Podcasts about Michelangelo

Italian sculptor, painter, architect (1475–1564)

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Latest podcast episodes about Michelangelo

TMNT Der Talk
Episode 379 - Prähistorischer Turtlesaurier

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 64:20


Episode 379 von TMNT - Der Talk. Das Hauptthema diesmal sind TMNT#37 und "Turtles in Time#1" von IDW Comics. Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

TMNT Der Talk
ENGLISH Episode 133 - Welcome to the Blastorama Pleasuredome!

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 47:51


Episode 133 of "TMNT - The Talk" in English. I am talking about "TMNT: The Armageddon Game#2" by IDW Comics. Check out my blog at http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com or send me an e-mail at tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

The Daily Grind Podcast
Ep. 89 | The Power of Time Management Systems | Sarah Reiff-Hekking, Ph.D

The Daily Grind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 26:25


The Daily Grind podcast brings you your Monday motivation with other brothers and sisters that are helping others on their Daily Grind. Every Monday you will hear from an expert, coach, or entrepreneur that is making waves in the health, business, and relationship industries. You don't want to miss out on this week's episode. More from today's guest Sarah Reiff-Hekking, Ph.D. : Sarah Reiff-Hekking, Ph.D. is the founder of True Focus Coaching Inc., a speaker, coach, and Psychologist with 20 years of experience helping people reach their goals. She empowers entrepreneurs and professionals to get a grip on time so that they can get to the next level in their lives and businesses. She believes that you have to find the time management system that works for you, that solutions are found by paying attention to the present moment, and that just like Michelangelo had to chip away at the stone to find the statue, we have to get rid of all the extra stuff that isn't the core of your life. Find out how Sarah has helped Others like You! Links from Sarah Reiff-Hekking, Ph.D.:  https://www.truefocuscoaching.com/tmbc-live/ More resources from the Daily Grind Podcast: 1- Make sure you review this episode → https://forms.endorsal.io/form/62c75a1698ff8c29a1ad7141/ 2-Checkout The Daily Grind Podcast site: www.thedailygrindpodcast.com

The Nice Guys on Business
Steve Sims: Achieve Ridiculous Goals

The Nice Guys on Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 39:14


From organizing a private dinner in front of Michelangelo's David, to securing a tour of SpaceX led by Elon Musk himself, his accomplishments always start with the same questions: How far can I take this? What would make this a stupid achievement? Steve examines famously stupid goals in history, the key habits of successful people, and lessons from his own career to help you let go of your fear and get out of your own way. Order Steve Sims' book “Go For Stupid: The Art of Achieving Ridiculous Goals” by clicking on this link: https://www.amazon.com/Go-Stupid-Achieving-Ridiculous-Goals/dp/1544535600 Connect with Steve Sims:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/stevedsims/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevedsims Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stevedsims Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sdsims/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/stevedsims TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@stevedsims TurnKey Podcast Productions Important Links:The Ultimate Podcast Launch Formula- www.TurnkeyPodcast.com/UPLFplusFREE workshop on how to "Be A Great Guest."Free E-Book 5 Ways to Make Money Podcasting at www.Turnkeypodcast.com/gift Ready to earn 6-figures with your podcast? See if you've got what it takes at TurnkeyPodcast.com/quizSales Training for Podcasters: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/sales-training-for-podcasters/id1540644376Nice Guys on Business: http://www.niceguysonbusiness.com/subscribe/The Turnkey Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/turnkey-podcast/id1485077152 Partner Links -- We use these apps and get amazing results and huge time savings too!Design tool: Canva Pro: Create Stunning Design in Minutes!Check out Headliner to create social media posts with video easily- make.headliner.appSimplecast is the easiest way to set up your podcast hosting- Simplecast.comZoom is the easiest way to schedule meetings and record your podcast interviews. Zoom.usAcuity is the easiest way to schedule your podcast interviews, meetings, and life.Acuityscheduling.com

TMNT Der Talk
Episode 378 - Monster, Leichen, Zerstörung und Verstümmelungen

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 112:39


Episode 378 von TMNT - Der Talk. Das Hauptthema diesmal sind die schockierendsten und verstörendsten Momente in TMNT Serien, Filmen etc. Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

Get Ready for Rome
98. The Design of the Sistine Ceiling

Get Ready for Rome

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 23:20


Michelangelo used painted architecture and numerous nudes to divide the Sistine Chapel ceiling into separate panels and give it a complex design. Today we summarize the elaborate arrangement he came up with.

Comic Book Couples Counseling Podcast
CBCC 86: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles -Mirage Studios

Comic Book Couples Counseling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 106:49


Nearly forty years ago, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles sprung from the Jack Kirby and Frank Miller-obsessed brains of Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. Pop culture was forever altered. For the better. In this week's episode, we continue to explore the sibling dynamics between the four mutant brothers: Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael. This time, however, we go back to the beginning, flipping through the pages of the first seven Mirage Studios issues. What we find within feels familiar and unfamiliar simultaneously. It's an emotionally rich and turbulent saga, an immigrant story involving revenge, mad scientists, and aliens. Not a single slice of pizza is present. Helping us understand the TMNT familial relationships is Dawn Huebner, Ph.D., and her book "The Sibling Survival Guide: Surefire Ways to Solve Conflicts, Reduce Rivalry, and Have More Fun with Your Brothers and Sisters, illustrated by Kara McHale.  Before we dig into this thick turtle soup, we must celebrate this year's Baltimore Comic-Con, our last convention of the season. We discuss the friends we caught up with, the past guests we finally met in person, the artists we stood in line for, and the comics we purchased. Every con has its unique vibe, and there is no other place on Earth like Baltimore Comic-Con. The two-dollar bins alone should entice your curiosity. Relevant Links: CBCC on TMNT: The Movie w/Bryan Young CBCC Interviews Kevin Eastman Comic issues covered in this episode: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1 - 7 and the Raphael one-shot. All were written, illustrated, and toned by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. Issues 1 - 4 were lettered by Eastman and Laird, issues 5 - 7 were lettered by Steve Lavigne. The comics were originally published by Mirage Studios between May 1984 and March 1986.  Be sure to follow Comic Book Couples Counseling on Facebook, on Instagram, and on Twitter @CBCCPodcast, and you can follow hosts Brad Gullickson @MouthDork & Lisa Gullickson @sidewalksiren. Send us your Words of Affirmation by leaving us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts. SUPPORT THE PODCAST BY JOINING OUR PATREON COMMUNITY. Continue your conversation with CBCC by hopping over to our website where we have reviews, essays, and numerous interviews with comic book creators. Podcast logo by Aaron Prescott @acoolhandfluke, podcast banner art by @Karen_XmenFan.

Armstrong & Getty Podcast
Boiling Borscht

Armstrong & Getty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 37:20


Hour 4 of Tuesday's A&G: Are the roots of the divide between Russia and the US based on the pilot episode of "Friends"? The problem with reparations, forgiving pandemic rhetoric, and Michelangelo, a thief? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSFO Podcast
Boiling Borscht

KSFO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 37:20


Hour 4 of Tuesday's A&G: Are the roots of the divide between Russia and the US based on the pilot episode of "Friends"? The problem with reparations, forgiving pandemic rhetoric, and Michelangelo, a thief? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Armstrong and Getty
Boiling Borscht

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 37:30


Hour 4 of Tuesday's A&G: Are the roots of the divide between Russia and the US based on the pilot episode of "Friends"? The problem with reparations, forgiving pandemic rhetoric, and Michelangelo, a thief? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talk Nerdy to Me
The Last Ronin - Supreme Edition 1:4 Scale Statue by PCS unbox and review

Talk Nerdy to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 13:24


The Ninja Turtles are one of the most popular comic book/cartoon franchises out there. The Last Ronin mini-series sold well enough to make the New York Times best seller list. This statue pays homage to that series. ABOUT THIS STATUE “No matter what's changed … this is still our home turf.” Sideshow and Premium Collectibles Studio present the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin 1:4 Scale Statue – Supreme Edition. Inspired by Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin, this incredible statue captures the determination and resolve of the last surviving member of the TMNT, Michelangelo, in a bleak alternate future ruled by the Foot Clan. The Last Ronin Statue – Supreme Edition measures 23.5” tall as Michelangelo stalks the sewers in pursuit of his enemies, guided by the ghosts of his brothers. A highly detailed environment base puts the turtle in his native element, with grimy water flowing around rust-colored pipes deep beneath the Foot Clan-controlled city. The statue includes four weapon proximity pieces that can be placed anywhere along the base for an added storytelling element, representing the arsenals of Michelangelo's fallen brothers as well as his own: a sai, a broken bo staff, a shattered sword, and nunchaku. The breathtaking proximity piece of brothers Leonardo, Raphael, and Donatello is fully sculpted and painted in a spectral teal with white highlights to make the turtle trio stand out against the darkness of the ronin's stealthy garb. Reaching their hands out to lend strength to their brother, these fallen heroes in a half shell are detailed with intricate costume textures and a base of ghostly wisps encompassing the entire scene. The Last Ronin Statue – Supreme Edition can be displayed with or without this element attached. Without the ghost brothers, the statue measures 20.5” tall. The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin 1:4 Scale Statue – Supreme Edition has a fully sculpted costume to recreate Michelangelo's stealthy new suit, detailed with incredible textures replicating fabric, belts, and weathered armor elements. The statue includes two pairs of arms, each with unique weapons for a variety of display options: Michelangelo has a sleeved right arm holding a sai, a sleeved left arm with a bo staff, a sleeveless right arm with a katana, and a sleeveless left arm with a tonfa. A removable sword handle fits into the sheath on his back to add yet another display configuration, giving you complete control of the ronin's arsenal. With a black domino mask beneath his hood and a snarl on his face, this incredible statue embodies the rage and determination of the last Ninja Turtle in his tireless quest for vengeance. Brand: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Manufacturer: PCS Type: Statue Genre: Comic Book Action Adventure Materials: Polystone Product Size: Height: 23.5" (59.7 cm) Width: 18.5" (47 cm) Depth: 20" (50.8 cm) SUBSCRIBE to watch more videos like this one! LET'S CONNECT! -- Zia Comics website -- Zia Comics TikTok -- Zia Comics Facebook -- Zia Comics Twitter -- Zia Comics Instagram LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST! - iTunes #ziacomics #lascruces #newmexico #lascrucesnm #lascrucesnewmexico #sideshow #sideshowcollectibles #ninjaturtles #tmnt #teenagemutantninjaturtles #lastronin #thelastronin

TMNT Der Talk
Episode 377 - Tod, Leid, Blut und Kakerlaken

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 101:19


Episode 377 von TMNT - Der Talk. Das Hauptthema diesmal sind die schockierendsten und verstörendsten Momente in TMNT Comics. Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

Nightlife
This Week in History: Sistine Chapel is Unveiled

Nightlife

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 26:00


His name will always be associated with it, but did you know that Michelangelo never wanted to paint the Sistine Chapel? 

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church (Gilbert, AZ) Podcasts
Father Chris Axline Video Chat - Aug. 12, 2022

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church (Gilbert, AZ) Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 4:52


Reopening Weekend! Hello St. Mary Magdalene,  Thanks for tuning in to this week's video with me, Fr. Chris. This weekend we are back in our full church and I'm so excited to celebrate with you all in this new space. Though the furnishings in our sanctuary are temporary, we are thrilled to have our new tabernacle here and to start using it to house the Lord. I will bless the tabernacle at the vigil Mass on Saturday (tomorrow).  With us moving back in here are a few things to know: First, the new renovations have changed the acoustics of our building. Our sound team has been working on re-balancing our mics and speaker system and will be continuing to make improvements during the coming weeks so please be patient during these adjustments. Remember that when run sound testing outside of Mass, the room isn't occupied and it sounds different when it's empty than it does when full of people. This means that some observations and experimental balancing can only happen during Mass so thank you for bearing with us as we seek to improve this area.    Second, we'll be distributing Communion from our altar rail using only the priest and the deacon as ordinary ministers of Holy Communion. Our ushers will also be giving directions on how to fill the rail so please watch the ushers for guidance. We'll be watching and observing over the next few weeks and making refinements as needed. Based on what I've seen from other parishes with altar rails this should not prolong Communion. However, I do want to speak to that point, even if Mass does go a bit longer that's not a bad thing. Remember that after receiving Communion, you've got about 15-20 minutes where Jesus is literally inside you! How are you spending that time? What better way than to pray and give thanks for this incredible gift and to ask Him to help you throughout the coming week!  Third, our mural work is in production and is anticipated to be installed within the next six months. Our altars and ambo are expected to follow shortly after, as they are custom made marble pieces tailored to the size, theme, and dimensions of our sanctuary space. Additionally, I was able to find out that the Italian marble now in our sanctuary came to us from the famous quarries of the Carrara region: the same region which provided marble used by Michelangelo and in the construction of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome! Lastly, on Monday we celebrate the Assumption of Mary, and while it's not a holy day this year it's still a solemnity when we celebrate Our Lady being taken up to Heaven. Her Assumption is a sign of hope for us and a reminder of the hope of the Resurrection of the dead. So, to conclude our video today, let us ask our Blessed Mother to intercede for us and to bolster our faith in Christ, please join me in praying the Hail Holy Queen… God bless,   Fr. Chris Visit us: https://www.smarymag.org Donate online: https://membership.faithdirect.net/AZ754

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 330: Walter Pater

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 3:24


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Walter Pater, in full Walter Horatio Pater, (born August 4, 1839, Shadwell, London, England—died July 30, 1894, Oxford, Oxfordshire), was an English critic, essayist, and humanist whose advocacy of “art for art's sake” became a cardinal doctrine of the movement known as Aestheticism. Pater was educated at King's School, Canterbury, and at Queen's College, Oxford, where he studied Greek philosophy under Benjamin Jowett. He then settled in Oxford and read with private pupils. In 1864 he was elected to a fellowship at Brasenose College. Pater's early intention to enter the church gave way at this time to a consuming interest in classical studies. Pater then began to write for the reviews, and his essays on Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Pico della Mirandola, Michelangelo, and others were collected in 1873 as Studies in the History of the Renaissance (later called simply The Renaissance). His delicate, fastidious style and sensitive appreciation of Renaissance art in these essays made his reputation as a scholar and an aesthete, and he became the centre of a small group of admirers in Oxford. In the concluding essay in The Renaissance, Pater asserted that art exists for the sake of its beauty alone, and that it acknowledges neither moral standards nor utilitarian functions in its reason for being. These views brought Pater into an association with Algernon Charles Swinburne and with the Pre-Raphaelites.Marius the Epicurean (1885) is his most substantial work. It is a philosophical romance in which Pater's ideal of an aesthetic and religious life is scrupulously and elaborately set forth. The setting is Rome in the time of Marcus Aurelius; but this is a thin disguise for the characteristically late-19th-century spiritual development of its main character. Imaginary Portraits (1887) are shorter pieces of philosophical fiction in the same mode. Appreciations (1889) is a return to the critical essay, this time largely on English subjects. In 1893 came Plato and Platonism, giving an extremely literary view of Plato and neglecting the logical and dialectical side of his philosophy. Pater's Greek Studies (1895), Miscellaneous Studies (1895), and Essays from The Guardian (privately printed, 1896; 1901) were published posthumously. Also published posthumously was his unfinished romance, Gaston de Latour (1896).The primary influence on Pater's mind was his classical studies, coloured by a highly individual view of Christian devotion and pursued largely as a source of extremely refined artistic sensations. In his later critical writings Pater continued to focus on the innate qualities of works of art, in contrast to the prevailing tendency to evaluate them on the basis of their moral and educational value. Pater's early influence was confined to a small circle in Oxford, but he came to have a widespread effect on the next literary generation. Oscar Wilde, George Moore, and the aesthetes of the 1890s were among his followers and show obvious and continual traces both of his style and of his ideas.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Walter-Pater. For more information about Walter Pater:The Renaissance: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520036642/the-renaissance“Art vs. aestheticism: the case of Walter Pater”: https://newcriterion.com/issues/1995/5/art-vs-aestheticism-the-case-of-walter-paterThe Renaissance: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2398/2398-h/2398-h.htm“Walter Pater”: https://campuspress.yale.edu/modernismlab/walter-pater/

The Return Slot ... OF HORROR!
Staff Meeting: Halloween Freaky Field Trip!

The Return Slot ... OF HORROR!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 57:55


The Return Slot...OF HORROR! concludes its Halloween preparations with something deliriously different. Sometimes you just gotta go outside and experience life or perhaps…THE AFTERLIFE! The smell of golden foliage is in the air, the apples and pumpkins are begging to be picked, and everyone is ready for a good scare. Michelangelo leads a staff meeting to discuss fall activities in all their ghoulishly glorious wonder. Listen anywhere you get podcasts and follow us on Instagram @thereturnslot_ofhorrorpod

TMNT Der Talk
ENGLISH Episode 132 - Chaos in Mutant Town

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 34:05


Episode 132 of "TMNT - The Talk" in English. I am talking about TMNT#133 by IDW Comics. Check out my blog at http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com or send me an e-mail at tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

TMNT Der Talk
Episode 376 - Raph reichts

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 47:39


Episode 376 von TMNT - Der Talk. Das Hauptthema diesmal ist die 2003-Cartoon-Folge "Zwischen den Fronten - Teil 3". Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

but why should i care?
Why care about the art of Michelangelo?

but why should i care?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 24:38


Art can open up conversations about God. Listen as Ellie and Deanna discuss the traveling art of the Sistine Chapel.

The bigEDidea Podcast
Episode 2.26 with Brian DeLuca: Make Learning Visible with Microcredentials!

The bigEDidea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:26


Brian LaDuca is the founding Executive Director of the Institute of Applied Creativity for Transformation (IACT) at the University of Dayton. His research is focused on the relationship between necessary 21st Century skills in the workforce and competency-based curriculum in post-secondary education. He has been with Dayton for ten years where he leads the ongoing evolution of all micro-credentials and badges for the University of Dayton students, faculty and staff and steers the ongoing city-wide collaboration of The GEM, Dayton's emerging education incubator with a mission to maximize possibilities for city educators to be innovative change agents for developing new teaching and learning solutions to help Dayton's community and society progress. Since 2015 he has presented his research and work across the world including keynote presentations and workshops in Mexico, Switzerland, Peru, and China. He has degrees from the University of Illinois-Urbana, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Dayton (2023); and is lovingly supported by his wife Susie and his twin boys, Michelangelo and Joaquin and their sister, Giada. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bigedidea/message

TMNT Der Talk
SHREDDER Kapitel 2 - Dämonen (Teil 3)

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 18:51


"Kapitel 2 - Dämonen (Teil 3)" von SHREDDER. SHREDDER ist ein Hörbuch, welches die Geschichte erzählt, wie Oroku Saki zu Shredder wurde. Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

Get Ready for Rome
2.11: Botticelli's Facing Frescoes in the Sistine Chapel

Get Ready for Rome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 21:12


Michelangelo dominates the Sistine Chapel, but the chapel's walls feature twelve frescoes by the previous generation of great Florentine artists. We look at two by Botticelli as an introduction to all twelve.

Love Your Work
290. Leonardo Mind, Raphael World

Love Your Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 15:11


The world expects us to be Raphaels, but some of us are Leonardos. Don't hold your Leonardo mind to Raphael standards, because this Raphael world would be nothing without Leonardo minds. There's an inscription in the Pantheon in Rome that says, “Here lies that famous Raphael by whom Nature feared to be conquered while he lived.” In other words, Raphael was such an amazing painter, Nature was supposedly shaking in her boots, afraid he would learn all her tricks. (Ironically, Raphael's remains are sealed away in a sarcophagus, where Nature can't get to them. Who's afraid of who?) But Nature had nothing to fear. Raphael could not outdo her. As Raphael was being buried, the painter Nature should have feared lay hundreds of miles to the north, in a little church on the grounds of the King of France's chateau. Raphael the young phenom, Leonardo, the old has-been Several years before Raphael's early death, he was getting paid thousands of ducats to paint one fresco after another in the Vatican. Meanwhile, the aging Leonardo da Vinci was nearby, living off a meager 33 ducat-a-month stipend, not doing much of importance. The pope had tried hiring him to paint something, but ended up frustrated, saying, “This man will never get anything done!” When the prolific art patron, Elizabeth d'Este, who had hounded Leonardo for a portrait for decades, came to visit Rome, she didn't bother getting in touch with Leonardo. He was a has-been, who couldn't be counted on to follow through. Who was she there to see? The young phenom, Raphael. Raphael was very similar to Leonardo, but also very different. His most important difference was that he was a master executor. If you hired Raphael, he got the job done. He also had been raised in the workshop of his father, a court painter for a Duke, so Raphael was refined and well-mannered. He knew how to schmooze with nobility. He had the connections that came along with that background, and could get a letter of recommendation from one powerful person to another with ease. Leonardo, on the other hand, was born out of wedlock – which made him “illegitimate” at the time – and didn't get much education. While he had gained a reputation as a brilliant engineer and architect, he had also gained a reputation as an unreliable painter. Raphael: A reliable Leonardo As Raphael continued his career as the pope's wunderkind, Leonardo worked his way north. He left yet another project unfinished in Milan, then impressed King Francis I enough to be invited to join him at the Chateau d'Amboise, as the official painter, architect, and court pageantry designer. While a gig with the King of France wasn't the worst thing in the world, it was a step down from what Leonardo could have been doing if he hadn't been reputed as someone who couldn't get things done. The pope and all the nobles in all the principalities of Italy just watched him go. He'd never return again. While Raphael had some clear advantages that helped his career advance, he couldn't have done it without the ways he and Leonardo were similar. The frescoes being painted by the young Raphael – such as his most-famous School of Athens – were exactly the kinds of projects Leonardo would have been great for, if only he could have been counted on to finish them. In fact, there was no person in the world to whom Raphael owed his own painting style more than Leonardo. When it came to painting, Raphael was mostly a reliable Leonardo. Raphael's “Leonardo period” Art historians call the years during which Raphael spent a lot of time in Florence his “Florence period.” But they might as well call them his “Leonardo period.” That's the four years during which Raphael's work started looking less like that of his mentor, Perugino, and more like that of his idol, Leonardo. During Raphael's Florence period, Leonardo was in a public face-off with another young phenom, Michelangelo. Leonardo had been commissioned to paint a battle scene in the Florence Council Hall. As usual, the first deadline came and went. Meanwhile, Michelangelo had done such a great job with his David statue, the council decided it would be a great idea to have him paint a battle scene, too. It was a pretty awkward situation for Leonardo. He was already struggling to finish, and a committee of which he had been a part had gone against his recommendation for a less-conspicuous location and put the David right outside the entrance of the council hall. Michelangelo was an arrogant prick who openly taunted Leonardo for his past failures, and now Leonardo had to walk through the shadow of Michelangelo's latest triumph to get to his mural. Oh, and Michelangelo's battle scene mural was directly across the room from his. By all accounts at the time, this was a painting competition – a battle of battle scenes. Leonardo wasn't competitive by nature, but this was supposedly going to motivate him to finish his mural. Today, we might say putting Leonardo in this position was pretty machiavellian. Which is ironic, because it was arranged with the help of none other than the inventor of machiavellianism, the council's secretary, Niccolò Machiavelli. Once word of this painting battle traveled outside Florence, young artists traveled to Florence to witness it. One of those artists: Raphael – armed with a letter of recommendation from the mother of the future Duke of Urbino to the leader of the Florentine Republic, stating that the twenty-one year-old was “greatly gifted…sensible and well-mannered.” It's during this “Florence period” that Raphael's work changed dramatically. It started to look as if he might know a thing or two about anatomy, he started aping Leonardo's smokey sfumato technique, and drawing contorted, muscular men in the heat of battle. He learned a bit watching Michelangelo, but he learned a lot watching Leonardo. As it turned out, neither Leonardo nor Michelangelo finished his mural. For Michelangelo, it wasn't a big deal. He got summoned to Rome, where he eventually painted the Sistine Chapel ceiling. Leonardo, however, had more of his career behind him than ahead of him. Yet another public failure meant he never got another public commission. So while Leonardo, in his sixties, was wandering around Europe, chasing what work he could, Raphael, in his early thirties, was getting showered with high-paying papal commissions, as a more-reliable Leonardo. The rise and fall of Raphael These days, we admire Leonardo more than we do Raphael, but that wasn't always the case. That Raphael is one of the few people entombed in the palace of the gods, alongside kings, is testament to his popularity when he died. Heck, at his funeral, the pope kissed his hand. Around 1800, the church in which Leonardo was buried was destroyed in the French Revolution. Nobody bothered to try to recover Leonardo's remains. They were mixed in with everyone else's and forgotten. Meanwhile, Raphael was as popular as ever. If you take a peek at Google Ngram, you see a sharp increase in mentions of Raphael around that time. For hundreds of years after Raphael's death, he was considered the quintessential painter of the High Renaissance. The art academies around Europe, who controlled the opinion of what was or wasn't good art, built their curricula around studying the work of Raphael. But as the influence of art academies crumbled in the late 1800s with the rise of Impressionism, so too did crumble the reverence for Raphael. Meanwhile, Leonardo has risen in popularity over the centuries. Today, if you want to find a good book on Leonardo, you have lots of choices. Raphael, not so much. The probable cause of this rise in popularity and the probable cause of Leonardo's struggles with follow-through are one in the same: Nature had more reason to fear Leonardo than Raphael. Leonardo's massive iceberg Through the centuries after Leonardo's death, his notes began to resurface. They had been inherited by someone who was supposed to compile and publish them, but were so numerous and disorganized, that was a nearly impossible task. His notes ended up collated and bound into individual notebooks, scattered amongst collectors around Europe. One notebook was found as recently as the 1960s, hiding in plain sight in Madrid, in the collection of the library. These notebooks have revealed that for Leonardo, painting a picture was about much more than painting a picture. When Raphael did an anatomy study, it was all about knowing how the skin on the surface of the body was shaped by the muscles underneath. The only purpose was to mimic Nature, on a superficial level. For Leonardo, an anatomy study was about much more. He didn't just want to know what muscles were under the skin. He wanted to also know which muscles were engaged by which movements, or which nerves activated by which emotions. As a painter, there was no reason for Leonardo to know what the human heart looked like, or how it worked. Yet Leonardo made observations about the heart that would have advanced science by centuries, had they been published. Leonardo searched, Raphael found As I talked about on episodes 105 and 288, economist David Galenson would say Raphael was a conceptual innovator, while Leonardo was an experimental one. To Leonardo, there was no such thing as irrelevant information. In the course of researching how to paint something, he might make a new discovery about anatomy, metallurgy, geology, or some other field, that would set him down a different path. The art historian Eugene Garin thought, based upon Leonardo's many thousands of pages of notes, that he was trying to compile a treatise of all human knowledge. Leonardo wasn't studying Nature just so he could paint it convincingly – he was trying to understand all of Nature. Raphael didn't have to explore all aspects of the world. He merely had to copy the result of Leonardo's thinking. Galenson told me, “It's what conceptual innovators do, it turns out.” Conceptual innovators take an idea, and make it their own. It's what Picasso did with the work of Cézanne, what Warhol did with the work of Pollack, what Hemingway did with the work of Stein and Twain. The projects Leonardo pursued were impossible to finish Leonardo's experimental approach meant his paintings were never finished. He was always discovering something new, so he was constantly revising. For example, after one of his anatomy studies, he realized he had painted some neck muscles wrong, so he went back and repainted them thirty years after the fact. He did the bulk of his work on the Mona Lisa during four years, but moved it around for fifteen, making finishing touches until a paralyzed hand rendered him unable. The patron never got their painting, Leonardo never collected payment, and the Mona Lisa was still collecting dust in his studio when he died. This experimental, iterative approach extended to Leonardo's materials and methods, and made it even more difficult for him to follow through. The best-practice method of painting murals in fresco required laying down plaster and painting on it before it dried and literally set itself in stone. It wasn't great for Leonardo's blurry-edged painting style, and it made iteration impossible. He couldn't lay down dozens of layers of paint over the course of years, as he did with the Mona Lisa. By the time Leonardo was painting his battle scene in the Florence Council Hall, his famous Last Supper was already fading and flaking, thanks to his resistance to painting in the reliable fresco technique. Not satisfied with adapting his style to this technique, Leonardo instead experimented once again on his battle-scene mural. He was almost finished, before the fire he was using to set colors got too close, destroying his work. This Raphael world is nothing without Leonardos Historically, the world rewards Raphaels. It rewards the ability to formulate a plan, follow through, collect payment and prestige, and move on. So, the world trains us to be Raphaels. Why do we follow a curriculum and fill out bubbles on standardized tests with #2 pencils? Because our teacher already knows the answer. They know the answer so well, they've programmed a computer to grade the test, and it'll get confused if you use a #3 pencil. But for the curriculum to be designed to make Raphaels, we first need Leonardos. We need people who explore and experiment. We need them to ask questions that might not have answers, and to come up with new questions nobody ever thought of. That's not a straightforward process. It's messy and disorganized, and it would cause any Raphael to pull their hair out. When you don't always find answers, and the answers you do find lead to new questions, you don't always finish. The days of the Raphaels of the world are numbered. If somebody already knows the process, already knows the answer, we don't need Raphael. A computer or machine can follow a process. Raphael knew this. Once his fame was established, he milked it for all it was worth. His later frescoes were painted by his staff of assistants in the largest workshop of the High Renaissance. He licensed his drawings to a printmaker, who sold copies of his work. As it becomes harder to make it as a Raphael, it's becoming easier to make it as a Leonardo. I think Leonardo would have been a great blogger. He wouldn't have to collect and document all knowledge, then rely on an heir to collate, typeset, and publish his life's work on expensive parchment. He could instead write and publish one note at a time, gradually building his treatise of human knowledge. He wouldn't have to wander around Europe looking for patrons – he could get them without leaving his home. If you're a Leonardo, don't bother being a Raphael If you're a Leonardo mind, don't fall into the trap of evaluating yourself by the standards of the Raphael world. There's a reason why the Raphaels are so good at getting it done: Their task is simpler. Don't beat yourself up by your inability to plan and carry out a vision no one could reasonably execute on their first attempt. Instead, find a way to explore in public, one little project at a time, building up into your grand masterpiece. Leonardo's remains were forgotten for sixty years. Some scientist, perhaps motivated by the gradual resurfacing of the notes revealing Leonardo's genius, gathered together some bones he figured were those of the master. They're in a tomb in a chapel on the grounds of the chateau, and it's one of the top attractions in Amboise. Are they actually Leonardo's bones? Probably not. His remains are probably where they should be – not sealed away in some sarcophagus, but one with Nature. Thank you for having me on your podcasts! Thank you to Costa Michailidis for having me on the InnovationBound podcast. As always, you can find interviews of me on my interviews page. About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is author of Mind Management, Not Time Management, The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative. Follow David on: Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher YouTube RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »     Show notes: https://kadavy.net/blog/posts/leonard-mind-raphael-world/

Innovations and Breakthroughs
The Secret to Achieving Outrageous Goals

Innovations and Breakthroughs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 34:32


Steve D. Sims is a speaker, coach, and author who delivers unbelievable experiences. He has sent clients down to the wreck of the Titanic, placed some on stage with their favorite rock group, and closed museums in Florence to place a table at Michelangelo's “David” and had Andrea Bocelli come in to serenade them. Because of his reputation for making the impossible possible, Steve has been called the real-life wizard of Oz by Entrepreneur and Forbes. He is also the author of Bluefishing and Go For Stupid. In this episode… What do the most successful people do to achieve the impossible? What can entrepreneurs learn from them? One of the secrets to success is having purposeful conversations on essential subjects. Surround yourself with the right people and offer them value by focusing on their needs. Steve D. Sims advises business people to challenge others and focus on empowering, applauding, and uplifting them. While many make excuses, he says the most successful people don't care about ridicule from others. They do the impossible and push themselves to make life better for others. In this episode of the Innovations and Breakthroughs Podcast, Rich Goldstein interviews Steve D. Sims — a speaker, coach, and author — about the secret to achieving outrageous goals. Steve talks about his career background, tips for building valuable relationships, and the benefits of working with people who will challenge you.

Keeping Her Keys
Seeing The Sibyl: Ancient Mystics To Modern Predictions

Keeping Her Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 145:54


Enter the mysteries of the deeper world by allowing the Sibyl within to awaken. Angela Natividad and I explore The Sibyl, from the classical antiquity to contemporary oracles. Angela and I talked for over two hours, with about the first hour being an intro and the second more on specific Sibyls and bringing this archetype to the present day The Sibyl was an ancient priestess of great prestige in many areas of the Greek and Roman worlds. Their influence continued in Christianity right up to the Renaissance. There were many sibyls, including The Pythia (which was also a title referring to many prophetesses, pictured) and The Sibyl of Cumae. To the ancients, The Sibyllae were the chosen priestesses who held the sacred gift of prophecy. They prophesied the rise of Rome and predicted the birth of the messiah. So powerful were her words that her books were dearly guarded by the Romans. Michelangelo painted her on the Sistine Chapel. There were many other important sibyls throughout the ancient Mediterranean, predicting the rise and fall of empires accurately as well as responding to questions about the details of everyday life. The Sibylline Oracles are a compendium of oracular writings attributed to ancient Sibyls, but more likely heavily adapted by early Christian writers. As an archetype, The Sibyl persists today, from the popularity of astrology and tarot to the mysterious oracles spoken by economists. I dedicated an entire chapter to the sibyllic in Entering Hekate's Garden: The Magick, Medicine and Mystery of Plant Spirit Witchcraft. Available from most major online booksellers. Join Covina to go deeper into your journey with The Sibyl. You can view the slides (art, references, etc.) and access the searchable video with transcript here.

Achieve Your Goals with Hal Elrod
452: Why You Should Set Stupid Goals with Steve Sims

Achieve Your Goals with Hal Elrod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 33:52 Very Popular


If you had a chance to learn how to set major goals from the man who sent clients to the wreck of the Titanic, arranged for people to get married by the Pope in the Vatican, and set up a private dinner at the feet of Michelangelo's David (statue) while being serenaded by Andrea Bocelli, would you seize it? You are about to get that opportunity! My guest today, Steve Sims, has done things that seem like they've been ripped out of a Hollywood movie script. Forbes and Entrepreneur magazine have even called him “The Real Wizard of Oz.”  Steve is an example that you don't need to be afraid to dream big and that nothing is impossible. Fear of failure is a self-fulfilling prophecy, and you need to eradicate those thoughts from your mind to achieve your most cherished goals. In today's conversation, we discussed the importance of thinking big, taking massive action and why you should embrace failure to get to success. We also discuss Steve's latest book Go For Stupid: The Art of Achieving Ridiculous Goals and his strategy for developing an unbeatable mindset that will make it possible to turn your dreams into a reality. KEY TAKEAWAYS The strategy that helped Steve go from being a nightclub doorman to doing business with Elon Musk, Sir Elton John, Sir Richard Branson, and many more. Why most people are scared to chase their deepest passions and Steve's method for overcoming that problem. How to forget the word “impossible” and go after ridiculous, stupid goals! If you act boldly, chances are you'll fail. But you have to get comfortable with failure to reach success. How Steve helps prison inmates turn illegal hustles into productive businesses. Get The Full Show Notes To get full access to today's show notes, including audio, transcript, and links to all the resources mentioned, visit MiracleMorning.com/452 Subscribe, Rate & Review I would love if you could subscribe to the podcast and leave an honest rating & review. This will encourage other people to listen and allow us to grow as a community. The bigger we get as a community, the bigger the impact we can have on the world. To subscribe, rate, and review the podcast on your favorite podcast app, visit MiracleMorning.com/subscribe. Connect with Hal Elrod Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube

The Strategic Life Podcast
Steve Sims - Go for Stupid, Speaking Tips, Magical Connections, Selfishness, Get Unstuck

The Strategic Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 56:28


If you can dream it, Steve Sims is the guy who can make it happen! He is known as The Real Life Wizard of Oz and the visionary founder of the first high-end luxury concierge through which he had organized a private dinner in front of Michelangelo's David, a romantic wedding at the Vatican, a SpaceX tour led by Elon Musk, and so much more! In his new book, Go for Stupid, Steve teaches us how to ignore naysayers and go for our big, stupid, ridiculous goals. There are so many stories that you would want to hear about this man with top legends of the world, and he's sharing them not to impress you but to impress upon what's possible for you. As he said in this interview, if he can do it, you can do it too! Some questions I asked: What's the idea behind Go for Stupid? What advice would you give someone who feels stuck in life?  Tips to become a powerful speaker. How do you keep your audience interested and entertained? In this episode, you will learn: From making things happen to going for stupid. Getting into the dream first. Everything is about relationships. How to magically connect with almost anyone. The true meaning of fear. Why you need to focus on the aggravation. Little nuggets from “Go for Stupid”. How to train your brain to look for opportunity.  Sims' SpeakEasy Tips.  When being selfish means being strategic. Books and Resources: Go For Stupid: The Art of Achieving Ridiculous Goals: https://www.amazon.com/Go-Stupid-Achieving-Ridiculous-Goals/dp/1544535600/  Bluefishing: The Art of Making Things Happen: https://www.amazon.com/Bluefishing-Art-Making-Things-Happen/dp/1501152521  Sims SpeakEasy: https://www.stevedsims.com/simsspeakeasy/  The Art of Making Things Happen Podcast: https://www.stevedsims.com/podcast/   Connect with Steve: Website: https://www.stevedsims.com/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stevedsims/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/stevedsims/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stevedsims  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevedsims/  Connect with Jake to see how he can speak, consult, or collaborate with your team. Website: https://www.jakehavron.com Podcast: https://www.jakehavron.com/podcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jakehavron YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxG3bKqLK_M_HZpOgiVrtng 

7-Figure Millennials
#104: The Art Of Achieving RIDICULOUS Goals w/ “The Real Life Wizard of Oz” Steve Sims

7-Figure Millennials

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 55:51


What would you achieve if you weren't afraid of being laughed at? In the age of “gotcha” culture, people are terrified to do anything that might be laughed at. Steve Sims is the exact opposite. This is the THIRD time that Steve has come on the show… Not only are his episodes some of the favorites I've ever recorded, but listeners like you agree! In this episode, we dive deep into Steve's new book: “Go For Stupid: The Art of Achieving Ridiculous Goals.” Steve teaches you how to ignore what everyone else thinks and go for big, stupid, ridiculous goals. From organizing a private dinner in front of Michelangelo's David, to securing a tour of SpaceX led by Elon Musk himself, his accomplishments always start with the same questions: How far can I take this? What would make this a stupid achievement? In this episode, you'll learn to “go for stupid” so that you'll open the door to the life you've always dreamed about. Check out Steve's new book, Go For Stupid, on Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/Go-Stupid-Achieving-Ridiculous-Goals/dp/1544535600

The Art of Making Things Happen (Bluefishing)  Steve Sims

What would you achieve if you weren't afraid of being laughed at? In the age of “gotcha” culture, people are terrified to do anything that might be laughed at. Steve Sims is the exact opposite. In Go For Stupid: The Art of Achieving Ridiculous Goals, Steve teaches you how to ignore what everyone else thinks and go for big, stupid, ridiculous goals. From organizing a private dinner in front of Michelangelo's David, to securing a tour of SpaceX led by Elon Musk himself, his accomplishments always start with the same questions: How far can I take this? What would make this a stupid achievement? Steve examines famously stupid goals in history, the key habits of successful people, and lessons from his own career to help you let go of your fear and get out of your own way.  If you do something amazing, you will be ridiculed until you are revered. Stop overthinking and go for ridiculous, stupid goals. Once you “go for stupid,” you open the door to the life you always dreamed about.  Grab your copy today for $0.99 cents for this week only! 

Historias de Arte en Podcast
MIGUEL ANGEL: EL JUICIO FINAL

Historias de Arte en Podcast

Play Episode Play 27 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 25:21 Transcription Available


Historias de Arte en Podcast está de regreso con una nueva temporada y que mejor que traerles hoy este excepcional episodio. El Juicio Final de Miguel Angel es el fresco pintado en el altar de la Capilla Sixtina, un impactante mural que representa magistralmente la escena Biblica del Juicio Universal. Les contamos acerca de toda la obra, y describimos algunas partes muy detalladamente por lo que recomendamos ir mirando las correspondientes imágenes publicadas en nuestro sitio web http://historiasdearte.com y en nuestras redes sociales. Una vez más bienvenidos, esperamos que este episodio los impresione y emocione tanto como a nosotras. BIBLIOGRAFÍAhttps://artstor.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/michelangelos-last-judgment-uncensored/https://lacapillasixtina.es/el-infierno/https://elpais.com/diario/1987/08/30/opinion/557272809_850215.htmlhttps://elpais.com/diario/1989/09/18/opinion/622072805_850215.htmlhttps://www.latribunadetoledo.es/noticia/zcdd702c5-0483-b5ce-a4a4e2ff5fb70949/201403/la-polemica-con-miguel-angelhttps://smarthistory.org/michelangelo-last-judgment/https://smarthistory.org/the-protestant-reformation/https://www.museivaticani.va/content/museivaticani/en/collezioni/musei/cappella-sistina/giudizio-universale.htmlhttps://web.archive.org/web/20070516000937/http://www.artehistoria.jcyl.es/genios/cuadros/94.htmSi te ha gustado este episodio, déjanos una estrella y un comentarios en apple podcast, si nos oyes en spotify marca la campanita y lo mas importante, recomiéndanos a un amigo.Las imágenes relacionadas con este y todos nuestros episodios las pueden encontrar en nuestra página web https://historiasdearte.com y en nuestras redes sociales:Instagram @historiasdearte.enpodcastFacebook Historias de Arte en Podcast Twitter @HistoriasdeArt1

Your Kickstarter Sucks
Episode 273: The Putt Putt Sniper

Your Kickstarter Sucks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 106:46


Wow I just watched a good ass football game and now while I'm feeling all hyped up, I'm going to write up the episode description for my minor hit comedy podcast, Your Kickstarter Sucks! I bet this is what Michelangelo felt like, when he was really in a groove doing a painting or whatever. And maybe the place where he went to college won a big game. University of Italy defeats France State! And Michelangelo is flying over the stadium in one of his weird flying contraptions, smoking a big cigar. Wow, history sure was amazing! Anyway on today's show we're talking about toe condoms, the Ed Gein Card Game, and Producer Dan's favorite state: Florida! Plus some really weird Kickstarters you are definitely going to want to listen to us talk about while you're in the shower. So grab a ziploc and go to town on yourself with a rag…it's YKS! Music for YKS is courtesy of Howell Dawdy, Craig Dickman, Mr. Baloney, and Mark Brendle. Additional research by Zeke Golvin. YKS is edited by Producer Dan. Executive Producer lola butt.Look I'm not just saying this cause you look really smart/cool/good with money/trickable (pick 2), but really, YKS Premium is one of the best deals in the business right now. Just $5 a month gets you 5 bonus episodes and access to hundreds, if not billions, of shows in our expansive back catalog. Toss in $3 more and you get video of every YKS Premium! That's right, YKS on your TV! And all this…ad free, delivered to you via the scrappy and lovable Patreon app, and with a convenient resubscribe every month option helpfully pre-selected. It just doesn't get any better than that! Oh wait yes it does, cause it's…MIKETOBER!!! This episode of YKS is sponsored by these fine brands:Factor – It occurs to me to me that I think of Factor as the healthy, easy, and delicious meals I get to eat for lunch sometimes, but that's not really true. For one thing, lunch and dinner are basically interchangeable, right? Plus they got a bunch of other stuff on there, too. Shakes and juices and cookie and wellness shots and sausages and stuff? Oh well, to me, they are “Mr Yummy Lunch”! Get $60 off your first box at go.factor75.com/yks60NordVPN – EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal ➼ https://nordvpn.com/yks Try it risk-free now with a 30-day money-back guarantee! Yoooooooooo!Honey – I just used Honey a few minutes ago to save a nice chunky change on a cake I was ordering! I'm serious! I really hope I remember this anecdote when it comes time to do the next ad read! Download it for yourself at JoinHoney.com/YKS and save some of your own cake money! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

TMNT Der Talk
Episode 375 - Ein neues Mädchen ist in der Stadt

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 51:17


Episode 375 von TMNT - Der Talk. Das Hauptthema diesmal ist die 2003-Cartoon-Folge "Zwischen den Fronten - Teil 2". Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

Screen Slate Podcast
17 - Nosferasta with Oba, Adam Khalil, and Bayley Sweitzer

Screen Slate Podcast

Play Episode Play 57 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 103:08


Artists Adam Khalil, Bayley Sweitzer, and Oba, the brain trust behind Empty Metal, visit Screen Slate HQ to speak with Cosmo Bjorkenheim about their latest project, Nosferasta: First Bite. Currently showing at Someday Gallery through October 22 (on the heels of blockbuster screenings at MoMA and Triple Canopy), Nosferasta: First Bite is a radical anti-colonial reimagining of the vampire film with Oba in the title role.On the pod we talk about Christopher Columbus as vampire-pirate, vampirism as time travel, developments regarding Marvel's Blade and Robert Eggers's Nosferatu remake, and why artist Michelangelo belongs in the Nosferasta cinematic universe. Halfway through the pod Oba—who happens to be Screen Slate HQ's neighbor—gets a call that “The Godfather 4” is shooting outside and he has to move his car to avoid being towed. At that point Jon Dieringer hops on mic to co-host and speaks with Khalil & Sweitzer about their collaborative history, how the hierarchy of film sets can be reimagined, Khalil's work with New Red Order, and more.Support the showThe Screen Slate Podcast is supported by its Patreon members. Sign up and get access to bonus episodes, our lockdown-era streaming series archives, discounts from partners like Criterion and Posteritati, event invitations, and more.

Pete's Percussion Podcast - Pete Zambito
Pete's Percussion Podcast: Episode 314 - Matt McClung (Part 2)

Pete's Percussion Podcast - Pete Zambito

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022


St. Olaf College (MN) Percussion Professor Matt McClung returns to talk about transitioning into full-time percussion before and during his master's at Cincinnati Conservatory of Music (02:45), going to Rice University (TX) for the doctorate (17:40), working for 3 years in the Honolulu Symphony (HI) (35:00), his job at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi and leaving it to move to Minneapolis/St. Paul (49:00), and finishes with the Random Ass Questions, including segments on student impressions, “bad” Tom Hanks movies, great authors, and Michelangelo's “David” (58:20).Finishing with a Rave on musical acts from the 2022 Roots N Blues Music Festival (01:28:30).Links:Part 1 with Matt McClungMatt McClung's St. Olaf page“Music for Pieces of Wood” - Steve Reich“George Washington Bridge” - William SchumanTI-35 Calculator“Five Scenes from the Snow Country” - Hans Werner Henze“Mirage” - Yasuo Sueyoshi“Time for Marimba” - Minoru MikiPercussion Group CincinnatiRichard BrownAnn-MargretDoug PerkinsMusser M31 4.0 Octave Windsor II Kelon MarimbaRobert Van SiceEduardo LeandroTodd Meehan's 2017 appearance on the podcastEurhythmics at Cleveland Institute of MusicPresser Foundation ScholarshipValerie NaranjoDane RichesonMaureen NelsonGlimmerlass FestivalAlexis C. Lamb on the podcast in 2021Joe vs. The Volcano trailerTurner and Hooch trailerLove Actually trailerJohn IrvingTom RobbinsDavid Foster WallaceJoseph HellerRichard PowersSo PercussionGraeter's Ice CreamAmbar India RestaurantGoode Company BBQKentucky Symphony OrchestraUffizi Gallery - Florence (Italy)Raves:Roots N Blues Festival

TMNT Der Talk
ENGLISH Episode 131 - Playing some games with Shredder and Friends

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 34:17


Episode 131 of "TMNT - The Talk" in English. I am talking about "TMNT: Saturday Morning Adventures#1" by IDW Comics. Check out my blog at http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com or send me an e-mail at tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

St. Anthony's Tongue
St. Anthony of the Desert, Victor of Demons

St. Anthony's Tongue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 46:49


St. Anthony of the Desert is one of the most interesting saints of all. He is what is known as a "desert father" - and his legend largely involves his time spent meditating on God, as well as his courageous battles against the demonic. His stories have inspired some of the most famous artists of all time, such as Michelangelo and Dali, as well as inspired those who also may want to move into the desert to pray - or those battling demons of their own. This saint is personally interesting to me, as he's a saint that often hated being asked for things while alive - and in some cultures, he is also seen as a saint to not mess with as a spirit either, but when he does come through for you, he comes through in a very powerful way. This episode begins with my take on a famous story of St. Anthony, and ends discussing his lore, legend and more. For more bonus content as well as show notes and more join the Patreon here: http://www.patreon.com/anthonystongue

Legends of Surgery
Episode 108 - The Michelangelo of Medicine: Frank Netter and the Atlas of Human Anatomy

Legends of Surgery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 14:21 Very Popular


In this episode, we will explore the famous 20th century medical illustrator Frank Netter and his magnum opus, the Atlas of Human Anatomy. While this work is his most famous, many people do not realize that Frank Netter was also a doctor, and (briefly) practiced as a surgeon, before spending the majority of his career as a commercial artist. Have a listen to find out more!

A Fine Time for Healing
The Philosophy of Non-Duality in Healing the Mind and Body with Dr. Anoop Kumar

A Fine Time for Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 64:00


Today's special guest, Anoop Kumar, MD, encourages audiences to rethink the relationship between mind and body in a way that informs solutions to real-world challenges including healing diseases and upgrading the quality of our education. He communicates his vision through the lens of the Three Minds–a framework inspired by the philosophy of Advaita Vedanta. The application of this framework in healthcare is Health Revolution, a movement demonstrating that healing is possible when we see ourselves fully. He has written books, written articles, given keynote talks, consulted with organizations, and collaborated with luminaries like Deepak Chopra. Dr. Kumar has been exploring and experimenting with mind-body perspectives since he was a child. To quote Anoop, "As a child, I was surrounded by the teachings of Advaita Vedanta (the philosophy of non-duality). I began to see that life could be lived from two perspectives—as a character in a story, and as something beyond all stories. My journey and work has been to clarify and integrate these perspectives. Looking at the world anew can reveal unseen aspects of who we are. The result? We experience ourselves and our world more clearly, fully, and intimately." Anoop Kumar, MD, MM is board certified in Emergency Medicine and holds a Master's degree in Management with a focus in Health Leadership from McGill University. He practices in the Washington, DC metro area, where he also leads meditation gatherings for clinicians. He is the author of the book Michelangelo's Medicine: How Redefining the Human Body Will Transform Health and Healthcare. Anoop enjoys exploring and communicating about the intersection of self-awareness, science, and wellbeing. Visit him at anoopkumar.com and follow along @DrAnoopKuma

On the Brink with Andi Simon
332: Byron Reese—How Humans Learned to See the Future, and You Can Too!

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 33:24


Hear how telling each other stories helped us evolve My audience knows how much I like to learn about early human evolution and how we continue to adapt to changing times. Thanks to my former PR guru, Sarah Wilson, I was introduced to Byron Reese, who is a futurist, an author and an entrepreneur. He tends to see things through that fresh lens I always talk about. Byron's new book (his fourth) is called, Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think: How Humans Learned to See the Future—and Shape It. This is a fascinating book that provides a new look at the history and destiny of humanity. Storytelling allows us to envision the future. Dice teach us about probability, which enables us to try to predict the future. And rocks that think—a reference to a computer's CPU—enable us to build the future. Listen in! Watch and listen to our conversation here From our very beginnings, we've been a very different type of being. I wasn't quite sure what Byron's book is about until I opened the first pages and began to wander with him through the still unanswered questions about how humans became these amazing creatures with story-making minds, the ability to think and then converse about their ideas, and the wherewithall to develop cultures that we can share, change and believe to be our best realities. As humans, the one thing we must do is see the future. All other animals live in the moment. Perhaps some have evolved genetic capabilities that enable them to survive in different environments—like the 40,000 ant species that populate the world. But humans are one species, and we know we have a past and a future. That future is important. We know we are not immortal. Do other animals plan for the afterlife? Develop religions? Think big philosophical thoughts? From our thinking came our language, and conversations that are essential to our being and our survival. I invite you to listen in or read the transcript of our conversation because it's fascinatin. Just remember, you have a unique place on this earth. Treat it, and yourself, kindly. If you'd like to connect with Byron, you can find him on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and his website, and you can email him at byronreese@gmail.com. For more about storytelling and how the future shapes us, start here Blog: What Is Futurism And Do You Need It? Blog: How Storytelling Can Transform Your Culture And Energize Your Team Podcast: Now Is No Time To Be Afraid Of This Blurry Future Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. As you know, I'm your host and your guide, and my job is to get you off the brink. I want you to soar. But the only way you can do that is if you can see, feel and think in new ways so that you can change what you've  been doing. The times are changing, and we're futurists. We need to see what's coming and begin to make stories up about them. That's what Simon Associates does. And that's about all the advertising I'm going to tell you about. Our job is to help you change. People hate to change. Today, I found a marvelous, marvelous person who came to me through my PR firm of the past: Sarah Wilson. Byron Reese is amazing. Let me tell you about him and then he'll tell you about your new self. And I love his face. Byron is an Austin-based entrepreneur with a quarter century of experience building and running technology companies. It's gonna be interesting listening to how he's applied it in his new book today. The new book is called Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think, and don't kid yourself: we're going to be talking a lot about how humans learn to see the future and shaping our conversation for today. He's a recognized authority on AI, and holds a number of technology patents. He's also a futurist. Now, this podcast has been ranked among the top 20 futurists podcasts. I didn't know I was a futurist. But I like to help you see that future. And if you can't see it, you can't live today.  Byron gives talks around the globe about how technology is changing work, education and culture, like everything. And it's fun to think about it. He's an author of four books. But today, I think we're going to talk about this new one because it adds some dimension to all the others that he's put together. Byron, thank you for joining me today. Byron Reese: Thank you for having me. Andi Simon: It's so much fun to share with the listener, or the viewer. Who is Byron Reese? Give us your journey so we can talk about how you got here because everything had a little of the past, a little of the future, and a lot of hard work to come. Tell us about your book, Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think. How did Byron come up with it? Byron Reese: Well, I've always been in technology, because I've always been really interested in it. I'm not a gadget person, but I'm really interested in the idea of technology. And it's this thing we kind of discovered as a species that allows us to amplify what we're able to do without it. There was a time that we think we hit a genetic bottleneck a long time ago, and there were just 1,000 or 2,000 humans left and nobody would have bet on us then. And here we are. It's because we learned that trick about technology. And so I've always just been really intrigued by the idea of technology. And so I've done that as a business. And then I started writing. Every morning before I got to work, I would just start writing and those became the books that I wrote. And they're just kind of my own journey of what I think about and I find interesting. Andi Simon: Well, you don't sort of just stumble into being an AI or a patent expert in technology. Was this important as you were growing up, did you have particular role models or aha moments, or things that just started making you curious? Byron Reese: I grew up on a farm in East Texas, outside of a town with only 500 people. So it was not an area steeped in technology. But my father had a corporate job for 30-something years, and his father worked in the railroad and his father operated a ferry. And when I looked back, it always seemed like they kind of did the thing that epitomized their times. It was the Western migration, and then the railroad, and then just the corporate thing that came up and unemployment and all of that, and I knew growing up that you could just tell it was technology. And so I went to college and met my wife or the woman who would become my wife, and we moved to the Bay Area, to be a part of that energy that was in the 90s. And we did that for a while. And then when we decided to start a family, we moved back to Texas, to Austin, and we raised and homeschooled our children. And that's me. Andi Simon: That's a very interesting story, your reflection on how each of your parents, grandparents, and so forth, was reflecting the times in which they were living. You in some ways are reflecting the times that we're living in now, which I would not have thought about, but if the listener or viewer is listening and watching: think about it. Where are you now because of where we are now as a society? This book, though, has a particular purpose. And I think it would be good to talk about, it's not a textbook, it is a history of humankind in a very important way, which should give the listener and the viewer some time to think about the times that we are in. Because somehow, 50,000 years ago, we had a quantum leap in our brain. And we are just like any other animal. Remember, we are one species, there are 40,000 different ant species. That's how they have mutated and populated the world. We're just one. And we probably can be intimate with anyone across the globe, which is sort of an interesting phenomenon. But we also can see the future and anticipate our mortality, and look back on the past and worry about our memory. Was it right? Was it wrong? And was it different than what actually happened? So we are an interesting human. Let's talk about Byron. How did this book begin to develop? And let us talk about the three phases that so fascinated you. Byron Reese: They're very interested in the question of why. Why we're different from animals, because you'll always hear: we're just another animal. But when you look around the world, it doesn't look that way. It really looks like we're aliens. And everything else is kind of native. But we're very different in our cities and literature and all that. And we really got curious why that happened. And the short answer is, we believe in two things that don't exist. We believe in the future and the past. And animals don't. That's a contentious statement, but I try to justify it in the book. And what we do is, we have what's known as episodic memory, where we remember specific things that happened to us, which animals don't. They don't make predictions into the future, maybe just a minute into the future. Maybe I'm thinking, Okay, I want to climb that tree and get an apple. What's the best way to do it? Those sorts of things. And those were, I think, the first stories we told ourselves. They were in fiction, they were like us. We think that way. We kind of picture these different things, very different from other creatures. The coolest thing I learned writing this book is probably that it was a creature that lived before it's called Homo Erectus. And Erectus lived on this planet 1.6 million years, 80,000 generations, and simply had one tool: the hand axe. It looks like a big arrowhead. And that's it. And no matter when you find these, on which of three continents you find them, they're all alike. And that's really mysterious because you would think if in 80,000 generations, everybody was just copying their parents, then eventually they would, like the telephone game, they would just change and in different regions, but they didn't. They're all identical. And what does that mean? It means Erectus didn't know they were making those tools, the way a bird doesn't know they're building a nest, they just do it. But it isn't something that they know how to do. It's not a cultural object, or technological object, it's a genetic object. You see a beaver, if you put a recording of music, of running water in the middle of the field, and a beaver walks by the dam over it, they don't really know what they're doing, but they know how to build that one dam. So, you think about that: 80,000 generations where nothing happened. And then you think about us. We only took three generations to get from Kitty Hawk to the moon. And you realize we are a very different thing. And I kind of think it's this for millions of years, billions of years: the only place we had to write down what we learned was in our DNA. It took millions of years to write one new thing. And then one day, we got what you talked about: language, 40,000-50,000 years ago, and all of a sudden we can think and that's really the power of language. It organizes your thoughts. It's not mere speculation. There's a wonderful quote in the book from Helen Keller, who talked about what her life was like before her teacher came and how she didn't know she was a person. She didn't know she was a discrete thing in the universe. So we got language. Andi Simon: Listen for a second, because I think that for my audience, I know that this is a curious question. We were able to sync and not necessarily communicate our thoughts. And I think that when you are walking in the woods, and there's nobody to talk to, but you're thinking, and you're doing just what our ancestors were doing, then the question always is, and I was fascinated by your effort to try and explain how did that happen, where all of a sudden we went from our thoughts to be able to share our thoughts. And how would they know what those words meant? And was there a quantum leap in the DNA of everyone at the time to be able to understand language? We have, you know, different languages, but they're all very similar in structure. Is it part of our acquired DNA? I mean, this is not simple stuff, because it's really quite interesting about how we took the thinking and turned it into a conversation that you and I can understand each other's meaning. Byron Reese: Yes, absolutely. And of course, we have to speculate a little. And so there's four or five different ideas on how that could have happened. I tend to believe that there was a mutation that happened in one person one time, you know, on some Tuesday morning at 8:30, or something like that happened, that his or her progeny may have inherited. And that's the capacity to think. In language, you see, we don't really have any organs for language. We have to repurpose organs we use for other stuff to be able to do this. And if in fact, language did begin in just one person, in one of these little lonely bands of 100-150 people, then after a few generations, when it had spread among them, they would be superheroes, and they would have superpowers, and they would very quickly displace everything else that didn't have capacity for language. And that's why it looks like it appeared everywhere, all at once. But I think that's what must have happened because human universals. There are a couple of hundreds of these things that all human cultures have. Andi Simon: Yes. Now, the interesting part is, I got fascinated by the cave art, that all of a sudden, we went from no cave. Africa has practically nothing that looks like the European or the Asian cave art that came at a period of time. And it's not stick figures. And even in the Americas, there's amazing art that all of a sudden emerges at once. And we say, How did that happen? You know, your point is that an alien is not so crazy. Talk to us about art, about music, about the flute, the things that emerge and seem to say something about who those people were, who created it, and how they shared something that was difficult to share across continents of that time. And all sudden it all at once. Even getting to Australia. I mean, there's something there worth sharing, more than just reading the book, because I love those stories. That's what makes me go, Oh, how did that happen? What happened? And how did it happen? Byron Reese: You're right, there were no precursors of anything like representative art. And if you look at some of these caves, they are beautiful. I mean, it's just beautiful. I would frame that and hang it on my wall. But the thing to keep in mind is, it wasn't just that they could do that beautifully. It was high tech, like literally, because they were using fat to make the pigments and here they weren't using the power to extend them. For black, they could have used charcoal. They had charcoal in the fire 20 feet away. But it wasn't black enough evidently. And so they figured out a new way to make black pigment using a mineral they had to heat 1200 degrees, which was hard to do and the closest source was 240 miles away. So they had to be mindful enough to go. They had to build scaffolding too and then to your point, digging in those caves in Chile is amazing because it's like King Tut's tomb. It was sealed off and we found it and the footprints, like a boy and his dog or sand, like in the kitchen. But when you excavate those times, you're right, we find musical instruments. The oldest ones we have at the exact same time, and we find the representative art at the exact same time. So whatever gave us language, I think really did a lot more than that. I mean, it made us, and your remark about aliens, I think might be a reference to something in the book where every time I mentioned this to people, they would obviously have bet it's aliens. And it isn't that people think it's aliens, but it is so dramatic and invites something like that. Andi Simon: That makes you ask how, and the problem is, we want answers. And the problem is, we don't have any. And then there were the Neanderthals and Denisovans, and others who looked similar but didn't survive the same way. We still have our DNA, they have their DNA. And so, you know, they were there. But it's a really interesting set of questions. So your point about our ancestors having a DNA that allowed them to produce the same tool everywhere they were, and then humans began to create variety and tremendous ingenuity across the globe. However, we expanded, and then came the Middle Ages and something transformative developed. And I think I'd like to move on a little bit. I mean, that's a lot of time to go from the starting point to major transformation. But I don't care if it's Michelangelo or anybody else in 1716 or 1617: something happened that changed us. Probability theory? What happened? Byron Reese: What happened is, we got this capacity for language, which we then use to imagine these stories that were very mundane. They were just moments ahead. And later, we started articulating them. But once we could imagine the future, we weren't content with that. We're not a particularly contented species. And we weren't competing with that. And we didn't want to just leave the picture, we wanted to know what was going to happen. We wanted to predict it. And that seems like a tall order. But that's what happened. And we, in 1654, these two men, de Fermat and Pascal are writing these letters, they're trying to solve this math problem that is trivially simple. I won't even bore you with it, other than to say, a 10-year-old could solve it. And this is a math problem. The great minds of Europe had worked on it for 100 years. And they needed a new way to think about the future. And that's what they did. And they did it: probability theory. And then, man, it just all happened, you had the first probability textbook within eight years. And the whole modern world, artificial intelligence is just probability theory. High speed, like, it's all, that's what it is, we invented that. And the reason it took so long is because we had to figure out why the future happened the way it did. I mean, a futurist is really that people try to understand why the future unfolded this way, not that way, if I may have a visual aid. There were all different theories on why things happened the way they did. They were destined to happen, and they were fated to happen. Or they can only happen that way. Andi Simon: Or we don't have a clue. Byron Reese: What they never guessed was this: So this is probably something you may have seen at a science museum before. This is a paper full of BBs, I'm about to flip it. And when I do that, the BBs are gonna fold down and they're gonna hit these things. And they can bounce to the left, to the right, and then they'll hit another one. They can bounce to the left or the right, left to the right. And what happens is, every time you do it, you get a normal curve. You can do this all day long. And this is the thing nobody ever imagined was in randomness. Even to this day, if you were to ask me, If you flipped the coin 1000 times, how many times will heads come up? I know how to answer that: 500. But I mean, I've never done it. And I didn't know how to answer it. I would have said, who knows, maybe 100. And then the next time 908, 105, 100. But the chances that it's ever under 400, or more than 600, or one in many billions. It's never happened, it never will happen. And so you think about the most random thing: imagine a coin toss that you can say something that confident about it. And that's the basis of probability theory: you can assign probabilities to things in the future.  Andi Simon: I love reading Martin Seligman, his work on humble perspectives. And as I often work with my clients, I tell them that if you want to live today, you have to have some visualization of what tomorrow is gonna bring. Because if not, we will have a very difficult time. You can do the habits of yesterday. We're very happy with them, and comfortable with our habits. But tomorrow isn't going to be like yesterday and may move slowly or quickly. I mean, the pandemic was so catalytic because it showed everybody how in a moment, everything can change, and without any control or decision-making or probability...although I suspect some people have had a probability theory that that was going to happen. But it is an interesting phenomenon for humans because we need to know what's coming in order for us to prepare for it by living now. The past has given us experiential, but we only remember parts of that, not every memory. And if you talk to people about what happened on X day, when we were all together, they each have a different story. And the creativity is that they fit the story into their own stories. And so the story reflects them. They're all the heroes in it, but not really necessarily what the truth is. My favorite quote is, "The only truth is there is no truth." And so then we begin to think about what came out of then, a great creativity there, and then came along your computers and the modern age, more or less, whatever is going on now. And what's coming into the future. Mr. Futurist? What do you see coming? And how are you getting folks to prepare for the uncertainties that are coming next? What do you see happening? Byron Reese: When we got our cognitive eye opening, remember earlier I talked about the only place we had to write things was in our DNA? Well, suddenly, we had a new place. We could write stuff. We could write it in our DNA, but we could also write it just in our head. And that became our DNA. Instead of taking 100,000 years to learn not to eat the purple berries, I could just say, Hey, man, don't eat those purple berries, they'll make you sick. And that's it. That's it, that was a mutation about to spread. Everybody can say, Those purple berries are bad. Well, there's an old essay called iPad that was written seven years ago, where a guy points out, Nobody knows how to make a pencil. There's not a person alive who knows every step of making every part of the pencil, and yet pencils get made, even though nobody knows how to make it. So what has happened in the computer age is, we now know that with writing and computers, the human story is that people will learn stuff, and then they die. And then it's forgotten. Then somebody else comes along, learns something, and then they die, and it's forgotten. Or maybe they told somebody but then they messed it up. And our whole species just kind of resets every generation, a few things filter down but for most things are forgotten. And I think that's what's really going to change is that, I'm gonna have a toothbrush that will tell me if I've got the flu virus in my mouth. And I mean, I want that toothbrush, and it will collect data. And I will have the spoon that will tell me the nutrition of every bite I have. That's collecting data, right? And so it can tell me, Oh, you're not getting enough, whatever. And one after the other. And I think that's kind of what we're building. When we just had probability theory, we basically had paper and pencils, and cycles. That was it. And so between 1654, when we invented probability, to 1954, the world we built, we built with paper. And now, we said, We want to do this, like, on a massive scale, even beyond our own ability. So I think that's what we do. We're collecting evermore data. And we're going to use that data to record the life experiences of everybody, and use those to make everybody else's life better. So that in the future, everyone will be wiser than anyone who's ever lived because everyone will have at least access to this knowledge base. In the book, I guess, all these examples of things that we couldn't have seen in the day, like iodine and salt, because so people wouldn't get goiter. But they didn't know this whole country had an iodine deficiency. And when they measured the average IQ, it went up four points and in some parts of the country, went up 15 points from that one thing in the south, which had a corn based diet, there was niacin deficiency, and we started fortifying corn flakes with niacin. And then that went away. And then we used to put stuff in things like lead. Lead paint and lead constantly and we didn't know, there just wasn't any data. There was no such thing as data before for 16 people. It didn't exist. Why would it? What would you have ever done with data for 16 people? And now, if we had handled the data, you would have been able to see all that stuff in that data. And that is a speculation. I mean, there's an antidepressant called Wellbutrin that after some number of years of being used, some people said, you know, my cravings for cigarettes went down. They studied and they found out, Wow, that's a smoking cessation drug. Very good. They repackaged it down, and, and so forth. So there's everything in the data. But we don't yet have the tools. We have the computers to do it now, like we have processor power. But we don't really have the tools to cope with the kinds of datasets that are being automatically built to try to build this knowledge base. Andi Simon: For a number of years, I taught a course for the Society for Healthcare Strategy and Market Development, and it was called Your Data's Talking to You, Can You Hear It?, because healthcare strategists had an abundance of data points. I'm an anthropologist. Anthropologists are taught early that out of context, data do not exist. And consequently, that abundance of stuff needed to be turned into a story. And I work with them on, Which story are you going to tell to the leadership of your organization, to the middle management, to the physicians? How are you going to craft those data points so one size doesn't fit anyone, because the first thing that doctors start to do is delete your data. The data is wrong. It's the way you crafted a story, using the data to help you see, feel and think about that in a different fashion. And Byron is right, because you know, the computers can't think, maybe they're getting there, but they can't. They can accumulate all of this data, but they can't really interpret it, or craft a story for you. So our uniqueness takes us back to the beginning of our conversation. Think. And if we can think with better insights to what's happening, what could we think about that could be transformative about our society? You know, he writes about education and culture, and it works well, like everything. And how do we think about coming out of pandemic time in a way that gives us an amazing opportunity. I always tell people, Don't waste a crisis. Humans hate to change. The amygdala loves to hijack new ideas. The cortisol comes flying out the minute there's something new. So as you're listening to us, I bet you're saying, Oh, no, and I'm saying, Yes. And begin to think through what's possible. You know, Byron, we've had such a good time, but I think it's time we wrap up a couple of things you don't want our listeners to forget. Byron Reese: The book has one of the purposes of stories, which I accumulated over a couple of years, just reading storybooks. When I was working on this book, I would write it in the mornings, but in the evenings, I read storybooks. And I would just try to figure out what purpose is the story serving, and I think I came up with 20. But if you read the epilogue, one page long, there is a secret 21st purpose that is the biggest one of all when it's the stories that give life meaning. And there's these two different narratives of our lives. One is that, you know, we're just kind of like big bags of chemicals and electrical impulses that careened through space and bumped into other big bags. And then we fizzle out and are forgotten. That's a story and it robs everything of any meaning permanently. But there's another one that says that your life is not that. All life has inherent worth. And that your life is not a domino rally of minute after minute after minute after minute, but that all of the moments of your life are kind of connected in a sequence that tells a story. And can I close the book by asking, who is telling that story? Andi Simon: Well, in that you're leading to something real important, I'm gonna put the book up again soo the folks can see. There we go: Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think. And it's how humans learn to see the future and shape it. And I think that, from my perspective, what I would like our listeners to walk away with other than to go by the book, is reading with this open mind and being curious. I think it's our curiosity that has become so essential for us to see things through a fresh lens, and to begin to understand. If I hadn't worked with company after company that get stuck or stalled, I'd say to you, Piece of cake, the times have changed, we just adapt. But humans are so convinced that what they do today is the way we should do it, that they forget that we would have never done it that way over all of these centuries. You know, maybe Homo Erectus did the same things with this Chilean tool exactly the same way because it was DNA driven. But for us, we're creators, and we're story makers. And as we listen to each other's stories that capture the insights that come, and begin to see your own life with different purpose and different opportunity, the one thing that we often say in here is that we are mortal. We know that. And that changes the dynamics. Does my dog know to live everyday in the moment? People say, Live in the moment. It's hard to do that because we can see what's coming, even if we're not sure. So where should they buy your book, Byron? Byron Reese: All of the usual places. Andi Simon: And if you buy it on Amazon and like to write reviews, it is a great place to put in a little. It's a great book. And I think you're going to enjoy reading it and reflecting on our own next step. Because if you spent the past year thinking about the future, and the future is here for us to create. And I do think that it's a time of great creativity, and don't waste a crisis because it's a time for you to think in new ways. Thank you. Do you also speak and consult? Are there other things that you can offer our listeners? Byron Reese: Yes, I do. I speak when I'm invited. And that's most of what I do. I'm writing another book, which is due in 33 days, because I've got a big countdown clock on my mantle. Andi Simon: I'm laughing because I could look to November 1. I thank you for taking time out to do this. And we'll do a podcast to discuss your next book and mine. But for now, thank you all for coming today. It's been absolutely a pleasure. Byron Reese wrote this great book, but he's coming up with his next one. But he reflects like I love to do on who we are as humans, where we've been and where we're going and how we're going to do better together. Because it's only together that we can go anywhere. Humans love herds. And we love to be together. And it's hard to be alone. And loneliness often comes from living alone. You send me great emails and you send me great people you want me to interview. It's info@Andisimon.com. And you can find my books there and everything else. And we love to help you see, feel and think in new ways so you can change, so come along and send us your thoughts. Have a great day. Thank you again.

We Should Talk About That
Acceptance: An Indictment of the American Dream with Harvard Grad and Author, Emi Nietfeld

We Should Talk About That

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 36:03


As a homeless teenager writing college essays in her rusty Toyota Corolla, Emi Nietfeld was convinced that the Ivy League was the only escape from her dysfunctional childhood. But upward mobility required crafting the perfect resilience narrative. She had to prove that she was an “overcomer,” made stronger by all that she had endured. The truth was more complicated. Emi's mom was a charming hoarder who had her put on antipsychotics but believed in her daughter's brilliance—unlike the Minnesotan foster family who banned her “pornographic” art history flash cards (of Michelangelo's David). Emi's other parent vanished shortly after coming out as trans, a situation few understood in the mid-2000s. Her own past was filled with secrets: mental health struggles, Adderall addiction, and the unbecoming desperation of a teenager fending for herself. And though Emi would go on to graduate from Harvard and become a software engineer at Google, she found that success didn't necessarily mean safety. In this episode, Jess and Jess have a very honest conversation with Emi about what it actually means to overcome- and our obsession with "resilience porn" as a culture. As per usual, the conversation gets a little uncomfortable, as Jess B confronts her own reality: She makes a living sharing about her resilience. The bottom line is that we have to hold space for the complexity in all things- that is something everyone can agree on.Meet Emi:Emi Nietfeld is the author of Acceptance, a memoir from Penguin Press. After graduating from Harvard in 2015, she worked as a software engineer at Google and Facebook.Her essays have appeared in New York Times, Longreads, Vice, and Boulevard, been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, and noted in The Best American Essays 2021. She lives in New York City with her family and is available for select speaking engagements.Support the show

TMNT Der Talk
Episode 374 - Ninjas aus Japan und Gangster aus dem All

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 72:12


Episode 374 von TMNT - Der Talk. Das Hauptthema diesmal ist die 2003-Cartoon-Folge "Zwischen den Fronten - Teil 1". Besucht auch meinen Blog unter http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com oder schreibt mir an tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

Mortgage Marketing Expert
146 Go For Stupid with Steve Sims

Mortgage Marketing Expert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 34:10


In this episode I'm excited to welcome back 4-time guest, and my good friend, Steve Sims. In this episode we talk about defining mistakes so that you can fail forward, understanding what part of failure we are actually scared of, and how to create massive goals and Go For Stupid!  Episode breakdown:  00:00 – Intro   02:45 – Living a full life  04:44 – Defining mistakes  07:08 – Steve starts his podcast  10:37 – Elon Musk's cyber truck  13:00 – An opportunity to unify  15:34 – Entrepreneur soap box moment   17:47 – What we are really frightened of  19:22 – London room full of failures   20:55 – Do you care what people think  22:41– Go for stupid  27:46 – Reactions to lofty goals  32:24 – People's biggest blind spot  Steve Sims is the Founder of The Bluefish, a luxury experiential concierge firm, author of the best-selling book “Bluefishing” and is releasing his latest book “Go for Stupid” which asks the question, what would you achieve if you weren't afraid of being laughed at?  In the age of “gotcha” culture, people are terrified to do anything that might be laughed at. Steve Sims is the exact opposite. In “Go For Stupid: The Art of Achieving Ridiculous Goals” Steve teaches you how to ignore what everyone else thinks and go for big, stupid, ridiculous goals.  From organizing a private dinner in front of Michelangelo's David, to securing a tour of SpaceX led by Elon Musk himself, his accomplishments always start with the same questions: How far can I take this? What would make this a stupid achievement? Steve examines famously stupid goals in history, the key habits of successful people, and lessons from his own career to help you let go of your fear and get out of your own way.   PRE-ORDER HERE: amzn.to/3Tmhrdp   Connect with Steve: stevedsims.com   Text “SIMS” to 33777  If you are enjoying the MME podcast, please take a second and LEAVE US A REVIEW, and don't forget to connect with us on social media!  

Get Ready for Rome
2.10 Reintroducing the Sistine Chapel

Get Ready for Rome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 21:22


We return for a second introduction to the Sistine Chapel and outline some of the main challenges Michelangelo had to overcome in painting the ceiling.

TechFirst with John Koetsier
When AI creates: how generative AI will change the world

TechFirst with John Koetsier

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 19:25


We're seeing so much generative art today: text, images, even video created by AI. I can't get the image out of my mind of “The Creation of Adam” by Michelangelo in which God reaches down to touch Adam and stir him into life. In this TechFirst, we're going to chat about generative AI - What it can do - What it means - How it will change the world - And how it might change us Our guest is Alex Cardinal, CEO of Glimpse.ai. They have 2 AI projects … Article Forge, that generates articles on a topic based on a keyword And WordAI, which will rewrite content uniquely in the same style.

The Return Slot ... OF HORROR!

The Return Slot concludes its off-beat celebration of Halloween with Michelangelo’s ‘Kookie Spookies’ pick from the ‘Mickey’s Off-Beat Halloween Movie Massacre’ section of the video store. What could be more Kookie than a Halloween party hosted by a collective of Brooklyn artists who want to murder the guest of honor in the name of art on All Hallow’s Eve? Join us as we talk about 2007’s MURDER PARTY. Listen anywhere you get podcasts and follow us on Instagram @thereturnslot_ofhorrorpod

TMNT Der Talk
ENGLISH Episode 130 - The Rat King and his demonic Queen

TMNT Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 59:02


Episode 130 of "TMNT - The Talk" in English. I am talking about "TMNT: The Armageddon Game#1" by IDW Comics. Check out my blog at http://tmnttalk.blogspot.com or send me an e-mail at tmnttalk1984@gmail.com.

Travels Through Time
Damian Dibben: Venice and ‘The Colour Storm' (1510)

Travels Through Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 43:58


This week we are off to see some of the Renaissance masters at work with the acclaimed novelist Damian Dibben. * In the early years of the sixteenth century Venice was not only a place of great power it was a site of huge cultural splendour. In particular a new generation of artists were animating the buildings like never before. And unlike many of the other Renaissance painters, the Venetians were not solely obsessed by line and form; they were equally interested in the allure and possibility of colour.  In this episode (with a short detour to the Sistine Chapel) we set our gaze on a place that is still affectionately known as the Queen of the Adriatic. In doing so we look at two of its great artists as they work with their cobalts and ultramarines. One of them, Titian, is well known to us. The other, Giorgione, or ‘Big George', is a more elusive character. Only a small number of Giorgione's paintings survive today, but they convey his strange and brilliant originality. Art historians have spent centuries trying to make sense of his enigmatic depictions, which are suffused with a misty light that seems to have drifted straight off the lagoon. Damian Dibben's novels have been translated into twenty-seven languages and published in over forty countries. His series The History Keepers was an international publishing phenomenon. His new book is The Colour Storm. Show notes Scene One: 1510. Titian, the 22 year old Venetian painter paints his 'Man with a Quilted Sleeve. Scene Two: 1510. Michelangelo paints the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. This was an incredible feat of artistic brilliance and physical endurance, achieved by a someone who was a true genius but personally difficult and far from pleasant. Scene Three: October 1510. The death of Giorgione. One of the greatest painters, a vital link in the history of art who would have produced stunning masterpieces had he not died at 33, probably of plague. Memento: Giorgione's painting of a knight and his squire, or groom, c.1507 People/Social Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Damian Dibben Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours Theme music: ‘Love Token' from the album ‘This Is Us' By Slava and Leonard Grigoryan Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Or on Facebook See where 1510 fits on our Timeline

Educate Your Travel
#34 Two Weeks in Italy - Part 2 (Florence)

Educate Your Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 44:14


Today's episode covers the artistic wonders of Firenze! From the Uffizi Gallery to Michelangelo's David, you're sure to be wow'ed by this incredible place. Listen in for the what to do's and the what NOT to do's when visiting this amazing city.

Lighthouse Faith – FOX News Radio
The Vatican Museum's Secrets Revealed by Art Historian Dr. Liz Lev

Lighthouse Faith – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 35:10 Very Popular


The Sistine Chapel, where Michelangelo's masterpiece of the biblical narrative detailed in color and motion adorns the walls and ceiling, is part of the tour of the Vatican Museum in Rome. Why does the Roman Catholic Church have a museum filled with works of art that include not just Christian art, but also those that are of pagan, pre-Christian and Jewish origin and more? Because the history of art and how artists interpret the world, is the history of humanity and God's relationship with His creation. And since the early 16th century, popes have strived to conserve these unique expressions of human existence. The museum itself has a separate entrance from the Vatican grounds, and thanks to Pope John Paul II who had it remodeled in the 1980's, it's a great deal more user friendly, accommodating some 35,000 visitors a day. Not just anyone can give tours of the museum; Dr. Elizabeth Lev is a professor of Art History and is one of the select few licensed to give tours in the museum. On a recent trip to Rome, I was privileged enough to take a tour with Dr Lev. On this episode of Lighthouse Faith, we talked afterwards about how and why art is very much a central part of Christianity and how connected the works are to the central theme of the Holy See's mission, which is saving souls. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Love Your Work
288. Summary: Old Masters and Young Geniuses, by David W. Galenson

Love Your Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:37


The book, Old Masters and Young Geniuses shows there are two types of creators: experimental, and conceptual. Experimental and conceptual creators differ in their approaches to their work, and follow two distinct career paths. Experimental creators grow to become old masters. Conceptual creators shine as young geniuses. University of Chicago economist, and author of Old Masters and Young Geniuses, David Galenson – who I interviewed on episode 105 – wanted to know how the ages of artists affected the prices of their paintings. He isolated the ages of artists from other factors that affect price, such as canvas size, sale date, and support type (whether it's on canvas, paper, or other). He expected to find a neat effect, such as “paintings from younger/older artists sell for more.” But instead, he found two distinct patterns: Some artists' paintings from their younger years sold for more. Other artists' paintings from their older years sold for more. He then found this same pattern in the historical significance of artists' work: The rate at which paintings were included in art history books or retrospective exhibitions – both indicators of significance – peaked at the same ages as the values of paintings. When he looked closely at how painters who followed these two trajectories differed, he found that the ones who peaked early took a conceptual approach, while those who peaked late took an experimental approach. Cézanne vs. Picasso The perfect examples of contrasting experimental and conceptual painters are Paul Cézanne and Pablo Picasso. Paintings from Cézanne's final year of life, when he was sixty-seven, are his most valuable. Paintings from early in Picasso's career, when he was twenty-six, are his most valuable. A painting done when Picasso was twenty-six is worth four times as much as one done when he was sixty-seven (he lived to be ninety-one, and his biographer and friend called the dearth of his influential work later in life “a sad end”). A painting done when Cézanne was sixty-seven – the year he died – is worth fifteen times as much as one done when he was twenty-six. Cézanne, the experimenter Cézanne took an experimental approach to painting, which explains why it took so long for his career to peak. Picasso took a conceptual approach, which explains why he peaked early. Cézanne left the conceptual debates of Paris cafés to live in the south of France, in his thirties. He spent the next three decades struggling to paint what he truly saw in landscapes. He felt limited by the fact that, as he was looking at a canvas, he could only paint the memory of what he had just seen. He did few preparatory sketches early in his career, but grew to paint straight from nature. He treated his paintings as process work, and seemed to have no use for them when he was finished: He only signed about ten percent of his paintings, and sometimes threw them into bushes or left them in fields. Picasso, the conceptual genius Picasso, instead, executed one concept after another. He had early success with his Blue period and Rose period, then dove into Cubism. He often planned paintings carefully, in advance: He did more than four-hundred studies for his most valuable and influential painting, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. One model described how he simply stared at her for an hour, apparently planning a series of paintings in his head, which he began painting the next day, without her assistance. Cézanne said, “I seek in painting.” Picasso said, “I don't seek; I find.” Cézanne struggled to paint what he saw, and Picasso said, “I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them.” Experimental vs. conceptual artists Here are some qualities that differ between experimental and conceptual artists: Experimental artists work inductively. Through the process of creation, they arrive at their solution. Conceptual artists work deductively. They begin with a solution in mind, then work towards it. Experimental artists have vague goals. They're not quite sure what they're seeking. Conceptual artists have specific goals. They already have an idea in their head they're trying to execute. Experimental artists are full of doubt. Since they don't already have the solution, and aren't sure what they're looking for, they rarely feel they've succeeded. Conceptual artists are confident. They know what they're after, so once they've achieved it, they're done, and can move on to the next thing. Experimental artists repeat themselves. They might paint the same subject over and over, tweaking their approach. Conceptual artists change quickly. They'll move from subject to subject, style to style, concept to concept. Experimental artists do it themselves. They're discovering throughout the process, so they rarely use assistants. Conceptual artists delegate. They just need their concept executed, so someone else can often do the work. Experimental artists discover. Over the years, they build up knowledge in a field, to invent new approaches. Conceptual artists steal. To a greater degree than experimental artists, they take what others have developed and make it their own. Other experimental & conceptual artists Some other experimental artists: Georgia O'Keeffe: She painted pictures of a door of her house in New Mexico more than twenty times. She liked to start off painting a subject realistically, then, through repetition, make it more abstract. Jackson Pollock: He said he needed to drip paint on a canvas from all four sides, what he called a “‘get acquainted' period,” before he knew what he was painting. Leonardo da Vinci: He was constantly jumping from project to project, rarely finishing. He incorporated his slowly-accrued knowledge of anatomy, optics, and geology into his paintings. Some conceptual artists: Georges Seurat: He had his pointillism method down to a science. He planned out his most-famous painting, Sunday Afternoon, through more than fifty studies, and could paint tiny dots on the giant canvas without stepping back to see how it looked. Andy Warhol: Used assistants heavily, saying, “I think somebody should be able to do all my paintings for me,” and “Why do people think artists are special? It's just another job.” Raphael: Who had a huge workshop of as many as fifty assistants, innovated by allowing a printmaker to make and sell copies of his work, and synthesized the hard-won methods of Leonardo and Michelangelo into his well-planned designs. Experimental & conceptual creators in other fields Galenson has found these two distinct experimental and conceptual trajectories in a variety of fields. This runs counter to the findings of Dean Simonton, who believes the complexity of a given field determines when a creator peaks. Galenson argues that the complexity of having an impact in a field changes, as innovations are made or integrated into the state of the art. Sculpture In sculpture, Méret Oppenheim had a conversation in a café with Picasso, and got the idea to line a teacup with fur. It became the quintessential surrealist sculpture, Luncheon in Fur, but it was totally conceptual. She continued to make art into her seventies, and never did another significant work. Constantin Brancusi spent a lifetime as an experimental sculptor. He said, “I don't work from sketches, I take the chisel and hammer and go right ahead.” He did his most famous work, Bird in Space, when he was fifty-two. Novels In novels, Mark Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn experimentally, in at least three separate phases, over the course of nine years. He finally published it when he was fifty. Hemingway's novels were conceptually driven, using his trademark dialog as one of his major devices. He picked up this technique and synthesized it from studying the work of Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Anderson, and Twain himself. When I talked to Galenson on episode 105, he explained the way to spot the difference between an experimental and a conceptual novel is to ask, “are the characters believable?” Conceptual novelists focus on plot, while experimental novelists focus on character. Poetry In poetry, Robert Frost, who spent his career trying to perfect how rhythms and stress patterns affected the meanings of words – so-called “sentence sounds” – wrote “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” when he was forty-eight. Ezra Pound developed his technique of “imagism” when he was twenty-eight, and had thought it through so well he published a set of formal rules. With this conceptual approach, he created the bulk of his influential poems before he was forty, despite living well into his eighties. Movies In film, Orson Welles created Citizen Kane when he was only twenty-six. The carefully-planned conceptual innovations in cinematography and musical score make it widely-regarded as the most influential film ever. Alfred Hitchcock didn't make his most-influential films until the final years of his life, as he was about sixty. He said, “style in directing develops slowly and naturally.” Are you an old master, or young genius? I really enjoyed Old Masters and Young Geniuses. I find this dichotomy of experimental versus conceptual approaches really helpful in understanding why, in general, some creative solutions come quickly, while others take months or years of searching. Do you have a choice in the matter? Galenson is careful to stress that you aren't either an experimental or conceptual creator – it's a spectrum, not a binary designation. But in case you're wondering if you can make yourself a conceptual creator, to become successful more quickly, Galenson says you can't. You might switch from a conceptual to an experimental approach, and find it works better for you, as did Cézanne, or you might try to go from experimental to conceptual and find it doesn't, as did Pissarro. But you can't change the way you think. He told me, “It's like trying to change your brain, and we don't know how to do that.” About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is author of Mind Management, Not Time Management, The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative. Follow David on: Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher YouTube RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »       Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/old-masters-young-geniuses