Podcasts about blackhawk

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Best podcasts about blackhawk

Latest podcast episodes about blackhawk

Innovating with Scott Amyx
Interview with Ziad Abdelnour, President and CEO of Blackhawk Partners

Innovating with Scott Amyx

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 36:19


Ziad Abdelnour, President and CEO of Blackhawk Partners. He is a Lebanese-born American author, Wall Street financier, philanthropist, activist, lobbyist, and commodities trader.

Miller's Military Moments
Air Assault in Baghdad, Iraq in 2006

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:42


I participated in my first Air Assault in Baghdad, Iraq in 2006. We delivered our customers on target on time. An air assault is simply us landing near the objective and letting the infantry out of the Blackhawk to go perform combat operations. Air Assaults are adrenaline pumping nerve wrecking events. So many things can go wrong. Yet, everything can go right. For us this one and many others went right. We planned and executed flawlessly. Not because we were lucky or just good. We trained hard for this. We learned from our mistakes and didn't make them again. We took pride in this part of our mission. This is what we were meant to do. No one wants to go to war. If war is necessary, lets find, engage and destroy the enemy and come home. Doing air assaults meant we were up close and personal to accomplishing those very things. This is what we signed up to do!From Apaches providing overhead cover, to fixed wing to even an AC 130 Spectre Gunship, this mission had it all. https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1539260Interested in supporting me and this show? Subscribe to my Patreon to earn rewards while supporting me! My Patreon page allows you to subscribe at 1 of 5 different levels. They range from 1 dollar a month to 100 dollars a month. Each tier is named after an Army rank such as private Sergeant, Staff Sergeant, First Sergeant, and General! Each level provides you with rewards for your subscription https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments Wanna start your own podcast? Buzzsprout is the best Podcast Hosting site! I use Buzzsprout, love their services and their value. They make it really easy to start, learn and grow your show! Sign up with Buzzsprout today!https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1539260Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREESupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Half Percent Podcast: Black Hawk Down, Delta Force, and Rocking Out and Giving Back with Silence and Light. (#47)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


Brad Thomas spent 20 years in the U.S. Army, first as a Ranger and later as an operator in Delta Force, the Army’s Tier 1 special missions unit. Brad was deployed to Somalia and was on the ground in Mogadishu for the incident which became known as “Black Hawk Down.” Brad would later earn his way […]

Miller's Military Moments
Saddam Hussein was my Passenger

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 40:21


This is maybe one of the most anticipated episodes from my experiences as a Soldier. Saddam Hussein was a passenger on my helicopter in 2006. YES! In the flesh, he was climbed in the aircraft on my side and sat about 2 feet from me. He was as defiant as ever. Saddam chewed on a unlit cigar while pointing at me and saying who knows what! We did not handcuff him or blindfold him as we treated him as a head of state. Some may find that difficult to hear, but we did. We often do try and do the right things in according to international norms. The preparation and execution of this mission was painstakingly difficult. The step by step process included about 40+ steps. The Commanding General was listening to the execution of the mission in case some thing went wrong. We executed it flawlessly,  but it was a pain in the ass getting ready for a mission that lasted about 7 minutes. After dropping him off, we went and picked up Chemical Ali and the other henchmen. Ali was dressed in cargo shorts, a Hawaiian shirt, flip flops like he was going to the beach! Tune in for the rest of the details! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Supreme Myths
Episode 38: Professor Maggie Blackhawk

Supreme Myths

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 55:23


Professor Maggie Blackhawk stops by Supreme Myths to talk about a host of issues surrounding Native Americans, the McGirt case, and legal formalism versus legal realism.  

Miller's Military Moments
Shooting Flares from the Blackhawk Helicopter

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 35:35


In 2006 we had a system called Common Missile Warning System (CMWS pronounced C-Moss) to protect us from incoming missiles. Shooting flares from the Blackhawk helicopter was an all too often scenario. Although this new system was computer controlled, the algorithm that told the system a missile was in bound was not very accurate. Due to this inaccuracy, we would often shoot flares for no reason while flying over Baghdad. Sometimes we even started brush fires after our flares hit the ground. We often scared the populace below with our random flares heading their way. Crew Chiefs had to carry extra buckets of flares to replace the buckets when they would get empty. We learned that changing them while the engines were still running, was not fun nor comfortable for the Crew Chiefs! Tune in for a few other funny stories regarding our CMWS! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Your Daily Writing Habit
Your Daily Writing Habit - Episode 887: Squashing the Doubters

Your Daily Writing Habit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 5:58


Today's Sunday Story Time selection - "The P.I.L.O.T. Method: The 5 Elemental Truths to Leading Yourself in Life" by Black Hawk helicopter pilot, author, and professional speaker Elizabeth McCormick. Get the book: https://amzn.to/3ErN0f7 Join the author conversation: https://www.facebook.com/groups/inkauthors/ Learn more about YDWH and catch up on old episodes: www.yourdailywritinghabit.com

Another Movie Podcast
#136 Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, Candyman, Black Hawk Down

Another Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 169:18


#136 Shang Chi: The Legend of the Ten Rings, Candyman, Black Hawk Down We enter the latest Marvel phase in full force with Eastern realms and more magical input. In a trend of martial arts films, Shang Chi is not bad in stunts and choreography. The Candyman sequel turned out to be more needed than we anticipated as it updates to gentrification in Chicago with brutal horror. Black Hawk Down celebrates its 20th anniversary this year and we talk pretty positively at the immense cast and solid Ridley Scott directing.      podmoviecast@gmail.com otherpodcast.com @podmoviecast   Oscar: @Armenfilmmaker Ralf: @GamerRalf  Twitch: SiouxTrauma Luke: @SlothMasterLuke     Recent Discoveries Ralf: Fear Street 1978 & 1966 Oscar: Ghost in the Machine (1993), A Quiet Place II, Stowaway, Pig     Show Notes 00:00:00 INTRO 00:15:01 Recent Discoveries 00:33:03 Shang Chi: The Legend of the Ten Rings 00:51:29 spoilers 01:17:43 Candyman 01:44:28 spoilers 02:00:03 Black Hawk Down 02:46:11 EXIT

The Dale Jackson Show
Dale and Brad Presnall discuss their thoughts on George W. Bush's "woke" comments comparing Jan. 6th rioters to 9/11 terrorists, and Black Hawk Down hero Michael Durant's jump into the District 5 Congressional race - 9-13-21

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 20:00


Gibborim
Living unafraid, with "Black Hawk Down" hero Jeff Struecker

Gibborim

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 41:57


Join the Gibborim today by downloading the Gibborim app or visiting www.gibborim.com

Comic Book Noise Family
Geek Brunch Retrocast 160 – When a Stranger Calls

Comic Book Noise Family

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021


Join Mike, Chris, and Rob as they discuss Passive Aggressive, When a Stranger Calls (1979), Nauicaa of the Valley of the Wind, Kickstarters, Targitt #1, Crime Suspense Stories #19, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olson #107, Blackhawk #212, The Unexpected...

Geek Brunch
Geek Brunch Retrocast 160 – When a Stranger Calls

Geek Brunch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 145:31


Join Mike, Chris, and Rob as they discuss Passive Aggressive, When a Stranger Calls (1979), Nauicaa of the Valley of the Wind, Kickstarters, Targitt #1, Crime Suspense Stories #19, Superman's Pal Jimmy Olson #107, Blackhawk #212, The Unexpected #222, Ghosts #104, Saddle Justice #3

Checkered Past
Caught With Your Pants Down (Blackhawk 223)

Checkered Past

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 44:54


The Blackhawks stumble their way through defeating Mr. Quick-Change, who manages to conceal his true identity through the clever use of *checks notes* a goattee. Join the fun, won't you?

Checkered Past
Caught With Your Pants Down (Blackhawk 223)

Checkered Past

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 44:54


The Blackhawks stumble their way through defeating Mr. Quick-Change, who manages to conceal his true identity through the clever use of *checks notes* a goattee. Join the fun, won't you?

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Destination Illinois: The Black Hawk State Historic Site

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021


For this week’s Destination Illinois, Julie Nelson, the director of the Hauberg Museum and assistant site superintendent at Black Hawk State Historic Site, joins Steve Bertrand on Chicago’s Afternoon News to discuss the rich history of the Sauk and Mesquakie (Fox) Native Americans, specifically the nearby site of Saukenuk, where an estimated 4,800 Sauk comprised […]

Life on the Line
Life After Service - Gary and Renee Wilson

Life on the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 56:41


This is the audio-only version of our Life After Service episode with Tamara Sloper-Harding. Watch the video documentary episode now on YouTube! Gary Wilson was a signaller attached to the 2nd Commando Regiment. On the 21st of June, 2010, Gary and then-fiancé Renee's lives were changed forever when Gary was severely injured in a Black Hawk helicopter crash. In this episode of Life After Service, Thomas Kaye speaks to the now-married couple, Gary and Renee, about the accident, the challenges they overcame and how they are helping pave the way to support others, both veterans and the families of those veterans. Want to join the Wilsons and support veterans, their families and give back? Check out The Wilson Initiative. https://thewilsoninitiative.com.au/ Looking to have more energy, manage pain and optimise your health? Gary runs Bare Coaching, his personal coaching service. Find out more at: https://www.barecoaching.com/ CLOSING CREDITS: Guests: Gary Wilson & Renee Wilson Special Thanks: Kill Kapture Brought to you by Thistle Productions: Thomas Kaye, Alex Lloyd, Rohan Viswalingam Intro Music: THREE METRES by Stephen Keech Episode Soundtrack: THE HELL BEYOND by The Externals Workout Scene Music: WIRE by OBOY Fuelled by Striker Coffe Co. Copyright Thistle Productions 2021 THISTLE PRODUCTIONS, LIFE ON THE LINE and TECI

Miller's Military Moments
United States Army Experiences with Ben Myers

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 74:34


I served with Ben Myers in my early days in the Army. 2002-2004. Although he was a Kiowa Warrior mechanic and I worked on Blackhawks, we still found ourselves around the same shenanigans sometimes. Who knows what a camo ball is? Listen to find out! Although my deployment experience in 2003 was challenging, he had a much different one than I did. He was much more forward than I was, and closer to the Kiowa's.Great stories and laughs with Ben Myers! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Rock Island Lines
Black Hawk's Offer

Rock Island Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 2:49


This is Roald Tweet on Rock Island.

Hard Factor
8/31: ESPN Duped by Fake High School, and a String of Penis-Related Crimes

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 61:47


ESPN aired a High School Football game with a fake school playing in it (00:19:17), while a terrifying sting of penis related incidents gripped the nation, including one man who removed his own penis during a police chase (00:50:15). This, and much more on today's episode of Hard Factor... (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time, w/ Will (00:05:46) - Holidays - Bacon and Whiskey Day, Lawyer Talk (00:07:25) - Today in History - Jack the Ripper, Honolulu, and General Sherman (00:11:16) - #3 - Weather: South Lake Tahoe evacuated due to record setting fires in California, and Hurricane Ida Damage Report (00:15:14) - #2 - Taliban owned Blackhawk helicopters and other newly acquired military gear are being put to use for public executions, while the USA withdraws all troops from Afghanistan (00:19:17) - #1 - Bishop Sycamore is a fake high school that somehow got a football game aired on ESPN (00:26:13) - The Story of MGD and the Tennessee River - Wes takes us to the homeless camps near Knoxville for a violent crime that luckily got foiled by some dog shit and good samaritans TikTok International Moment, w/Pat (00:36:11) - Russia - Sushi Restaurant Bullied into Removing Interracial Ad (00:41:20) - Brazil - Organized Criminals Using Human Shields on their Vehicles (00:43:48) - China - the CCP is Limiting Video Game Time to Just 3 Hours a Week for All Children (00:50:15) - Lightning Round of Penis Incidents: Each one crazier than the last, starting with dildos on roofs, and ending with actual penises being removed… a shocking report from Mark. These stories and more… brought to you by our fantastic sponsors. Talkspace - Match with a licensed therapist when you go to talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month with the promo code HARDFACTOR. Gabi - Start saving on your auto insurance today! Go to Gabi.com/hardfactor to start saving today! Helix Sleep - Go to HelixSleep.com/hardfactor, take their two-minute sleep quiz, and they'll match you to a customized mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life & get up to $200 off all mattress orders AND two free pillows . Also download the Greenroom App by Spotify to join us for LIVE What the Fuck Wednesday Shows, every Wednesday at 5 PM Eastern Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480 or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Pods to hear it on Friday's show

Bounced From The Roadhouse
Homeslice Polka, Nuts and Bolts Pizza, Superman Stance, The Tallest Man, Moses parting the fence, if Brandon was a cat and MORE.

Bounced From The Roadhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 58:08


On this episode of Bounced from the Roadhouse we are on location at the Central States Fairgrounds in Rapid City. We talk bell bottoms, coffee and hairballs, bold and bossy and Brandon is in the doghouse! We hear from creepy clown Brandon and did he get the advice he needed from Blackhawk? Amy looks like a donkey with bangs, Food at the Central States Fair, Food that goes bad, Homeslice Polka, Hot Dogs are killing us and if Brandon was a cat. Concerts, Moses parting the fence, Nuts and bolts pizza, Roadhouse 5 in honor of back to school, Robots at Theme Parks, Soundchecks album, Superman Stance, Telling your pet secrets, The Tallest Man, Too early for pumpkin spice and we will end it with a Feel Good Moment.Don't forget to subscribe, leave us a review and some stars!!! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-334 - Bar None

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 38:40


In this episode, Biden threatens ISIS-K (sort of). The Taliban took a joyride in Blackhawk helicopters, after re-enacting the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima.

TacticalPay Radio
Producing Quality Tactical Gear With Mike Noell Of Sentry

TacticalPay Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 23:19


Thirty years ago, former Navy Seal Mike Noell developed Blackhawk so military personnel would have trustworthy gear. Now, he's started Sentry, which designs, manufactures and distributes a growing line of innovative products supporting Military, Law Enforcement and Shooting Sports markets. Whether it's firearms accessories, tactical gear, or otherwise... Mike's company takes a quality first approach. Listen along as he shares his story! For more information and to view the show notes, visit: https://www.tacticalpay.com/077-sentry/

The Sean Hannity Show
Afghanistan Could Have Been Avoided - August 26th, Hour 1

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 33:05


We have left 83 billion dollars of equipment in Afghanistan when we had every indication that the Taliban had spent the entire Spring growing and expanding. There are 75,000 armored vehicles and over 200 Blackhawk helicopters. If you don't think this is a tragedy, you're wrong. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast
Afghans, Ankles, Almost died

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 32:03


Today, Rich recaps the latest on Biden's surrender in Afghanistan and the selling out of Americans one Blackhawk helicopter at a time. Then, how much liberty will Americans give up in the name of this current plague of illness? Plus, an amazing story about a cop and a rap star resurfaces with a new twist.Comment and follow on Facebook, Twitter, and Parler or visit us at RichValdes.com.Portions of today's program are brought to you by PolitiWeek.com.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, We are witnessing— a failing Presidency—as Joe Biden flounders and wallows in his own failure

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—and if that offends you—honestly—I don't care—somebody has to tell it to you straight—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   Three— The most important river in the nation's Southwest—is drying up—which has been going on for years—but its worse now than it has ever been—    Two— The House of Representatives—while ignoring the collapse of Afghanistan—and Americans being left behind—along with our allies—to face the wrath of the terrorists—   One— We are witnessing— a failing Presidency—as Joe Biden flounders and wallows in his own failure—  It may be the weakest President to be in the White House since James Buchanon—and he led us into the front end of the American Civil War—because of his weakling approach to the office— Right now— It is pretty clear that it is the Taliban calling the shots in Afghanistan—and dictating to the Biden Administration— how things are going to go and rejecting any idea that American military forces will remain there past August 31st—   In fact the Taliban is openly threatening—the United States with serious consequences—if we remain past the end of the month— What should be happening—is President Biden—should be telling the terrorists—we will be there as long as it takes to get our people out—and those that supported the U-S over the last 20 years— But instead—Biden is bowing to a bunch of murdering terrorists—after he walked out and left them tens of billions of dollars in military gear—armored vehicles—Blackhawk helicopters—grenade launchers—600,000 rifles and small arms—mortars—and on and on and on— It is the biggest failure in American foreign policy in my lifetime—and that's why Joe Bidens support among Americans has fallen faster than any other President that I have ever heard— We begin this hour with this

Rich Zeoli
Abandoned U.S. Equipment Has Armed the Taliban (Non-Stop Talk 08-25-21)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 58:22


In today's hour of non-stop talk, the Biden administration continues to stand by their August 31st deadline for a full withdrawal of Americans from Afghanistan. Despite the growing criticism and seemingly rushed effort has resulted in the abandonment of U.S. military equipment including Black Hawk helicopters.   Photo by: Drew Angerer / Staff See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bounced From The Roadhouse
Bank Robbers and Spelling, Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Aftermath, Stupid Criminal, Yellowstone Prequel, Food Recall Diet and More.

Bounced From The Roadhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 40:54


On this episode of Bounced from the Roadhouse, the Sturgis Rally aftermath, Luke Combs lookalikes, was the Sturgis Rally a super-spreader? We also talk about Swass and Switt gifts, bank robbers should know how to spell, Bob Ross conspiracy theories, Brandon's advice from Blackhawk, Brandon's favorite song, Brandon's poor liver. Defining Idioms, I'm fat again, Leaving chocolates, Luke Bryan's Dirt Road Diary, Matthew McConaughey doesn't wear deodorant, Stupid Criminal involving a laser pointer, another food recall, and a Yellowstone prequel.Don't forget to subscribe, leave us a review and some stars!!! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago
Podcast: Bears fall flat in preseason game 2, Cubs are atrocious, and White Sox facing the AL's best

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021


The Swerski Crew is back talking Justin Fields during game 2, an awful loss to Mitchell Trubisky and the Buffalo Bills, the Cubs facing 95 losses on the season, and the White Sox in the midst of facing the AL's best. All of this and more on this latest episode of Swerski SportsMake sure to follow us on:Twitter: @SwerskiSportsFacebook: /SwerskiSportswww.SwerskiSports.comyoutube.com/SwerskiSportshttps://feeds.feedblitz.com/-/663588440/0/billswerskissportstalkchicago.MP3and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher or the TuneIn app      Related StoriesPodcast: Justin Fields in game 1, Cubs stink, and White Sox win the Field of Dreams gamePodcast: Big Dave joins us to talk Bulls, White Sox, and BearsPodcast: Analyzing the Cubs and White Sox trade moves, Fleury a Blackhawk, and the Bears training camp 

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show
God Forbid Biden Represents America Much Longer

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 37:11


One week after the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban and Al-Qaeda, we do well to do a brief inventory of the fallout at home and abroad. Three points to consider from reports at home and abroad over the past few days. 1. Biden Not Only Gave Afghanistan Back to the Taliban; He Also Armed Them Biden not only gave Afghanistan back to the Taliban. He also allowed them to take possession of military bases, vehicles, communications equipment, small arms, and ammunition. The New York Post reports the Taliban now has billions of dollars' worth of U.S. weapons, including Black Hawk helicopters, Humvees, and up to 600,000 rifles The Daily Wire reports the Biden administration is considering air strikes to destroy American weapons in Taliban possession. 2. France is Lecturing America About the Need for Swift, Decisive Action Biden is trying so hard to control the narrative, his administration is trying to censor the president of France. The Blaze reports the White House is accused of removing from the transcript of Biden's call with French President Macron a plea from the French leader that Biden share ‘moral responsibility' for rescuing Afghanis 3. Hollywood and British Lords Roundly Condemn Biden for Bungling Hollywood royalty and British Lords are coming down hard on Biden, and rightly so. The Blaze reports Angelina Jolie is ‘ashamed' of Biden's withdrawal from Afghanistan, describing it as having been undertaken in “the most chaotic way imaginable.” The Daily Wire reports British Lords roundly condemned Biden administration for catastrophic bungling in Afghanistan, calling this a loss for not only the U.S. and her allies, but the West as a whole. How Will Our American Generation Be Remembered? The blessing and curse of representative government is that when we Americans are led by great men, we can walk tall on the world stage and in the annals of history. But when we are led by the corrupt and ineffectual whose best defense for overseeing catastrophic failure is either incompetence or cognitive decline, then also are we represented. Perhaps it is fitting that Biden is the so-called leader of the free world right now. Confused, defiant, willful, stubborn, and dishonest - the humiliation is too much to be borne, unless this is God's judgment on our nation. The wind has been sown, and perhaps now we reap the whirlwind. However, I for one do still pray that the good Lord delivers us from evil and leads us not into temptation. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/support

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Maybe the most visual failure is the Taliban driving around in American military vehicles

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—and if that offends you—honestly—I don't care—somebody has to tell it to you straight—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   Three— A huge upset is now official in the deep blue state of Connecticut—in what could be the biggest indicator of what is coming for Democrats in the upcoming elections—a GOP win in a district Biden carried by 25 points— stunning!   Two— Illegal border crossings are on the way to being the worst in American history as the Biden record of failure is truly reaching the point of totally unprecedented—   One— Maybe the most visual failure—is the Taliban driving around in American military vehicles—that are heavily armed—and that is just part of what they are cashing in on—in fact in addition to the estimated 2,000 armored vehicles left behind—   Here is what the Taliban may now have in its arsenal to use against the U-S or anyone else that tries to come in—around 40 military aircraft—including Black Hawk helicopters—and scout attack helicopters—high tech scan Eagle drones—   Between just 2002 and 2017-- $28 billion dollars worth of American military gear flowed in—to help the Afghan army—on that list is 600,000 infantry weapons—including M-16's and 16,000 night vision goggles—   It is an absolute treasure trove—and even though some U-S commanders want to attack and destroy the big prizes—they cannot—because right now—because of the immense failure of intelligence by the U-S—the biggest focus is on an evacuation that is anything but certain—and attacking military equipment could trigger the assassination of thousands of Americans and friendly Afghani's that have been unable to get out of the country—talk about a deadly catch-22   Then there is this—the Taliban can also use the newly captured bounty—to play let's make a deal with America's bigger enemies like China and Russia—    By sharing technology with others— the Taliban might be able to trade up for better killing toys—   And through it all—the Biden Administration—seems to be living in Joes Dementia— all alone—in their own Private Idaho—  

Locked On Blackhawks - Daily Podcast On The Chicago Blackhawks
MacKenzie Entwistle Inks Two-Year Extension, + Blackhawks Complete 2021 NHL Draft Dive (Part 1)

Locked On Blackhawks - Daily Podcast On The Chicago Blackhawks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 35:28


Thursday's episode of Locked On Blackhawks begins with a conversation on forward MacKenzie Entwistle being the latest Blackhawk to sign an extension with the club. Then, host Jack Bushman begins to take a deeper dive into ALL the selections that the Blackhawks made in the 2021 NHL Draft. What's the NHL upside for defenseman Nolan Allan and forward Colton Dach? Who could be a sneaky late-round pick for the Blackhawks in the future? All that and more on Locked On Blackhawks. Part of the Locked On Podcast Network. Your Team. Every Day. Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Entwistle's Extension (3:05) Nolan Allan (2021 1st, 11:45) Colton Dach (2021 2nd, 16:05) Taige Harding (2021 3rd, 22:55) Ethan Del Mastro (2021 4th, 25:00) Victor Stjernborg (2021 4th, 27:25) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mettle of Honor: Veteran Stories of Personal Strength, Courage, and Perseverance

Retired Army Ranger, Larry Moores lead a convoy to capture two Somali leaders when two Blackhawks were shot down in 1993. The 'Black Hawk Down' mission describes what led to '18 hours of constant fighting'   In part 2, Larry Moores will share with us valuable lessons he learned in Mogadishu and what roles his men played in recovering our dead and wounded.  But here in part 1, we will learn more about him joining the military and his principles of leadership. He enlisted as a young Army Ranger, commissioned through Officer Candidate School and served a 21-year career in Airborne, Ranger and Special Operations assignments, with numerous deployments including, Grenada, Somalia and Afghanistan. Moores is now Executive Director of Three Rangers Foundation, which provides veterans with experts, advice and assistance in every aspect of their journey; whether spiritual, physical, mental, employment, finances, family, or education. Learn more about his foundation http://www.threerangersfoundation.org/ Larry proudly supports James Dietz's portraits in his home: http://www.jamesdietz.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mettle-of-honor/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mettle-of-honor/support

The John Batchelor Show
1602: The Taliban of Afghanistan and the Taliban of Pakistan are two sides of a coin that threatens to radicalize and beggar the region. @KamranBokhari Newlines Institute for Strategy and Policy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 12:35


Photo: An aerial view of an Afghan Border Police facility taken from a Blackhawk helicopter, April 4, 2011, near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. Strongholds like this are located up and down the border, also called the Duran Line, to provide security and prevent drugs and explosives from entering the country.. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Taliban of Afghanistan and the Taliban of Pakistan are two sides of a coin that threatens to radicalize and beggar the region. @KamranBokhari  Newlines Institute for Strategy and Policy Director of analytical development at the Newlines Institute for Strategy and Policy and a national-security and foreign-policy specialist at the University of Ottawa's Professional Development Institute. https://www.wsj.com/articles/afghanistan-withdrawal-biden-pakistan-taliban-russia-china-belt-and-road-cpec-economic-corridor-11628868392?page=1

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago
Podcast: Justin Fields in game 1, Cubs stink, and White Sox win the Field of Dreams game

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


The Swerski Crew is back talking Justin Fields during his first game ever (and the Bears overall in game 1), the dreadful Cubs pitching, and the White Sox. All of this and more on this latest episode of Swerski SportsMake sure to follow us on:Twitter: @SwerskiSportsFacebook: /SwerskiSportswww.SwerskiSports.comyoutube.com/SwerskiSportshttps://feeds.feedblitz.com/-/662663686/0/billswerskissportstalkchicago.MP3and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher or the TuneIn app      Related StoriesPodcast: Big Dave joins us to talk Bulls, White Sox, and BearsPodcast: Analyzing the Cubs and White Sox trade moves, Fleury a Blackhawk, and the Bears training campPodcast: Blackhawks trades, Cubs/White Sox at the trade deadline, and Bears report to camp 

Fanboy And The Snob
Black Hawk Down Review

Fanboy And The Snob

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 32:22


Chris decided he wanted to watch a war movie. Chad isn't the biggest war movie fan. Find out if Chris could change Chad's mind with BLACK HAWK DOWN! Check it out! https://linktr.ee/Chrisandchadlikemovies Instagram @fanboyandthesnob #blackhawkdown #war #action --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fanboyandthesnob/support

This Year I Turn 40
Community is...

This Year I Turn 40

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 81:37


This week I talk to my friend and MILS-Sister (Military Spouse-Sister) Meg Kelvington. During the pandemic, between her leadership and determination to keep us Christ-centered and sane, and my determination to keep us jubilant and maybe slightly tipsy, she and I worked our magic to keep the heart and soul of our community vibrant. While much of our community-building efforts began before the shutdown in 2020, I feel, as a community, we were our best during the pandemic and this has motivated me to cultivate the same sense of community in every lived-in space I have going forward. As I get older, I find that community where one LIVES is so important. We don't always have to go out to find a sense of belonging and although it may seem hard at first, it is possible to cultivate a sense of belonging and togetherness in heterogeneous communities. Listen as she and I share our community stories and provide advice from our lived experiences on how to create a community where it is needed most, in our neighborhoods. About this week's guest: I'm kicking myself for this because during the episode I fail to really capture what a badass Meg is. Please forgive me! Meg flew helicopters, planes and deployed to Afghanistan. Now she uses her Army leadership experience to coach others through her company "Riveting Mission LLC" while being an Army Wife and mother to 4 young children. She grew up in an Army family with both her mother and father being West Point graduates. She joined the family business and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 2006. After graduating from flight school in 2008, qualified in both the Blackhawk helicopter and RC-12 Guardrail airplane, she was stationed at Hunter Army Airfield. She then deployed to Afghanistan and flew over 200 combat hours. After additional schooling, she went on to the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Corps before leaving the Army to focus on her family and pursue coaching and mentoring. She has done work with Team Red White and Blue, Wear Blue: Run to Remember, and led groups in her local church. She and her husband, Mike, have four children, McKinley (9), Madison (8), “Mac” Arthur (5), and Moriah (2). Find her at riveting.mission@gmail.com and on Facebook @RivetingMissionLLC and Instagram @riveting.mission.llc She runs a Monday morning virtual group that shares a short Bible-based message and then does a workout together called "Fit To Serve." You can find details on Facebook or email her for more info. During the show, we mention some resources that are great for women and people in general. Find links to them all below. Breathe By Priscilla Shirer (here's an intro video too) The Turquoise Table by Kristin Schell - We didn't talk about this during the recording but she shared it with me after. It seems like a great place to start with building community in heterogeneous spaces. She Reads Truth Podcast The Green Plate by Jill Connett - https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6681123-the-green-plate --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thisyeariturn40/message

The Windy City Benders Podcast
The Tony O ~ Episode 148

The Windy City Benders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 66:48


Jarom and Tanner are back and boy was this a rough week when it came to former Blackhawks. Right before the guys got on to record new broke that Hockey Hall of Famer and Chicago Blackhawks Legend Tony Esposito had passed away after a short battle with pancreatic cancer. They guys talked about the legacy of the Hawks all time leader in wins and how dominant he was through out his career. Sadly that wasn't all for bad news, they guys touch on former Blackhawk and current radio color analyst Troy Murray announcing he has cancer. Switching to some happier news the guys talk about their guy Hagel finally getting signed to a nice 3 year deal that if he keeps up what he did last season will set him up for a nice pay day in three years. They then look at what the top two lines could be and get excited that there arent really bad combos. They touch on Hardmans new deal and discuss with the cap all but spent these depth guys will be important when injuries happen. The guys then wonder what is going on with Nylander and if he even has a spot on this team anymore. Finally they wrap up Hawks Talk with comments Marc Andre Fleury talking to the media and this got the guys pumped. NHL talk was spent looking at the latest contracts that have been signed, including Nurse, Hart, and Shesterkin. Finally the guys wrap thing up playing a little game of "Draft" where they Drafted Three Forwards, Two Defensemen, and One Goalie that fit a theme. This episodes theme was "Players you forgot/never knew played for the Hawks" Follow us on Instagram and Twitter @WCBPodcast. Make sure to subscribe on Apple Podcast, Youtube, and Spotify. Also leave us a review over on Apple Podcast as well to help the show grow!

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago
Podcast: Big Dave joins us to talk Bulls, White Sox, and Bears

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021


The Swerski Crew is back and with our good pal, Big Dave from Locked On Bulls and Bawl on Bulls talking Bulls, White Sox, and Chicago Bears. All of this and more on this latest episode of Swerski SportsMake sure to follow us on:Twitter: @SwerskiSportsFacebook: /SwerskiSportswww.SwerskiSports.comyoutube.com/SwerskiSportshttps://feeds.feedblitz.com/-/661735260/0/billswerskissportstalkchicago.MP3and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher or the TuneIn app      Related StoriesPodcast: Analyzing the Cubs and White Sox trade moves, Fleury a Blackhawk, and the Bears training campPodcast: Blackhawks trades, Cubs/White Sox at the trade deadline, and Bears report to campPodcast: Cubs selling, White Sox rolling, Blackhawks at expansion draft, no deal for Bears Robinson 

Miller's Military Moments
Establishing our Area of Operations

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 44:49


Flying our Blackhawks in and around Baghdad is a lot more complicated then just getting in a bird and going. We were flying way more than we ever thought we would or could. The Army actually has restrictions on how many hours you can fly a day, at night and how many days you can work in a row! Plus we had to perform maintenance on the aircraft while never dropping a mission. It was exhausting and chaotic over the first 30 days then we settled into our battle rhythm. The battle rhythm atleast gave us predictability but we are still exhausted. Tune in for details of our first 30 days and how we did it! One of the most amazing teams I have ever been a part of. Jayson Miller's Website Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 377 - Dressed to Impress

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 96:46


Join Crash Test Carlos, Matt, Nev and Armando for this week's programme. In this week's show the Smithsonian gains a few dollars, a banner towing pilot tries his hand at a game of bridge, & we take a look at just who is the cleanest & safest airline in the world and Nev BA are in the top 10! In the military aH-60 black hawk makes an emergency landing, the USAF thanks a plane spotter, and the SU-75 has enormous wings. If you want to see what we got up to last month check out these highlights: https://youtu.be/KXASgGW2Wy8 Don't forget you can get in touch with us all at : WhatsApp +44 757 22 491 66 Email podcast@planetalkinguk.com or comment in our chatroom on YouTube. Here are the links to the stories we featured this week : COMMERCIAL Microsoft Flight Simulator Great Britain Central Scenery & Skiathos Airport Announced; Twin Otter & Airbus A380 https://twinfinite.net/2021/07/microsoft-flight-simulator-uk-skiathos-twin-otter-a380/ Ryanair kicks off UK cabin crew recruitment drive https://travelweekly.co.uk/news/air/ryanair-kicks-off-uk-cabin-crew-recruitment-drive Airbus to base new A350 freighter ‘predominantly' on -1000 variant https://www.flightglobal.com/air-transport/airbus-to-base-new-a350-freighter-predominantly-on-1000-variant/144826.article Teenage banner plane pilot makes safe emergency landing on bridge in Ocean City https://www.fox13news.com/news/small-plane-lands-on-bridge-near-ocean-city-new-jersey Smithsonian To Receive Historic $200 Million Donation From Jeff Bezos http://warbirdsnews.com/aviation-museum-news/smithsonian-to-receive-historic-200-million-donation-from-jeff-bezos.html LAX pilot spots another jet pack in the sky https://nypost.com/2021/07/29/lax-pilot-spots-another-weird-object-in-sky/ Cessna 408 SkyCourier Debuts at EAA AirVenture https://www.flyingmag.com/story/aircraft/cessna-debuts-408-skycourier/ Sleeping at the airport: American Airlines flight attendant, pilot unions complain about lack of hotel rooms https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/28/american-airlines-flight-attendant-union-summer-travel-complaint.html World's 20 best airlines are named by air safety website https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/27/air-safety-site-lists-20-best-airlines-in-the-world.html An airport pianist earned $60k in tips after a stranger posted his playing to Instagram https://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/instruments/piano/airport-pianist-earns-60k-tip-strangers/ MILITARY U.S. Black Hawk helicopter makes emergency landing in downtown Bucharest https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/41558/watch-this-black-hawk-clip-street-lights-during-emergency-landing-in-romanian-capital US Air Force Pilot Thanks British Man Who Guaranteed a Happy Landing https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/07/23/us-air-force-pilot-thanks-british-man-who-guaranteed-happy-landing.html Southampton City Council Backs Plans For Spitfire Monument http://warbirdsnews.com/warbirds-news/southampton-city-council-backs-plans-for-spitfire-monument.html Most Interesting Details In The Official Unveiling Of Russia's ‘Checkmate' Fighter Jet https://theaviationist.com/2021/07/20/checkmate-unveiling/

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
New Yorkers need vaccine passport to enter places

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 120:25


Today on TruNews, the team provides the latest updates on the Pentagon shooting, as Blackhawk helicopters circle the US Capitol city. As the federal backs down on vaccine mandates, cities are ramping up new lockdowns, such as in Wuhan, to new efforts to implement vaccine passports in Mayor De Blasio's New York City. Edward and Lauren speak to AZ state senator Wendy Rogers for the latest updates on the Maricopa County election audit. America's Voice reporter Ben Bergquam provides updates on the immigration invasion. Rick Wiles, Edward Szall, Lauren Witzke, Raymond Burkhart, Kerry Kinsey. Airdate (8/03/21)

SILENCE!
Episode 17: SILENCE! #255 (PRESTIGE FORMAT SPECIAL)

SILENCE!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 109:07


HEY PUT IT DOWN, THAT'S DAD'S SWORD!It's a Very Special Episode! The Beast Must Die is flying solo, with an episode-length exegesis on the myriad pleasures and horrors of the fabled Prestige Format Comic. It's an epic for our times for sure, and when you look at these times that tells you everything you need to know about this epic...Okay gird your girdles, stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...here we go. The Beast talks about Batman: Gotham By Gaslight, Batman: Holy Terror, Batman: Full Circle, Batman: The Scottish Connection, Batman: Mitefall, Batman: Year 100, Batman: Manbat, Batman: The Cult, Batman: Run Riddler Run, Robin 3000, World's Finest, Catwoman Defiant, Cosmic Odyssey, Legend Of The Green Flame, Blackhawk, Deadman: Love & Death, Deadman: Exorcism, The Horrorist, The Golden Age, Hawkworl, The Books of Magic, Martian Manhunter: American Secrets, Adam Strange: The Man of Two Worlds, Twilight, OMAC, Justice Inc, Black Orchid, The Prisoner: Shattered Visage, Breathtaker, Black Mask, Gilgamesh II, The Nazz, My Name Is Chaos,  Clash, The Psycho, Skull & Bones, Tempus Fugitive, The Griffin, Grendel Vs Batman... sweet christmas... I need a lie down.  Normal business resumes soon. @frasergeesin @thebeastmustdiesilencepodcast@gmail.comYou can support us using Patreon if you like.This edition of SILENCE! is proudly sponsored by the greatest comics shop on the planet, DAVE'S COMICS of Brighton. It's also sponsored the greatest comics shop on the planet GOSH! Comics of London.

Light After Trauma
Episode 54: Wounded in Combat: A Veteran's Journey to Healing with Michael “CQ” Carrasquillo

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 60:08


In this week's episode, Alyssa sits down with veteran, PTSD survivor, and comedian Michael “CQ” Carrasquillo. Michael provides an in-depth perspective on his time serving in the military, from the moment he enlisted until the very moment in Afghanistan when he was shot 5 times in an ambush. Following two years of being in the hospital, Michael talks about his battle with PTSD, the survivor's guilt he struggles with, and how he came to find joy and laughter in life again. He is truly a hero, an inspiration, and resilient beyond belief.  Support the Podcast Read more about Michael's story: How One Veteran is Using Standup to Heal the Wounds of War Michael at Wounded Warrior Project Michael's Radio Show   Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hi everybody, welcome back to another episode of the Light After Trauma podcast. Welcome, welcome. Hope everybody is doing well. We have a really special episode happening for us today, a really special guest speaker. This was quite an emotional episode. It's a lot of tough stuff. But this episode is truly the epitome of finding light after trauma. So I am really looking forward to diving in. I know it's going to be a tough one, but it's an incredible story and I am really looking forward to hearing all of the details and just being able to bear witness to the strength that our guest speaker has today, to be able to bear witness to the strength that our guest speaker has. So today we are meeting with Michael CQ Carrasquillo. Now, Michael is a combat wounded army airborne infantry man. He served in both Iraq and Afghanistan at the height of combat operations in the early 2000s. He spent two years in an army hospital recovering from his injuries, underwent 40 plus surgeries, actually died twice and was eventually medically retired from service. Since then, he has tried just about everything from skydiving, golf, scuba diving, hunting, et cetera. Eventually, he found himself performing stand up comedy and loving it. That paved the way to hosting a weekly live internet radio pop culture talk show on WTF nation radio called POP Culture Warrior. All right, so with that being said, also, side note, I just want to incorporate in there that I sort of did the Spanglish version of Michael's name, during the introduction. So it is not the way that I first pronounced it. We're going to be as American with this pronunciation as possible, and it's going to be Carrasquillo, right? Michael Carrasquillo [00:23]: That's right, that's right. Alyssa Scolari [02:39]: That just feels wrong. Michael Carrasquillo [02:41]: Well, yeah, if you want to go Spanish, it's Carrasquillo. Alyssa Scolari [02:44]: Carrasquillo, that feels right. That feels right to me. Michael Carrasquillo [02:44]: Spanish Italian. Alyssa Scolari [02:51]: So hello, Michael, how are you? Michael Carrasquillo [02:54]: I'm good. I'm good. And for the simplest simplicity of it all, everyone refers to me as CQ. So feel free, CQ, a lot less formal. And got to- Alyssa Scolari [02:54]: Cool- Michael Carrasquillo [03:05]: ... respect the brand. Alyssa Scolari [03:07]: Oh, oh, my God, your hat. Michael Carrasquillo [03:09]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [03:11]: Dude, that's so cool. Okay, so everybody calls you CQ. That's just- Michael Carrasquillo [03:11]: Yep- Alyssa Scolari [03:16]: ... All right, all right. So we're rolling with it. So we've got CQ with us today. I have read about your story in the articles that you linked, and then obviously in the short description that you sent me. Michael Carrasquillo [03:33]: Sure. Alyssa Scolari [03:34]: Holy, Holy Mother of God. Michael Carrasquillo [03:39]: Am I what you expected? I'm just curious. Alyssa Scolari [03:43]: Well, when I was reading the articles, I thought to myself, this is somebody who has taken everything that he's been through, and he's really... I mean, I'm a big fan of humor therapy. Because it's like, if we don't laugh about it, we're just going to sob about it. So I have a very dark sense of humor. And I got that, that it's almost like you have been able to find the humor in all of this, which is just incredibly powerful. So is it what I would expect? No, I mean, to the listeners out there, I've got, like the background that I'm looking at, he's super into Marvel, we've got the Iron Man fist, the Iron Man, helmet, [inaudible 00:04:24] Man, some Funko Pop figures, which is like, as many of you know who are listening, right up my alley. So as soon as I saw the background, I was like, ooh, tell me what you have. Let's talk about all the toys you have. So yeah, and I mean, I guess, my first question, just to be able to inform the listeners so they can get on the same level as us is, can you talk just a little bit about what happened to you? I mean, first and foremost, just from my introduction alone, they know of your service, I know of your service. So I, and the listeners, thank you for your service. Michael Carrasquillo [05:04]: I appreciate it. Alyssa Scolari [05:06]: And could you talk to us about, how did you even end up enlisting in the first place? Michael Carrasquillo [05:14]: Yeah, from a 40,000 foot view, it's such a big, large chunk of story. And I really don't want to bore anybody with all the minutiae of little details. But kind of just from a high level, I was born and raised in New York City. Very poor upbringing. Literally kind of the ghetto, Spanish Harlem, upper Eastside. Teenage mom, dad not in the picture. So starting out in not the greatest of places. And I was a senior in high school when 9/11 happened. And so at that point, I didn't really know what I wanted to do. I was kind of lost, college wasn't for me. It was looking like just getting a job and working. And then when that happened, that kind of just... the military had never been a thing to me. It had never been like, oh, something I'm considering. Guys like me didn't join the military. Alyssa Scolari [06:12]: It wasn't even your radar. Michael Carrasquillo [06:14]: Yeah, if I'm being 100% honest, I think at that point in my life, I didn't know we still had military. You know what I mean? I'm 16, 17 years old, whatever. I'm like, wars aren't a thing anymore? Alyssa Scolari [06:26]: Right, it's old school. You have that kid mentality of like, that's not even a thing anymore. Michael Carrasquillo [06:31]: Exactly. Pre 9/11, this wasn't for those that weren't around, it had been a while since there had been any conflicts in my lifetime. And so when that happened, obviously it felt personal, even though obviously they're attacking the country, they literally attacked my home. Places that I roamed very frequently, my school wasn't that far from ground zero. And so obviously there was big uptake in commercials for the military and things, as the [inaudible 00:07:02] went on. And it just became this idea of, yeah, get some payback, like very immature. But at the same time, it was also, as I looked at it as more of a thing that was possible, it became this thing that was, I can get out. This is my way out. I come from a poor background, I come from nothing... I don't know, it was a way for me to kind of escape what was going on in my own life, and get away and do my own thing. And a way to be successful, I guess, on my own. I saw kids I grew up with that were into drugs and to gangs, they were either getting arrested or ended up in dead end jobs. And I was just like, there's got to be more to life. And yeah, so I enlisted, basically, almost right out of high school. I graduated, and then there were so many people enlisting at that time. They had thing called the Delayed Entry Program, since there were just so many people coming through and wanting to join that, you just basically signed in, you're sweared in, and you did all this stuff. But so I did that in the summer, I graduated, but it wasn't until January of 2003 that I actually officially entered into the army, went to basic training and did all that. So yeah, I joined the infantry, for those that don't know, when you think army, those are your guys. Those are the ground level combat troops. You're not a mechanic, you're not a cook, your whole job is fighting. You do nothing but train with weapons and explosives and things and conduct raids and all the things you would think about typical army guy stuff. Alyssa Scolari [08:44]: Did you have a choice in that or that was just kind of what you were given? Michael Carrasquillo [08:50]: Yeah, so basically, when you join the military, you'll take what's called the ASVAB, it's an aptitude test. And based on your scores, will be what jobs are available to you to sign up. Now, of course, you could score really well, and then, but I don't want to be a, I don't know, X-ray technician, and you scored well enough for it. But then there's things like needs of the army, where if there's too many people in that job, they're not going to keep accepting those people in the job. So there's facets of how you get into certain jobs. I scored well enough that I think out of the 240 odd jobs available, I qualified for 238 of them. Alyssa Scolari [09:30]: Wow- Michael Carrasquillo [09:30]: I think the only one was like something to do with nuclear technology or something like that, I didn't qualify for. But I scored really well on my test. Luckier brains, I don't know, a little bit of both. But at that time, silly me, I didn't think about a job, I didn't think about a career, I didn't think about what would help me when I leave the military. I thought about like, I want to shoot guns, I want to blow shit up. I want to do that stuff. And so I joined the infantry. And also, airborne, so the idea of jumping out of planes and directly engaging enemy combatants, to me, that was like, yeah, this is what I want to do. Alyssa Scolari [10:06]: That was like an adrenaline rush for you. You were like, absolutely. Michael Carrasquillo [10:09]: Oh, yeah. And so yeah, so I joined in January 2003, I started. And I went to Fort Benning, Georgia, did my basic training there, airborne school there. And then straight out of there, was sent to the Vicenza, Italy. I was stationed with the 1/73rd Airborne in Vicenza, Italy. It's an American-based, it's not Italian in any way. It's a quick reaction force, so the idea being, in a time of peace, we have a unit there overseas, where if something happens, we're able to react to that much faster than anyone in the states can. We're the tip of the spear, so to speak. We're halfway there. And so it's one of those things that, it was exciting, because this is really like the first time I'd left the country. Just turned 19 at that point, and green behind the ears and was like, oh, my God, I'm this infantry guy now, I'm this airborne guy now. And now I'm being stationed in Italy. And then right out the gate, they're like, oh, by the way, we're jumping into Iraq, we're invading Iraq. So I went from basic training and just getting into the military, to being in combat within a few weeks. Alyssa Scolari [11:19]: Oh, my gosh. Michael Carrasquillo [11:21]: Yeah, a lot to process, a lot to process. Alyssa Scolari [11:25]: Right, and zero time to do so. Because it's just like, hey, here we go. Michael Carrasquillo [11:30]: Yeah, pretty much. Alyssa Scolari [11:32]: Wow, so did things change for you in that moment of like, when it became clear to you that you were going to invade Iraq? Or were you still in that mindset of like, yeah, let's do this. Michael Carrasquillo [11:48]: I was terrified, I was absolutely terrified. It becomes real, real fast. Signing up for it, and doing the training, super gung ho, and then you get there. And honestly, it might have just been the fact that being a literal new guy, like somebody who, I'd just got there, I didn't feel very prepared. Because as much as you... basic training, they teach you to march and salute. It's why it's called basic training, you learn the basic things of being in the military. How to make a bed, how to dress in uniform. But as far as how to fight, we spent days at the range learning how to shoot, how to communicate with the team, but I really knew nothing. I mean, I knew nothing. I'd never been in a Humvee, the military vehicle. I'd never been in a Humvee before. Outside of the range, I'd never handled live ammunition. Like these are guys that, when they got the word, they had about six months. I mean, obviously, we train as part of our day-to-day, but this specific deployment, they had trained for six months to really gear up and be ready for it. And here I am, I show up like three weeks before the event. And at that point, it's not about training, it's about saying goodbye to your families and packing up rooms and getting the gear ready to go. And then going. So I really had no training leading up to that deployment with those guys. And so it was really difficult, really difficult at first. And a lot of these guys were, they had known each other for a long time and they trained together. And I'm this X factor that just shows up, that literally knows nothing. And it was difficult. The first six to eight months, it was not... I messed up a lot. I'd love to say I was this amazing, excellent soldier, but I messed up a lot. And it was just because I didn't know any better. Alyssa Scolari [13:46]: Right, how could you not? How could you not? The world is frantic, coming off the heels of 9/11, how could you know any differently? Michael Carrasquillo [13:57]: Yeah, pretty much. But I made it through the deployment and I found my way and kind of gained the respect of the guys by the end of the deployment. We were supposed to be there only three weeks, that's what we were told. We jump in, we secure some airfields, they bring in the rest of the army, and then they pull us out. And that's what the families had heard, that's what the wives and the kids and everybody. That's what we packed for, was three weeks. The unit was there a total of 15 months, continuously. And so yeah, about a year and some odd change. And finally, they pulled us out. And at that point, obviously we're a cohesive team and we're clicking on all levels. And I remember we get back from Iraq, and literally we touched down a couple different stops and then our final destination is in Italy, is in Aviano, Italy. And they're going to put us on a bus to go back to our base in Vicenza. And they say, hey, get it, we're back, enjoy this, celebrate it, spend time with the families. But just know, we just got word we're going back in a year. So this year is going to be all about training. We got to get better, we got to be better than we were before. And we find out quickly after that, that we weren't going back to Iraq, we were actually going to Afghanistan, the next one. And they said, as hard as you thought Iraq was, Afghanistan is going to be worse. And so that was kind of a buzzkill, as we got down. But that started the clock, that gave us an idea that in one year's time, we had to be ready to go back and do it again. This time, knowing from the start, that we were going to spend a year there. They told us, look, it's going to be a year. And so, it's a lot to ask of a person, of a man, a boy, really, barely. Alyssa Scolari [15:52]: A kid, right. You're barely an adult. Michael Carrasquillo [15:56]: Yeah. But that was tough. But we spent that year training hard. Spent a couple months in Germany, training in the mountains and really getting ready for it. And obviously, I felt much more prepared by the time that deployment came around. I was leading a team at that time. And yeah, I made it six months through that deployment. And then during a mission, I got ambushed. And I ended up getting wounded. I ended up getting shots. Another guy went down first, and I was kind of dragging him out of the situation. And I got shot twice. And then through the continued fighting, got shot three more times. And then my body was like, you know what, we're done. We're taking a timeout. And I kind of just collapsed. And yeah, was fortunate to survive. And I'm here now. Alyssa Scolari [16:49]: No, I was reading, you had what's called, is it the life saving, a type of specific training? Michael Carrasquillo [16:55]: Combat Lifesaver. Alyssa Scolari [16:57]: Combat Lifesaver, okay. So you had that specific training, so you were actually able, for a little while there, to kind of tell somebody how to care for your wounds immediately. Michael Carrasquillo [17:09]: Yeah. So what happens is, the way we did things. Because I'm sure every division, every company, everybody does things differently. But the way we did, you have a four-man team, two teams make a squad. So in your four-man team, there'd always be one guy who went through this course, Combat Lifesaver. You're not a medic, I never claimed to be a medic. They just teach you very, very important skills of how to splint the leg, how to start an IV, how to put on a tourniquet, how to treat a sucking chest wound. The things that like, these are things that are time critical. Because it could take a medic, who knows how long, to get to somebody. So the idea being, if you just know just enough to keep them stable for a medic to get to them, it increases their chances of survival. So in my team, my four-man team, I was the combat lifesaver. And it was a squad of us. So there was another team and they had a combat lifesaver guy as well. So when I got wounded, which, that's technically why, to explain why I was dragging a guy through gunfire, it's because we were doing an air assault mission. So as we landed, as we exited the helicopter, we got ambushed. They had the high ground, they started shooting at us. I look up the leaves, one of my guys got shot through the leg. But before I knew he had been shot, what had happened was, I had already exited the aircraft. And I was looking back and I just see him on the ground grabbing his leg, and I'm thinking, crap, he stumbled out the plane, he rolled his ankle- Alyssa Scolari [18:45]: Right, he sprained his ankle or something. Michael Carrasquillo [18:47]: Yeah, something. He's grabbing his leg, something, and I could see that he was kind of, I don't want to say screaming, but I could see he was yelling. And I'm like, ah, maybe he broke something. And so in my head I'm thinking, all right, I'm going to have to splint this leg, I'm going to have to fill out a report. We're going to have call in a 9-line MedEvac and get him out of here. I'm thinking, ugh, this is great. I'm just like, ugh, Jesus Christ, another thing I've got to deal with. Alyssa Scolari [19:07]: Right, one more thing I got to do. Michael Carrasquillo [19:08]: And then when the helicopter took away, because it's very loud, that's when I heard the gunshots, and I hear him screaming, "I'm hit, I'm hit, I'm hit." And so in that moment, I had to like, I just did what I did. I ran out, grabbed him and started dragging him to what I thought would be safety, a big rock with boulders, trying to drag him back to that. And as soon as I drag him back, my thought was all right, I'm going to have to check his wounds and everything. But as a team leader, you have to assess the situation and you have to coordinate with the guys, and make sure everybody's doing what they're doing, what they should be doing. And luckily, we trained so much. And this was, like I said, we're six months in, we're used to this kind of stuff. Everybody's doing what they needed to do. Nobody needed direction. We all know how to react to this. And so as I was trying to assess the situation and everything, that's when I got shot again, and I was down. The other team had kind of rotated towards, and that's when the other combat lifesaver guy saw me, and ran over to me. And he started working on me. Now, obviously, bullets are flying, explosions are happening. So it's a very intense situation. And like, we're talking to each other. Because at this point, I'm out of the fight. It's not that I don't want to be in the fight, my body was just like, you're done. You're taking the time out. And so I'm walking through him, like in my mind, I'm talking to him, and I'm like, "Hey, I think I'm in shock. I can't move." And first thing, I'm like, "I hope I didn't get hit in the spine." I don't feel anything, but I'm like maybe I severed my spine, and now I'm quadriplegic. And I'm telling him, "Hey, check my back, do you see anything?" And we're just talking it out. And he's like, "I see blood." I'm like, "Where?" He's like, "Everywhere." I'm like, "That's not good. Check my spine." I mean, I could kind of move my neck, I could kind of move my chest, but I was having trouble breathing. And what had happened was I had took two rounds to the chest, which my armor had stopped the rounds. But it had shattered all my ribs on one side and collapsed my lung. So I was having trouble breathing. And I'm just like, "Okay, check this, check this, check this." And as the adrenaline was starting to come down, I'm like, "Hey, something's wrong with my shoulder." And so he slid his hand in my vest, and he immediately pulled it out, and it's just drenched in blood. And he's like, "Dude, there's a hole in there." And I'm like, okay. And I know, again, for my training, entry holes, where the bullet goes in, typically very small, exit holes, very large. The larger the caliber, the larger the hole, it's a very, very big hole. And typically, when someone bleeds out and dies, that's the cause, is the exit hole. And so once he told me, there was a big hole in my back, I said, "Well, how big is it?" And he just kind of held up his fist to me, and he's like, "It's about that big." "All right, well, we need to... You got to get..." I'm recalling all my training, I'm like, "All right, we have these bandages, they're called Kerlix, they're tight packaged." Usually you unfurl it, unroll it and wrap it around somebody. I was like, "Dude, just pop it open, shove the whole thing in there. And just keep packing it as much as you can." So he starts doing that. And the whole time, luckily the other guys are doing what they have to do. They're repelling the enemy. And we had air support on standby. So Apache helicopters coming in and doing gun runs. It was crazy. And at one point, someone screamed, "Grenade!" And he immediately stopped what he was doing and he just threw his body over me, and covered me. And there was an explosion nearby. And just yeah, it was an intense little bit. I remember he, I think he was a private at the time, a low rank guy, and he started screaming at our platoon sergeant. And he's like, "You got to call those effing birds back in here. We got to get him out of here." And I hear the platoon sergeant screaming back like, "Nope, it's too hot. We can't risk it. Birds come in, they shoot it down or something, then we're really screwed." And so this guy, he starts, very low rank guy screaming at a very high rank guy like, "You get those [inaudible 00:23:04] effing birds back in here now, or he's going to die. It's going to be on you." And I immediately flashback to Combat Lifesaver training, stage one, reassure the victim, let them know it's going to be all right, he's going to be okay. And this guy is screaming, "He's going to die!" Alyssa Scolari [23:21]: He's literally going to die, like he's about to die. Gee, oh, my God- Michael Carrasquillo [23:26]: I'm like, oh, man, your bedside manner's not great, bruh. Alyssa Scolari [23:28]: Right, we got to work on that. Michael Carrasquillo [23:29]: Yeah. But to his credit, he put the fear of God in this man, and they called in the birds. And what they did was, we were on a mountainside, so they just kind of landed like a mile away down this mountainside. Because I remember seeing it land and they're like, "All right, the birds are here, we're going to get you there." And it looked like an ant. It was so tiny, this big Black Hawk helicopter was so tiny. And I'm just like, oh, God, I'm going to die before I get there. And their idea was, they were going to, because, again there's still gunfire and stuff, they wanted to drag me down the mountainside to keep me low. And I was like, "Dude, if you drag me down this mountainside, I will die before we ever get to this thing." I told him, I said, "Hey, man, pick me up, we just run." I have just the same amount of chance, if you pick me up and we run. And at this point, they had to strip my body armor off, I wasn't wearing my helmet. And I was just like, "We got to go, we got to go." And so they called over another guy, they pick me up. At this point, I was starting to get feeling back in my feet, and I couldn't move anything upper body. I had been shot through the bicep of my left arm, which severed all the muscles. And then I had been shot through my shoulder, I didn't have a shoulder anymore. So at this point, they just picked me up and we hauled ass. We ran down this mountain as fast as we could, and got me to the helicopter. And yeah, they got me out of there. And somehow, I stayed conscious the whole time. Alyssa Scolari [24:58]: Oh, my God. Michael Carrasquillo [25:00]: Got back to our base. They immediately rushed us into surgery, or me into surgery. And they knocked me out. I woke up three days later at the main base in Afghanistan, which was Bagram. And then from there, got sent to Germany. I was in Germany, at the main hospital in Germany for about a week, which they basically said, "There's nothing we can do for you." They're like, "You're too messed up." From Germany, I was there for a few days. And then they packaged me up and shipped me out. I ended up in Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. And I spent the next two years recovering at the hospital. I spent six weeks in ICU. I actually died twice during this process, that they had to bring me back. But six weeks in ICU, and then about six months, I was an inpatient in the hospital, in the orthopedic ward, where they were rebuilding my body piece-by-piece. And I should have been in the hospital longer, but at about six months, they were like, "Look, you're good enough that you can kind of get up and walk around." And at this point, there were thousands of guys coming in every day. There were busloads of dudes coming into the hospital. And so they were like, "Look, we need the bed." So if you were able to walk, they put you in a building next door to the hospital. And basically, you would just kind of come in, spend the whole day in the hospital and then go back. It was like a hotel for the overflow. So I was good enough... if not for the so many people, I'd have been in the hospital proper for the whole two years. But about six months inpatient, and then about a year and a half of recovery, where I was just kind of coming in and out for surgeries. Coming in and out for physical therapy, occupational therapy, things like that. So yeah, and at the end of the two years, I medically retired. I was 22 years old and a disabled veteran, with two combat tours, and a Purple Heart and all these medals, and yada, yada, yada. So it was an intense couple of years. Alyssa Scolari [27:05]: And then you're kind of just on your own. And at this point, because I know you mentioned you have a wife, so at this point, you're not married, haven't met your wife yet? Michael Carrasquillo [27:14]: No, no. I actually, funny enough, I met my wife while I was at the hospital. She just happened to be someone who lived nearby. Well, actually, she didn't even live nearby. She was visiting family nearby. And it was on one of my kind of excursions out, because you get crazy in the hospital. So once in a while, once I was healthy enough, I would go out and just go to the mall or go, just to get out and do something. And I met her, yeah, I met her at the mall at a CD store. That tells you how long ago this was. Met her at a CD store at the mall. And yeah, that was a whole 'nother thing. But yeah, that's where we met. That's how we met. And then we just- Alyssa Scolari [27:58]: So you met her while on the process of recovery? Michael Carrasquillo [28:02]: Oh, yeah. Alyssa Scolari [28:03]: Fresh off of some of the most intense trauma anybody could ever possibly experience. You're still essentially a kid at 22 years old. At what point, for you, would you say, did the PTSD symptoms start? Because I read that there was like a point in your life where you shifted, like your mood shifted completely. When did that start to happen for you? Michael Carrasquillo [28:32]: Yeah, no, that's a fair question. I think the big change came, because for two years, the focus was on my physical health. And as it should be, I was literally dying. And I was literally being stitched back together. Alyssa Scolari [28:51]: I mean, right, we can't worry about your mental health, if you're not physically around to be able to get better. Michael Carrasquillo [28:56]: Right. And that was the case. And now, let me also specify, it's much different now. This is 2000, let's see, I got wounded in 2005. And it was kind of wild west back then, so many people, they were not prepared for this. And now, mental health is such a much more bigger part of the holistic healing process. So this isn't the case now, but at that time, the sole focus was on my physical health. And once, after two years, once I got the green thumb that like, hey, you're as good as you're going to get. It was like, sign here, you're not in the military anymore. Good luck! And I walked out the door. I never took classes on transitioning back into civilian life, or what to do next. Now- Alyssa Scolari [28:56]: No, none of that was even a thing- Michael Carrasquillo [29:44]: ... you're a disabled veteran- Alyssa Scolari [29:46]: ... right? Michael Carrasquillo [29:47]: Yeah. So I kind of got tossed out. And I did the only thing I could think of, I bought a house in the mountains of Pennsylvania, the Pocono Mountains to just hide away. And I just wanted to be left alone, I'm getting this retirement pay, which is not enough, you're not rich by any means, but it's enough to pay the bills, and I can just live a nice, quiet life. And it's all I needed. And for a couple years, I did that. What I didn't realize was the slow kind of descent into this, this darkness. I mean, physically, even today, I'm not all there. I have severe nerve damage, and I have limitations in my mobility and things like that. But for the most part, I had my health. But there's so much that goes on with survivor's guilt of the guys that didn't make it. The why me? I didn't have a word for it, back then. PTSD wasn't as widely known. Alyssa Scolari [30:46]: Yeah. Michael Carrasquillo [30:47]: And so I was going through these depressions spouts, I was suffering from severe anxiety. I wouldn't go out. There could be a whole week, I didn't step foot outside my house. And yet, I'm up all night. I'm patrolling my own... which, again, we lived out in the woods. We're a mile from our nearest neighbor. But I'm like doing patrols in my house, triple checking doors and windows and just all these things that I just, I took them as, oh, this is normal. And my wife, God bless her, she didn't know what I was dealing with. And how could she? And she would ask me, "Hey, are you all right? Is everything..." I'm like, "Yeah, I'm fine. Fine, sure, yeah, cool." But yeah, I was going through a lot, I was going through a lot. And I'm just very fortunate that I had some people kind of get involved in my life, and organizations and people and met the right... Yeah, I got very lucky. because the path I was headed down was not good. And it took me a long, long time to kind of really get to a good place. Because it's a process, but it was good, it was good. Alyssa Scolari [32:03]: Yeah, it's a long and arduous process I can only fathom. It's PTSD and survivor's guilt, and also just not even understanding it. And you go from being okay, one minute, to then feeling intensely suicidal. And you feel like you're going out of your mind at some points, I would imagine. Michael Carrasquillo [32:26]: Yeah, yeah. No, it was a lot. Over the course of a couple years, so many changes in my life. I mean, I went from being this poor kid who didn't know any better, and then being in the infantry and airborne. We're trained and bred to be the cockiest, SOBs out there. We're invincible, we're untouchable, you have to be, you have to be. We have to believe that. I really, not really, but I really believed that I was unbreakable, I was untouchable. Alyssa Scolari [32:58]: You have to, if not, I think the fear of even doing it would be too much. Michael Carrasquillo [33:03]: Yeah, yeah. I've explained to people, I'm like, I have to go out on a mission, watch one of my friends die, go back, and then be like, all right, tomorrow, we're going back out. You have to have this mentality of, that can't be me. You have to have this kind of dark sense of humor too, to just kind of mask the pain and the hurt that you're going through. And so then to get injured and survive, it messes with your mental state, it messes with your psyche. I went from the pinnacle of physical health. I was solid muscle, I was fast, I was lethal. Now, I can't wipe my own butt. I couldn't, like if somebody rolled me into a closet, well, that's just where I live now. Because I couldn't use my hands. Both arms were completely encased. If I had an itch on my nose, I had to ask for help. And so to be 22 years old, and feel that this is the rest of your life, you're going to be this potato that's just sitting here and having the world happen around you, it was devastating to my mental state. And fortunate enough for me, I was able to regain the majority use of my arms and hands. Again, still not perfect, but to what it could be, they were considering cutting off my arms. They really were considering saying, look, the damage is so extensive that you're going to be better if you just cut them off now and learn to use the prosthetics. The sooner you get that started, the better. And I was like, let's give it a little bit. Alyssa Scolari [34:38]: Right, let's hold off on that. Michael Carrasquillo [34:39]: Yeah, I was stubborn that way. Alyssa Scolari [34:42]: Well, for good reason. Michael Carrasquillo [34:45]: Yeah, it really played into my mental state, because I felt like I was on the top of the mountain, and now just fell off and rolled all the way to the bottom. And I felt broken and defeated. And again, not having people to talk about, understand and feeling like you're the only one in the world going through this. Obviously, that's ridiculous. But... Alyssa Scolari [35:09]: Not when you're in it, it's very real. That's your reality, when you're in it. Michael Carrasquillo [35:14]: Yeah, absolutely. And really feeling as if I'm the only person going through this, no one's going to understand me. Because we're trained, suck it up, drive on, rub some dirt in it, get up and keep going, like, you try. And you can fake it for so long, but it wears you down. If you're not able to talk about it and get the help that you need, whether it's counseling or medication or whatever, it will take you down, man. I've seen some really strong guys really, really tumble down. And not even need to be physically injured to go through this kind of stuff. I had the excuse of, oh, yeah, I was physically injured. But I know guys who came out perfectly fine and just spiraled out of control. And I can understand, in talking to some of them, I can understand, you're like, oh, what do I have to complain about? I survived. I came out without a scratch. And it's like, well, that's not the point. It's not that I have an excuse to have PTSD, the fact that it's... Yeah, it's a whole thing. Alyssa Scolari [36:20]: It is, it is. And that's, I think to me, is an element of survivor's guilt, which is like, well, what do I have to be upset about? I survived, there are people who are mourning the loss of their loved ones. But I think you make a fantastic point, which is that PTSD truly doesn't discriminate. Not even just being in the army, but even right down to, before I was in private practice and was a trauma therapist, I worked with the police department. And did a lot of work with police. And just the sheer number of police suicides, and people who were not injured, who were never injured in the line of duty, nothing of that nature. The suicide attempts, because of the untreated trauma, the noise in your brain that you simply can't shut off, it doesn't discriminate. Michael Carrasquillo [37:18]: Yeah, I mean, sexual trauma survivors, I had a good friend of mine who got into a pretty bad car accident, and came out of in fine, little shaken up, but fine. And she couldn't drive for a while. And I'm like, well, that's PTSD. That's a snapshot, you went through a traumatic event, and it is now affecting your life moving forward. It's affecting you to act, I don't want to say normal, because what is normal? Alyssa Scolari [37:46]: Right, what does that mean?- Michael Carrasquillo [37:48]: But acting in a way that you weren't before. I once gave a talk at an elementary school, which I thought it was going to be older kids, and it turned out to be much younger kids, which I'm like, I don't think they're prepared to hear this kind of stuff. But I had this little kid ask me, "What is PTSD?" And I had to stop, and really, how can I explain this in a way that such a small child could understand? And so basically what I came up with on the spot, is I said, "When you learn things, when you do things, your brain is changing. You're learning how to do things. When you go through a trauma event, something scary, something happens, your brain is trying to protect itself. It's trying to teach itself, to learn from it." And I said that, "Sometimes you go through this event, and your brain decides, I don't want to do that again. And so we develop certain ways to handle that. It's a normal reaction, it's the way the brain is trying to protect itself. And sometimes that doesn't help us. As much as the brain is intending to help us, it actually makes things more difficult." I've talked about how, why do I get so anxious when I'm at a market or outside and I feel like I'm being watched, and I feel... It's like, oh, well, because years ago, when I'd be out in the market, I'm worrying about someone blowing me up or shooting me, or a sniper. And even though I know I'm not in that place right now, my brain is correlating the idea of feeling exposed. And so it is triggering a response to say, be on alert. Be on the lookout. Something can happen right now. I was driving one day and a piece of trash kind of blew across the road. And I swerved wildly, and my wife was like, "What the hell?" And I was like, "It surprised me." And she goes, "It was just like a paper bag or whatever." And I'm like, "Yeah, but I don't know, it just..." I used to drive in Iraq. I used to drive in Afghanistan, I was the driver. And something like that could be, it could be an explosive, bag of garbage or something, it could be an explosive. It could be a guy popping out with an RPG that was hiding behind something. The brain, it's something we can't consciously control. And it's correlating these things that I went through. I remember somebody telling me something about how the way the brain, certain repetitive actions, or certain being at a high level of adrenaline or on edge for a certain amount, changes your brain chemistry. And the idea is, when you're in combat, that is you, you are at 100% all the time. You are on high alert all the time. Alyssa Scolari [40:39]: You never shut it off. Michael Carrasquillo [40:40]: It's never shut off. I wake up, and it might be different for combat specialty guys who are like... we're sleeping out in the wilderness, we're out where the enemy is. We're not maybe in a big safe base or whatever. But you're on high alert all the time. You're listening for sounds, listening for the slightest change in anything. So you're on this constant level of the highest level of alert. It's equated to a guy who's a defensive lineman in football, where he's watching the movements. He's watching the eyes of the quarterback, he's watching all these things. But he's doing that for 30 seconds of a play. And then he takes a break, then he comes back. But it's like doing that all day, every day, for a year without getting a break. And that fundamentally changes the way your brain operates. Alyssa Scolari [41:28]: Absolutely. Michael Carrasquillo [41:29]: It's not something you walk away from and go, well, I'm not in combat anymore. Alyssa Scolari [41:33]: Right, your brain is still wired for protection. And your brain doesn't stop doing that even when you're home. The hyper vigilance just doesn't go away. For you, what would you say, because you went from being traumatized, having survivor's guilt, which I think PTSD, I think recovery is a lifelong journey. What was the most helpful for you? Because now you're a comedian, you find the joy in life. How did you get to that spot? What was the most helpful for you? Michael Carrasquillo [42:14]: Yeah, I mean, you hit the nail on the head in that it's a journey. It's a long road. I still struggle, I still have lots of struggles. I have a service dog, which helps me when I'm out and about in the world, it gives me just a sense of comfort. But for years before I had the dog, I don't like being in crowds. I don't like being outside. I surround myself in my little bubble. I'm happy in my bubble. But no, it's a long process. It's understanding that, for me, and this is for me, because not everybody is the same. For me, it was opening up about it. And being okay to talk about it. And this is something that took years, years, this is not an easy solution. But I had a really great guy come into my life, became my mentor. And I would watch him talk to people, and just open up about all these things. And I'm like, oh, my God, they're going to think you're crazy. They're going to think you're a psycho, you can't admit to having those thoughts. You can admit to having those feelings. And he always did it so easily. It fascinated me. And I started studying him like, how can you do that? How do you do that? I remember one day he told me, "We all carry this baggage with us, different types, different sizes, all that. And if you can equate it to, when I tell my story, when I share what I'm going through, I'm extending out some of that baggage. And I'm saying, hey, can you help me carry this? And the load gets lighter." And I called BS. And I was like, "That's ridiculous, that's not how it goes." Alyssa Scolari [43:45]: That's a bunch of shit, yeah. Michael Carrasquillo [43:48]: But I started, little by little. "How are you doing?" Instead of just the, "I'm good, I'm good." "It's good days and bad days." Little by little. Alyssa Scolari [43:58]: Even that little shift, that little, subtle shift makes such a difference. Michael Carrasquillo [44:03]: It does. And over time, I was able to kind of open up more and more with my wife, with my family, with my friends. And once that started to lift some of the burden, I realized, oh, I like this feeling, I want more. And so opening up more and sharing more, and started seeing therapy. And because therapy is such a bad, dirty word... Alyssa Scolari [44:24]: So stigmatized, yeah. Michael Carrasquillo [44:25]: Yeah, but it helped so much. For a little while, I was on medication just to help with some of the anxiety, help with sleeping and things like that. But pretty soon, over the course of a long time and creating relationships and understanding I'm not alone, and accepting that this isn't unique, this isn't something only I've gone through. And I can talk about and I can share with it and connect with people, opening up my circle more and more. Yeah, it helped over time. I got to a pretty good place when people started coming to me and letting things off their plate, and I could be there. It's being there for someone else. And starting to get out of my own head of, my own problems are the worst thing in the world. And being able to share that. And then hear what someone else is going through and empathize with them and sympathize with them. And go through it with them and give them advice and listen to them. So once I was starting to give of myself, that was a big game changer. It was all in steps. First, it was admitting that I'm not okay, then it was opening up, then it was being there for others. I started doing volunteer work and just getting out of my own head. And being a positive influence. And then that changed things. And then eventually, I got into a place where I was okay, as physically as good as I'm going to get, mentally, pretty darn good. And then, okay, what can I start to do to challenge myself? I've grown to the edges of these boundaries, now how can I break those boundaries? How can I extend past them? And so for one thing, comedy came into my life. And basically, I heard about this program for veterans, like, oh, they teach the arts, they teach writing and music, all these different things. But one of the things that caught my eye was this comedy stand up class. And for someone who doesn't like being the attention, I don't like being the center of attention. I don't like everyone looking at me, I don't like everybody waiting for me to say something. I don't like that feeling. I figured, wow, this is the way to literally, it's the sensory training where you put yourself in that situation and learn to be okay with it. And really, when I started it, [inaudible 00:46:43] it's a six-week class, once a week, do a little performance at the end, and you're done. And I was like, cool, this will be my, I'm just going to go through it, I'm going to check it off the list, I did it. I've learned something and I'm going to move on. But in the process of going through it, I fell in love. It was so, for me, therapeutic to put my thoughts on paper, and to make the decision to take traumatic things in my life and massage them a little bit, to make them funny, and to find the joy and laughter. I talk about being shot in my standup. I talk about that day. I talk about my recovery and some of the things that I went through. But always in the vein of like, hey, let's laugh together about this. How ridiculous is this? Alyssa Scolari [47:33]: Right, like, this is so surreal, and so unbelievable. Michael Carrasquillo [47:36]: Right, exactly. And so that was a big step forward for me, in being able to make light of it and control the narrative in a way. It was weird, because with comedy, you want it to be based in reality, but the fact is, you've got to punch it up a little bit to make it funny. And so having, in essence, having this paintbrush to paint the story the way I wanted to, and to make it my own, it was kind of therapeutic. And nothing like getting a laugh, I was addicted to making the audience laugh, and it was such a good time. I did it for a while, I did it for a couple years. And then my son came around and I took a step back, because I wanted to be good dad, and I'm not going to be some traveling comedian that's on the road 50 weeks out of the year. And so I took a step back with that. And then like a year later, pandemic hits. So just as I was about, all right, I'm ready to start getting back out there and doing comedy, and then the pandemic hit. Alyssa Scolari [48:34]: Of course. Michael Carrasquillo [48:35]: But that's how I ended up falling into doing a weekly live show online. And it's been awesome, because I can do it from home and I can get all that fun stuff out, and do what I'm passionate about, but still be around part of my family. Alyssa Scolari [48:51]: Here's what's also really, really beautiful to me, as I hear you talk. It's like, I think back, as you're telling me, to the bio that I read, where it's like since everything that you've gone through, you have also done other things like skydiving, scuba diving. And then I think back to what you were telling me about how you were truly an adrenaline lover, addicted to adrenaline. And for people who develop PTSD, it's very, very tough to get that love for adrenaline, because typically, our brains compute that as like, oh, this is danger. So to me, you stepped back into yourself truly. And that is, I think, the most beautiful thing. You are that person again. You have been able to get back in touch with yourself when PTSD pulls you so far away from yourself. Michael Carrasquillo [49:50]: No, it's true. It's absolutely true. I rarely pat myself on the back, but something I do feel is true, is that I'm a better version of myself now than before I got shot. As awesome as I was, I'm a better version of myself now. I'm much more humble and have humility and appreciative and want to give back of myself. And all those adventures came from a time when, like I said, as I was trying to expand this bubble and grow past myself, I realized I had opportunities in front of me, if I would just be open to them. And so it became anything that gets put in front of me, I'm going to say yes to. And so being a disabled veteran, especially at that time, there was all these organizations like, hey, we'll take you fishing. Hey, we'll do this. And hey, we'll do that. And I wasn't broke, but I wasn't made of money. So I was like, I can't do those things. But oh, no, no, we'll pay for you. Travel included and equipment included. And so I said yes to scuba diving, I said yes to skydiving. I did a veteran exchange program where I went to Israel for a week. And they sent Israelis to the States. And so I did that. And I traveled, I went to Germany, went to Venezuela. And my wife's from El Salvador, so I traveled to El Salvador. I just started trying to challenge myself and just say yes, be open to opportunities. Not everything's going to click, I did a golf program where you learn to play golf. And they even get you these really nice clubs and everything. I absolutely hated it, hated it, hated it with a passion. The clubs are still sitting in a closet somewhere. But there are things that, I really enjoyed the scuba diving, I really enjoyed the skydiving. I played racquetball for a little while. There is professional racquetball out there, I helped the professional Racquetball Association create its first division for disabled people. Because I was like, look, I can't be the only one that's enjoying it. There's no way I'm going to compete with these guys that are full abled, full bodied, whatever you want to call it. Alyssa Scolari [52:06]: Right, with people who haven't been shot. Michael Carrasquillo [52:08]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [52:09]: It's not right. Michael Carrasquillo [52:10]: But we created a division and got guys with, amputees that are playing, we got a wheelchair division, things that... It's been an awesome ride. And then it eventually, after a couple years, it went full circle where I hadn't been working, I hadn't been doing anything other than charity work and all these adventures and things like that. And I got to a point where I was like, you know what, I think I'm ready to get back to work and do something. Not just do stuff, but have a vision, have a goal. And I wanted us to have, we had a small little house, and I felt at a place where like, I want more, I can do more. And I got a job and started working and doing stuff. And obviously the service dog helped with that a lot. To be able to tolerate certain things. But then yeah, my son came around. And it's been an adventure. It's been something. Alyssa Scolari [53:08]: And with every word that you speak, all I can think to myself is, you are rewriting the narrative and actively changing those patterns in your brain that tell you that every single thing is a danger. You're getting out there and you're proving yourself and your brain otherwise. Michael Carrasquillo [53:27]: Yeah, it's not easy. It's not easy. Alyssa Scolari [53:30]: No, no, oh, God, no. Michael Carrasquillo [53:32]: I still deal with a lot of self doubt, I question myself constantly, anxiety. If I send out an email, I'm like, did that make sense? Are they going to think I'm weird? All these things, but I have to constantly just not let those voices take over and just like, no, do it. Trust in yourself, you've done it, you've been okay, just keep going. And I slip up, I make mistakes. Something me and my wife have developed a long time ago is, being comfortable not being comfortable. And so I have days where nothing necessarily needed to happen, I just wake up and I'm in a mood. And so we've coined the term, I'm blue. That's just our thing. And so if she spots it, or if I spot it myself, I'll be the first to tell her, "Listen, it's one of those days, I'm blue. I just need..." And she knows, okay, he needs some space, he needs some time. I'm here, he knows I'm here. Or if I'm struggling with something and I'm having a lot of anxiety, my wife will be like, "Do you need some time? How are you doing?" And we just check in with each other. Check in with myself and check in with her and it's been helpful to have that support, it's an effort. It takes a village. But good days and bad days, but more good than bad. So that's a good a thing. Alyssa Scolari [54:52]: Yeah, yes. Wow. So this show, can you just remind, I know I said it in the intro, but can you just remind the listeners, where can they find you if they want to hear more? Michael Carrasquillo [55:08]: Sure, sure. Alyssa Scolari [55:09]: And by listeners, I mean me, because I want to hear more. Michael Carrasquillo [55:12]: No, yeah. So POP Culture Warrior, which is my show. It's a weekly live show, so we do in front of a live audience, live virtual audience. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. The places that we go live are Facebook, YouTube, Twitch, Twitter actually has, Periscope as its live thing and then our website. But yeah, it's a fun show. I have a passion, obviously, for comic books and movies and video games and things. So each episode, I'll just talk about what you know what's happening this week in those categories. And then we started doing celebrity interviews, believe it or not, it. I had a couple people I knew from my travels, who hopped on. And we did a call and we talked. I've had Clark Gregg, who was Agent Coulson in The Avengers. Louie Anderson, who's a legendary comedian, Matt Iseman, the host of American Ninja Warrior. So I had a couple friends of friends who came onto the show, and it was obviously well received. And so we just kind of made it a thing. And now, I mean, we've had amazing people; actors. We just had, literally when was it, today's Wednesday, so yesterday, I was talking with Efren Ramirez, who was Pedro in Napoleon Dynamite. Alyssa Scolari [56:24]: Oh, that's so cool. Michael Carrasquillo [56:27]: Yeah, we had a great conversation yesterday. And it's awesome, because it's very interactive. The audience can participate, ask questions. It's all super interactive. Actually, right now. I mean, if you can get to the page, I don't know when this is getting released. But we're doing a giveaway. We hit one of our goals. And so like, I'll send out care packages full of pop culture swag, and things. I've been given autographs from different events and different things. And so I give away celebrity autographs and it's just a fun thing to thank the audience for hanging out and being part of it. So yeah, it's POP Culture Warrior, like I said, Twitter, Instagram, or wherever. One of my nephew's made me start a TikTok, I'm not going to be putting up TikTok videos, but- Alyssa Scolari [57:10]: Ha, you have a TikTok, me too. Michael Carrasquillo [57:12]: I mean, for the show, I might post some stuff. But anywhere you can find social media, look up POP Culture Warrior. Alyssa Scolari [57:20]: POP Culture Warrior. Michael Carrasquillo [57:21]: Yeah, we're around. And it's a fun show. It's Tuesdays 8:00 PM until usually question mark, but the first hour we do the headlines, and in the second hour, we'll have a celebrity guest or some type of guest. And yeah, it's been really fun. We're at 57 episodes and going strong. Alyssa Scolari [57:41]: Awesome. Michael Carrasquillo [57:41]: This fall is going to be intense, I've already had some conversation with some pretty big stars, talking like the leads of movies that are coming out this fall- Alyssa Scolari [57:51]: Nice- Michael Carrasquillo [57:51]: ... will be [crosstalk 00:57:52]. So yeah, it's going to be pretty cool. We're building to something awesome, so I'm excited. Alyssa Scolari [57:57]: Oh, that's so cool. I will link that, I'm also going to link the articles that you had shared with me in the show notes for the listeners. So you all can check out those articles. That is POP Culture Warrior, POP Culture Warrior, we'll be putting that in the show notes as well. Thank you isn't honestly even fitting. I don't want to thank you, because it doesn't feel like it would do it justice. But I just am expressing sincere, genuine and overwhelming gratitude for your vulnerability, your strength and just the way that you are humanizing this process. Because I think a lot of people can see wounded veterans as just... I feel like we don't humanize them enough. And you're doing that, you're doing that. And you are fighting the good fight. And I am so thankful you're here. Michael Carrasquillo [58:59]: I appreciate it. Thank you. And thank you for carrying some of my baggage for me. I appreciate you and what you're doing. So yeah, this has been fun. Alyssa Scolari [59:09]: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma, and on Twitter, it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support.

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago
Podcast: Analyzing the Cubs and White Sox trade moves, Fleury a Blackhawk, and the Bears training camp

Bill Swerski's Sports Talk Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021


The Swerski Crew is back and analyzing the Cubs and White Sox trade deadline moves, Fleury joining the Blackhawks, and Bears first week of training camp. All of this and more on this latest episode of Swerski SportsMake sure to follow us on:Twitter: @SwerskiSportsFacebook: /SwerskiSportswww.SwerskiSports.comyoutube.com/SwerskiSportshttps://feeds.feedblitz.com/-/660862700/0/billswerskissportstalkchicago.MP3and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher or the TuneIn app      Related StoriesPodcast: Blackhawks trades, Cubs/White Sox at the trade deadline, and Bears report to campPodcast: Cubs selling, White Sox rolling, Blackhawks at expansion draft, no deal for Bears RobinsonPodcast: Hawks trade Duncan Keith, Cubs and Sox at the all star break, and Bears talk 

Miller's Military Moments
My Story: December 2005 in Kuwait. Preparing to head to Iraq

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 50:40


The continuation of my story. The day that I recorded this happens to be my last day in the Army. July 31st. 20 years and 4 days of service. I share a small tribute and a few words at the beginning of this episode. In December 2005, we were in Kuwait and preparing our aircraft and ourselves for our upcoming deployment to Taji, Iraq. We were excited to do our mission but had no idea how tough it really was going to be. We prepared our aircraft, saw sand being imported into kuwait, and I had my crew chief seat stolen a couple of days before i was supposed to fly to Iraq. The Army issued us brand new M240's for our helicopters. What a fun weapon to shoot. We made it to Taji and went through our right seat/left seat rides with no issues. We were happy with our living conditions etc. Time for the mission, lets go!Miller's Military MomentsMiller's PatreonSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Miller's Military Moments
Soldier Stories with Dave and Ricardo: Party Line

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 83:20


Two guests on at the same time. Two different branches of service. Army and Air Force. Two different stories. After the show, 3 good friends! Ricardo shares his story of being in the Air Force and working on drones and how the quality of life is generally better in the Air force! Now he is working for SpaceX. How cool is that?Dave shares stories from his early days in the Army in Afghanistan in 2003 and our early days at Fort Hood when we met in 2005. He started out as a mechanic and became a crew chief where he hasn't given up the crew chief life yet! Great show!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
Listener Mail: Secret Scientists, Hidden Blackhawks, and the Mystery of Melungeons

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 61:14


Why did the US government have a secret group of scientists known as the Jasons? Why would someone hide Blackhawk helicopters in an abandoned Walmart? What exactly are Melungeons? All this and more in this week's listener mail. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Madhouse Chicago Hockey Podcast
Marc-Andre Fleury is a Blackhawk, or is he? (07.27.2021)

Madhouse Chicago Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 27:55


The Blackhawks shocked the hockey world on Tuesday, trading for reigning Vezina Trophy winner Marc-Andre Fleury, but the celebration was quickly spoiled when rumors of Fleury's unhappiness and threats of retirement started to make the rounds. Will Fleury ever play for the Blackhawks? James Neveau and Jay Zawaski discuss on this Madhouse Podcast.  Submit your Blue Wire Hustle application here: http://bwhustle.com/join SPONSORS: Fry the Coop Kent Sinson of the Sinson Law Group Triple Threat Sports Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Miller's Military Moments
Soldier Stories with Jon Lang CW3 Retired Part 1 Ep 12 Sea 2

Miller's Military Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 78:58


Jon is a retired Blackhawk Pilot that also was a Crew Chief and flight instructor for new crew chiefs just like myself while he served in the United States Army.  He served in Germany, Honduras twice, Fort Hood, Savannah and Joint Base Lewis McChord in Washington state. He has deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan multiple times in an Assault battalion, medevac unit and as a pilot. Jon and I served together in 3-4 Assault Helicopter Battalion as part of the 4th Combat Aviation Brigade and 4th Infantry Division out of Fort Hood, Texas in 2005-2007. He was a Flight instructor that taught me how to be a crew chief. He also participated in Operation Hurricane Katrina Relief with me. He spends a lot of time talking about Katrina Relief in this episode and makes it a point to say how this event was one of his top experiences in the Army. Jon is an incredible Soldier, Leader, Teammate, and friend. I am proud to have served with him. America is lucky to have a selfless individual like Jon, and a family that supported him and our nation. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/millersmilitarymoments)

Moose & Roons
Episode 214 - Bryson Broken?

Moose & Roons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 64:53


Episode 214 kicks off with some live Open Championship reax as we check in on our picks, talk impressions of Royal St. George's, Bryson's breakdown and more. The MLB kicks off their 2nd half, who goes to the World Series and takes home the major awards? Duncan Keith is no longer a Blackhawk and we are #sad. What's Conor McGregor's future? NBA Finals is a best of 3 and so much more! Subscribe, rate, review on iTunes and send in those mailbags!