Podcasts about argentine

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People of the country of Argentina or who identify as culturally Argentine

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Latest podcast episodes about argentine

Art of the Kickstart
Brew Fresh Coffee and Tea Anywhere With Qterra Craft

Art of the Kickstart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:51


In this episode of Art of the Kickstart, we interviewed Pierre Baston, the inventor of Qterra. Qterra Craft, which is now active on Kickstarter, is more than just a travel mug. Instead, it's a travel brewer. This environmentally friendly travel mug lets you brew fresh coffee or tea and then quickly cool it for drinking, with the twist of a dial. With less than a week left in their Kickstarter campaign, Qterra has already garnered the interest of over 110 backers and surpassed their funding goal. Learn how Baston's trip to Argentina sparked the idea that led to the creation of Qterra Craft. Topics Discussed and Key Crowdfunding Takeaways How Baston's travel background influenced Qterra Craft Advice for entrepreneurs looking to launch a new product How Baston's background led him to be an entrepreneur How "Qterra" got its name What the Qterra team learned from its Kickstarter campaign Links Qtrerra Craft's Kickstarter Campaign Note: As an Amazon Associate, Art of the Kickstart may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Sponsors Art of the Kickstart is honored to be sponsored by The Gadget Flow, a product discovery platform that helps you discover, save, and buy awesome products. The Gadget Flow is the ultimate buyer's guide for cool luxury gadgets and creative gifts. Click here to learn more and list your product - use coupon code ATOKK16 for 20% off! Transcript View this episode's transcript Roy Morejon: Welcome, entrepreneurs and startups, to Art of the Kickstart, the podcast that every entrepreneur needs to listen to before you launch. I'm your host, Roy Morejon, president and founder of Enventys Partners, the world's only turnkey product launch company that has helped over 2,000 innovations successfully raise over $400 million in capital since 2010. Each week, I interview a crowdfunding success story, an inspirational entrepreneur, or a business expert in order to help you take your startup to the next level. This show would not be possible without our main sponsor Product Hype, a 300,000 member crowdfunding media site and newsletter that's generated millions of dollars in sales for over 1,000 top-tier projects since 2017. Check out producthype.co to subscribe to the weekly newsletter. Now, let's get on with the show. Roy Morejon: Welcome to another edition of Art of the Kickstart. Today, I am super excited because I am speaking with Pierre Baston, the inventor of Qterra. Pierre, thank you so much for joining us today on Art of the Kickstart. Pierre Baston: Thank you, Roy, for having me. I'm happy to be here. Roy Morejon: Yeah, really excited to talk about this amazing innovation because you've packed so much into this product, right? Qterra Craft live right now on Kickstarter, so go check that out. It is truly not just a travel mug. This is the travel mug made for everyone that wants to get out there and, basically, really maximize the overall flavor, as well as all of those antioxidants that go into brewing coffee or tea. So I really have to know, what led you to creating this innovation? Pierre Baston: Well, I have to tell you, I used to drink coffee and tea just like many people do as an occasional thing, almost like a habit without thinking too much about it. But I love to travel. And I went to Argentina many times in order to study tango, in order to study the Argentine culture. And when I was in Argentina, I was struck by one of the most prominent cultural features of the country, and that is their love for a drink called mate. Mate is this hot herbal infusion that was first invented by the Guaraní Indians of Argentina over 500 years ago. And Argentines today love mate. Over 90% of Argentines drink this every single day. And what's very interest thing to me, and what struck me, is that they insist on doing this in the traditional way of the Guaraní Indians 500 years ago. Pierre Baston: I mean, even though it would be easy for them to just dr...

Free Agent Lifestyle
Argentine Futbol Star Diego Maradona Gets Accused Of GUESS WHAT...A YEAR After His Demise

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 128:17


Argentine Futbol Star Diego Maradona Gets Accused Of GUESS WHAT...A YEAR After His Demise Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

The Jim Colbert Show
Get That Snood

The Jim Colbert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 160:06


Tuesday – Jim ponders who started the hickey? Librarian shot and killed by biker and she may have been the agressor? Wow. We learn that the Argentine black and white tegu is a Florida problem. We review the making of the Red Rocks Amphitheatre for WYDTN. Orlando Sentinel Columnist Scott Maxwell joins us to discuss sports betting in Florida, parade and tales of Thanksgiving. Plus, WOKE News, Trivia & Last Call.

PRI's The World
Advocates seek better alternatives to immigration detention

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 56:38


Many immigration rights advocates want an end to detention at facilities. But proponents and current immigrants under surveillance say alternative methods, like ankle monitors or cell phone tracking apps, have taken a toll on their health. Also, when the Beatles swept the world in 1964, it didn't take long before Argentina's local bands began imitating its sounds. Argentine rock musicians, inspired by the Beatles, started to speak up against human rights violations taking place in the ‘60s and ‘70s. And, we hear from Afghanistan's first female commercial airline pilot, Mohadese Mirzaee, who is now living in exile in Bulgaria.

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
How the Beatles inspired a rock revolution in Argentina

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


The birth of Argentine rock coincided with a turbulent time in Latin American history when many countries fell under military dictatorships. 

ESPN FC
Pochettino's English Escape Route

ESPN FC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:07


The FC crew discuss the rumors that Mauricio Pochettino will leave PSG for Manchester United and question why the Argentine would leave in the middle of the season. Plus, the guys criticize Man United's decision to place Michael Carrick as interim manager of the club and argue if Juventus focus on winning the Champions League group against Chelsea or Serie A?

Gold and Guest talk Tottenham
Antonio Conte's stare, injured Argentines and Ndombele's challenge

Gold and Guest talk Tottenham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 43:18


The international break is finally over and Rob and Ali are back to chat everything Tottenham. Ali attended Antonio Conte's first in-person press conference at Hotspur way and the Spurs reporters chat about that, Leeds and Tanguy Ndombele.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1810: #NewWorldReport: Argentina again votes for change. Latin American Research Professor Evan Ellis @revanellis, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 7:25


Photo:  Calchaquí Vase from Andalgalá, Catamarca, in the Argentine Northwest. #NewWorldReport: Argentina again votes for change.  Latin American Research Professor Evan Ellis  @revanellis, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.  https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Argentine-midterms-could-make-president-a-lame-16620032.php ..

Les Nuits de France Culture
La Nuit Joseph Kessel (5/12) : Joseph Kessel, le chroniqueur du monde

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:00


durée : 01:00:00 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit - Un survol radiophonique de la vie et de l'ouvre de Joseph Kessel à bord d'un Latécoère 28, piloté par Françoise Estèbe. Avec comme passagers : André Asséo, Olivier Weber, Roger Grenier, Alexandre Eyriès, Georges Walter, Pierre Schoendoerffer et Hubert Bouccara. "Joseph Kessel fut le chroniqueur du monde et un témoin actif des événements majeurs du 20ème siècle", annonce la productrice Françoise Estebe en introduction de ce numéro de l'émission "Une Vie, une ouvre" de septembre 2008. Mais il fut aussi un être tourmenté, percé de blessures secrètes, habité par un imaginaire peuplé de héros et de monstres, irrésistiblement attiré par les bas-fonds, les êtres blessés et déchus. * Georges Walter :  Joseph Kessel était de la race des conteurs, et il fut un grand journaliste parce qu'il était avant tout, un grand écrivain. C'est le portrait radiophonique de cet homme aux mille vies et aux mille facettes, véritable "flamme vivante", que les auditeurs sont invités à découvrir dans cette émission composée d'entretiens et d'archives.   Né en 1898 dans la pampa Argentine, de parents russes juifs, Joseph Kessel était de la "race des conteurs" rappelle son ami l'écrivain Georges Walter, et "_il fut un grand journaliste parce qu'il était avant tout, un grand écrivain". _ Olivier Weber, André Asseo et Pierre Schoendorffer, fins connaisseurs de la geste kesselienne, décrivent tour à tour et avec justesse la vie démesurée de ce jeune aviateur prenant des risques incroyables à dix-huit ans et qui fut une figure de la Résistance française.  "Jef" comme le surnommaient ses amis proches, qui disait avoir reçu l'hystérie russe grâce aux tsiganes, était un noceur et un bagarreur qui arpenta les coins les plus reculés de la planète, fasciné par les bandits, les aventuriers ou les farouches cavaliers afghans.  Grand lecteur de Dostoïevski, Joseph Kessel était également un découvreur de talents, c'est lui, indique André Asséo, qui a fait d'Henri de Monfreid un écrivain. En somme, "c'était un type incroyable", comme le résume ce libraire qui avoue avoir vécu l'aventure et le voyage par procuration grâce à Joseph Kessel. Il a d'ailleurs baptisé sa librairie "La Rose de Java" en hommage à l'un des romans de Kessel publié en 1937.  Avec Roger Grenier, Alexandre Eyriès, Georges Walter, André Asséo, Pierre Schoendoerffer, Hubert Bouccara et Olivier Weber. Avec en archives, les voix de Joseph Kessel et Maurice Druon. Par Françoise Estèbe  Réalisation : Jean-Claude Loiseau Une vie, une oeuvre - Joseph Kessel (1898 - 1979), fortune carrée (1ère diffusion :   25/09/2008) Indexation web : Sylvain Alzial, Documentation Sonore de Radio France Archive Ina-Radio France

L'heure du crime
L'ENQUÊTE - La disparition de Marie-Anne Erize

L'heure du crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 14:06


Le 15 octobre 1976, en milieu de matinée, une jeune femme se rend dans une petite boutique de réparation de bicyclettes dans le centre ville de San Juan, en Argentine. Marie-Anne Erizé, une Française de 24 ans, vit là depuis quelques mois. Elle veut faire réparer les freins de son vélo, le confie à la boutique et les prévient qu'elle reviendra le prendre à midi. Lorsqu'elle revient le chercher, en sortant du magasin, un homme lui saute dessus. La Française se débat et appelle au secours. Elle est jetée à l'arrière d'un véhicule, lui-même suivi par deux autres voitures. La vendeuse du kiosque à journaux est la dernière personne à apercevoir Marie-Anne Erizé vivante. Ecoutez L'heure du Crime avec Jean-Alphonse Richard du 18 novembre 2021

Hand Of Pod
Episode 412: World Cup qualification is sealed

Hand Of Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 73:25


This week, Sam's voice sounds ridiculous for the first half of the episode because Santi and Andrés didn't say anything about it until the half-time break. The three of them discuss Argentina's two recent World Cup qualifiers – a 1–0 win away to Uruguay and a 0–0 draw at home to Brazil – which (together with Ecuador claiming a 2–0 win away to Chile on Tuesday night) confirmed Argentina's place at the 2022 World Cup.

Portland Timbers Podcast Network
Catching Up, featuring Ross Smith | A chat with Sebastián Blanco

Portland Timbers Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 20:50


Timbers soccer analyst Ross Smith chats with midfielder Sebastián Blanco about Seba's family and being the youngest of three brothers and the Argentine's soccer experiences abroad in Ukraine and England. Blanco also tells a story about playing with the legendary Diego Maradona and how the two linked up for a goal.

CSO Audio Program Notes
Virtual Preconcert Conversation: Guerrero Conducts Piazzolla & Beethoven

CSO Audio Program Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 20:25


Astor Piazzolla, born a century ago, revolutionized the Argentine tango with urbane sophistication. His Aconcagua — named for an Andean mountain — is alternately pensive and streetwise in spirit. Giancarlo Guerrero leads a program bookended by Buxtehude's Chaconne, vibrantly orchestrated by Mexican composer Carlos Chávez, and Beethoven's witty and confident First Symphony. Learn more: cso.org/performances/21-22/cso-classical/guerrero-conducts-piazzolla-and-beethoven/

New Books Network
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Environmental Studies
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in Latin American Studies
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in Literature
Jordan Salama, "Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena" (Catapult, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


Jordan Salama's Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children. Joy, mourning, and humor come together in this astonishing debut, about a country too often seen as only a site of war, and a tale of lively adventure following a legendary river. Kathryn B. Carpenter is a doctoral candidate in the history of science at Princeton University. She is currently researching the history of tornado science and storm chasing in the twentieth-century United States. You can reach her on twitter, @katebcarp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

CSO Audio Program Notes
CSO Program Notes: Guerrero Conducts Piazzolla & Beethoven

CSO Audio Program Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:31


Astor Piazzolla, born a century ago, revolutionized the Argentine tango with urbane sophistication. His Aconcagua — named for an Andean mountain — is alternately pensive and streetwise in spirit. Giancarlo Guerrero leads a program bookended by Buxtehude's Chaconne, vibrantly orchestrated by Mexican composer Carlos Chávez, and Beethoven's witty and confident First Symphony.

Hand Of Pod
Episode 411: River's title to lose, and two huge matches for Argentina

Hand Of Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 62:32


This week Sam and Santi look back on three weeks of action (due to Sam first being on holiday and then being very busy) during which the title race seems to have swung decisively in River Plate's favour. We wax lyrical about Julián Álvarez (Independiente fan Santi even compares him to a young Sergio Agüero) and answer some listeners' questions. We also preview Friday and Tuesday's World Cup qualifying double header, in which Argentina have their two biggest clásicos: first they travel across the Río de la Plata to face Uruguay, then they head to San Juan, where they'll host Brazil.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 136: Part 2 - Finding Jewelry Inspiration in Ecuador's Mountains and Sea Turtles with Jameson Murphy, Co-Founder & General Manager of Flor de la Vida

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:40


What you'll learn in this episode: How Flor de la Vida draws inspiration from Ecuador's unique landscape and wildlife  How the company developed a partnership with local and international polo teams, and their process for designing a trophy for the World Polo Championship Why it was important for Jameson to work with recycled gold and ethically sourced gems Why a jewelry design that sells well in one market won't always be popular in another What NFTs are, and how people are using blockchain technology to invest in jewelry About Jameson Murphy Jameson Murphy is co-founder and general manager of Flor de la Vida, a jewelry brand founded in 2014 and based in Quito, Ecuador. The company uses 3D technology and innovative techniques to create sustainable, handcrafted high jewelry and engagement and wedding rings. Flor de la Vida aims to reshape the business model of selling high jewelry and push the limits of e-commerce in Ecuador and worldwide.  Additional Resources: Website Instagram Photos: Transcript: Founded in 2014 with simple silver jewelry sold door-to-door, Flor de la Vida has grown into a global high jewelry brand that combines the inspiration of Ecuador's natural landscape with cutting-edge design and e-commerce technology. Co-owner Jameson Murphy joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how the company sources its materials ethically; why Flor de la Vida partnered with the Polo World Championship; and how blockchain technology is changing the way people buy and invest in jewelry. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: How does the fact that you're in Ecuador influence your designs? It's interesting to me. In my questions, I've mentioned the Southwest. Everybody talks about the light, or in Iceland, they talk about certain aspects of the country. What does Ecuador have to offer that's different? Jameson: Our main product we sell here is engagement rings and wedding rings. We have a showroom here in Quito which we sustain ourselves with, selling and doing this. We also have the vision for luxury jewelry with this Galapagos line. We've been inspired by designs that are popular in the US for engagement rings. We've tried to work with that style, and it doesn't always work. I speak with my wife and say, “Hey, what's going on here?” and she says, “Well, it's a Latin American group. They have different interests.” You have to market it differently. You can't just go to a website in the U.S. and say, “Hey, I'm going to take some pictures that look similar to these pictures that work for them.” You need to work with the culture a little bit more. There are designs that are more interesting to the people here that I wouldn't have thought would be good sellers. Some of our best models have been things I would not have thought would have been. Sharon: Such as? Can you give an example? Jameson: Our top engagement ring, the sides are braided with really small, one-millimeter diamonds, and then there's a central diamond on top. Another design we thought to put in there, and it turned out to be the best design, was something I wouldn't have imaged. It's not something very specific, but I'm saying the customers here are drawn to that. It's something that must be cultural. Sharon: If I went to Argentina and looked at jewelry, is there something that makes your jewelry specifically Ecuadorean in a sense? Jameson: Specifically this Galapagos line that just came out. We have the Galapagos, but we also have some of the mountains here. We would also love to get into the Amazon. We have a unique country here. We have the Amazon. We have the Andes. We have the coast and the Galapagos. There's a lot of physical area that's good for inspiring. We haven't gotten into the Amazon yet, but we'd love to do work with that as well. For the moment, the inspiration has been the Galapagos, which has been this line we just came out with. Sharon: In your mind, when you think about the future and the Amazon, are you thinking of crocodiles, alligators? Jameson: There's so much opportunity. I love the colors and the gems, so I'm thinking of frogs, jaguars, all kinds of interesting jewelry that I would love to do for the next line. Sharon: I guess my question is, I'm somebody who knows very little about Latin America. I've been to Argentina; that's about it. If I come to Ecuador and look at your jewelry and then I go to Brazil, am I going to see a difference in the design and say, “Ah, that reflects that mountains of Ecuador”? What am I going to see that's different? Jameson: Well, if we talk specifically about the line I'm making, this is unique to Ecuador. One of the largest mountains in Ecuador is Chimborazo. It's actually the highest mountain if you're judging it from the center of the earth, due to the bulge of the planet. It's the farthest from the center of the earth. This is Chimborazo. We made a pendant that's based on the 3D model of this mountain, and we have a sun that's setting behind the mountains. This is a really unique pendant. This is something that's unique to Ecuador, and also the wildlife we're making the pieces of as well. Sharon: Do you find that people who are travelling or tourists are drawn to this mountain pendant because it's a reminder? Who is drawn to that? Jameson: Yes, since we started, we've always wanted our jewelry to be meaningful. We understand that this is part of the magic jewelry has. People have an engagement ring and they remember the moment; they remember the feeling. There's so much connected to it or a pendant. If it was a gift, they remember when they got it, where it came from, and they carry that with themselves. We want this to be the same for people who are visiting Ecuador. Thanks to this event we're doing with polo, we're preparing ourselves for the people who come here to take something back home from this event, the polo players, something to give to their wives. We're also going to be offering it in the cruise, so they'll remember that. It'll be something that's meaningful. They'll remember the whole event, their trip to Ecuador, the polo, that it was a gift. We want to incorporate all of this and have it represent this meaning to the people. Sharon: If you put the polo aside, do you think your customers see meaning in the jewelry you're doing that says, “Oh, this is uniquely Ecuadorean,” or “I wouldn't find this in Colombia”? Is there something that's a little different? I'm just trying to understand if there is some differentiation. You're talking to somebody who's so naïve about the geography and that culture. Jameson: Sure, the wildlife is unique, the wildlife in the Galapagos. We also made a sea iguana. In the Galapagos, they have the only sea iguana that exists. Sharon: Oh, a sea iguana, really? Jameson: It goes into the water and eats algae, and then it comes back out and dries out on the land. It's the only iguana in the world that actually goes out to sea. So, we took an image of this. We made a really elaborate iguana, and he's holding a big tanzanite. We wanted to create a link with Africa, where these gems are coming from, and the Galapagos. He has studded emeralds going down his back, so it's a really beautiful piece and it's unique. This is absolutely Ecuadorean. You wouldn't think of Colombia or anywhere else, because this is the only place in the world where you can find this animal. Sharon: That's interesting, a sea iguana. Has this been a popular item? I realize it's a high-end item from what you're describing. Do people say, “Oh, this is something I should have in my shop because I have people who will want something like this”?  Jameson: The sea iguana is actually the piece that has gotten the most attention. I reached out to some other polo groups thinking, “I'm in this world. I'm going to take advantage of it to see what I can what I do with it.” There's another owner of a polo group and she said, “Wow! I want to make a trophy also. I'm not even thinking of doing it in Ecuador. I want to make a trophy out of a sea iguana.” She wanted to do it, and she actually used the image of the jewelry I sent her as her WhatsApp image for a couple of days, just showing her friends and letting everyone know about this image she loves. I believe she's probably going to be the first customer for this piece, hopefully.  Sharon: I hope that comes to pass. This is really talking about niche marketing here, the niche of the polo group. In five or 10 years, we're going to talk and you're going to be the polo jeweler, in a sense. Jameson: That would be great. That would be a great spot to be for lovely jewelry. Sharon: Oh, sure. Jameson: You need a client who can afford a piece like this. Polo is definitely known to have high-net-worth attendees to a game like this. Sharon: Where else are they playing this in Latin America, this sport? Jameson: Where else are they playing polo? Sharon: Yes. Jameson: Like I mentioned before, I know it's really big in Argentina. They do horse breeding. They do their own tournaments and everything, so it's definitely very important in Argentina. I couldn't say how important it is in other places in South America. Sharon: Would there be resistance with an Argentine team saying, “You're from Ecuador. Why do we want something made by people in Ecuador or designed by people in Ecuador?” Would there be barriers in terms of the culture or somebody saying, “We'll do our own”? Jameson: For the jewelry do you mean? Sharon: Yeah. Jameson: It would have to be meaningful to them. If I say, “Hey, check out this sea iguana. Would you like to buy this?” and if it's not meaningful to them, if they're not doing an event in Ecuador, if they've never visited Ecuador and they don't think about coming to Ecuador, it's certainly not going to be interesting to them. They'll say, “Hey, it's interesting, but what am I going to do with it?” That's definitely a barrier. So, you need people that see meaning in this as well. I need to find them. Like I mentioned, the people that are running this event, they have a cruise line that goes from the coast of Ecuador out to the Galapagos, so, I can also do marketing on the cruise line. This is an opportunity because this means I'm reaching people that see deep meaning in Ecuador. They're here visiting with their family. They're here with their wives, their husbands, and this is a meaningful moment for them, so yes, they are interested in this. That's a great way to reach them. Just like you mentioned, if I show it to everybody, they could say, “Hey, it's interesting, but I'm not planning on visiting Ecuador. I've never been in that corner, so it wouldn't be that interesting for me.” Sharon: It's interesting to me, because talking to different makers, jewelers, I don't hear a lot about finding your niche. It's so important that you're being very targeted. Your money goes a lot further, and it's so much easier to find your market. Jameson: Right. Sharon: In your background, you mentioned e-commerce and blockchain. How does that play into what you're doing in terms of selling your jewelry? Jameson: Blockchain is something that's very interesting. This is something I've been interested in for a long time. About six years ago, Bitcoin came out—I don't how long ago—but it's something that's always been interesting to me. I've followed it; I've investigated it; I've spent a lot of time looking into it. I've never actually had something to do with it. It's just been something I love investigating about the economy and I find interesting. Blockchain, based on cryptocurrencies, is something I found interesting, so I thought, “How am I going to link this to jewelry?” Have you ever heard of an NFT? Sharon: I've heard of it, but is it possible to briefly and succinctly—because I know it's such a complicated area—explain the blockchain and NFTs, which is very important in jewelry? Jameson: Sure, an NFT is a non-fungible token. It's a very specific name, but basically it's a digital item that is unique, and you know it's unique because it's backed by the blockchain. A blockchain is something that is non-centralized that can safely record information. You know the information is correct because it's not produced by anybody; it's actually produced by everybody in some way. We could say it like this. So, an NFT is a digital file that's unique, and you know it's unique because it is linked to the blockchain.  To give an example, there's a business that's selling diamonds as NFTs. For the jewelry industry, it's easier to understand how this could be useful. There's a business called Icecap Diamonds and they sell NFTs. I can go online and if I have a cryptocurrency—I need Ethereum, specifically—I can buy one of these diamonds. So, I buy it and what do they send? They send a digital copy of this diamond. What can I do with this? I could sell this to another person. Now, I need to know there's actually a physical diamond related to this, so this is important: I need to trust this business, that not just anybody is selling me an image of a diamond. It needs to be a trustworthy business, but I can buy this diamond, and this is an investment.  I have a digital image; I have it my cryptocurrency wallet. I can sell this to somebody else if they're interested, or I can burn this image. This one of the terms. If I burn this, in a sense I'm going to be canceling it, and then they send me the diamond physically. If I actually want the diamond physically, they can give it to me. I can have it in my stock; I could use it as an investment. These are specifically investment-created diamonds. If I had it physically, any time I want to have my NFT again, I want to sell it or I want to have my digital backing of this diamond, I send it back to them. They check it out and make sure this is the same diamond, that there's no damage or anything, and they reactivate my NFT so I have it again. They have it in their safe. It's in their bank, in their vault, and then I have this digital image or file showing that I have this. It's just an interesting way of investing. They're using this towards people that are investing. That want to diversify their portfolios. They can easily buy a diamond and sell it to other people or have the diamond and buy it back.   I wanted to do something similar myself, so I was thinking, “How can I do this? How can I do an NFT with jewelry?” Reaching out to another polo group, I got in contact with another owner of a major league polo group in the United States. I saw in the news that she was doing an NFT deal with polo players and making NFTs of polo players. This is basically like trading cards, you could say. They have value because you know that there's only one or 10 of them, and you know exactly how many and you know who produced it. If we're talking about baseball cards, you know it's an official baseball card and you know there are only 10 in circulation, and that gives it value. An NFT has something similar. If I make cards of the best polo players and I only make one or ten of them, then it has a value of whatever value people give it knowing it's unique.  I saw that she was a doing a big deal and she just got a big contract with this for players, so I reached out and said, “Hey, I'm making this jewelry. Would you be interested in doing some trophies or NFTs?” She was thrilled, and we actually just got a contract. I'm going to be doing an NFT jewelry line with her. This is exciting. This is digital jewelry, but it's also exchangeable—there's a better word for it—meaning that if they burn the image, I send them the piece of jewelry. If they send it back to me or we destroy this NFT, then I send them the physical piece of jewelry or they can have the image, which represents a piece of jewelry they can have any time or sell. Someone else could buy it. They can trade this with other people. The jewelry is based on a mascot for this polo league, which is a unicorn. It's a unicorn that we made, and it has a gem in its belly. This is the image. People can buy this, and if they want this necklace, they let us know. They exchange the NFT for the necklace, or they can hold onto it or trade it to other people if they want. Sharon: So, if I'm a member of the league, she sends out a catalogue with T-shirts and keychains and a picture of your unicorn with the gem, and then I say, “Oh, I really like that.” Is it the same price? Would I pay the same amount for this image as I am for the gem? Jameson: Yes, you pay the full price. If you want the piece of jewelry, then you have to exchange the image for the jewelry, or you can just have the image that's tradeable so anybody else could buy it from them. From the blockchain we will know who the owner is. You can see who has always been the owner from the creator, so whoever the owner is can say at any moment, “I would like to now have this necklace,” and then you produce it and send it to them. Sharon: When you say “you,” will you be producing it? Jameson: I will be producing it, yes. Sharon: Do you have to have it in stock in case people want them? Jameson: No, that's one of the exciting pieces. We could sell potentially hundreds of these and not have to make them until somebody requests it. That's an interesting aspect. Sharon: But you have to know how to make it, right? Jameson: Absolutely, yes. We have tested; we have everything ready. We know we can make it.  Sharon: Wow! Do people pay with Bitcoin? Do they pay for these with Bitcoin, or can I send you a check or an electronic transfer? How do people pay? Jameson: We're just doing press for it right now. Last week we launched it. We're getting people excited about it. We're creating hype, so it's not for sale yet. Depending on the platform we put it on—because there are a lot of different platforms, websites that offer NFTs. Some you can only pay in cryptocurrencies; others you can pay with a credit card, and they convert it because it has to be related to the blockchain at some point. We don't have it defined. It's probably going to be in cryptocurrency first. Sharon: When you say the blockchain--I don't know how many times I've tried to understand this—the blockchain, can you explain how that fits into all of this? The blockchain, is that the cryptocurrency? Is that the different kinds of cryptocurrency that makes up a blockchain?   Jameson: Sure, I could clear this up a little bit. Specifically, I have studied Bitcoin. There are so many cryptocurrencies we now have. They all have something unique to them, which is exciting. They're different. They're not just a copy of Bitcoin, although some are and they just put a different name on it. Basically, a blockchain is a ledger that is confirmed by no one. Let's say I have a ledger; I have a back account that says I have $100 and you have $100 in your bank account. I send you $100, and who confirms that I sent you the $100? We need the bank. We need a bank that says, “O.K., Jamie really had $100 and he really sent Sharon $100 and she really accepted $100.” We need somebody in between us to verify that this transaction has taken place. Blockchain is a technology that uses cryptography to be able to confirm that I have $100 or 100 Bitcoin and I sent it. This cryptography confirms that I really have $100 or 100 Bitcoin. Sharon: What's this cryptography? Jameson: This is complicated. I don't know it in the depth that I should, but cryptography means there's a whole impressive algorithm that confirms that I actually have this, that I actually sent it. Let's start from there, because later I'll explain exactly how it's interesting as well. This digital surveyor, let's say, confirms that I have this, that I'm sending it to you, and that I'm not sending it to two people at once, because I could try to send—like I have a hundred Bitcoins, so I'm going to send a hundred to one person and I'm also going to send a hundred to my brother, but it's the same hundred Bitcoin and I'm trying to cheat the system. This is impossible. This won't happen because the cryptography says it can only go one place. I could possibly trick the system for a little bit of time, but because it's a blockchain and every block of it is connected to the next, there are so many computers that are confirming this at once that I wouldn't be able to trick the system for very long. Let's go into what these computers are doing. Have you ever heard of someone who mines cryptocurrency or mines Bitcoin? Sharon: No, you're talking to somebody who knows very little. I'm working in cash. But people mine this stuff, did you say? Jameson: I'm almost done. I understand that this is a pretty far-out topic, but it's actually related to the jewelry, so I can bring it around. When somebody is mining cryptocurrency, you basically turn on your computer and you use your computer to look at a whole bunch of numbers. If you can look at the numbers fast, if you have a really big computer and you're reviewing these numbers, which is checking the cryptography—you don't know what you're checking; you're just reviewing that the cryptography is correct. What you're doing is confirming the transactions people make.  There are millions of people right now, at this moment, who are mining cryptocurrencies. They turn on their computers and they link them to a centralized place where you're confirming all of these transactions. You don't know whose transaction you're confirming. You have no idea what you're doing, but your computer is checking that the cryptography is correct. Why would anybody do this? Because cryptocurrencies reward you if you solve the transaction. You found out the transaction is correct. You don't know whose it is or where it is, but you solved it. Your computer found the bits, the numbers that link together, so then you earn Bitcoin. The Bitcoin itself produces and sends you Bitcoin, so nobody sent it to you. You don't know whose transaction you solved, but you solved it; you solved it with cryptography, so there's no third party. You're solving everybody's transaction, so it's decentralized.  Sharon: I've seen several sites where people say, “We accept Bitcoin.” Have people paid you in Bitcoin for things? Jameson: A few, yes. Sharon: Has that been something you're comfortable with, in terms of giving somebody a piece of jewelry and they give you Bitcoin? Jameson: Like I mentioned, we've come a long way from when we started, just making some artisanal silver jewelry. It was a limit that I had. We had a customer who reached out to us. She was a South African customer. She said, “Hey, I'd like to buy some jewelry, but I'd like to pay you in Bitcoins.” This was the first time. I said, “O.K., I've got to figure out what it is. If I don't know what this is, how am I going to accept it? And if I don't know what it is, I'm limiting myself.” I wanted to look into it; I wanted to know. I found it really interesting and I found out everything I could. I say, “Well, it's currency.” If somebody sends you Bitcoin, it's not that hard to go on a platform and turn it into US dollars and deposit it in your bank account. It's really simple, actually. There's a lot of resistance because people don't know what it is, but it's not that difficult to turn it back into US dollars. Sharon: That's very interesting. There was so much resistance among dealers just going online until Covid. For years, I was trying to encourage friends who are dealers or in the business to go online, do your website, and nobody did it until there was nowhere else to sell your stuff with Covid. Anyway, is it Jamie? I know you said Jameson, but you go by Jamie.  Jameson: I used to go by Jamie, yes. Sharon: Thank you so much for being with us today. This is really interesting. You're going to become the expert and people are going to be coming to you and saying, “How do I do this with Bitcoin?” Jameson: I'm glad to talk. Sharon: Thank you so much. It's greatly appreciated. Jameson: Thank you so much, Sharon. Thanks for having me here. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

All the Hacks
Pushing Your Mind and Body to Win with NBA Legend Manu Ginobili

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 64:49


NBA legend Manu Ginobili joins Chris to share how he made the journey from an Argentine kid who loved basketball to becoming an NBA All-Star. They discuss how Manu pushed his mind and body to beat the odds throughout his career, what led him to such a frugal lifestyle for a professional athlete, and what he's planning for his more than one million credit card points.Manu (@manuginobili) is an Argentine former professional basketball player and two time NBA all star. Over his 23 year career, he became one of only two players to win a EuroLeague title, an NBA championship, and an Olympic gold medal. He was a member of the San Antonio Spurs for his entire NBA career, making the playoffs with the team every single year and winning four NBA championships. He retired from in 2018 at age 40 as one of only 30 players to ever play in the NBA in their 40s.Full show notes available at: https://www.allthehacks.com/winning-manu-ginobili SponsorThis episode is brought to you by BlockFi. BlockFi is the company I use to store all my crypto and I think they provide huge value because. Whether you buy your crypto with them or transfer in what you already have, you can start earning interest on all of it, which is a great way to earn some passive income with almost no effort. And that also includes stable coins based in us dollars where you can earn 9% without having your savings fluctuate with the crypto markets. This is where I store the cash I used to keep at a high yield savings account. Since opening my account, I've already earned thousands of dollars of interest.BlockFi also has a rewards credit card that instead of earning points or miles gives you Bitcoin back on every purchase you make offering 3.5% back in the first three months and 1.5% percent back after that. If you want to check out BlockFi, you can get an exclusive bonus of up to $250 free when you sign at https://allthehacks.com/blockfi. Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Manu Ginobili: Twitter | InstagramWaking up with Sam Harris: WebsiteManu's Book recommendations: Thinking, Fast and Slow | Sapiens | Why We Sleep | Waking Up | Guns Germs and Steel | UnshakeableAll the Hacks #19 with Andy RachleffOura Ring for sleep ($50 Off)Best Restaurant in Oklahoma: Red PrimeSteak Full Show NotesWho is Manu Ginobili? [00:15]Changing the aspirations of argentinian basketball players. [02:38]Manu's atypical NBA career as an outsider and late bloomer. [05:03]The benefit of appreciating the value of coaching early on. [07:09]Why he unusually stayed with one team his entire career. [09:23]How he unknowingly kept an unbeatable style. [10:42]How to persevere when you lose more than you win. [12:38]What helped Manu become an exceptional outlier in the NBA. [16:20]The very mundane changes Manu made to improve his life. [18:54]How mindfulness and meditation transformed Manu's mind and career. [20:30]Spending time after retirement. [24:57]Earn passive income with almost no effort[26:00]Why your brain needs you to exercise. [27:08]Staying disciplined with exercise even when you don't feel like it. [28:56]Transitioning to being a VC from scratch. [31:17]The differences between running a company and running a team. [33:27]Why he doesn't work full-time. [34:35]Not facing the challenges he thought he was going to face after retiring. [35:34]Why Manu never brought basketball home. [38:10]Why Manu drives a minivan and doesn't buy fancy watches.[42:38]What Manu DOES splurge on. [45:51]How Manu got into the world of points and miles. [46:51]Manu Ginobili's travel bucket list. [50:22]Manu's traveling style. [52:26]Must dos in Argentina.[54:42]Does everyone on a basketball team sit in business class when the team travels? [56:23]How Manu realized he's doing investing all wrong. [57:44]Figuring out the value of sleep. [59:37]Manu's book recommendations [1:00:58] Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Violinist Daniel Hope embarks on his most creative project to date

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:13


Daniel Hope — Hope (DG) Jump to giveaway form New Classical Tracks - Daniel Hope by “Music doesn't let me go. I always knew that it was the focus of my life, but it became a lifeline,” violinist Daniel Hope said about the pandemic. “It became a lifeline to the outside world. It was the luxury of time and connections to so many musicians that were willing to experiment and improvise that helped me find hope.” That resulted in his most creative project to date, his new recording with the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Hope. “I've been music director of the Zurich Chamber Orchestra since 2016,” he said. “I've known them since I was a little boy. I heard them when I was 3, and it was the first orchestra that I experienced a violin concerto and symphony. An explosive and emotional orchestral sound came from the ensemble. I never dreamed that 40-odd-years later, I would be the music director, and we've grown enormously together since.” How did the idea for this album emerge? “Throughout the lockdown, we started an online series concerts, Hope at Home. Our message was to rediscover hope through music. The connection between these ideas of positive feelings, energy and music was so strong that we decided to make an album which tries to tap into them. I did feel there was a tremendous connection to the people, and that meant a lot to me during the lockdown. That's really how this album came together.” Why did you focus on songs and the human voice on this new recording? “It was very hard for musicians not to be able to perform and travel during the pandemic. But for vocalists, in particular, the idea of singing was banned, more or less. You were just not allowed to sing. The images of people singing from their balconies and connecting via Zoom was so powerful and moving. I thought, let's put the idea of the human voice at the center of this album.”  Can you talk about the evolution of the opening work by Argentine composer Ariel Ramirez? “I heard this piece as a child. I became obsessed with this gorgeous recording of it by Jose Carreras. I said to myself one day I want to play this on the violin. I actually wanted to sing it, but I realized my voice wasn't good enough to do that. I thought, why not create a version with violin? I had this idea for decades.” Watch now To hear the rest of my conversation, click on the extended interview above, or download the extended podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Giveaway Giveaway You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy. This giveaway is subject to the Official Giveaway Rules. Resources Daniel Hope — Hope (Amazon) Daniel Hope — Hope (DG Store) Daniel Hope (official site)

Today's Top Tune
Chancha Via Circuito: ‘Sano'

Today's Top Tune

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 3:20


Argentine producer Chancha Via Circuito joins forces with fellow countrywoman — singer-songwriter Luvi Torres to heal through Andean electro-folkloric sound. “Sano” Spanish for “I Heal” allows listeners to connect with the divine in love and healing. 

Contra Radio Network
Prepping 2.0 Ep 157 lll Encore: Real World Collapse Survivor FerFAL from Argentina

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 52:51


Episode 157 is an encore. Please pray for Glen while he recovers in the hospital from COVID.  We talk to FerFal, a survivor of the Argentine collapse in 2001 and author of several non-fiction, must-read books.  He answers Patreons' questions in the After Show, which is available exclusively to Patreon Supporters.  Please support our sponsors US Law Shield,  EMP Shield, Numanna Foods, Backwoods Home Magazine, CATI Armor, Jared Savik - Montana Realtor, Minutemen Coffee, and My Kind CBD. Learn more about our podcast at Prepping 2-0.com.

Prepping 2.0
Encore: Real World Collapse Survivor FerFAL from Argentina

Prepping 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 52:51


Episode 157 is an encore. Please pray for Glen while he recovers in the hospital from COVID.  We talk to FerFal, a survivor of the Argentine collapse in 2001 and author of several non-fiction, must-read books.  He answers Patreons' questions in the After Show, which is available exclusively to Patreon Supporters.  Please support our sponsors US Law Shield,  EMP Shield, Numanna Foods, Backwoods Home Magazine, CATI Armor, Jared Savik - Montana Realtor, Minutemen Coffee, and My Kind CBD. Learn more about our podcast at Prepping 2-0.com.

The John Batchelor Show
1815: #NewWorldReport: Deeply-indebted Argentina risks Venezuela-scale failure. Senadora Maria Fernanda Cabal. @MariaFdaCabal (on leave) Joseph Humire @JMHumire @SecureFreeSoc

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 16:44


Photo:  Argentina 2005:  Depositors protest the freezing of their accounts, mostly in dollars. They were converted to pesos at less than half their new value. (From Spanish: "Demonstration of Argentine savers against the Financial Corralito in front of a BBVA Banco Francés branch located on Florida Street, Buenos Aires, Argentina.") #NewWorldReport:  Deeply-indebted Argentina risks Venezuela-scale failure.  Senadora Maria Fernanda Cabal. @MariaFdaCabal (on leave) Joseph Humire @JMHumire @SecureFreeSoc https://www.securefreesociety.org https://www.ft.com/content/814e0898-30d5-4b4f-b468-dddfd447af7c ..  ..  ..  Permissions: Manifestación de ahorristas argentinos contra el Corralito financiero frente a la una sucursal del BBVA Banco Francés ubicada en calle Florida, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Date | 6 February 2002 Source | English: Taken by the uploader, w:es:Usuario:Barcex Español: Tomada por w:es:Usuario:Barcex I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following licenses: Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled GNU Free Documentation License. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. | You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Talks On Psychoanalysis
José Eduardo Fischbein - “The Body in The Psychoanalytic Session”.

Talks On Psychoanalysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 27:45


  This paper aims at categorizing two types of discourse with which the body is referred to. It is based on the model of psychic apparatus as presented in Chapter VII of The Interpretation of Dreams, using it as a conceptual instrument for reading the clinical material in the session. These are the discourse of the "evoked body" and the one on the "perceived body". The former historicizes memories and bodily experiences, while the latter alludes almost exclusively to the present of perception and the recording of what has been done. The discourse of the evoked body corresponds to the field of defensive formations—the expression of a conflictive situation for the mind—, in which different types of acting psychic defences can be distinguished. It is a discourse on the body constructed by representations of the oedipal linking framework. The discourse of the perceived body conveys a body that focuses on references to the perception of economic excitatory aspects; it is rich in its allusions to sensations and experiences that have their axis in bodily functions. It talks about the perception of well-being vs. discomfort, pain vs. absence thereof, increasing tension or discharge processes.   Dr. José Eduardo Fischbein MD from the University of Buenos Aires, graduated with Honours Diploma. Specialist in Psychiatry, National Ministry of Health. Full Member and Training  Analyst of the Argentine Psychoanalytic Association (APA), Latin American Federation of Psychoanalysis (FEPAL), International Psychoanalytic Association (IPA). Specialized  in Child and Adolescent Psychoanalysis, APA, FEPAL, IPA. Master in Psychoanalysis, National University of La Matanza [UNLAM] Elected Director of the Department of Psychosomatics of APA in several administrations, most recently from 2012 to 2016. APA Vice President, 2018-2020 Chair of the Research Group "The body in the psychoanalytic session" (2010 - 2020) He has published numerous articles (approx. 65) in Argentine and foreign reviewed journals (Int. J. Psychol., Revista de Psicoanálisis, APA; Psicoanálisis, APdeBA), as well as chapters in several books.   Link to the paper https://docs.google.com/document/d/1--skeUZx8K4J_T12BhbU5LG-FhALv8N1/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=112457875385152358388&rtpof=true&sd=true     This episode is available also in Spanish  

En sol majeur
En sol majeur - Marina Tomé, l'Argentine en plein jour

En sol majeur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 48:30


C'est une comédienne dont on connaît le visage, on dit « ah oui, j'l'ai déjà vue, mais où ? ». C'est un peu le problème de ce genre de profil : comédienne de l'entre-deux, entre les ruelles du théâtre et les faubourgs du cinéma et de la télé, Marina Tomé fait partie du cercle et s'en échappe. (Rediffusion du 13 février 2020) C'est d'ailleurs toute sa vie, la preuve autour de la commission AAFA qu'elle a créée avec ces acteurs et actrices qui deviennent invisibles, passée la cinquantaine. Mais pour En sol majeur, on rembobinera aussi quelques-uns de ses rôles souvent comiques, pour réaliser que le tragique n'est jamais très loin. Née dans le souffle du Bandonéon argentin, Marina Tomé aime tellement mythologiser sa vie qu'elle en a fait un seul en scène : ça s'appelle La lune en plein jour. C'est comme un pays clair et obscur où celle qui se définit comme une Argentine non argentine et une non-Francaise française... Les choix musicaux de Marina Tomé Mercedes Sosa Duerme negrito Astor Piazzola et Roberto Goyeneche Vuelvo al Sur

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Matteo Guendouzi The Sideshow Bob of Marseille | Olympique de Marseille

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 5:13


Mattéo Guendouzi finding his position and role under Jorge Sampaoli with Marseille Matteo Elias Kenzo Guendouzi Olié is a French professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Ligue 1 club Marseille, on loan from Premier League club Arsenal. Olympique de Marseille, also known as OM or simply Marseille, is a French professional men's football club based in Marseille. Founded in 1899, the club plays in Ligue 1 and have spent most of their history in the top tier of French football. Jorge Luis Sampaoli Moya is an Argentine football coach who is currently in charge of Ligue 1 club Marseille. Sampaoli started out as a youth player and eventually switched to management after a severe injury

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Cristian Romero The Fighter | Tottenham Hotspur F.C.

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 6:49


Cristian Romero finding his feet with Tottenham and Argentina as the future looks bright. Cristian Gabriel Romero is an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Premier League club Tottenham Hotspur, on loan from Serie A club Atalanta, and the Argentina national team. Coming through the youth system, Romero began his senior career in 2016 at Belgrano. Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, commonly referred to as Tottenham or Spurs, is an English professional football club based in Tottenham, London, that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football.

Le Média
Franquisme, chroniques d'une impunité - L'intégrale

Le Média

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 50:01


La dictature franquiste mourra-t-elle avec ses derniers dignitaires ? Protégés par la loi d'amnistie de 1977, les derniers bourreaux franquistes passent l'arme à gauche, les uns après les autres, sans jamais avoir du répondre de leurs crimes. Dans un contre-la-montre haletant comme un polar, les victimes du régime et leurs descendants se battent contre l'impunité, l'indifférence et les zones d'ombres d'une « Transition démocratique » incomplète. Près d'un demi-siècle après la mort de Franco, les corps de milliers de combattants républicains, d'anarchistes et de civils attendent toujours une sépulture décente, loin des fosses communes de la dictature. Résistants fusillés, prisonniers torturés, enfants volés : les fantômes du siècle passé hantent toujours le pays. Ce match de la dernière chance se joue bien sûr en Espagne, mais aussi en Argentine, où s'est constitué le seul dossier judicaire pour condamner les crimes de la dictature au nom de la justice universelle. Cet épisode final rassemble les quatre parties de notre enquête : « Qui veut la peau des derniers franquistes ? », « La juge qui venait d'Argentine », « L'Espagne finira-t-elle par enterrer Franco ? » et « Le communiste à la perruque ». « Franquisme, chroniques d'une impunité », un podcast Le Média TV, à retrouver à l'écrit sur le site du Média. De Madrid à Buenos Aires, une enquête de Laura Guien et Fabien Palem. Avec les voix de Romain Mahdoud et Bérénice Sevestre. Réalisation : Jordan Escoda et Téo Cazenaves. Générique : Maxime-Marc Chazarenc. Illustrations : Adrien Colrat et Léo Tixador. ▶ Soutenez Le Média :

BLOOM RECORDS PODCAST
PREMIERE: Agustin Lupidi - Second Sight [PHW Elements]

BLOOM RECORDS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 7:21


PREMIERE: Agustin Lupidi - Second Sight [PHW Elements] Agustín Lupidi is an Argentinian DJ and producer from Villa María, Córdoba. He has released his productions on labels such as Onedotsixtwo, Balkan Connection and Genesis Music just to name a few. His main influences are Guy J, Henry Saiz, Khen and Hernán Cattaneo. Also got inspiration from Daft Punk, Depeche Mode, Gustavo Cerati, Alberto Spinetta, Tame Impala, Coldplay and various Argentine artists from the underground scene. His music has received the support of his references Nick Warren and Hernan Cattaneo. Agustin shared booth with artists like Stas Drive, Li-Polymer, Interaxxis, Alejo Gonzalez, Guhus, Berni Turletti, Fernando Ferreyra, Santiago Teillagorry, Luis Bondio, Ezequiel Arias, Artfaq, among others. You can join me: Facebook: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-fb Instagram: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-ig YouTube: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-youtube Spotify: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-spotify Beatport: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-beatport Soundcloud: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-soundcloud Mixcloud: bit.ly/agustinlupidi-mixcloud

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Fossil of crocodile's ‘grandfather' discovered A 150-million-year-old fossilized skeleton discovered in the mountains of southern Chile was likely the ancestor of the modern crocodile, the Argentine Museum of Natural Sciences announced on July 23. The species, named Burkesuchus mallingrandensis, was found in 2014 in an Andean fossil deposit near the Patagonian town of Mallin Grande by Argentine and Chilean researchers. Since then it has been analyzed at the Argentine Museum of Natural Sciences in Buenos Aires. The specimen is a “grandfather” of current crocodiles and should allow scientists to understand how they evolved, the museum said. (Reuters) Fossil of new four-legged whale found in Egypt Scientists said on Aug. 25 they had discovered the 43-million-year-old fossil of a previously unknown amphibious four-legged whale species in Egypt — a discovery that will help trace the transition of whales from land to sea. The whale belongs to the Protocetidae, a group of extinct whales that falls in the middle of that transition, the Egyptian-led team of researchers said in a statement. The new whale, named Phiomicetus anubis, had an estimated body length of some 3 meters and a body mass of about 600 kg and was likely a top predator, the researchers said. Its skeleton revealed it as the most primitive protocetid whale known from Africa. (Reuters) These articles were provided by The Japan Times Alpha.

The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild
Luli Masera - Rewilding in Argentina

The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:00


Luli Masera is the Strategy and Partnerships Director for Rewilding Argentina, an Argentine nonprofit organization seeking to prevent species extinction and reverse environmental degradation, with the goal of restoring the functionality of ecosystems and the well-being of surrounding communities. Luli stops by the Lookfar Podcast to talk about the diverse array of landscapes in which Rewilding Argentina works -- the grasslands of Iberá, the forests of El Impenetrable in the Gran Chaco, and the steppes of Patagonia, among others -- and the remarkable multitude of locally extirpated species successfully reintroduced to Argentina, including the giant river otter, collared peccary, red-and-green macaw, marsh deer, and, of course, the jaguar.

Behind The Turf brought to you by Nadeem from Colin Campbell Chemicals
Ep 34 Dr Ben McGraw Entomologist Penn State University

Behind The Turf brought to you by Nadeem from Colin Campbell Chemicals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 49:39


In today's episode I speak to De Ben McGraw a entomologist from Penn State University. Ben has been on the podcast before on episodes. We catch on COVID and how he has adapted. Again I speak to him about weevils as this insect is the most troublesome insect on cool season grasses in the US as it is here in Australia particularly in NSW. Even though in Australia we have the Argentine stem Weevil the characteristics and behaviour is very similar to the Annual Bluegrass Weevil in the US.

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Emiliano Martínez Success After Leaving Arsenal | Aston Villa F.C

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 5:34


Emiliano Martínez is outperforming after leaving Arsenal; as Emi enjoys his time with Aston Villa Damián Emiliano Martínez Romero is an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Premier League club Aston Villa and the Argentina national team. Aston Villa Football Club is an English professional football club based in Aston, Birmingham. The club competes in the Premier League, the top tier of the English football league system. Founded in 1874, they have played at their home ground, Villa Park, since 1897. Arsenal Football Club is a professional football club based in Islington, London, England. Arsenal plays in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina. Argentina's home stadium is Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti in Buenos Aires. How long has Martinez been at Arsenal? Emiliano Martinez been at Arsenal for 10 years. How good is Emiliano Martínez? Emiliano Martinez is averaging a 77.2% save success rate per 90. How much did Aston Villa pay Martinez? Aston Villa paid £17 million that can go up to £20 million for Martínez transfer from Arsenal. Where is Emi Martinez from? Emi Martinez is from Mar del Plata, Argentina. What is Martinez salary? Emiliano Martínez salary is £2,444,000 per year.

Hand Of Pod
Episode 410: Back together again

Hand Of Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 73:13


Allow us one indulgent episode title about ourselves rather than the football we're covering, because this week's episode was the first since March 2020 to be recorded with all of us in the same living room. Sam, English Dan and Andrés get reacquainted with one another and discuss Argentina's World Cup qualifying draw with Paraguay and wins over Uruguay and Peru before going over the last couple of rounds of action in the Liga Profesional.

KEXP Song of the Day
Guazú & Terror/Cactus - Almita

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:11


Guazú & Terror/Cactus - "Almita" from the 2021 EP Botanas: Guazú & Terror Cactus on Shika Shika Collective. “Almita” is one of three tracks on an EP that melds the simpatico genius of two Argentine-born producers living nearly seven thousand miles away from each other. With Lucas Page a.k.a GUAZÚ  in Buenos Aires and Martin Selasco aka Terror/Cactus in Seattle, it should have been difficult to find each other. Luckily, with the help of social media, the two recognized their shared history and influences as well as their individual styles and started exchanging remixes. Via email, a collaboration was sprung and, with the help of Berlin label Shika Shika, Botanas was born. GUAZÚ's dark and mysterious sound is centered around the rich percussive legacy of Latin America with ample use of marimbas, bombo legüeros, warm guitars, kalimbas and birdsong . Terror/Cactus' more upbeat sound takes its main inspiration from cumbia with a modern electronic flair. Together, they've made something that seems like it could fit just as comfortably in the techno clubs of their label's hometown  as in the dancehalls of Buenos Aires. Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Conversations With Warrior Women Podcast
Kathy Schuh- Get in the Picture and STOP Self-Judgement- Episode 76

Conversations With Warrior Women Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:14


Episode Description: Todays guest, Kathy Schuh, an amazing and sought after photographer, tells us about the importance of releasing her own self judgement about the way she looks and how she helps other women to do the same. Kathy and I talk about why life is NOT a bitch, how what you focus on expands, and why we are modeling for our daughters what female friendships look like. Show Notes: Connect with Kathy! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kathy.schuh/ Website etc: https://linktr.ee/kathyschuhphotography Guest Bio: Kathy Schuh is a portrait and branding photographer that specializes in what she calls Signature Portraits. In her 10 years as a photographer she has photographed hundreds of woman through guided photoshoots that leave them feeling confident & empowered. Kathy's style and approach to portraiture has been embraced by clients such as Walt Disney Imagineering, LA Area Chamber of Commerce & scores of entrepreneurs and small business owners. Kathy attributes her nurturing approach to photography to being the daughter of Italian & Argentine immigrants and is never shy about tossing in a "BRAVA" when she captures that perfect shot!

HTI Open Plaza
Publica intellectualis

HTI Open Plaza

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:25


Sociologist Carlos Martínez García is an opinion columnist for the Mexican national daily La Jornada . He writes on various topics, beginning with his advocacy for religious and other minorities in southern Mexico. In this bilingual episode of OP Talks, Martínez García and religious historian Dr. Daniel Ramírez discuss the role of the public intellectual in religious and political life and how Evangelicals have shaped Mexican political discourse. Martínez García addresses: The generally respectful relationship between indigenous evangélicos and leaders of the 1994 Zapatista uprising: Religious tolerance was included in their initial declaration, and evangélicos were later credited by Zapatista leaders for their safe escape from the encroaching federal army in the first month of the revolt. The unique pastoral and prophetic ministry of the controversial San Cristóbal Catholic bishop Samuel Ruiz García. Evangélico historical memory and amnesia: Although individual Protestants were present in colonial New Spain, Protestantism as an organized movement was not. The roots of Spanish-speaking Protestantism, however, stretch to the 16th century, with the translation work of migrating, exiled Spanish humanists like Juan Valdez, Francisco Enzinas, and Juan de Pineda. The project culminated in the historic Biblia del Oso, Casiodoro de Reina's 1569 Bible translation (in Antwerp) and in Cipriano de Valera's 1602 revision (in Amsterdam), known today as the Reina y Valera Bible. The iconic Bible's long-delayed introduction and reception in the Spanish-speaking Americas in the 19th and 20th centuries seeded a new era of religious pluralism, leaving an important cultural and literary imprint, as seen in the works of such literary lights as Chiapas poet Jaimes Sabines; Mexican cultural critic Carlos Monsivais; Argentine poet Jorge Luis Borges; Mexican poet and literary critic Octavio Paz; and Mexican essayist José Emilio Pacheco, among others. The first and last titles in the Monsisvais oeuvre—for example, Principados y potestades [Principalities and Powers] and Apocalipstick— reflect the Sunday School Bible recitation practices that formed the writer's childhood. The January 2019 celebration of the Biblia del Oso anniversary, with a commemorative postal stamp issued by Mexico's Correos Nacionales' (national postal service), marks a historical and cultural watershed in Mexico and Latin America. El sociólogo Carlos Martínez García es columnista de opinión del diario nacional mexicano La Jornada. Escribe sobre varios temas, empezando con su defensa de las minorías religiosas y otros grupos minoritarios en el sur de México. En este episodio bilingüe de OP Talks, Martínez García y el historiador religioso Dr. Daniel Ramírez discuten el papel del intelectual público en la vida religiosa y política y cómo los evangélicos han dado forma al discurso político mexicano. Martínez García nota: La relación generalmente respetuosa entre los evangélicos indígenas y los líderes del levantamiento zapatista de 1994: La tolerancia religiosa se incluyó en su declaración inicial, y los líderes zapatistas les dieron crédito a los evangélicos por haber escapado a salvo del ejército federal invasor en el primer mes de la revuelta. El singular ministerio pastoral y profético del controvertido obispo católico de San Cristóbal Samuel Ruiz García. La memoria histórica y la amnesia evangélica: Aunque los protestantes individuales estaban presentes en la Nueva España colonial, el protestantismo como movimiento organizado no lo estaba. Sin embargo, las raíces del protestantismo de habla hispana se remontan al siglo XVI, con el trabajo de traducción de humanistas españoles emigrados y exiliados como Juan Valdez, Francisco Enzinas y Juan de Pineda. El proyecto culminó en la histórica Biblia del Oso, la traducción de la Biblia de Casiodoro de Reina de 1569 (en Amberes) y en la revisión de Cipriano de Valera de 1602 (en Amsterdam), conocida hoy como la Biblia Reina y Valera. Retrasada durante mucho tiempo, la introducción y recepción de la emblemática Biblia en las Américas de habla hispana durante los siglos XIX y XX sembró una nueva era de pluralismo religioso, dejando una importante huella cultural y literaria, como se ve en las obras de luces literarias como el poeta chiapaneco Jaimes. Sabinos; el crítico cultural mexicano Carlos Monsiváis; el poeta argentino Jorge Luis Borges; el poeta y crítico literario mexicano Octavio Paz; y el ensayista mexicano José Emilio Pacheco, entre otros. Los primeros y últimos títulos de la obra de Monsisvais —por ejemplo, Principados y potestades y Apocalipstick— reflejan las prácticas de recitación bíblica de la escuela dominical que formaron la infancia del escritor. La celebración del aniversario de la Biblia del Oso en enero de 2019, con un sello postal conmemorativo emitido por Correos Nacionales de México, marca un hito histórico y cultural en México y América Latina.

Argentine Mennonite Church
Staying on your Call

Argentine Mennonite Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 28:14


Today we are going to look at one of the problems the early church faced and how the Apostles solved it. Our passage is in the start of the 6th chapter of Acts. Scholars who do the chronological research tell us that we are about 5 years past Pentecost at this point. The church at this time is growing extremely fast and when you grow that fast you are crossing into new ethnic groups. In this case the ethnic group that is coming into the church are the Greek speaking believers who were originally Jewish. They were Jews who grew up in other parts of the world and therefore had different mother tongues. But these Jews had returned to live in Jerusalem at the time. We also know that this community many widows. How so?

Hand Of Pod
Episode 409: River beat ten-man Boca, and previewing Argentina's World Cup qualifiers

Hand Of Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 71:22


This week's Hand Of Pod sees Sam, Santi and Andrés review a couple of rounds of league action, including River Plate's 2–1 win over Boca Juniors in Sunday's superclásico, which sent River top of the table. We also preview the upcoming World Cup qualifying triple header, in which (as long as no health authorities invade the pitch this time) Argentina will take on Paraguay in Asunción and Uruguay and Peru in Buenos Aires.

What In The Word
WITW Short 26 - Silver Lotus

What In The Word

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 32:16


This week's short is looong, but it's a goodie, we promise! Today we unpack the history of Mah Jong and we settle the heated debate around the pronunciation of Argentina. Carolyn's Sources: http://www.biblioteca.jus.gov.ar/Argentina-Constitution.pdf https://www.quora.com/Do-people-born-in-Argentina-prefer-to-be-called-Argentinian-or-Argentine https://www.britannica.com/place/Rio-de-la-Plata --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/what-in-the-word/message

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Nahuel Molina Another Argentine in Udine | Udinese Calcio

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 6:42


The rise of Nahuel Molina Nahuel Molina Lucero is an Argentine footballer who plays as a right-back for Serie A club Udinese and the Argentina national team. Udinese Calcio, commonly referred to as Udinese, is an Italian football club based in Udine, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, that currently plays in Serie A. It was founded on 30 November 1896 as a sports club, and on 5 July 1911 as a football club. Club Atlético Rosario Central is a sports club based in Rosario, Argentina, that plays in the Argentine Primera División. The club was officially founded December 24, 1889 by a group of railway workers, taking its name from the English-owned Central Argentine Railway company. The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina. Argentina's home stadium is Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti in Buenos Aires The Primera División. The Primera División is the country's premier football division and is the top division of the Argentine football league system. It operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the Primera Nacional (Second Division), with the teams placed lowest at the end of the season being relegated.

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Short - Julio Cortázar

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 0:32


Today's Quotation is care of Julio Cortázar.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app!Julio Cortázar, pseudonym Julio Denis, (born August 26, 1914, Brussels, Belgium—died February 12, 1984, Paris, France), was an Argentine novelist and short-story writer who combined existential questioning with experimental writing techniques in his works.Cortázar was the son of Argentine parents and was educated in Argentina, where he taught secondary school and worked as a translator. Bestiario (1951; “Bestiary”), his first short-story collection, was published the year he moved to Paris, an act motivated by dissatisfaction with the government of Juan Perón and what he saw as the general stagnation of the Argentine middle class. He remained in Paris, where he received French citizenship in 1981, though he also kept his Argentine citizenship and remained engaged with political causes in Argentina and Nicaragua. He also traveled widely.Cortázar's masterpiece, Rayuela (1963; Hopscotch), is an open-ended novel, or antinovel; the reader is invited to rearrange the different parts of the novel according to a plan prescribed by the author. It was the first of the “boom” of Latin American novels of the 1960s to gain international attention. Cortázar's other novels were Los premios (1960; Eng. trans. The Winners), 62: modelo para armar (1968; 62: A Model Kit), and Libro de Manuel (1973; A Manual for Manuel). A series of playful and humorous stories that Cortázar wrote between 1952 and 1959 were published in Historias de cronopios y de famas (1962; Cronopios and Famas). His later collections of short stories included Todos los fuegos el fuego (1966; All Fires the Fire, and Other Stories), Un tal Lucas(1979; A Certain Lucas), and Queremos tanto a Glenda, y otros relatos (1981; We Love Glenda So Much, and Other Tales). Cortázar also wrote poetry and plays and published numerous volumes of essays.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Julio-Cortazar. For more information about Julio Cortázar:“Julio Cortázar, The Art of Fiction No. 83”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/2955/the-art-of-fiction-no-83-julio-cortazar“What Julio Cortázar Might Teach Us About Teaching Writing”: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/what-julio-cortazar-might-teach-us-about-teaching-writing“The Subtle Radicalism of Julio Cortázar's Berkeley Lectures”: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/03/the-subtle-radicalism-of-julio-cortazars-berkeley-lectures/520812/

Hand Of Pod
Episode 408: What happened in Brazil v Argentina and catching up on the rest

Hand Of Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 75:17


This week, Sam and English Dan catch up with what's been going on in the three weeks since we last recorded. The main focus is on trying to unpick exactly what went on in São Paulo a couple of weeks back when the Brazil v Argentina World Cup qualifier was called off – and what do we think will happen next? We also give you a quick overview of the other World Cup qualifying matches (including yet another record for Lionel Messi) and give you a Liga Profesional update.

Par Jupiter !
Le Premier Exil de Santiago H. Amigorena

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 4:17


durée : 00:04:17 - La chronique de Clara Dupont-Monod - par : Clara Dupont-Monod - Clara Dupont-Monod a lu le dernier livre de l'écrivain Santiago H. Amigorena, dans lequel il parle des années passées en Uruguay, pays qu'il a rejoint pour fuir son Argentine natale.

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia
394: Four Weeks down Colombia's Magdalena River

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 54:49


An exhilarating travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children Tune in for an enjoyable conversation with the author and buy his book! https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/676218/every-day-the-river-changes-by-jordan-salama/

My Old Man Said - An Aston Villa Podcast
Argentine Concern Threatens Season's First Full-Strength Villa Team

My Old Man Said - An Aston Villa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 25:23


Is Dean Smith playing mind games with Everton over Villa's Argentine duo Emi Buendia and Emiliano Martínez returning back to the UK on the day of the game? Knowing Villa's luck with Covid, they'll probably fail their re-entry PCR test anyway. Still, will we finally in the 5th game of the season see Smith getting to chose a full strength team?We catch up with Dean Smith's press conference and the latest Villa happenings since the last main MOMS podcast show.This episode of the My Old Man Said podcast is brought to you by Freetrade, the commission-free investing app. Get yourself a free share on MOMS, check out - freetrade.io/momsUTVGET THE EXCLUSIVE MOMS PATRON PODCAST CHANNEL and JOIN MATCH CLUBIf you want extra podcast shows during the month and to join Match Club, please do support the show by becoming a MOMS Patron.For more details and to become a Patron, click here: Become a MOMS PatronFollow the show on Twitter at @myoldmansaid and join the show's listener facebook group The Mad Few.T-Shirt, Mugs & Merch Listeners can now buy a MOMS Podcast T-shirt or mug to show their support of the show and look cool, check out the MOMS SHOP to buy.Credits: David Michael - @oldmansaidChris Budd - @BUDD_musicMy Old Man Said - https://www.myoldmansaid.comEditor/Producer - David Michael See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ESPN FC
Messi Makes History (Again)

ESPN FC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 64:36


The FC crew praise Lionel Messi's brilliant performance against Bolivia, which saw him become South America's all-time leading scorer in men's international football, and discuss why the Argentine legend is playing with a freer mind after his Copa America win this summer. Plus, the panel preview a host of games, including Ronaldo's hotly anticipated return to Man United, Leipzig's tense showdown with Bayern Munich and Napoli's matchup against Juventus.