Podcasts about Modernism

Philosophical and art movement (late 19th – early 20th century)

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Latest podcast episodes about Modernism

Way of the Bible
Conversation with Pastor Andrew Reilly

Way of the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 50:25


#079 This Conversation with Pastor Andrew Reilly is a must listen to episode if you are a college student or younger! Parents and grandparents, if you have kids or grandkids who are college students or younger this is a must listen episode!Andrew completely nails post-Modernism, the disconnect culturally that is totally devastating our most precious resource in colleges across the country. The ferocity at which post-Modernism is tearing apart the precious lives of Gen-Z students cannot be over emphasized.I completed an organizational doctoral leadership program five years ago specifically looking at the mindset and worldview of Millennials and Gen-Z as they entered the workplace. I wrote a 400 page dissertation based upon my research and later a book on this topic. What I discovered culturally about these two generations was so shocking I completely altered my vocational path in an attempt to warn others of what is coming our way. What we are seeing in 2022 is just the start of something much darker coming our way.Andrew nails the issue during our conversation and presents very practical means of binding the open artery draining the life blood out of our youth. You will hear truth in this conversation that will cause you to quake if you're a believer. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of listening to what Andrew has to say.PUSH PLAY and listen… you'll never think the same way afterward. Pray, pray, pray for the Lord to rescue his vulnerable sheep and save us from the whirlwind to come.More on Andrew Reilly go to RefugeLSU.com or theChapelBR.comSHOWNOTES: https://47d800ed-2293-49f4-b1f4-6964b8bcb082.filesusr.com/ugd/ec4c20_c9eeb47cf1864a978f5ed982de3b8fa6.pdf 

Encounter Culture
Discovering Delight with Rachel Preston: Celebrating the Girard Wing's 40th Anniversary at the Museum of International Folk Art

Encounter Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 38:34


Take a trip through Santa Fe, and you'll undoubtedly notice that this city wears its design diversity with pride. Architectural storyteller Rachel Preston Prinz joins host Charlotte Jusinski to discuss the history of Museum Hill, Santa Fe's remarkable collection of museums just outside downtown.  The episode focuses on the Museum of International Folk Art, by engineer-turned-architect John Gaw Meem, and its Girard Wing, which currently displays over 10,000 pieces of folk art. Built in 1953, MOIFA is considered a revolutionary testament to Modernism in the city and an anomaly among New Mexico's museums.  As it approaches its 70th anniversary, MOIFA is preparing for the next wave of design conversations, scouring its archives for treasures that will inspire fresh stories. MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE EC0105: An Underground Love Affair, The Palace Seen and Unseen with Archaeologists Cordelia Snow & Stephen Post First Unitarian Church of Albuquerque St. John's College Santa Fe La Reina Bar at El Ray Court Compound Restaurant Visit https://newmexicoculture.org for info about our museums, historic sites, virtual tours, and more. *** Encounter Culture, a production of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, is produced and edited by Andrea Klunder at The Creative Impostor Studios. Hosted by Charlotte Jusinski, Editor at El Palacio Magazine Technical Director: Edwin R. Ruiz Recording Engineer: Kabby at Kabby Sound Studios in Santa Fe Executive Producer:  Daniel Zillmann Show Notes: Lisa Widder Associate Editor: Helen King Associate Producer: Alex Riegler Theme Music: D'Santi Nava Instagram: @newmexicanculture For more, visit podcast.nmculture.org.

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#276/AIA 2022 National Conference: Robert Ivy + Special Musical Guest Diane Schuur

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 58:36


The American Institute of Architects or AIA, is the leading professional association in the US, and USModernist Radio was there for their national conference last June in Chicago.  Joining us is the most relaxed person at the conference, just-retired CEO of the AIA, Robert Ivy. And later, music with American jazz legend Diane Schuur, aka Deedles.

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#275/Down The Shore At Wildwood NJ: Daniel Vieyra + Stephanie Hoagland + Ian Smith

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 30:34


Wildwood used to be the Palm Springs of the Jersey Shore. No, not where Snooki and The Situation spent their misspent youth, that's Seaside Heights, way to the north.  Wildwood is three towns along a six-mile barrier island near the southern tip of New Jersey: Wildwood Crest, Wildwood, and Wildwood North, famous for a colorful array of over 300 wildly themed mid-century motels providing families wonderful vacation memories for decades.  Staying in Wildwood was the first exposure to Modernism for millions of Americans. Over drinks at the Philadelphia Marriott, where they spoke at the DOCOMOMO Conference, you'll hear George talk with Daniel Vieyra, Professor Emeritus in the Kent State University School of Architecture; Stephanie Hoagland, Principal and Architectural Conservator of Jablonski Building Conservation; and Ian Smith, Principal of IS-DG Architects. 

Tim Ben & Brooke: The GTF Podcast
Bailey Smiths College Paper on Taylor Swifts All Too Well TBB Extra Podcast 11-18-22

Tim Ben & Brooke: The GTF Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 10:00


Bailey Smith is a college student studying to become a marriage and family counselor She wrote a paper about Taylor Swift's "All Too Well" explaining the examples of Modernism vs. Post-Modernism depicted in the 10 minute song So of course we had to talk to her Recorded Thursday November 11, 2022 with Tim Hattrick, Ben Campbell and Brooke Hoover

Creedal Catholic
E132 Wakanda, Modernism, and Art Punching Through: What a Week w/Andrew Petiprin

Creedal Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 64:40


On this week's installment, we banter a bit about film and storytelling and do a food-themed Misinformation segment before diving into our close read for the week: an interview of Fen de Villiers in the European Conservative. Then we wrap with our recommendations for the week (linked below). Breakthrough: https://europeanconservative.com/articles/interview/interview-with-fen-de-villiers/ 'Wakanda Forever' Review: https://www.nationalreview.com/2022/11/wakanda-forever-exploits-commercial-politics/ 'First Man': https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1213641/

Front Row
The Wonder, Making Modernism, Frantic Assembly, Opera and elitism

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 42:24


With Samira Ahmed. Guests Katy Hessel and Lillian Crawford review Florence Pugh's drama The Wonder, based on an Emma Donoghue novel, and the Royal Academy's Making Modernism exhibition, which explores the lives of a group of female artists active in Germany in the early twentieth century. The theatre company Frantic Assembly is running a nationwide programme to find the actors of the future, hopefully from unexpected places. Luke Jones talks to Frantic Assembly's artistic director Scott Graham about their plan to get a wider range of young people into theatre and to some of the aspiring actors taking part in this year's programme. As the fallout of the Arts Council announcements continues, Lillian Crawford and composer Gavin Higgins consider why opera is still being branded elitist and what can be done about it. Producer: Ellie Bury Photo credit: Florence Pugh as Lib Wright in The Wonder. Cr. Aidan Monaghan

The Michael J. Matt Show
NYPD COP: On Vaccines, Violence & Victims of the New Normal

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 49:12


In this Special Edition of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt interviews Sergeant James Hipple – a retired New York City police officer. This discussion goes well beyond the midterm elections to the disastrous effects of the Democrat war on God and His law – the root cause of massive escalation of violence in America. Defund the police, the exploitation of race, the promotion of abortion, the breakup of the family, the obscenity of forced vaccination, the attack on law and order – it's all a “God thing,” which is why this Catholic cop relies on the Latin Mass and the Rosary to keep him sane during one of the worst periods of social unrest in American history. Although he'd left the Church for many years, Sergeant Hipple explains that it was the Latin Mass that brought him back in 2021. So, Sergeant Hipple: “What do you think of Pope Francis?” Spoiler Alert: Francis made it impossible for Catholic police officers in New York City – including Sergeant Hipple – to get a religious exemption from taking the vaccines. This third-generation cop retired early rather than take the vaccine. For Sergeant Hipple, the gloves are off. His war is our war: Unite the clans beneath the banner of Christ the King! There's no other way to save our nation's soul. Please support RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV:Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Subscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/user Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates

Horror Queers
Starship Troopers (1997)

Horror Queers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 118:20


Grab your bug spray because we're heading to the alien bug planets of Klendathu and Planet P to satirize the fascists in Paul Verhoeven's adaptation of Robert Heinlein's controversial novel Starship Troopers!Join us as we go over the film's lengthy (lengthy) production history before diving into the film's political commentary that 1997 critics and audiences just didn't seem to detect. Is it subtext? Or is it text? We aim to find out!References:Todd Berliner. “Genre and Ideology in Starship Troopers.” Hollywood Aesthetic: Pleasure in American CinemaFlorentine Strzelczyk. "Our Future—Our Past:Fascism, Postmodernism, and Starship Troopers (1997)” Modernism/modernity, Volume 15, Number 1, January 2008Questions? Comments? Snark? Connect with the boys on Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, Letterboxd, Facebook, or join the Facebook Group to get in touch with other listeners> Trace: @tracedthurman> Joe: @bstolemyremoteBe sure to support the boys on Patreon! Theme Music: Alexander Nakarada Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Michael J. Matt Show
DEMOCRAT PROMISES: Baby-Killing, Satanism & Deadly Vaccines

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 28:59


Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt Do you think the midterm elections don't matter? George Soros disagrees with you. Soros has donated $128.5 million to Democracy PAC, $10.5 million of which went to Senate Majority PAC, a super PAC controlled by Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer. Soros also gave $1 million to J Street Action Fund and Planned Parenthood's super PAC. Big changes at Remnant TV! In this edition of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt lays out a new course of action in the wake of YouTube's decision to take Remnant TV off the air. Citing National Public Radio's diabolical decision to broadcast an abortion live, Michael warns that America is facing the end of the world as we know it.  Here's why the midterm elections actually do matter this time…perhaps more than ever before in the history of this country. In a stirring rallying cry to the clans around the world, Michael challenges RTV viewers to do the right thing, to keep hope alive, and to make this moment a defining moment of change for all those who are still willing to do whatever it takes to save this nation, to save the family, and to become the fighters for truth that God is calling us all to be. Support RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Subscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/user Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates  

Restitutio
468 Touching the Supernatural (Dale Allison)

Restitutio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 60:34


Renowned Historical Jesus Scholar and Princeton Theological Seminary Professor, Dale Allison's life changed forever when he was just sixteen years old. In fact, he has chronicled nine profound spiritual experiences throughout his life. These extraordinary moments of transcendence led him to a comparative study to learn more about what is happening to people all around the world in our time. The result? A book that catalogues and describes weird encounters with angels in white, sudden terminal lucidity, near death experiences, and even encounters with evil spiritual entities. This is not the typical sort of book written by someone who has made a career of scholarship within a guild that generally prefers naturalism and reductionism to the miraculous or inexplicable. Nonetheless, now tenured and sitting atop a mountain of published successes--and without concern about his career--Professor Allison feels free to explore his own numinal episodes as well as those of a staggering number of others--most of whom keep such experiences to themselves. Listen to this episode on Spotify or Apple Podcasts https://youtu.be/H4_ZSJH6SRs —— Links —— Get the book we discussed, Encountering Mystery For more about Dale Allison, see his books on Amazon Support Restitutio by donating here Designate Restitutio as your charity of choice for Amazon purchases Join our Restitutio Facebook Group and follow Sean Finnegan on Twitter @RestitutioSF Leave a voice message via SpeakPipe with questions or comments and we may play them out on the air Intro music: Good Vibes by MBB Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) Free Download / Stream: Music promoted by Audio Library. Who is Sean Finnegan?  Read his bio here —— Questions —— You begin your book by telling three personal experiences of the transcendent. Were you worried what people would think about you as a distinguished scholar of Jesus and the New Testament, especially among the more secular-minded elements in the academy? You remark on the difficulty of acquiring accurate statistics on mystical experiences because people tend to keep their encounters private. Why is that? And yet, they seem to be increasing, or at least reported more (see p. 21) You talk about a small piece of paper that you keep in your desk draw that chronicles nine experiences you've had between 1979 and 1999. Do you think it's important for people to maintain their memories of extraordinary events? Honestly, your little piece of paper reminded me of Blaise Pascal's night of fire. He sowed it into his house jacket and it was only discovered after he died. Why do you think there's so much shame and silence surrounding people's experiences of spiritual realities? Let's talk about the dark side. You related some stories of people who experienced love or joy or light and then others where people felt terrified by the numinous. Let's talk about the so-called old hag experience (Newfoundland Legend). What is that? You found one source that claimed approx. 20% of North Americans have had this experience (p. 24). How do you make sense of that? Is it that people are in an altered stage of consciousness and can perceive a spiritual dimension that is usually invisible to them? Specifically, could you share about your daughter? (She saw shadow people and had PTSD for 10 years!?) Have you thought much about psychedelics? There's increasing research about micro dosing where people have similar experience to what you cover in the book, both benevolent and malevolent.prayer (skip)...though one story about the lady who saw a phone number and called a pay phone and got the guy who was struggling with negative thoughts Angels: you talk about the AIW (angel in white) as well as anti-gravity stories. You talk about people nearly falling off roofs or falling and then floating downwards. These are especially hard for people to believe since they aren't subjective experiences. These are either the most powerful or the most ridiculous. Did you struggle to include these? Sudden clarity among the dying..other dreams and visions (60%) Many Christians hold to cessationism, probably b/c it's easy. Dismiss everything as hearsay and hallucination. But, you're book, essentially makes that view impossible. But this raises another problem. Read p. 82. How do you respond to this objection?

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
The Shock of the New | The Year 1913: The World on the Brink

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 54:08


The Ottoman Empire is at war in the Balkans. There's a revolution in Mexico and a coup in Istanbul. Women worldwide agitate for suffrage. Modernism bursts onto the artistic stage, and Rabindranath Tagore becomes the first non-western writer to win the Nobel Prize. Part four in our series, The Shock of the New, exploring how change happens.

New Books in Literary Studies
On Thomas Mann's "The Magic Mountain"

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:51


When Thomas Mann published The Magic Mountain in 1924, tuberculosis had a deadly hold on Europe and the United States, killing one in seven adults in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If that wasn't enough, Mann's writing was interrupted by the First World War, so it took him twelve years to finish the book. Mann was a modern, experimental writer who wrote about the major issues of his time—not only the war and the pandemic, but also industrialization, class resentment, and rising nationalism. The characters of The Magic Mountain live in a sanitorium, recovering from tuberculosis. The experiences they have and the people they meet there symbolize many of the big ideas circulating Europe at the time. Professor Pericles Lewis of Yale University discusses Thomas Mann's literary legacy and the encyclopedic nature of The Magic Mountain. Pericles Lewis is the Douglas Tracy Smith Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of English at Yale University. His works include Modernism, Nationalism, and the Novel and Religious Experience and the Modernist Novel. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Dish Knows Nothing
Reflection, Modernism, Silica Packets, and Dog Thoughts (S1E16)

Dish Knows Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 40:27


This episode was split as I recorded the beginning portion when I was 25 years old and the second portion when I was 26 years old. It was a time for reflection and sharing about some things that have been on my mind. Thankful for everyone who has been in my life leading up to this epi, particularly those I mentioned in the recording, especially my wife

New Books Network
On Thomas Mann's "The Magic Mountain"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:51


When Thomas Mann published The Magic Mountain in 1924, tuberculosis had a deadly hold on Europe and the United States, killing one in seven adults in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If that wasn't enough, Mann's writing was interrupted by the First World War, so it took him twelve years to finish the book. Mann was a modern, experimental writer who wrote about the major issues of his time—not only the war and the pandemic, but also industrialization, class resentment, and rising nationalism. The characters of The Magic Mountain live in a sanitorium, recovering from tuberculosis. The experiences they have and the people they meet there symbolize many of the big ideas circulating Europe at the time. Professor Pericles Lewis of Yale University discusses Thomas Mann's literary legacy and the encyclopedic nature of The Magic Mountain. Pericles Lewis is the Douglas Tracy Smith Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of English at Yale University. His works include Modernism, Nationalism, and the Novel and Religious Experience and the Modernist Novel. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in German Studies
On Thomas Mann's "The Magic Mountain"

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:51


When Thomas Mann published The Magic Mountain in 1924, tuberculosis had a deadly hold on Europe and the United States, killing one in seven adults in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If that wasn't enough, Mann's writing was interrupted by the First World War, so it took him twelve years to finish the book. Mann was a modern, experimental writer who wrote about the major issues of his time—not only the war and the pandemic, but also industrialization, class resentment, and rising nationalism. The characters of The Magic Mountain live in a sanitorium, recovering from tuberculosis. The experiences they have and the people they meet there symbolize many of the big ideas circulating Europe at the time. Professor Pericles Lewis of Yale University discusses Thomas Mann's literary legacy and the encyclopedic nature of The Magic Mountain. Pericles Lewis is the Douglas Tracy Smith Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of English at Yale University. His works include Modernism, Nationalism, and the Novel and Religious Experience and the Modernist Novel. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#272/Appraising Modernist Houses: James Ebert + Musical Guest Elijah Rock

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 58:20


Ever since Modernism started, most banks have been, let's say this delicately, a huge PITA. Getting reasonable appraisals for mortgages, insurance claims, property taxes, and determining sales price is difficult, especially post-2008 when all the appraisal rules tightened up.  That's where you need an expert, someone who knows Modernist architecture and can assign fair value.  Today's guest is one of the foremost Modernist appraisers in California, James Ebert.  Later on, musical guest, the classy Elijah Rock.

All Current Classes From Dean Bible Ministries
169 - Members of One Another [B]-Ephesians (2018)

All Current Classes From Dean Bible Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 53:52


Are you aware you're living in a war zone? A war zone of competing worldviews? Listen to this message to learn about two prominent worldviews that may be influencing you more than you know. The first of these is called Modernism, which stresses that reason and logic are all that were necessary to live a good life. This view was discredited by the devastation of the first World War. The worldview that followed it and is current today is called Postmodernism. Learn how its goal is to bring utopia to this world through social change. In contrast to these false worldviews is the biblical view that man is helpless to save himself, but God's plan for mankind is to redeem him through Christ's death on the Cross when we trust in Him. Finish this lesson with a study of who the “one another” in Ephesians refers to and the importance of the body of Christ called the Church.

Ephesians (2018)
169 - Members of One Another [B]

Ephesians (2018)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 53:52


Are you aware you're living in a war zone? A war zone of competing worldviews? Listen to this message to learn about two prominent worldviews that may be influencing you more than you know. The first of these is called Modernism, which stresses that reason and logic are all that were necessary to live a good life. This view was discredited by the devastation of the first World War. The worldview that followed it and is current today is called Postmodernism. Learn how its goal is to bring utopia to this world through social change. In contrast to these false worldviews is the biblical view that man is helpless to save himself, but God's plan for mankind is to redeem him through Christ's death on the Cross when we trust in Him. Finish this lesson with a study of who the “one another” in Ephesians refers to and the importance of the body of Christ called the Church.

The Michael J. Matt Show
COUNTERREVOLUTION: Pope Francis, Joe Biden Losing Control

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 38:38


QUESTION: With 90-year-old Joseph Cardinal Zen on trail this week for defying the Chinese Communist Government, where's the Vatican? Why is pope Francis not speaking out in Zen's defense? In this episode of The Remnant Underground, Michael takes a look at this question, as well as the ramifications of two recent developments: 1) Elon Musk takes control of Twitter and the revival of free speech is underway 2) New York Supreme Court rules that the jab does not stop the spread of Covid Both of these developments come as a threat to the globalists, including Team Francis inside the Vatican, especially where Number 2 is concerned.  If Tony Fauci needs to be help responsible for crimes against humanity, certainly so too should Pope Francis.  And now the woke pope's alliance with Globalism and the radical Left is throwing the Catholic Church into civil war. In his bid to become chaplain of the New World Order, Francis has alienated powerful members of the hierarchy, including the former head of the Holy Office. Let's review: Archbishop Charles Chaput blasted any priest who would dare give communion to Joe Biden – a “Catholic” who, according to Chaput, is not in communion with the Catholic Church. Cardinal Zen, who  is now in prison, for standing up to Communist China -- a government with which Francis has signed a secret deal -- called the Vatican Secretary of State a "betrayer".  Bishop Schneider didn't pull any punches where the Vatican is concerned when he appeared in person on Steve Bannon's War Room. Cardinal Muller on EWTN accused Team Francis of engaging in a "hostile takeover of the Catholic Church." Archbishop Vigano, in a recent interview, levelled the Vatican's sellout to Davos. And there're much more. Whether you're Catholic or not, this is big!  Pope Francis -- who provided the moral authority for the global lockdown and climate change revolution -- is facing massive pushback from within his own Church, which is why the Vatican Secretary of State said THIS to the top brass at EWTN in Rome last week.  Finally, the civil war is on. Which side are you on? Plus! Introducing Flores Cardinal Crayola, Prefect of the Congregation for Whole Body Listening… Please support RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Subscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/user Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates  

The Lunar Society
Brian Potter - Future of Construction, Ugly Modernism, & Environmental Review

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 145:57


Brian Potter is the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he discusses why the construction industry has been slow to industrialize and innovate.He explains why:* Construction isn't getting cheaper and faster,* We should have mile-high buildings and multi-layer non-intersecting roads,* “Ugly” modern buildings are simply the result of better architecture,* China is so great at building things,* Saudi Arabia's Line is a waste of resources,* Environmental review makes new construction expensive and delayed,* and much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up; subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews with Tyler Cowen (about talent, collapse, & pessimism of sex). Charles Mann (about the Americas before Columbus & scientific wizardry), and Austin Vernon about (Energy Superabundance, Starship Missiles, & Finding Alpha).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you share it, post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) - Why Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist (06:54) - Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures (10:10) - Unique Woes of The Construction Industry  (19:28) - The Problems of Prefabrication (26:27) - If Building Regulations didn't exist… (32:20) - China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, & Japan(44:45) - Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies (1:00:51) - 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of Labour(1:08:02) - AI's Impact on Construction Productivity(1:17:53) - Brian Dreams of Building a Mile High Skyscraper(1:23:43) - Deep Dive into Environmentalism and NEPA(1:42:04) - Software is Stealing Talent from Physical Engineering(1:47:13) - Gaps in the Blog Marketplace of Ideas(1:50:56) - Why is Modern Architecture So Ugly?(2:19:58) - Advice for Aspiring Architects and Young Construction PhysicistsTranscriptWhy Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist Dwarkesh Patel Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Potter, who is an engineer and the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he writes about how the construction industry works and why it has been slow to industrialize and innovate. It's one of my favorite blogs on the internet, and I highly, highly recommend that people check it out. Brian, my first question is about The Line project in Saudi Arabia. What are your opinions? Brian Potter It's interesting how Saudi Arabia and countries in the Middle East, in general, are willing to do these big, crazy, ambitious building projects and pour huge amounts of money into constructing this infrastructure in a way that you don't see a huge amount in the modern world. China obviously does this too in huge amounts, some other minor places do as well, but in general, you don't see a whole lot of countries building these big, massive, incredibly ambitious projects. So on that level, it's interesting, and it's like, “Yes, I'm glad to see that you're doing this,” but the actual project is clearly insane and makes no sense. Look at the physical arrangement layout–– there's a reason cities grow in two dimensions. A one-dimensional city is the worst possible arrangement for transportation. It's the maximum amount of distance between any two points. So just from that perspective, it's clearly crazy, and there's no real benefit to it other than perhaps some weird hypothetical transportation situation where you had really fast point-to-point transportation. It would probably be some weird bullet train setup; maybe that would make sense. But in general, there's no reason to build a city like that. Even if you wanted to build an entirely enclosed thing (which again doesn't make a huge amount of sense), you would save so much material and effort if you just made it a cube. I would be more interested in the cube than the line. [laughs] But yeah, those are my initial thoughts on it. I will be surprised if it ever gets built. Dwarkesh Patel Are you talking about the cube from the meme about how you can put all the humans in the world in a cube the size of Manhattan? Brian Potter Something like that. If you're just going to build this big, giant megastructure, at least take advantage of what that gets you, which is minimum surface area to volume ratio.Dwarkesh Patel Why is that important? Would it be important for temperature or perhaps other features? Brian Potter This is actually interesting because I'm actually not sure how sure it would work with a giant single city. In general, a lot of economies of scale come from geometric effects. When something gets bigger, your volume increases a lot faster than your surface area does. So for something enclosed, like a tank or a pipe, the cost goes down per thing of unit you're transporting because you can carry a larger amount or a smaller amount of material. It applies to some extent with buildings and construction because the exterior wall assembly is a really burdensome, complicated, and expensive assembly. A building with a really big floor plate, for instance, can get more area per unit, per amount of exterior wall. I'm not sure how that actually works with a single giant enclosed structure because, theoretically, on a small level, it would apply the same way. Your climate control is a function of your exterior surface, at some level, and you get more efficient climate control if you have a larger volume and less area that it can escape from. But for a giant city, I actually don't know if that works, and it may be worse because you're generating so much heat that it's now harder to pump out. For examples like the urban heat island effect, where these cities generate massive amounts of waste heat, I don't know if that would work if it didn't apply the same way. I'm trying to reach back to my physics classes in college, so I'm not sure about the actual mechanics of that. Generally though, that's why you'd want to perhaps build something of this size and shape. Dwarkesh Patel What was the thought process behind designing this thing? Because Scott Alexander had a good blog post about The Line where he said, presumably, that The Line is designed to take up less space and to use less fuel because you can just use the same transportation across. But the only thing that Saudi Arabia has is space and fuel. So what is the thought process behind this construction project? Brian PotterI get the sense that a lot of committees have some amount of success in building big, impressive, physical construction projects that are an attraction just by virtue of their size and impressiveness. A huge amount of stuff in Dubai is something in this category, and they have that giant clock tower in Jeddah, the biggest giant clock building and one of the biggest buildings in the world, or something like that. I think, on some level, they're expecting that you would just see a return from building something that's really impressive or “the biggest thing on some particular axis”. So to some extent, I think they're just optimizing for big and impressive and maybe not diving into it more than that. There's this theory that I think about every so often. It's called the garbage can theory of organizational decision-making, which basically talks about how the choices that organizations make are not the result of any particular recent process. They are the result of how, whenever a problem comes up, people reach into the garbage can of potential solutions. Then whatever they pull out of the garbage can, that's the decision that they end up going with, regardless of how much sense it makes. It was a theory that was invented by academics to describe decision-making in academia. I think about that a lot, especially with reference to big bureaucracies and governments. You can just imagine the draining process of how these decisions evolve. Any random decision can be made, especially when there's such a disconnect between the decision-makers and technical knowledge.Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures Dwarkesh PatelTell me about your eBay arbitrage with designer clothes. Brian Potter Oh man, you really did dive deep. Yeah, so this was a small business that I ran seven or eight years ago at this point. A hobby of mine was high-end men's fashion for a while, which is a very strange hobby for an engineer to have, but there you go. That hobby centers around finding cheap designer stuff, because buying new can be overwhelmingly expensive. However, a lot of times, you can get clothes for a very cheap price if you're even a little bit motivated. Either it shows up on eBay, or it shows up in thrift stores if you know what to look for. A lot of these clothes can last because they're well-made. They last a super, super, super long time–– even if somebody wore it for 10 years or something, it could be fine. So a lot of this hobby centered around finding ways to get really nice clothes cheaply. Majority of it was based around eBay, but it was really tedious to find really nice stuff on eBay. You had to manually search for a bunch of different brands, filter out the obviously bad ones, search for typos in brands, put in titles, and stuff like that. I was in the process of doing this, and I thought, “Oh, this is really annoying. I should figure out a way to automate this process.” So I made a very simple web app where when you searched for shoes or something, it would automatically search the very nice brands of shoes and all the typos of the brand name. Then it would just filter out all the junk and let you search through the good stuff. I set up an affiliate system, basically. So anybody else that used it, I would get a kick of the sales. While I was interested in that hobby, I ran this website for a few years, and it was reasonably successful. It was one of the first things I did that got any real traction on the internet, but it was never successful in proportion to how much effort it took to maintain and update it. So as I moved away from the hobby, I eventually stopped putting time and effort into maintaining the website. I'm curious as to how you even dug that up. Dwarkesh Patel I have a friend who was with you at the Oxford Refugees Conference, Connor Tabarrok. I don't know if you remember him. Brian Potter Nice. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Finding other information about you on the internet was quite difficult actually. You've somehow managed to maintain your anonymity. If you're willing to reveal, what was the P&L of this project? Brian Potter Oh, it made maybe a few hundred dollars a month for a few years, but I only ever ran it as a side hobby business, basically. So in terms of time per my effort or whatever, I'm sure it was very low. Pennies to an hour or something like that. Unique Woes of The Construction Industry   Dwarkesh Patel A broad theme that I've gotten from your post is that the construction industry is plagued with these lossy feedback loops, a lack of strong economies of scale, regulation, and mistakes being very costly. Do you think that this is a general characteristic of many industries in our world today, or is there something unique about construction? Brian Potter Interesting question. One thing you think of is that there are a lot of individual factors that are not unique at all. Construction is highly regulated, but it's not necessarily more regulated than medical devices or jet travel, or even probably cars, to some extent, which have a whole vat of performance criteria they need to hit. With a couple of things like land use, for example, people say, “Oh, the land requirements, could you build it on-site,” explaining how those kinds of things make it difficult. But there is a lot that falls into this category that doesn't really share the same structure of how the construction industry works.I think it's the interaction of all those effects. One thing that I think is perhaps underappreciated is that the systems of a building are really highly coupled in a way that a lot of other things are. If you're manufacturing a computer, the hard drive is somewhat independent from the display and somewhat independent from the power supply. These things are coupled, but they can be built by independent people who don't necessarily even talk to each other before being assembled into one structured thing. A building is not really like that at all. Every single part affects every single other part. In some ways, it's like biology. So it's very hard to change something that doesn't end up disrupting something else. Part of that is because a job's building is to create a controlled interior environment, meaning, every single system has to run through and around the surfaces that are creating that controlled interior. Everything is touching each other. Again, that's not unique. Anything really highly engineered, like a plane or an iPhone, share those characteristics to some extent. In terms of the size of it and the relatively small amount you're paying in terms of unit size or unit mass, however, it's quite low. Dwarkesh Patel Is transportation cost the fundamental reason you can't have as much specialization and modularity?Brian Potter Yeah, I think it's really more about just the way a building is. An example of this would be how for the electrical system of your house, you can't have a separate box where if you needed to replace the electrical system, you could take the whole box out and put the new box in. The electrical system runs through the entire house. Same with plumbing. Same with the insulation. Same with the interior finishes and stuff like that. There's not a lot of modularity in a physical sense. Dwarkesh Patel Gotcha. Ben Kuhn  had this interesting comment on your article where he pointed out that many of the reasons you give for why it's hard to innovate in construction, like sequential dependencies and the highly variable delivery timelines are also common in software where Ben Koon works. So why do you think that the same sort of stagnation has not hit other industries that have superficially similar characteristics, like software? Brian Potter How I think about that is that you kind of see a similar structure in anything that's project-based or anything where there's an element of figuring out what you're doing while you're doing it. Compared to a large-scale manufacturing option where you spend a lot of time figuring out what exactly it is that you're building. You spend a lot of time designing it to be built and do your first number of runs through it, then you tweak your process to make it more efficient. There's always an element of tweaking it to make it better, but to some extent, the process of figuring out what you're doing is largely separate from the actual doing of it yourself. For a project-based industry, it's not quite like that. You have to build your process on the fly. Of course, there are best practices that shape it, right? For somebody writing a new software project or anything project-based, like making a movie, they have a rough idea for how it's going to go together. But there's going to be a lot of unforeseen things that kind of come up like that. The biggest difference is that either those things can often scale in a way that you can't with a building. Once you're done with the software project, you can deploy it to 1,000 or 100,000, or 1 million people, right? Once you finish making a movie, 100 million people can watch it or whatever. It doesn't quite look the same with a building. You don't really have the ability to spend a lot of time upfront figuring out how this thing needs to go. You kind of need to figure out a way to get this thing together without spending a huge amount of time that would be justified by the sheer size of it. I was able to dig up a few references for software projects and how often they just have these big, long tails. Sometimes they just go massively, massively over budget. A lot of times, they just don't get completed at all, which is shocking, but because of how many people it can then be deployed to after it's done, the economics of it are slightly different. Dwarkesh Patel I see, yeah. There's a famous law in software that says that a project will take longer than you expect even after you recount for the fact that it will take longer than you expect. Brian Potter Yeah. Hofstadter's law or something like that is what I think it is. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. I'm curious about what the lack of skill in construction implies for startups. Famously, in software, the fact that there's zero marginal cost to scaling to the next customer is a huge boon to a startup, right? The entire point of which is scaling exponentially. Does that fundamentally constrain the size and quantity of startups you can have in construction if the same scaling is not available?Brian Potter Yeah, that's a really good question. The obvious first part of the answer is that for software, obviously, if you have a construction software company, you can scale it just like any other software business. For physical things, it is a lot more difficult. This lack of zero marginal cost has tended to fight a lot of startups, not just construction ones. But yeah, it's definitely a thing. Construction is particularly brutal because the margins are so low. The empirical fact is that trying what would be a more efficient method of building doesn't actually allow you to do it cheaper and get better margins. The startup that I used to work at, Katerra, their whole business model was basically predicated on that. “Oh, we'll just build all our buildings in these big factories, get huge economies of scale, reduce our costs, and then recoup the billions of dollars that we're pumping into this industry or business.” The math just does not work out. You can't build. In general, you can't build cheap enough to kind of recoup those giant upfront costs. A lot of businesses have been burned that way. The most success you see in prefabrication type of stuff is on the higher end of things where you can get higher margins. A lot of these prefab companies and stuff like that tend to target the higher end of the market, and you see a few different premiums for that. Obviously, if you're targeting the higher end, you're more likely to have higher margins. If you're building to a higher level of quality, that's easier to do in a factory environment. So the delta is a lot different, less enormous than it would be. Building a high level of quality is easier to do in a factory than it is in the field, so a lot of buildings or houses that are built to a really high level of energy performance, for instance, need a really, really high level of air sealing to minimize how much energy this house uses. You tend to see a lot more houses like that built out of prefab construction and other factory-built methods because it's just physically more difficult to achieve that on-site. The Problems of Prefabrication Dwarkesh Patel Can you say more about why you can't use prefabrication in a factory to get economies of scale? Is it just that the transportation costs will eat away any gains you get? What is going on? Brian PotterThere's a combination of effects. I haven't worked through all this, we'll have to save this for the next time. I'll figure it out more by then. At a high level, it's that basically the savings that you get from like using less labor or whatever is not quite enough to offset your increased transportation costs. One thing about construction, especially single-family home construction, is that a huge percentage of your costs are just the materials that you're using, right? A single-family home is roughly 50% labor and 50% materials for the construction costs. Then you have development costs, land costs, and things like that. So a big chunk of that, you just can't move to the factory at all, right?  You can't really build a foundation in a factory. You could prefab the foundation, but it doesn't gain you anything. Your excavation still has to be done on-site, obviously. So a big chunk can't move to the factory at all. For ones that can, you still basically have to pay the same amount for materials. Theoretically, if you're building truly huge volume, you could get material volume discounts, but even then, it's probably not looking at things like asset savings. So you can cut out a big chunk of your labor costs, and you do see that in factory-built construction, right? These prefab companies are like mobile home companies. They have a small fraction of labor as their costs, which is typical of a factory in general, but then they take out all that labor cost while they still have their high material costs, and then they have overhead costs of whatever the factory has cost them. Then you have your additional overhead cost of just transporting it to site, which is pretty limited. The math does not really work out in favor of prefab, in terms of being able to make the cost of building dramatically cheaper. You can obviously build a building in a prefab using prefab-free methods and build a successful construction business, right? Many people do. But in terms of dramatically lowering your costs, you don't really see that. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah. Austin Vernon has an interesting blog post about why there's not more prefabricated homes. The two things he points out were transportation costs, and the other one was that people prefer to have homes that have unique designs or unique features. When I was reading it, it actually occurred to me that maybe they're actually both the result of the same phenomenon. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly, but have you heard of the Alchian-Allen theorem in economics? Brian Potter Maybe, but I don't think so. Dwarkesh Patel Basically, it's the idea that if you increase the cost of some category of goods in a fixed way––let's say you tax oranges and added a $1 tax to all oranges, or transportation for oranges gets $1 more expensive for all oranges––people will shift consumption towards the higher grade variety because now, the ratio of the cost between the higher, the more expensive orange and the less expensive orange has decreased because of the increase in fixed costs. It seems like you could use that argument to also explain why people have strong preferences for uniqueness and all kinds of design in manufactured houses. Since transportation costs are so high, that's basically a fixed cost, and that fixed cost has the effect of making people shift consumption towards higher-grade options. I definitely think that's true. Brian PotterI would maybe phrase this as, “The construction industry makes it relatively comparatively cheap to deliver a highly customized option compared to a really repetitive option.” So yeah, the ratio between a highly customized one and just a commodity one is relatively small. So you see a kind of industry built around delivering somewhat more customized options. I do think that this is a pretty broad intuition that people just desire too much customization from their homes. That really prevents you from having a mass-produced offering. I do think that is true to some extent. One example is the Levittown houses, which were originally built in huge numbers–– exactly the same model over and over again. Eventually, they had to change their business model to be able to deliver more customized options because the market shipped it. I do think that the effect of that is basically pretty overstated. Empirically, you see that in practice, home builders and developers will deliver fairly repetitive housing. They don't seem to have a really hard time doing that. As an example, I'm living in a new housing development that is just like three or four different houses copy-pasted over and over again in a group of 50. The developer is building a whole bunch of other developments that are very similar in this area. My in-laws live in a very similar development in a whole different state. If you just look like multi-family or apartment housing, it's identical apartments, you know, copy-pasted over and over again in the same building or a bunch of different buildings in the same development. You're not seeing huge amounts of uniqueness in these things. People are clearly willing to just live in these basically copy-pasted apartments. It's also quite possible to get a pretty high amount of product variety using a relatively small number of factors that you vary, right? I mean, the car industry is like this, where there are enough customization options. I was reading this book a while ago that was basically pushing back against the idea that the car industry pre-fifties and sixties we just offering a very uniform product. They basically did the math, and the number of customization options on their car was more than the atoms in the universe. Basically just, there are so many different options. All the permutations, you know, leather seats and this type of stereo and this type of engine, if you add it all up, there's just a huge, massive number of different combinations. Yeah, you can obviously customize the house a huge amount, just by the appliances that you have and the finishes that are in there and the paint colors that you choose and the fixtures and stuff like that. It would not really theoretically change the underlying way the building comes together. So regarding the idea that the fundamental demand for variety is a major obstruction, I don't think there's a whole lot of evidence for that in the construction industry. If Construction Regulation Vanished… Dwarkesh Patel I asked Twitter about what I should ask you, and usually, I don't get interesting responses but the quality of the people and the audience that knows who you are was so high that actually, all the questions I got were fascinating. So I'm going to ask you some questions from Twitter. Brian Potter Okay. Dwarkesh Patel 0:26:45Connor Tabarrok asks, “What is the most unique thing that would or should get built in the absence of construction regulation?”Brian Potter Unique is an interesting qualifier. There are a lot of things that just like should get built, right? Massive amounts of additional housing and creating more lands in these really dense urban environments where we need it, in places like San Francisco–– just fill in a big chunk of that bay. It's basically just mud flat and we should put more housing on it. “Unique thing” is more tricky. One idea that I really like (I read this in the book, The Book Where's My Flying Car),  is that it's basically crazy that our cities are designed with roads that all intersect with each other. That's an insane way to structure a material flow problem. Any sane city would be built with multiple layers of like transportation where each one went in a different direction so your flows would just be massively, massively improved. That just seems like a very obvious one.If you're building your cities from scratch and had your druthers, you would clearly want to build them and know how big they were gonna get, right? So you could plan very long-term in a way that so these transportation systems didn't intersect with each other, which, again, almost no cities did. You'd have the space to scale them or run as much throughput through them as you need without bringing the whole system to a halt. There's a lot of evidence saying that cities tend to scale based on how much you can move from point A to point B through them. I do wonder whether if you changed the way they went together, you could unlock massively different cities. Even if you didn't unlock massive ones, you could perhaps change the agglomeration effects that you see in cities if people could move from point A to point B much quicker than they currently can. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, I did an episode about the book, where's my flying car with Rohit Krishnan. I don't know if we discussed this, but an interesting part of the book is where he talks about transistor design. If you design transistors this way, can you imagine how slow they would be? [laughs] Okay, so Simon Grimm asks, “What countries are the best at building things?”Brian Potter This is a good question. I'm going to sort of cheat a little bit and do it in terms of space and time, because I think most countries that are doing a good job at building massive amounts of stuff are not ones that are basically doing it currently.The current answer is like China, where they just keep building–– more concrete was used in the last 20 years or so than the entire world used in the time before that, right? They've accomplished massive amounts of urbanization, and built a lot of really interesting buildings and construction. In terms of like raw output, I would also put Japan in the late 20th century on there. At the peak of the concern and wonder of “Is Japan gonna take over the world?”, they were really interested in building stuff quite quickly. They spent a lot of time and effort trying to use their robotics expertise to try to figure out how to build buildings a lot more quickly. They had these like really interesting factories that were designed to basically extrude an entire skyscraper just going up vertically.All these big giant companies and many different factories were trying to develop and trying to do this with robotics. It was a really interesting system that did not end up ever making economic sense, but it is very cool. I think big industrial policy organs of the government basically encouraged a lot of these industrial companies to basically develop prefabricated housing systems. So you see a lot of really interesting systems developed from these sort of industrial companies in a way that you don't see in a lot of other places. From 1850 to maybe 1970 (like a hundred years or something), the US was building huge massive amounts of stuff in a way that lifted up huge parts of the economy, right? I don't know how many thousands of miles of railroad track the US built between like 1850 and 1900, but it was many, many, many thousands of miles of it. Ofcourse, needing to lay all this track and build all these locomotives really sort of forced the development of the machine tool industry, which then led to the development of like better manufacturing methods and interchangeable parts, which of course then led to the development of the automotive industry. Then ofcourse, that explosion just led to even more big giant construction projects. So you really see that this ability to build just big massive amounts of stuff in this virtuous cycle with the US really advanced a lot of technology to raise the standard of development for a super long period of time. So those are my three answers. China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, and JapanDwarkesh Patel Those three bring up three additional questions, one for each of them! That's really interesting. Have you read The Power Broker, the book about Robert Moses? Brian Potter I think I got a 10th of the way through it. Dwarkesh Patel That's basically a whole book in itself, a 10th of the way. [laughs] I'm a half of the way through, and so far it's basically about the story of how this one guy built a startup within the New York state government that was just so much more effective at building things, didn't have the same corruption and clientelism incompetence. Maybe it turns into tragedy in the second half, but so far it's it seems like we need this guy. Where do we get a second Robert Moses? Do you think that if you had more people like that in government or in construction industries, public works would be more effectively built or is the stagnation there just a result of like other bigger factors? Brian Potter That's an interesting question. I remember reading this article a while ago that was complaining about how horrible Penn Station is in New York. They're basically saying, “Yeah, it would be nice to return to the era of like the sort of unbound technocrat” when these technical experts in high positions of power in government could essentially do whatever they wanted to some extent. If they thought something should be built somewhere, they basically had the power to do it. It's a facet of this problem of how it's really, really hard to get stuff built in the US currently. I'm sure that a part of it is that you don't see these really talented technocrats occupy high positions of government where they can get stuff done. But it's not super obvious to me whether that's the limiting factor. I kind of get the sense that they would end up being bottlenecked by some other part of the process. The whole sort of interlocking set of institutions has just become so risk averse that they would end up just being blocked in a way that they wouldn't when they were operating in the 1950s or 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah, that's interesting. All right, so speaking of Japan, I just recently learned about the construction there and how they just keep tearing stuff down every 30 to 40 years and rebuilding it. So you have an interesting series of posts on how you would go about building a house or a building that lasts for a thousand years. But I'm curious, how would you build a house or a building that only lasts for 30 or 40 years? If you're building in Japan and you know they're gonna tear it down soon, what changes about the construction process? Brian Potter Yeah, that's interesting. I mean, I'm not an expert on Japanese construction, but I think like a lot of their interior walls are basically just paper and stuff like that. I actually think it's kind of surprising that last time I looked, for a lot of their homes, they use a surprising post and beam construction method, which is actually somewhat labor-intensive to do. The US in the early 1800s used a pretty similar method. Then once we started mass producing conventional lumber, we stopped doing that because it was much cheaper to build out of two-by-fours than it was to build big heavy posts. I think the boring answer to that question is that we'd build like how we build mobile homes–– essentially just using pretty thin walls, pretty low-end materials that are put together in a minimal way. This ends up not being that different from the actual construction method that single-family homes use. It just even further economizes and tightens the use of materials–– where a single-family home might use a half inch plywood, they might try to use three-sixteenths or even an eighth inch plywood or something like that. So we'd probably build a pretty similar way to the way most single-family homes and multi-family homes are built currently, but just with even tighter use of materials which perhaps is something that's not super nice about the way that you guys build your homes. But... [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel Okay, so China is the third one here. There's been a lot of talk about a potential real estate bubble in China because they're building housing in places where people don't really need it. Of course, maybe the demographics aren't there to support the demand. What do you think of all this talk? I don't know if you're familiar with it, but is there a real estate bubble that's created by all this competence in building? Brian PotterOh, gosh, yeah, I have no idea. Like you, I've definitely heard talk of it and I've seen the little YouTube clips of them knocking down all these towers that it turns out they didn't need or the developer couldn't, finish or whatever. I don't know a huge amount about that. In general, I wish I knew a lot more about how things are built in China, but the information is in general, so opaque. I generally kind of assume that any particular piece of data that comes out of China has giant error bars on it as to whether it's true or not or what the context surrounding it is. So in general, I do not have a hard opinion about that. Dwarkesh Patel This is the second part of Simon's question, does greater competence and being able to build stuff translate into other good outcomes for these countries like higher GDP or lower rents or other kinds of foreign outcomes? Brian Potter That's a good question. Japan is an interesting place where basically people point to it as an example of, “Here's a country that builds huge amounts of housing and they don't have housing cost increases.” In general, we should expect that dynamic to be true. Right? There's no reason to not think that housing costs are essentially a supply-demand problem where if you built as much as people wanted, the cost would drop. I have no reason to not think that's true. There is a little bit of evidence that sort of suggests that it's impossible to build housing enough to overcome this sort of mechanical obstacle where the cost of it tends to match and rise to whatever people's income level are. The peak and the sort of flattening of housing costs in Japan also parallel when people basically stopped getting raises and income stopped rising in Japan. So I don't have a good sense of, if it ends up being just more driven by some sort of other factors. Generally though I expect the very basic answer of “If you build a lot more houses, the housing will become cheaper.”Dwarkesh PatelRight. Speaking of how the land keeps gaining value as people's income go up, what is your opinion on Georgism? Does that kind of try and make you think that housing is a special asset that needs to be more heavily taxed because you're not inherently doing something productive just by owning land the way you would be if you like built a company or something similar?Brian Potter I don't have any special deep knowledge of Georgism. It's on my list of topics to read more deeply about. I do think in general, taxing encourages you to produce less of something for something that you can't produce less of. It's a good avenue for something to tax more heavily. And yeah, obviously if you had a really high land value tax in these places that have a lot of single-family homes in dense urban areas, like Seattle or San Francisco, that would probably encourage people to use the land a lot more efficiently. So it makes sense to me, but I don't have a ton of special knowledge about it. Dwarkesh Patel All right, Ben Kuhn asked on Twitter, “What construction-related advice would you give to somebody building a new charter city?”Brian Potter That is interesting. I mean, just off the top of my head, I would be interested in whether you could really figure out a way to build using a method that had really high upfront costs. I think it could otherwise be justified, but if you're gonna build 10,000 buildings or whatever all at once, you could really take advantage of that. One kind of thing that you see in the sort of post-World War II era is that we're building huge massive amounts of housing, and a lot of times we're building them all in one place, right? A lot of town builders were building thousands and thousands of houses in one big development all at once. In California, it's the same thing, you just built like 6 or 10 or 15,000 houses in one big massive development. You end up seeing something like that where they basically build this like little factory on their construction site, and then use that to like fabricate all these things. Then you have something that's almost like a reverse assembly line where a crew will go to one house and install the walls or whatever, and then go to the next house and do the same thing. Following right behind them would be the guys doing the electrical system, plumbing, and stuff like that. So this reverse assembly line system would allow you to sort of get these things up really, really fast, in 30 days or something like that. Then you could have a whole house or just thousands and thousands of houses at once. You would want to be able to do something similar where you could just not do the instruction the way that the normal construction is done, but that's hard, right? Centrally planned cities or top-down planned cities never seem to do particularly well, right? For example, the city of Brasilia, the one that was supposed to be a planned city— the age it goes back to the unfettered technocrat who can sort of build whatever he wants. A lot of times, what you want is something that will respond at a low level and organically sort out the factories as they develop. You don't want something that's totally planned from the top-down, that's disconnected from all the sorts of cases on the ground. A lot of the opposition to Robert Moses ended up being that in a certain form, right? He's bulldozing through these cities that are these buildings and neighborhoods that he's not paying attention to at all. So I think, just to go back to the question, trying to plan your city from the top down doesn't have a super, super great track record. In general, you want your city to develop a little bit more organically. I guess I would think to have a good sort of land-use rules that are really thought through well and encourage the things that you want to encourage and not discourage the things that you don't want to discourage. Don't have equity in zoning and allow a lot of mixed-use construction and stuff like that. I guess that's a somewhat boring answer, but I'd probably do something along those lines. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting, interesting. I guess that implies that there would be high upfront costs to building a city because if you need to build 10,000 homes at once to achieve these economies of scale, then you would need to raise like tens of billions of dollars before you could build a charter city. Brian Potter Yeah, if you were trying to lower your costs of construction, but again, if you have the setup to do that, you wouldn't necessarily need to raise it. These other big developments were built by developers that essentially saw an opportunity. They didn't require public funding to do it. They did in the form of loan guarantees for veterans and things like that, but they didn't have the government go and buy the land. Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies Dwarkesh Patel Right, okay, so the next question is from Austin Vernon. To be honest, I don't understand the question, you two are too smart for me, but hopefully, you'll be able to explain the question and then also answer it. What are your power rankings for technologies that can tighten construction tolerances? Then he gives examples like ARVR, CNC cutting, and synthetic wood products. Brian Potter Yeah, so this is a very interesting question. Basically, because buildings are built manually on site by hand, there's just a lot of variation in what ends up being built, right? There's only so accurately that a person can put something in place if they don't have any sort of age or stuff like that. Just the placement itself of materials tends to have a lot of variation in it and the materials themselves also have a lot of variation in them. The obvious example is wood, right? Where one two by four is not gonna be exactly the same as another two by four. It may be warped, it may have knots in it, it may be split or something like that. Then also because these materials are sitting just outside in the elements, they sort of end up getting a lot of distortion, they either absorb moisture and sort of expand and contract, or they grow and shrink because of the heat. So there's just a lot of variation that goes into putting a building up.To some extent, it probably constrains what you are able to build and how effectively you're able to build it. I kind of gave an example before of really energy efficient buildings and they're really hard to build on-site using conventional methods because the air ceiling is quite difficult to do. You have to build it in a much more precise way than what is typically done and is really easily achieved on-site. So I guess in terms of examples of things that would make that easier, he gives some good ones like engineered lumber, which is where you take lumber and then grind it up into strands or chips or whatever and basically glue them back together–– which does a couple of things. It spreads all the knots and the defects out so they are concentrated and everything tends to be a lot more uniform when it's made like that. So that's a very obvious one that's already in widespread use. I don't really see that making a substantial change.I guess the one exception to that would be this engineered lumber product called mass timber elements, CLT, which is like a super plywood. Plywood is made from tiny little sheet thin strips of wood, right? But CLT is made from two-by-four-dimensional lumber glued across laminated layers. So instead of a 4 by 9 sheet of plywood, you have a 12 by 40 sheet of dimensional lumber glued together. You end up with a lot of the properties of engineered material where it's really dimensionally stable. It can be produced very, very accurately. It's actually funny that a lot of times, the CLT is the most accurate part of the building. So if you're building a building with it, you tend to run into problems where the rest of the building is not accurate enough for it. So even with something like steel, if you're building a steel building, the steel is not gonna be like dead-on accurate, it's gonna be an inch or so off in terms of where any given component is. The CLT, which is built much more accurately, actually tends to show all these errors that have to be corrected. So in some sense, accuracy or precision is a little bit of like a tricky thing because you can't just make one part of the process more precise. In some ways that actually makes things more difficult because if one part is really precise, then a lot of the time, it means that you can't make adjustments to it easily. So if you have this one really precise thing, it usually means you have to go and compensate for something else that is not built quite as precisely. It actually makes advancing precision quite a bit more complicated. AR VR, is something I'm very bullish on. A big caveat of that is assuming that they can just get the basic technology working. The basic intuition there is that right now the way that pieces are, when a building is put together on site, somebody is looking at a set of paper plans, or an iPad or something that tells them where everything needs to go. So they figure that out and then they take a tape measure or use some other method and go figure out where that's marked on the ground. There's all this set-up time that is really quite time consuming and error prone. Again, there's only so much accuracy that a guy dragging a tape 40 feet across site being held by another guy can attain, there's a limit to how accurate that process can be. It's very easy for me to imagine that AR would just project exactly where the components of your building need to go. That would A, allow you a much higher level of accuracy that you can easily get using manual methods. And then B, just reduce all that time it takes to manually measure things. I can imagine it being much, much, much faster as well, so I'm quite bullish on that. At a high level and a slightly lower level, it's not obvious to me if they will be able to get to the level where it just projects it with perfect accuracy right in front of you. It may be the case that a person moving their head around and constantly changing their point of view wont ever be able to project these things with millimeter precision––it's always gonna be a little bit jumpy or you're gonna end up with some sort of hard limit in terms of like how precisely you can project it. My sense is that locator technology will get good enough, but I don't have any principle reason believing that. The other thing is that being able to take advantage of that technology would require you to have a really, really accurate model of your building that locates where every single element is precisely and exactly what its tolerances are. Right now, buildings aren't designed like that, they are built using a comparatively sparse set of drawings that leaves a lot to sort of be interpreted by the people on site doing the work and efforts that have tried to make these models really, really, really precise, have not really paid off a lot of times. You can get returns on it if you're building something really, really complex where there's a much higher premium to being able to make sure you don't make any error, but for like a simple building like a house, the returns just aren't there. So you see really comparatively sparse drawings. Whether it's gonna be able to work worth this upfront cost of developing this really complex, very precise model of where exactly every component is still has to be determined. There's some interesting companies that are trying to move in this direction where they're making it a lot easier to draw these things really, really precisely and whave every single component exactly where it is. So I'm optimistic about that as well, but it's a little bit TBD. Dwarkesh Patel This raises a question that I actually wanted to ask you, which is in your post about why there aren't automatic brick layers. It was a really interesting post. Somebody left in an interesting comment saying that bricks were designed to be handled and assembled by humans. Then you left a response to that, which I thought was really interesting. You said, “The example I always reach for is with steam power and electricity, where replacing a steam engine with an electric motor in your factory didn't do much for productivity. Improving factory output required totally redesigning the factory around the capabilities of electric motors.” So I was kind of curious about if you apply that analogy to construction, then what does that look like for construction? What is a house building process or building building process that takes automation and these other kinds of tools into account? How would that change how buildings are built and how they end up looking in the end? Brian Potter I think that's a good question. One big component of the lack of construction productivity is everything was designed and has evolved over 100 years or 200 years to be easy for a guy or person on the site to manipulate by hand. Bricks are roughly the size and shape and weight that a person can move it easily around. Dimensional lumber is the same. It's the size and shape and weight that a person can move around easily. And all construction materials are like this and the way that they attach together and stuff is the same. It's all designed so that a person on site can sort of put it all together with as comparatively little effort as possible. But what is easy for a person to do is usually not what is easy for a machine or a robot to do, right? You typically need to redesign and think about what your end goal is and then redesign the mechanism for accomplishing that in terms of what is easy to get to make a machine to do. The obvious example here is how it's way easier to build a wagon or a cart that pulls than it is to build a mechanical set of legs that mimics a human's movement. That's just way, way, way easier. I do think that a big part of advancing construction productivity is to basically figure out how to redesign these building elements in a way that is really easy for a machine to produce and a machine to put together. One reason that we haven't seen it is that a lot of the mechanization you see is people trying to mechanize exactly what a person does. You'd need a really expensive industrial robot that can move exactly the way that a human moves more or less. What that might look like is basically something that can be really easily extruded by a machine in a continuous process that wouldn't require a lot of finicky mechanical movements. A good example of this technology is technology that's called insulated metal panels, which is perhaps one of the cheapest and easiest ways to build an exterior wall. What it is, is it's just like a thin layer of steel. Then on top of that is a layer of insulation. Then on top of that is another layer of steel. Then at the end, the steel is extruded in such a way that it can like these inner panels can like lock together as they go. It's basically the simplest possible method of constructing a wall that you can imagine. But that has the structural system and the water barrier, air barrier, and insulation all in this one really simple assembly. Then when you put it together on site, it just locks together. Of course there are a lot of limitations to this. Like if you want to do anything on top of like add windows, all of a sudden it starts to look quite a bit less good. I think things that are really easy for a machine to do can be put together without a lot of persistent measurement or stuff like that in-field. They can just kind of snap together and actually want to fit together. I think that's kind of what it looks like. 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of LabourDwarkesh Patel What would the houses or the buildings that are built using this physically look like? Maybe in 50 to 100 years, we'll look back on the houses we have today and say, “Oh, look at that artisanal creation made by humans.” What is a machine that is like designed for robots first or for automation first? In more interesting ways, would it differ from today's buildings? Brian Potter That's a good question. I'm not especially bullish on 3D building printing in general, but this is another example of a building using an extrusion process that is relatively easy to mechanize. What's interesting there is that when you start doing that, a lot of these other bottlenecks become unlocked a little bit. It's very difficult to build a building using a lot of curved exterior surfaces using conventional methods. You can do it, it's quite expensive to do, but there's a relatively straightforward way for a 3D-printed building to do that. They can build that as easily as if it was a straight wall. So you see a lot of interesting curved architecture on these creations and in a few other areas. There's a company that can build this cool undulating facade that people kind of like. So yeah, it unlocks a lot of options. Machines are more constrained in some things that they can do, but they don't have a lot of the other constraints that you would otherwise see. So I think you'll kind of see a larger variety of aesthetic things like that. That said, at the end of the day, I think a lot of the ways a house goes together is pretty well shaped to just the way that a person living inside it would like to use. I think Stewart Brand makes this point in––Dwarkesh Patel Oh, How Buildings Learn. Brian Potter There we go. He basically makes the point that a lot of people try to use dome-shaped houses or octagon-shaped houses, which are good because, again, going back to surface area volume, they include lots of space using the least amount of material possible. So in some theoretical sense, they're quite efficient, but it's actually quite inconvenient to live inside of a building with a really curved wall, right? Furniture doesn't fit up against it nicely, and pictures are hard to hang on a really curved wall. So I think you would see less variation than maybe you might expect. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting. So why are you pessimistic about 3D printers? For construction, I mean. Brian Potter Yeah, for construction. Oh God, so many reasons. Not pessimistic, but just there's a lot of other interesting questions. I mean, so the big obvious one is like right now a 3D printer can basically print the walls of a building. That is a pretty small amount of the value in a building, right? It's maybe 7% or 8%, something like that. Probably not more than 10% of the value in a building. Because you're not printing the foundation, you're not printing like the overhead vertical, or the overhead spanning structure of the building. You're basically just printing the walls. You're not even really printing the second story walls that you have in multiple stories. I don't think they've quite figured that out yet. So it's a pretty small amount of value added to the building. It's frankly a task that is relatively easy to do by manual labor. It's really pretty easy for a crew to basically put up the structure of a house. This is kind of a recurring theme in mechanization or it goes back to what I was talking about to our previous lead. Where it takes a lot of mechanization and a lot of expensive equipment to replace what basically like two or three guys can do in a day or something like that. The economics of it are pretty brutal. So right now it produces a pretty small value. I think that the value of 3D printing is basically entirely predicated on how successful they are at figuring out how to like deliver more components of the building using their system. There are companies that are trying to do this. There's one that got funded not too long ago called Black Diamond, where they have this crazy system that is like a series of 3D printers that would act simultaneously, like each one building a separate house. Then as you progress, you switch out the print head for like a robot arm. Cause a 3D printer is basically like a robot arm with just a particular manipulator at the end, right?So they switch out their print head for like a robot arm, and the robot arm goes and installs different other systems like the windows or the mechanical systems. So you can figure out how to do that reliably where your print head or your printing system is installing a large fraction of the value of the building. It's not clear to me that it's gonna be economic, but it obviously needs to reach that point. It's not obvious to me that they have gotten there yet. It's really quite hard to get a robot to do a lot of these tasks. For a lot of these players, it seems like they're actually moving away from that. I think in ICON is the biggest construction 3D printer company in the US, as far as I know. And as far as I know, they've moved away from trying to install lots of systems in their walls as they get printed. They've kind of moved on to having that installed separately, which I think has made their job a little bit easier, but again, not quite, it's hard to see how the 3D printer can fulfill its promises if it can't do anything just beyond the vertical elements, whichare really, for most construction, quite cheap and simple to build. Dwarkesh Patel Now, if you take a step back and talk how expensive construction is overall, how much of it can just be explained by the Baumol cost effect? As in labor costs are increasing because labor is more productive than other industries and therefore construction is getting more expensive. Brian Potter I think that's a huge, huge chunk of it. The labor fraction hasn't changed appreciably enough. I haven't actually verified that and I need to, but I remember somebody that said that they used to be much different. You sent me some literature related to it. So let's add a slight asterisk on that. But in general the labor cost has remained a huge fraction of the overall cost of the building. Reliably seeing their costs continue to rise, I think there's no reason to believe that that's not a big part of it. Dwarkesh Patel Now, I know this sounds like a question with an obvious answer, but in your post comparing the prices of construction in different countries, you mentioned how the cost of labor and the cost of materials is not as big a determiner of how expensive it is to construct in different places. But what does matter? Is it the amount of government involvement and administrative overhead? I'm curious why those things (government involvement and administrative overhead) have such a high consequence on the cost of construction. Brian Potter Yeah, that's a good question. I don't actually know if I have a unified theory for that. I mean, basically with any heavily regulated thing, any particular task that you're doing takes longer and is less reliable than it would be if it was not done right. You can't just do it as fast as on your own schedule, right? You end up being bottlenecked by government processes and it reduces and narrows your options. So yeah, in general, I would expect that to kind of be the case, but I actually don't know if I have a unified theory of how that works beyond just, it's a bunch of additional steps at any given part of the process, each of which adds cost. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Now, one interesting trend we have in the United States with construction is that a lot of it is done by Latino workers and especially by undocumented Latino workers. What is the effect of this on the price and the quality of construction? If you have a bunch of hardworking undocumented workers who are working for below-market rates in the US, will this dampen the cost of construction over time? What do you think is going to happen? Brian Potter I suspect that's probably one of the reasons why the US has comparatively low construction costs compared to other parts of the world. Well, I'll caveat that. Residential construction, which is single-family homes and multi-family apartment buildings all built in the US and have light framed wood and are put together, like you said, by a lot of like immigrant workers. Because of that, it would not surprise me if those wages are a lot lower than the equivalent wage for like a carpenter in Germany or something like that. I suspect that's a factor in why our cost of residential construction are quite low. AI's Impact on Construction ProductivityDwarkesh Patel Overall, it seems from your blog post that you're kind of pessimistic, or you don't think that different improvements in industrialization have transferred over to construction yet. But what do you think is a prospect of future advances in AI having a big impact on construction? With computer vision and with advances in robotics, do you think we'll finally see some carry-over into construction productivity or is it gonna be more of the same? Brian Potter Yeah, I think there's definitely gonna be progress on that axis. If you can wire up your computer vision systems, robotic systems, and your AI in such a way that your capabilities for a robot system are more expanded, then I kind of foresee robotics being able to take a larger and larger fraction of the tasks done on a typical construction site. I kind of see it being kind of done in narrow avenues that gradually expand outward. You're starting to see a lot of companies that have some robotic system that can do one particular task, but do that task quite well. There's a couple of different robot companies that have these little robots for like drawing wall layouts on like concrete slabs or whatever. So you know exactly where to build your walls, which you would think would not be like a difficult problem in construction, but it turns out that a lot of times people put the walls in the wrong spot and then you have to go back and move them later or just basically deal with it. So yeah, it's basically a little Roomba type device that just draws the wall layout to the concrete slab and all the other systems as well–– for example, where the lines need to run through the slab and things like that. I suspect that you're just gonna start to see robotics and systems like that take a larger and larger share of the tasks on the construction site over time. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, it's still very far away. It's still very far away. What do you think of Flow? That's Adam Neumann's newest startup and backed with $350 million from Andreeseen Horowitz.Brian Potter I do not have any strong opinions about that other than, “Wow, they've really given him another 350M”. I do not have any particularly strong opinions about this. They made a lot they make a lot of investments that don't make sense to me, but I'm out of venture capital. So there's no reason that my judgment would be any good in this situation–– so I'm just presuming they know something I do not. Dwarkesh Patel I'm going to be interviewing Andreeseen later this month, and I'm hoping I can ask him about that.Brian Potter You know, it may be as simple as he “sees all” about really high variance bets. There's nobody higher variance in the engine than Adam Neumann so, maybe just on those terms, it makes sense. Dwarkesh Patel You had an interesting post about like how a bunch of a lot of the knowledge in the construction industry is informal and contained within best practices or between relationships and expectations that are not articulated all the time. It seems to me that this is also true of software in many cases but software seems much more legible and open source than these other physical disciplines like construction despite having a lot of th

One True Podcast
Hariclea Zengos on "On the Quai at Smyrna"

One True Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 52:14


One hundred years ago, in September 1922, Turkish forces torched the port city of Smyrna in a hellish episode towards the end of the Greco-Turkish War. The ensuing evacuation, with its chaos and grisly violence, inspired Hemingway's journalism as well as his short fiction. Hemingway's most enduring effort to capture this atrocity is "On the Quai at Smyrna," which would become the first story in his collection In Our Time. This masterpiece of irony with its memorable narrative voice has intrigued readers, even as its historical basis has been less discussed, especially by American readers. To help us penetrate this puzzling narrative, we are joined by Hariclea Zengos, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English at the American University of Ras Al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates. Prof. Zengos guides us through the tragic historical roots of “On the Quai at Smyrna” as well as the story's structure, voice, its unforgettable imagery, and its devastating opening and closing lines.

The Michael J. Matt Show
GLOBALISM'S EXORCISM: Why These US Midterms Matter

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 41:45


Please support RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today In this episode of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt looks at November's midterm elections from the viewpoint of the globalists. The world is watching. The Vatican is watching.  The World Economic Forum is watching. Will the midterms matter? How so when for so long the ballot box has been little more than a suggestion box for the slaves? Plus, Justin Trudeau disarms Canadians, Steve Bannon is sentenced the prison, and Pfizer's Albert Bourla tells Klaus Schwab that people will need to take one Covid jab every year for the rest of their lives. Everybody okay with that? Meanwhile, the CDC says American children need to be Covid vaxxed if they want to go to school. Governor Ron DeSantis's response to that? "Over my dead body!" And, finally, Abortion: Why are the Democrats obsessed with it? Since they treat abortion like it's an article of faith, maybe we should treat opposing abortion the same way. Will the good guys finally figure out that this is a spiritual war against bloodthirsty demons? If the good guys don't bring God back, it's the “end of days” for America. Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts: SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0 APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Subscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/user Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates

All Current Classes From Dean Bible Ministries
168 - The LIE vs. The Truth [B]-Ephesians (2018)

All Current Classes From Dean Bible Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 57:29


The Truth or the Lie. Which do you believe? Listen to this lesson to learn the origins of God's ultimate truth and of Satan's lie. See how you can recognize the Lie when you hear it. Find out how Modernism and Postmodernism have influenced our thinking. See the importance of saturating your thinking with the Word of God so your thinking will be renewed in the Truth. Understand how believing the Lie leads to chaos and disorder.

Ephesians (2018)
168 - The LIE vs. The Truth [B]

Ephesians (2018)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 57:29


The Truth or the Lie. Which do you believe? Listen to this lesson to learn the origins of God's ultimate truth and of Satan's lie. See how you can recognize the Lie when you hear it. Find out how Modernism and Postmodernism have influenced our thinking. See the importance of saturating your thinking with the Word of God so your thinking will be renewed in the Truth. Understand how believing the Lie leads to chaos and disorder.

TRADCAST: The Traditional Roman Catholic Podcast

TRADCAST EXPRESS - Episode 163 Topics covered: News about the Synod on Synodality; Eric Sammons on the Papacy; 'Fr.' John Hunwicke is impressed by an Anglican idea; Peter Kwasniewski and the "miracle of the Papacy". Links: Antipope Francis, Address to the General Chapter of the Missionaries of Mariannhill, Vatican.va (Oct. 20, 2022) Eric Sammons, Tweet of Oct. 19, 2022 Rev. John Hunwicke, "Manifesto?", Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment (Oct. 20, 2022) "Cardinal Gerhard Ludwig Müller issues 'Manifesto of Faith' in apparent Swipe at Francis", Novus Ordo Wire (Feb. 9, 2019) Collection of Magisterial Quotes: The Catholic Teaching on the Papacy Peter Kwasniewski, "Lessons from Church History: A Brief Review of Papal Lapses", One Peter Five (Aug. 6, 2018) "The Limits to Invoking 'Papal Lapses' as a Justification for the Recognize-and-Resist Position: A Response to Dr. Peter Kwasniewski", Novus Ordo Wire (Sep. 26, 2018) Julia Meloni, "Modernism and 'The Miracle of the Papacy'", Crisis Magazine (Oct. 15, 2022) Peter Kwasniewski, Facebook Post (Mar. 26, 2021) "The Battle for the Catholic Ethos: Peter Kwasniewski tries to save Recognize-and-Resist", Novus Ordo Wire (Apr. 19, 2021) Sign up to be notified of new episode releases automatically at tradcast.org. Produced by NOVUSORDOWATCH.org Support us by making a tax-deductible contribution at NovusOrdoWatch.org/donate/

Front Row
Front Row reviews popular culture of 1922

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 42:16


For the poet Ezra Pound it was ‘year zero for Modernism' but what were people in Britain really reading, watching, listening to and looking at in 1922? To mark the BBC's centenary, Front Row reviews the popular culture of 1922: from the West End musical comedy The Cabaret Girl by Jerome Kern and PG Wodehouse to May Sinclair's novel The Life and Death of Harriett Frean, via the silent film epic Robin Hood with Douglas Fairbanks and a fond farewell to Gainsborough's portrait of The Blue Boy at The National Gallery, all set to a soundtrack of jazz, music hall and early radio. Tom Sutcliffe is joined by academic Charlotte Jones (Queen Mary, University of London), the writer and broadcaster Matthew Sweet and the music critic Kevin Le Gendre. Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe Producer: Kirsty McQuire Image: Enid Bennett, Douglas Fairbanks and Sam De Grasse in Robin Hood, 1922

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
USModernist in Los Angeles - November 12 + 13!

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 0:59


Join USModernist and USModernist Radio at the Sheats-Goldstein house for a cocktail party November 12, and the next day at the the Stahl House for a Champagne tour. It's a rare chance to see inside these iconic Modernist houses! Details at www.usmodernist.org/la.    

The Catholic Culture Podcast
145 - Catholic Imagination Conference poetry reading

The Catholic Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 68:16


The Catholic Culture Podcast Network sponsored a poetry reading session at the fourth biennial Catholic Imagination Conference, hosted by the University of Dallas. Thomas Mirus moderated this session on Sept. 30, 2022, introducing poets Paul Mariani, Frederick Turner, and James Matthew Wilson. Paul Mariani, University Professor Emeritus at Boston College, is the author of twenty-two books, including biographies of William Carlos Williams, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Hart Crane, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wallace Stevens. He has published nine volumes of poetry, most recently All that Will be New, from Slant. He has also written two memoirs, Thirty Days and The Mystery of It All: The Vocation of Poetry in the Twilight of Modernism. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA and NEH. He is the recipient of the John Ciardi Award for Lifetime Achievement in Poetry and the Flannery O'Connor Lifetime Achievement Award. His poetry has appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines, including Image, Poetry, Presence, The Agni Review, First Things, The New England Review, The Hudson Review, Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, and The New Criterion. Frederick Turner, Founders Professor of Arts and Humanities (emeritus) at the University of Texas at Dallas, was educated at Oxford University. A poet, critic, translator, philosopher, and former editor of The Kenyon Review, he has authored over 40 books, including The Culture of Hope, Genesis: An Epic Poem, Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics, Natural Religion, and most recently Latter Days, with Colosseum Books. He has co-published several volumes of Hungarian and German poetry in translation, including Goethe's Faust, Part One. He has been nominated internationally over 40 times for the Nobel Prize for Literature and translated into over a dozen languages. James Matthew Wilson is Cullen Foundation Chair of English Literature and Founding Director of the MFA program in Creative Writing at the University of Saint Thomas, in Houston. He serves also as Poet-in-Residence of the Benedict XVI Institute for Sacred Music and Divine Worship, as Editor of Colosseum Books, and Poetry Editor of Modern Age magazine. He is the author of twelve books, including The Strangeness of the Good. His work has won the Hiett Prize, the Parnassus Prize, the Lionel Basney Award (twice), and the Catholic Media Book Award for Poetry.

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#270/Modernism Week 2022 Wrapup: Aaron Betsky + Andrew Pielage + Alan Hess + Trina Turk

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 84:33 Very Popular


In this our last show from Modernism Week 2022, we close out with fascinating poolside conversations with speakers from the week! Aaron Betsky is a household name, if your house is full of architects.  He's a critic, curator, educator, and lecturer who is Director of the Virginia Tech School of Architecture and Design.  Betsky is joined today with returning podcast guest Andrew Pielage, an internationally published architecture and travel photographer who, like Star Trek, is on a multi-year mission to photograph every single Frank Lloyd Wright building. Aaron and Andrew brought us the new book 50 Lessons to Learn from Frank Lloyd Wright. Returning guest, architect and author Alan Hess has been on this show more times than anyone.  If you're old enough to remember Johnny Carson, Alan is the Charles Nelson Reilly of USModernist Radio.  A longtime advocate for Modernist preservation, he is a prolific author with some 20 books. He's the top presenter every year at Modernism Week. Returning guest, fashion designer, and CEO Trina Turk has one of the most exciting brands of brightly colorful, wildly fun clothing for both men and women. Trina is also a devoted serial Modernist, having owned many houses, and an active philanthropist, contributing to preservation causes, including the USModernist Advisory Board and the fight to Move Marilyn in Palm Springs.  Last February, she spoke at Modernism Week to discuss the influence of another important lifestyle entrepreneur and tastemaker, Vera Neumann.

The Michael J. Matt Show
NEOCONS & WARHAWKS: Can Anyone Stop the Democrat (War) Party?

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 38:02


In this episode of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt takes a hard look at two issues of international urgency: 1) Pfizer's shocking admission to a MEP on the floor of the EU parliament. 2) Even Leftist progressives are sounding the alarm that Team Biden is recklessly pushing US into World War III With respect to Number 1: Whom are we to judge first for this crime against humanity? Pope Francis? Bill Gates? With respect to Number 2: Do those who support US intervention in Ukraine realize that they're also supporting World War III? And as if that weren't enough, do they realize with whom they're in bed, i.e., Justin Trudeau, Barack Obama, and George Soros? It's time to ask the question everyone from Jeffrey Sachs to Colonel Douglass McGregor has been asking for months now: Why is negotiating for peace with Russia simply not an option? Plus, Pope Francis attacks traditional Catholics again, this time right in the middle of saying Mass. The takeaway: The pope is, as Cardinal Muller admitted recently, engaging in a ‘hostile takeover of the Catholic Church” and to get there, he needs to get rid of us. So, what we're watching right now is the Globalist cabal dismantling the Catholic Church (which built Western Civilization) while systematically pulling America apart at the seams. After all, “equity and inclusion” demand that the American taxpayer give billions of dollars to Joe Biden, to he can fight Barack Obama's proxy war with Russia. Russia is Public Enemy Number One. Right? So bring on World War III! Everybody okay with this? Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989   If you'd like to contribute to RTV's expansion, please consider a donation: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Stay Connected to RTV:Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-todaySubscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/userSign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates  

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#269/Edward Killingsworth: Kelly Sutherlin McLeod + Musical Guest Laura Windley

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 51:19 Very Popular


Edward Killingsworth graduated from USC in 1940 and was the most prolific creator of Case Study Houses – a project sponsored by Arts and Architecture Magazine to provide affordable housing for returning WWII soldiers and their families.  These architects included Richard Neutra, Charles and Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig, Rodney Walker, and the fast and furious Craig Ellwood, among others. Killingsworth, who died in 2004, won 42 AIA award and was campus architect for Cal State Long Beach for more than 40 years. Today's guest knew Killingsworth well and honeymooned in one of his hotels, the Kapalua Bay Hotel in Maui, sadly destroyed in 2006.  Architect Kelly Sutherlin McLeod of Long Beach specializes in historic preservation projects, working on buildings by Richard Neutra and Ed Killingworth, among many others.  She also bought his office!  Later on, swing jazz with musical guest Laura Windley.  

The Michael J. Matt Show
THE GREAT RESIST: From Cardinal Müller to Giorgia Meloni & from Musk to Putin

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 46:16


PLEASE SHARE the new RTV documentary, "Guardian of Tradition": https://youtu.be/rqowXajfXF0 In this special edition of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt looks at the conservative political figures Pope Francis has tried to destroy---from Trump, to Le Pen, to Salvini and now to Georgia Meloni, Italy's new Catholic prime minister. Why does Francis hate all the good guys? Plus, a startling speech by Vladimir Putin on September 30, 2022 in Moscow -- combined with a Biden/Zelensky move to bring on World War III -- shakes down the whole Ukrainian narrative, and forces us all to ask the hard question: "You don't suppose we're the baddies?" Finally, an blockbuster interview shakes down Pope Francis's entire synodal Church of Accompaniment. You don't want to miss the former head of the CDF Gerhard Cardinal Müller's declaration of war on those inside the Vatican who are "occupying the Catholic Church" and in fact engaging in a "hostile takeover." Warns Müller: If we don't RESIST, Team Francis will destroy the Catholic Church! This is war. This is what we've been waiting for. Don't forget to like and share this important episode of The Remnant Underground! Cardinal Muller Interview: https://youtu.be/SZiAMxZxxOs Sign up for the Catholic Identity Conference LIVESTREAM: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/cic-livestream-video-on-demand-registration Message of AKITA: https://www.ewtn.com/catholicism/library/message-from-our-lady--akita-japan-5167 Get the #ResistFrancis tee! https://shop.remnantnewspaper.com/index.php/remnant-shop/remnant-shop/remnant-apparel/resistfrancis-t-shirt-detail Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts: SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0 APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 GOOGLE: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9yZW1uYW50LXR2LmNvbS9mZWVkLz9jY XROYW1lPXRoZS1taWNoYWVsLWotbWF0dC1zaG93 If you'd like to contribute to RTV's expansion, please consider a donation: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Subscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/user Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates

The Michael J. Matt Show
NATIONS ANNIHILATED! Is The Great Reset Worth World War III?

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 41:30


Sign up for the Catholic Identity Conference LIVESTREAM: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/cic-livestream-video-on-demand-registration Get the #ResistFrancis tee! https://shop.remnantnewspaper.com/index.php/remnant-shop/remnant-shop/remnant-apparel/resistfrancis-t-shirt-detail In this episode of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt takes a hard look at the downward spiral of President Biden's foreign policy, specifically his funding of the war in Ukraine. With Putin threatening nukes and engaging in massive wargames, we'd better find out what's going on here. And why are we funding that war? On the floor of the United Nations last week, U.S. Secretary of State Tony Blinken told us exactly why when he said that President Putin must be stopped because he is “shredding the international order” that “we have sworn to defend.” And who was sitting just behind Blinken when he made this stunning admission? Victoria Nuland, of course, President Obama's Secretary of State for European Affairs, who lead the regime change in Ukraine in 2014.  And just like that, everything becomes clear. Plus, 90-year-old Cardinal Joseph Zen is in prison awaiting trial, facing a life sentence for opposing persecution of Christians in Communist China. And is Pope Francis condemning this outrageous persecution of one of his own cardinals? Don't be silly! Meanwhile, as Francis cancels traditional Catholics worldwide, another diocese announces that it is closing three-quarters of its churches. Yep, Catholics got the message: Religious services are 'non-essential'!  Thanks, Francis! Finally, Michael announces a major press conference to be held this coming Saturday that will formalize resistance to Francis and proclaim the Kingship of Christ in the face of Francis's attempt to appease his Globalist masters by canceling Christianity.  Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts: SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0 APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 GOOGLE: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9yZW1uYW50LXR2LmNvbS9mZWVkLz9jY XROYW1lPXRoZS1taWNoYWVsLWotbWF0dC1zaG93 If you'd like to contribute to RTV's expansion, please consider a donation: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Subscribe to Remnant TV's independent platform: https://remnant-tv.com/user Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates

Two Guys One Book
Two Guys One Book: Ulysses by James Joyce

Two Guys One Book

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 32:52


In this episode, we discuss Ulysses, Bloom as the modern hero, Realism vs Modernism, what the heck is up with this behemoth of a book, and much more. Two Guys One Book is now in podcast form! It is available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Please consider subscribing directly to our feed so you get updates in your podcast catcher whenever a new podcast goes live! Follow us on Goodreads to see what we're reading: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/96149881-max-chapin https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/96136938-pedro-michelsYou can also watch the video here: This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit maxchapin.substack.com

The Ezra Klein Show
Interrogating the Stories We Tell About Our Minds

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 67:05


The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that nearly one in five adults in America lives with a mental illness. And we have plenty of evidence — from suicide rates to the percentage of Americans on psychopharmaceuticals — that our collective mental health is getting worse. But beyond mental health diagnoses lies a whole, complicated landscape of difficult, often painful, mental states that all of us experience at some point in our lives.Rachel Aviv is a longtime staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of the new book “Strangers to Ourselves: Unsettled Minds and the Stories That Make Us.” Aviv has done some of the best reporting toward answering questions like: How do people cope with their changing — and sometimes truly disturbing — mental states? What can diagnosis capture, and what does it leave out? Why do treatments succeed or fail for different people? And how do all of us tell stories about ourselves — and our minds — that can either trap us in excruciating thought patterns or liberate us?We discuss why children seeking asylum in Sweden suddenly dropped out mentally and physically from their lives, how mental states like depression and anxiety can be socially contagious, how mental illnesses differ from physical ailments like diabetes and high blood pressure, what Aviv's own experience with childhood anorexia taught her about psychology and diagnosis, how having too much “insight” into our mental states can sometimes hurt us, how social forces like racism and classism can activate psychological distress, the complicated decisions people make around taking medication or refusing it, how hallucinations can be confused with — or might even count as — a form of spiritual connection, what “depressive realism” says about the state of our society, how we can care for one another both within and beyond the medical establishment, and more.This episode contains a brief mention of suicidal ideation. If you are having thoughts of suicide, text 988 to reach the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline. A list of additional resources is available at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.Mentioned:“It's Not Just You,” a series on mental health in America from New York Times Opinion“The Trauma of Facing Deportation” by Rachel AvivRuth Ozeki on The Ezra Klein Show: “What We Gain by Enchanting the Objects in Our Lives”Thomas Insel on The Ezra Klein Show: “A Top Mental Health Expert on Where America Went Wrong”Judson Brewer on The Ezra Klein Show: “That Anxiety You're Feeling? It's a Habit You Can Unlearn.”Book Recommendations:Madness and Modernism by Louis SassOf Two Minds T.M. Luhrmann“Wants” by Grace PaleyThoughts? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com. (And if you're reaching out to recommend a guest, please write  “Guest Suggestion" in the subject line.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin and Rogé Karma. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair. Original music by Isaac Jones. Mixing by Sonia Herrero, Isaac Jones and Carole Sabouraud. Audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#268/Colin Flavin + Justin Beal + Special Musical Guest Toni Tennille + Our Last Minutes with Louisa Whitmore

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 77:22 Very Popular


Colin Flavin, founder of Flavin Architects, has been building modern houses in New England for more than 30 years. An avid sketch artist and an MIT grad, Colin spoke at Modernism Week on East Coast modernist residential architecture and its impact on community design.  Author and artist Justin Beal went to Yale and USC and his art is included in the permanent collections of the Albright Knox Museum, the Hammer Museum, and the LA Museum of Contemporary Art. Now a professor at Hunter College, Justin's most recent project is Sandfuture, a look at life and work of Minoru Yamasaki, who came to fame through the Lambert-St. Louis airport and his most heralded creation, the original World  Trade Center twin towers in New York City.  Later on, we visit with pop and jazz superstar Toni Tennille, the next Dolly Levi, and then sadly, our last segment with TikTok design critic Louisa Whitmore, as she leaves the show to attend University and a bright promising future.  

Why Did Peter Sink?
Unmoderning (part 3)

Why Did Peter Sink?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 17:09


I was caught between the lukewarm and the deists and the atheists and the fundamentalists and the humanists. I was half hippy, half redneck, half preppy, half nerd, half metalhead. I say there were many “halves” because what this modernist input and media blast does is make you confused. That is the state of most people today, especially if your main hobby is screen staring. Jesus cures a demoniac who has this problem of a fragmented identity. The person says, “I am Legion” which means, “We are many.” The story of this Legion dude in the Bible never made sense until I started examining my own thoughts and worldview once I got out of the fog of modernism. Then I realized, “Holy s**t, I was Legion.” No wonder I was so off-centered. Legion is a story about someone who has too many forces struggling for control in his head. It's actually shocking to read the two lines of dialogue from Legion in light of my own life, because I had a similar reaction of anger and revolt when someone approached me about making Jesus my personal savior. I didn't use the same words, but pretty close. “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me!”Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “Legion is my name. There are many of us.” (Mark 5:1-20) This is exactly the same condition of our heads today drowning in media. Anyone that has a visceral reaction of anger to the name of Jesus is in this state. The funny thing is that Jesus heals. Savior means “healer”. And he does heal. He heals people of mental problems and anxiety issues a million times a day. But the modernist teaching cannot admit that. In fact, psychology, which is intended to heal, purposefully avoids any talk of Jesus. Western medicine in general has the same allergic reaction to the name Jesus. I can't help but wonder if the updated translation of Modernism is Legion. There are all kinds of external voices from TV and TikTok leasing space in our head. They are Legion. And if the media is sponsored and paid for, you can bet it is not borrowing ideas from Christ. You can tell if a show is Christian, because the production quality is usually bad and nearly unwatchable. This is not surprising because fireworks and glamor is the polar opposite of Jesus. Well, on TV anyway. Once you meet him, then it flips completely. But the goal of any image or sound the emits from your radio, television, or internet is to keep you distracted, to keep you divided, and to keep you watching. The more you watch, the more ideas are planted into your head. If only you could track this history of grooming your thoughts that's been done for you, compliments of Hollywood writers. It's not unreasonable to say that the idea that abortion is not killing a human probably came from an episode of Felicity that you watched college. In my first attempt to escape the madness of the crowd, I leaned secular because I felt that those were the non-hypocrites. Only the religious people were crazy. That's what I told myself. Upon further review, like an instant replay in football, which took twenty years, I have come to understand with glaring clarity that I leaned secular because of eighteen years of heavy schooling on the humanist doctrine. I was drinking from that vine, like every other public school child, like the pods in the Matrix. We were being kept alive in a vat of sugar water with re-runs of The Cosby Show and Night Court. (Through those two shows alone we learned a valuable lesson: we thought Bill Cosby was the upstanding citizen and John Larroquette was the pervert, only to wake up twenty years later and find out it was the opposite. But let me leave that path into the woods right there, before I get lost.) All the while, the truth of Christ was there for the finding, but it was buried under hours upon hours of youth sports and late-night math assignments and writing reports, which all boiled down to despair, in the form of party-til-you-puke. The message of Christ barely stood a chance, and yet somehow it still emerged. His light is the one thing that cannot be extinguished. Somehow it finds a way to reach people, despite massive attempts to stifle and kill it off. He finds us when we aren't even looking for him. The end result of this anti-spiritual education was to slowly but surely kill off God in our lives. This isn't hidden or a conspiracy, it's plainly stated in the writings and manifestos of the founders of modern education. The problem is that if you do try to kill God, you don't kill God. You wound the child. How? If you tell a child there is no God, he has no meaning for existence. So he must invent one. Kids recognize this meaninglessness early on. They are more aware of this loss than adults are, and you can observe when the light is going dim in middle-school age children. Unless the child has a hobby or goal or sport or some kind of self-invented worth, the loss of God will be felt early and often. For those that have some kind of meaning without God, it will soon fade and need a replacement. Sports and Pokemon will turn into the pursuit of money or sex or mental escape. The search begins, and it never ends. With the onslaught of tech and screens distracting the mind, the searching starts even earlier now, as non-believing indoctrinated parents don't even have a badly formed concept of God to offer their children, but even that is better than nothing. The promise of a utopia through social justice sounds great and is a worthy goal, but there is a flaw with this as a standalone solution for finding meaning in life. The problem is that it doesn't strike the heart or address anything related to the needs of the soul. If you deny the soul, you can never get over these issues with the ultimate questions. That is the whole problem with humanism and socialism; these are philosophies that can score some points for finding meaning, but they are shooting the ball at the wrong basket. This is the whole reason why Jesus continues to win hearts and minds. With Jesus there is a plan for all things, and authority, and a reason, and it allows for suffering to make sense, at least to some degree. But these other philosophies that lack God are a team with no coach and no plan, other than a constant “progress.” It leads to chaos, because an endless search means you are always lost. Even if you hit a goal, you immediately need a new goal. Why? Because the heart and soul are restless and aimless without God. Ships need both a rudder and a sail. The attempt to indoctrinate us away from God may seem to work for a while but eventually leads us directly back to God. “The desire for God is written in the human heart, because man is created by God and for God; and God never ceases to draw man to himself. Only in God will he find the truth and happiness he never stops searching for.” (CCC 27)The spiritual death that these education reformers aimed for succeeded in my life, but they failed to bring about the utopia, unless a massive problem of broken homes, drug abuse, isolation, and identity crises is what they had in mind. If it was, then mission accomplished. The greatest period of wealth generation and higher education in human history has already happened, yet the utopia is nowhere near. Yes, we need to work for a better world, but with the soul denied and God excluded from our lives, that better world will never arrive because we have to invent new enemies and problems to solve. We