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Publishing business of the University of Cambridge

  • 649PODCASTS
  • 2,751EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 4, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Cambridge University Press

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Latest podcast episodes about Cambridge University Press

New Books Network
Sushmita Pati, "Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 65:47


We live in cities whose borders have always been subject to expansion. What does such transformation of rural spaces mean for cities and vice-versa? Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi (Cambridge UP, 2022) looks at the spatial transformation of villages brought into Delhi's urban fray in the 1950s. As these villages transform physically; their residents, an agrarian-pastoralist community - the Jats - also transform into dabblers in real estate. A study of two villages - Munirka and Shahpur Jat - both in the heart of bustling urban economies of Delhi, reveal that it is 'rent' that could define this suburbanisation. 'Bhaichara', once a form of land ownership in colonial times, transforms into an affective claim of belonging, and managing urban property in the face of a steady onslaught from the 'city'. Properties of Rent is a study of how a vernacular form of capitalism and its various affects shape up in opposition to both state, finance capital and the city in contemporary urban Delhi. Sushmita Pati is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore. She studied Political Science at Delhi University and Jawaharlal Nehru University. She is interested in studying the intersections of Urban Politics and Political Economy. Her recent book, Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi is now out from Cambridge University Press. Saronik Bosu (@SaronikB on Twitter) is a doctoral candidate in English at New York University. He is writing his dissertation on literary rhetoric and economic thought. He co-hosts the podcast High Theory and is a co-founder of the Postcolonial Anthropocene Research Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in South Asian Studies
Sushmita Pati, "Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 65:47


We live in cities whose borders have always been subject to expansion. What does such transformation of rural spaces mean for cities and vice-versa? Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi (Cambridge UP, 2022) looks at the spatial transformation of villages brought into Delhi's urban fray in the 1950s. As these villages transform physically; their residents, an agrarian-pastoralist community - the Jats - also transform into dabblers in real estate. A study of two villages - Munirka and Shahpur Jat - both in the heart of bustling urban economies of Delhi, reveal that it is 'rent' that could define this suburbanisation. 'Bhaichara', once a form of land ownership in colonial times, transforms into an affective claim of belonging, and managing urban property in the face of a steady onslaught from the 'city'. Properties of Rent is a study of how a vernacular form of capitalism and its various affects shape up in opposition to both state, finance capital and the city in contemporary urban Delhi. Sushmita Pati is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore. She studied Political Science at Delhi University and Jawaharlal Nehru University. She is interested in studying the intersections of Urban Politics and Political Economy. Her recent book, Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi is now out from Cambridge University Press. Saronik Bosu (@SaronikB on Twitter) is a doctoral candidate in English at New York University. He is writing his dissertation on literary rhetoric and economic thought. He co-hosts the podcast High Theory and is a co-founder of the Postcolonial Anthropocene Research Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books in Anthropology
Sushmita Pati, "Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 65:47


We live in cities whose borders have always been subject to expansion. What does such transformation of rural spaces mean for cities and vice-versa? Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi (Cambridge UP, 2022) looks at the spatial transformation of villages brought into Delhi's urban fray in the 1950s. As these villages transform physically; their residents, an agrarian-pastoralist community - the Jats - also transform into dabblers in real estate. A study of two villages - Munirka and Shahpur Jat - both in the heart of bustling urban economies of Delhi, reveal that it is 'rent' that could define this suburbanisation. 'Bhaichara', once a form of land ownership in colonial times, transforms into an affective claim of belonging, and managing urban property in the face of a steady onslaught from the 'city'. Properties of Rent is a study of how a vernacular form of capitalism and its various affects shape up in opposition to both state, finance capital and the city in contemporary urban Delhi. Sushmita Pati is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore. She studied Political Science at Delhi University and Jawaharlal Nehru University. She is interested in studying the intersections of Urban Politics and Political Economy. Her recent book, Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi is now out from Cambridge University Press. Saronik Bosu (@SaronikB on Twitter) is a doctoral candidate in English at New York University. He is writing his dissertation on literary rhetoric and economic thought. He co-hosts the podcast High Theory and is a co-founder of the Postcolonial Anthropocene Research Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in Sociology
Sushmita Pati, "Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 65:47


We live in cities whose borders have always been subject to expansion. What does such transformation of rural spaces mean for cities and vice-versa? Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi (Cambridge UP, 2022) looks at the spatial transformation of villages brought into Delhi's urban fray in the 1950s. As these villages transform physically; their residents, an agrarian-pastoralist community - the Jats - also transform into dabblers in real estate. A study of two villages - Munirka and Shahpur Jat - both in the heart of bustling urban economies of Delhi, reveal that it is 'rent' that could define this suburbanisation. 'Bhaichara', once a form of land ownership in colonial times, transforms into an affective claim of belonging, and managing urban property in the face of a steady onslaught from the 'city'. Properties of Rent is a study of how a vernacular form of capitalism and its various affects shape up in opposition to both state, finance capital and the city in contemporary urban Delhi. Sushmita Pati is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore. She studied Political Science at Delhi University and Jawaharlal Nehru University. She is interested in studying the intersections of Urban Politics and Political Economy. Her recent book, Properties of Rent: Community, Capital and Politics in Globalising Delhi is now out from Cambridge University Press. Saronik Bosu (@SaronikB on Twitter) is a doctoral candidate in English at New York University. He is writing his dissertation on literary rhetoric and economic thought. He co-hosts the podcast High Theory and is a co-founder of the Postcolonial Anthropocene Research Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast
On the Shelf for July 2022 - The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast Episode 233

The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 15:10


On the Shelf for July 2022 The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast - Episode 233 with Heather Rose Jones Your monthly roundup of history, news, and the field of sapphic historical fiction. In this episode we talk about: Podcast of interest: Swords & Sapphics Recent and upcoming publications covered on the blogGarber, Linda. 2022. Novel Approaches to Lesbian History. Palgrave, Cham. ISBN 978-3-030-85416-4 Medd, Jodie (ed). 2015. The Cambridge Companion to Lesbian Literature. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. ISBN 978-1-107-66343-5 Castle, Terry. 1993. The Apparitional Lesbian: Female Homosexuality and Modern Culture. Columbia University Press, New York. ISBN 0-231-07653-3 New and forthcoming fictionPenny's Forest by Tatiana Dee Becoming the Pannell Witch: A Prequel (The Pannell Witch #1) by Melissa Manners The Only Game in Town by Geonn Cannon Jazzed by Jill Dearman Worth a Fortune by Sam Ledel Between Boat and Shore by Rhiannon Grant What I've been consumingAcross the Green Grass Fields by Seanan McGuire The Galaxy and the Ground Within by Becky Chambers Witness for the Dead by Katherine Addison First Kill Netflix tv series A transcript of this podcast is available here. Links to the Lesbian Historic Motif Project Online Website: http://alpennia.com/lhmp Blog: http://alpennia.com/blog RSS: http://alpennia.com/blog/feed/ Twitter: @LesbianMotif Discord: Contact Heather for an invitation to the Alpennia/LHMP Discord server The Lesbian Historic Motif Project Patreon Links to Heather Online Website: http://alpennia.com Email: Heather Rose Jones Twitter: @heatherosejones Facebook: Heather Rose Jones (author page)

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep93: Prof. Roger Pielke Jr. "The Inconvenient Truth about Climate Science"

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 99:23


Roger Pielke, Jr. has been on the faculty of the University of Colorado Boulder since 2001, where he teaches and writes on a diverse range of policy and governance issues related to science, technology, environment, innovation and sports. Roger is a professor in the  Environmental Studies Program. Roger is currently focusing his research on a NSF-sponsored, 16-country evaluation of science advice in the COVID-19 pandemic. Roger holds degrees in mathematics, public policy and political science, all from the University of Colorado. In 2012 Roger was awarded an honorary doctorate from Linköping University in Sweden and was also awarded the Public Service Award of the Geological Society of America. In 2006, Roger received the Eduard Brückner Prize in Munich, Germany in 2006 for outstanding achievement in interdisciplinary climate research. Roger has been a Distinguished Fellow of the Institute of Energy Economics, Japan since 2016. From 2019 he has served as a science and economics adviser to Environmental Progress. Roger was a Fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences from 2001 to 2016. He served as a Senior Fellow of The Breakthrough Institute from 2008 to 2018. In 2007 Roger served as a James Martin Fellow at Oxford University's Said Business School. Before joining the faculty of the University of Colorado, from 1993 to 2001 Roger was a Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. At the University of Colorado, Roger founded and directed both the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research and the Sports Governance Center. He also created and led the university's Graduate Certificate Program in Science and Technology Policy, which has seen its graduates move on to faculty positions, Congressional staff, presidential political appointees and in positions in business and civil society. His books include Hurricanes: Their Nature and Impacts on Society (with R. Pielke Sr., 1997, John Wiley, full text free as PDF), Prediction: Science, Decision Making and the Future of Nature (with D. Sarewitz and R. Byerly, 2001, Island Press), The Honest Broker: Making Sense of Science in Policy and Politics published by Cambridge University Press (2007), The Climate Fix: What Scientists and Politicians Won't Tell you About Global Warming (2010, Basic Books). Presidential Science Advisors: Reflections on Science, Policy and Politics (with R. Klein, 2011, Springer), and The Edge: The War Against Cheating and Corruption in the Cutthroat World of Elite Sports (Roaring Forties Press, 2016). His most recent book is The Rightful Place of Science: Disasters and Climate Change (2nd edition, 2018, Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes).

The Next Page
Why International Organizations Hate Politics with Dr. Lucile Maertens & Dr. Marieke Louis

The Next Page

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 43:08


Marieke Louis and Lucile Maerten's book, Why International Organizations Hate Politics: Depoliticizing the World, draws on the extensive literature on functionalism and the related topic of technocracy, on anti-politics and bureaucractic multilateralism, and the wider, crosssectional research on expertise, knowledge and technicization, to systematically analyse and shine new light on the less explored topic of depoliticization.  Through current and historical case studies they examine behind the facades to reveal the common structures, mechanisms and logics of the depoliticization process at work and point to the unintended consequences and impacts on the very issues that IOs were created to address. Their argument is carefully constructed and very nuanced and they invite us to consider their whole book and to question everyday practices that may, as they say, “backlash”. Marieke Louis is Associate Professor in Political Science and International Relations at Sciences Po Grenoble, PACTE, University Grenoble Alpes. Lucile Maertens is Senior Lecturer in Political Science and International Relations at IEP / CRHIM, University of Lausanne. Resources Transcript:  • Finnemore, M. and Barnett, M.N. (2004) Rules for the world: international organizations  in global politics. Cornell University Press. • Hay, C. (2007) Why we hate politics (Vol. 5). Polity.  • Hay, C. (2014) “Depoliticisation as Process, Governance as Practice: What Did the ‘First Wave' Get Wrong and Do We Need a ‘Second Wave' to Put it Right?,” Policy and Politics 42, no. 2. 293–311. • Human Development Index. UNDP. https://hdr.undp.org/data-center/humandevelopment-index#/indicies/HDI  • Keohane, R. O. (1978) “The Functional Theory of Politics. By David Mitrany. (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1975. Pp. xxv 294),” American Political Science Review. Cambridge University Press, 72(2), pp. 805–806. doi: 10.2307/1954263. • Littoz-Monnet, A. (2017) The politics of expertise in international organizations. London: Routledge. • Mérand, F. (2021) The Political Commissioner: A European Ethnography. Oxford University Press. • Müller, B. (ed.) (2013) The gloss of harmony: the politics of policy‐making in multilateral organisations. London. Pluto Press. • Ruwet, C. (2012) “La RSE négociée: règles du jeu et contenus. Le cas d'ISO 26000,” Négociations 2, no. 18 (2012): 93–108. • Steffek, J. (2021) International Organization as Technocratic Utopia. Oxford University Press.  • Steffek J, Holthaus L. (2018) The social-democratic roots of global governance: Welfare internationalism from the 19th century to the United Nations. European Journal of International Relations. 24(1):106-129. doi:10.1177/1354066117703176. Where to listen to this episode Apple podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-next-page/id1469021154  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/10fp8ROoVdve0el88KyFLy  Youtube:  Content   Speakers: Dr. Lucile Maertens & Dr. Marieke Louis Host: Amy Smith Editors & Producers: Amy Smith, Alma Rinaldi & Natalie Alexander Social media designs: Alma Rinaldi & Natalie Alexander   Recorded & produced at the United Nations Library & Archives Geneva 

New Books in Literary Studies

Eric Wade speaks with Saronik about lust. They discuss how depictions of sexuality in medieval literature have persisted through literary traditions and shaped modern ideas of Orientalism and the sexual other. In the episode, Eric mentions a number of modern theorists, including Edward Said, Joseph Boone, Ghassan Moussawi, and Joseph Massad. Dr. Erik Wade—a visiting lecturer at the Universität-Bonn—researches the global origins of early medieval English ideas of sexuality and race. He is co-writing a book with Dr. Mary Rambaran-Olm, titled Race in Early Medieval England, out next year from Cambridge University Press. This week's image is a medieval illumination of the Dream of the Magi, showing the three kings hanging out naked in bed, in the Salzburg Missal, Regensburg ca. 1478-1489 [München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 15708 I, fol. 63r]. Music used in promotional material: ‘Streets of Sant'lvo' by Mid-Air Machine Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network

Eric Wade speaks with Saronik about lust. They discuss how depictions of sexuality in medieval literature have persisted through literary traditions and shaped modern ideas of Orientalism and the sexual other. In the episode, Eric mentions a number of modern theorists, including Edward Said, Joseph Boone, Ghassan Moussawi, and Joseph Massad. Dr. Erik Wade—a visiting lecturer at the Universität-Bonn—researches the global origins of early medieval English ideas of sexuality and race. He is co-writing a book with Dr. Mary Rambaran-Olm, titled Race in Early Medieval England, out next year from Cambridge University Press. This week's image is a medieval illumination of the Dream of the Magi, showing the three kings hanging out naked in bed, in the Salzburg Missal, Regensburg ca. 1478-1489 [München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 15708 I, fol. 63r]. Music used in promotional material: ‘Streets of Sant'lvo' by Mid-Air Machine Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sex, Sexuality, and Sex Work

Eric Wade speaks with Saronik about lust. They discuss how depictions of sexuality in medieval literature have persisted through literary traditions and shaped modern ideas of Orientalism and the sexual other. In the episode, Eric mentions a number of modern theorists, including Edward Said, Joseph Boone, Ghassan Moussawi, and Joseph Massad. Dr. Erik Wade—a visiting lecturer at the Universität-Bonn—researches the global origins of early medieval English ideas of sexuality and race. He is co-writing a book with Dr. Mary Rambaran-Olm, titled Race in Early Medieval England, out next year from Cambridge University Press. This week's image is a medieval illumination of the Dream of the Magi, showing the three kings hanging out naked in bed, in the Salzburg Missal, Regensburg ca. 1478-1489 [München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 15708 I, fol. 63r]. Music used in promotional material: ‘Streets of Sant'lvo' by Mid-Air Machine Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

High Theory
Lust

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 15:39


Eric Wade speaks with Saronik about lust. They discuss how depictions of sexuality in medieval literature have persisted through literary traditions and shaped modern ideas of Orientalism and the sexual other. In the episode, Eric mentions a number of modern theorists, including Edward Said, Joseph Boone, Ghassan Moussawi, and Joseph Massad. Dr. Erik Wade—a visiting lecturer at the Universität-Bonn—researches the global origins of early medieval English ideas of sexuality and race. He is co-writing a book with Dr. Mary Rambaran-Olm, titled Race in Early Medieval England, out next year from Cambridge University Press. This week's image is a medieval illumination of the Dream of the Magi, showing the three kings hanging out naked in bed, in the Salzburg Missal, Regensburg ca. 1478-1489 [München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 15708 I, fol. 63r]. Music used in promotional material: ‘Streets of Sant'lvo' by Mid-Air Machine Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing
'Ant' or 'Ahnt'? Capitalizing Cocktail Names. Archie Bunker.

Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 15:13


What's up with the fancy-schmancy "ahnt" pronunciation of the word "aunt"? And why are the rules about capitalizing cocktail  names so wonky? We have all the answers today!Transcript:  https://grammar-girl.simplecast.com/episodes/ant-or-ahnt-capitalizing-cocktail-names-archie-bunkerReferences for the "ahnt" segment by Valerie Fridland:Phillips, Betty.  (1989). The Diffusion of a Borrowed Sound Change. Journal of English Linguistics, 22(2), 197–204.Freeborn, Dennis.  (1992). From old English to standard English : a course book in language variation across time. University of Ottawa Press: Ottawa.Grandgent, C.H. (1899). Franklin to Lowell. A Century of New England Pronunciation. Publication of the Modern Language Association, vol. 14 (2), 207-239.Trudgill, Peter (2008). The Historical Sociolinguistics of Elite Accent Change: On Why RP is not Disappearing. Studia Anglica Posnaniensia 44: 3–12.Walker, John. (1791). A critical pronouncing dictionary. London: Robinson.Wells, John. (1982). Accents of English. Cambridge University Press.| Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates.| Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course.| Peeve Wars card game. | Grammar Girl books. | HOST: Mignon Fogarty| VOICEMAIL: 833-214-GIRL (833-214-4475)| Grammar Girl is part of the Quick and Dirty Tips podcast network.| Theme music by Catherine Rannus at beautifulmusic.co.uk.| Grammar Girl Social Media Links:https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/podcastshttps://www.tiktok.com/@therealgrammargirlhttp://twitter.com/grammargirlhttp://facebook.com/grammargirlhttp://instagram.com/thegrammargirlhttps://www.linkedin.com/company/grammar-girl

TheEgyptianHulk
EP 20 - Zaynab El Bernoussi: Dignity in the Egyptian Revolution

TheEgyptianHulk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 51:24


Dr. Zaynab El Bernoussi is an assistant professor of International Politics at Sciences Po Rabat, International University of Rabat. El Bernoussi's most recent publication and first book, “Dignity in the Egyptian Revolution: Protest and Demand During the Arab Uprisings,” (Cambridge University Press 2021) explores the concept of Dignity (or Karama in Arabic) in the context of the Egyptian Revolution (#Jan25). Based on interviews with participants in the 2011 protests and analysis of the art forms that emerged during protests, Zaynab El Bernoussi explores understandings of the concept of dignity, showing how protestors conceived of this concept in their organisation of protest and uprising, and their memories of karama in the aftermath of the protests, revisiting these claims in the years subsequent to the uprising. Dr. El Bernoussi's book: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/dignity-in-the-egyptian-revolution/E66234FA0A694166A7FEC7EF62582A15 Episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/1asKdPfMInA Reach out! TahrirPodcast@gmail.com Streaming everywhere! https://linktr.ee/TahrirPodcast Support us on Patreon for as low as $2 per month ($20 per year)! https://www.patreon.com/TahrirPodcast (Use VPN if in Egypt)

WeeklyTech Podcast
A conversation with Dr. Paul D. Miller on Christian nationalism

WeeklyTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 41:24


In this episode, I am joined by Dr. Paul D. Miller, professor of the practice of international affairs at Georgetown University and author of a recent book entitled The Religion of American Greatness: What's Wrong with Christian Nationalism. Today, we talk about religion, politics, social ethics, and the rise of Christian nationalism.Meet Dr. Miller: Dr. Miller earned his PhD from Georgetown University and holds a masters in public policy from Harvard University. He spent a decade in public service as director for Afghanistan and Pakistan on the National Security Council staff, an intelligence analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency, and a military intelligence officer in the US Army. Miller's writing has appeared in Foreign Affairs, The Dispatch, The Washington Post, Providence Magazine, Mere Orthodoxy, The Gospel Coalition, Foreign Policy, and elsewhere. He is the author of Just War and Ordered Liberty from Cambridge University Press.Resources:The Religion of American Greatness by Paul D. MillerThe Virtue of Nationalism by Yoram HazonyBetween Kin and Cosmopolis by Nigel BiggarTaking America Back for God by Andrew Whitehead and Samuel PerryHow the Nations Rage by Jonathan LeemanPolitics after Christendom by David VanDrunenThe Digital Public Square is a production of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission and is produced and hosted by Jason Thacker.Production assistance is provided by Cameron Hayner. Technical production provided by Owens Productions. It is edited and mixed by Mark Owens.

New Books in Literary Studies

Nicholas Birns talks about ‘the hyperlocal', a modality of American journalism in the early 1990s that he adapts to characterize a flexible and transposable concept of the local used in eighteenth and nineteenth century British and American literatures. Nicholas Birns teaches at the Center for Applied Liberal Arts at New York University. He is the author of The Hyperlocal in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literary Space (Lexington, 2019). With Louis Klee, he is currently coexisting a companion to the Australian novel to be published by Cambridge University Press. Image: “The Hyperlocal” © 2021 Saronik Bosu Music used in promotional material: ‘It All Begins Here' by Borrtex Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
The Hyperlocal

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 14:17


Nicholas Birns talks about ‘the hyperlocal', a modality of American journalism in the early 1990s that he adapts to characterize a flexible and transposable concept of the local used in eighteenth and nineteenth century British and American literatures. Nicholas Birns teaches at the Center for Applied Liberal Arts at New York University. He is the author of The Hyperlocal in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literary Space (Lexington, 2019). With Louis Klee, he is currently coexisting a companion to the Australian novel to be published by Cambridge University Press. Image: “The Hyperlocal” © 2021 Saronik Bosu Music used in promotional material: ‘It All Begins Here' by Borrtex Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

High Theory
The Hyperlocal

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 14:17


Nicholas Birns talks about ‘the hyperlocal', a modality of American journalism in the early 1990s that he adapts to characterize a flexible and transposable concept of the local used in eighteenth and nineteenth century British and American literatures. Nicholas Birns teaches at the Center for Applied Liberal Arts at New York University. He is the author of The Hyperlocal in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literary Space (Lexington, 2019). With Louis Klee, he is currently coexisting a companion to the Australian novel to be published by Cambridge University Press. Image: “The Hyperlocal” © 2021 Saronik Bosu Music used in promotional material: ‘It All Begins Here' by Borrtex Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Harvard Neuroscientist Dr. Baland Jalal Explains ”Sleep Paralysis, Lucid Dreaming and Premonitions: Expanding our Awareness into the Mysteries of Our Brain During Sleep”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 62:34


“Dreams are one of the great mysteries of science. In their bizarre complexity, they can reveal deeper truths about who you are at the most basic level.” Researcher at Harvard University and the World's leading expert on sleep paralysis, Dr. Baland Jalal Watch this interview on YouTube here https://youtu.be/nE15JIqy5rU On the episode you will learn: ✔ Who is Dr. Baland Jalal, and how did he find his way to study neuroscience and sleep, becoming the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis?  ✔ How is Dr. Baland connected to Francis Crick, who discovered the double helix of the DNA structure and Dr. V.S. Ramachandran? ✔ What is sleep paralysis and what happens to the brain while this is occurring? ✔Why is the time just before we go to sleep and the time just before we wake up important for increasing our creativity or gaining insight? ✔ Are premonitions real, and can we access important information from our dreams? ✔Can we actually travel to places we have never been? ✔ What is lucid dreaming and how can we gain insight from what we see in these dreams? ✔Can lucid dreaming be beneficial for our waking hours? ✔What advancements in neuroscience do you think could help us in the future with our dreams? For returning guests, welcome back, and for those who are new here, I'm Andrea Samadi, author, and educator, with a passion for learning, understanding difficult concepts, and breaking them down so that we can all use and apply the most current research to improve our productivity and results in our schools, sports environments, and modern workplaces. On today's EPISODE #224 (that was postponed from April due to our guest's busy travel and work schedule) we are going to go beyond where we've ever gone before on this podcast, and cover some topics that you might have questions about, like I did, and I've found Dr. Baland Jalal[i], from Harvard, the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis, who has published 48 peer reviewed academic papers as well as a book from Cambridge University Press, to answer our questions.   We've covered dreams before, on EPISODE #104[ii], with Sleep Scientist Antonio Zadra and his book When Your Brain Dreams: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep but I left out some parts of the dream world that I thought might be too weird for this podcast, until I heard Dr. Jalal connecting the brain to our dreams, and this changed everything for me. I mentioned on EPISODE #211, that when I first was introduced to Dr. Jalal, his team sent me an email with his Harvard Bio and a write-up about his work on dreams but little did I know that his work would open my mind to places it's never been before, as I began to explore sleep paralysis (something I've experienced—just once which was enough for me, I just had no idea there was a name for it), lucid dreams (that I flat out thought I was crazy for having), and learning how my brain operates while dreaming, which revealed more truths about who I am at the core than I knew before coming across Dr. Jalal's work. I've gone on to study English scientist and professor of neuroscience, Mathew Walker and often tune into his podcast that's all about sleep, the brain and the body[iii] to see how we can all learn more about ways to improve our sleep, which we all know to be one of our top 5 health staples. I did create this podcast to bring credibility to some of the concepts that used to be considered weird, but now, science and FMRI scans show why these practices that 20 years ago were not mainstream, are now commonly used in our schools and work environments.  Before watching Dr. Jalal's lectures, I don't think I would openly talk about the experiences I've had with the dream world, but I thought if I've experienced these things, what if our listeners have also, wherever you are listening to this podcast in the world, and perhaps hearing from Dr. Jalal WHAT these bizarre things called dreams actually are, WHY we have them, and see if they can expand our self-awareness, and open up our world to a new level and even be used in a way to improve our productivity, creativity and results in our waking life. My mentor Bob Proctor was always challenging me to stop looking at life through the key hole, and instead, open up the door and expand my level of awareness. He would say, “Once the mind has been expanded, it will never go back to its original state. Awareness is not something you lose.” (Bob Proctor) When Dr. Jalal and I were working on rescheduling our interview, he asked me how early on a Sunday I would wake up, since he is currently in Europe, and my response to him was that I would wake up at midnight to speak with him about this topic because it's fascinating and I know will help all of us to expand our thinking. Let's meet Dr. Baland Jalal, and see if he can shed some light with what neuroscience can tell us about our dream world. Welcome Dr. Jalal, thank you for coming on the podcast, and helping all of us to expand our thinking about what happens in our dream world—especially knowing that this time takes up 1/3 of our life and that our sleep is such an important health staple. Thanks for being here today…I know you have been busy recording your second TED TALK and that you are in Europe now? I'm hoping you can shed some light for ways we can gain a deeper understanding of ourselves through our dreams, and what neuroscience can tell us about our sleeping brain. Intro Q: I've watched all of your most recent podcasts, and had no idea how much I would learn from them. I really enjoyed your interview on The Ranveer Show[iv] as Ranveer seemed like such an open-minded person. You mention your beginnings on this podcast that I think are important to begin with since there's a lot more to you than we see without listening to your story, so I've got to ask, can you take us back to your humble beginnings, and then how you met your mentor (Dr. V.S. Ramachandran)?[v] Q1:  Until I heard your lectures, I probably wouldn't ever admit to the fact that I had felt sleep paralysis. It's such a weird and scary experience, and you explained it EXACTLY as I felt it over 20 years ago. For those listening, can you explain what sleep paralysis is, why we become paralyzed during REM sleep, and what's happening in our brain to make this happen? Q1B: Why does it feel so scary? I had an experience that if I had not heard you say this, I probably wouldn't be mentioning it at all—but I thought there was a ghost laying on my chest. I could see him (in my head) and he definitely “felt” evil. Did my brain play a trick on me with what I was seeing and feeling or was there really a ghost in this sleep paralysis experience? Q1C) How did you become known as the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis and then I saw the topic of your most recent TED talk you how are you have designed one of the first treatments for sleep paralysis to help people who experience this terrifying phenomenon regularly? Q2: I think it's crazy that most of us have had these experiences, but we would just leave them off the table of our regular conversations with people, since they are just so weird. I actually remember asking a sleep expert years ago why I could “see things” in my head in those moments that I was drifting off to sleep. He wrote down the term “hypnagogia[vi]” and told me to study that.  I can sometimes see people's faces and sometimes what I see foreshadows important events many years later. What can you tell us about the importance of this time before sleep and wake, and how insights can be drawn from what we see so we can trust what we see to be useful? 2B: Sometimes during this time, we can have the sensation of floating above our body.  I know you've talked about this often, and explain what's happening in the brain for this to occur. Can you explain the part of our brain that's responsible for our self-awareness, (Temporal Parietal Lobe) and how we could possibly see another version of ourselves floating above our self? (Sup Parietal Lobe) Q3: Premonitions? Is there any TRUTH to what we are dreaming? Are there messages from our waking hours in our sleeping world? I think there are (after seeing common themes in my dreams from my waking hours) but what do you think? After your research and connecting science to dreaming, why do we have dreams? Are we supposed to learn from them? What part of our brain can help us to interpret our dreams? Q4: What about lucid dreaming. At the time I first wrote these questions (in April) I didn't know there was a name for this. There are times just before I wake up, or times just before I go to sleep, that I can see things. My eyes are closed, (but I can feel them opening and moving around in my head as I'm trying to see this vision in my head) that I think are lucid dreams. Some of these visions have helped me in life with massive life-changing decisions and others I have no idea what I'm supposed to be learning from them. One example I can give you that I have no idea what the purpose of the vision is—there's a hallway, and I can see people walking down the hallway. I know where this hallway is, and who the people are from what they are wearing. I've never been there before, but there's certain things in the hallway, in addition to the people, that tell me where it is.  The last time I saw this hallway, I was able to (for the first time) zoom in on certain parts of the hall, and see photos on the wall, or the light at the end of the hallway, where the people were walking.   I know this hallway is a real place, because I saw a news clip of it, and had this immediate feeling of recognition like “that's the hallway” but the camera in the news clip was shooting from a different angle than what I saw in my dream and I kept thinking…turn around, so I could see the hallway as I saw it in my head. What's happening here? How can see “see” places in our mind where we have never been before? I don't need to ask if it's real because I'm certain it is from what I have seen, but what's the purpose of have a lucid dream? 5: When we are “lucid dreaming” I recently learned from Mathew Walker's research that in this state, our PFC that usually shuts down usually in dreaming, lights up and this explains why we can actually interact with people in our lucid dreams, or gain control of our dream.  I've always just been an observer (like my hallway example I'm standing behind the people) but recently saw that I could zoom in and out of the hallway and see the pictures on the wall--wouldn't it be neat if we could interact with the people we see, or even bring back something to show we really were there, like a pen from someone's desk or something. You mention that you had this experience, and that you put a piece of paper in your pajama pocket. Can you explain what happened to the paper? Do you know how to control lucid dreams so they could be beneficial for us? Q6: If lucid dreaming is real, and I think it is, couldn't we use this skill for improved productivity or creativity in our waking hours? Could athletes use this for mental rehearsal since dreaming of doing something is almost equivalent to actually doing it? What about in the workplace to gain access to ideas or answers to problems? Is there a way to enter lucid dreaming at will vs just randomly happen (which is how it happens for me)? I can't control what I see, it just happens. Q7: How can we “test” ourselves to see if we are dreaming or not so we can develop Lucid dreaming more? Is it like the MATRIX when Neo puts his hand on the wall and it either stops, or goes through?  Can we do this to test if we are dreaming or not? What are you learning from your dream experiences to help yourself and others? Q8: For people to learn more about your work, is the best place to follow you on YouTube where you post your lectures? Thank you very much Dr. Jalal, for coming on the podcast, opening up my awareness BEFORE the interview, and giving us all an understanding of how our brain connects to our dream world. I hope it can help others to not be afraid of what they see during REM sleep, and keep searching for answers to help them in their waking hours, with whatever it is they are working on. It's been such a pleasure to speak with you. FOLLOW DR. JALAL Facebook https://www.facebook.com/balandjalal Instagram https://www.instagram.com/balandjalal/?hl=en YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/DrBalandJalal   RESOURCES: Sleep Paralysis and the Monsters Inside Your Mind by Baland Jalal July 15, 2020 https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/sleep-paralysis-and-the-monsters-inside-your-mind/       REFERENCES:   [i] Dr. Baland Jalal https://psychology.fas.harvard.edu/people/baland-jalal [ii] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #104 with Antonio Zadra on “When Brains Dream” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/sleep-scientist-antonio-zadra-on-when-brains-dream-exploring-the-science-and-mystery-of-sleep/ [iii] Mathew Walker's Podcast https://themattwalkerpodcast.buzzsprout.com/ [iv] The Ranveer Show Published on YouTube July 30, 2021 Neuroscientist Explains Scary Secrets of Your Brain https://www.youtube.co/watch?v=vJ_7h-OijAQ&t=24s [v] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V._S._Ramachandran https://www.ted.com/talks/vs_ramachandran_3_clues_to_understanding_your_brain [vi] What is Hypnagogia, the State Between Wakefulness and Sleep https://www.healthline.com/health/hypnagogia  

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Turkey's Domestic and International Politics Over the Past Two Decades (Webinar)

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 97:48


This panel explored the interconnectedness of Turkey's domestic and foreign politics over the past two decades. How do geopolitical histories and imaginaries affect Turkey's foreign policy? What are the links between everyday culture and Turkey's foreign policy? To what extent have global and regional developments impacted on and informed domestic politics? In what ways has foreign policy been used as a technique of governance? Evren Balta is Professor of International Relations and chair of the International Relations Department at Özyeğin University. She is the author of 'The American Passport in Turkey: National Citizenship in the Age of Transnationalism' (with O Altan-Olcay, UPenn, 2020), 'Age of Uneasiness' (İletisim, 2019) and 'Global Security Complex' (İletisim, 2012). She is the editor of 'Neighbors with Suspicion: Dynamics of Turkish-Russian Relations' (with G. Ozcan and B. Besgul, İletisim, 2017); 'Introduction to Global Politics' (Iletisim, 2014) and 'Military, State and Politics in Turkey' (with I. Akca, Bilgi University Press, 2010). She served as a research fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences/Russia in Global Dialogue Program (Vienna, Austria 2017) and as a Fulbright visiting associate professor at New York University, Program in International Relations during the 2017-2018 academic year. Balta is a senior scholar at Istanbul Policy Center, a member of the Global Relations Forum and co-editor of International Relations Journal. She was appointed as the academic coordinator of TÜSİAD Global Politics Forum in 2021. Lisel Hintz is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. She was a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University and was visiting assistant professor at Barnard College, Columbia University. She studies the arenas in which struggles over various forms of identity – e.g., national, ethnic, religious, gender – take place. Her regional focus is on Turkey and its relations with the Middle East, Europe, and the US. Her 2018 book 'Identity Politics Inside Out: National Identity Contestation and Foreign Policy in Turkey' (Oxford University Press) examines how Turkey's Justice and Development Party (AKP) used foreign policy gambits to weaken its domestic obstacles and open up space for disseminating its own Ottoman Islamist understanding of Turkish national identity and, ultimately, the ways in which contestation over national identity spills over to shape and be shaped by foreign policy. Her current book project, under contract with Cambridge University Press, investigates Turkey's state-society struggles over identity in the pop culture sphere. Her work also appears in journals and news outlets contributing to discussions on Turkey's increasing authoritarianism, opposition dynamics, foreign policy shifts, and identity-related topics including Kurdish, Alevi, and gender issues. Spyros A. Sofos is a Researcher at the LSE Middle East Centre. Spyros has been a member of the Fragmentation of peacemaking and peacebuilding: Non-Western dynamics of peace and transition management project team, funded by the FCDO and the PeaceRep Consortium. His research explores the intersection of societal insecurity, identity, and collective action and, to date, it has focused on Turkish politics and society, nationalism, populism and Islamism in Europe and the Middle East, urban citizenship, and European Muslim identities and politics. His latest book Turkish Politics and ‘The People': Mass Mobilisation and Populism (Edinburgh University Press) – explores the emergence of populism in Turkey and its genealogy as a tradition of action and discourse. His other publications include 'Nation and Identity in Contemporary Europe' (Routledge), 'Tormented by History: Nationalism in Greece and Turkey' (Oxford University Press), 'Islam in Europe: Public Spaces and Civic Networks' (Palgrave).

Zeitsprung
GAG351: Die Erfindung des Saxophons - Aufstieg und Fall des Adolphe Sax

Zeitsprung

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 49:27


Wir springen in dieser Folge ins Frankreich des 19. Jahrhunderts, wo der belgische Instrumentenbauer und Erfinder Adolphe Sax gerade dabei ist, die Welt der Musikinstrumente zu revolutionieren. Doch trotz seines großen Erfolgs, stellt sich das von ihm erfundene Saxophon bald mehr als Fluch denn als Segen heraus. Das Episodenbild zeigt den Saxophonisten Ben Vereecken, ca. 1917 (spiegelverkehrt) // Literatur - Richard Ingham. 1999. The Cambridge Companion to the Saxophone (Cambridge Companions to Music). Cambridge University Press. - Michael Segell. 2005. The Devil's Horn: The Story of the Saxophone, From Noisy Novelty to King of Cool. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. - Stephen Cottrell. 2013. The Saxophone. Yale University Press. //Aus unserer Werbung Du möchtest mehr über unsere Werbepartner erfahren? Hier findest du alle Infos & Rabatte: https://linktr.ee/GeschichtenausderGeschichte NEU: Wer unsere Folgen lieber ohne Werbung anhören will, kann das über eine kleine Unterstützung auf Steady oder ein Abo des GeschichteFM-Plus Kanals auf Apple Podcasts tun. Wir freuen uns, wenn ihr den Podcast bei Apple Podcasts rezensiert oder bewertet. Für alle jene, die kein iTunes verwenden, gibt's die Podcastplattform Panoptikum, auch dort könnt ihr uns empfehlen, bewerten aber auch euer ganz eigenes Podcasthörer:innenprofil erstellen. Wir freuen uns auch immer, wenn ihr euren Freundinnen und Freunden, Kolleginnen und Kollegen oder sogar Nachbarinnen und Nachbarn von uns erzählt!

The Moral Imagination
Ep. 41: A Guide to C.S. Lewis' The Abolition of Man with Father Michael Ward

The Moral Imagination

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 69:36


In this episode, I speak with Michael Ward about his book, After Humanity: A Guide to C.S. Lewis The Abolition of Man.  I think The Abolition of Man is of the most important books in the twentieth century. It addresses important issues that are relevant today — from what it means to be human, reason, passion, and the emotions, to how to think about technology, power, and beauty. It's a short book but can be a bit difficult to understand at times, and Michael Ward does a great service by going through the book line by line and explaining and providing context to make the book easier to follow.  We discuss key themes of The Abolition of Man:  whether beauty and morality are objective or purely subjective education power and authority honor nobility sacrifice for others,  dystopian fiction technology and technocracy  contraception and how man's power over nature ends up being man's power over other men  We also discuss the relationship between the Abolition of Man, Eustace Scrubb, and Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia and the space trilogy, Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength.   Word on Fire Special Offer: After Humanity + Abolition of Man   Biography  Michael Ward is an English literary critic and theologian. He works at the University of Oxford where he is a member of the Faculty of Theology and Religion. He is the author of the award-winning Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C.S. Lewis (Oxford University Press) and co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to C.S. Lewis (Cambridge University Press). Though based at Oxford in his native England, Dr Ward is also employed as Professor of Apologetics at Houston Baptist University, Texas, teaching one course per semester as part of the online MA program in Christian Apologetics. On the fiftieth anniversary of Lewis's death (22 November 2013), Professor Ward unveiled a permanent national memorial to him in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey.  He is the co-editor of a volume of commemorative essays marking the anniversary, entitled C.S. Lewis at Poets' Corner. Michael Ward presented the BBC television documentary, The Narnia Code, directed and produced by BAFTA-winning filmmaker, Norman Stone.  He authored an accompanying book entitled The Narnia Code: C.S. Lewis and the Secret of the Seven Heavens. Michael was resident Warden of The Kilns, Lewis's Oxford home, from 1996 to 1999.  He studied English at Oxford, Theology at Cambridge, and has a Ph.D. in Divinity from St Andrews.  He was Senior Research Fellow at Blackfriars Hall, Oxford (2012-2021).  He has been awarded honorary doctorates in Humane Letters (Hillsdale College, Michigan, 2015) and Sacred Theology (Thorneloe University, Ontario, 2021). Visit https://www.themoralimagination.com/episodes/ward for show notes and resources.

Turkey Book Talk
Murat Metinsoy on resistance and dissent in early republican Turkey

Turkey Book Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 30:18


Murat Metinsoy on “The Power of the People: Everyday Resistance and Dissent in the Making of Modern Turkey, 1923-38” (Cambridge University Press). The book examines how ordinary people's reaction to Kemalist reforms shaped, modified or softened how those reforms were implemented on the ground. Become a member to support Turkey Book Talk. Members get a 35% discount on all Turkey/Ottoman History books published by IB Tauris/Bloomsbury, transcripts of every interview, transcripts of the whole archive, and over 200 reviews covering Turkish and international fiction, history and politics.

Stuff You Missed in History Class

At a young age, Alexis Soyer became a very well-known chef in both France and England, as popular for his fun personality as for his cooking. But he also left a legacy of invention and charity. Research: Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Jules-Armand, prince de Polignac". Encyclopedia Britannica, 26 Feb. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Jules-Armand-prince-de-Polignac Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "July Revolution". Encyclopedia Britannica, 20 Jul. 2021, https://www.britannica.com/event/July-Revolution Guest, Ivor. "Fanny Cerrito". Encyclopedia Britannica, 7 May. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Fanny-Cerrito “Soyer stove, sealed pattern, 1953.” National Army Museum. https://collection.nam.ac.uk/detail.php?acc=2002-12-6-1#:~:text=The%20Soyer%20stove%2C%20named%20after,modifications%20for%20over%20100%20years. Macmillan, Ann. “War Stories.” Simon and Schuster. 2018. Sandover, Cherry. “THE TRIUMPH OF FAME OVER DEATH: THE COMMEMORATIVE FUNERARY MONUMTHE ARTIST IN 19TH CENTURY BRITAIN AS SIGNIFIER OF IDENTITY.” University of Essex. Academia.edu. https://www.academia.edu/12192637/SUMMARY_OF_THE_DISSERTATION_THE_TRIUMPH_OF_FAME_OVER_DEATH_THE_COMMEMORATIVE_FUNERARY_MONUMTHE_ARTIST_IN_19TH_CENTURY_BRITAIN_AS_SIGNIFIER_OF_IDENTITY_ Pickering, W. “Obituary – Madame Soyer.”  The Gentleman's Magazine. Volume 172. 1842. https://books.google.com/books?id=rCZIAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA667#v=onepage&q&f=false Soyer, Alexis. “Memoirs of Alexis Soyer With Unpublished Receipts and Odds and Ends of Gastronomy.” Edited by F. Volant, et al. Cambridge University Press. 2014. Brandon, Ruth. “The People's Chef.” Wiley. 2004.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Democracy Group
Majority Minority with Dr. Justin Gest | Village SquareCast

The Democracy Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 86:04


How do societies respond to great demographic change? This question lingers over the contemporary politics of the United States and other countries where persistent immigration has altered populations and may soon produce a majority minority milestone. Or where the original ethnic or religious majority loses its numerical advantage to one or more foreign-origin minority groups. Until now, most of our knowledge about large-scale responses to demographic change has been based on studies of individual people's reactions, which tend to be instinctively defensive and intolerant. We know little about why and how these habits are sometimes tempered to promote more successful coexistence.Dr. Justin Gest is an Associate Professor of Policy and Government at George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. He is the author of six books, primarily on the politics of immigration and demographic change—all from Oxford University Press or Cambridge University Press. Dr. Gest's research has been published in journals including the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Comparative Political Studies, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Global Governance, Global Policy, International Migration Review, Migration Studies, Polity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He is the editor of Silent Citizenship: The Politics of Marginality in Unequal Democracies (Routledge, 2016), special issues of Citizenship Studies, and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.He has also provided commentary, analysis, or reporting to a number of broadcast networks, including ABC, BBC, CBC, CNN, and NPR, and news publications including The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, POLITICO, Reuters, The Times, Vox, and The Washington Post.Additional InformationThe Village SquareCast PodcastMore shows from The Democracy Group

Dark Histories
Catherine Elise Muller & Her Mission to Mars

Dark Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 62:12


The belief of extraterrestrial life is one of the most exotic, exciting and long endearing throughout human history. Mars in particular has always proven to be of particular interest. One of our nearest planetary neighbours, the red planet has inspired thousands of works ranging from the earliest science fiction, all the way to contemporary fringe theology. In the late 19th Century, interest in the planet saw a boom, as astronomers battled with one another over their beliefs of the existence of a great Martian civilization, creating a scientific debate that crossed over into far more fringe elements. Spiritualism, with it's equal boom, became far more interested in the interstellar than one might expect and one case in particular, of a young, Swiss medium named Catherine Elise muller, would charge out in front, presenting the world with not only surreal images of the hypercolour martian landscape, but with descriptions of an alien society and a working language to boot. SOURCES Flournoy, Theodore (1900) From India to the Planet Mars. Harper & Bros, London, UK Keep, Christopher (2020) Life on Mars?: Hélène Smith, Clairvoyance, and Occult Media. Journal of Victorian Culture , Volume 25 (4) – Nov 16, 2020. Leeds Trinity University, Oxford University Press, UK. Clerke, Agnes Mary (2011) A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press, UK. Greg, Percy (1880) Across the  Zodiac: The Story of a Wrecked Record. Ballantyne Press, London, UK.   Crossley, Robert (2011) Imagining Mars: A Literary History. Wesleyan University Press, CT, USA. Tipler, F.J. (1981) A Brief History of the Extraterrestrial Intelligence Concept. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 22, P. 133, 1981. ---------- For almost anything, head over to the podcasts hub at darkhistories.com Support the show by using our link when you sign up to Audible: http://audibletrial.com/darkhistories or visit our Patreon for bonus episodes and Early Access: https://www.patreon.com/darkhistories The Dark Histories books are available to buy here: http://author.to/darkhistories Dark Histories merch is available here: https://bit.ly/3GChjk9 Connect with us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/darkhistoriespodcast Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/darkhistories & Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dark_histories/ Or you can contact us directly via email at contact@darkhistories.com or via voicemail on: (415) 286-5072 or join our Discord community: https://discord.gg/cmGcBFf The Dark Histories Butterfly was drawn by Courtney, who you can find on Instagram @bewildereye Music was recorded by me © Ben Cutmore 2017 Other Outro music was Paul Whiteman & his orchestra with Mildred Bailey - All of me (1931). It's out of copyright now, but if you're interested, that was that.  

HistoryBoiz
The History of Abortion

HistoryBoiz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 177:31


Joining us for this intense episode, is the very funny Sally Jordan!Bewig, Matt. “Abortion and Constitutional Law.” Audible.com, 2022, https://www.audible.com/pd/Abortion-and-Constitutional-Law-Audiobook/B09S1FHXRG. CLEGHORN, ELINOR. Unwell Women: A Journey through Medicine and Myth in a Man-Made World. WEIDENFELD & NICOLSON, 2022. Kaplan, Laura. The Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Feminist Abortion Service. The University of Chicago Press, 2019. Ziegler, Mary. Abortion and the Law in America Roe v. Wade to the Present. Cambridge University Press, 2020. ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast
On the Shelf for June 2022 - The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast Episode 231

The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 28:49


On the Shelf for June 2022 The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast - Episode 231 with Heather Rose Jones Your monthly roundup of history, news, and the field of sapphic historical fiction. In this episode we talk about: How I put together a podcast episode SFF Pride Storybundle Recent and upcoming publications covered on the blogFrye, Susan & Karen Robertson (eds). Maids and Mistresses, Cousins and Queens: Women's Alliances in Early Modern England. Oxford University Press, New York. ISBN 0-19-511735-2 Garber, Linda. 2022. Novel Approaches to Lesbian History. Palgrave, Cham. ISBN 978-3-030-85416-4 Medd, Jodie (ed). 2015. The Cambridge Companion to Lesbian Literature. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. ISBN 978-1-107-66343-5 Book ShoppingTinsley, Omise'eke Natasha. 2010. Thiefing Sugar: Eroticism between Women in Caribbean Literature. Duke University Press, Durham. ISBN 978-0-8223-4777-4 Donato, Clorinda. 2020. The Life and Legend of Catterina Vizzani: Sexual identity, science and sensationalism in eighteenth-century Italy and England. Voltaire Foundation, Oxford. ISBN 978-1-78962-221-8 By Your Side: The First 100 Years of Yuri Manga & Anime by Erica Friedman New and forthcoming fictionEmma: Restraint and Presumption by Garnet Marriott & Jane Austen On Stolen Land by Stephanie Rabig Something Happened in River Falls by Karyn Walters Valiant Ladies by Melissa Grey Glorious Poison by Kat Dunn The Bluestocking Beds Her Bride: An Age Gap Regency Romance (Must Love Scandal) by Fenna Edgewood title by author Briefly, A Delicious Life by Nell Stevens Perilous Passages (The Wellington Mysteries #2) by Edale Lane Beautiful Little Fool by Sarah Zane LOTE by Shola von Reinhold Last Call at the Nightingale by Katharine Schellman Harlem Sunset (A Harlem Renaissance Mystery Book 2) by Nekesa Afia In the Shadow of Love (Shadow Series #2) by J.E. Leak Dead Letters from Paradise by Ann McMan Vera Kelly: Lost and Found (Vera Kelly #3) by Rosalie Knecht Jobs for Girls with Artistic Flair by June Gervais What I've been reading:Light from Uncommon Stars by Ryka Aoki Blood Moon by Catherine Lundoff Toad Words by T. Kingfisher A Master of Djinn by P. Djèlí Clark Black Water Sister by Zen Cho Spear by Nicola Griffith A transcript of this podcast is available here. (Interview transcripts added when available.) Links to the Lesbian Historic Motif Project Online Website: http://alpennia.com/lhmp Blog: http://alpennia.com/blog RSS: http://alpennia.com/blog/feed/ Twitter: @LesbianMotif Discord: Contact Heather for an invitation to the Alpennia/LHMP Discord server The Lesbian Historic Motif Project Patreon Links to Heather Online Website: http://alpennia.com Email: Heather Rose Jones Twitter: @heatherosejones Facebook: Heather Rose Jones (author page)

JHIdeas Podcast
The Italian Renaissance and Modern Humanities: John Raimo interviews Christopher S. Celenza

JHIdeas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 83:42


John Raimo, one of the founding editor of the JHI Blog and PhD candidate at New York University, interviews Christopher S. Celenza, James B. Knapp Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of History in Classics at Johns Hopkins University about his new book, "The Italian Renaissance and the Origins of the Modern Humanities: An Intellectual History, 1400-1800"(Cambridge University Press, 2021).

Warfare
The Royal Family & WW1

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 31:06


Happy Platinum Jubilee! As Queen Elizabeth II becomes the first British monarch to mark 70 years on the throne - as well as commander-in-chief of Her Majesty's Armed Forces - we trace the origins of the House of Windsor's close-knit links to the British military.Why are the two so seemingly inseparable? The story begins in the First World War, when the dynasty changed its name from the House of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha to distance itself from its German roots. Rather than suffer due to its kinship with the kaiser, the royal family's stock amongst the UK public and its soldiery actually rose during and after the Great War.In this episode James is joined by Heather Jones, Professor in Modern & Contemporary European History at UCL and the author of a new book on the subject, to explore exactly why the Armed Forces serve for king, queen and country.Prof. Jones's book For King and Country: The British Monarchy and the First World War is out now via Cambridge University Press.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Village SquareCast
Majority Minority with Dr. Justin Gest

Village SquareCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 85:52


“Trenchant and groundbreaking work.” —Molly Ball, National Political Correspondent, TIME Magazine “The go-to source for understanding how demographic change is impacting American politics.” —Jonathan Capehart, The Washington Post and MSNBC How do societies respond to great demographic change? This question lingers over the contemporary politics of the United States and other countries where persistent immigration has altered populations and may soon produce a majority minority milestone. Or where the original ethnic or religious majority loses its numerical advantage to one or more foreign-origin minority groups. Until now, most of our knowledge about large-scale responses to demographic change has been based on studies of individual people's reactions, which tend to be instinctively defensive and intolerant. We know little about why and how these habits are sometimes tempered to promote more successful coexistence. Dr. Justin Gest is an Associate Professor of Policy and Government at George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. He is the author of six books, primarily on the politics of immigration and demographic change—all from Oxford University Press or Cambridge University Press.  Dr. Gest's research has been published in journals including the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Comparative Political Studies, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Global Governance, Global Policy, International Migration Review, Migration Studies, Polity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He is the editor of Silent Citizenship: The Politics of Marginality in Unequal Democracies (Routledge, 2016), special issues of Citizenship Studies, and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. He has also provided commentary, analysis, or reporting to a number of broadcast networks, including ABC, BBC, CBC, CNN, and NPR, and news publications including The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, POLITICO, Reuters, The Times, Vox, and The Washington Post. Find this program online at The Village Square. This podcast series is presented in partnership with Florida Humanities. Village SquareCast is part of The Democracy Group. Check out one of our fellow network podcasts here: How Do We Fix It?

Inside Independent Publishing (with IBPA)
Profitable & Creative Book Distribution Tips for Independent Publishers

Inside Independent Publishing (with IBPA)

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 47:35


IBPA is always looking for ways to set up independent publishers and author publishers for success, so we partnered with PubWest and Portland State University's Graduate Program in Book Publishing to research five key issues facing publishing distribution today. Portland State University's Director of Book Publishing and Assistant Professor in English Dr. Rachel Noorda and Rachel Done, who is one of the talented students who worked on this project and a freelance publishing professional, visit “Inside Independent Publishing (with IBPA)” to discuss the findings of the project, which include ways for indie publishers to make their distribution more profitable, sustainable, and eco-friendly!PARTICIPANTSDr. Rachel Noorda is Director of Book Publishing and Assistant Professor in English. She researches twenty-first century book topics such as entrepreneurship, marketing, small business, national identity, and international publishing. Her book Entrepreneurship Identity in U.S. Book Publishing in the Twenty-First Century was published last year by Cambridge University Press. She loves guiding students and collaborating with her colleague Kathi Inman Berens on media behavior and piracy.Rachel Done Cubillas is currently a freelancing publishing professional, with focuses on writing, design, marketing, and project management. Basically a little bit of everything. She is set to graduate with her MA in Book Publishing and Comics Studies Certificate from PSU this coming June. She loves exploring new topics and skills, as well as spending time with her menagerie of a family. Independent Book Publishers Association is the largest trade association for independent publishers in the United States. As the IBPA Director of Membership & Member Services, Christopher Locke helps guide the 4,100+ members as they travel along their publishing journeys. As one of his major projects, he oversees the IBPA NetGalley program, which generates buzz and garners reviews for indie publishers' titles. He's also passionate about indie publishing, because he's an author publisher himself, having published two novels so far in his YA trilogy, The Enlightenment Adventures.LINKSTo learn more about the many benefits of becoming a member of Independent Book Publishers Association, visit here https://www.ibpa-online.org/general/register_member_type.asp?View the full distribution report here: https://www.ibpa-online.org/news/601797/IBPA-PubWest-and-Portland-State-University-Publish-Students-Research-on-Distribution-Practices.htmFollow IBPA on:Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/IBPAonlineTwitter – https://twitter.com/ibpaInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/ibpalovesindies/Follow Dr. Rachel Noorda:Twitter - @rachellynchaseLinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachel-noorda-4273623bFollow Rachel Done:Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/rachel.doneGR/Twitter - @RachelDC06LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachel-done-97510b186/Website: https://racheldonecubillas.com/portfolio/

Intel on AI
AI, Social Media, and Political Influence – Intel on AI Season 3, Episode 11

Intel on AI

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 33:38


In this episode of Intel on AI host Amir Khosrowshahi talks with Joshua Tucker about using artificial intelligence to study the influence social media has on politics. Joshua is professor of politics at New York University with affiliated appointments in the department of Russian and Slavic Studies and the Center for Data Science. He is also the director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and co-director of the Center for Social Media and Politics. He was a co-author and editor of an award-winning policy blog at The Washington Post and has published several books, including his latest, where he is co-editor, titled Social Media and Democracy: The State of the Field, Prospects for Reform from Cambridge University Press. In the podcast episode, Joshua discusses his background in researching mass political behavior, including Colored Revolutions in Eastern Europe. He talks about how his field of study changed after working with his then PhD student Pablo Barberá (now a professor at the University of Southern California), who proposed a method whereby researchers could estimate people's partisanship based on the social networks in which they had enmeshed themselves. Joshua describes the limitations researchers often have when trying to study data on various platforms, the challenges of big data, utilizing NYU's Greene HPC Cluster, and the impact that the leak of the Facebook Papers had on the field. He also describes findings regarding people who are more prone to share material from fraudulent media organizations masquerading as news outlets and how researchers like Rebekah Tromble (Director of the Institute for Data, Democracy and Politics at George Washington University) are working with government entities like the European Union on balancing public research with data privacy. The episode closes with Amir and Joshua discussing disinformation campaigns in the context of the Russo-Ukrainian War. Academic research discussed in the podcast episode: Birds of the Same Feather Tweet Together: Bayesian Ideal Point Estimation Using Twitter Data. Tweeting From Left to Right: Is Online Political Communication More Than an Echo Chamber?

New Books in Psychology
Timmen Cermak, "Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystique of Cannabis" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 56:51


Few substances have been researched as extensively, and debated as fiercely, as cannabis. In Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystique of Cannabis (Cambridge University Press, 2022), psychiatrist Timmen Cermak offers a balanced, science-based analysis of how marijuana affects people physiologically, psychologically, and spiritually. Cermak draws on current understandings of the brain and nervous system to describe how cannabis achieves its effects as well as how it can pose risks to some individuals. Cermak believes that most people can enjoy cannabis safely as long as they apply sensible guidelines and precautions. Far different in tone from the heated polemics that cannabis can inspire, Marijuana on My Mind is a deeply informed assessment of what we know about cannabis and how people can deploy that knowledge wisely.  Steve Beitler's work in the history of medicine focuses on how pain has been understood, treated, experienced, and represented. His recently published articles examined the history of opiates in American football and surveyed the history of therapeutic drugs. He can be reached at steve@stevebeitler.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books Network
Timmen Cermak, "Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystique of Cannabis" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 56:51


Few substances have been researched as extensively, and debated as fiercely, as cannabis. In Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystique of Cannabis (Cambridge University Press, 2022), psychiatrist Timmen Cermak offers a balanced, science-based analysis of how marijuana affects people physiologically, psychologically, and spiritually. Cermak draws on current understandings of the brain and nervous system to describe how cannabis achieves its effects as well as how it can pose risks to some individuals. Cermak believes that most people can enjoy cannabis safely as long as they apply sensible guidelines and precautions. Far different in tone from the heated polemics that cannabis can inspire, Marijuana on My Mind is a deeply informed assessment of what we know about cannabis and how people can deploy that knowledge wisely.  Steve Beitler's work in the history of medicine focuses on how pain has been understood, treated, experienced, and represented. His recently published articles examined the history of opiates in American football and surveyed the history of therapeutic drugs. He can be reached at steve@stevebeitler.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Medicine
Timmen Cermak, "Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystique of Cannabis" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 56:51


Few substances have been researched as extensively, and debated as fiercely, as cannabis. In Marijuana on My Mind: The Science and Mystique of Cannabis (Cambridge University Press, 2022), psychiatrist Timmen Cermak offers a balanced, science-based analysis of how marijuana affects people physiologically, psychologically, and spiritually. Cermak draws on current understandings of the brain and nervous system to describe how cannabis achieves its effects as well as how it can pose risks to some individuals. Cermak believes that most people can enjoy cannabis safely as long as they apply sensible guidelines and precautions. Far different in tone from the heated polemics that cannabis can inspire, Marijuana on My Mind is a deeply informed assessment of what we know about cannabis and how people can deploy that knowledge wisely.  Steve Beitler's work in the history of medicine focuses on how pain has been understood, treated, experienced, and represented. His recently published articles examined the history of opiates in American football and surveyed the history of therapeutic drugs. He can be reached at steve@stevebeitler.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Political Science
Rana Siu Inboden, "China and the International Human Rights Regime: 1982–2017" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 70:51


In China and the International Human Rights Regime (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Rana Siu Inboden examines the evolution of China's posture towards the U.N. human rights system since the early 1980s. The book examines in unprecedented details China's role and impact on the complex negotiations between U.N. members over the International Covenant Against Torture and its optional protocol; the establishment of the U.N. Human Rights Council; and the monitoring powers of the International labour Organization. A former U.S. State Department official in the Bureau of Democracy, Labor and Human Rights, Inboden shows how China, through subtle yet persistent efforts, largely but not entirely successfully managed to constrain the U.N. human rights system. Based on a range of documentary and archival research, as well as extensive interview data, Inboden provides fresh insights into the motivations and influences driving China's conduct and explores China's rising position as a global power. In this interview, Inboden discusses her findings as well as more recent developments under the leadership of President Xi Jinping. Nicholas Bequelin is a human rights professional with a PhD in history and a scholarly bent. He has worked about 20 years for Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, most recently as Regional director for Asia. He's currently a Visiting Scholar and Lecturer at Yale Law School. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
Rana Siu Inboden, "China and the International Human Rights Regime: 1982–2017" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 70:51


In China and the International Human Rights Regime (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Rana Siu Inboden examines the evolution of China's posture towards the U.N. human rights system since the early 1980s. The book examines in unprecedented details China's role and impact on the complex negotiations between U.N. members over the International Covenant Against Torture and its optional protocol; the establishment of the U.N. Human Rights Council; and the monitoring powers of the International labour Organization. A former U.S. State Department official in the Bureau of Democracy, Labor and Human Rights, Inboden shows how China, through subtle yet persistent efforts, largely but not entirely successfully managed to constrain the U.N. human rights system. Based on a range of documentary and archival research, as well as extensive interview data, Inboden provides fresh insights into the motivations and influences driving China's conduct and explores China's rising position as a global power. In this interview, Inboden discusses her findings as well as more recent developments under the leadership of President Xi Jinping. Nicholas Bequelin is a human rights professional with a PhD in history and a scholarly bent. He has worked about 20 years for Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, most recently as Regional director for Asia. He's currently a Visiting Scholar and Lecturer at Yale Law School. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

RADIKAAL
64. Lenka Bustikova on Radical Right Parties in Eastern Europe

RADIKAAL

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 24:58


My guest today is Lenka Bustikova, currently an Associate Professor of Political Science at Arizona State University who will soon join St. Anthony's College at the Oxford University, as Associate Professor in European Union and Comparative East European Politics. Her research focuses on party politics, democratic decay, ethnicity, and clientelism, with special reference to Eastern Europe. She is the author of the awards-winning book Extreme Reactions: Radical Right Mobilization in Eastern Europe, published by Cambridge University Press in 2019. Lenka is currently working on a new book project about the social origins of illiberalism, exploring the relationship between ‘uncivil society' and political radicalization in Eastern Europe. You can follow Lenka Bustikova on Twitter at @LBustikova.

Seekers of Unity
Maimonides' Magical Universe + How to Become an Angel

Seekers of Unity

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 28:05


An attempt to leave our 21st century heads and get back into the mind of a 12th century philosopher who saw the world in entirely different ways than we do. Diving into the Middle Ages thought the mind of Maimonides. Exploring Maimonides on the Cosmic Spheres, the Flow, the Active Intellect, his theory prophecy and.. how to becoming an angel. Sources and Further Reading • A. J. Heschel, “Did Maimonides Believe That He Had Attained the Rank of Prophet,” in Prophetic Inspiration After the Prophets, 1996, pp. 69-126 • Adam Afterman “And They Shall Be One Flesh”: On the Language of Mystical Union in Judaism, 2016, p. 103-127 • Adam Afterman, “Moses Maimonides on the Holy Spirit,” in Journal of Religion vol. 100, 2020 • Alexander Altmann, Maimonides's Attitude Toward Jewish Mysticism, p. 213 • Alfred Ivry, The Guide and Maimonides' Philosophical Sources, p. 59 • Christopher A. Morray-Jones, ‘‘Transformational Mysticism in the Apocalyptic-Merkabah Tradition,'' Journal of Jewish Studies 43 (1992): pp. 1–31 • Daniel Abrams, “Orality in the Kabbalistic School of Nahmanides: Preserving and Interpreting Esoteric Traditions and Texts,” Jewish Studies Quarterly 2 (1995): 85–102 • Diana Lobel, “'Silence Is Praise to You': Maimonides on Negative Theology, Looseness of Expression, and Religious Experience,” American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76, no. 1 (2002): 31-58 • Diana Lobel, “A Dwelling Place for the Shekhinah.” Jewish Quarterly Review 90 (1999): 103–125 • Elliot Wolfson, ‘‘Yeridah la-Merkavah: Typology of Ecstasy and Enthronement in Early Jewish Mysticism,'' Mystics of the Book, 13–44, esp. pp. 23–26 • Elliot Wolfson, “By Way of Truth: Aspects of Nahmanides' Kabbalistic Hermeneutic,” AJS Review 14, (1989): 153–78 • Elliot Wolfson, “Mysticism and the Poetic-Liturgical,” p. 186 • Elliot Wolfson, “Seven Mysteries,” p. 191 • Haviva Pedaya, Nahmanides: Cyclical Time and Holy Text, (Tel Aviv: Am Oved, 2003) (Hebrew). • Ithamar Gruenwald, “Maimonides' Quest beyond Philosophy and Prophecy,” in Perspectives, ed. J. L. Kraemer (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. 147 • Justin Sledge, “Maimonides at the Crossroads of Jewish Occultism, Magic and the Kabbalah” @ESOTERICA, Youtube, 15 April 2022, https://youtu.be/i6qclz26OYY • Matthew David Litwa, Posthuman Transformation in Ancient Mediterranean Thought, Becoming Angels and Demons, Cambridge and New York, Cambridge University Press, 2021 • Moshe Idel, “Enoch is Metatron,” Immanuel 24/25 (1990): 234–237 • Moshe Idel, “Rabbi Moshe ben Nahman: Kabbalah, Halachah and Spiritual Leadership,” Tarbiz 64, (1995): 535–580 (Hebrew) • Moshe Idel, “We Have No Kabbalistic Tradition on This,” in Rabbi Moses Nahmanides: Explorations in His Religious and Literary Virtuosity, 1983, 51–73 • Moshe Idel, The Angelic World, pp. 102-4; 210 • Pico Della Mirandola, Oration on the Dignity of Man, trans. A. Robert Caponigri, 1967, p. 9 • Sarah Pessin, The Influence of Islamic Thought on Maimonides, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2005