Podcast appearances and mentions of Henry James

American-British writer and literary critic

  • 534PODCASTS
  • 1,013EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 27, 2023LATEST
Henry James

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Henry James

Show all podcasts related to henry james

Latest podcast episodes about Henry James

The Podcast for Social Research
Faculty Spotlight: Bruce King

The Podcast for Social Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 77:25


In episode three of Faculty Spotlight, Lauren K. Wolfe and Mark DeLucas interview BISR classicist Bruce King. The three discuss: what brought Bruce to the classics; the charisma of his teachers (and the poverty of their ideas); queering the canon; the trouble with the Odyssey; coming to love Latin (and why he's keeping Horace to himself); learning Sanskrit with friends; BISR's new Language Learning and Critique program; and Bruce's favorite non-ancient things—from Henry James to Claude Lévi-Strauss to La Monte Young's "Pythagorean" Dream House.

Classic Audiobook Collection
Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 604:16


Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev audiobook. The fathers and children of the novel refers to the growing divide between the two generations of Russians, and the character Yevgeny Bazarov has been referred to as the "first Bolshevik", for his nihilism and rejection of the old order. Turgenev wrote Fathers and Sons as a response to the growing cultural schism that he saw between liberals of the 1830s/1840s and the growing nihilist movement. Both the nihilists (the "sons") and the 1830s liberals sought Western-based social change in Russia. Additionally, these two modes of thought were contrasted with the conservative Slavophiles, who believed that Russia's path lay in its traditional spirituality. Fathers and Sons might be regarded as the first wholly modern novel in Russian Literature (Gogol's Dead Souls, another main contender, is sometimes referred to as a poem or epic in prose as in the style of Dante's Divine Comedy). The novel introduces a dual character study, as seen with the gradual breakdown of Bazarov's and Arkady's nihilistic opposition to emotional display, especially in the case of Bazarov's love for Madame Odintsova and Fenichka. This prominent theme of character duality and deep psychological insight would exert an influence on most of the great Russian novels to come, most obviously echoed in the novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. The novel is also the first Russian work to gain prominence in the Western world, eventually gaining the approval of well established novelists Gustave Flaubert, Guy de Maupassant, and Henry James, proving that Russian literature owes much to Ivan Turgenev. 

Classic Audiobook Collection
Cousin Betty by Honore de Balzac ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 1022:49


Cousin Betty by Honore de Balzac audiobook. Cousin Betty (La Cousine Bette), published in serial format in 1846, was one of the last and greatest of Balzac's works. It was part of his long novel collection titled La Comédie Humaine. Set in mid-19th-century France, it tells the story of a woman who resents her position as a "poor relation." As we follow her schemes to bring ruin upon the more privileged members of her family, we see a society in transition. The stability and idealism of the old order give way to a new bourgeois world in which virtue is strangled in the struggle for power and money. In this novel, Balzac searchingly probes the psychology and motivations of his characters: his work influenced the development of literary realism, as practised by writers such as Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Flaubert, Proust, and Henry James.

Classic Audiobook Collection
Father Goriot by Honore de Balzac ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 714:47


Father Goriot by Honore de Balzac audiobook. One of Balzac's most popular works, set around 1815 during the re-ascendancy of the Bourbon kings following the defeat of Napoleon. Said to have been an inspiration to Charles Dickens and Henry James as well as others, the novel seeks to portray the realism of scenes and people. It is also a commentary upon the changing social strata and mores of the day.

New Books in Intellectual History
Lorraine Daston Books In Dark Times (JP)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 33:48


Our Books in Dark Times series offered John this 2021 chance to speak with Lorraine Daston of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. Her list of publications outstrips our capacity to mention here; John particularly admires her analysis of “epistemic virtues” such as truth to nature and objectivity in her 2007 Objectivity (coauthored with Peter Galison). Although she “came of age in an era of extreme contextualism” Daston is anything but time-bound. She starts things off in John's wheelhouse with Henry James, before moving on to Pliny the Younger–no, not the scientist, the administrator! Then she makes a startling flanking maneuver to finish with contemporary Polish poetry. John puffs to keep up… Discussed in this episode: Henry James, Portrait of a Lady (Nicole Kidman as Isabel Archer, American abroad, in Jane Campion's Portrait of a Lady) Pliny the Younger, Letters (“the very model of the good civil servant”) Lisa Ford, Settler Sovereignty Ovid, Tristia Zbigniew Herbert, e.g. Mr. Cogito Wislawa Szymborska View with a Grain of Sand D. H. Lawrence, “Snake” (and other animal poems) Peter Godfrey-Smith, Other Minds (“This [octopus encounter] is probably the closest we will come to meeting an intelligent alien.”) George Herbert, “The Rose“ Olga Tokarczuk, Drive Your Plow over the Bones of the Dead Stanislaw Lem, Solaris (1961) and The Futurological Congress (1971) Listen and Read: 41 RTB Books in Dark Times 13: Lorraine Daston, Historian of Science Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Literary Studies
97* Lorraine Daston Books In Dark Times (JP)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 33:48


Our Books in Dark Times series offered John this 2021 chance to speak with Lorraine Daston of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. Her list of publications outstrips our capacity to mention here; John particularly admires her analysis of “epistemic virtues” such as truth to nature and objectivity in her 2007 Objectivity (coauthored with Peter Galison). Although she “came of age in an era of extreme contextualism” Daston is anything but time-bound. She starts things off in John's wheelhouse with Henry James, before moving on to Pliny the Younger–no, not the scientist, the administrator! Then she makes a startling flanking maneuver to finish with contemporary Polish poetry. John puffs to keep up… Discussed in this episode: Henry James, Portrait of a Lady (Nicole Kidman as Isabel Archer, American abroad, in Jane Campion's Portrait of a Lady) Pliny the Younger, Letters (“the very model of the good civil servant”) Lisa Ford, Settler Sovereignty Ovid, Tristia Zbigniew Herbert, e.g. Mr. Cogito Wislawa Szymborska View with a Grain of Sand D. H. Lawrence, “Snake” (and other animal poems) Peter Godfrey-Smith, Other Minds (“This [octopus encounter] is probably the closest we will come to meeting an intelligent alien.”) George Herbert, “The Rose“ Olga Tokarczuk, Drive Your Plow over the Bones of the Dead Stanislaw Lem, Solaris (1961) and The Futurological Congress (1971) Listen and Read: 41 RTB Books in Dark Times 13: Lorraine Daston, Historian of Science Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Lorraine Daston Books In Dark Times (JP)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 33:48


Our Books in Dark Times series offered John this 2021 chance to speak with Lorraine Daston of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. Her list of publications outstrips our capacity to mention here; John particularly admires her analysis of “epistemic virtues” such as truth to nature and objectivity in her 2007 Objectivity (coauthored with Peter Galison). Although she “came of age in an era of extreme contextualism” Daston is anything but time-bound. She starts things off in John's wheelhouse with Henry James, before moving on to Pliny the Younger–no, not the scientist, the administrator! Then she makes a startling flanking maneuver to finish with contemporary Polish poetry. John puffs to keep up… Discussed in this episode: Henry James, Portrait of a Lady (Nicole Kidman as Isabel Archer, American abroad, in Jane Campion's Portrait of a Lady) Pliny the Younger, Letters (“the very model of the good civil servant”) Lisa Ford, Settler Sovereignty Ovid, Tristia Zbigniew Herbert, e.g. Mr. Cogito Wislawa Szymborska View with a Grain of Sand D. H. Lawrence, “Snake” (and other animal poems) Peter Godfrey-Smith, Other Minds (“This [octopus encounter] is probably the closest we will come to meeting an intelligent alien.”) George Herbert, “The Rose“ Olga Tokarczuk, Drive Your Plow over the Bones of the Dead Stanislaw Lem, Solaris (1961) and The Futurological Congress (1971) Listen and Read: 41 RTB Books in Dark Times 13: Lorraine Daston, Historian of Science Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Recall This Book
97* Lorraine Daston Books In Dark Times (JP)

Recall This Book

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 33:48


Our Books in Dark Times series offered John this 2021 chance to speak with Lorraine Daston of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. Her list of publications outstrips our capacity to mention here; John particularly admires her analysis of “epistemic virtues” such as truth to nature and objectivity in her 2007 Objectivity (coauthored with Peter Galison). Although she “came of age in an era of extreme contextualism” Daston is anything but time-bound. She starts things off in John's wheelhouse with Henry James, before moving on to Pliny the Younger–no, not the scientist, the administrator! Then she makes a startling flanking maneuver to finish with contemporary Polish poetry. John puffs to keep up… Discussed in this episode: Henry James, Portrait of a Lady (Nicole Kidman as Isabel Archer, American abroad, in Jane Campion's Portrait of a Lady) Pliny the Younger, Letters (“the very model of the good civil servant”) Lisa Ford, Settler Sovereignty Ovid, Tristia Zbigniew Herbert, e.g. Mr. Cogito Wislawa Szymborska View with a Grain of Sand D. H. Lawrence, “Snake” (and other animal poems) Peter Godfrey-Smith, Other Minds (“This [octopus encounter] is probably the closest we will come to meeting an intelligent alien.”) George Herbert, “The Rose“ Olga Tokarczuk, Drive Your Plow over the Bones of the Dead Stanislaw Lem, Solaris (1961) and The Futurological Congress (1971) Listen and Read: 41 RTB Books in Dark Times 13: Lorraine Daston, Historian of Science Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The History of Literature
477 Does Edith Wharton Hate You? (Part 2 - "The Vice of Reading")

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 49:37


Does Edith Wharton hate us? That's a provocative question - but perhaps one that Wharton herself provoked, with her essay on the readers who damaged literature and her fiction satirizing the same. In this two-part series, Jacke takes a look at the type of readers targeted by Wharton: not the readers of trash fiction, whom she believed were harmless enough, but the readers of serious fiction who nevertheless read fiction in the wrong way. Does it include History of Literature Podcast listeners or even - gulp - its host? This episode is Part Two, which focuses on Wharton's 1903 essay "The Vice of Reading." Part One, which focuses on Wharton's 1916 short story "Xingu," will be available at the same time. Additional listening: Edith Wharton (with Mike Palindrome) 61 In the Mood for a Good Book - Wharton, Murakami, Chandler, and Fowles (with Vu Tran) 414 Henry James's Golden Bowl (with Dinitia Smith) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The History of Literature
476 Does Edith Wharton Hate You? (Part 1 - "Xingu")

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 77:46


Does Edith Wharton hate us? That's a provocative question - but perhaps one that Wharton herself provoked, with her essay on the readers who damaged literature and her fiction satirizing the same. In this two-part series, Jacke takes a look at the type of readers targeted by Wharton: not the readers of trash fiction, whom she believed were harmless enough, but the readers of serious fiction who nevertheless read fiction in the wrong way. Does it include History of Literature Podcast listeners or even - gulp - its host? This episode is Part One, focusing on Wharton's 1916 short story "Xingu." Part Two, which focuses on Wharton's 1903 essay "The Vice of Reading," will be available at the same time. Additional listening: Edith Wharton (with Mike Palindrome) 61 In the Mood for a Good Book - Wharton, Murakami, Chandler, and Fowles (with Vu Tran) 414 Henry James's Golden Bowl (with Dinitia Smith) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lexicon Valley
The Ambassadors

Lexicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 29:48


Henry James wrote his final novels just over a century ago — and yet they are far less accessible than works written much earlier. John explains. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit lexiconvalley.substack.com/subscribe

Lost Ladies of Lit
Hiatus Replay: Constance Fenimore Woolson — Anne with Anne Boyd Rioux

Lost Ladies of Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 47:37 Transcription Available


WE'RE BACK WITH A NEW EPISODE ON FEBRUARY 7, 2023. In this episode, Kim and Amy have a conversation about Constance Fenimore Woolson's novel Anne (1880) with professor and author Anne Boyd Rioux, whose biography of Woolson was named one of 2016's ten best books of the year by The Chicago Tribune. Woolson, a close friend of Henry James, is remembered as a salacious footnote in his story, yet upon its publication, her novel Anne sold ten times as many copies as James's Portrait of a Lady. Learn more about Woolson's fascinating life, and find out what makes her novel one we know you'll want to read too. For episodes and show notes, visit: LostLadiesofLit.com Follow us on instagram @lostladiesoflit. Follow Kim on twitter @kaskew. Sign up for our newsletter: LostLadiesofLit.com Email us: Contact — Lost Ladies of Lit Podcast

The Podcast for Social Research
Podcast for Social Research, Episode 57: At Year's End with the Angel of History—2022 in Review

The Podcast for Social Research

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 128:13


In episode 57 of the Podcast for Social Research, Ajay Singh Chaudhary, Rebecca Ariel Porte, Danielle Drori, Mark DeLucas, Lauren K. Wolfe, and Michael Stevenson look back at their 2022 in cultural experiences, from high-brow to middle- to low-: visiting NYC landmarks (for the first time), the New York Philharmonic (and David Geffen Hall's questionable acoustics), the Upanishads, diary-keeping (and destroying), Sybille Bedford (vs. Henry James), Lucy Ives's Life is Everywhere, the Xenoblade Chronicles (an allegory for communism?), Pink Floyd, "low-powered" cultural objects, Station 11, Bernadette Mayer, Stockholm's Vasa Museum (a museum dedicated to failure), Chester the dog,  Annie Ernaux, and autofiction—again, and again, and again. 

Vision For Life
Episode 112 | Best Reads Of 2022

Vision For Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 52:24


Resources mentioned in this episode:Spiritual Life"A Model of Christian Maturity" by D.A. Carson (https://amazon.com/dp/0801093953)"Keeping Place" by Jen Pollock Michel (https://amazon.com/dp/B0722P5FR9)Biography and History"Dominion" by Tom Holland (https://amazon.com/dp/B07NCY9RG9)"Out of our Past" by Carl N. Degler (https://amazon.com/dp/0061319856)"Martin Luther, Vol 2" by Martin Brecht (https://amazon.com/dp/0800628144)"Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings" by William. R. Russell (https://amazon.com/dp/0800698835)"River of the Gods" by Candice Millard (https://amazon.com/dp/B09BTJNJCX)Theology and Bible"The Desire of the Nations" by Oliver O'Donovan (https://amazon.com/dp/0521665167)"Christian Mission in the Modern World" by John Stott (https://amazon.com/dp/0830844392)""Fundamentalism" and the Word of God" by J.I. Packer (https://amazon.com/dp/0802811477)General Interest"A Time to Build" by Yuval Levin (https://amazon.com/dp/1541699270)"Art of the Commonplace" by Wendell Berry (https://amazon.com/dp/1593760078)"Surrender" by Bono (https://amazon.com/dp/B09ZHK2N71)Fiction and Literature "The Legend of the Poinsettia" by Tomie dePaola (https://amazon.com/dp/0698115678)"The Ambassadors" by Henry James (https://amazon.com/dpB00JDN27Q0)"Everything Sad is Untrue" by Daniel Nayeri (https://amazon.com/dp/B08BR2HFWJ)"The Prisoner" by Marcel Proust (https://amazon.com/dp/0143133594)"The Fugitive" by Marcel Proust (https://amazon.com/dp/0143133705)

Read Me to Sleep, Ricky
School Days, a poem by Richard Howard

Read Me to Sleep, Ricky

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 20:06


"School Days" is from Richard Howard's 2008 collection of poetry Without Saying. A distinguished poet, critic and translator, Richard Howard held a unique place in contemporary American letters. Howard was credited with introducing modern French fiction—particularly examples of the Nouveau Roman—to the American public; his translation of Charles Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal (1984) won a National Book Award in 1984. A selection of Howard's critical prose was collected in the volume Paper Trail: Selected Prose 1965-2003, and his collection of essays Alone with America: Essays on the Art of Poetry in the United States since 1950 (1969) was praised as one of the first comprehensive overviews of American poetry from the latter half of the 20th century. First and foremost a poet, Howard's many volumes of verse also received widespread acclaim; he won the 1970 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for his collection Untitled Subjects. His other honors included the American Book Award, the Harriet Monroe Memorial Prize, the PEN Translation Medal, the Levinson Prize, and the Ordre National du Mérite from the French government. For many years, Howard was the poetry editor of the Paris Review.Known for his erudition and interest in the nature of artistic expression, Howard's poems are often dramatic monologues in which figures from history and literature speak directly to the reader. From Howard's first book, Quantities (1962), his approach to the dramatic monologue set him apart as a unique practitioner of contemporary poetry. Using voices from characters as disparate as Oscar Wilde, Walt Whitman, Henry James, and Orpheus among others, Howard's narrative monologues are darkly comic, laced with irony and sadness, and distinctly learned. Early books such as The Damages (1967) and Untitled Subjects (1969) saw Howard honing his skill with a wide range of subjects and voices. Frequently addressing the incommensurability of word and world, Barbara Fischer asserted in her review of Talking Cures (2003) that “in [Howard's] work's insistent writtenness and its collages of polyvocal quotation he reminds us that the immediacy of contact—vocal, erotic, somatic, sensory contact—is out of reach as soon as we write about it.”Howard's work in the 1970s and '80s continued to explore the use of monologue, dialogue, and other forms of the speaking voice in his poetry. In Two-Part Inventions (1974) and Fellow Feelings (1976), he creates imaginary conversations between historical persons, uncovering shared assumptions and emotions between himself and such writers as Walt Whitman and Charles Baudelaire. The poems of Misgivings (1979) are all addressed to the subjects of 19th-century photographic portraits, while those of Lining Up (1984) are the voices of artists and musicians. Speaking to Allen Wiggins of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Howard explained that in his poems he tries to get “out of the way of voices, letting the voices speak through me and for me, and I have discovered that my own experience can be represented much better than it can be presented.” With his 10th book of poetry, Like Most Revelations (1994), Howard inhabits the voices of Edith Wharton and Walt Whitman, but he also offers elegies for friends who have died from AIDS and cancer. Support the showRead Me to Sleep, Ricky is hosted by Rick WhitakerContact: rickawhitaker@gmail.comhttps://readmetosleepricky.com

Bedside Reading
Christmas Special: The Turn of the Screw

Bedside Reading

Play Episode Play 43 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 38:03


I'm delighted to welcome back an old friend of the podcast, Catriona Davis to talk about a real classic ghost story - Henry James' The Turn of the Screw  which starts on Christmas Eve and is the ideal short novella if you want a creepy, dark, ghost story for a cold dark night.We talk about unreliable narrators, "spider sense" and how we get into trouble because we don't listen to the little voice telling us it's all going to go horribly wrong. We also think about how to talk to children in an age appropriate way about sex and why learning correct anatomical terms is really important.Follow Catriona on twitter https://twitter.com/catrionadavisCatriona and I talk about some books we are desperately hoping to get for Christmas and a special mention to my favourite bookshop in the world: Scarthin Books in Matlock http://www.scarthinbooks.com/ who also have a brilliant mail order service if you can't make it there in person https://scarthinbooksonline.com/ as well as a presence on bookshop.org https://uk.bookshop.org/shop/scarthinbooks

Instant Trivia
Episode 677 - 19Th Century Literature - General Food - Ernie - Living At The Watergate - Tv Is Really Cooking

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 7:46


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 677, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: 19Th Century Literature 1: Essays making up this 1854 work include "Reading", "Solitude" and "The Pond in Winter". Walden; or, Life in the Woods. 2: Akela the wolf and Baloo the brown bear are 2 of the animals featured in this collection of stories. The Jungle Book. 3: Early in this Jules Verne tale, professor Otto Lidenbrock, his nephew and a guide descend into a volcano. Journey to the Center of the Earth. 4: Wordsworth began a poem, "I wandered lonely as" this "that floats on high o'er vales and hills". a cloud. 5: 2 expatriates come to Boston to visit relatives in his 1878 novel "The Europeans". Henry James. Round 2. Category: General Food 1: A term for grain from grass, it follows "breakfast" in your morning routine. cereal. 2: General term for the edible kernel of a one-seeded fruit. a nut. 3: Food in the Old West, perhaps from the wagon of the same name. chuck. 4: Despite its name, this storeroom similar to a pantry is not specifically for keeping hog fat. a larder. 5: Sometimes "K" or "C", they're food supplies for soldiers. rations. Round 3. Category: Ernie 1: On "Sesame Street", Ernie sang of his great affection for this bathtub accessory. the rubber ducky. 2: As Stinky, Ernie Weckbaugh was a cast member of this group that also included Spanky and Alfalfa. the Little Rascals (or Our Gang). 3: Famous Ernie's in State College, Pennsylvania is famous for the sandwiches "wit or witout onions". a cheesesteak. 4: In 1961 Ernie Davis of Syracuse won this trophy; no African American had before, not even Ernie's idol Jim Brown. the Heisman. 5: Cartoonist Ernie Bushmiller created this mischievous young girl. Nancy. Round 4. Category: Living At The Watergate 1: This Kansas senator was head of the RNC and living at the Watergate during the '72 break-in but was in Chicago that night. Bob Dole. 2: Ironically, in 1969 Rose Mary Woods, this man's secretary, was the victim of one of the Watergate's first burglaries. Richard Nixon. 3: In 1996 this Supreme Court justice from N.Y. and Watergate resident had her purse snatched outside the building. Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 4: At the center of a pres. scandal herself, she left neighbors apology notes for the fuss she brought to the building in the '90s. Monica Lewinsky. 5: This Secretary of State often played chamber music piano accompanied by 4 friends in her apartment. Condoleezza Rice. Round 5. Category: Tv Is Really Cooking 1: Tortellini with Bolognese sauce and pizza Margherita were featured in "Mario Eats Italy", Mario being this guy. Mario Batali. 2: Bam! In 1990 he opened his first restaurant; bam! Later that decade, Food Network gave us the "Essence of" him. Emeril. 3: Chairman Kaga oversaw culinary "battles" that were held in Kitchen Stadium on this show. Iron Chef. 4: On this Fox show where you best not mess up the risotto, cooks vied to be the new head chef at a Gordon Ramsay restaurant. Hell's Kitchen. 5: Adam Richman hit New Orleans to eat 180 oysters in under an hour in a challenge on this Travel Channel show. Man v. Food. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia! Special thanks to https://blog.feedspot.com/trivia_podcasts/

The Meaningful Life with Andrew G. Marshall
Dr. John Kaag: Be Not Afraid: How Philosophy and William James Saved My Life

The Meaningful Life with Andrew G. Marshall

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 51:22


“Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact.” Philosopher William James (brother of the novelist Henry James) seems way ahead of his time with this insight.  Our guest this week is author and philosopher John Kaag. John credits William James with helping him through several existential crises, including bouts of despair as a young man, and two divorces.  Andrew and John discuss: ⭐️The pressing choice in modern life of where to put our attention ⭐️How philosophy helps parents ⭐️The ways daily habits and routines entrap us ⭐️The problem of empathy and the challenge of honouring the inner lives of others.   Subscriber Content This Week If you're a subscriber to The Meaningful Life (via Apple Podcasts, Spotify or Patreon), this week you'll be hearing: ⭐️When is it justified to believe? ⭐️3 things John Kaag knows to be true. ⭐️AND subscribers also access all of our previous bonus content - a rich trove of insight on love, life and meaning created by Andrew and his interviewees.   Follow Up Read Andrew's new Substack newsletter The Meaningful Life, and join the community there.  Buy John Kaag's new book Be Not Afraid of Life: In the Words of William James Buy John Kaag's other books: American Philosophy: A Love Story Sick Souls, Healthy Minds: How William James Can Save Your Life  Hiking with Nietzsche: On Becoming Who You Are Follow John Kaag on Twitter @JohnKaag  Read Andrew's book Wake Up and Change Your Life: How to Survive a Crisis and be Stronger, Wiser and Happier You might also enjoy Andrew's interview with Andy West on Inherited Guilt: How Philosophy Helped Me Heal  Join our Supporters Club to access exclusive behind-the-scenes content, fan requests and the chance to ask Andrew your own questions. Membership starts at just £4.50.  Andrew offers regular advice on love, marriage and finding meaning in your life via his social channels. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube @andrewgmarshall   

The Bookshop Podcast
Paula Marantz Cohen, Author

The Bookshop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 34:12


In this episode, I'm chatting with Dr. Paula Marantz Cohen about empathy, Shakespeare, teaching, and her book Of Human Kindness: What Shakespeare Teaches Us About Empathy.Paula Marantz Cohen is Distinguished Professor of English at Drexel University where she teaches courses in literature, film, and creative writing. She is the recipient of the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching and is a co-editor of jml: Journal of Modern Literature.Cohen is the author of four nonfiction books and five novels and is the producer of the documentary film, Two Universities and the Future of China. Her play, The Triangle, about John Singer Sargent, Henry James, and Edith Wharton, was a finalist in the Julie Harris Playwriting Competition. Her essays, stories, and reviews have appeared in The Yale Review, The American Scholar, The Southwest Review, the Times Literary Supplement, Raritan, The Hudson Review, and other publications. She writes a weekly online column, “Class Notes,” for The American Scholar and is the host of The Drexel Interview, a  TV show based in Philadelphia that is broadcast on over 350 local stations, including 150 PBS stations, throughout the country.         Cohen holds a B.A. in French and English from Yale College and a Ph.D. in English Literature from Columbia University.Paula Marantz CohenOf Human Kindness: What Shakespeare Teaches Us About Empathy, Paula Marantz CohenMr. B: George Balanchine's 20th Century, Jennifer HomansPlato's Republic, PlatoThick: And Other Essays, Tressie McMillan CottomDaniel Deronda, George EliotMiddlemarch, George Eliot  Support the show

Dirty Moderate with Adam Epstein
Stay Dirty. Stay Moderate: The White Lotus and American Delusion

Dirty Moderate with Adam Epstein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 22:01


Politics is always downwind of culture. And for 2022's final installment of Stay Dirty, Stay Moderate, Adam weaves the parallels between Henry James's "The Portrait of a Lady" and the HBO critically-acclaimed series "The White Lotus" with the delusion of American culture. We'll be back after the holidays but until then, don't forget: Vote.org, Vote.org, Vote.org! Get registered to vote if you're not already and register everyone you know. You can even help them figure out where their nearest voting location is and when early voting starts…the 2024 Presidential Election campaigns have already begun.Thanks for listening, Dirty Moderate Nation! Subscribe to Substack for first dibs at podcast episodes, behind the scenes video clips, and access to the heady and fabulous Dirty Moderate Nation newsletter with in-depth coverage of the political landscape, actionable ways to make a difference, random dad jokes, endless reminders to vote, and all things “fight like hell to save democracy” related. Thank you for helping us save democracy one episode at a time.

El ojo crítico
El ojo crítico - Use Lahoz y la creatividad

El ojo crítico

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 8:21


'El arte de la ficción', de Walter Bessant, Henry James y Robert Louis Stevenson con traducción de Juan José Utrilla y introducción de Alvaro Uribe. Publicado por Firmamento.  Escuchar audio

On the Same Page
Ep 58. ”The Master” by Colm Toibin

On the Same Page

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 66:44


Few novels are as simultaneously literary and accessible as Colm Tóibín's 2004 novel “The Master”. Regardless of whether you know the eponymous master referred to is Henry James, or if you're an avid James devotee, this book treats everyone equally. Everyone, that is, except Henry James, who we meet in his 50s and on the verge of the biggest failure of his prodigious career. Rather than drag the reader through a whole-life narrative, Tóibín focuses on a five-year period of flux, a period dominated by self-doubt, repression, regret, ambition and perhaps most of all, ambiguity. It is this latter quality of James, a cat-like elusiveness to categorisation, which the “The Master” captures so well. It's a novel that doesn't rely on plot to drive the story forward, but rather relies upon an alluring atmosphere of ambiguity that sweeps our eyes across its pages like mist over rolling hills. Some of the books and authors discussed in this episode include: "The Master" by Colm Toibin “The Victim” by P.D. James “The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King” by J.R.R. Tolkien Additional segments throughout the podcast include: Inner Shelf Fact or fiction What are you reading? On that Quote Apple Podcast: https://lnkd.in/gF2zVhQT Spotify: https://lnkd.in/gTHtxVh5 Podbean: https://onthesamepagepodcast.podbean.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/thesamepagepod_ Email: seamusandblake@gmail.com IG: https://www.instagram.com/on.the.same.page.podcast/  -------- #bookpodcast #podcast #book #novel #stories #shortstories #apassagenorth #anukaradpragasm #tolstoy #poetry #shortstoryskirmish #litfacts #paris #literature #books #novels #salmonrushdie #spotifypodcasts #applepodcasts #audible #samsungpodcasts #books #novels #audibleau #lit #onthesamepage #whatareyoureading #literaryfacts #podbean #whatareyoureading

Scary Stories - Daily Short Stories
The Romance of Certain Old Clothes - Henry James

Scary Stories - Daily Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 45:49


View our full collection of podcasts at our website: https://www.solgoodmedia.com or YouTube channel: https://www.solgood.org/subscribe

Relatos de Misterio y Suspense
#227 El Tarn de Hugh Walpole

Relatos de Misterio y Suspense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 40:00


El Tarn es un relato de terror del escritor británico Hugh Walpole (1884-1941), publicado originalmente en la edición de octubre de 1923 de la revista Success, y luego reeditado en numerosas antologías, entre ellas: La gorra negra; El espino plateado; Un siglo de historias de fantasmas y Fantasmas en aldeas rurales. El Tarn, uno de los mejores cuentos de Hugh Walpole, relata la historia de Foster, un escritor que visita a un viejo conocido, Fenwick, en su remota casa en el Distrito de los Lagos. Ha oído que Fenwick le guarda rencor y está ansioso por arreglar las cosas. Pero Fenwick no está de humor para hacer las paces; de hecho, en las apacibles aguas del Tarn se entrega a voluptuosas fantasías, como retorcer lentamente el cuello de Foster. ¡¡¡¡¡¡SPOILERS!!!!!! En la superficie, El Tarn de Hugh Walpole es una brillante historia de celos [en este caso, literarios] y venganza, pero debajo hay más, mucho más. Fenwick, el protagonista, es autor de una novela que ha fracasado rotundamente, mientras que su amigo, Foster, escribió una basura sentimental que resultó ser un éxito. Desde ese momento, Fenwick fantasea con asesinar al despreocupado Foster, a quien culpa de su propio fracaso. Con la intención de reconciliarse [y acaso para regodearse en su victoria], Foster se invita a sí mismo a la casa de Fenwick en el Distrito de los Lagos ingleses, donde se presenta con un falso sentido de la modestia, admitiendo, claro, que tiene algo de talento, «pero no tanto como dice la gente», antes de jactarse de sus premios literarios, sus viajes a Italia y Grecia, y sus ganancias [«Por supuesto, cien libras no es mucho»]. Fenwick lo soporta en silencio, aparentando cierta amistad y receptividad, pero en secreto piensa «en lo agradable que sería hundir los ojos de Foster en su cabeza, muy, muy profundo, haciéndolos crujir, dejando las cuencas vacías, abiertas y ensangrentadas». En este contexto, Fenwick invita a Foster a dar un paseo por un Tarn: un pequeño pero profundo lago en la base de una colina [el término deriva del escandinavo tjörn, el cual describe un pequeño lago de montaña sin afluentes visibles.]. Allí, por fin, Fenwick consuma su venganza al estilo de Edgar Allan Poe. De hecho, Fenwick y Foster bien podrían ser sustitutos de Montresor y Fortunato de El barril de Amontillado. Al igual que Montresor, Fenwick solo busca reparar lo que él considera un agravio: el éxito de Foster. El tercer personaje de este notable relato de Hugh Walpole es el Tarn, este pequeño pero profundo lago en el regazo de una colina. Es un lugar remoto, y de algún modo parece ejercer una influencia nefasta en Fenwick, como si presionara en su resentimiento para darle ese empujón necesario para pasar de la fantasía a realmente asesinar a Foster: [«¿Sabes por qué amo este lugar, Foster? Parece pertenecerme especialmente, tanto como tu gloria y fama y éxito parecen pertenecerte a ti. Yo tengo esto y tu tienes aquello. Quizás al final estemos a mano después de todo.»] Fenwick lleva a Foster hacia un embarcadero y lo ahoga en las sombras del profundo Tarn. De camino a casa, cree que alguien [o algo] lo sigue; incluso cree que su misterioso perseguidor podría ser el propio Tarn «resbalando, deslizándose por el camino». Esto no lo perturba demasiado. Después de todo, Fenwick es un hombre solitario que disfruta pasar el tiempo en el Tarn, pero no encuentra paz esa noche. A la madrugada, el Tarn parece manifestarse en su propio dormitorio, inundándolo, arrastrándolo hacia abajo y, finalmente, ahogándolo. Por la mañana, la criada descubre el cuerpo de Fenwick y una simple jarra de agua volcada. El Tarn de Hugh Walpole es un cuento muy bien logrado. Hace lo que hace de una manera clásica, y lo hace muy bien, con un estilo elegante y evocador, sobre todo en cuanto a la ambientación y la descripción de los pensamientos homicidas de Fenwick. Lo más desconcertante aquí es el Tarn, que en cierto modo es como el Genius Loci de Clark Ashton Smith; es decir, un egregore o espíritu elemental que presiona sobre las debilidades mentales de su víctima, en este caso, el resentimiento de Fenwick [ver: Los Tulpas y el Horror: nos acecha lo que pensamos]. La manifestación final del Tarn, además de ser innovadora, acaso simboliza el arrepentimiento [no reconocido] de Fenwick por haber asesinado a su único amigo. En cierto modo, la escena final de El Tarn parece ser intencionalmente una versión sobrenatural del final de El corazón delator. En este sentido, hay que decir que Hugh Walpole era un escritor familiarizado con la fama, moviéndose en los mismos círculos que Henry James y Joseph Conrad; por lo que es probable que también haya estado familiarizado con los celos de Fenwick. La mayoría de los relatos de Hugh Walpole poseen elementos autobiográficos, por ejemplo, el protagonista suele ser un escritor con una relación conflictiva con un colega. Por supuesto, lo sobrenatural siempre está presente [en este caso, en la figura incierta del Tarn], pero debajo siempre hay un entramado de sutilezas psicológicas en la relación entre dos hombres que, además, son escritores. Este escenario de aislamiento entre dos hombres también está presente en Señora Lunt (Mrs. Lunt), así como los sentimientos conflictivos entre dos hombres, acaso inspirados en las intensas [aunque discretas] relaciones sentimentales de Hugh Walpole con otros escritores. Esto, creo, es lo que constituye buena parte de la corriente subyacente de tristeza y añoranza en los relatos de Hugh Walpole. El Tarn, sus insondables profundidades reprimidas que emergen de repente, claramente resuenan en la homosexualidad de Hugh Walpole en una época en la que serlo era ilegal. [«Detrás de ese escarpado pico enorme, negro, como si tuviera un instinto de poder voluntario, alzó la cabeza. Cada vez más inmóvil en estatura, la forma siniestra se elevó entre las estrellas y yo, y aún así, porque eso parecía, con un propósito propio y un movimiento medido, como un ser vivo, y caminó tras de mí.»] La cita anterior no es de Hugh Walpole, sino de William Wordsworth, el cual versifica una epifanía mientras rema a través de un lago y percibe el paisaje imbuido de una misteriosa vida propia, tangible, pero incomprensible, enfatizando su propia insignificancia como ser humano ante la naturaleza; aunque bien podría tratarse de una descripción de Fenwick de los horrores manifestados por el Tarn. Pero Wordsworth, en vez de asesinar a alguien, se sintió transformado por esta extraña experiencia: [«Durante muchos días mi cerebro funcionó con un vago e indeterminado sentido. Sobre mis pensamientos colgaba una oscuridad, llámese soledad o abandono. No quedaron imágenes agradables de árboles, del mar o del cielo, ni colores de campos verdes; sino formas enormes y poderosas que no viven como los hombres; se movían lentamente a través de mi mente durante el día, y eran un problema para mis sueños.»] Fenwick, el protagonista de El Tarn, no menciona a Wordsworth, pero sería difícil creer que un autor británico no estuviese familiarizado con sus escritos, sobre todo porque Fenwick se ha enclaustrado en el Distrito de los Lagos, en una casa cerca de Ullswater, y parece ser el tipo de hombre que, a pesar de repudiarlos, volvería a los escritores románticos para reflexionar sobre los fracasos de su vida. La influencia de Wordsworth en El Tarn también está presente en la forma en que Fenwick percibe el paisaje [las nubes son «ejércitos fantasmales», las colinas detrás de Ullswater se extienden sobre el «pecho de las llanuras»]. A pesar de todos sus intentos de sofisticación urbana, Fenwick está enamorado de ese paisaje, de «esas curvas, líneas y huecos», y constantemente lo personifica, como cuando menciona las «nubladas colinas púrpura, encorvadas como mantas sobre las rodillas de un gigante yacente». Foster, mucho más insensible, también percibe esa presencia, pero desde otra constitución emocional y psicológica. Para él, las colinas solo son extrañas en el crepúsculo, «como hombres vivos». Donde Fenwick ve belleza, Foster ve una amenaza, aunque no puede articularla claramente. Hay una sutil alusión al cuento de hadas en El Tarn de Hugh Walpole, más precisamente a la historia del ratón de campo y el ratón de ciudad [ver: Los cuentos de hadas y una Teoría sobre la Imaginación]. En este sentido, Foster es el sofisticado ratón de ciudad que sabe cómo jugar el juego, mientras que Fenwick es el ingenuo ratón de campo que cree que la vida se rige por méritos y esfuerzo. No es casual que Fenwick se haya exiliado en el Distrito de los Lagos y viva en una relativa penuria; menos aun que experimente algo de comodidad mental en el aislamiento físico y cultural. Después de todo, codearse con otros escritores en Londres solo le recordaría su fracaso. La psicología de toda la situación planteada en El Tarn es intrigante. Según Fenwick, su fracaso es totalmente atribuible a Foster. De alguna manera, éste último siempre ha logrado superar a Fenwick, tomando la dirección de una revista aquí, logrando que su novela sea mejor recibida por la crítica [y publicándola en la misma semana que la de Fenwick]. Al mismo tiempo, la exagerada admiración de Foster por el trabajo de Fenwick no parece del todo sincera; de hecho, parece motivada por el deseo de ser admirado él mismo por alguien que evidentemente lo detesta [«odiaba que alguien pensara mal de él; quería que todos fueran sus amigos»]. De los dos hombres, Fenwick es el más emocionalmente consciente de su Sombra Jungiana. Reconoce la intensidad de su odio por Foster y que no es seguro que se encuentren, es decir, no confía en ser capaz de controlar sus impulsos homicidas. En cuanto a si realmente no quiere amigos, como él afirma, es menos claro. Tengo la sensación de son dos personas profundamente diferentes, pero igualmente vulnerables, que bien podrían haber sido amigos en diferentes circunstancias [ver: Freud, el Hombre de Arena, y una teoría sobre el Horror] El vínculo de Fenwick con el Tarn es tal que afirma: «un día me imagino que también me tomará en su confianza y me susurrará sus secretos», mientras que Foster ni siquiera sabe qué es un Tarn, y cuando lo ve solo lo describe como «muy agradable» y «muy bonito. Esta falta de apreciación es significativa. A pesar de su deseo de amistad [auténtico o fingido], Fostr realmente tiene poca idea de lo que mueve a Fenwick. Por otro lado, no hay indicios de que Fenwick planeara asesinar a Foster cuando sugiere que den un paseo nocturno hasta el Tarn, aunque no hay duda de que alberga pensamientos y fantasías violentas. Sin embargo, los pensamientos y las fantasías están lejos de la acción, sobre todo en alguien que ha intentado mantenerse alejado, incluso físicamente, de la fuente de esa violencia. Uno inmediatamente relaciona al Tarn con el Genius Loci, pero la historia de Clark Ashton Smith establece una relación causal distinta, aunque ligeramente complicada, entre el lugar y la persona [ver: Genius Loci: el espíritu del lugar]. Incluso en Los Sauces ('The Willows), de Algernon Blackwood, se insinúa una especie poder sobrenatural detrás de los eventos [ver: La Llamada de lo Salvaje]. La historia de Hugh Walpole es mucho más ambigua. Por un lado, puede ser que la obsesión de Fenwick con Foster lo impulse a asesinarlo en el Tarn, justo cuando este último confiesa su miedo al agua y relata una experiencia infantil traumática, en la que unos muchachos mayores casi lo ahogan. Es decir, no hay indicios de que Fenwick supiera esto antes de sugerir el paseo al Tarn. Sin embargo, sus fantasías sobre Foster constantemente implican una una acción física directa. Hugh Walpole es ambiguo incluso en el modus operandi del crimen. Fenwick primero pone sus manos alrededor del cuello de Foster, y luego lo empuja al agua. ¿Cómo funciona esto exactamente? En cualquier caso, una vez cometido el crimen, Fenwick es «consciente de un alivio cálido y lujoso, un sentimiento sensual que no era pensado en absoluto». Rodeado por un silencio que adquiere atributos humanos, Fenwick parece estar en comunión con el propio Tarn [«miró fijamente a Fenwick a la cara con aprobación»]. El Tarn se ha convertido en «el único amigo que tenía en todo el mundo». Hasta se podría decir que es la soledad lo que lo ha vuelto loco: [«Tuvo la más extraña fantasía, pero su cerebro latía tan ferozmente que no podía pensar: que era el Tarn el que lo estaba siguiendo, el Tarn resbalando, deslizándose a lo largo del camino, estando con él para que no se sintiera solo.»] A partir de entonces, todo alrededor de Fenwick, cada sonido, insinúa culpabilidad y remordimiento. El clic de la puerta de su dormitorio al cerrarse sugiere el sonido metálico de una celda que se cierra. Sus sentidos se están derrumbando. Dos candelabros le recuerdan la voz de Foster, «lloriqueando con su miserable lamento centelleante». Luego, finalmente, al despertar en la noche, encuentra que su habitación se llena silenciosamente de agua. ¿Qué es lo que lo sujeta del tobillo, luego de los muslos, finalmente presionando sus globos oculares? ¿Acaso al ahogarse uno siente como si estuviera siendo estrangulado o ahorcado? ¿Esto tiene que ver con las manos de Fenwick alrededor del cuello de Foster antes de arrojarlo al Tarn? Si no fuera por Annie, la criada, que al parecer se refiere a los dos hombres, uno podría preguntarse si Foster realmente existe; o Fenwick, para el caso. El hecho de que ambos nombres empiecen con la misma letra, junto con la naturaleza intensamente antitética de los dos hombres, sugiere la escisión de un personaje en dos en algún momento [tal vez antes del inicio de la historia] y, de hecho, podría explicar la insondable sensación de soledad de Fenwick después del [aparente] asesinato. El final de El Tarn de Hugh Walpole abre una nueva línea de especulación sobre el punto de vista de la historia. Todo el tiempo se asume que es el de Fenwick, pero en la sección final algo más entra en juego. De hecho, ¿qué hacer con esa última línea?: «En la brisa, una ramita de hiedra golpeó ociosamente contra el cristal de la ventana. Era una hermosa mañana.» Una imagen tan común y, sin embargo, tan extrañamente amenazante. Al final, no sabemos más que al comienzo de la historia. Lo que parecía seguro se ha visto socavado. De hecho, cuanto más de cerca se examina la historia, más frágil se vuelve. Lo que inicialmente parecía tener sentido ya no encaja del todo, pero no está claro por qué podría ser así. Y ahí, en ese hueco donde las cosas no terminan de tener sentido, reside la exquisita rareza de El Tarn. Lo que parece tan ordinario, tan sencillo, se vuelve cada vez más extraño a medida que uno profundiza en ello. Lo cual nos lleva de vuelta a Wordsworth, tal vez, y esas «formas enormes y poderosas que no viven como los hombres» [ver: Tulpas, Seres Interdimensionales y una teoría sobre el Horror] Análisis de: El Espejo Gótico http://elespejogotico.blogspot.com/2022/03/el-tarn-hugh-walpole-relato-y-analisis.html Texto del relato extraído de: http://elespejogotico.blogspot.com/2022/03/el-tarn-hugh-walpole-relato-y-analisis.html Musicas: - 01. PGM Misterio Autor: Antonio Muñoz Guirado en colaboración con Jim Bryan y Brendan Brown - Cedida en exclusiva para este programa de Relatos de Misterio y Suspense. -02. Música de terror (sin copyright) - Creepypasta Aftermaths. Nota: Este audio no se realiza con fines comerciales ni lucrativos. Es de difusión enteramente gratuita e intenta dar a conocer tanto a los escritores de los relatos y cuentos como a los autores de las músicas. Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

London Review Podcasts
Introducing The Long and Short

London Review Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 10:41


Seamus Perry and Mark Ford return with a new twelve-part Close Readings series, The Long and Short, taking a fresh look at 19th and 20th-century literature through the lens of short stories and long poems. Starting in January 2023, the series will look at twelve writers, from Tennyson and Henry James to Elizabeth Bowen and Alice Oswald, with a new episode appearing each month. This sample is from the first episode, on Tennyson's ‘Maud'.Subscribers to the full series will receive copies of the books discussed in each episode and access to online seminars with Seamus and Mark throughout the year. Audio-only options are also available.Subscribe to the series here: https://lrb.me/longshortFind out about other Close Readings series here: https://lrb.me/closereadings Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The History of Literature
462 My Last Book (with Laurie Frankel)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 63:10


The question stopped Jacke in his tracks. "Dear Jacke," said the emailer. "What do you want your "last book" to be? This will be the last book you will ever read..." And so, he set about determining what his "last book" should be, with help from dozens of guests (and counting). In this special episode, Jacke talks to super guest Laurie Frankel (Goodbye For Now, One Two Three) about her choice for the "last book" she will ever read. With special cameos from Dinitia Smith, Saikat Majumdar, Isaac Butler, and Anna Beer. Additional listening suggestions: 332 Hamlet (with Laurie Frankel) 360 FMK Shakespeare! (with Laurie Frankel) 414 The Golden Bowl by Henry James (with Dinitia Smith) 447 Lady Chatterley's Lover (with Saikat Majumdar) 449 Method Acting and "Bad Hamlet" (with Isaac Butler) 459 Eve Bites Back! An Alternative History of English Literature (with Anna Beer) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 357: Henry James

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 2:43


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Henry James, (born April 15, 1843, New York, N.Y., U.S.—died Feb. 28, 1916, London, Eng.), was a U.S.-British novelist. Born to a distinguished family, the brother of William James, he was privately educated. He traveled frequently to Europe from childhood on; after 1876 he lived primarily in England. His fundamental theme was to be the innocence and exuberance of the New World in conflict with the corruption and wisdom of the Old. Daisy Miller (1879) won him international renown; it was followed by The Europeans (1879), Washington Square(1880), and The Portrait of a Lady (1881). In The Bostonians (1886) and The Princess Casamassima (1886), his subjects were social reformers and revolutionaries. In The Spoils of Poynton (1897), What Maisie Knew(1897), and The Turn of the Screw (1898), he made use of complex moral and psychological ambiguity. The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903), and The Golden Bowl (1904) were his great final novels. His intense concern with the novel as an art form is reflected in the essay “The Art of Fiction” (1884), his prefaces to the volumes of his collected works, and his many literary essays. Perhaps his chief technical innovation was his strong focus on the individual consciousness of his central characters, which reflected his sense of the decline of public and collective values in his time.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Henry-James-American-writer. For more information about Henry James:The Aspern Papers: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-aspern-papers-henry-james/1116755591“A Discussion of Henry James's The Aspern Papers”: https://lareviewofbooks.org/entitled-opinions/another-look-dci-event-discussion-henry-james-aspern-papers/“Henry James”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/henry-james“Henry James and the American Idea”: https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2011/julyaugust/feature/henry-james-and-the-american-idea

True Story
[À REDÉCOUVRIR] Virginia Woolf, une écrivaine en avance sur son temps

True Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 14:22


Ses romans post-impressionnistes ont marqué l'histoire de la littérature et son essai "Une chambre à soi " a marqué celle du féminisme. On la connaît comme une femme libre, intelligente, talentueuse... Mais aussi mélancolique, dépressive et malade. Son nom : Virginia Woolf. A travers ses combats et ses écrits, découvrez sa True Story. Elle a baigné dans la littérature dès son plus jeune âge Au 22 Hyde Park Gate, dans le Kensington, au cœur de Londres, réside une grande famille recomposée. Sir Leslie Stephen et Julia Duckworth, tous les deux veufs, vivent avec leurs huit enfants. Virginia, née en 1882, est l'avant-dernière. Ses parents font partie du grand cercle intellectuel londonien. Dès son plus jeune âge, elle baigne dans un univers culturel très riche et des grandes figures littéraires comme Henry James font partie de son entourage. Sa curiosité pour les lettres fera d'elle l'une des écrivaines les plus talentueuses de sa génération... Son histoire incroyable est à écouter dans ce podcast. Pour découvrir d'autres récits passionnants, cliquez ci-dessous : Alfred Nobel, le chimiste qui voulait la paix en fabriquant des armes Le naufrage du Prestige, l'une des pires marées noires de l'Histoire Eddie Chapman, l'ex-gangster au destin héroïque Un podcast Bababam Originals Écriture : Karen Etourneau Réalisation : Célia Brondeau, Antoine Berry Roger Voix : Andréa Brusque Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Charles Dickens: A Brain on Fire!
Hard Times: with Gage McWeeny

Charles Dickens: A Brain on Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 61:51


Dominic is joined by Gage Mcweeny, who is Professor of English at Williams College, Massachusetts. Gage is an alumni of both Columbia and Princeton, with a specialism in nineteenth-century literature; sociology; and culture. His book The Comfort of Strangers: Social Life and Literary Form  (OUP) examines that Victorian phenomenon of new people emerging everywhere in the Great Cities as Industrialisation takes its hold in the 19th Century and how authors such as George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James and of course  Dickens respond to it. He also wrote the introduction to the Longman edition of Hard Times. Reading extracts from Hard Times is the actor Ben Eagle and The Bookshop Band also appear in the episode with their song The Tumbling Girl ... Support the showIf you like to make a donation to support the costs of producing this series you can buy 'coffees' right here https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dominicgerrardHost: Dominic GerrardSeries Artwork: Léna GibertOriginal Music: Dominic GerrardThank you for listening!

Théâtre et compagnie
"Le scénario Proust" de Harold Pinter (partie 2)

Théâtre et compagnie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 104:38


durée : 01:44:38 - Fictions / Théâtre et Cie - L'histoire mondiale du cinéma est jalonnée de films mythiques qui n'ont jamais été tournés, dont un des plus fameux est le projet d'adaptation d'"À la recherche du temps perdu" par Joseph Losey, en collaboration avec Harold Pinter.il en est résulté une œuvre pleinement achevée : Le scénario Proust. - invités : Jean Pavans Ecrivain et traducteur de Henry James

Théâtre
"Le scénario Proust" de Harold Pinter (partie 2)

Théâtre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 104:38


durée : 01:44:38 - Fictions / Théâtre et Cie - L'histoire mondiale du cinéma est jalonnée de films mythiques qui n'ont jamais été tournés, dont un des plus fameux est le projet d'adaptation d'"À la recherche du temps perdu" par Joseph Losey, en collaboration avec Harold Pinter.il en est résulté une œuvre pleinement achevée : Le scénario Proust. - invités : Jean Pavans Ecrivain et traducteur de Henry James

Théâtre et compagnie
"Le scénario Proust" de Harold Pinter (partie 1)

Théâtre et compagnie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 117:20


durée : 01:57:20 - Fictions / Théâtre et Cie - C'est durant toute l'année 1972 que Harold Pinter travailla avec Barbara Bray et Joseph Losey à une adaptation d'À la recherche du temps perdu, pour un film que Losey ne put finalement jamais tourner. - invités : Jean Pavans Ecrivain et traducteur de Henry James

Théâtre
"Le scénario Proust" de Harold Pinter (partie 1)

Théâtre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 117:20


durée : 01:57:20 - Fictions / Théâtre et Cie - C'est durant toute l'année 1972 que Harold Pinter travailla avec Barbara Bray et Joseph Losey à une adaptation d'À la recherche du temps perdu, pour un film que Losey ne put finalement jamais tourner. - invités : Jean Pavans Ecrivain et traducteur de Henry James

Old Time Radio Listener
Danny Kaye - The Great Donivitch Kayeoff

Old Time Radio Listener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 30:01


THE DANNY KAYE SHOW In December 1944 it was announced that Pabst Sales Co. was dropping The Kenny Baker Show in favor of a vehicle for rising star Danny Kaye. Pabst had tried to sign established comedian Fred Allen for the show at a whopping cost of $25,000 per episode but the effort fizzled when Allen reportedly sniffing that he didn't care to work for a beer company. Kaye agreed to a package costing the beer producer $16,000 per week, 2/3 the cost of Fred Allen. The Danny Kaye Show debuted on January 6, 1945 and featured Eve Arden, Frank Nelson, Lionel Stander among others. Music was provided by Harry James and a 26-piece orchestra. Interestingly, before signing onto the show James contractually insisted that his wife would never be mentioned and that he would not serve as a comedy stooge for Kaye. Lionel Stander served as the second man while Ken Niles was announcer (followed by Fred Robbins and Dick Joy). Dick Mack of Warwick & Legler was the producer. Initially Phil Rapp was approached to script the show but talks fell through and Kaye's wife Sylvia Fine was responsible for much of the writing when it first took to the air. The highly regarded Goodman Ace took over writing duties when the show returned in the fall on September 28 at a salary of $3,500 per episode. Eventually Ace walked away calling the entire effort a “lost cause.” During its sixteen-month run (minus a 1945 summer hiatus) The Danny Kaye Show never really found its rhythm and could only draw mediocre ratings. In an effort to steady the ship after a shaky start, Kaye, who owned the show package, called in MCA to advice in March 1945 – after just months on the air – when early ratings for the show proved disappointing for Pabst. Even bandleader Henry James ran into issues with the American Federation of Radio Artists early in the show's run when the organization insisted that he was talking too much and should have to join the actors' union. When the series returned in the fall of 1945 Danny Kaye was on a European tour and could not even appear on his own show. Big name talent including Frank Sinatra, Jack Benny, and George Burns and Gracie Allen were hired to take Kaye's place. Pabst pulled the plug on The Danny Kaye Show on May 31, 1946. Samuel Goldwyn, who had Kaye's motion picture contract, had opposed his getting into radio from the beginning, claiming the performer relied too much on visual gimmicks to be successful in the purely aural arena. While the radio program did little to further Kaye's career although it did not hinder him much, either, as indicated by his many years of success that were still to come. To learn whom Danny Kaye is then follow this link: Danny Kaye - Wikipedia

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
Washington Square

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 44:41


Tonight, we'll rebroadcast the opening to “Washington Square”, written by Henry James and published in 1880. This episode originally aired on November 18, 2020. The novel recounts the conflict between a dull but sweet daughter and her brilliant, unemotional father. The plot of the novel is based upon a true story told to James by his close friend, a British actress. The book is often compared with Jane Austen's work (who of course, wrote “Pride and Prejudice”) for the clarity and grace of its prose and its intense focus on family relationships. This is the second time Henry James is featured on Snoozecast. You can find “The Turn of the Screw” back in October 2019. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Happily Booked: A Bookcast
S1, E13 - We finally got Q's!

Happily Booked: A Bookcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 76:34


Hey everyone! Thanks so much for returning to the show notes and being such faithful listeners! We apologize for the delay in publishing this episode! Life tends to have a way of allowing things to get away from us, we're only human, and all of that! So I hope you'll forgive your favorite bookcasters for being a bit behind on this week's episode! 10:35 - How To Disappear Completely And Never Be Found by Sara Nickerson 11:17 - The Twilight Series by Stephenie Meyer 11:43 - Harry Potter Series by J. K. Rowling 12:32 - Dr. Seuss Books 12:43 - Nancy Drew Books by Carolyn Keene / The Hardy Boys Books by Franklin w. Dixon/ The Boxcar Children Books by Gertrude Chandler Warner / American Girl Books 12:59 - The Secret Garden by Francs Hodgson Burnett13:08 - The Babysitter Club Books by Ann M. Martin 13:26 - Pride And Prejudice by Jane Austen / The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain14:14 - Edgar Allan Poe 14:21 - The Odyssey by Homer / The Iliad by Homer 19:59 - Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel 22:15 - Blood Red by James A. Moore 23:55 - The Mysterious Island by Jules VerneTV Show Lost / TV Show Black Mirror / TV Show The I-Land25:56 - Murder In The Bowery by Victoria Thompson 27:23 - Old Magic by Marianne Curley 28:35 - Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain29:50 - Some Kind Of Happiness by Claire Legrand31:01 - An Arrow To The Moon by X. R. Pan    32:09 - Storm And Silence by Robert Thier 33:22 - The End Of October by Lawrence Wright 39:44 - Wait Till Helen Comes: A Ghost Story by Mary Downing Hahn 40:45 - DragonQuest (2) by Donita K. Paul / Dragonspell (1) / Dragonknight (3)41:39 - Run, rose, Run by James Patterson & Dolly Parton 42:28 - Goblin: A Novel In Six Novellas by Josh Malerman 45:05 - The Sandman Act I, Audible Original by Neil Gaiman / Also mentioned The Sandman Graphic Novels by Neil Gaiman 46:27 - Lock Every Door by Riley Sager 47:17 - Home Before Dark by Riley Sager49:30 - Follow Me To Ground by Sue Rainsford 53:36 - Comfort Me With Apples by Catherynne M. Valente / Also mentioned Movie, Mother! 201757:38 - The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones 59:31 - Hallowe'en Party by Agatha Christie 1:00:00 - I'm Thinking Of Ending Things by Iain Reid / Foe: A Novel by Iain Reid 1:02:00 - The Haunting Of Hill House / The Haunting Of Bly Manor Netflix Originals1:06:37 - The Lottery by Shirley Jackson1:07:43 - The Turn Of The Screw by Henry James 1:08:39 - Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling Be sure to keep yourself Happily Booked! Instagram/ TikTok - happilybookedpodcastFacebook - Happily Booked PodcastLikewise - BrookeBatesHappilyBookedGoodreads - Brooke Lynn Bates Storygraph - brookebatesratesbooks THE Sideways Sheriff - Permanent Sponsor Insta/ TikTok - Sideways_sheriffFacebook - Sideways SheriffYoutube - Sideways Sheriff

The Film Comment Podcast
Halloween Hangover 2022 with Steven Mears and Kelli Weston

The Film Comment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 74:40


It's the time of year when ghosts, ghouls, and goblins are on the prowl. That's right: it's Halloween. Or, if we're getting technical, the day after Halloween. And as much as Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute are scared to admit it, that means it's also time for another Halloween Hangover episode of the Film Comment Podcast, where the two confront one of their greatest fears—horror movies—with the help of some masters of the macabre. This year, Clint and Devika asked Kelli Weston, who literally holds a PhD in horror cinema, and Steven Mears, a critic and Film Comment's famously nocturnal copyeditor, to inflict two movies of their choice upon us. Kelli chose the 1976 slasher flick Alice Sweet Alice, and Steve picked Jack Clayton's Henry James adaptation The Innocents. Both movies were ultimately more goofy than scary, but they yielded a truly rich conversation about the role of religion, class, children, and more in horror.

Backlisted
The Altar of the Dead and Other Tales by Henry James

Backlisted

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 76:05


This Hallowe'en episode of Backlisted focusses on the collection of ‘uncanny' stories by Henry James, first gathered together under the title The Altar of the Dead and Other Tales to form the seventeenth volume of the New York Edition of his Collected Works in 1917. We are joined, as ever, by our resident spook-master Andrew Male, and by acclaimed novelist and Henry James aficionado Tessa Hadley. We each choose a story to present and read from - these are tackled in chronological order to better trace the evolution of James's famously dense and challenging late style . Before that Andy confesses his admiration for I Used to Live Here Once, Miranda Seymours' new biography of Jean Rhys and reads a short Jean Rhys ghost story, while John revisits Giving Up the Ghost, Hilary Mantel's haunting (and haunted) memoir. Timings: 5:49 - I Used to Live Here Once by Miranda Seymour 12:19 - Giving Up the Ghost by Hilary Mantel 19:38 - The Altar of the Dead and Other Tales by Henry James * If you'd like to purchase any of the books mentioned in this episode please visit our bookshop at https://uk.bookshop.org/shop/backlisted where all profits help to sustain this podcast and UK independent bookshops. * For more information about the show visit www.backlisted.fm * If you'd like to support the show and get extra bonus fortnightly episodes, become a Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/backlisted

Save Me From My Shelf
Episode 31 - The Turn of the Screw

Save Me From My Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 63:56


Two friends and academics recap classic literature and take it off its pedestal. In our thirty-first episode and the second of two Halloween specials, we get properly scary with a ghost story full of ambiguous trauma, creepy children, and isolated country mansions: Henry James's The Turn of the Screw (1898). We also investigate the 'obscure hurt' a young Henry James did to his balls, speculate about hasty office sex, and introduce some weird factoids about the Aztecs.Cover art © Catherine Wu.Episode theme: Alexander Scriabin, 'Prelude No.1, Op. 67' Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 329: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 1:38


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!American poet, essayist, and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson was born on May 25, 1803, in Boston, Massachusetts. After studying at Harvard and teaching for a brief time, Emerson entered the ministry. He was appointed to the Old Second Church in his native city, but soon became an unwilling preacher. Unable in conscience to administer the sacrament of the Lord's Supper after the death of his nineteen-year-old wife of tuberculosis, Emerson resigned his pastorate in 1831.The following year, he sailed for Europe, visiting Thomas Carlyle and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Carlyle, the Scottish-born English writer, was famous for his explosive attacks on hypocrisy and materialism, his distrust of democracy, and his highly romantic belief in the power of the individual. Emerson's friendship with Carlyle was both lasting and significant; the insights of the British thinker helped Emerson formulate his own philosophy. On his return to New England, Emerson became known for challenging traditional thought. In 1835, he married his second wife, Lydia Jackson, and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. Known in the local literary circle as "The Sage of Concord," Emerson became the chief spokesman for Transcendentalism, the American philosophic and literary movement. Centered in New England during the 19th century, Transcendentalism was a reaction against scientific rationalism.Emerson's first book, Nature (1836), is perhaps the best expression of his Transcendentalism, the belief that everything in our world—even a drop of dew—is a microcosm of the universe. His concept of the Over-Soul—a Supreme Mind that every man and woman share—allowed Transcendentalists to disregard external authority and to rely instead on direct experience. "Trust thyself," Emerson's motto, became the code of Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, and W. E. Channing. From 1842 to 1844, Emerson edited the Transcendentalist journal, The Dial. Emerson wrote a poetic prose, ordering his essays by recurring themes and images. His poetry, on the other hand, is often called harsh and didactic. Among Emerson's most well known works are Essays, First and Second Series (1841, 1844). The First Series includes Emerson's famous essay, "Self-Reliance," in which the writer instructs his listener to examine his relationship with Nature and God, and to trust his own judgment above all others.Emerson's other volumes include Poems (1847), Representative Men (1850), The Conduct of Life (1860), and English Traits (1865). His best-known addresses are The American Scholar (1837) and The Divinity School Address, which he delivered before the graduates of the Harvard Divinity School, shocking Boston's conservative clergymen with his descriptions of the divinity of man and the humanity of Jesus. Emerson's philosophy is characterized by its reliance on intuition as the only way to comprehend reality, and his concepts owe much to the works of Plotinus, Swedenborg, and Böhme. A believer in the "divine sufficiency of the individual," Emerson was a steady optimist. His refusal to grant the existence of evil caused Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry James, Sr., among others, to doubt his judgment. In spite of their skepticism, Emerson's beliefs are of central importance in the history of American culture. Ralph Waldo Emerson died of pneumonia on April 27, 1882.From https://poets.org/poet/ralph-waldo-emerson. For more information about Ralph Waldo Emerson:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., about Emerson, at 21:55: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-104-eddie-s-glaude-jrSamantha Rose Hill about Emerson, at 17:05: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-171-samantha-rose-hill“Ralph Waldo Emerson”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/ralph-waldo-emerson“Ralph Waldo Emerson”: https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/ralph-waldo-emerson“Ralph Waldo Emerson”: ​​https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/emerson/

Happily Booked: A Bookcast
"There was a lot of projectile vomiting"

Happily Booked: A Bookcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 70:38


Hello friends! Or should I say “Kindred Spirits”? We hope everyone is doing well and we are so happy to have you back with us for our 10th episode! We talk about a lot more spooky books/movies/shows than we realized while recording! But how perfect since we are in the DEAD center of spooky season! We love us some spooky season, that's for sure! Also, in some fun news, Becky met a real-life published author! How fun is that? We hope one day someone will say that about meeting us! Go give our 10th episode a listen and let us know what you think! We love and appreciate you all! Be sure to keep yourself nice and happily booked! 3:54 - Brooke's Knitted Scrunchies @brookielynnbates on Instagram9:00 - Bookish Apps that Brooke uses to document her reading:Bookshelf, Goodreads, Storygraph10:10/12:40 - Earthling Halloween Book Series 0. Mr. Dark's Carnival by Glen Hirshberg  Blood Red by James A. MooreThe Unblemished by Conrad Williams The Haunted Forest Tour by James A. Moore & Jeff Strand Moontown by Peter AtkinsOctober Dark by David HerterBy Wizard Oak by Peter CrawfordBlood Harvest by James A. MooreMotherless Child by Glen Hirshberg The Bones Of You by Gary McMahon The Halloween Children by Brian James Freeman & Norman Prentiss Rage Master by Simon Clark They Say A Girl Died Here Once by Sarah Pinborough Goblin: A Novel In 6 Novellas by Josh Malerman 13:54 - Spotify Audiobooks/ Audible Podcasts19:34 - The Watcher Netflix Series 21:14 - Betrayed Mondays at 9/8 Central on Investigation Discovery; Season 4, Episode 7: Unholy Alliances 25:41 - The Strangers 2008 Movie26:05 - Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets by J. K. Rowling 26:36 - Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them Movie/ Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald/ Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore 30:39 - Jurassic Park/ The Lost World by Michael Crichton /Jurassic Park Movies/ Jurassic World Movies30:55 - Avatar: The Last Airbender Tv Show 31:06 - Lock Every Door by Riley Sager32:36 - Goblin by Josh Malerman40:50 - Anne Of The Island by L. M. Montgomery 41:11 - The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel 41:51 - Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel 43:48 - My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix/ My Best Friend's Exorcism Movie Amazon Prime Original 45:02 - American Horror Stories Season 1, Episode 1 52:33 - Run, Rose, Run by Dolly Parton & James Patterson 53:17 - Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling53:40 - The Turn Of The Screw by Henry James 53:57 - The Haunting Of Hill House/ The Haunting Of Bly Manor Netflix Orignal Series54:52 - The Sandman: Act I Audible Original 57:49 - Published Author Dawn Camp The Beauty Of Grace The Gift Of FriendshipThe Heart Of MarriageWith Love, MomIt All Began In A Garden My Essential Oil Companion Be sure to keep yourself Happily Booked! Instagram/ TikTok - happilybookedpodcastFacebook - Happily Booked PodcastTHE Sideways Sheriff - Permanent Sponsor Insta/ TikTok - Sideways_sheriffFacebook - Sideways SheriffYoutube - Sideways Sheriff

Just Sleep - Bedtime Stories for Adults
What Maisie Knew by Henry James

Just Sleep - Bedtime Stories for Adults

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 35:25 Very Popular


Tonight's bedtime story is What Maisie Knew by Henry James. Published in 1897, it is the story of the effect of a bitter divorce on a young child.Interested in more sleepy content or just want to support the show? Join Just Sleep Premium here: https://justsleeppodcast.com/supportAs a Just Sleep Premium member you will receive:Ad-free and Intro-free episodesThe entire audiobook of the Wizard of OzA collection of short fairy tales including Rapunzel and the Frog PrinceAn additional 2 episodes every monthThe chance to vote on the next story that you hearThe chance to win readings just for youThe entire back catalogue of the podcast, ad and intro-free (coming soon!)Thanks for your support!Sweet Dreams...Intro Music by the Psychedelic Squirrel Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Composers Datebook
Columbus Day music

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 2:00 Very Popular


Synopsis Today's date marks the original Columbus Day, honoring the Italian explorer who for decades was described as the man who “discovered America.” In recent years Native American leaders have pointed out that indigenous peoples had been living on the continent for thousands of years, and Columbus didn't “discover” anything — in fact, he didn't even know where he was, which is why he called the people he found here “Indians.” Some historians now think that Viking explorers from Scandinavia arrived in America long before Columbus – and others suggest the Chinese arrived before those Europeans. Even so, it's Columbus who has a national holiday (now always observed on the closest Monday in October), and concert music written to celebrate it. For example, there's a “Columbus Suite” by Victor Herbert, originally commissioned for the 1893 Chicago World Fair to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the Columbus voyage, but not actually premiered until 1903. A much more recent “Columbus-inspired” work, and much more elegiac in tone, is by the Native American composer James DeMars. It's titled: “Premonitions of Christopher Columbus” and is scored for Native American flute, African drum, and chamber orchestra. In this work, DeMars blends sounds of the various ethnic traditions that would come to make up modern America. Music Played in Today's Program Victor Herbert (1859-1924) Columbus Suite Slovak Radio Symphony; Keith Brion, cond. Naxos 8.559027 James DeMars (b. 1952) Premonitions of Christopher Columbus Tos Ensemble with R. Carlos Nakai, Native American flute Canyon 7014 On This Day Births 1686 - German composer and lutenist Silvius Leopold Weiss, in Breslau; 1713 - Baptismal date of German composer Johann Ludwig Krebs, in Butterstedt, Weimar; 1872 - English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, in Down Ampney, Gloucestershire; 1880 - English-born Canadian composer and organist Healey Willan, in London; Deaths 1692 - Italian composer Giovanni Battista Vitali, in Bologna, age 60; Premieres 1910 - Vaughan Williams: "A Sea Symphony" (after Walt Whitman) at the Leeds Festival; 1924 - Mahler: Symphony No.10 (1st and 3rd movements only), arranged by Ernest Krenek (with additional retouching by Alexander von Zemlinksy and Franz Schalk), by Vienna Philharmonic, Franz Schalk conducting; The American premiere of these two movements was give on Dec. 6, 1949, by the Erie (Pa.) Philharmonic conducted by the composer's nephew, the Austro-American conductor Fritz Mahler (1901-1973); The English musicologist Deryck Cooke prepared the first performing edition of Mahler's entire Tenth Symphony which received its first performance on August 13, 1964, by the London Symphony conducted by Berthold Goldschmidt; Since then, Cooke has revised his arrangement, and several other musicologists have prepared their own rival performing editions of Mahler's surviving notation for this symphony; 1931 - Rachmaninoff: “Variations on a Theme of Corelli (La Folia)” for solo piano, in Montréal (Canada), by the composer; 1951 - Bizet: opera "Ivan le Terrible" (posthumously), in Bordeaux; 1951 - Dessau: opera "Die Verurteilung des Lukullus" (The Trial of Lucullus) (2nd version), in East Berlin at the Deutsche Staatsoper; 1961 - Douglas Moore: opera "The Wings of the Dove" (after the novel by Henry James), in New York; 1971 - Andrew Lloyd Webber: rock musical "Jesus Christ Superstar," in New York City; A choral version of this musical was performed in Kansas City, Kan. On May 15, 1971, and a touring company was launched to present the musical on July 12, 1971; Prior to any staged presentations, the work was first released as a double LP record album in October of 1970; 1984 - Olly Wilson: "Siinfonia," by the Boston Symphony, Seiji Ozawa conducting; 1984 - Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: "Celebration" for orchestra, by the Indianapolis Symphony, John Nelson conducting; 1997 - Sallinen: "Overture Solennel," in Monaco by the Monte Carlo Philharmonic, James DePreist conducting; 1998 - Philip Glass: opera "The Voyage," at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Bruce Ferden conducting; 2000 - Rautavaara: Harp Concerto, in Minneapolis with harpist Kathy Kienzle and the Minnesota Orchestra, Omso Vänskä conducting; Others 1739 - Handel completes in London his Concerto Grosso in Bb, Op. 6, no. 7 (Gregorian date: Oct. 23). Links and Resources On Columbus Day On Victor Herbert On James DeMars

Chatting with Sherri
Chatting With Sherri welcomes award-winning writer Azure Arther!

Chatting with Sherri

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 41:00


  Chatting With Sherri welcomes award-winning writer Azure Arther! Azure Arther is a native of Flint, Michigan, who resides in Dallas, Texas, with her husband, son, and Blazion, the Betta fish. Azure began writing at a young age, and while her inspiration began with Grimm fairytale stories and the Sleepover Friends, much of her current style has been heavily influenced by Octavia Butler and Henry James. She is obsessed with literature and has found that her passions are evenly distributed between writing, teaching, parenting, and reading books with her son. Azure's stories and poems have appeared or are forthcoming in more than a dozen publications, but Writers of the Future is her first professional sale. About “Agatha's Monster,” Azure says, “Agatha began with some random questions. One day, I found myself wondering: what if monsters were born out of trauma? What would the world look like? How would humanity stay safe? Thus, Agatha came to life as a Hunter, a mage, a regular person with basic needs and worries. The ride Agatha and her monsters go on surprised me at times, and every rewrite shifted the narrative just enough to keep me, and hopefully future readers, guessing about what would happen next. The ending actually surprised me, too, and I feel it is one of my best-written endings thus far.” . Azure Arther won The Writers of the Future contest earning her a cash prize, trip to Hollywood, a week-long professional workshop, and her story, "Agatha's Monster," is published in the anthology, L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume 38                

Composers Datebook
A ghost story by Henry James and Benjamin Britten

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 2:00 Very Popular


Synopsis Do you enjoy a good ghost story? The American novelist Henry James did, but liked to give the ones he wrote an extra twist – another “turn of the screw” you might say. In fact, one of his classic ghost stories from 1898 is titled just that: “The Turn of the Screw.” In it, a young British governess is entrusted with the care of two orphaned children, who may – or may not – have been abused by their previous governess and her lover, both now dead, who may – or may not – have returned as ghosts to continue their torment of the children. The manner in which Henry James tells the story leaves open the question whether the ghosts are real or just figments of the young governess's lurid imagination. “The Turn of the Screw” has been adapted for both stage and screen, and, on today's date in 1954, an operatic version by the British composer Benjamin Britten received its premiere performance at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice. Each of the 16 scenes in Britten's chamber opera is preceded by a variation on a ghostly 12-note theme, a “tone row” in the style of the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg, and since we see and hear the ghosts on stage, it's pretty clear Britten is suggesting the ghosts and the evil in the tale are disturbingly real. Music Played in Today's Program Benjamin Britten (1913–1976) –The Turn of the Screw (Sir Peter Pears, tenor; English Opera Group, Benjamin Britten, cond.) London/Decca 4256722

What A Scream
Episode 78. The Turn of The Screw with Elaine Pascale

What A Scream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 48:06


On this week's episode, host Ygraine chats with the podcast's literary expert Elaine Pascale about Henry James' 1898 gothic horror novella The Turn of The Screw. They discuss three movie adaptations of the text and how they interpret James' ghost story. Theme song: 'Afraid of Me' by Cadaver Club

The History of Literature
420 Honoré de Balzac

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 63:40 Very Popular


Very few novelists can match the ambition or output of French novelist Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850). A pioneer of the great nineteenth-century "realism" tradition, his novel sequence La Comédie Humaine presents a panoramic view of post-Napoleonic France. Containing something like 90 finished novels and novellas, Balzac's achievement has influenced writers like Hugo, Dickens, Flaubert, and Henry James. In this episode, Jacke talks to contemporary novelist Carlos Allende (Coffee, Shopping, Murder, Love) about his love for Balzac and his works. Additional listening suggestions: Stendhal 390 Victor Hugo Alexander Dumas Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Great Books
Episode 233: 'The Turn of the Screw' by Henry James

The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:03 Very Popular


John J. Miller is joined by Loraine Murphy of Hillsdale College to discuss Henry James's book, "The Turn of the Screw."

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
The Portrait of a Lady

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 35:59 Very Popular


Tonight, we'll read the first chapter to “The Portrait of a Lady” written by Henry James and published in 1880. It is one of James's most popular novels and is regarded by critics as one of his finest.This is the story of Isabel Archer, a spirited young American woman who inherits a large sum of money. The novel reflects James's continuing interest in the differences between the New World and the Old, often to the detriment of the former. It also treats in a profound way the themes of personal freedom, responsibility, and betrayal.— read by V — Listen Ad-Free on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.