs at home or if you need to stick some earphones in for an hour to drown out the noise of your kids for some well deserved 'me time' (no judgement here!) [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/10/15130640/1015_Final.mp3"][/audio] Jam-packed full of all the bits you may have missed the Ah Sure Lookit Wasn't That It podcast is your one-stop shop for all things Dermot & Dave. While our Dermot is back to work after suffering with a (non-Covid) lurgy, the cold is ‘never ending'. Bur it does have some benefits. His ‘impression stable' has increased by 30% and includes Steve Garrigan AND Chris Martin. Someone hold Maria back! Meanwhile, Dave's latest World Cup is causing serious consternation amongst the team, his Instagram followers, and dare we say…the nation! We heard about pints delivered by drone, heard some of the best excuses for missing work and Eimear told us about the UNREAL roll that was popular in her school. Think curry sauce. But for Team D&D, there's only one big thing in our world. Our producer Maria is headed off to get hitched. We saw her off in style with a team breakfast, a decorated desk…and a card that says Mrs& Mrs. Johnny is surely delighted. Plus all your faves from Noni, to Say Stuff That Suits the Music and of course…Dave's bad jokes! 🚨Sound the alarm!! 🚨 Is this the BEST Dave's Bad Jokes ever?! 😂@DaveTodayFM @DermotTodayFM pic.twitter.com/dK52oBEw4C — Today FM 💛 (@TodayFM) October 14, 2021 You can catch all the craic by clicking play above.

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast
63 - Unreal Estate Part 2

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 66:55


The haunted family manor inherited by the Oxventure crew doesn't want to be sold. The Oxventurers struggle heroically to give tours to prospective buyers. Nude portraiture ensues.  Check out Scooby-Doo: Escape From the Haunted Mansion at theop.games and use promo code OXVENTURE for 10 percent off.  Selling trading cards? Get the eBay app to list them in a snap at  ebay.com/scantolist. Discover the full Outside Xbox and Outside Xtra Hallowstream schedule at twitter.com/outsidexbox. To watch all the original Oxventure Dungeons & Dragons videos, visit us on YouTube at youtube.com/outsidexbox and youtube.com/outsidextra.  With thanks to Johnny Chiodini, Oxventure Dungeon Master and Literally Everyone Else in the World. 

The mindbodygreen Podcast
342: Are healthy foods secretly spiking your blood sugar? | Casey Means, M.D.

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:31


Casey Means, M.D.: “Metabolic health is not just about avoiding long-term chronic illnesses…It's also about feeling good in the moment.” Means, a Stanford-trained physician and co-founder of Levels, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob, to discuss which healthy foods can secretly spike your blood sugar, plus: - How your microbiome affects your blood sugar - How to prepare your body for a glucose spike - Underrated tips to keep your metabolism stable - Why you should switch from sweet to savory breakfasts - How to actually know if your metabolism is healthy Referenced in the episode: - Levels. - Data showing the average American eats 152 pounds of sugar in one year. - A study on how poor sleep can affect metabolism. - A study on how microbiome can dictate glucose responses. - Levels blog post on the top 10 worst foods for blood sugar. - mbg Podcast episode #294, with Jud Brewer, M.D., Ph.D. - Product recommendations: Unreal chocolate quinoa peanut butter cups, Lief Therapeutics HRV monitor, Siete Foods burrito size tortillas, Whole Foods nori sheets, Forager Project cashew milk yogurt. Enjoy this episode! Whether it's an article or podcast, we want to know what we can do to help here at mindbodygreen. Let us know at: podcast@mindbodygreen.com.

Red Star Radio
Australia's Crazy COVID-19 Response w/ Nicolas Hausdorf

Red Star Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 81:23


Nicolas Hausdorf, writer and resident of Melbourne, joins us to give us the inside scoop on Australia's COVID-19 response. Are things as bad as they seem? Listen to find out. Mentioned in the show: Nicolas' review of Benjamin Bratton's book, Revenge of the Unreal

Bachelor of Hearts
Ancient Kisstory #4 - Chanute Salute (Bachelor US S1 E4)

Bachelor of Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 80:38


On this episode of Ancient Kisstory, we're looking at the first ever Hometown Dates in Bachelor history. It's an opportunity to reflect on the institutions which run deep throughout the franchise's DNA - Christianity, the city of Dallas, and of course, suffering. It's a little bizarre to see Hometown Dates without the usual cookie-cutter drama: so instead of manufactured 'over-protective dad' tropes, we get naturalistic glimpses of America in 2002 (which just happens to include a few over-protective dads). Plus... a room full of corpses.

Blogging the Boys: for Dallas Cowboys fans
Dallas Cowboys Roundup (10/12): Trevon Diggs has been unreal so far this season

Blogging the Boys: for Dallas Cowboys fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:28


Life continues to be great for the Dallas Cowboys as they are 4-1 on the season with one game left before their bye. Head Coach Mike McCarthy and staffers spoke on Monday and gave us an idea where things stand with them at this point in the season. Check out the latest episode of Dallas Cowboys Roundup as Dan Rogers gets you caught up on everything you need to know. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast
62 - Unreal Estate Part 1

Oxventure - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:35


Let's go to Necropolis-on-Sea, the creepy ancestral home of Oxventure's own party pirate Corazón de Ballena. Could it be haunted? It definitely could. Mike and Andy introduce the first part of this spectral special, but also talk some Super Monkey Ball Banana Mania and Squid Game.   You can see Oxventure live and in person at EGX 2021 in London on 8 and 9 October! You can discover the full Hallowstream schedule at twitter.com/outsidexbox! To watch all the original Oxventure Dungeons & Dragons videos, visit us on YouTube at youtube.com/outsidexbox and youtube.com/outsidextra.  With thanks to Johnny Chiodini, Oxventure Dungeon Master and Literally Everyone Else in the World. 

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 278: BioShock (part four)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 78:06


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we continue our series on BioShock. We talk a lot about the surprise of the scene of Ryan, and some mechanical and production aspects we haven't had a chance to talk about yet. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: Up to Apollo Square! Issues covered: where the game should (?) have ended, playing golf with your dad, finding a way to incorporate a power station, Ryan the abstract monster vs Ryan the concrete monster, changing the lens you view Ryan through, rationalizing one's choices, the red yarn board, forcing the player to see a scene the way they want you to, egocentric Ryan and seeing oneself as a tragic hero, every villain as the hero of his own story, mythological framing, other ways you could tackle player agency here, "The Cake Is A Lie," the Irish charmer becoming the Irish thug, using Atlas to puff out Ryan as a monster, the many many layers of references and archetypes, all that matters to me is me and all that matters to you is you, killing people who are much like you, differentiating the Little Sisters in the Tenenbaum section, the mind-control plasmid, walking a tightrope with difficulty and challenge, mixing up your plasmids, the simplicity of upgrades, some numbers change or more things can be impacted, not feeling the power of tonics and plasmids, lack of builds, the limited number of axes across which powers and weapons apply, compressing the depth, modularity in world construction, solid art direction, regularity in the built world, kit-bashing, a couple of kind reviews, dealing with issues of preservation, what gets lost, wanting leaders to do more, having let's plays for reference. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: System Shock 2, Snowpiercer, Portal, Walt Disney, Wide World of Disney, PIXAR, Studio Ghibli, William Hearst, Citizen Kane, Modern Warfare 2, The Last of Us 2, Death Stranding, Hideo Kojima, Arkham City/Arkham Knight, Robert De Niro, The Irishman, Ken Levine, Village of the Damned, Metroid, Ratchet & Clank, Unreal, Gears of War, Skyrim, Fallout (series), Jarkko S., Baldur's Gate, Diablo, Final Fantasy VI, Metal Gear Solid, Chris_3646363, Ocarina of Time, mysterydip, Phil Spencer, Vectrex, Double Fine, Square Enix, The Matrix (series/Online), The Wachowskis, Meridian 59, Andrew and Chris Kirmse, Control, The Lost Room, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Links: Twitter thread on preservation Next time: Finish the game! Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

The Daily Swole
#1977 - ”Papa And The Fam Saved Me From An Early Death”

The Daily Swole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 4:56


Today's story is absolutely UNREAL. So proud of our SwoleFam and of Kristopher's amazing progress!   F Your Resolutions specials are officially LIVE! Join the fam today with amazing special offers on memberships.   Today's episode is for members only for the SwoleFam Accountability Meeting. Join today and never miss a single episode of your favorite show!   Join The SwoleFam! : https://www.swolenormousx.com/memberships APPAREL - Use code "DAILYSWOLE" for 10% off: https://papaswolio.com Free Swolega Class: https://www.swolenormousx.com/swolega Download the 7 Pillars Series HERE: https://www.swolenormousx.com/7-Pillars-Ebook Daily Swole Podcast LIVESTREAM Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/dailyswolepodcast  

The Darren Smith Show
Kirk Morrison "Kupp and Stafford's chemistry is unreal"

The Darren Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 18:42


Kirk Morrison on why the 4-0 Aztecs are ready for a Power Five, if they've had their breakthrough games, why the Rams offense can score at will and the incredible chemistry between Matthew Stafford and Cooper Kupp.

Locked On NFL
Big Ben cooked? Real or Unreal/Power Rankings

Locked On NFL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 27:43


Big Ben is holding the Steelers back. 3 teams are surprising the league. Are they real or unreal? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Boo Crew
Ep#260 - Mary Elizabeth Winstead (DEATH PROOF / THE THING / KATE)

The Boo Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 35:54


On an all new episode of your Boo Crew, you are joined by the epitome of cool... MARY ELIZABETH WINSTEAD! Her new extraordinary and bloody action flick KATE - is number one on Netflix! She'll tell you how she built this unstoppable bad ass! Hear what went into some of the gory gags and fx, the choreography involved in a spectacular 5 minute battle sequence ballet that has to be seen to be believed! We revisit some of her incredible genre films like Final Destination 3, Death Proof, Black Christmas, the underrated genius of Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter and more. Were those insane Studio ADI practical fx that ended up being replaced in 2011's THE THING actually filmed? What about Mary's UNREAL musical project Got A Girl with Dan The Automator? Her duet with Mike Patton?! Grab a Boom Boom Lemon and jump kick your way into Episode 260, now playing! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.