Podcast appearances and mentions of Robert Frost

American poet

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Best podcasts about Robert Frost

Latest podcast episodes about Robert Frost

The Growing Edge
Growing Edge Episode 49 Feb 2023

The Growing Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 56:56


Parker and Carrie hope you'll join us as we explore the poem "Thanks, Robert Frost" by David Ray. Inspired by the poem, we revisit parts of our history and talk about reframing the stories we tell ourselves about who we are and what has shaped us. Staying true to the facts as best we can, we explore ways of holding our experiences with greater compassion for others and ourselves, valuing all that we can learn when we're able to befriend our own and others' mistakes.

Ye Old Reading Room
The Trial By Existence -- By Robert Frost --

Ye Old Reading Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 3:46


Robert Frost was born in San Francisco on March 26, 1874. Robert Frosts work is painted by tragedy just like his life. His father died in 1885, his mother in 1900, and his sister, who was committed to a mental institution, dies in 1920. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-fennell6/support

Queens of the Mines
Ina Coolbrith

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 32:19


Support the podcast by tipping via Venmo to @queensofthemines, buying the book on Amazon, or becoming a patron at www.partreon.com/queensofthemines   When Agnes Moulton Coolbrith joined the Mormon Church in Boston in 1832, she met and married Prophet Don Carlos Smith, the brother of Joseph Smith, founder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There, at the first Mormon settlement, Agnes gave birth to three daughters. The youngest was Josephine Donna Smith, born 1841. Only four months after Josephine Donna Smith's birth, Don Carlos Smith died of malaria.  In spite of Don Carlos being a bitter opposer of the ‘spiritual wife' doctrine, Agnes was almost immediately remarried to her late husband's brother, Joseph Smith in 1842, making her his probably seventh wife. Today we will talk about Josephine Donna Smith's, who's life in California spanned the pioneer American occupation, to the first renaissance of the 19thcentury feminist movement. an American poet, writer, librarian, and a legend in the San Francisco Bay Area literary community. Season 3 features inspiring, gallant, even audacious stories of REAL 19th Century women from the Wild West.  Stories that contain adult content, including violence which may be, disturbing to some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised. I am Andrea Anderson and this is Queens of the Mines, Season Three.    They called her Ina. But Sharing your partner with that many people may leave you lonely at times. Not surprisingly, during the marriage, Agnes felt neglected. Two years later, Smith was killed at the hands of an anti-Mormon and anti-polygamy mob. Agnes, scared for her life, moved to Saint Louis, Missouri with Ina and her siblings. Agnes reverted to using her maiden name, Coolbrith, to avoid identification with Mormonism and her former family. She did not speak of their Mormon past.  She married again, in Missouri, to William Pickett. Pickett had also converted to Mormonism, and had a second wife. He was an LDS Church member, a printer, a lawyer and an alcoholic. Agnes had twin sons with Pickett. They left the church and headed west, leaving his second wife behind.    Ina had never been in a school, but Pickett had brought along a well-worn copy of Byron's poetry, a set of Shakespeare, and the Bible. As they traveled, the family passed time reading. Inspired, Ina made up poetry in her head as she walked alongside her family's wagon. Somewhere in the Nevada sands, the children of the wagon train gathered as Ina buried her doll after it took a tumble and split its head.  Ina's life in California started at her arrival in front of the wagon train  through Beckwourth Pass in 1851. Her sister and her riding bareback on the horse of famous mountain man, explorer and scout Jim Beckwourth. He had guided the caravan and called Ina his “Little Princess.” In Virgina, Beckwourth was born as a slave. His father, who was his owner, later freed him. As the wagon train crossed into California, he said, “Here, little girls, is your kingdom.” The trail would later be known as Beckwourth Pass. Ina was the first white child to cross through the Sierra Nevadas on Beckwourth Pass.  The family settled in San Bernardino and then in Los Angeles which still had largely a Mormon and Mexican population. Flat adobe homes with courtyards filled with pepper trees, vineyards, and peach and pomegranate orchards. In Los Angeles, Agnes's new husband Pickett established a law practice. Lawyers became the greatest beneficiaries, after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, acquiring Mexican land in exchange for representation in court contests. Pickett was one of those lawyers. Ina began writing poetry at age 11 and started school for the first time at 14. Attending  Los Angeles's first public school on Street and Second. She published her poetry in the local newspaper and she was published in The Los Angeles Star/Estrella when she was just fifteen years old.  At 17, she met Robert Bruce Carsley, a part-time actor and a full time iron-worker for Salamander Ironworks.  Salamander Ironworks.built jails, iron doors, and balconies. Ina and Robert married in a doctor's home near the San Gabriel Mission. They lived behind the iron works and had a son. But Robert Carsley revealed himself to be an abusive man. Returning from a minstrel show in San Francisco, Carsley became obsessed with the idea that his new wife had been unfaithful to him. Carsley arrived at Pickett's adobe, where Ina was for the evening,  screaming that Ina was a whore in that very tiny quiet pueblo. Pickett gathered up his rifle and shot his son in law's hand off.  The next few months proved to be rough for Ina. She got an uncontested divorce within three months in a sensational public trial, but then, tragically, her infant son died. And although divorce was legal, her former friends crossed the street to avoid meeting her. Ina fell into a deep depression. She legally took her mothers maiden name Coolbrith and moved to San Francisco with her mother, stepfather and their twins.  In San Francisco, Ina continued to write and publish her poetry and found work as an English teacher. Her poems were published in the literary newspaperThe Californian. The editor of The Californian was author Samuel Langhorne Clemens. Also known as, Mark Twain. Ina made friends with Mark Twain, John Muir, Bret Harte and Charles Warren Stoddard, Twain's queer drinking companion. Coolbrith, renowned for her beauty, was called a “dark-eyed Sapphic divinity” and the "sweetest note in California literature” by Bret Harte. John Muir attempted to introduce her to eligible men.  Coolbrith, Harte and Stoddard formed what became known as the Golden Gate Trinity. The Golden Gate Trinity was closely associated with the literary journal, Overland Monthly, which published short stories written by the 28-year old Mark Twain. Ina became the editorial assistant and for a decade, she supplied one poem for each new issue. Her poems also appeared in Harper's, Scribner's, and other popular national magazines.   At her home on Russian Hill, Ina hosted literary gatherings where writers and publishers rubbed shoulders and shared their vision of a new way of writing – writing that was different from East Coast writing. There were  readings of poetry and topical discussions, in the tradition of European salons and Ina danced the fandango and  played the guitar, singing American and Spanish songs.  Actress and poet Adah Menken was a frequent visitor to her parties. We know Adah Menken from earlier episodes and the Queens of the Mines episode and she is in the book, as she was a past fling of the famous Lotta Crabtree.  The friendship between Coolbrith and Menken gave Menken credibility as an intellectual although Ina was never able to impress Harte of Menken's worth at the gatherings.     Another friend of Ina's was the eccentric poet Cincinnatus H. Miller. Ina introduced Miller to the San Francisco literary circle and when she learned of his adoration of the heroic, tragic life of Joaquin Murrieta, Ina suggested that he take the name Joaquin Miller as his pen name. She insisted he dress the part with longer hair and a more pronounced mountain man style.  Coolbrith and Miller planned a tour of the East Coast and Europe, but when Ina's mother Agnes and Ina's sister both became seriously ill, Ina decided to stay in San Francisco and take care of them and her nieces and nephews. Ina agreed to raise Miller's daughter, Calla Shasta, a beautiful half indigenous girl, as he traveled around Europe brandishing himself a poet. Coolbrith and Miller had shared an admiration for the poet Lord Byron, and they decided Miller should lay a wreath on his tomb in England. They collected laurel branches in Sausalito, Ina made the wreath. A stir came across the English clergy when Miller placed the wreath on the tomb at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Hucknall. They did not understand the connection between the late lord and a couple of California poets. Not to be outdone, the clergy sent to the King of Greece for another laurel wreath from the country of Byron's heroic death. The two wreaths were hung side by side over Byron's tomb. After this, Miller was nicknamed "The Byron of the West." Coolbrith wrote of the excursion in her poem "With a Wreath of Laurel".  Coolbrith was the primary earner for her extended family and they needed a bigger home. So, while Miller was in Europe, she moved her family to Oakland, where she was elected honorary member of the Bohemian Club. When her mother and sister soon died and she became the guardian of her orphaned niece and nephew, The Bohemian Club members discreetly assisted Ina in her finances.  Ina soon took a full-time job as Oakland's first public librarian. She worked 6 days a week, 12 hours a day, earning  $80 per month. Much less than a man would have received in that position at the time. Her poetry suffered as a result of the long work hours and for nearly twenty years, Ina only published sporadically.  Instead, Ina became a mentor for a generation of young readers. She hand chose books for her patrons based on their interests. In 1886, Ina mentored the 10-year-old Jack London. She guided his reading and London called her his "literary mother". London grew up to be an American novelist, journalist and social activist. Twenty years later, London wrote to Coolbrith to thank her he said “I named you Noble. That is what you were to me, noble. That was the feeling I got from you. Oh, yes, I got, also, the feeling of sorrow and suffering, but dominating them, always riding above all, was noble. No woman has so affected me to the extent you did. I was only a little lad. I knew absolutely nothing about you. Yet in all the years that have passed I have met no woman so noble as you." One young reader was another woman featured in a previous Queens of the Mines episode, Isadora Duncan, “the creator of modern dance”. Duncan described Coolbrith as "a very wonderful" woman, with beautiful eyes that glowed with burning fire and passion. Isadora was the daughter of a man that Ina had dazzled, enough to cause the breakup of his marriage.  The library patrons of Oakland called for reorganization in 1892 and after 18 years of service, a vindictive board of directors fired Ina, giving her three days' notice to clear her desk. One library trustee was quoted as saying "we need a librarian not a poet." She was replaced by her nephew Henry Frank Peterson. Coolbrith's literary friends were outraged, and worried that Ina would move away, becoming alien to California. They published a lengthy opinion piece to that effect in the San Francisco Examiner. John Muir, who often sent letters and the occasional box of freshly picked fruit,  also preferred to keep her in the area, and in one package, a letter suggested that she fill the newly opened position of the librarian of San Francisco. In Coolbrith's response to Muir, she thanked him for "the fruit of your land, and the fruit of your brain" but said, "No, I cannot have Mr. Cheney's place. I am disqualified by sex." San Francisco required that their librarian be a man. Ina returned to her beloved Russian Hill. In 1899, the artist William Keith and poet Charles Keeler offered Coolbrith the position as the Bohemian Club's part-time librarian. Her first assignment was to edit Songs from Bohemia, a book of poems by journalist and the Bohemian Club co-founder, Daniel O'Connell. Her salary in Oakland was $50 each month. The equivalent of $1740 in 2022. She then signed on as staff of Charles Fletcher Lummis's magazine, The Land of Sunshine. Her duties were light enough that she was able to devote a greater proportion of her time to writing.  Coolbrith was often sick in bed with rheumatism. Even as her health began to show signs of deterioration, she did not stop her work at the Bohemian Club. She began to work on a history of California literature as a personal project. Songs from the Golden Gate, was published in 1895; it contained "The Captive of the White City" which detailed the cruelty dealt to Native Americans in the late 19th century.  Coolbrith kept in touch with her first cousin Joseph F. Smith to whom and for whom she frequently expressed her love and regard. In 1916, she sent copies of her poetry collections to him. He publicized them, identifying as a niece of Joseph Smith. This greatly upset Coolbrith. She told him that "To be crucified for a faith in which you believe is to be blessed. To be crucified for one in which you do not believe is to be crucified indeed." Coolbrith fled from her home at Broadway and Taylor with her Angora cats, her student boarder Robert Norman and her friend Josephine Zeller when the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake hit. Her friends took a few small bundles of letters from colleagues and Coolbrith's scrapbook filled with press clippings about her and her poems. Across the bay, Joaquin Miller spotted heavy smoke and took a ferry from Oakland to San Francisco to help Coolbrith in saving her valuables from encroaching fire. Miller was prevented from doing so by soldiers who had orders to use deadly force against looters. Coolbrith's home burned to the ground. Soldiers evacuated Russian Hill, leaving Ina and Josie, two refugees, among many, wandering San Francisco's tangled streets. Coolbrith lost 3,000 books, row upon row of priceless signed first editions, rare original artwork, and many personal letters in the disaster. Above all, her nearly complete manuscript Part memoir, part history of California's early literary scene, including personal stories about her friends Bret Harte, Mark Twain, and John Muir, were lost. Coolbrith spent a few years in temporary residences after the blaze and her friends rallied to raise money to build her a house. Mark Twain sent three autographed photographs of himself from New York that sold for $10 a piece. He then sat for 17 more studio photographs to further the fund. She received a discreet grant from her Bohemian friends and a trust fund from a colleague in 1910. She set up again in a new house at 1067 Broadway on Russian Hill. Coolbrith got back to business writing and holding literary salons. Coolbrith traveled by train to New York City several times for several years, greatly increasing her poetry output. In those years she produced more than she had produced in the preceding 25 years.  Her style was more than the usual themes expected of women. Her sensuous descriptions of natural scenes advanced the art of Victorian poetry to incorporate greater accuracy without trite sentiment, foreshadowing the Imagist school and the work of Robert Frost. Coolbrith was named President of the Congress of Authors and Journalists in preparation for the 1915 Panama–Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. That year, Coolbrith was also named California's first poet   , and the first poet laureate of any American state on June 30, 1915. A poet laureate composed poems for special events and occasions. Then, it was a position for the state that was held for life. The Overland Monthly reported that eyes were wet throughout the large audience when Coolbrith was crowned with a laurel wreath by Benjamin Ide Wheeler, President of the University of California, who called her the "loved, laurel-crowned poet of California." After several more speeches were made in her honor, and bouquets brought in abundance to the podium,  74-year old Coolbrith accepted the honor, wearing a black robe with a sash bearing a garland of bright orange California poppies, saying: "There is one woman here with whom I want to share these honors: Josephine Clifford McCracken. For we are linked together, the last two living members of Bret Harte's staff of Overland writers. In a life of unremitting labor, time and opportunity have been denied. So my meager output of verse is the result of odd moments, and only done at all because so wholly a labor of love.” Coolbrith continued to write and work to support herself until her final publication in 1917. Six years later, in May of 1923, Coolbrith's friend Edwin Markham found her at the Hotel Latham in New York very old, disabled, ill and broke.  Markham asked Lotta Crabtree to gather help for her.  Coolbrith was brought back to California where she settled in Berkeley to be cared for by her niece.  The next year, Mills College conferred upon her an honorary Master of Arts degree. In spring of 1926, she received visitors such as her old friend, art patron Albert M. Bender, who brought young Ansel Adams to meet her. Adams made a photographic portrait of Coolbrith seated near one of her white Persian cats and wearing a large white mantilla on her head.  A group of writers began meeting at the St Francis Hotel in San Francisco, naming their group the Ina Coolbrith Circle. When Ina returned to Berkeley she never missed a Sunday meeting until her death at 87-years-old. Ina Coolbrith died on Leap Day, February 29, 1928. The New York Times wrote, “Miss Coolbrith is one of the real poets among the many poetic masqueraders in the volume.” She is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland. My fave. Her grave was unmarked until 1986 when the literary society The Ina Coolbrith Circle placed a headstone.  It was only upon Coolbrith's death that her literary friends discovered she had ever been a mother. Her poem, "The Mother's Grief", was a eulogy to a lost son, but she never publicly explained its meaning. Most people didn't even know that she was a divorced woman. She didn't talk about her marriage except through her poetry.  Ina Coolbrith Park was established in 1947 near her Russian Hill home, by the San Francisco parlors of the Native Daughters of the Golden Westmas. The park is known for its "meditative setting and spectacular bay views". The house she had built near Chinatown is still there, as is the house on Wheeler in Berkeley where she died. Byways in the Berkeley hills were named after Bret Harte, Charles Warren Stoddard, Mark Twain, and other literati in her circle but women were not initially included. In 2016, the name of a stairway in the hills that connects Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Miller Avenue in Berkeley was changed from Bret Harte Lane to Ina Coolbrith Path. At the bottom of the stairway, there is a plaque to commemorate Coolbrith. Her name is also commemorated at the 7,900 foot peak near Beckwourth Pass on Mount Ina Coolbrith in the Sierra Nevada mountains near State Route 70. In 2003, the City of Berkeley installed the Addison Street Poetry Walk,  a series of 120 poem imprinted cast-iron plates flanking one block of a downtown street. A 55-pound plate bearing Coolbrith's poem "Copa De Oro (The California Poppy)" is  raised porcelain enamel text, set into the sidewalk at the high-traffic northwest corner of Addison and Shattuck Avenues Her life in California spanned the pioneer American occupation, the end of the Gold Rush, the end of the Rancho Era in Southern California, the arrival of the intercontinental train, and the first renaissance of the 19th century feminist movement.  The American Civil War played no evident part in her consciousness but her life and her writing revealed acceptance of everyone from all classes and all races.  Everyone whose life she touched wrote about her kindness.  She wrote by hand, a hand painfully crippled by arthritis after she moved to the wetter climate of San Francisco.  Her handwriting was crabbed as a result — full of strikeouts.  She earned her own living and supported three children and her mother. She was the Sweet Singer of California, an American poet, writer, librarian, and a legend in the San Francisco Bay Area literary community, known as the pearl of our tribe.  Now this all leads me to wonder, what will your legacy be?     Queens of the Mines was created and produced by me, Andrea Anderson. You can  support Queens of the Mines on Patreon or by purchasing the paperback Queens of the Mines. Available on Amazon.  This season's Theme Song is by This Lonesome Paradise. Find their music anywhere but you can Support the band by buying their music and merch at thislonesomeparadise@bandcamp.com        

Attack Life, Not Others
Kick-Start Your Week - 01.16.23

Attack Life, Not Others

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 2:32


"In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: It goes on.” — Robert Frost

Wisdom Daily by Motiversity
Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken - A Life Changing Poem For Hard Times

Wisdom Daily by Motiversity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 2:28


Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken - A Life Changing Poem For Hard TimesRobert Lee Frost was an American poet, who preferred to depict the realistic life in his work. Regarded as one of the most celebrated poets in America, Frost was an author of searching complex life philosophy and universal themes. His poem "The Road Not Taken" is regarded as one of the greatest poems written in the English language, and is still taught to this day.Spoken by: John Mydrim Ballantyne DaviesMusic: Audiojungle Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

@ Sea With Justin McRoberts

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and sorry, I could not travel them both and be one traveler, long I stood and looked down one as far as I could, to where it bent in the undergrowth, you might recognize that as the opening stanza to the Robert Frost poem, The Road Not Taken. It's the poem that ends, Two roads diverged in the wood, and I took the one less traveled by, and it has made all the difference. It's probably even more familiar. I remember being exposed to that poem. It was probably the first poem as a whole poem that I was actually taught or read really fully exposed to. I think I was a freshman in high school. And as I was exposed to and read and saw this poem, really for the first time, two things happened in me that I recall. One was a kind of, I guess, embarrassed response poetry, poems. They were written by and for hyper, emotive, weird people. And that if you were into poems and you liked poetry, then you must be a hyper-emotive and weird person. I was on the football team. I ran track. I was a guy.That was the one thing happening in my brain. The other thing happening in me was that I was really resonating, and I really liked the poem. And I really liked the rest of that section in our English class about poetry. Something about the very intentional use and shape and reframing of words actually resonated with my soul. That tension resolved itself over the years, till the beginning and even later in high school, as life got weirder and required more complex and deeper emotional responses. Poetry became an actual feature in my life as something I attempted to write. But definitely, I started reading more poetry all the way through college. And to be entirely honest, really, in the last decade or so, the more I've spent time, intentionally on, in my own inner universe, and done my best to come alongside people working in the arts and working in religious spaces where life is hard and complex and weird and strange.Poetry has not just become a useful tool or a powerful practice. It has become a really safe, generative, and transformative aspect of expression.It's a beautiful part of my life.I listened to Scott Cairns's read and lecture at the festival faith in writing. I believe it was in 2016. And not just not only was I struck by his writing and the way he read the things he wrote, but I was also really captured by the way he talked about his work. That's one of those. It's one of the aspects of art-making that oftentimes inspires me. So someone who's excellent in their craft and has the ability to talk about what they do, how they do it, and why they do it. I've been thinking about and hoping to catch Scott to talk about the power of poetry, the essence of poetry, and the necessity of poetry for a really long time. And so I'm really glad I got some time to sit down with him. I enjoy this conversation. I think you will as well.More info on Scott Cairns Hearts and Minds Bookstore

Madeleine And Her Attorney Watch Movies
Episode 18: 2022 YEAR-END REVIEW (Our Top 5 Movies)

Madeleine And Her Attorney Watch Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 126:20


Madeleine and her attorney get together for the first episode of 2023 and the last episode of 2022 and discuss their favorite movies of the year, and a few other things. We also establish a new annual tradition of Robert Frost reading.

Words in the Air: 52 Weeks of Poetry
1 January 1965 by Joseph Brodsky

Words in the Air: 52 Weeks of Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 2:28


Read Terry Casburn Production and Sound Design by Kevin Seaman

No BS Spiritual Book Club
Face to Face with Patricia Cori

No BS Spiritual Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 63:50


Face to Face with Patricia CoriLive on OMTimes Radio Thursday, December 29, 2022 at 10:30 PST / 1:30 PM ESTWatch the Livestream on the No BS Spiritual Book Club on Facebook, OMTimes Radio & TV Facebook, or OMTimesTV YoutubePsychic discoveries behind the iron curtain, ET's and abductions, conversations with the other side, parallel universes, the poetry of Robert Frost, the dark agenda currently playing out in our world, and archaeological evidence of ancient civilizations and gods… are just some of the topics covered in the 10 Best Spiritual Books list of this week's guest on the NO BS Spiritual Book Club's live streaming video series.PATRICIA CORI is an acclaimed author who has been bringing forth views on the underpinnings of global control for more than two decades. The former host of the Beyond the Matrix show, she is the author of several books including Hacking the God Code, The Conspiracy to Steal the Human Soul, No More Secrets, No More Lies: A Handbook to Starseed Awakening, Before We Leave You: Messages from the Great Whales and the Dolphin Beings, and The Cosmos of Soul: A Wake-Up Call for Humanity, to name a few.Connect with Sandie Sedgbeer at https://www.sedgbeer.com#PatriciaCori #SandieSedgbeer #NoBSSpiritualBookClubSubscribe to our Newsletter https://omtimes.com/subscribe-omtimes-magazine/Connect with OMTimes on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Omtimes.Magazine/ and OMTimes Radio https://www.facebook.com/ConsciousRadiowebtv.OMTimes/Twitter: https://twitter.com/OmTimes/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/omtimes/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/2798417/Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/omtimes/

No BS Spiritual Book Club Meets... The 10 Best Spiritual Books
Patricia Cori's 10 Best Spiritual Books

No BS Spiritual Book Club Meets... The 10 Best Spiritual Books

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 63:54


No BS Spiritual Book Club Meets… Acclaimed Author & Former Host of the Beyond Matrix Show Patricia Cori Psychic discoveries behind the iron curtain, ETs and abductions, conversations with the other side, parallel universes, the poetry of Robert Frost, the dark agenda currently playing out in our world, and archaeological evidence of ancient civilizations and gods… are just some of the topics covered in the 10 Best Spiritual Books list of this week's guest on the No BS Spiritual Book Club's live streaming video series. Patricia Cori is an acclaimed author who has been bringing forth views on the underpinnings of global control for more than two decades. The former host of the Beyond the Matrix show, she is the author of several books, including Hacking the God Code, The Conspiracy to Steal the Human Soul, No More Secrets, No More Lies: A Handbook to Starseed Awakening, Before We Leave You: Messages from the Great Whales and the Dolphin Beings, and The Cosmos of Soul: A Wake-Up Call for Humanity, to name a few. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sandie-sedgbeer/support

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
North of Boston | Robert Frost

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 31:27


Tonight, we'll read poems from “North of Boston” a collection from Robert Frost first published in 1914. Most of the poems resemble short dramas or dialogues. It is also called a book of people because most of the poems deal with New England themes and Yankee farmers. Known for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech, Robert Frost frequently wrote about settings from rural life in New England in the early 20th century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. Frequently honored during his lifetime, Frost is the only poet to receive four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. Read by 'N' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

UU Church of Annapolis Podcast
Frostiana: UUCA Choir Sunday

UU Church of Annapolis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 28:42


On this choir Sunday, from December 18th, listen to "Frostiana", seven of Robert Frost's poems put to music by composer Randall Thompson. Celebrate the incredible talent of Rob Redei, our many musicians, and our fabulous UUCA Choir!

Moonlight Audio Theatre
PULP-POURRI THEATRE: A Christmas Cornucopia

Moonlight Audio Theatre

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 56:37


Continuing our special run of Christmas and holiday shows, we proudly present this episode of Pulp-Pourri Theatre, A CHRISTMAS CORNUCOPIA. Originally launched in 2016, this comes from Season Four of that series. Enjoy and have a very merry holiday season! NARADA RADIO COMPANY PULP-POURRI THEATRE S4 E3: A CHRISTMAS CORNUCOPIA  1. SCROOGE & MARLEY'S REUNION (Live recording): Pete Lutz, Micah Blain, Jason D. Johnson, Ross Bernhardt, Julio Herrera 2. Robert Frost's STOPPING BY WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING: Lisa Michaud 3. BIX BIXBY BOOK REVIEW 1 (Dickens's "A Christmas Carol"): Melody Gaines, Nick Wommack, Austin Hanna, Pete Lutz 4. THE MARCH SISTERS' CHRISTMAS (Live recording): Pete Lutz, Victoria Fancki, Jessica Matthews, Paige Walker, Debby Leal-Ramirez, Wendy Sauer, Merilee Robinson, Richard Robinson 5. George Wither's A CHRISTMAS CAROL (1622) Austin Hanna, Geri Elliff, George Hatfield, Kristy Glick 6. THE BICKERSONS' CHRISTMAS EVE: Dana Gonsalves, Victoria Fancki, Pete Lutz 7. BIX BIXBY BOOK REVIEW 2 (Better Homes & Gardens Cook Book): Pete Lutz, Nick Wommack

The Leaves of a Victim never more with Steven Wilson
The Grinch and the consumerism of Merry Christmas

The Leaves of a Victim never more with Steven Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 27:26


Tonight I speak about how one member of the group session and their testimonial about one of. The circumstances in which they were raped. The group member gave a testimonial about what happened while watching How the Grinch stole Christmas TV special.I watched it this morning and it became a slight trigger for myself and afterwards I felt sick to my stomach.  It is rare that this happens to me.I read “Christmas Trees” from Robert frost as it parallels to allegory of consumerism in Christmas and the removal of the reason for the season now identified as the trappings of Christmas: lights, egg nog n brandy, presents, parties, and trees.

As It Goes
044 // The Darkness of the Winter Solstice

As It Goes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 55:38


We're going on a journey into the dark depths of our being to feel the heaviness of winter and reap the benefits of doing so before the festival of light in the holiday season. Many of us feel a sadness during these “merry” times be it loss, grief, loneliness, or unhealed wounds that surface. It chokes us when we suppress it; when we try to avoid it; when we don't make space to hold ourselves. Here, humbly, is that invitation and space. I hope it serves. Share with a friend... because sharing this energy is caring ✨ Friends who fuel friends to be well and live fully are true friends! www.RESELF.me Timestamps (00:00) A whispered message recorded after attending the candlelit service (03:35) Beginning with a meditation to enter the darkness within and set us off on our journey (essential for the most transformation) (10:02) The origins of the Winter Solstice celebration and its necessity to *make* this time joyous; feeling around in the underworld (18:32) What conspired to bring you to this moment to sit with your darkness? What do you find here? (26:34) Your unwavering light within is you as the embodiment and continuation of Creation to see and hold your pain as a gift so you can let it go (39:01) Robert Frost and Mary Oliver offer us food for our souls (44:12) Coming home to our true nature (47:27) We fade into our meditation to journey from the dark underworld back to the light transformed As Mentioned Women Who Run With The Wolves Yoni Circle 036 // Experiencing Oneness & Ourselves as Oneness Resources for further exploration and release via RECALIBRATE guides: The Shadow Embracing Endings Love our conversations? Support the future of As It Goes Join the RE SELF family Instagram YouTube www.RESELF.me --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/as-it-goes/support

Bookwallah Teatime Tales
The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost. Read by Seena Jacob of Bookwallah Organization.

Bookwallah Teatime Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 1:38


A beautiful poem about the choices we make impacting our life's journey.

Words by Winter
Poetry Snack: The Aim Was Song, with Robert Frost

Words by Winter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 3:43


It's a Poetry Snack, featuring Robert Frost.Words by Winter: Conversations, reflections, and poems about the passages of life. Because it's rough out there, and we have to help each other through.Original theme music for our show is by Dylan Perese. Additional music composed and performed by Kelly Krebs. Artwork by Mark Garry.  Today's poem, The Aim Was Song, is by Robert Frost and is in the public domain. Words by Winter can be reached at wordsbywinterpodcast@gmail.com. 

KZYX Public Affairs
For The Love Of Reading: "Poems We Love"

KZYX Public Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 57:40


December 7, 2022--On “For the Love of Reading” POEMS WE LOVE": Comforting, Funny, Epic, and Passionate–poetry by Edgar Lee Masters (from Spoon River Anthology), Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Dorothy Parker (from Enough Rope), Walt Whitman (from Leaves of Grass), and many more. Read for you by Linda Pack, Kate Magruder, and Nichole Phillips-Rakes.

The Daily Good
Episode 688: An incredible “water battery” reservoir, a classic winter poem from Robert Frost, good news for penguins in the Galapagos, the beauty of a Stockholm Christmas market, the musical genius of Teddy Wilson, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 25:47


Good News: A fascinating new method of storing energy is being worked on in Switzerland: a “water battery”! Learn more HERE. The Good Word: Robert Frost’s classic wintertime poem, “Stopping By The Woods On A Snowy Evening”. Good To Know: A fascinating fact about snowfall… Good News: An interesting and unique species of penguin in […]

Poem-a-Day
Robert Frost: "The Aim Was Song"

Poem-a-Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 3:20


Recorded by Robert Frost for Poem-a-Day, a series produced by the Academy of American Poets. Published on December 4, 2022. www.poets.org

Teaching Learning Leading K-12
Carol Anderheggen talks about her books - Writing Down Cancer and Born-Child - 523

Teaching Learning Leading K-12

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 37:52


Carol Anderheggen talks about her books - Writing Down Cancer & Born-Child. This is episode 523 of Teaching Learning Leading K12, an audio podcast.  Carol Anderheggen has been a published poet and writer since the 1980s and is an active disaster relief volunteer with the American Red Cross. She has confronted many challenges in her life. Taken out of her home early in her life, removed from a mom with mental health issues, she floundered in foster care and then was adopted by a Navy couple. Her second mother became an alcoholic. Later in life she became a survivor of breast cancer. Both her childhood of trauma and her adult health scare are the subject of her books. Her first chapter book, Writing Down Cancer, was published by Finishing Line Press. She followed that up with the publishing of Born-Child. She has been published in regional journals such as Anemone, The Great Swamp Gazette, Newport Life, and Northeast Journal and served on the staff of The Frost Festival of Poetry, Franconia, NH for seven years. She served as docent for the museum hours at Robert Frost's home in Franconia, NH, assisted the director with book sales and edited the annual attendee anthology of readings. Carol also worked as a school librarian media specialist for nearly three decades. Carol is active in the Ocean State Poets of Rhode Island, both as their web designer and as a practitioner of poetry outreach. As secretary and web-master of the organization, Ocean State Poets, in Rhode Island, Carol created and maintains the website, www.oceanstatepoets.org for the organization. As an OSP member, Carol has participated in area readings and nurtured a public library writing group with another poet, Heather Sullivan. Carol and Heather have worked together for seven years in a Salve Regina University community service class which pairs developmentally handicapped adults with Salve students. The class has produced two anthologies of poetry, a DVD of stage presentations highlighting community students abilities, and several group poems presented orally each school year. She earned a BA in English and an MLS from University of Rhode Island. Carol has two children and two grandchildren. She resides in Rhode Island. For more information, please consult: www.carolmaeray.com Some extra information before you go... The new intro and outro music was written and performed by Brian K. Buffington. Connect with Brian at briankbuffington@gmail.com or go to his website at  https://briankbuffington.com/ He is an awesome musician, comedic power, teacher, trainer, technology guru, and overall creator of all that is cool. Thanks, Brian! Oh, yeah... Could you do me a favor? Please go to my website at https://www.stevenmiletto.com/reviews/ or open the podcast app that you are listening to me on and would you rate and review the podcast? That would be Awesome. Thanks! Hey, I've got another favor...could you share the podcast with one of your friends, colleagues, and family members? Hmmm? What do you think? That would so awesome! Thanks for sharing! Thanks for listening! Connect and Learn More: https://www.carolmaeray.com/ carolmaeray@cox.net Length - 37:52

Let It Be Easy with Susie Moore
Who Are You Living For?

Let It Be Easy with Susie Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 7:05


Robert Frost said, "In three words, I can sum up everything I've learned about life: It goes on."What do you think will happen after your funeral? Let's think about that today.Also, I'm hosting a free workshop to show you how to coach yourself through life's challenges. Check it out here.And if you like this episode, please consider rating and reviewing the podcast on Apple Podcasts if you enjoy this episode! This helps to get the message out to more people just like you. And be sure to click the "Follow" button to get notified of updates.

The Poetry Exchange
75. Acquainted with the Night by Robert Frost - A Friend to Glyn Maxwell

The Poetry Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 28:08


In our latest episode, acclaimed poet, playwright and librettist Glyn Maxwell talks about the poem that has been a friend to him: 'Acquainted with the Night' by Robert Frost. Glyn is in conversation with Fiona Bennett and Michael Shaeffer. Glyn Maxwell's volumes of poetry include The Breakage, Hide Now, Pluto, and How The Hell Are You, all of which were shortlisted for either the Forward or T. S. Eliot Prizes, and The Nerve, which won the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize. On Poetry, a guidebook for the general reader, was published by Oberon in 2012. The Spectator called it ‘a modern classic' and The Guardian's Adam Newey described it as ‘the best book about poetry I've ever read.' Drinks With Dead Poets, which is both an expansion of On Poetry and a novel in itself, was published by Oberon in September 2016. Many of Maxwell's plays have been staged in London and New York, including Liberty at Shakespeare's Globe, and at the Almeida, Arcola, RADA and Southwark Playhouse. ********* Acquainted with the Night By Robert Frost I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain—and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. I have looked down the saddest city lane. I have passed by the watchman on his beat And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain. I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet When far away an interrupted cry Came over houses from another street, But not to call me back or say good-bye; And further still at an unearthly height, One luminary clock against the sky Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right. I have been one acquainted with the night. Robert Frost, "Acquainted with the Night" from The Poetry of Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem. Copyright © 1964, 1970 by Leslie Frost Ballantine. Copyright 1936, 1942 © 1956 by Robert Frost. Copyright 1923, 1928, © 1969 by Henry Holt and Co.

Don't Mom Alone Podcast
Good Boundaries and Goodbyes :: Lysa TerKeurst [Ep 387]

Don't Mom Alone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 39:57


“Good fences make good neighbors” is a line from Robert Frost's Mending Wall, but the poem goes on to say, “Before I built a wall I'd ask to know / What I was walling in or walling out”  So often in our lives we feel the unrest of chaos or dysfunction in our relationships, but we don't know exactly what we need to wall out or wall in. My guest this week, Lysa TerKeurst faced a new season of life and wanted to enter it with wisdom and strength - caring for others and herself in each of her relationships. Her personal journey led to her newest book, Good Boundaries and Goodbyes, a guide for each of us as we navigate relationships, practice setting healthy boundaries and even sometimes need to say goodbye.  Connect with Lysa TerKeurst:  Website:  https://lysaterkeurst.com  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OfficialLysa  Instagram:  @lysaterkeurst  Links Mentioned:   Good Boundaries and Goodbyes : Loving Others Without Losing the Best of Who You Are by Lysa TerKeurst    Setting Healthy Boundaries with Family :: Dr. John Townsend [Ep 250] Leslie Vernick and Difficult v Destructive Relationships - https://leslievernick.com  Therapy and Theology Podcast  Related Episodes: Setting Healthy Boundaries with Family :: Dr. John Townsend [Ep 250] Forgiving What You Can't Forget :: Lysa TerKeurst [Ep 304] 5 Schedule Sappers and How to Stop Them :: Lysa TerKeurst [Ep 45] Uninvited :: Lysa TerKeurst, Kay Wyma and Courtney DeFeo [Ep 131] Featured Sponsors:  Find links to this week's sponsors and unique promo codes at dontmomalone.com/sponsors.

Thoughts on the Market
Mike Wilson: Dealing With the Late Cycle Period

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 4:20


As we transition away from our fire and ice narrative and into the late cycle stage, investors will want to change up their strategies as we finish one cycle and begin another.----- Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Mike Wilson, chief investment officer and chief U.S. equity strategist for Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about the latest trends in the financial marketplace. It's Monday, November 14th, at 11 a.m. in New York. So let's get after it. Last year's fire and ice narrative worked so well, we decided to dust off another Robert Frost jewel to describe this year's outlook, with The Road Not Taken. As described by many literary experts, and Frost himself, the poem presents the dilemma we all face in life that different choices lead to different outcomes, and while the road taken can be a good one, these choices create doubt and even remorse about the road not taken. For the year ahead, we think investors will need to be more tactical with their views on the economy, policy, earnings and valuation. This is because we are closer to the end of the cycle at this point, and that means that trends in these key variables can zig and zag before the final path is clear. In other words, while flexibility is always important to successful investing, it's critical now. In contrast, the set-up was so poor a year ago that the trends in all of the variables mentioned above were headed lower in our view. Therefore, the right choice or strategy was about managing or profiting from the new downtrend. After all, Fire and Ice the poem is not a debate about the destination, it's about the path to that destination. In the case of our bear market call, it was a combination of both fire and ice - inflation and slowing growth, a bad combination for stocks. As it turned out, the cocktail has been just as bad for bonds, at least so far. However, as the ice overtakes the fire and inflation cools off, we're becoming more confident that bonds should beat stocks in this final verse that has yet to fully play out. That divergence can create new opportunities and confusion about the road we are on, and why we have recently pivoted to a more bullish tactical view on equities. In the near term, we maintain our tactically bullish call as we transition from fire to ice, a window of opportunity when long term interest rates typically fall prior to the magnitude of the slowdown being reflected in earnings estimates. This is the classic late cycle period between the Fed's last hike and the recession. Historically, this period is a profitable one for stocks. Three months ago, we suggested the Fed's pause would coincide with the arrival of a recession this cycle, given the extreme inflation dynamics. In short, the Fed would not be able to pause until payrolls were negative, the unequivocal indicator of a recession, but too late to kick save the cycle or the downtrend for stocks. However, the jobs market has remained stronger for longer, even in the face of weakening earnings. More importantly, this may persist into next year, leaving the window open for a period when the Fed can slow or pause rate hikes before we see an unemployment cycle emerge. That's what we think is behind the current rally, and we think it can go higher. We won't have evidence of the hard freeze for a few more months, and markets can dream of a less hawkish Fed, lower interest rates and resilient earnings in the interim. Last week's softer than expected inflation report was a critically necessary data point to fuel that dream for longer. We expect long duration growth stocks to lead the next phase of this rally as interest rates fall further. That means Nasdaq should catch up to the Dow's outsized move higher so far. Unfortunately, we have more confidence today than we did a few months ago in our well below consensus earnings forecast for next year, and that means the bear market will likely resume once this rally is finished. Bottom line, the path forward is much more uncertain than a year ago and likely to bring several twists and periods of remorse for investors wishing they had traded it differently. If one were to take our 12 month S&P 500 bear, base and bull targets of 3500, 3900, and 4200 at face value, they might say it looks like we are expecting a generally boring year. However, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, we would argue the past 12 months have been boring because a bear market was so likely we simply set our defensive strategy and stayed with it. That strategy has worked well all year, even during this recent rally. But that kind of strategy won't work over the next 12 months, in our view. Instead, investment success will require one to turn over the portfolio more frequently as we finish one cycle and begin another. Thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcast app. It helps more people to find the show.

Orden de traslado
Al detenerse junto al bosque una noche que nieva (Robert Frost, por Paula Zucchello)

Orden de traslado

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 0:55


Creo que sé de quién es este bosque. Pero, como su casa está en el pueblo, no va a advertir que me detengo acá a ver cómo en su bosque cae la nieve. Mi caballito ha de pensar que es raro hacer un alto en medio de la nada, entre el bosque y el lago que se heló, la noche más oscura de este año. Sacude los cencerros del arnés, preguntando si no hay algún error. Fuera de eso, únicamente se oye el viento suave y la mullida nieve. Qué hermoso el bosque, oscuro y bien tupido, pero quedan promesas por cumplir y kilómetros antes de dormir, y kilómetros antes de dormir.

Tales from the Majestic Mothership
32. Sacred Pause : Poetry Reading : Robert Frost

Tales from the Majestic Mothership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 4:31


I couldn't help myself! A poem that helps me process all this eclipse-y stuff!!! Enjoy! XO Jen Waiting—Afield at Dusk Robert Frost - 1874-1963 What things for dream there are when spectre-like, Moving among tall haycocks lightly piled, I enter alone upon the stubble field, From which the laborers' voices late have died, And in the antiphony of afterglow And rising full moon, sit me down Upon the full moon's side of the first haycock And lose myself amid so many alike. I dream upon the opposing lights of the hour, Preventing shadow until the moon prevail; I dream upon the night-hawks peopling heaven, Each circling each with vague unearthly cry, Or plunging headlong with fierce twang afar; And on the bat's mute antics, who would seem Dimly to have made out my secret place, Only to lose it when he pirouettes, And seek it endlessly with purblind haste; On the last swallow's sweep; and on the rasp In the abyss of odor and rustle at my back, That, silenced by my advent, finds once more, After an interval, his instrument, And tries once—twice—and thrice if I be there; And on the worn book of old-golden song I brought not here to read, it seems, but hold And freshen in this air of withering sweetness; But on the memory of one absent most, For whom these lines when they shall greet her eyes. This poem is in the public domain.

The Great Books
Episode 251: The Poetry of Robert Frost

The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 31:51


John J. Miller is joined by James Matthew Wilson of the University of St. Thomas to discuss the poetry of Robert Frost.

Teach Me A Lesson with Greg James and Bella Mackie
Is Taylor Swift Our Greatest Living Poet?

Teach Me A Lesson with Greg James and Bella Mackie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 42:50


Following the release of her latest album, 'Midnights', Greg and Bella find out if Taylor Swift is a great poet, as well as a great songwriter. English teacher Miss Tiddy is a Taylor Swift superfan, with an encyclopaedic knowledge of Taylor Swift's music (and dating history!). In this lesson, she'll use techniques familiar from English Language GCSE to dissect Taylor's lyrics, such as assonance, alliteration and pathetic fallacy. With the help of Shakespearean actor Olivia Vinall, Taylor's lyrics are brought to life and put under the microscope by Miss Tiddy - are Taylor's songs just nice words strung together, or are they actually poetry? Fellow Swiftie Jeremy Vine pops by to host a game of Taylor Swift vs. Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Miss Tiddy continues the comparison to the greats by looking at the similarities between Taylor and Lord Byron, Wordsworth, Robert Frost and Shakespeare. Bad students of all ages are welcome. Expect brilliant teachers, captivating subjects but absolutely no homework. Get in touch with the podcast - email us at teachme@bbc.co.uk

Matthew Kelly
Uncovering PURPOSE and DIRECTION for Your Life - Matthew Kelly

Matthew Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 2:01


The Road Not TakenUncovering PURPOSE and DIRECTION for Your Life - Matthew KellyGet Matthew's 60 Second Wisdom delivered to your inbox: https://www.matthewkelly.com/subscribeVideo Transcript:“In his classic poem “The Road Not Taken,” Robert Frost describes coming to a fork in the road and having to choose between the two paths that lie before him. The poem closes with one of the most famous lines of modern literature: “I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.”Too often the poem is interpreted as being about one monumental moment, one enormous decision, that determines the outcome of a person's whole life. It is as if, once this one decision is made, all is well, and the rest of the road is smooth and slopes gently downhill. The poem is not about one moment in a person's life. It is about every moment of our lives. We find ourselves constantly at a crossroads. No sooner do we make one decision and take three or four steps down either path than we come upon two roads diverging in a yellow wood . . . again!The fork in the road is constantly appearing in our lives.The ability to choose comes from a sense of purpose. Leaders are charged with the responsibility of making decisions, because they above all others are supposed to understand the purpose of the people or organization they lead. Direction comes from an understanding of where you are going. If you don't know where you are going, you are lost.What matters most to you? Where are you going?”If you have not read LIFE IS MESSY, order your copy today: https://amzn.to/2TTgZKn Subscribe to Matthew's YouTube Channel today! https://www.youtube.com/c/MatthewKellyAuthor/featured?sub_confirmation=1https://www.matthewkelly.comGet Matthew's 60 Second Wisdom delivered to your inbox: https://www.matthewkelly.com/subscribe The Best Version of Yourself and 60 Second Wisdom are registered trademarks.#MatthewKelly #BestVersionOfYourself #BestVersion #ThoughtLeader #holymoment #holymoments

Business Broken to Smokin' Podcast
Episode 023 - October 12, 2022 - Guest Ryan Emge, successful business owner, husband, and father.

Business Broken to Smokin' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 149:56


In this episode of the Business Broken to Smokin' Podcast, Lodestone True North's Head Coach Mark Whitmore has a robust discussion with our guest, Ryan Emge. A successful business owner, husband, and father. PART 1 Links to Ryan's companies: https://www.freightedge.biz/ https://www.assured.construction/ 0:00 Intro 2:01 Ryan talks about his business 8:45 Revenue blindness 34:16 Raising kids with the house project 37:50 Core values 43:30 Book reference - The Road Less Traveled, M. Scott Peck “Life is difficult. This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths. It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it. Once we truly know that life is difficult-once we truly understand and accept it-then life is no longer difficult. Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters.” ~M. Scott Peck 48:00 Thoughts on self-discipline 49:15 Poem reference Road less Travelled, Robert Frost 49:25 Book reference Discipline without punishment 56:00 5 books Bible Chesterton collections Collective works pre-nicean church fathers Paradise Restored by David Shultan 1:09:26 Book reference The Road, Cormack McCarthy 1:16:00 Ryan shoutout to Mark 1:21:40 Lincoln Quote - look up 1:25:18 P.u.l.s.e. Meeting People, Unearth, Lead, Scorecard, Execute 1:29:00 Family meeting 1:34:39 Movie Oblivion 1:35:25 AAR Meeting (After Action Review) 1:36:30The Huddle meeting 1:37:20 Family Dinner Time 1:39:28 Book Reference Grit by Angela Duckworth 1:40:27 Song Reference - The Highwomen, “Crowded Table” 1:47:51 Book Reference - Thou Shalt Prosper by Rabi Lapin????? 1:49:29 Recruiting Flywheel 1:55:55 Monitoring your Core Values 1:59:10 Book Reference The Advantage by Pat Lencioni 2:06:04 Compelling vision 2:09:00 Teeing up the Story of Ryan's dad, and business transition 2:10:52 Question for Mark from Ryan: Balancing Business and Family Life, prioritizing energy, bring life and fruit to work family and personal family - Answer S3 2:20:30 80/20 principle 2:22:18 Book Reference Steve Jobs biography 2:24:15 How does the family, marriage, and business all tie together before coaching them 2:27:00 Ryan shoutout to Mark Website: https://www.lodestonetruenorth.com Website https://www.bigeasydesk.com LinkedIn Mark: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-whitmore-lodestone/ LinkedIn Lodestone: https://www.linkedin.com/company/lodestone-true-north Lodestone Courses on Thinkific: https://lodestone.thinkific.com Podcast: YouTube (video) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWcZ3wC733fQzTkWtAud0IQ Spotify (video or audio) https://open.spotify.com/show/3QCsZ7fyKr4z804oTac3FU Apple Podcasts (audio) https://apple.co/3O4uv4H Other Podcast Platforms https://lodestonetruenorth.com/podcast/ **Credits** Music - The Living Years, Mike & the Mechanics @3:45 Book reference - The Road Less Traveled - M. Scott Peck Book reference - Grit - Angela Duckworth Book reference - The Advantage - Pat Lencioni

Words in the Air: 52 Weeks of Poetry
Ghost House by Robert Frost

Words in the Air: 52 Weeks of Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 3:01


College Park Baptist Church, Cary, NC
[10/23/2022 AM] Diverging Paths (Mark 2:1-3:6)

College Park Baptist Church, Cary, NC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 45:51


Speaker: Pastor Matthew Walker Series: The Gospel of Mark American poet Robert Frost wrote of two diverging paths that wound through a forest. He could only choose one and his poem reflects his reasoning on which to take. Jesus also referred to two paths, and these also diverged: with one leading to eternal life and the other to eternal death. Today's sermon looks at the diverging paths: the one taken by unbelievers who reject God‘s love and the other by Christians who accept it.  

Switched On
Africa and The Road Not Taken

Switched On

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 29:34


Several countries in Africa are looking to expand their energy systems to meet rising electricity demand. The question remains whether they will industrialize in the same way developed nations have done in the past, or whether they will install a greater proportion of low-carbon technologies. The region is at an inflection point and just like in Robert Frost's poem The Road Not Taken, choosing the road less traveled may have benefits.   As we look ahead to the COP27 summit, which will be held in Egypt in November 2022, climate finance for the developing world will be in the spotlight. Today, we speak with Chasity McFadden, an energy transition analyst at BloombergNEF focused on Africa, about what she is seeing in the region. Through case studies in Namibia and South Africa, we think about what the future energy system could look like in Sub-Saharan Africa. For additional information, BNEF subscribers can read the research notes titled Namibia Spearheads Energy Storage in Sub-Saharan Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa's Power Technology Debate, and South Africa Tackles Power Outages Through Private Sector. These can be found at BNEF on the Bloomberg Terminal, at bnef.com, or on BNEF's mobile app.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TheWanderingPaddy
Reluctance - Robert Frost [Poem]

TheWanderingPaddy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 1:25


Out through the fields and the woods  And over the walls I have wended;I have climbed the hills of view  And looked at the world, and descended;I have come by the highway home,  And lo, it is ended. The leaves are all dead on the ground,  Save those that the oak is keepingTo ravel them one by one  And let them go scraping and creepingOut over the crusted snow,  When others are sleeping. Reluctance - Robert FrostAnd the dead leaves lie huddled and still,  No longer blown hither and thither;The last lone aster is gone;  The flowers of the witch hazel wither;The heart is still aching to seek,  But the feet question ‘Whither?' Ah, when to the heart of man  Was it ever less than a treasonTo go with the drift of things,  To yield with a grace to reason,And bow and accept the end  Of a love or a season? Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/thewanderingpaddy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Mind Flow Show
90. The Secret To Weathering The Storm

Mind Flow Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 8:57


This episode dedicated to anyone who experienced any sort of emotional pain this year, and is looking for some encouragement or inspiration. Listen along as I describe "weathering the storm" through the lens of a quote I learned from the famous poet and Pulitzer Prize Winner, Robert Frost. Follow me on: MindFlowShow.com Facebook Page @mindflowshow Facebook Group @mindsetmecca Instagram @danielrobertsanchez

First Cup of Coffee with Jeffe Kennedy
First Cup of Coffee - October 10, 2022

First Cup of Coffee with Jeffe Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 22:54 Transcription Available


Mulling craft and art, and how some writers can grab you with only a few words-and how this comes from subconscious clarity & artistic confidence. Also: is it wrong to make the reader happy?? The poem I reference is here https://poets.org/poem/my-november-guestInterested in Author Coaching from me? Information here: https://jeffekennedy.com/author-coachingSHADOW WIZARD, Book One in Renegades of Magic, continuing the epic tale begun in DARK WIZARD. https://jeffekennedy.com/shadow-wizard is out now!ROGUE'S PARADISE is out (https://jeffekennedy.com/rogue-s-paradise). Buy book 1, ROGUE'S PAWN, here! (https://jeffekennedy.com/rogue-s-pawn) and book 2, ROGUE'S POSSESSION, here! (https://jeffekennedy.com/rogue-s-possession).ORIA'S GAMBIT now available in audio on Scribd here! https://www.scribd.com/audiobook/571010481/Oria-s-Gambit LONEN'S WAR - now in audio! - is available wide. Buy links here https://jeffekennedy.com/lonen-s-war and in audio on Scribd here https://www.scribd.com/audiobook/558914129/Lonen-s-WarIf you want to support me and the podcast, click on the little heart or follow this link (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/jeffekennedy).You can watch this podcast on YouTube here https://youtu.be/2mZZD6w4A18Sign up for my newsletter here! (https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/r2y4b9)Support the show

Beauty Beyond the Ashes with Tonya B. Jones
Episode 16 - Free to Be Bold

Beauty Beyond the Ashes with Tonya B. Jones

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 18:13


It wasn't until I EXPERIENCED freedom that I actually UNDERSTOOD freedom!!! Freedom is BOLD!!! And BOLDNESS is FREEDOM!!!Robert Frost says, "Freedom lies in being bold!" I could not agree with that statement more than I do now.  On this episode of Beauty Beyond the Ashes Podcast, I share with you a bit of my experience at the "Free Woman Retreat" hosted by the amazing LaToya Mathews.After losing my voice at the retreat and taking a week off, I wobbled my little raspy voice on back to share a few words with you on taking action in being bold to be free...and free to be bold!!! Take it either way...but you can't take it apart. They walk hand in hand!God is a BOLD God!!! He is Freedom!!!  In him, there is no bondage, no condemnation! Rest in that...AND BE BOLD!!! BE FREE!!!Join Tonya B. each Wednesday for a new episode of Beauty Beyond the Ashes as she shares details of her own journey and inspires you in a refreshing, compassionate and comforting approach in yours.Follow Tonya B. Jones:Facebook - Tonya Bailey Jones  https://www.facebook.com/tonya.bailey.7773Instagram - Blessed1_t2w  https://www.instagram.com/blessed1_t2w/TikTok - Beauty Beyond the Ashes  https://www.tiktok.com/@beauty_beyond_the_ashes?lang=en

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life
Yom Kippur Sermon: Show Up. Step Up. Clean Up. with Rabbi Wes Gardenswartz

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 23:01


This summer I studied with my 94-year-old father-in-love a classic text that I had encountered before, but seeing it at the age of 61, I saw something I had never seen before, which now seems obvious. We were studying Robert Frost's poem about being at the crossroads which famously concludes: I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. What I picked up this summer is the narrator's lingering uncertainty, wistfulness, regret, about whether the decision at the crossroads was the right decision. The title jumped out at me this summer: The Road Not Taken. The sigh jumped out at me: I shall be telling this with a sigh. Maybe I messed up. Maybe I should have taken the road not taken.

The Leadership Project
076. Capitalize on Community - David Shriner-Cahn

The Leadership Project

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 44:56 Transcription Available


The phrase "Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." by Robert Frost rings true for entrepreneurs. When starting out, there are bound to be bumps and bruises as they stumble through dealing with self-doubt, taking calculated risks, getting and keeping talent.  If any of these comes close to where you are or how you're feeling, Can you call someone you respect and give them an earful about what you're feeling? Will you get  the energy and perspective you need to turn things around? Will you feel better knowing you're not alone and that there's a way out?If you are part of a community, the answer is yes. Our guest this week is a renowned expert on leadership and entrepreneurship, David Shriner-Cahn is the host of the podcasts, Smashing the Plateau and Going Solo, and founder of the Smashing the Plateau Community. He is a successful entrepreneur who has created a community for consultants to connect, learn together and support each other. The kind of community that would give access to a group of colleagues who understood the same language, share success examples and a network of potential collaborators and partners. People who are bouncing back and aspire to make a positive difference in the world with their expertise and creativity by starting their own profitable businesses.Download this episode to learn how scaling happens naturally when you have a community behind you: David Shriner-Cahn Social Media·  Website: https://community.smashingtheplateau.com/split-community-podcast-landing-page·  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidshrinercahn/·  Twitter: https://twitter.com/smashingplateauJoin us in our mission at The Leadership Project and learn more about our organization here. https://linktr.ee/mickspiersYou can purchase a copy of the Mick Spiers bestselling book "You're a Leader, Now What?" as an eBook or paperback at Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09ZBKK8XV

Lost Ladies of Lit
Lola Ridge with Terese Svoboda

Lost Ladies of Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:09 Transcription Available


Lola Ridge was once considered one of America's preeminent poets, on par with E.E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer, and Robert Frost. We discuss the radical life and career of this early 20th century modernist poet, anarchist, and literary editor with guest Terese Svoboda, whose 2018 biography of Ridge was described as “magisterial” in The Washington Post. For episodes and show notes, visit: LostLadiesofLit.comFollow us on instagram @lostladiesoflit. Follow Kim on twitter @kaskew. Sign up for our newsletter: LostLadiesofLit.comEmail us: Contact — Lost Ladies of Lit PodcastDiscussed in this episode: Anything That Burns You: A Portrait of Lola Ridge, Radical Poet by Terese SvobodaFirehead by Lola Ridge Emma Goldman Ferrer CenterFrancisco FerrerThe Ghetto, and Other Poems by Lola RidgeSacco and Vanzetti Guggenheim FellowshipShelley Memorial AwardLost Ladies of Lit episode on Heterodoxy with Joanna ScuttsHilda Dolittle (H.D.) Lost Ladies of Lit episode on Nora May French with Catherine PrendergastOthers: A Magazine of New VerseBroom MagazineMatthew Josephson Gertrude SteinMargaret SangerEdna St. Vincent MillayKatherine Anne Porter“Street Poet” by Robert Pinsky (Slate)Sun Up and Other Poems by Lola Ridge

The Old Man's Podcast
Episode 325; Warning Signs, Trash Cans, Bold Living and Free Samples

The Old Man's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 26:52


On this episode I question the collective intelligence of our species based on an all to common highway warning sign. Let's see if you can follow my metaphor which uses trash cans as a foundation. Robert Frost gives us some great advice that supports my mantra of "Live Boldly". And free samples, need I say more? Actually I do, so listen so you'll know what I mean. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theoldmanspodcast/message

Ask Win
E: 6 S: 15 Win Charles interviews Deirdre Fagan on being an author

Ask Win

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 24:19


Deirdre Fagan Thursday, September 29, 2022   Ask Win: http://ask-win.weebly.com. Please donate to Ask Win by going to Payment Venmo Win1195 at https://venmo.com/. Win Kelly Charles' Books: https://www.amazon.com/Win-Kelly-Charles/e/B009VNJEKE/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1. Win Kelly Charles' MONAT: https://wincharles.mymonat.com.   On Ask Win today (Thursday, September 29, 2022), Best-Selling Author, Win C welcomes Deirdre Fagan. Deirdre is a widow, wife, mother of two, associate professor and coordinator of creative writing at Ferris State University. Fagan is the author of the Living Now Award-winning memoir Find a Place for Me: Embracing Love and Life in the Face of Death (Nov. 1, 2022), an Eric Hoffer Award Category Finalist and Next Generation Indie Book Award Finalist short story collection, The Grief Eater (2020), a poetry chapbook, Have Love (2019), and a reference book, Critical Companion to Robert Frost (2007). To learn more about Deirdre visit deirdrefagan.com.

Your Good Body Podcast
Sometimes The Only Way Out Is Through

Your Good Body Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 16:59


You've heard this quote but Robert Frost right? It's SUCHHHH a good one, except it's not always that easy to digest! But today we're talking about going in circles in our body journey versus going through the journey and making our way to FREEDOM.  SUBSCRIBE TO THIS PODCAST!  Subscribe To My Emails HERE Follow Me On Instagram @jennifertaylorwagner and @yourgoodbodypodcast  

Midnight Train Podcast
Our History of Swear Words. (Sorry, Mom)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 124:37


Sign up for our Patreon for bonuses and more! www.themidnightrainpodcast.com    Do you happen to swear? Is it something you happen to do when you stub your pinky toe on the coffee table? What about when you've just finished dinner and you pull that glorious lasagna out of the oven, burn yourself and then drop your Italian masterpiece on the floor, in turn burning yourself once again? Odds are that if you're listening to this show, you have a rather colorful vernacular and aren't offended by those that share in your “darker” linguistic abilities. Those dramatic and often harsh, yet exceedingly hilarious words, have a pretty amazing history. Were they written in manuscripts by monks? Or, did we find them used by regular people and found in prose like the names of places, personal names, and animal names? Well, could they tell us more about our medieval past other than just that sex, torture, plagues and incest was all the rage? Let's find out!   Fuck   Let's start with our favorite word. Let's all say it together, kids. “Fuck!” This most versatile yet often considered one of the worst of the “bad words” doesn't seem to have been around in the English language prior to the fifteenth century and may have arrived later from the German or th Dutch. Leave it to those beautiful Germans to introduce us to such a colorful word. In fact, the Oxford English Dictionary says it wasn't actually used until 1500. However, the name of a specific place may have been used even earlier.   Many early instances of fuck were said to actually have been used to mean “to strike” rather than being anything to do with fornicating. The more common Middle English word for sex was ”swive”, which has developed into the Modern English word swivel, as in: go swivel on it. Some of the earliest instances of fuck, seen to mean “hitting” or “striking,” such as Simon Fuckebotere (from in 1290), who was more than likely in the milk industry, hitting butter, or Henry Fuckebeggar (1286/7) who may have, hit the poor.   The earliest examples of the word fuck in the English language appeared in the names of places. The first of these is said to be found near Sherwood in 1287: Ric Wyndfuk and Ric Wyndfuck de Wodehous. These both feature a kestrel known as the Windfucker which, we must assume, went in the wind. The next definite example comes from Bristol 1373 in Fockynggroue, which may have been named for a grove where couples went for “some quiet alone time.”   However, Somewhere among the indictment rolls of the county court of Chester (1310/11), studied by Dr. Paul Booth of Keele University (Staffordshire), a man whose Christian name was Roger is mentioned three times. His less Christian last name is also recorded. The name being mentioned repetitively pretty much means it did not result from a spelling mistake but rather it's the real thing. Meaning, the man's full name was Roger Fuckebythenavele. Not only does his second name move back the earliest use of fuck in its modern sense by quite a few decades; it also verifies that it is, in fact, a Middle English word. But of course, there are those fuckers that will undoubtedly debate it's fucking origin.   The stem *fukkō-, with its characteristic double consonant, is easy to explain as a Germanic iterative verb – one of a large family of similar forms. They originated as combinations of various Indo-European roots with *-nah₂-, a suffix indicating repeated action. The formation is not, strictly speaking, Proto-Indo-European; the suffix owes its existence to the reanalysis of an older morphological structure (reanalysis happens when people fail to analyze an inherited structure in the same way as their predecessors). Still, verbs of this kind are older than Proto-Germanic.   *fukkō- apparently meant to ‘strike repeatedly, beat' (like, say, “dashing” the cream with a plunger in a traditional butter churn). Note also windfucker and fuckwind – old, obsolete words for ‘kestrel'.   A number of words in other Germanic languages may also be related to fuck. One of them is Old Icelandic fjúka ‘to be tossed or driven by the wind' < *feuka-; cf. also fjúk ‘drifting snowstorm' (or, as one might put it in present-day English, a fucking blizzard). These words fit a recurrent morphological pattern observed by Kroonen (2012): Germanic iteratives with a voiceless geminate produced by Kluge's Law often give rise to “de-iterativised” verbs in which the double stop is simplified if the full vocalism or the root (here, *eu rather than *u) is restored. Kluge's law had a noticeable effect on Proto-Germanic morphology. Because of its dependence on ablaut and accent, it operated in some parts of declension and conjugation, but not in others, giving rise to alternations of short and long consonants in both nominal and verbal paradigms.   If the verb is really native (“Anglo-Saxon”), one would expect Old English *fuccian (3sg. *fuccaþ, pl. *fucciaþ, 1/3sg. preterite *fuccode, etc.). If these forms already had “impolite” connotations in Old English, their absence from the Old English literary corpus is understandable. We may be absolutely sure that *feortan (1/3 sg. pret. *feart, pret. pl. *furton, p.p. *forten) existed in Old English, since fart exists today (attested since about 1300, just like the word fuck) and has an impeccable Indo-European etymology, with cognates in several branches. Still, not a single one of these reconstructed Old English verb forms is actually documented (all we have is the scantily attested verbal noun feorting ‘fart(ing)').   One has to remember that written records give us a strongly distorted picture of how people really spoke in the past. If you look at the frequency of fuck, fucking and fucker in written English over the last 200 years, you may get the impression that these words disappeared from English completely ca. 1820 and magically reappeared 140 years later. Even the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary pretended they didn't exist. The volume that should have contained FUCK was published in 1900, and Queen Victoria was still alive.   According to the Oxford English Dictionary: Forms:  α. 1500s fucke, 1500s– fuck; also Scottish pre-1700 fuk.   Frequency (in current use):  Show frequency band information Origin: Probably a word inherited from Germanic. Etymology: Probably cognate with Dutch fokken …   In coarse slang. In these senses typically, esp. in early use, with a man as the subject of the verb. Thesaurus » Categories » intransitive. To have sexual intercourse. ▸ ?a1513   W. Dunbar Poems (1998) I. 106   Be his feirris he wald haue fukkit.   transitive. To have sexual intercourse with (a person). In quot. a1500   in Latin-English macaronic verse; the last four words are enciphered by replacing each letter with the following letter of the alphabet, and fuccant has a Latin third-person plural ending. The passage translates as ‘They [sc. monks] are not in heaven because they fuck the wives of Ely.' [a1500   Flen, Flyys (Harl. 3362) f. 47, in T. Wright & J. O. Halliwell Reliquiæ Antiquæ (1841) I. 91   Non sunt in cœli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk [= fuccant uuiuys of heli].]   transitive. With an orifice, part of the body, or something inanimate as an object. Also occasionally intransitive with prepositional objects of this type. [1680   School of Venus ii. 99   An hour after, he Ferked my Arse again in the same manner.]   transitive. To damage, ruin, spoil, botch; to destroy, put an end to; = to fuck up 1a at Phrasal verbs 1. Also (chiefly in passive): to put into a difficult or hopeless situation; to ‘do for'. Cf. also mind-fuck v. 1776   Frisky Songster (new ed.) 36   O, says the breeches, I shall be duck'd, Aye, says the petticoat, I shall be f—d.   transitive. U.S. To cheat; to deceive, betray. Frequently without. 1866   G. Washington Affidavit 20 Oct. in I. Berlin et al. Black Mil. Experience in Civil War (1982) v. xviii. 792   Mr. Baker replied that deponent would be fucked out of his money by Mr. Brown.   transitive. In oaths and imprecations (chiefly in optative with no subject expressed): expressing annoyance, hatred, dismissal, etc. Cf. damn v. 6, bugger v. 2a. See also fuck it at Phrases 2, fuck you at Phrases 1b. 1922   J. Joyce Ulysses ii. xv. [Circe] 560   God fuck old Bennett!   Phrases   Imprecatory and exclamatory phrases (typically in imperative or optative with no subject expressed sense).  P1. Expressing hostility, contempt, or defiant indifference. Categories » go fuck yourself and variants. 1895   Rep. Senate Comm. Police Dept. N.Y. III. 3158   By Senator Bradley: Q. Repeat what he said to you? A. He said, ‘Go on, fuck yourself, you son-of-a-bitch; I will give you a hundred dollars'; he tried to punch me, and I went out.   fuck you. 1905   L. Schindler Testimony 20 Dec. in People State of N.Y. Respondent, against Charles McKenna (1907) (N.Y. Supreme Court) 37   Murray said to me, ‘Fuck you, I will give you more the same.' And as he said that, I grabbed the two of them.   P2. fuck it: expressing dismissal, exasperation, resignation, or impetuousness. 1922   E. E. Cummings Enormous Room iv. 64   I said, ‘F— it, I don't want it.'   P3. fuck me and elaborated variants: expressing astonishment or exasperation. 1929   F. Manning Middle Parts of Fortune II. xi. 229   ‘Well, you can fuck me!' exclaimed the astonished Martlow. Cunt Cunt is a vulgar word for the vulva or vagina. It is used in a variety of ways, including as a term of disparagement. Reflecting national variations, cunt can be used as a disparaging and obscene term for a woman in the United States, an unpleasant or stupid man or woman in the United Kingdom, or a contemptible man in Australia and New Zealand. However, in Australia and New Zealand it can also be a neutral or positive term when used with a positive qualifier (e.g., "He's a good cunt"). The term has various derivative senses, including adjective and verb uses.   Feminist writer and English professor Germaine Greer argues that cunt "is one of the few remaining words in the English language with a genuine power to shock". The earliest known use of the word, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was as part of a placename of a London street, Gropecunt Lane. Use of the word as a term of abuse is relatively recent, dating from the late nineteenth century. The word appears not to have been taboo in the Middle Ages, but became that way toward the end of the eighteenth century, and was then not generally not allowed to be printed until the latter part of the twentieth century.   There is some disagreement on the origin of the term cunt, although most sources agree that it came from the Germanic word (Proto-Germanic *kunto, stem *kunton-), which emerged as kunta in Old Norse. The Proto-Germanic form's actual origin is a matter of debate among scholars. Most Germanic languages have cognates, including Swedish, Faroese, and Nynorsk (kunta), West Frisian, and Middle Low German (kunte), Middle Dutch (conte), Dutch kut (cunt), and Dutch kont (butt), Middle Low German kutte, Middle High German kotze ("prostitute"), German kott, and maybe Old English cot. The Proto-Germanic term's etymology ia questionable.   It may have arisen by Grimm's law operating on the Proto-Indo-European root *gen/gon "create, become" seen in gonads, genital, gamete, genetics, gene, or the Proto-Indo-European root guneh or "woman" (Greek: gunê, seen in gynaecology). Relationships to similar-sounding words such as the Latin cunnus ("vulva"), and its derivatives French con, Spanish coño, and Portuguese cona, or in Persian kos (کُس), have not been conclusively demonstrated. Other Latin words related to cunnus are cuneus ("wedge") and its derivative cunēre ("to fasten with a wedge", (figurative) "to squeeze in"), leading to English words such as cuneiform ("wedge-shaped"). In Middle English, cunt appeared with many spellings, such as coynte, cunte and queynte, which did not always reflect the actual pronunciation of the word.   The word, in its modern meaning, is attested in Middle English. Proverbs of Hendyng, a manuscript from some time before 1325, includes the advice:   (Give your cunt wisely and make [your] demands after the wedding.) from wikipedia. The word cunt is generally regarded in English-speaking countries as unsuitable for normal publicconversations. It has been described as "the most heavily tabooed word of all English words".   Quoted from wikipedia: Some American feminists of the 1970s sought to eliminate disparaging terms for women, including "bitch" and "cunt". In the context of pornography, Catharine MacKinnon argued that use of the word acts to reinforce a dehumanisation of women by reducing them to mere body parts; and in 1979 Andrea Dworkin described the word as reducing women to "the one essential – 'cunt: our essence ... our offence'".   While “vagina” is used much more commonly in colloquial speech to refer to the genitals of people with vulvas than “cunt” is, its  origins are defined by its service to male sexuality, making “cunt” —  interestingly enough — the least historically misogynistic of the two. “Cunt” has also been used in Renaissance bawdy verse and in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, but it was not until Shakespeare's era that its meaning began to fundamentally shift, during the dawn of Christian doctrine.   Arguably, if cunt simply means and refers to “vagina”, then why would that be bad? Vaginas are pretty great! They provide people with pleasure, they give life, and they're even a naturally developed lunar calendar! So, why would a person refer to another, assumedly pissy person as a vagina?    So, should we as society fight the negative stereotypes and embrace the term cunt again? It's a tiny word that bears a lot of weight, but it should be anything but scary or offensive. It can be a massive dose of love instead of an enormous force of hate if we actively define our vocabulary rather than letting it define us.   Words only have that type of power when the uptight, vanilla flavored, missionary only Karen's and Kevin's of the world decide they don't like them. This has been going on for as long as we've been using words. So, let's take it back. We love you, ya cunts!   coarse slang in later use. Thesaurus » Categories » The female genitals; the vulva or vagina. Cf. quaint n.1 a1400   tr. Lanfranc Sci. Cirurgie (Ashm.) (1894) 172   In wymmen þe necke of þe bladdre is schort, & is maad fast to the cunte. 1552   D. Lindsay Satyre Procl. 144   First lat me lok thy cunt, Syne lat me keip the key. 1680   Earl of Rochester et al. Poems 77   I fear you have with interest repaid, Those eager thrusts, which at your Cunt he made. 1865   ‘Philocomus' Love Feast iii. 21   I faint! I die! I spend! My cunt is sick! Suck me and fuck me!   A woman as a source of sexual gratification; a promiscuous woman; a slut. Also as a general term of abuse for a woman. 1663   S. Pepys Diary 1 July (1971) IV. 209   Mr. Batten..acting all the postures of lust and buggery that could be imagined, and..saying that the he hath to sell such a pouder as should make all the cunts in town run after him.   As a term of abuse for a man. 1860   in M. E. Neely Abraham Lincoln Encycl. (1982) 154   And when they got to Charleston, they had to, as is wont Look around to find a chairman, and so they took a Cunt   A despised, unpleasant, or annoying place, thing, or task. 1922   J. Joyce Ulysses ii. iv. [Calypso] 59   The grey sunken cunt of the world.   Bitch   Women were frequently equated to dogs in Ancient Greek literature, which was used to dehumanize and shame them for their alleged lack of restraint and sexual urges. This is believed to have originated from the hunter goddess Artemis, who was frequently depicted as a pack of hounds and was perceived to be both beautiful and frigid and savage. According to popular belief, the term "bitch" as we use it today evolved from the Old English word "bicce," which meant a female dog, about the year 1000 AD. The phrase started out as a critique of a woman's sexuality in the 15th century but eventually evolved to signify that the lady was rude or disagreeable.   Clare Bayley has connected this growth of the term "bitch" as an insult to the suffrage struggle and the final passage of women's suffrage in the early 20th century, particularly the 1920s. Men were intimidated when women started to challenge their subordinate roles in the patriarchal power structure, and the phrase started to be used to ferocious and irate females. Men's respect for women and the prevalence of the term are clearly correlated, since usage of the term rapidly decreased during World War II as men's appreciation of women's contributions to the war effort increased.   However, as they competed with women for employment after the war ended and the men went back to work, the word's usage increased once more. As the housewife paradigm started to fade away during the war, the position of women in the workplace and society as a whole underwent an irreparable change. However, males perceived the presence of women in the workforce as a challenge to their supremacy in society.   With songs like Elton John's "The Bitch is Back" ascending the charts in 1974, the slur became more common in mainstream culture and music in the latter decades of the 20th century. As a result of artists like Kanye West and Eminem using the term "bitch" to denigrate women and depict violence against them in their lyrics, hip-hop culture has also long been accused of being misogynistic.   We just need to look at Hillary Clinton's recent campaign for president in 2016 to understand how frequently this slur is leveled at women, especially those in positions of authority who are defying patriarchal expectations and shattering glass ceilings. Rep. AOC being called a "fucking bitch" by a GOP Rep. is another similar example. It is evident that the usage of the phrase and the degree to which males regard women to be a danger are related.   bitch (v.)   "to complain," attested from at least 1930, perhaps from the sense in bitchy, perhaps influenced by the verb meaning "to bungle, spoil," which is recorded from 1823. But bitched in this sense seems to echo Middle English bicched "cursed, bad," a general term of opprobrium (as in Chaucer's bicched bones "unlucky dice"), which despite the hesitation of OED, seems to be a derivative of bitch (n.).   bitchy (adj.) 1925, U.S. slang, "sexually provocative;" later (1930s) "spiteful, catty, bad-tempered" (usually of females); from bitch + -y (2). Earlier in reference to male dogs thought to look less rough or coarse than usual. The earliest use of "bitch" specifically as a derogatory term for women dates to the fifteenth century. Its earliest slang meaning mainly referred to sexual behavior, according to the English language historian Geoffrey Hughes:   The early applications were to a promiscuous or sensual woman, a metaphorical extension of the behavior of a bitch in heat. Herein lies the original point of the powerful insult son of a bitch, found as biche sone ca. 1330 in Arthur and Merlin ... while in a spirited exchange in the Chester Play (ca. 1400) a character demands: "Whom callest thou queine, skabde bitch?" ("Who are you calling a whore, you miserable bitch?").   In modern usage, the slang term bitch has different meanings depending largely on social context and may vary from very offensive to endearing, and as with many slang terms, its meaning and nuances can vary depending on the region in which it is used.   The term bitch can refer to a person or thing that is very difficult, as in "Life's a bitch" or "He sure got the bitch end of that deal". It is common for insults to lose intensity as their meaning broadens ("bastard" is another example). In the film The Women (1939), Joan Crawford could only allude to the word: "And by the way, there's a name for you ladies, but it isn't used in high society - outside of a kennel." At the time, use of the actual word would have been censored by the Hays Office. By 1974, Elton John had a hit single (#4 in the U.S. and #14 in the U.K.) with "The Bitch Is Back", in which he says "bitch" repeatedly. It was, however, censored by some radio stations. On late night U.S. television, the character Emily Litella (1976-1978) on Saturday Night Live (portrayed by Gilda Radner) would frequently refer to Jane Curtin under her breath at the end of their Weekend Update routine in this way: "Oh! Never mind...! Bitch!"   Bitchin' arose in the 1950s to describe something found to be cool or rad. Modern use can include self-description, often as an unfairly difficult person. For example, in the New York Times bestseller The Bitch in the House, a woman describes her marriage: "I'm fine all day at work, but as soon as I get home, I'm a horror....I'm the bitch in the house."Boy George admitted "I was being a bitch" in a falling out with Elton John. Generally, the term bitch is still considered offensive, and not accepted in formal situations. According to linguist Deborah Tannen, "Bitch is the most contemptible thing you can say about a woman. Save perhaps the four-letter C word." It's common for the word to be censored on Prime time TV, often rendered as "the b-word". During the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign, a John McCain supporter referred to Hillary Clinton by asking, "How do we beat the bitch?" The event was reported in censored format:   On CNN's "The Situation Room," Washington Post media critic and CNN "Reliable Sources" host Howard Kurtz observed that "Senator McCain did not embrace the 'b' word that this woman in the audience used." ABC reporter Kate Snow adopted the same location. On CNN's "Out in the Open," Rick Sanchez characterized the word without using it by saying, "Last night, we showed you a clip of one of his supporters calling Hillary Clinton the b-word that rhymes with witch." A local Fox 25 news reporter made the same move when he rhymed the unspoken word with rich.   A study reported that, when used on social media, bitch "aims to promote traditional, cultural beliefs about femininity". Used hundreds of thousands of times per day on such platforms, it is associated with sexist harassment, "victimizing targets", and "shaming" victims who do not abide by degrading notions about femininity   Son of a bitch The first known appearance of "son-of-a-bitch" in a work of American fiction is Seventy-Six (1823), a historical fiction novel set during the American Revolutionary War by eccentric writer and critic John Neal.  The protagonist, Jonathan Oadley, recounts a battle scene in which he is mounted on a horse: "I wheeled, made a dead set at the son-of-a-bitch in my rear, unhorsed him, and actually broke through the line." The term's use as an insult is as old as that of bitch. Euphemistic terms are often substituted, such as gun in the phrase "son of a gun" as opposed to "son of a bitch", or "s.o.b." for the same phrase. Like bitch, the severity of the insult has diminished. Roy Blount Jr. in 2008 extolled the virtues of "son of a bitch" (particularly in comparison to "asshole") in common speech and deed. Son of a bitch can also be used as a "how about that" reaction, or as a reaction to excruciating pain. In politics the phrase "Yes, he is a son of a bitch, but he is our son of a bitch" has been attributed, probably apocryphally, to various U.S. presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Richard Nixon. Immediately after the detonation of the first atomic bomb in Alamogordo, New Mexico, in July 1945 (the device codenamed Gadget), the Manhattan Project scientist who served as the director of the test, Kenneth Tompkins Bainbridge, exclaimed to Robert Oppenheimer "Now we're all sons-of-bitches." In January 2022, United States President Joe Biden was recorded on a hot mic responding to Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy asking, "Do you think inflation is a political liability ahead of the midterms?" Biden responded sarcastically, saying, "It's a great asset — more inflation. What a stupid son of a bitch." The 19th-century British racehorse Filho da Puta took its name from "Son of a Bitch" in Portuguese. The Curtiss SB2C, a World War 2 U.S. Navy dive bomber, was called "Son-of-a-Bitch 2nd Class" by some of its pilots and crewmen. In American popular culture, the slang word "basic" is used to derogatorily refer to persons who are thought to favor mainstream goods, fashions, and music. Hip-hop culture gave rise to "basic bitch," which gained popularity through rap music, lyrics, blogs, and videos from 2011 to 2014. "Bros" is a common word for their male counterparts. Other English-speaking nations have terms like "basic bitch" or "airhead," such as modern British "Essex girls" and "Sloane Rangers," as well as Australian "haul girls," who are noted for their love of shopping for expensive clothing and uploading films of their purchases on YouTube. Oxford English Dictionary  transitive. To call (a person, esp. a woman) a bitch. 1707   Diverting Muse 131   Why how now, crys Venus, altho you're my Spouse, [If] you Bitch me, you Brute, have a care of your Brows   transitive. To behave like a bitch towards (a person); to be spiteful, malicious, or unfair to (a person); to let (a person) down. 1764   D. Garrick Let. 23 Aug. (1963) II. 423   I am a little at a loss what You will do for a Woman Tragedian to stare & tremble wth yr Heroes, if Yates should bitch You—but she must come.   intransitive. To engage in spiteful or malicious criticism or gossip, esp. about another person; to talk spitefully or cattily about. 1915   G. Cannan Young Earnest i. x. 92   It's the women bitching at you got into your blood.   intransitive. Originally U.S. To grumble, to complain (about something, or at someone). Frequently collocated with moan. 1930   Amer. Speech 5 238   [Colgate University slang] He bitched about the course.   †3. intransitive. To back down, to yield. Obsolete. rare. 1777   E. Burke Let. 9 May in Corr. (1961) III. 339   Norton bitched a little at last, but though he would recede; Fox stuck to his motion.   Shit shit (v.) Old English scitan, from Proto-Germanic *skit- (source also of North Frisian skitj, Dutch schijten, German scheissen), from PIE(proto indo-european) root *skei- "to cut, split." The notion is of "separation" from the body (compare Latin excrementum, from excernere "to separate," Old English scearn "dung, muck," from scieran "to cut, shear;" see sharn). It is thus a cousin to science and conscience.   "Shit" is not an acronym. Nor is it a recent word. But it was taboo from 1600 and rarely appeared in print (neither Shakespeare nor the KJV has it), and even in the "vulgar" publications of the late 18c. it is disguised by dashes. It drew the wrath of censors as late as 1922 ("Ulysses" and "The Enormous Room"), scandalized magazine subscribers in 1957 (a Hemingway story in Atlantic Monthly) and was omitted from some dictionaries as recently as 1970 ("Webster's New World"). [Rawson]   It has extensive slang usage; the meaning "to lie, to tease'' is from 1934; that of "to disrespect" is from 1903. Also see shite. Shat is a humorous past tense form, not etymological, first recorded 18th century.   To shit bricks "be very frightened" attested by 1961. The connection between fear and involuntary defecation has generated expressions in English since the 14th century. (the image also is in Latin), and probably also is behind scared shitless (1936).   shit (n.) Middle English shit "diarrhea," from Old English scitte "purging, diarrhea," from source of shit (v.). The general sense of "excrement" dates from 1580s (Old English had scytel, Middle English shitel for "dung, excrement;" the usual 14c. noun for natural discharges of the bodies of men or beasts seems to have been turd or filth). As an exclamation attested in print by 1920 but certainly older. Use for "obnoxious person" is by 1508; meaning "misfortune, trouble" is attested from 1937. Shit-faced "drunk" is 1960s student slang; shit list is from 1942. Shit-hole is by 1937 as "rectum," by 1969 in reference to undesirable locations. Shitload (also shit-load) for "a great many" is by 1970. Shitticism is Robert Frost's word for scatological writing.   Up shit creek "in trouble" is by 1868 in a South Carolina context (compare the metaphoric salt river, of which it is perhaps a coarse variant). Slang not give a shit "not care" is by 1922. Pessimistic expression same shit different day is attested by 1989. To get (one's) shit together "manage one's affairs" is by 1969. Emphatic shit out of luck is by 1942. The expression when the shit hits the fan "alluding to a moment of crisis or its disastrous consequences" is attested by 1967.   Expressing anger, despair, surprise, frustration, resignation, excitement, etc. 1865   Proc. Court Martial U.S. Army (Judge Advocate General's Office) U.S. National Arch.: Rec. group 153, File MM-2412 3 Charge II.   Private James Sullivan...did in contemptuous and disrespectful manner reply..‘Oh, shit, I can't' or words to that effect.   Ass/Asshole The word arse in English derives from the Proto-Germanic (reconstructed) word *arsaz, from the Proto-Indo-European word *ors-, meaning "buttocks" or "backside". The combined form arsehole is first attested from 1500 in its literal use to refer to the anus. The metaphorical use of the word to refer to the worst place in a region (e.g., "the arsehole of the world"), is first attested in print in 1865; the use to refer to a contemptible person is first attested in 1933. In the ninth chapter of his 1945 autobiography, Black Boy, Richard Wright quotes a snippet of verse that uses the term: "All these white folks dressed so fine / Their ass-holes smell just like mine ...". Its earliest known usage in newspapers as an insult was 1965. As with other vulgarities, these uses of the word may have been common in oral speech for some time before their first appearances in print. By the 1970s, Hustler magazine featured people they did not like as "Asshole of the Month." In 1972, Jonathan Richman of Modern Lovers recorded his song "Pablo Picasso", which includes the line "Pablo Picasso was never called an asshole."   Until the early 1990s, the word was considered one of a number of words that could not be uttered on commercial television in the United States. Comedian Andrew Dice Clay caused a major shock when he uttered the word during a televised MTV awards show in 1989. However, there were PG-13 and R-rated films in the 1980s that featured use of the word, such as the R-rated The Terminator (1984), the PG-13-rated National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989), and the PG-rated Back to the Future (1985). By 1994, however, vulgarity had become more acceptable, and the word was featured in dialog on the long-running television series NYPD Blue, though it has yet to become anything close to commonplace on network TV. In some broadcast edits (such as the syndication airings of South Park), the word is partially bleeped out, as "assh—". A variant of the term, "ass clown", was coined and popularized by the 1999 comedy film Office Space.   The word is mainly used as a vulgarity, generally to describe people who are viewed as stupid, incompetent, unpleasant, or detestable. Moral philosopher Aaron James, in his 2012 book, Assholes: A Theory, gives a more precise meaning of the word, particularly to its connotation in the United States: A person, who is almost always male, who considers himself of much greater moral or social importance than everyone else; who allows himself to enjoy special advantages and does so systematically; who does this out of an entrenched sense of entitlement; and who is immunized by his sense of entitlement against the complaints of other people. He feels he is not to be questioned, and he is the one who is chiefly wronged.   Many would believe the term ass to be used to describe an ungulate or a hoofed mammal of the smaller variety. Those people would be correct. However ass would be used as slang to describe the incompetence of people as they seem to resemble that of a donkey. Slow and stupid. We don't see donkeys in this manner but the people of old may have.   A stupid, irritating, or contemptible person; a person who behaves despicably. Cf. arsehole n. 3, shithole n. 2. Quot. 1954, from a story originally told in 1933, provides evidence for the development of this sense from figurative uses of sense 1. [1954   V. Randolph Pissing in Snow (1976) lxx. 106   When God got the job [of making men and women] done,..there was a big pile of ass-holes left over. It looks to me like the Almighty just throwed all them ass-holes together, and made the Easton family.]   Dick/dickhead   Dick is a common English language slang word for the human penis. It is also used by extension for a variety of slang purposes, generally considered vulgar, including: as a verb to describe sexual activity; and as a term for individuals who are considered to be rude, abrasive, inconsiderate, or otherwise contemptible. In this context, it can be used interchangeably with jerk, and can also be used as a verb to describe rude or deceitful actions. Variants include dickhead, which literally refers to the glans. The offensiveness of the word dick is complicated by the continued use of the word in inoffensive contexts, including as both a given name (often a nickname for Richard) and a surname, the popular British dessert spotted dick, the classic novel Moby-Dick, the Dick and Jane series of children's books, and the American retailer Dick's Sporting Goods. Uses like these have given comic writers a foundation to use double entendre to capitalize on this contradiction. In the mid-17th century, dick became slang for a man as a sexual partner. For example, in the 1665 satire The English Rogue by Richard Head, a "dick" procured to impregnate a character that is having difficulty conceiving:   “The next Dick I pickt up for her was a man of a colour as contrary to the former, as light is to darkness, being swarthy; whose hair was as black as a sloe; middle statur'd, well set, both strong and active, a man so universally tryed, and so fruitfully successful, that there was hardly any female within ten miles gotten with child in hugger-mugger, but he was more than suspected to be Father of all the legitimate. Yet this too, proved an ineffectual Operator.”   An 1869 slang dictionary offered definitions of dick including "a riding whip" and an abbreviation of dictionary, also noting that in the North Country, it was used as a verb to indicate that a policeman was eyeing the subject. The term came to be associated with the penis through usage by men in the military around the 1880s.   The term "dick" was originally used to describe a vile or repulsive individual in the 1960s.   A stupid, annoying, or objectionable person (esp. a male); one whose behaviour is considered knowingly obnoxious, provocative, or disruptive. Cf. dick n.1 6. 1960   S. Martinelli Let. 28 Dec. in C. Bukowski & S. Martinelli Beerspit Night & Cursing. (2001) 132   You shd listen to yr own work being broadcast [on the radio]... You cd at least tell ME when to list[en] dickhead!   Twat noun Slang: Vulgar. vulva. First recorded in 1650–60; perhaps originally a dialectal variant of thwat, thwot (unattested), presumed Modern English outcome of Old English thwāt, (unattested), akin to Old Norse thveit “cut, slit, forest clearing” (from northern English dialect thwaite “forest clearing”)   What does twat mean? Twat is vulgar slang for “vagina.” It's also used, especially in British English slang, a way to call someone as stupid, useless, or otherwise contemptible person. While twat has been recorded since the 1650s, we don't exactly know where it comes from. One theory connects twat to the Old English term for “to cut off.” The (bizarre) implication could be that women's genitalia were thought to be just shorter versions of men's.   Twat was popularized in the mid-1800s completely by accident. The great English poet Robert Browning had read a 1660 poem that referred, in a derogatory way, to a “nun's twat.” Browning thought a twat must have been a kind of hat, so he incorporated it into his own work.   Words for genitalia and other taboo body parts (especially female body parts) have a long history of being turned into abusive terms. Consider a**, d*ck, p***y, among many others. In the 1920s, English speakers started using twat as an insult in the same way some use a word like c**t, although twat has come to have a far less offensive force than the c-word in American English. In the 1930s, twat was sometimes used as a term of abuse for “woman” more generally, and over the second half of the 1900s, twat was occasionally used as slang for “butt” or “anus” in gay slang.   Twat made headlines in June 2018 when British actor Danny Dyer called former British Prime Minister David Cameron a twat for his role in initiating the Brexit referendum in 2016—and then stepping down after it passed.   Twat is still common in contemporary use as an insult implying stupidity, especially among British English speakers.   Even though it's a common term, twat is still vulgar and causes a stir when used in a public setting, especially due to its sexist nature. Public figures that call someone a twat are often publicly derided. Online, users sometimes censor the term, rendering it as tw*t or tw@t.   If you're annoying, you might be accused of twattiness; if you're messing around or procrastinating, you might be twatting around; if you're going on about something, you might be twatting on. Twatting is also sometimes substituted for the intensifier ”fucking”.   As a term of abuse: a contemptible or obnoxious person; a person who behaves stupidly; a fool, an idiot. Now chiefly British. The force of this term can vary widely. Especially when applied to a woman, it can be as derogatory and offensive as the term cunt (cunt n. 2a), but it can also be used (especially of men) as a milder form of abuse without conscious reference to the female genitals, often implying that a person's behaviour, appearance, etc., is stupid or idiotic, with little or no greater force than twit (twit n.1 2b). 1922   ‘J. H. Ross' Mint (1936) xxxv. 110   The silly twat didn't know if his arse-hole was bored, punched, drilled, or countersunk. The top 10 movies with the most swear words: The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013) – 715 Uncut Gems (Josh and Benny Safide, 2019) – 646 Casino (Martin Scorsese, 1995) – 606 Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (Kevin Smith, 2001) – 509 Fury (David Ayer, 2014) – 489 Straight Outta Compton (F. Gary Gray, 2015) – 468 Summer of Sam (Spike Lee, 1999) – 467 Nil By Mouth (Gary Oldman, 1997) – 432 Reservoir Dogs (Quentin Tarantino, 1992) – 418 Beavis and Butt-Head Do America (Mike Judge, 1996) – 414

god united states tv women american relationships history father australia english school house men online law british new york times french joe biden australian german united kingdom spanish kanye west italian new zealand public open berlin class modern meaning abc greek heroes supreme court proverbs wolf south carolina navy speech brexit washington post snow world war ii shit civil war shakespeare dutch reflecting saturday night live mtv suck new mexico latin scottish fuck moral fox news swedish odds back to the future prime iv renaissance eminem terminator hillary clinton bitch spouse new world feminists bros pg charleston elton john hip alexandria ocasio cortez world war rochester portuguese earl frequency generally vaginas south park hustlers almighty gadgets poems mint webster artemis persian norton chester rec franklin delano roosevelt operator filho pie grimm phrases richard nixon merlin middle ages asshole yates john mccain hemingway variants slang kjv cf moby dick office space christmas vacation mccain browning national lampoon sherwood ancient greeks queen victoria p3 pablo picasso obsolete corr proc david cameron anglo saxons robert frost manhattan project amer aye boy george arse circe brute germanic weekend update ely joan crawford american english batten quoted old english colgate university swear words chaucer pessimistic puta sporting goods bitchin oxford english dictionary cunt atlantic monthly kluge north country blackboy nypd blue brows richard wright british english shat twats american revolutionary war canterbury tales gilda radner gary gray indo european situation room old norse peter doocy seventy six modern english jonathan richman middle english robert browning sorry mom gop rep danny dyer in american modern lovers rick sanchez emphatic germaine greer oed police dept syne respondent love feast deborah tannen aaron james phrasal andrea dworkin alamogordo jane curtin faroese proto indo european nynorsk john neal paul booth flen howard kurtz some american kate snow catharine mackinnon assholes a theory shitload proto germanic roy blount jr
Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas
Robert Frost shares some DAILY FIRE

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 1:14


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. –Robert Frost Check out John Lee Dumas' award winning Podcast Entrepreneurs on Fire on your favorite podcast directory. For world class free courses and resources to help you on your Entrepreneurial journey visit EOFire.com

Love Your Work
288. Summary: Old Masters and Young Geniuses, by David W. Galenson

Love Your Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:37


The book, Old Masters and Young Geniuses shows there are two types of creators: experimental, and conceptual. Experimental and conceptual creators differ in their approaches to their work, and follow two distinct career paths. Experimental creators grow to become old masters. Conceptual creators shine as young geniuses. University of Chicago economist, and author of Old Masters and Young Geniuses, David Galenson – who I interviewed on episode 105 – wanted to know how the ages of artists affected the prices of their paintings. He isolated the ages of artists from other factors that affect price, such as canvas size, sale date, and support type (whether it's on canvas, paper, or other). He expected to find a neat effect, such as “paintings from younger/older artists sell for more.” But instead, he found two distinct patterns: Some artists' paintings from their younger years sold for more. Other artists' paintings from their older years sold for more. He then found this same pattern in the historical significance of artists' work: The rate at which paintings were included in art history books or retrospective exhibitions – both indicators of significance – peaked at the same ages as the values of paintings. When he looked closely at how painters who followed these two trajectories differed, he found that the ones who peaked early took a conceptual approach, while those who peaked late took an experimental approach. Cézanne vs. Picasso The perfect examples of contrasting experimental and conceptual painters are Paul Cézanne and Pablo Picasso. Paintings from Cézanne's final year of life, when he was sixty-seven, are his most valuable. Paintings from early in Picasso's career, when he was twenty-six, are his most valuable. A painting done when Picasso was twenty-six is worth four times as much as one done when he was sixty-seven (he lived to be ninety-one, and his biographer and friend called the dearth of his influential work later in life “a sad end”). A painting done when Cézanne was sixty-seven – the year he died – is worth fifteen times as much as one done when he was twenty-six. Cézanne, the experimenter Cézanne took an experimental approach to painting, which explains why it took so long for his career to peak. Picasso took a conceptual approach, which explains why he peaked early. Cézanne left the conceptual debates of Paris cafés to live in the south of France, in his thirties. He spent the next three decades struggling to paint what he truly saw in landscapes. He felt limited by the fact that, as he was looking at a canvas, he could only paint the memory of what he had just seen. He did few preparatory sketches early in his career, but grew to paint straight from nature. He treated his paintings as process work, and seemed to have no use for them when he was finished: He only signed about ten percent of his paintings, and sometimes threw them into bushes or left them in fields. Picasso, the conceptual genius Picasso, instead, executed one concept after another. He had early success with his Blue period and Rose period, then dove into Cubism. He often planned paintings carefully, in advance: He did more than four-hundred studies for his most valuable and influential painting, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. One model described how he simply stared at her for an hour, apparently planning a series of paintings in his head, which he began painting the next day, without her assistance. Cézanne said, “I seek in painting.” Picasso said, “I don't seek; I find.” Cézanne struggled to paint what he saw, and Picasso said, “I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them.” Experimental vs. conceptual artists Here are some qualities that differ between experimental and conceptual artists: Experimental artists work inductively. Through the process of creation, they arrive at their solution. Conceptual artists work deductively. They begin with a solution in mind, then work towards it. Experimental artists have vague goals. They're not quite sure what they're seeking. Conceptual artists have specific goals. They already have an idea in their head they're trying to execute. Experimental artists are full of doubt. Since they don't already have the solution, and aren't sure what they're looking for, they rarely feel they've succeeded. Conceptual artists are confident. They know what they're after, so once they've achieved it, they're done, and can move on to the next thing. Experimental artists repeat themselves. They might paint the same subject over and over, tweaking their approach. Conceptual artists change quickly. They'll move from subject to subject, style to style, concept to concept. Experimental artists do it themselves. They're discovering throughout the process, so they rarely use assistants. Conceptual artists delegate. They just need their concept executed, so someone else can often do the work. Experimental artists discover. Over the years, they build up knowledge in a field, to invent new approaches. Conceptual artists steal. To a greater degree than experimental artists, they take what others have developed and make it their own. Other experimental & conceptual artists Some other experimental artists: Georgia O'Keeffe: She painted pictures of a door of her house in New Mexico more than twenty times. She liked to start off painting a subject realistically, then, through repetition, make it more abstract. Jackson Pollock: He said he needed to drip paint on a canvas from all four sides, what he called a “‘get acquainted' period,” before he knew what he was painting. Leonardo da Vinci: He was constantly jumping from project to project, rarely finishing. He incorporated his slowly-accrued knowledge of anatomy, optics, and geology into his paintings. Some conceptual artists: Georges Seurat: He had his pointillism method down to a science. He planned out his most-famous painting, Sunday Afternoon, through more than fifty studies, and could paint tiny dots on the giant canvas without stepping back to see how it looked. Andy Warhol: Used assistants heavily, saying, “I think somebody should be able to do all my paintings for me,” and “Why do people think artists are special? It's just another job.” Raphael: Who had a huge workshop of as many as fifty assistants, innovated by allowing a printmaker to make and sell copies of his work, and synthesized the hard-won methods of Leonardo and Michelangelo into his well-planned designs. Experimental & conceptual creators in other fields Galenson has found these two distinct experimental and conceptual trajectories in a variety of fields. This runs counter to the findings of Dean Simonton, who believes the complexity of a given field determines when a creator peaks. Galenson argues that the complexity of having an impact in a field changes, as innovations are made or integrated into the state of the art. Sculpture In sculpture, Méret Oppenheim had a conversation in a café with Picasso, and got the idea to line a teacup with fur. It became the quintessential surrealist sculpture, Luncheon in Fur, but it was totally conceptual. She continued to make art into her seventies, and never did another significant work. Constantin Brancusi spent a lifetime as an experimental sculptor. He said, “I don't work from sketches, I take the chisel and hammer and go right ahead.” He did his most famous work, Bird in Space, when he was fifty-two. Novels In novels, Mark Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn experimentally, in at least three separate phases, over the course of nine years. He finally published it when he was fifty. Hemingway's novels were conceptually driven, using his trademark dialog as one of his major devices. He picked up this technique and synthesized it from studying the work of Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Anderson, and Twain himself. When I talked to Galenson on episode 105, he explained the way to spot the difference between an experimental and a conceptual novel is to ask, “are the characters believable?” Conceptual novelists focus on plot, while experimental novelists focus on character. Poetry In poetry, Robert Frost, who spent his career trying to perfect how rhythms and stress patterns affected the meanings of words – so-called “sentence sounds” – wrote “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” when he was forty-eight. Ezra Pound developed his technique of “imagism” when he was twenty-eight, and had thought it through so well he published a set of formal rules. With this conceptual approach, he created the bulk of his influential poems before he was forty, despite living well into his eighties. Movies In film, Orson Welles created Citizen Kane when he was only twenty-six. The carefully-planned conceptual innovations in cinematography and musical score make it widely-regarded as the most influential film ever. Alfred Hitchcock didn't make his most-influential films until the final years of his life, as he was about sixty. He said, “style in directing develops slowly and naturally.” Are you an old master, or young genius? I really enjoyed Old Masters and Young Geniuses. I find this dichotomy of experimental versus conceptual approaches really helpful in understanding why, in general, some creative solutions come quickly, while others take months or years of searching. Do you have a choice in the matter? Galenson is careful to stress that you aren't either an experimental or conceptual creator – it's a spectrum, not a binary designation. But in case you're wondering if you can make yourself a conceptual creator, to become successful more quickly, Galenson says you can't. You might switch from a conceptual to an experimental approach, and find it works better for you, as did Cézanne, or you might try to go from experimental to conceptual and find it doesn't, as did Pissarro. But you can't change the way you think. He told me, “It's like trying to change your brain, and we don't know how to do that.” About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is author of Mind Management, Not Time Management, The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative. Follow David on: Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher YouTube RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »       Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/old-masters-young-geniuses

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2324: Fences

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 3:46


Lawyers, Guns & Money
LGM Podcast: Football

Lawyers, Guns & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 71:44


This is the first of the LGM football podcasts for the year, where we do a preseason preview of the National Football Conference. I even got to read a Robert Frost poem. Check it out. Also, football!!!! The LGM podcast is now available from a variety of corporate overlords, so please perform Freedom by making […]