Podcast appearances and mentions of Robert Frost

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American poet

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
Robert Frost

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Best podcasts about Robert Frost

Latest podcast episodes about Robert Frost

Words by Winter
Poetry Snack, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, with Robert Frost

Words by Winter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 4:39


It's another poetry snack with Robert Frost, a New Englander whose poems often center on that solitary, sensory landscape.Words by Winter: Conversations, reflections, and poems about the passages of life. Because it's rough out there, and we have to help each other through.Original theme music for our show is by Dylan Perese. Additional music by Kelly Krebs. Artwork by Mark Garry. Today's poem, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, by Robert Frost, is in the public domain. Words by Winter can be reached at wordsbywinterpodcast@gmail.com. 

Mornings on the Mall
1.17.22 Suparna Dutta Interview

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:25


Vince Coglianese speaks to Suparna Dutta, chairwoman of "Educators for Youngkin" who had the opportunity to read "The Road Not Taken" poem by Robert Frost at Governor Youngkin's inauguration. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Walter Edgar's Journal
100 years of the Poetry Society of South Carolina

Walter Edgar's Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 51:29


James Lundy's book, The History of the Poetry Society of South Carolina: 1920 to 2021, is a chronicle of the first 100 years of the oldest state poetry society in America, the Poetry Society of South Carolina. Founded in Charleston in 1920 by DuBose Heyward, John Bennett, Josephine Pinckney, Hervey Allen, and Laura Bragg, the Society's first 101 seasons run from the Jazz Age to the COVID era, where everyone from Carl Sandburg, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Robert Frost, Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, Ogden Nash, Billy Collins, Sherwood Anderson, Jericho Brown, Thornton Wilder, Robert Pinsky, and hundreds of others appeared before the membership.Talking with Walter Edgar, Lundy, also currently the Society's president, gives us an insider's view, with insights into the inner workings and disfunctions of the organization and its slow progress from a Whites-only organization of the segregated South founded in the aftermath of World War I and the Spanish Flu Pandemic, through the Roaring Twenties, into the darkness of the Great Depression, World War II, a resurgence during the Atomic Age, the turbulent Sixties, the decline of Charleston, its rebound into a tourist mecca, and into the present day.

Exploring A Course in Miracles
What Does the Course Say about Boundaries?

Exploring A Course in Miracles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 59:53


We all know healthy boundaries are important. Long before boundaries were celebrated as an essential part of self-care, Robert Frost wrote, “Good fences make good neighbors.” And yet, as Course students, the topic of boundaries brings up many significant questions: How do we reconcile boundaries with the spiritual teaching that we ultimately have no boundaries, that the lines between us are a fiction of the mind? When does an emphasis on setting boundaries get in the way of the supreme value of love and forgiveness? How would the Course advise us to enact a boundary or even to end a relationship? In this podcast, Circle founder Robert Perry and executive director Emily Bennington share what the Course has to teach us on this very important topic.

Thought for the Day
Bishop Nick Baines

Thought for the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 2:58


The American poet Robert Frost wrote: “The afternoon knows what the morning never suspected.” I know what he means. I remember turning 40 and realising that my life was probably half way through; today my elder son is 40 and I look back with amazement at what has happened, what choices we all made, what experiences we shared, what relationships we forged. Frankly, I think we did a good job: despite being born in Cheltenham and living around the country, he has always been a passionate Liverpool fan. What more could I want? Well, quite a lot actually. To go back to Robert Frost, I remember looking at a baby and realising the responsibility asleep in my arms. And the uncertainty about what might lie ahead of him - not just in the choices we and he would make as he grew up, but also what might happen in the world that couldn't be controlled but would shape or constrain those choices. While celebrating Christmas over the last few days I was conscious of the fact that the baby of Bethlehem grew up into an argumentative boy who clearly learned by debating and questioning. The boy grew into the man who learned his trade before hitting the political arena and eventually getting nailed to a cross. Growing up - and letting our own children grow up - is a nerve wracking business. We can't control what will happen to the children we love. We do our best … and face our failures … recognising that this is a pattern they might also one day repeat. But, if uncertainty is the name of the game, then society has to give all children the best start, the best example, the best opportunity. Which means what? Especially as no child can grow in isolation from other children, whatever their background. Well, along with guest editor Raheem Sterling this morning, we might start with education and opportunity. The Germans have two words for it: ‘Erziehung' has to do with nurture and learning, ‘Ausbildung' is all about training for a skill. And both are valuable. Of course, at the heart of both lies a person - the roots of whom need to be watered by more than mere information or ‘knowledge' - if they are to develop wisdom and character. And this means enabling young minds to roam widely, dig deeply, face unwelcome challenges and hard questions. As Aristotle noted: “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” Or, as the Book of Proverbs puts it: “Happy are those who find wisdom, and those who get understanding.”

Episode 1 - Interference in the Dem primaries
Episode 9 - Frost for a Change - a breather from the daily political grind by John P. Flannery (jonflan@aol.com, @jonflan)

Episode 1 - Interference in the Dem primaries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 17:41


We are all suffering from too much of our unceasing contact sport, politics. So how about a few poems from Robert Frost - for a change - John P. Flannery, jonflan@aol.com, @jonflan

Thor Holt Presents
Road Rage at Christmas?

Thor Holt Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 3:46


Thors tale of choices at Christmas, and every day. ‘Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.' From The Poetry of Robert Frost.

Classical Kids Corner
Eric Whitacre

Classical Kids Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 4:59


Composer Eric Whitacre is well known for the choral pieces he writes and their distinctive sound. Join host, Liz Lyon as she explores some of his music in this episode of YourClassical Adventures. Episode 65 playlist Eric Whitacre: Water Night — One of his earliest works, written in 1995. The text is from Octavio Paz's poem, “Agua Nocturna”.LISTEN — Eric Whitacre: Water Night Eric Whitacre: Water Night by Eric Whitacre: Sleep — The setting for this choral composition is a poem by Robert Frost, “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”. The theme of the lyrics, sleep, was based on the last stanza of this poem, “And miles to go before I sleep.”LISTEN — Eric Whitacre: Sleep Eric Whitacre: Sleep by Eric Whitacre: When David Heard — The text for this piece is one single, and sorrowful sentence accompanied by purposeful and dramatic silence.LISTEN — Eric Whitacre: When David Heard Eric Whitacre: When David Heard by You can now search and listen to YourClassical Adventures where podcasts are found. Explore more from YourClassical Adventures! What are you curious about? Let us know your thoughts You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy.

Joe Watches 60 Christmas Movies in 60 Days

39. Beaus of Holly Joe watches a movie so nice, it tells you about a church twice, Beaus of Holly (2020)! Holly is stuck on a romantic trip for two all by herself. Luckily, he has Jake the coachman to spend time with. There's also Phil, the ex, who is abysmal and Joe hates him. And Snowdrop the horse! Oh, Robert Frost, of course! Merry Christmas! Listen to Joe wonder why the crafting table is outside in this, the thirty-ninth episode of JOE WATCHES 60 CHRISTMAS MOVIES IN 60 DAYS! Write Joe a greeting card @joemoc!

Carrefour Poésie
FIRE AND ICE

Carrefour Poésie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 0:37


FIRE AND ICE by Robert Frost read by Jonel Juste

Dream Realm Enterprises Podcast
Episode 174: Poet's Passion Holiday Special

Dream Realm Enterprises Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 26:00


The Holiday Themed Season Finale' of Poet's Passion features our host, Jerry Kokich, who reads the original poem "The Warmth of the Season" by Jonithan Patrick Russell, as well as "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus". Pete Lutz reads "Christmas at Sea" by Robert Louis Stevenson and "Christmas Trees" by Robert Frost. His Narada Radio Company performs George Wither's "A Christmas Carol" featuring the voices of Austin Hanna, Geri Elliff, George Hatfield, and Kristy Glick. Happy Holidays from all of us here at Dream Realm Enterprises!Rated U for Universal Audiences!

Get Lit Podcast
Get Lit Episode 141: Robert Frost

Get Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 35:16


As we head into December, the time for FROST is upon us! That's right - Robert Frost! We head out East (mostly) to explore the life of this failed chicken farmer, teacher, newspaper delivery person and four-time Pulitzer Prize winning poet. We're off on a road less traveled by, come along for the walk! 

The Daily Good
Episode 429: A way to create eco-friendly fuel from CO2 and the sun, another lovely winter poem from Robert Frost, the splendor of Innsbruck’s Christmas Market, the melancholy wonder of A Charlie Brown Christmas and its soundtrack, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 20:51


Good News: Clever scientists and engineers have created a method of manufacturing a new fuel by taking CO2 out of the atmosphere and using solar power to transform it! Link HERE. The Good Word: A delightful poem celebrating a small joy of winter, by Robert Frost. Good To Know: Some fun history about tinsel! Good […]

The Slowdown
563: Dust of Snow

The Slowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 5:03


Today's poem is Dust of Snow by Robert Frost.

The Daily Good
Episode 427: A massive rewilding effort in the UK, a classic poem by Robert Frost, coffee may help fight Alzheimer’s, Christmas market FOODS, the joys of Louis Prima’s music, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 20:02


Good News: A pact has been agreed in the UK to “turbo charge” rewilding efforts, combining the efforts of groups who hold over a third of all land in England! Link HERE. The Good Word: A well-loved wintry poem by Robert Frost. Good To Know: A GREAT bit of trivia about “The Twelve Days of […]

Cottage In The Court
Episode 51 - Holiday Trees and more with Mrs. Know It All

Cottage In The Court

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 31:32


Selecting trees for decorating the inside of the home at this time of year can be daunting. Mrs. Know It All has a few tips to share before you go tree shopping. Check out Mrs.Know It All on her Facebook page. She is on the radio bi-weekly on The Organic Gardener on Radio.com from 7 -8 on Sunday mornings. The poem, Dust of Snow, by Robert Frost was found o poetryfondation.com. I love poetry, don't you? Thank you for being there and being patient with me. The first book, a collaborative effort with Kathy Jentz, Washington Gardener Magazine, and I were working on is available for pre-order on Amazon. The Urban Garden: 101 Ways to Grow Food and Beauty In the City is due March 2022. It is a dream come true to say I am an author...now to finish the second book. In the meantime... I want to say THANK YOU for being patient and continuing to follow me: Https://www.cottageinthecourt.com...Instagram and Twitter: @cottageincourt...Facebook: CottageInTheCourt, and sometimes on Medium: Cottage In The Court Please subscribe to Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts or Pandora Podcasts if you would like to stay in the know. Did I mention, I am almost finished writing ANOTHER BOOK? Details later! In the meantime...garden like you mean it! Teri, Cottage In The Court #gardencomm #playoutside

Fire the Canon
Robert Frost's Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening: They're All Pippin

Fire the Canon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 40:21


We read that wintry Frosty Rob classic! Here's the deal: we literally talked about this poem for almost a week after recording. Should we have said some of that stuff during the episode? You decide. Anyway, don't miss the Marvel-style post-credits scene! Theo is looking for a sugar mama (this is not a joke). Rachel gets s'owned. Jackie munches on some paper. Topics include: sea shanties, French henchmen, the United Nations flag, classic slapstick, the Beatles, Vietnam, Dominic Monaghan, Elijah Woods, Muppets, the clown beat, secret messages, limericks again, Donald Trump deepfakes, John Stamos & Frank Sinatra's son, serial killers, Joe Rogan's poetic interpretation, Dr. Seuss, and Dadaism. Content warning: suicide

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: On Animals, Pastry Love and other favorites

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 159:30


Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations. Susan Orlean previews her latest book about animals, including the history of the movie “Free Willy,” her relationship with turkeys and her Valentine's Day spent with a lion. Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and an author; her latest book is “On Animals.” Joanne Chang talks about her latest book inspired by her baking journals, “Pastry Love: A Baker's Journal of Favorite Recipes.” Chang is a James Beard award–winning pastry chef. Richard Blanco reads fall-themed poetry, including “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost, “The Blower of Leaves” by January Gill O'Neil, “November 2: Día de los muertos” by Alberto Ríos and “Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio” by James Wright. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. Howard Mansfield previews his latest book, "Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers," about communities throughout American history that sought freedom, happiness and utopia. Mansfield is an author who writes about history, architecture and preservation. Malcolm Gladwell discusses his new book, "Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know." Gladwell is a New Yorker staff writer and host of the “Revisionist History” podcast. Sy Montgomery explains how songbirds find mates for life in other birds who literally sing their tune and discussed vampire bats who adopt vampire bat pups. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and BPR contributor. Her latest book is "Becoming A Good Creature." Arthur C. Brooks discusses the key to happiness, drawing from his social science work and latest podcast, “How to Build a Happy Life.” Brooks is the William Henry Bloomberg professor of the practice of public leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, a professor of management practice at the Harvard Business School, the happiness correspondent at The Atlantic and host of the podcast series “How to Build a Happy Life.” Spencer Buell and Erica Walker talk about the rise of noise complaints in Boston, as well as what — and if — residents and politicians should do about it. Spencer Buell is a staff writer for Boston Magazine. Erica Walker is a noise researcher who founded Noise and the City. She is an assistant professor of epidemiology at Brown. Daniel Leader discusses his latest book, "Living Bread." Leader is a pioneer in the American baking world.

In Unison
EP411 Freshly Squeezed: Michael T Roberts

In Unison

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 63:44


On today's episode of In Unison we're continuing our mini-series of conversations with the composers whose works will be premiered on IOCSF's Freshly Squeezed program on December 4th and 18th this year. Today we're chatting with IOCSF's current Composer-in-Residence, Michael T Roberts, about all sorts of things, but most importantly his new composition—a prayer for rain of sorts—entitled “Come to Us in Water.” We may also discover whether or not Mike is a witch…! http://www.inunisonpodcast.com/episodes/s04e11#transcript (Episode transcript) Edited by https://www.inunisonpodcast.com/fausto (Fausto Daos) Music excerpts “https://www.hotmike.com/prayer.html (A Prayer in Spring),” by Michael T Roberts, text by Robert Frost, performed by http://www.choralchameleon.com (Choral Chameleon) “https://www.hotmike.com/o-child.html (O Child),” by Michael T Roberts, performed by http://www.iocsf.org (International Orange Chorale of San Francisco) “https://youtu.be/Iiswj0981G8 (Zoom)” by Michael T Roberts, performed by http://www.iocsf.org (International Orange Chorale of San Francisco) Episode references https://www.hotmike.com/ (Michael T Roberts) Theme Song:https://music.apple.com/us/album/mr-puffy/1457011536?i=1457011549 ( Mr. Puffy) by Avi Bortnik, arr. by Paul Kim. Performed byhttp://www.dynamicjazz.dk/ ( Dynamic)

Voice of the Arts
Matthew Mehaffey - Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh

Voice of the Arts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


The Music Director of the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, Matthew Mehaffey, talks with Jim Cunningham about the "Promise of Light" concert running December 10th through the 18th in several  venues starting at Westminster Presbyterian Church in the South Hills and ending at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, downtown. All are free, Wear your mask, please register in advance so they know you are coming.  It's a wide ranging program with a celebratory mood and a hopeful theme with poetry by Robert Frost, Mary Oliver and Ogden Nash plus singing about winter, the solstice and the holidays. Music by Carol King, Dolly Parton, Randall Thompson, Eriks Esenvalds and Melissa Dunphy. Matthew talks about his work at the University of Minnesota where he is a full professor, the challenges of the pandemic time and the specifics of the program.  For complete details on the presentations check out themendelssohn.org website. 

Rhythms
Choose Something Like a Star by Robert Frost

Rhythms

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 1:27


The wonder of a star

Words by Winter
Poetry Snack, Bare November Days, with Robert Frost

Words by Winter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 3:52


It's a poetry snack, with Robert Frost, a New Englander whose poems often center on that solitary, sensory landscape.Words by Winter: Conversations, reflections, and poems about the passages of life. Because it's rough out there, and we have to help each other through.Original theme music for our show is by Dylan Perese. Additional music by Kelly Krebs. Artwork by Mark Garry.  Today's poem, My November Guest, by Robert Frost, is in the public domain. Words by Winter can be reached at wordsbywinterpodcast@gmail.com. 

Poetry Unbound
Darrel Alejandro Holnes — Amending Wall

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 17:08


In a poem that directly addresses Robert Frost's “Mending Wall,” Darrel Alejandro Holnes asks questions: who gets to build walls, or guard borders?. Do good fences really make good neighbors? Taking a poem that's been part of an American imagination both of poetry and of citizenship, Darrel offers a critique that places contemporary migrant experiences at the center, challenging contemporary ideas of territory, conquest, and expansion.Darrel Alejandro Holnes is the author of Stepmotherland & Migrant Psalms. Holnes is an Afro-Panamanian American writer, performer, and educator. His writing has been published in English, Spanish, and French in literary journals, anthologies, and other books worldwide and online. He also writes for the stage. Most of his writing centers on love, family, race, immigration, and joy. He works as a college professor in New York City, NY.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Talking Hockey
Re-Drafting the 2017 and 2018 Seasons | Episode #86

Talking Hockey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 73:49


On this episode, we talk about Corey Pronman's articles about how he would re-draft the 2017 and 2018 seasons. The articles have been linked here if you want to follow along (it is the Athletic so it might be behind a paywall), but we talk about his rankings out loud as well. Topics discussed. 2017 Re-Draft (2:00): Is Petersson a top tier/elite centreman? Makar is the best from the draft Why are Necas and Hischier ranked lower than Nick Suzuki? Tie was right about Drake Batherson Is Casey Mittelstadt a top 15 pick? Connor Timmins, Robert Frost, Nolan Patrick, Kailer Yamamoto, Mario Ferraro, Ryan Poehling, and more 2018 Re-Draft (33:00): Andre Schvenikov is elite and the #1 pick Rasmus Dahlin is not an elite player from the draft... but who's fault is that? Quinn Hughes should be #2 Farrabi is a high quality pick Evan Bouchard is ranked too low Ty Smith is better than Rasmus Sandin Do you agree with us on our thoughts/Corey's list? Let us know on Instagram @talkinghockey and @talkinghockeypodcast Follow us on Twitter: @_TalkingHockey_ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mystic Lasagna
Episode 136 - Snail Anatomy

Mystic Lasagna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:30


Expectations fuck you up. Also, real life cat stroller adventures and somehow more Robert Frost references.  Release the hype for this week's strip Here.  Follow the Podcast on Twitter or Instagram Follow the Paul on Instagram  Follow Alex on Twitter or Instagram Mystic Lasagna is a Member of the Missing Sock network. For other great shows like this one, check out https://www.missingsocknetwork.com/ or search Missing Sock in your favorite pod catcher.  Also we have Merch!! Follow the network on Instagram.  To support us and all the shows on Missing Sock, here's our Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/missingsock Lasagnaste´

Nomads You And I
How To Enter The Gate And Stay On The Path That Leads To Everlasting Life

Nomads You And I

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 20:39


Having recently visited the home of poet, Robert Frost in Derry, New Hampshire, I walked a number of the beautiful autumnal little trails on his property that inspired his famous lines, “I took the road less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” I've always been able to relate to those words on a spiritual level, having opted in my teen years to take our Lord's advice to “Enter through the narrow gate, because the gate is wide and the way is spacious that leads to destruction, and there are many who enter through it. How narrow is the gate and difficult the way that leads to life, and there are few who find it!" (Matthew 7:13-14) Entering that narrow gate and traversing that challenging terrain on the narrow way has, at times, been anything but easy, but the views from that upward climb are not to be missed, and I've not for a moment regretted that decision made so many years ago! In this podcast, Cindy shares: What God says about how to enter that blessed gate and remain on that narrow way for the long haul. What hard things might you likely encounter along the way and what can you do to build the spiritual muscle you'll need to cope with those challenges? How does God help us successfully walk this path to everlasting life and what can we do to prepare the hearts of our young children to hike this ultimate trail?

Modern Torah
Choosing Choiceless Choices

Modern Torah

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 8:53


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.This week, I put Robert Frost's famous poem—"The Road Not Taken"— in conversation with our weekly Torah portion, Toldot. The parsha covers the story of Isaac, including the exchange between his sons Jacob and Esau, where Esau sells his birthright to his younger brother.Jacob's actions are often explained away by the rabbis, and Esau is commonly demonized as wild and wicked so Jacob comes across more kindly. This has never felt right to me, and in my mind I couldn't stop comparing what I imagine Esau's response to Jacob's offer must have been, with my own response every time I update my phone and click agree on a terms and condition statement I haven't read.—————I'm not a rabbi, so every week I look at our Torah portion and try to put it in conversation with the modern world around me. Judaism is rich in tradition, and each of us deserves the chance to find our own meaning in the text. Just remember, like the text itself says, “there's nothing new under the sun.”Modern Torah is published every week on Friday mornings, anywhere you get your podcasts. Learn more about me and any of my other podcasts at www.moderntorah.com.

Connections: A Podcast of the James L. Hamner Public Library

Jill reads "October" by Robert Frost.Contact Us: connections@hamnerlibrary.org

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.04.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:33


Zinc might help to stave off respiratory infection symptoms and cut illness duration Western Sydney University (Australia), November 2, 2021   A zinc supplement might help stave off the symptoms of respiratory tract infections, such as coughing, congestion, and sore throat, and cut illness duration, suggests a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published in the open access journal BMJ Open. But the quality of the evidence on which these findings are based is variable, and it's not clear what an optimal formulation or dose of this nutrient might be, caution the researchers. Respiratory tract infections include colds, flu, sinusitis, pneumonia and COVID-19. Most infections clear up by themselves, but not all. And they often prove costly in terms of their impact on health services and time taken in sick leave. Zinc has a key role in immunity, inflammation, tissue injury, blood pressure and in tissue responses to lack of oxygen. As a result, it has generated considerable interest during the current pandemic for the possible prevention and treatment of COVID-19 infection. In response to calls for rapid evidence appraisals to inform self-care and clinical practice, the researchers evaluated zinc for the prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, and other viral respiratory tract infections. When that review was published, the results of several relevant clinical trials weren't yet available, so this current review brings the available evidence up to date.  The review includes 28 clinical trials involving 5446 adults, published in 17 English and Chinese research databases up to August 2020. None of the trials specifically looked at the use of zinc for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The most common zinc formulations used were lozenges followed by nasal spraysand gels containing either zinc acetate or gluconate salts. Doses varied substantially, depending on the formulation and whether zinc was used for prevention or treatment. Pooled analysis of the results of 25 trials showed that compared with dummy treatment (placebo), zinc lozenges or nasal spray prevented 5 respiratory tract infections in 100 people a month. These effects were strongest for curbing the risk of developing more severe symptoms, such as fever and influenza-like illnesses. But this is based on only three studies. On average, symptoms cleared up 2 days earlier with the use of either a zinc spray or liquid formulation taken under the tongue (sublingual) than when a placebo was used. During the first week of illness, participants who used sublingual or nasal spray zinc were nearly twice as likely to recover as those who used placebo: 19 more adults out of 100 were likely to still have symptoms a week later if they didn't use zinc supplements.  While zinc wasn't associated with an easing in average daily symptom severity, it was associated with a clinically significant reduction in symptom severity on day 3.  Side effects, including nausea and mouth/nose irritation, were around 40% more likely among those using zinc, but no serious side effects were reported in the 25 trials that monitored them.  However, compared with placebo, sublingual zinc didn't reduce the risk of developing an infection or cold symptoms after inoculation with human rhinovirus, nor were there any differences in illness duration between those who used zinc supplements and those who didn't. Nor was the comparative effectiveness of different zinc formulations and doses clear. And the quality, size, and design of the included studies varied considerably. "The marginal benefits, strain specificity, drug resistance and potential risks of other over-the-counter and prescription medications makes zinc a viable 'natural' alternative for the self-management of non-specific [respiratory tract infections], the researchers write.  "[Zinc] also provides clinicians with a management option for patients who are desperate for faster recovery times and might be seeking an unnecessary antibiotic prescription," they add. "However, clinicians and consumers need to be aware that considerable uncertainty remains regarding the clinical efficacy of different zinc formulations, doses and administration routes, and the extent to which efficacy might be influenced by the ever changing epidemiology of the viruses that cause [respiratory tract infections]," they caution. And how exactly zinc might exert its therapeutic effects on respiratory infections, including COVID-19, warrants further research, they conclude.     Drinking alcohol to stay healthy? That might not work, says new study Ulrich John of University Medicine (Germany), November 2, 2021 Increased mortality risk among current alcohol abstainers might largely be explained by other factors, including previous alcohol or drug problems, daily smoking, and overall poor health, according to a new study publishing November 2nd in PLOS Medicine by Ulrich John of University Medicine Greifswald, Germany, and colleagues. Previous studies have suggested that people who abstain from alcohol have a higher mortality rate than those who drink low to moderate amounts of alcohol. In the new study, researchers used data on a random sample of 4,028 German adults who had participated in a standardized interview conducted between 1996 and 1997, when participants were 18 to 64 years old. Baseline data were available on alcohol drinking in the 12 months prior to the interview, as well as other information on health, alcohol and drug use. Mortality data were available from follow-up 20 years later. Among the study participants, 447 (11.10%) had not drunk any alcohol in the 12 months prior to the baseline interview. Of these abstainers, 405 (90.60%) were former alcohol consumers and 322 (72.04%) had one or more other risk factor for higher mortality rates, including a former alcohol-use disorder or risky alcohol consumption (35.40%), daily smoking (50.00%), or fair to poor self-rated health (10.51%). The 125 alcohol abstinent persons without these risk factors did not show a statistically significantly difference in total, cardiovascular or cancer mortality compared to low to moderate alcohol consumers, and those who had stayed alcohol abstinent throughout their life had a hazard ratio of 1.64 (95% CI 0.72-3.77) compared to low to moderate alcohol consumers after adjustment for age, sex and tobacco smoking. "The results support the view that people in the general population who currently are abstinent from alcohol do not necessarily have a shorter survival time than the population with low to moderate alcohol consumption," the authors say. "The findings speak against recommendations to drink alcohol for health reasons." John adds, "It has long been assumed that low to moderate alcohol consumption might have positive effects on health based on the finding that alcohol abstainers seemed to die earlier than low to moderate drinkers. We found that the majority of the abstainers had alcohol or drug problems, risky alcohol consumption, daily tobacco smoking or fair to poor health in their history, i.e., factors that predict early death."   Quercetin helps to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer Univ. of Hawaii and Univ. of Southern California, November 1, 2021 Quercetin, which is found naturally in apples and onions, has been identified as one of the most beneficial flavonols in preventing and reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer. Although the overall risk was reduced among the study participants, smokers who consumed foods rich in flavonols had a significantly greater risk reduction. This study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, is the first of its kind to evaluate the effect of flavonols – compounds found specifically in plants – on developing pancreatic cancer. According to the research paper, “only a few prospective studies have investigated flavonols as risk factors for cancer, none of which has included pancreatic cancer. “ Researchers from Germany, the Univ. of Hawaii and Univ. of Southern California tracked food intake and health outcomes of 183,518 participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study for eight years. The study evaluated the participants' food consumption and calculated the intake of the three flavonols quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin. The analyses determined that flavonol intake does have an impact on the risk for developing pancreatic cancer. The most significant finding was among smokers. Smokers with the lowest intake of flavonols presented with the most pancreatic cancer. Smoking is an established risk factor for the often fatal pancreatic cancer, notes the research. Among the other findings were that women had the highest intake of total flavonols and seventy percent of the flavonol intake came from quercetin, linked to apple and onion consumption. It is believed that these compounds may have anticancer effects due to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and alter other cellular functions related to cancer development. “Unlike many of the dietary components, flavonols are concentrated in specific foods rather than in broader food groups, for example, in apples rather than in all fruit,” notes the research study. Previously, the most consistent inverse association was found between flavonols, especially quercetin in apples and lung cancer, as pointed out in this study. No other epidemiological flavonol studies have included evaluation of pancreatic cancer. While found in many plants, flavonols are found in high concentrations in apples, onions, tea, berries, kale, and broccoli. Quercetin is most plentiful in apples and onions.   Researcher explains the psychology of successful aging University of California at Los Angeles, November 2, 2021 Successful aging can be the norm, says UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel in his new book, "Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging" (Oxford University Press). Castel sees many inspiring role models of aging. French Impressionist Claude Monet, he notes, began his beloved water lily paintings at age 73. Castel cites hundreds of research studies, including his own, combined with personal accounts from older Americans, including Maya Angelou, Warren Buffett, John Wooden, Bob Newhart, Frank Gehry, David Letterman, Jack LaLanne, Jared Diamond, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, John Glenn and Vin Scully. Castel notes that architect Gehry designed conventional buildings and shopping malls early in his career, and decades later designed the creative buildings he would only dream about when he was younger. Others who did much of their best work when they were older include Mark Twain, Paul Cezanne, Frank Lloyd Wright, Robert Frost and Virginia Woolf, he writes. "There are a lot of myths about aging, and people often have negative stereotypes of what it means to get old," Castel said. "I have studied aging for two decades, and have seen many impressive role models of aging, as well as people who struggle in older age. This book provides both science behind what we can to do age well and role models of successful aging. While some books focus on how to try to prevent or delay aging, 'Better with Age' shows how we can age successfully and enjoy the benefits of old age. I have combined the lessons the psychology of aging teaches us with insights from some of the people who have succeeded in aging well." Castel cites a 1979 study by Harvard University social psychologist Ellen Langer in which men in their 70s and 80s went to a week-long retreat at a motel that was re-designed to reflect the décor and music from 1959. The men, who were all dependent on family members for their care, were more independent by the end of the week, and had significant improvements in their hearing, memory, strength and scores on intelligence tests. Some played catch with a football. One group of the men, who were told to behave like they were 20 years younger, showed greater flexibility, and even looked younger, according to observers who saw photos of them at the start and end of the week. In another study, researchers analyzed Catholic nuns' diary entries made in the 1930s and 1940s, when the nuns were in their 20s, and determined their level of happiness from these diaries. More than 50 years later, 75 percent of the most cheerful nuns survived to age 80, while only 40 percent of the least happy nuns survived to 80. The happiest nuns lived 10 years longer than the least happy nuns. Happiness increases our lives by four to 10 years, a recent research review suggested. "As an added bonus," Castel writes, "those additional years are likely to be happy ones." Successful aging involves being productive, mentally fit, and, most importantly, leading a meaningful life, Castel writes. What are the ingredients of staying sharp and aging successfully, a process which Castel says can start at any age? He has several recommendations. Tips for longevity Walking or other physical exercise is likely the best method to ensure brain and body health, Castel writes. In a large 2011 study, older adults were randomly assigned to a group that walked for 40 minutes three times a week or a stretching group for the same amount of time. After six months and again after one year, the walking group outperformed the stretching group on memory and cognitive functioning tests. Too much running, on the other hand, can lead to joint pain and injuries. In addition, after one year, those who walked 40 minutes a day three times a week showed a 2 percent increase in the volume of the hippocampus—an important brain region involved in memory. Typically, Castel notes, the hippocampus declines about 1 percent a year after age 50. "Walking actually appears to reverse the effects of aging," Castel says in the book. Balance exercises are proven to prevent falls, can keep us walking and may be the most essential training activity for older adults, Castel writes. Each year, more than two million older Americans go to the emergency room because of fall-related injuries. A 2014 British study found that people who could get up from a chair and sit back down more than 30 times in a minute were less likely to develop dementia and more likely to live longer than those who could not. A good balance exercise is standing on one leg with your eyes open for 60 seconds or more, and then on the other leg. Those who did poorly on this were found in a study to be at greater risk for stroke and dementia. Like walking, sleep is valuable free medicine. Studies have shown a connection between insomnia and the onset of dementia. People who speak more than one language are at reduced risk for developing dementia, research has shown; there is some evidence being bilingual or multilingual can offset dementia by five years, Castel writes. One study found that among people between 75 and 85, those who engaged in reading, playing board games, playing musical instruments and dancing had less dementia than those who did none of those activities. "Lifelong reading, especially in older age, may be one of the secrets to preserving mental ability," Castel writes. Set specific goals. Telling yourself to "eat healthy" is not very likely to cause a change; setting a goal of "eating fewer cookies after 7 p.m." is better. Similarly, "walk four days a week with a friend" is a more useful goal than "get more exercise" and "call a friend or family member every Friday morning" is better than "maintain friendships." How can we improve our memory? When Douglas Hegdahl was a 20-year-old prisoner of war in North Vietnam, he wanted to learn the names of other American prisoners. He memorized their names, capture dates, methods of capture and personal information of more than 250 prisoners to the tune of the nursey rhyme, "Old MacDonald Had a Farm." Today, more than four decades later, he can still recall all of their names, Castel writes. Social connections are also important. Rates of loneliness among older adults are increasing and chronic loneliness "poses as large a risk to long-term health and longevity as smoking cigarettes and may be twice as harmful for retirees as obesity," Castel writes. The number of Americans who say they have no close friends has roughly tripled in the last few decades. There is evidence that people with more social support tend to live longer than those who are more isolated, and that older adults who lead active social lives with others are less likely to develop dementia and have stronger immune systems to fight off diseases. "Staying sharp," Castel writes, "involves staying connected—and not to the Internet." A 2016 study focused on "super-agers"—people in their 70s whose memories are like those of people 40 years younger. Many of them said they worked hard at their jobs and their hobbies. The hard work was challenging, and not always pleasurable, leaving people sometimes feeling tired and frustrated. Some researchers believe this discomfort and frustration means you are challenging yourself in ways that will pay off in future brain and other health benefits. Research has shown that simply telling older adults they are taking a "wisdom test" rather than a "memory test" or "dementia screening" actually leads to better results on the identical memory test, Castel writes. If you are concerned about your memory, or that of a loved one, it may be wise to see a neurologist, Castel advises. Castel, 42, said he is struck by how many older adults vividly recall what is most important to them. As Castel quotes the Roman philosopher and statesman Cicero: "No old man forgets where he has hidden his treasure."     Researchers find phthalates in wide variety of fast foods George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, October 29, 2021 A team of researchers from The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, the Southwest Research Institute and the Chan School of Public Health, has found phthalates in a wide variety of fast foods. In their paper published in Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, the group describes how they collected samples of fast food from several restaurants and tested them for phthalates and other chemicals meant to replace them—and what they found. Phthalates are esters of phthalic acid and are commonly used to make plastic substances more flexible. Prior research has shown that they can also increase durability and longevity making them popular for plastics makers. Researchers have found that consumption of phthalates can disrupt the endocrine system and by extension levels of hormones in the body. Research has also shown that they can lead to asthma in children and increased obesity.  In this new effort, the researchers built on prior work they conducted looking at urine samples of volunteers where they found that those who ate more fast food, tended to have more phthalates in their system. To learn more about the link between fast food and phthalate levels, the researchers visited six fast food restaurants in and around San Antonio, Texas, and collected 64 food items to be used as test samples. They also asked for a pair of the plastic gloves that were used by food preparers at the same establishments and obtained three of them. In studying the food samples, the researchers found DnBP in 81% of the samples and DEHP in 70% of them. They also noted that the foods with the highest concentrations of phthalates were meat-based, such as cheeseburgers or burritos. The team also found DINCH, DEHT and DEHA, chemicals that have begun replacing phthalates in many of the samples they collected. They note that it is not known if such replacements are harmful to humans if ingested. The researchers did not attempt to find out how the phthalates were making their way into the fast foods but suspect it is likely from residue on rubber gloves used by cooks who prepare them. It is also possible, they note, that they are coming from plastic packaging.   Removing digital devices from the bedroom can improve sleep for children, teens Penn State University, November 2, 2021 Removing electronic media from the bedroom and encouraging a calming bedtime routine are among recommendations Penn State researchers outline in a recent manuscript on digital media and sleep in childhood and adolescence. The manuscript appears in the first-ever special supplement on this topic in Pediatricsa nd is based on previous studies that suggest the use of digital devices before bedtime leads to insufficient sleep. The recommendations, for clinicians and parents, are:   1. Make sleep a priority by talking with family members about the importance of sleep and healthy sleep expectations; 2. Encourage a bedtime routine that includes calming activities and avoids electronic media use; 3. Encourage families to remove all electronic devices from their child or teen's bedroom, including TVs, video games, computers, tablets and cell phones; 4. Talk with family members about the negative consequences of bright light in the evening on sleep; and 5. If a child or adolescent is exhibiting mood or behavioral problems, consider insufficient sleep as a contributing factor. "Recent reviews of scientific literature reveal that the vast majority of studies find evidence for an adverse association between screen-based media consumption and sleep health, primarily delayed bedtimes and reduced total sleep duration," said Orfeu Buxton, associate professor of biobehavioral health at Penn State and an author on the manuscript. The reasons behind this adverse association likely include time spent on screens replacing time spent sleeping; mental stimulation from media content; and the effects of light interrupting sleep cycles, according to the researchers. Buxton and other researchers are further exploring this topic. They are working to understand if media use affects the timing and duration of sleep among children and adolescents; the role of parenting and family practices; the links between screen time and sleep quality and tiredness; and the influence of light on circadian physiology and sleep health among children and adolescents.

Raise the bar Smart Money
Alejandro Plasencia. Doctorado Honoris Causa

Raise the bar Smart Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 35:37


Mi invitado especial es Alejandro Plasencia. Empresario Mexicano que, entre otras cosas, revoluciona el gobierno corporativo, tema del cual le realizaron dos entrevistas en la revista Forbes México. Pero Alejandro va más allá del mundo empresarial en donde dirige sus negocios en México y en los Estados Unidos, con reconocimientos como Palmas de Oro 2019, Premio Nacional de Excelencia profesional 2020 y Doctorado Honoris Causa 2019. Además, Alejandro es Psicoterapeuta con gran interés y compromiso en el desarrollo y potencial humano, que, después de enfrentar y superar el reto de una de una profunda enfermedad, escribe un libro sobre cómo enfrentar la depresión y otros demonios. A mi en lo personal me encanto la cita de Robert Frost que Alejandro menciona en la primer parte de su libro: “En tres palabras puedo resumir todo lo que he aprendido acerca de la vida”; Continua hacia adelante. https://www.forbes.com.mx/ad-alejandro-plascencia-revoluciona-el-gobierno-corporativo/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/juan-pablo-delgado-mba-/ Credits: Smart money intro Traveler remix by Wildlight Voice: Eva Hernandez Podcast interview music background Bumbling by Pictures of Floating World

Art of the Possible
How to Rid the World of Bad Experiences: A Conversation with Jesse Purewal, Head of Brand at Qualtrics

Art of the Possible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 53:31


Rob and I are joined by Jesse Purewal, the Head of Brand at Qualtrics, who we define as a living example of Robert Frost's famous line - "the road less traveled." We intended to discuss the art of leadership, but instead fell into a fascinating conversation about the difference between being an entrepreneur and being entrepreneurial, and then shift into Jesse's wheelhouse - his quest to rid the world of bad experiences. For you customer experience strategy and design geeks, Jesse shares why behavioral data is not enough and needs sentiment data to unlock future experiences customers want... And listen through the end, Jesse drops some leadership/parenting wisdom inspired by Biff from Back to the Future II after he thought the mic was off. Enjoy!

The Calm Christmas Podcast with Beth Kempton
S2 Ep 1: PREPARE (intention + inspiration)

The Calm Christmas Podcast with Beth Kempton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:35


I have loved Christmas since I was a child. The hopes of snow and flying reindeer, that special Christmassy feeling in the air. I still sense that as a grown up, but the festive season seems to come with a lot more pressure these days. This year, instead of trying to create the perfect Instagrammable Christmas, what if we just relaxed and focused on what really matters? Welcome to Season Two of the Calm Christmas podcast with bestselling self-help author Beth Kempton. This series is all about making the season special for less – less stress, less expense, less pressure… Episode 1 is on the theme of PREPARE and includes:A cosy introduction to The Calm Christmas PodcastPondering the question of what Christmas means to you – and to meSome beautiful wintery words from some of my favourite writers and poetsJournaling prompts for reflecting on your Christmas experiencesPlus our weekly nature corner, recipes, wellbeing ideas and tips for getting ahead for ChristmasI hope this podcast will help you locate Christmas as an anchor in the stormy seas of winter in this world right now. New episodes every Wednesday throughout November and December. Remember to subscribe to get new episodes as soon as they drop! CLICK HERE to sign up for my FREE two-week writing course, the Winter Writing Sanctuary (runs Nov 22 – Dec 4 2021) For more details of my book Calm Christmas and a Happy New Year go to bethkempton.com/christmasTo be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of The Almanac 2022 by Lia Leendertz and my book Calm Christmas, head over to Instagram @bethkempton. The deadline for entries is 4pm UK time on Friday November 5, 2021. Take good care, Beth (@bethkempton on Instagram)Featured in this episode:·      Good Hours by Robert Frost, in A Mind of Winter edited by Robert Atwan·      We Can be Film Stars, Just for One Day by Sue Townsend in On Christmas: A seasonal anthology by Gyles Brandreth·      Of Calcutta, Christmas and New Year by Suhel Seth in On Christmas: A seasonal anthology by Gyles Brandreth ·      Introduction by Judith Flanders in Poems for Christmas·      Christmas: A biography by Judith Flanders ·      The Almanac: A seasonal guide to 2022  by Lia Leendertz ·      Royal Horticultural Society's Gardening Through The Year by Ian Spence·      East Wind Melts the Ice by Liza Dalby ·      Calm Christmas and a Happy New Year by Beth Kempton 

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Nothing Gold Can Stay

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 164:51


Today on Boston Public Radio: Adam Reilly and Saraya Wintersmith give final insights from the Boston mayoral race before tomorrow's election. Reilly is a reporter for GBH News and co-host of the Scrum politics podcast. Wintersmith covers Boston City Hall for GBH News. They co-host “Election 2021: Boston's Race Into History” on GBH 2. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on tomorrow's mayoral election. Charlie Sennott updates listeners on the state of climate change and statements from leaders at the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, known as COP62. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Michelle Singletary talks about the importance of the child tax credit and paid child leave, sharing her experiences facing racism and caring for her brother as a young adult. She also gives tips on how to avoid internet scams. Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column "The Color of Money" provides insight into the world of personal finance. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on a Boston Globe report showing how Black and white people travel to different areas of the city, and persisting reactions to Dave Chappelle Netflix special. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Richard Blanco reads fall-themed poetry, including “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost, “The Blower of Leaves” by January Gill O'Neil, “November 2: Día de los muertos” by Alberto Ríos and “Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio” by James Wright. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. We end the show by talking with listeners about how they're adapting their gift-giving plans amid supply chain issues and shortages.

A51 Crescita personale podcast
Ogni tua scelta fa la differenza

A51 Crescita personale podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 3:25


Due poesie di Robert Frost ci aprono la mente e ci spalancano il cuore e l'anima.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 2 - Is Hill House Haunted Or Not?!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 48:17


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 2 - Is Hill House Haunted Or Not?!   I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.     Read the first paragraph of chapter 2.    That is the first paragraph of chapter 2 of The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson.  This is episode 2 as we explore this haunted space- and Christy, haunted it is.  Last week, we spent a lot of time talking about Shirley Jackson and her relationship with her mother.  It was our argument that a lot of the terror she creates springs originally from the dysfunction of living with a toxic mother.  We introduced the idea of reality versus illusion and the difficulty of knowing one from the other- especially in these toxic relationships.  We introduced the idea of feeling trapped and alone.  All of these feelings metaphorically expressing themselves not just in the characters who populate the story, but also in the physical space- the haunted house itself.      And Jackson borrowed from every gothic trope she could find to build for us a very relatable creepy house-  it's so stereotypical, we have to wonder if that in itself is part of her strategy- which of course, it very much is.   But, why?  What is she expressing? Of course, we know that haunted houses do express evil and fear and always have. We, also know that houses, in and of themselves, occupy a very important place in our psyche.  As people, we have an incredibly powerful psychological attachment to the physical spaces that populate our lives.  Physical spaces can bring us memories; as in favorite vacation destinations, they can be sacred as in a church, and they can also be haunted.  Let me quote Dr. Montague as he explained the origins of haunted houses to his assistants in chapter 3     Page 50-51    Jackson, herself, was always interested in houses- and for good reason.  Her grandfather had been a very important architect  in San Francisco, and she brought all of that family interest into her own life.  Jackson wanted to write a ghost story and then she set out to write Hill House, so, I guess it just made sense for her to research a bunch of different houses in order to create the one for her story.  She even enlisted her mother to help her get some research about a famous haunted house in San Jose, California, the Winchester Mystery House- one that still attracts millions of visitors visit every year.      I also happened to notice that Dr. Montague directly references this very famous house.  I wish I can say I had heard of it, but I hadn't, so I looked it up.  A woman by the name of Sarah Winchester inherited $20 million in 1881 from her dead husband and his family who had made their money selling firearms.  She was said to have moved to California to build a home for the spirits of the dead people who had been killed by the firearms made by her husband's family.  The Winchester house is really bizarre and worth Googling.  I can see why it has so many visitors.  It is enormous: 24,000 square feet; it has 10,000 windows, 47 stairways and fireplaces, 160 rooms, and 17 chimneys among other things.      It's weird looking too with all those turrets that remind us of what a proper haunted house should look like,  and Jackson studied it and her house has turrets, but Hill House isn't just one house, and it's not near as large as the Winchester House.  It's funny how many theories there are about what all inspired Hill House.  Stanley, Shirley's husband worked as a professor at a woman's college, I'm not sure we got to that last episode, but he worked at Bennington College in Vermont.  Well the Music building on campus is called Jennings Hall, and it is apart from the other buildings.  It's made from gray stone and stands against the hills, kind of like the opening of Hill House.   Lots of people see that connection. Ruth Franklin, Jackson's most recent biographer and probably the leading expert on all things Jackson, talks about a file she found in Jackson's archive at the Library of Congress when she was researching Jackson's life.  She found a collection of pictures and newspaper clippings about all these different places and events that inspired Hill House.  One was a newpaper article about a poltergeist incident in Long island, there were pictures of a couple of castles, there was the Winchester house stuff, but then she found one called the Edward H Everett Mansion- which is also in Vermont, and actually very near Bennington where Jackson and her family lived.  Franklin and her husband went there when she was researching for her book on Jackson and were basically shocked at how evil that house looked.  She and her husband both got chills just being on the property, so Franklin believes a lot of Hill House is inspired by that place.      At the end of the day, Hill House is the invention of Shirley Jackson's mind- not a specific place on earth.  It is also a creepy ole' metaphor for something- and when you're reading the book by chapter 4 where we go to in this episode - you don't know what it could be- but you intuitively feel it has to have something to do with a home- but definitely not a happy home- but maybe a place that should have been happy but is twisted, but maybe it is even a place that promised to be happy or to be something- but it lied about that.  I think when we read novels, especially the ones we like, sometimes we don't really know what we identify with- we just feel some sort of connection.  I think that's the big question in this book- especially at the beginning.  What am I supposed to make of this house?  Why am I compelled to read about it?   If it's so creepy why does Eleanor stay there?  What compels her to go inside? What's attracting her there?  Is it just that it's not her sister's house so anything is better than that?  Is she looking for a home?  As we read further on, we will come to understand that that is exactly what it is all about.  Of course, for all of us- having a home is important.  Wouldn't you agree, with Bing Crosby, Garry, that there's no place like home for the holidays?    Homes and thus families are important, there's a lot of psychological research to support that, of course.  But let's just narrow in on the idea of that physical space we associate with our home- where we currently are living and hopefully nesting.  For many of us, if we are going to make it our home- and not just a place where we sleep and maybe eat, a home is part of our self-definition- it is that physical space that expresses who we really are.  That's why decorating a home in your own way and making it beautiful to YOU is so important.  It's why I encourage people, even if you're wealthy enough to hire professional decorators, to be involved in that process in a personal way.  Most of us, however, don't have that problem, but we should make our home reflective of our interests, our passions, our tastes.  We should let it reflect OUR identity- in a positive way.  It's also true and I quote Robert Frost here, “Home is the place that, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.”  That's another very important idea.  It is a place where you feel safe, and you can be oriented in space and time.  It's a place where you can be vulnerable without being exploited.  But that's where the dangers reside, right?  If you are vulnerable, then by definition, you can be exploited- and of course, that happens, and it definitely happened to Shirley Jackson.    For me, a house really does has a spirit to it.  As strange as that sounds, especially if someone has lived in the same place for a while.  In some sense, a physical space has to develop its own energy and personality.  This is what I mean, Garry and I got married when my oldest daughter was a junior in college.  When she entered our new house- her new home, even though we put her things in a room, put her pictures on the wall, and tried to make her feel “at home”, she just didn't bond with the physical space.  She was living at college in a house of her own, and she was spending just a few days a year with us.  Her room at our house was nice; it was beautiful; but the house just wasn't her friend yet.  A full year later, we had a house fire, and I was in tears as things burned, thankfully just one room truly burned before we stopped the fire, but Anna was very stoic about the whole thing.  She just couldn't be sad.  She told me, point blank, I don't feel anything.  I don't feel like this is my space.  This isn't my home.  Of course this made me sad because I wanted her to feel at home there in our space with her sister and step-father, but it wasn't something I had any power to create.   There were no memories in that space for her at that time, and the only that that would ever change that is creating memories for that space in that space- of course, the fire ironically was a memory for us all- but it really is about the passing of time and what we do with the passing of time.  Living there- bringing friends there, filling up the air with the smell of food and the fire place, sharing meals together- playing games around the table- the house has had to develop a spirit of its own- and hopefully a positive safe and welcoming one and hopefully one that is still being developed.    Of course you're right.  That is why it's important to be intentional about that sort of thing because just as a space can be positive, it can also be negative.  And just as it can have a positive effect on a person, it can have a negative one as well- obviously.     William Sax, Professor of anthropology, says it this way: People and places where they reside engage in a continuing set of exchanges; they have determinate, mutual effects upon each other because they are part of a single, interactive system.”  Listen to what he means- people and places engage with each other- they interact with each other and have effects on each other- they are part of one single interactive system.  It's a very interesting way of looking at how we engage the world.  This is true.  It's originally a Southeast Asian concept, but it really nails a universal truth.     Of course it's that very idea that I also see Jackson taking and running wild with it in her book- physical space interacting actively with the people who occupy its space.      Reading here how Jackson plays around with the concept of this house is really a hyperbolized version of spaces interacting with people- and in her case, she builds an entire 80 year history of negative memories in this house.  Here, crazy enough, the house actually is a villain- although I know that's not totally obvious by the end of chapter 4- but even early on before the house spooks a single person when we read the history of the house, we can see how much negative emotions and hurt are a part of the spirit of this house.     For sure, Jackson makes Hill House into a literal character in the story.  This house has emotions.  She tells us explicitly this house is without kindness and has no concession to humanity- not unlike her own mother (as we saw last episode).  She goes on to say Hill house is not fit for love or for hope- that's how Jackson literally describes it.  But unlike a real house in the real world, what makes this fictional story creepy is that we are going to see that the house has agency- or it at least appears to.  The house does stuff- or maybe it does stuff- that's the big unanswered question.  Who's doing the stuff in the house.  Either way, Of course, this is all the opposite sort of things we want in our physical home, and I'm sure almost everyone would agree with that.   And let's be mindful here.  Shirley Jackson spent a lot of time thinking about her house.  She spent a lot of time, in fact, most of her time, thinking about her home.  She was first and foremost a homemaker. And she was extremely intentional about what she invested her time in.  She did a lot of cooking- and neglected a lot of cleaning opting to make her space a fun liveable one, contrary to popular standards and practices of her time.  She, probably better than most writers or any genre at any time, knew exactly how powerful a home was and could be and how a person could frame it.  Heck, she financed her entire life out of humorously discussing hers.  Her house was famously vibrant, full of life, full of energy, full of visitors- both celebrated literary friends of hers, as well as the dozens of childhood playmates that continuously bounced between the walls.  She clearly knew how to make a happy home, but here in this book, she strips all of that positive away and we see she also knew what a house without kindness could be like.       So interesting.  What's also interesting to me is that historically, this haunted house archetype goes back hundreds of years, well before Jackson came on the scene.  We all know this, I mean who hasn't seen pictures of those gloomy castles in old Gothic stories.  We all know those houses that wreaked havoc on Victorian readers, on Scooby Doo readers, on all of us.  I've read several of these to my own kids over the years, And now that I think about it, all these haunted houses kind of look like Hill House, they usually have two stories maybe a turret or tower, but for sure a black cat on a porch, bats coming out a window, and full moon somewhere behind it.      So true,  I think I've even mailed one or two Halloween cards with those very images on them, but literary haunted houses are slightly differently than the Scooby Doo thing.  In literary fiction authors use these Gothic tropes, and I'm going to put Jackson in this group, to create some sort of metaphor, to flesh out something moral or psychological- and this makes the inside of the house much scarier than the outside- as creepy as these pictures are.  The house represents something inside that is scary and that really exists in our world.  So the question is, what about this house scares us?  What are we really afraid of?  What are the ghosts?    And for me, although, I know this is totally a non-literature way of looking at things, to answer that question I find myself looking at Shirley Jackson as a person and the world she lived in.  Shirley Jackson was a woman of the 1950s, she was a writer and commentator and a deep thinker about that world.  She was a daughter, as we discussed last week, but she was also a mother herself.  And the definition of motherhood in the 1950s was very unique in American history because, and I talked about this a little last episode, but there was a giant shift after WW2 for the American family and especially for women.  Last episode, I talked about that second wave of feminism and Jackson as a professional woman may have looked at all of that, but today I want to bring up another important and that is this idea of the postwar rush to the suburbs and America's cult of the family- that is a very big distinctive historically about this time period. And it in fact, it is still very much a part of our American identity, even to this day.  After WW2, life changed for almost everyone in a positive way.  Life wasn't as hard as it had been before the war.  People could own a home; everyone seemed to want a family.  It was a status symbol.  We all wanted a particular kind of family- the nuclear family with a mom and a dad and children who were the product of that marriage.      That's not just an American thing- isn't that what everyone aspires to all over the world even today.      Of course- but for America, in this post World War 2 era, everything was changing and prospering in a new way and so this was not a pipe dream- it was attainable in a way that had NEVER been possible before.  Think about Of Mice and Men and how destitute things were during the depression.  That was all over.  Now- People had time to think about things like competitive living.  Before that we all were just trying not to starve.  We also had mass media that was projecting what prosperity looked like, or at least should look like.  This kind of atomic family was the picture of happiness.  This social framework was on the covers of all the magazines, in all the movies, in all the tv shows.  It was sanctioned by our churches, and how good or successful we were as humans depended on how well we created this particular family.  If your family wasn't this kind of family, we used the word “broken”.  You came from a broken home.  I know this very personally because this was my reality.  I was raised in a “broken” home.  My parents were divorced- although I'm not from the 50s, but even during my childhood this was a very shameful thing for a child- something was wrong with you, with your family, with your home.  Shirley Jackson's home wasn't physically broken at all- at least not in the way that mine was, but the appearance of perfection haunted her from her earliest memories.  Her parents were in hot pursuit of that perfection.  And as an adult when she was homemaking she was very aware of all of these family and social dynamics at work.  Almost all of her writings center around these ideas in one way or another, the fiction and the non-fiction.      So, back to Hill House, if we look at a home your way, as a place where individuals are supposed to belong- let's look at these characters from that perspective of why they might be showing up at Hill House.  Because the characters in this story are definitely not coming from that background.  They are all broken, if we pay close attention.  We see that Eleanor doesn't have a father or now a mother.  Theo is very vague about her identity, even about who she lives with- we don't even know if her roommate is a man or  a woman, the only thing she lets out in her introductory comments is about spending her vacations alone at boarding school which is kind of dark, and Luke will claim later on to not having a mother.  So, I guess, none of them really have a place to go for the holidays, to use the language from Bing Crosby's song.  When they get to Hill House, although the house itself is creepy, they seem happy to have found each other.  The lure of having what this house may be offering is greater than the risk of what could be scary about it being haunted.  The girls even wear bright colors to brighten up the dreary home; they run outside, the house is in a valley and kind of covered up, but they also claim it's a “place for picnics”, something happy families do- and of course, we'll see at the end of the book that this parody of the picnic will come back to haunt both girls. In the beginning, Eleanor and Theo claim to be cousins and the last sentence of chapter 2 is, “Would you let them separate us now?  Now that we've found out we're cousins?”.      When they meet Luke in chapter 3, Eleanor very quickly asks, “Then you're one of the family? The people who own Hill House? Not one of Doctor Montague's guests?”  Of course, she doesn't mean her own family- but for Eleanor- in some ways that is what she is fantasizing about- this notion of family- a place to call home.      Let me also point out that by this point in the story, even though, we're still in the very beginning, the house has already played a benign trick on Eleanor and Theo- there was an incident about a rabbit frightening them.  It's cute and funny but odd none the less.  Hill House, for Eleanor, although is obviously ugly, vile and haunted, is not an unhappy place.  It holds promise.  When they come in and meet Dr. Montague, he pours drinks for everyone and Eleanor comments, “Everything's so strange, I mean, this morning I was wondering what Hill House would be like, and now I can't believe that it's real, and we're here.”  She struggles to believe it, but as she sits with the other three and the thought she has is this and I quote, “I am the fourth person in this room; I am one of them; I belong.”    And of course, all of the conversation between the four of them is fun-loving.  They make jokes about what they do in the other world.  Almost all of it is non-sense.  Eleanor talks about being the talk of café's, Luke says he is a bullfighter, Theo claims to be clad in silk and gold.      Yes, and Dr. Montague assumes the role of a a traditional father-figure.  He calls them children and tells them stories.  Let's read that part.  They all sit around, and he tells the story of Hill House.    Page 54-      It's definitely a creepy story and the Crain family is definitely a miserable group of people, but getting to the current moment if Mr. Montague is the father-fugure, Luke, Theo and Eleanor are the kids, then in some sense the house is the mother- there's no one else.  But from the history of the house, there was never really a real mother that ever lived here.    Yes- and that brings me back to my discussion of the 1950s.  Before the 50s, life in the United States was more difficult.  Many people we're struggling to exist- mostly fighting mother nature on a farm or a ranch.  When wealth came to the United States in that post war era, like we already said forming an ideal family and an ideal home was at the heart of that- but at the heart of the home were the children.  A new word showed up in the Webster dictionary in 1958 that had never existed in English before- that is the word, “parenting”.  And whatever it meant, parenting was about the responsibility of making perfect kids or at least making a perfect growing up experience for kids, and how to do that was naturally- again in very American form- supercontroversial and divisive.  There was this book that came out in 1944 by a doctor by the name of Dr. Benjamin Spock.  This book took America by storm.  In his book, he claimed parents should not discipline their children.  They should be permissive.  The idea before this was that humans were evil, and children were humans, so they needed to be disciplined or tamed into doing right- if you indulged them you would “spoil” them- that was the word.  Dr. Spock took the opposite approach, his theory was that all of us are good and it is not possible to spoil a child.  A child who is loved will never be spoiled by things you give him/her or do for him/her.  If they had everything they needed, they didn't need to act out or misbehave.  In either case, no matter which side of the argument you fell on- one thing both camps had in common was the child was the center of the home. Everything was about the children.     And this was where Shirley Jackson, the mother, fit in.  Look at the titles of her two books of essays about her children, Life Among the Savages and Raising Demons. Jackson took seriously this debate about “parenting”.  In 1960 she wrote a book titled “Special Delivery, a Useful Book for Brand-New Mothers”.  Let me read a small quote from an essay in there called, “Whos' the Boss?”    “After Careful study it is going to be clear to the earnest mother that the enormous propaganda on child raising in books, magazins, and even adverstisments is being largely written by babies.  Baby is the boss, the articles point out flatly; first you are waiting for him, an dthe you are waiting on him.  Perhaps this is because 20 or 25 years ago the going rage in baby care was exactly the opposite.  Children who were allowed a little freedom of choice were going to be ‘spoiled' and the worse possible thing an anguished mother could do was pick up a crying baby. In our family there is a sharp division of opinion on the question of the authority of the child.  Our four children ardently support he cause of absolute indulgence, warmly seconded by their grandparents on both sides.  My husband and I, bolstering one another secretly with reminders that we are firm, righteous, fair, stem although impartial, band beyond all else the heads of the family, have managed to fight the issue to a standstill somewhere between the two camps.”    She is funny.      She definitely is, and even in Hill House, there are parts of the dialogue that are really funny- especially when we get to the parts about Mrs. Montague who is absolutely absurd.  But here's where I want to land.  Eleanor is our central character- no doubt.  We are wedded to her point of view.  There is no doubt that the allure of Hill House is also her desire for a family- to not be alone- one of the creepier elements for me in this book is Eleanor's constant revisiting the phrase “Journeys end in lovers meeting”.  I think it's repeated 14 times, maybe more than that.     Yeah- what is that about.    Well, of course, we never really know.  It's actually a quote from Shakepeare's play 12th Night.  Which is a comedy about a girl named Viola.  12th Night is very typical Shakespeare, I actually just watched it at a Shakespeare in the park this summer in Nashville.  It's a happy play and after a lot of misteps and misidentities Viola finds true love at the end.  The Journey for Viola ended in a lovers meeting.  But the way Jackson uses it isn't like the way Shakespeare uses it at all.  It really is not used in any kind of romantic sense.  Eleanor wants to meet love, but I'm not sure she's very particular as to the kind of love she meets.  It doesn't have to be sexual, for sure.  Although there's a little bit of flirtation with Luke, it definitely ends poorly. This is a very asexual book.  In fact, the most graphic sexual part has to do with the demented Hugh Crain and his abusive relationship with his daughters.  Eleanor is looking for a family- she wants to be the center of someone's world, and that is normal and understandable, but she's also a bratty kid in many ways.  She's judgmental of everyone else, we will see.  Jackson is going to create every member of this family of Hill House to be dysfunctional and self-orbiting.  Every member of the family is tyrranically trying to be in control- and notice that is what Dr. Montague pointed out in the history of the house.  Hugh Crain, who built the house, is a horrible father- he parented his daughters as we find out late in the book- through sheer terror.  The house is a horrible mother, it's oppressive and vile and deceitful- but the Crain kids were terrible too.  They were competitive and hurtful.  And now we get these “kids” – if that is what we're going to call Luke, Theo and Eleanor- are going to all three be portrayed as self-centered and competitive.  Dr. Montague in this playful exchange at dinner says this and notice Jackson's carefully chosen words, “You are three willful, spoiled children who are prepared to nag me for your bedtime story.”  Jackson uses the loaded language of her generation- words everyone in the 1950s would recognize.      So are you saying, Jackson is saying, children are tyrranical as well as mothers?  Is everyone tyrranical?      Well, I really don't know if I'm ready to comment on that yet but maybe.  I want to point out something though that IS interesting.  Both Theo and Eleanor were selected to come to the house because they supposedly have powers, Theo has telepathic power and Eleanor can create these poltergeist experiences where we can move things around- maybe subconsciously even.  This, I think is an important detail to include.  They are not powerless, and Jackson leaves room we will see to see both of them exercising their powers at various places in the book, maybe.      What do you mean by that?  That they may be using their powers or maybe they aren't, we can't be sure?    That's it exactly- and we're not even sure if they know if they are using their powers- they seem not to really understand that they have them. Now, let's go back and think about the HOUSE itself- As the story sets itself up in the exposition, four very different people have moved into the house.  The only thing they have in common is that they all have some sort of brokenness in the background, even Dr. Montague as we will find out when we meet his hideous wife, but they all are willing to move into a house that is supposedly haunted- but how and by whom?  And what are they going to do in the house.  Of course this question comes up in their evening together- their first bonding experience sharing food and drink together- and Dr. Montague confesses that he has no idea what will happen to them.  They will take notes, but that is all he can offer. They will drink brandy- as Luke points out- they are there to drink spirits- pardon the pun.  And they most certainly will.   Before they go to bed that first night, Theo and Eleanor share the stories of where they come from.  Let's read this part.    Page 64    What is interesting about that exchange is that we, as readers, already know Eleanor is lying.  None of what she just told them is true.  Things at Hill House are not what they appear to be.  In chapter 4 when they tour the house, Dr. Montague makes a point of pointing that out.      Page 77     Much of chapter 4 is describing the house- and the house is off- you can't see it at first- but it's off center.  There is a fairly large distortion because so much is off. There's also the marble statue of Mr. Crain, the veranda that's crooked, the cold spot in front of the nursery ironically which is symbolically in the middle of the house, and then the chapter ends with noises. This is the first really scary part in the book.  Eleanor apparently wakes up with someone calling her.  She thinks it's her mother at first before she remembers she's at Hill House.  When she goes to Theo's room Theo is scared out of her mind because she's heard someone knocking, plus it's terribly cold.  The noise gets louder until Eleanor shouts wildly, “Go away, go away!”  The door trembles and shakes against the hinges and ultimately they hear a little giggle and a whisper and a laugh before the Dr. and Luke get to them.    That is all very creepy and very definitely the stuff scary movies are made of.      Yes, and chapter 4 ends with Dr. Montague's observation.    - read  ending pg 99    Whatever is pressuring the house- is pressuring this little make shift family to break up.      But then again, no one ever knows what forces  are at work in any family dynamic. Do we?  What kind of subversive forces are at work in a house, in a home… in a home that is haunted?    Ha!  Good point Jackson.  I guess we often never do.      Well, that's terrifying enough for one episode.  We will pick up with chapter 5 next time and see just what exactly Jackson is doing with our minds.  Thanks for spending time with us as we explore the terrifying world Jackson has created at Hill House.  As always please tell your friends about us, push out an episode on your twitter account, or your Facebook account.  Text an episode to a friend.  If you're a teacher and want to use podcasts for instruction, go to our website and download a listening guide for your students to fill out as they listen.  We want to support learning around the world, and helping us share the world is how you can help us grow.  Thank you     Peace out.        

Become Who You Are
#148: Friday Morning Musings; The Road Not Taken, Praying with Temptations and more!

Become Who You Are

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:28


#148: Friday Morning Musings; The Road Not Taken, Praying with Temptations and more! Robert Frost, Lewis Carroll, Jillian, Jesus, Fr. Ryan Browning, The Father of Mercy, Praying with Temptations, Saint Teresa and Saint FaustinaDon't forget to sign up for our Newsletter!!  JPll Renewal Center email listPlease consider being a Sponsor of the show! Email me with questions!Pray the Rosary Every Day! See Podcast #'s 118, 119, 120, and 121... Praying the Rosary together! Children and FamiliesContact Jack: BWYR Podcast is a production of the John Paul ll Renewal Center or email him at info@jp2renew.orgSupport the show (http://jp2renew.org/donate/)

ArtScene with Erika Funke
Paul Salerni; October 28 2021

ArtScene with Erika Funke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:42


Dr. Paul Salerni, NEH Distinguished Chair in the Humanities & Professor of Music at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA, speaking about his recent album, "People, Places and Pets" released on the Bridge Records label, featuring the Bowers Fader Duo in his settings of poets including Robert Frost and Natasha Trethewey. For more information: www.bridgerecords.com/ www.lehigh.edu/

The Paris Review
19. A Memory of the Species (with Robert Frost, Yohanca Delgado, Antonella Anedda)

The Paris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 46:54


Robert Frost defines modern poetry in an excerpt from his Art of Poetry interview; the Italian poet Antonella Anedda discusses her poem “Historiae 2” with her translator Susan Stewart before the American vocal ensemble Tenores de Aterúe re-imagines the poem as a song in the folk tradition of Anedda's native Sardinia; and Yohanca Delgado reads her story “The Little Widow from the Capital,” a tale of mystery, heartbreak, and embroidery set in a New York apartment building.   Robert Frost's December 16, 1959, interview with Richard Poirier appears courtesy of the Woodberry Poetry Room at Harvard University's Houghton Library. PS3511.R94 Z467 1959x. HOLLIS Permalink: 990023780790203941.   To learn more about Tenores de Aterúe, check out their documentary feature at www.aterue.com. Visit Bandcamp to hear more of their music. This episode was sound designed and mixed by John DeLore, and mastered by Justin Shturtz. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Christian Parent, Crazy World
How to Discover Your Purpose in Life - Episode 17

Christian Parent, Crazy World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:04


EPISODE 17—HOW TO DISCOVER YOUR PURPOSE Links 3:38 Do you know that you have a purpose in life? Like beyond parenting. Beyond what you do for a living, even, perhaps. Beyond paying the bills and doing the chores and feeding the kids. You have a purpose in life. Something that God created you to do before you were ever born. God has a very specific part for you to play in the grand story He is writing throughout all of history In this podcast, I'm going to talk about how to discover why you were born. I will give you the Five P's of finding your purpose. Discovering your purpose in life really does tie into your parenting in a big way. Because when your kids see you living your purpose in life, they are going to be inspired to live out theirs. The majority of people live and die without ever discovering their purpose in life, the reason God created them. Isn't that sad. But what is even more sad is that the majority of Christians, the majority of people who know the God who created them with a purpose to fulfill for His Kingdom, they never discover that purpose is either. They never realize why they were put on this earth. How sad is that? It is tragic, really. The 5 P's to Your Purpose: People who fulfill their God-given purpose in life are people of prayer. They are people who plant themselves in Christ's body, in the church. They are people who allow God to prune them without losing their faith. They are people who persevere. And all the while, they never stop praising God. The question is not “Do I have a purpose?” Scripture is clear—you do. The question is, then, “Will I discover God's purpose for my life?” And then, “Will I fulfill God's purpose for my life?” Or… “Will I usurp God's purpose for my life with my own?” I encourage you to fulfill your purpose by praying, planting, allowing God to prune, the persevere, all the while praising God. And as you do this, you will be modeling for your kids how to fulfill their purpose in life too. SCRIPTURES REFERENCED: Jeremiah 1:5 Isaiah 49:1-2 Psalm 139:13-17 Ephesians 2:10 Isaiah 46:10-11 Proverbs 25:2 Psalm 92:12-13 John 15:1-2 Psalm 144:1 OTHER SOURCES REFERENCED: John Bevere Devotional “Jobs Are Hard” video The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Westside Unitarian Universalist Church Podcast
October 24, 2021 Nothing Gold Can Stay

Westside Unitarian Universalist Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 31:34


Robert Frost's poem evokes the transitory nature of the things we love.  As we gather to mark the coming observance of All Souls' Day (which will occur on Tuesday, November 2), we pause to remember those who have passed, and to honor the beauty and magic of their lives.  We will share poems and readings, and speak the names of those who have passed from this life but are still in our hearts. You're listening to the podcast for Westside Unitarian Universalist Church. in Knoxville, Tennessee.Your kind donations help make this podcast possible, as well as support the community work of Westside. Donate here: https://www.westsideuuc.org/donate

Audio Fanfic Pod
XF: Wasted By OnlyTheInevitable - MA

Audio Fanfic Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 16:17


Story: Wasted Author: OnlyTheInevitable Rating: MA Site link: https://archiveofourown.org/works/23424232 Read by: AnnieXFloweres Summary: What if Mulder and Scully were drunk the first time they had sex? You wonder whether Robert Frost ever envisioned his words floating through the mind of a terrified woman at midnight, about to make the biggest decision of her life. Used by the author's permission. The characters in these works are not the property of the Audio Fanfic Podcast or the author and are not being posted for profit.

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas
Robert Frost shares some DAILY FIRE

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 1:14


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. –Robert Frost Check out John Lee Dumas' award winning Podcast Entrepreneurs on Fire on your favorite podcast directory. For world class free courses and resources to help you on your Entrepreneurial journey visit EOFire.com

Take this poem
Episode 46: But I Am Done With Apple Picking Now

Take this poem

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:22


"After Apple Picking" by Robert Frost is a dreamy, drowsy autumn poem that retains its fresh mysteriousness through many readings and many, many years.    You can find the poem here if you'd like to read it for yourself: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44259/after-apple-picking

Last 8% Morning
The Single Greatest Effect on Our Children

Last 8% Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 18:27


You want to have a positive impact on the young people in your life, whether it is your own children or the young people you influence.So, you worry; you worry about whether they are eating well, exercising enough, growing the right skills, getting into the right schools, being influenced by the right friends, in a relationship with right girlfriend or boyfriend. And on and on...But you are looking in the wrong place.In today's episode, I look at what has the single greatest effect on our children.Let's walk!Interested in finding out what your personality type is when you face a Last 8% situation?To take our assessment go to: http://last8percent.com/quizYou can register for our next Last 8% Academy at: https://last8percent.com/“The thing that has the single greatest effect on children is the unlived lives of their parents”.Carl Jung“There is nothing in the world so much admired as a man who knows how to bear unhappiness with courage.”SenecaTo dare is to lose one's footing momentarily. To not dare is to lose oneself.”-Soren KierkegaardThe best way out is always through.”-Robert Frost

The Matty Mo' Show
Ep.1,359 The Road Less Traveled

The Matty Mo' Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 13:44


Hello and welcome to your one stop shop for daily enteryayment and everything dope right here on the #1 daily podcast out, The Matty Mo' Show! Get ready for a beautiful episode that'll make your head explode! Well maybe not all that, but it is dope and has a great message kicking things off with a classic Robert Frost poem! Strap in, kick back and get yourself ready to relax. Enjoy, tag a friend and as always thank you for stopping by and rockin' out with me! One love❤️✊

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 597 (10-4-21): Anticipating Frost as Fall Settles In

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-1-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 4, 2021.  This week, we pause our series of episodes on water connections to the human body, to revisit an episode from fall 2017 that explores one of the hallmarks of the autumn season. MUSIC – ~ 11 sec – instrumental.Following the astronomical start of fall on September 22, this episode features a fiddle tune named for a water-related weather event that will mark a meteorological fall turning point when it occurs across the Commonwealth in October or November.  Have a listen to the music for about 25 more seconds. MUSIC - ~26 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to part of “Cold Frosty Morn',” performed here by the western Virginia band New Standard.  One of the consequences of fall's arrival is frost in the mornings and, eventually, a significant enough freeze to end of the growing season, when temperatures fall to about 28 degrees Fahrenheit or below.  That temperature typically occurs for the first time each fall in mid-to-late October in western Virginia, early-to-mid November east of the Blue Ridge, and mid-to-late November in some Virginia coastal areas.  Those predicted periods are based on historical records through 2010; the typical frost and freeze dates may be shifting as Virginia experiences climate change.Generally, frost forms when water vapor in the air contacts plants, windows, cars, or other solid surfaces that are at or below water's freezing point of 32 degrees Fahrenheit.  Some specific kinds of frost include radiationfrost, occurring when surface objects are cooled by radiating their heat; advection frost, occurring when surfaces are cooled by winds; and rime, a dense type of frost that forms when super-cooled liquid water in fog or clouds contacts solid surfaces, such as trees, radio towers, or ships on winter seas. Frost may seem far away on Virginia's often mild, early October days.   But to paraphrase a comment about truth from the poem “Birches,” by RobertFrost, frost-producing weather will soon break in with all of its matter-of-fact. Thanks to New Standard for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of “Cold Frosty Morn'.” MUSIC - ~12 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode repeats and replaces Episode 387, 9-25-17. The performance of “Cold Frosty Morn'” heard here is copyright by New Standard, from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” used with permission. More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 501, 12-2-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Maps showing frost/freeze dates in the continental United States, based on data from 1980 to 2010.  Upper map: ranges of earliest dates of first 32°F freeze; middle map: range of median dates of first 32°F freeze; lower map: range of median dates of first 28°F freeze.  Images from the National Weather Service/Northern Indiana Forecast Office, “Frost and Freeze Information,” online at http://www.weather.gov/iwx/fallfrostinfo, accessed 10-4-21. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Deborah Byrd, “Equinox Sun is Over Earth's Equator on September 22,” EarthSky, Sept. 22, 2021. Robert Frost, The Poetry of Robert Frost, Edward Connery Lathem, ed., Holt, Rineheart and Winston, New York, 1969.  The quote to which this episode refers, from “Birches” on page 121, is the following: “But I was going to say when Truth broke inWith all her matter of fact about the ice storm….” Kenneth G. Libbrecht, “Guide to Frost,” online at http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/frost/frost.htm. National Weather Service, “Ice Storms,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter-ice-frost.National Geographic Society, “Frost,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/frost/. National Geographic Society, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/rime-ancient-mariner/. National Weather Service, Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office, “Watch/Warning/Advisory Definitions,” online at https://www.weather.gov/lwx/WarningsDefined. Isaac W. Park et al., “Advancing frost dates have reduced frost risk among most North American angiosperms since 1980,” Global Change Biology 2021, 27: pages 165–176, accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15380. Sarah Vogelsong, “Autumn's first frost is falling later. For farmers, the consequences are wide-ranging,” Virginia Mercury, Nov. 3, 2020. WeatherOnline, “Rime,” online at http://www.weatheronline.co.uk/reports/wxfacts/Rime.htm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). See particularly the “Science” and “Weather” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes on frozen or freezing precipitation.Freezing rain, sleet, and snow – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Hail – Episode 362, 4-3-17.Ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18;  Episode 404, 1-22-18; Episode 406, 2-5-18; Episode 556, 12-21-20.Snow – Episode 300, 1-25-16; Episode 407, 2-12-18. Following are links to some other episodes related to fall. Fall migratory birds – Episode 183, 10-14-13; Episode 281, 9-14-15; Episode 335, 9-26-16.Tree colors and changes in fall – Episode 285, 10/9/15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.2.3 – Matter can exist in different phases. Grades K-5: Earth and Space SystemsK.9 – There are patterns in nature.1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes; including that changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans.2.6 – There are different types of weather on Earth.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.4.4 – Weather conditions and climate effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 66.3 – There is a relationship between the sun, Earth, and the moon. Key ideas include6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic. Life ScienceLS.8 – Change in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. Earth ScienceES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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The Paris Review
Season 3 Trailer: The Paris Review Podcast Returns

The Paris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 2:30


The celebrated podcast returns for its third season! Join us on an audio odyssey through the pages of The Paris Review, featuring the best fiction, poetry, interviews, and archival recordings, from the world's most legendary literary quarterly. This season features fiction by Yohanca Delgado, Venita Blackburn, Bud Smith, Allan Gurganus, and Edward P Jones. Poetry from Monica Youn, Deborah Landau, Jericho Brown, Antonella Anedda, and Natalie Scenters-Zapico. Plus excerpts of interviews with Joan Didion, Robert Frost, Rachel Cusk, and George Saunders. This season includes the voices of Phoebe Bridgers, Connor Ratliff, Jessica Hecht, and Amber Gray. Check out this trailer for a preview of the upcoming season, and subscribe now to hear the first episode on October 27th, 2021. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Words by Winter
Poetry Snack, with Robert Frost

Words by Winter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 4:27


It's a twice-monthly Poetry Snack, this time with Robert Frost.Words by Winter: Conversations, reflections, and poems about the passages of life. Because it's rough out there, and we have to help each other through.Original theme music for our show is by Dylan Perese. Additional music composed and performed by Kelly Krebs. Artwork by Mark Garry. Today's poem, Acquainted with the Night, by Robert Frost, is in the public domain. Words by Winter can be reached at wordsbywinterpodcast@gmail.com.

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - W.H. Auden

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 0:27


Today's Quotation is care of W. H. Auden.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app!Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York, England, on February 21, 1907. He moved to Birmingham during childhood and was educated at Christ Church, Oxford. As a young man he was influenced by the poetry of Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, as well as William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Old English verse. At Oxford his precocity as a poet was immediately apparent, and he formed lifelong friendships with two fellow writers, Stephen Spender and Christopher Isherwood. In 1928, his collection Poems was privately printed, but it wasn't until 1930, when another collection titled Poems (though its contents were different) was published, that Auden was established as the leading voice of a new generation.Ever since, he has been admired for his unsurpassed technical virtuosity and an ability to write poems in nearly every imaginable verse form; the incorporation in his work of popular culture, current events, and vernacular speech; and also for the vast range of his intellect, which drew easily from an extraordinary variety of literatures, art forms, social and political theories, and scientific and technical information. He had a remarkable wit, and often mimicked the writing styles of other poets such as Dickinson, W. B. Yeats, and Henry James. His poetry frequently recounts, literally or metaphorically, a journey or quest, and his travels provided rich material for his verse.He visited Germany, Iceland, and China, served in the Spanish Civil war, and in 1939 moved to the United States, where he met his lover, Chester Kallman, and became an American citizen. His own beliefs changed radically between his youthful career in England, when he was an ardent advocate of socialism and Freudian psychoanalysis, and his later phase in America, when his central preoccupation became Christianity and the theology of modern Protestant theologians. A prolific writer, Auden was also a noted playwright, librettist, editor, and essayist. Generally considered the greatest English poet of the twentieth century, his work has exerted a major influence on succeeding generations of poets on both sides of the Atlantic. W. H. Auden served as a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 1954 to 1973, and divided most of the second half of his life between residences in New York City and Austria. He died in Vienna on September 29, 1973.From https://poets.org/poet/w-h-auden. For more information about W. H. Auden:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Garnette Cadogan about Auden, at 16:48: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-101-garnette-cadoganRuha Benjamin about Auden, at 13:10: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-129-ruha-benjamin“The Messy Genius of W. H. Auden”: https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2018/summer/feature/the-messy-genius-w-h-auden“Remembering W. H. Auden”: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1975/01/20/remembering-wystan-h-auden-who-died-in-the-night-of-the-twenty-eighth-of-september-1973

Idea to Startup
Vertical Farms, Robert Frost, and Growth

Idea to Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 15:32


We are BACK.We talk through how to approach a startup idea in a space you aren't in expert in, how to build momentum and make decisions fast, and the problem mindset. We also talk through how everyone was wrong about Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken and what that means for Brian's vertical farm startup. The Tacklebox Method - link to discount for ITS listenersFounder Venn Diagram - free, in Foundations -> Founder Venn DiagramThe Growth Mindset Tom Eisenmann interview - Why Startups Fail