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Study of the fundamental properties of matter and energy

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Best podcasts about physically

Latest podcast episodes about physically

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
Aspire! How to Create Your Own Reality and Alter Your DNA w/ Frank Mckinney

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 42:56


On this episode, Jake and Gino interview Frank McKinney, a best-selling author, actor, and keynote speaker. He has written seven books in six genres, starred in two movies, and keynoted before audiences of ten to ten thousand around the world. Frank wrote his latest bestseller Aspire! in his Delray Beach, Florida, oceanfront treehouse office that has spectacular views and includes a bamboo desk, shower, bathroom, sink, air-conditioning, hardwood floors, cedar walls, a loft with a king size bed, and a suspension bridge to the master bedroom in the main house—that's Frank's commute to and from work! Physically, Frank has pushed the limit of his body by racing in the Badwater 135-mile Ultramarathon twelve times in the scorching summer in Death Valley, California, a race referred to by National Geographic as “the world's toughest footrace.” Key Insights 00:00 Introduction 01:30 Role of creativity and ingenuity in business growth 05:30 Taking risks and becoming an expert in your craft 08:18 Motivation and inspiration ignite aspiration 10:30 Lifecycle of consumerism and materialism 12:05 Making a difference and helping the under-privileged 14:05 How to ind your aspirations 17:29 Why mindset if so important - Get the mind right, the money will follow 19:13 How to create your own reality and alter your DNA 26:28 3, 6, 9 & 12 30:24 The secret behind Jake & Gino's success 32:01 Show up! 35:19 Success tips 39:00 Recommended books Visit Frank's website: https://www.frank-mckinney.com/the-aspire-book/ About Jake & Gino Jake & Gino are multifamily investors, operators, and mentors who have created a vertically integrated real estate company that controls over $100,000,000 in assets under management. They have created the Jake & Gino community to teach others their three-step framework: Buy Right, Finance Right and Manage Right®, and to become multifamily entrepreneurs. Subscribe to this channel: https://ytube.io/3McA   Sign up for free training: https://jakeandgino.mykajabi.com/freetraining Apply for Mentorship: https://jakeandgino.com/apply/   #realestate #multifamilyrealestate #multifamilyinvesting #investing #apartmentinvesting   Jake & Gino Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jakeandgino/   Jake & Gino Twitter: https://twitter.com/JakeandGino Jake & Gino Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/jake-and-gino-llc/ Jake & Gino Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jakeandgino/

Thriving Beyond Belief with Cheryl Scruggs

Dr. Matt Chalmers is a health and wellness expert, author and speaker who specializes in the areas of long-term wellness, nutrition, women's health, weight loss, athlete wellness and holistic healing. With a client list that includes professional athletes, business executives, politicians and celebrities, Dr. Chalmers takes a holistic-based approach with patients to identify and treat the source of their issues. Medical doctors regularly refer patients to Dr. Chalmers when traditional medications and treatments are not working with their patients. Dr. Chalmers works with patients to identify, treat and manage a wide variety of issues, including weight loss/gain, digestive problems, chronic fatigue, pain, injuries, celiac disease, chiropractic problems, fibromyalgia, carpal tunnel syndrome and plantar fasciitis. He also provides patients with hormone therapy guidance and treatment. Dr. Chalmers is the author of the bestselling book “Pillars of Wellness,” which helps readers cut through the information overload about wellness, exercise and diet to figure out the actions they can take that will have the greatest impact. The book details how to fuel the body physically, mentally and spiritually. Dr. Chalmers received his degree of Doctor of Chiropractic from Parker Chiropractic College in Dallas. He has a Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness, is a Certified Clinical Chiropractic Neurologist, a Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner and has additional certifications in spinal decompression and quantum reflex analysis. He currently lives in Dallas with his wife. More information is available at www.ChalmersWellness.com. Related Links: Facebook Group:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/wellnessinsightsdrchalmers Instagram: @DrChalmers1 Twitter: @DrChalmers1 Website: www.ChalmersWellness.com Supplement Store:  www.CWellstore.com Book "Pillars of Wellness": https://www.amazon.com/Pillars-Wellness-Holistic-Longevity-Optimizing-ebook/dp/B08ZNWFBKG/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=pillars+of+wellness&qid=1638390039&sr=8-1 

Land-Grant Holy Land: for Ohio State Buckeyes fans
Instant Recap Podcast: Ohio State gets physically beat down by TTUN 42-27

Land-Grant Holy Land: for Ohio State Buckeyes fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 82:08


In this episode of the Land Grant Holy-Land's instant recap podcast, Jordan and Chris have a conversation about the questionable offensive game plan and the defensive failures that finally caught up to the Buckeyes. They discuss what went wrong for the Buckeyes, then they get into how Michigan finally turn the tides back in the direction of the Wolverines. Then we get into the coaching staff, the recruiting misses, and the philosophical issues that led to Ohio State's failures not only in “The Game,” but throughout the season. After the break, Chris and Jordan get into why the Buckeyes are built for some success moving forward. This game is tough to stomach for a lot of people, but this team has a lot of positives moving forward. We also discuss the potential of some tough decisions Ryan Day will have to make going into next year. Up next for the Buckeyes: waiting see what bowl they are playing in and starting the 365 day preparation for revenge against SOB's from up north. Connect with Jordan Williams Twitter: @JordanW330 Connect with Chris Renne: Twitter: @ChrisRenneCFB Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Integrative Wellness Radio
How to Prepare for Pregnancy Mentally & Physically

Integrative Wellness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 58:38


Originally launched as a webinar, this week Integrative Wellness Radio is giving you an episode on how to prepare for pregnancy. Dr. Nicole and her guest discuss the best nutrients to facilitate fertility, how you may need to detox before “trying”, and the all too common topic of infertility. Dr. Nicole explains the potential root causes of infertility & how mentally preparing for pregnancy is just as important as preparing for it physically. This episode debunks some of the widespread misinformation around pregnancy and gives you an inside look at Dr. Nicole's very own pregnancy. Noteworthy Time Stamps: 01:30 Dr. Nicole's personal story 08:38 You can't give what you don't have 10:30 The elephant in the room (it's stress) 11:40 Coreen's pregnancy journey 15:03 Uncommon causes + contributing factors of infertility 18:15 Infertility is not just a hormone issue 21:55 Systemic inflammation and endometriosis 25:48 Everyday toxins and hormone disrupters 41:00 Morning sickness? Bad blood sugar 43:14 Infertility is not bad luck 44:50 Asking for help 46:32 Q&A

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass - The Moving Elegies For Abraham Lincoln

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 42:06


I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.  And I am Garry Shriver.  This is the How to Love Lit Podcast. This is our second episode discussing the bard of democracy, the great Walt Whitman.  Today we will feature one of his four poems honoring President Abraham Lincoln, but in order to understand why Whitman and many of us admire this great man, we want to revisit the  original 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass and listen to some of Whitman's observations of African Americans and slavery.  Christy, let's start this episode by reading and discussing two extracts from “I sing the Body Electric” , the ones where Whitman describes an African man and then an African woman at auction.    A man's body at auction,  (For before the war I often go to the slave-mart and watch the sale,)  I help the auctioneer, the sloven does not half know his business.    Gentlemen look on this wonder,  Whatever the bids of the bidders they cannot be high enough for it,  For it the globe lay preparing quintillions of years without one animal or plant,  For it the revolving cycles truly and steadily roll'd.  In this head the all-baffling brain,  In it and below it the makings of heroes.  Examine these limbs, red, black, or white, they are cunning in tendon and nerve,  They shall be stript that you may see them.  Exquisite senses, life-lit eyes, pluck, volition,  Flakes of breast-muscle, pliant backbone and neck, flesh not flabby, good-sized arms and legs,  And wonders within there yet.  Within there runs blood,  The same old blood! the same red-running blood!  There swells and jets a heart, there all passions, desires, reachings, aspirations,  (Do you think they are not there because they are not express'd in parlors and lecture-rooms?)  This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,  In him the start of populous states and rich republics,  Of him countless immortal lives with countless embodiments and enjoyments.  How do you know who shall come from the offspring of his offspring through the centuries?  (Who might you find you have come from yourself, if you could trace back through the centuries?)    8    A woman's body at auction,  She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers,  She is the bearer of them that shall grow and be mates to the mothers.  Have you ever loved the body of a woman?  Have you ever loved the body of a man?  Do you not see that these are exactly the same to all in all nations and times all over the earth?  If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,  And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,  And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful than the most beautiful face.  Have you seen the fool that corrupted his own live body? or the fool that corrupted her own live body?  For they do not conceal themselves, and cannot conceal themselves.  Whitman was raised a New York democrat, but his sympathies were with the Free Soil party that condemned the extension of slavery as a sin against God and a crime against man.  The Republican party would not exist until 1854, and Lincoln would be their presidential candidate in the election of 1860.  Of course, bear in mind, that the issues of those days are different than the issues of today, so the party names shouldn't be taken to represent modern day politics.      For Whitman it was undeniable for anyone with eyeballs that all men are born human and that implies certain things regardless if they are born  free or slave- of any race, creed or gender.  It is obvious to a man so aware of the physical body, that we are of the same atom-  the magnificence of the body proclaims our humanity- and ironically where on earth could this magnificence be most easily seen than at a slave auction like what he witnessed during his New Orleans days. In all of its ruthless degradation it ironically showcased the magnificence of the human body.  It's why Whitman could say, almost sarcastically- I am a better salesman of slaves than the auctioneer-I know and understand the beauty and value of what you are selling and you don't- you fool.   Whitman was the poet of the democratic soul- we are after all leaves of grass, but he was also the poet of the body- that physical form we are all chained to.  For Whitman, to be a human was to understand and be okay with one's physical body- and it is a holy thing. Our souls inhabit a sanctified space on earth- that of the body- be it man or woman- the pigmentation of flesh was just one of many individual and unique features- for Whitman our bodies is the starting point for equality- we are all wedded to one.      It doesn't seem radical to us now, but at that time in history- even talking about the body like that was revolutionary- almost vulgar- Whitman democratically equates the man with the woman with the black with the white.  In 1855, this was not self-evident anywhere else in the United States of America or really anywhere on planet earth.      By 1855, Walt Whitman knew his country was falling apart.  He understood that the ideals on which the great American experiment were founded were being overwhelmed by all kinds of forces, not least of which was plain ordinary corruption.  In his mind, what the world needed was repentance- a total course correction- a return to the original ideals and this was going to happen through conversion to a different set of moral ideals- he wanted to convince America to revisit and embrace all these original self-evident democratic ideals by reading and absorbing Leaves of Grass.  He really truly believed if people would just read his book, they would stop hating each other.    Well, it's a nice thought, however slightly unrealistic…especially in light of the single digit sales of that first edition.  But even if he had gotten everyone to read his book, it was a tall order.  By 1860, any kind of peaceful coming together seemed unrealistic.  America was on the brink of war and violence was springing up.  John Brown is one notable example; in an attempt to free slaves through violence he and a small gang stormed Harper's Ferry.  They were captured, tried and condemned to death, but this event inflamed the country and raised the stakes for the upcoming presidential election.  A few months after Brown was executed, the democratic party, split between pro and- anti- slavery factions, was to confront a new political party- one that had never existed before, the Republican party. It had nominated a Southern born anti-slavery man from Illinois, a lawyer who had never attended school but who was known as honest Abe.  A newspaper in South Carolina put it this way “the irrepressible conflict is about to be vised upon us through the Black Republican nominee and his fanatical diabolical Republican party.”    Walt Whitman did not see Lincoln as an instigator of a conflict.  Whitman saw him almost as an extension of himself- a mediator.  He really believed Lincoln was going to bring healing  and unity through politics something he had tried and failed to do through poetry.      I'm not sure which is the greater challenge= trying to unify  a group of people through poetry or politics!!      Ha! True but Whitman was paying attention to what Lincoln was saying and he identified with him.  He saw himself in Lincoln.  They both came from poor families. Neither had formal education.  One thing that is interesting, Lincoln was from the West, and Whitman believed the hope of America was in the West.  Both men believed in democracy to the core, but also- both believed in unity.  Whitman saw Lincoln as America's hope.    Although, he was likely the most hated man of his age in some corners, but the only hope of America in others.  Lincoln wanted first and foremost to be a unifier.  He had been elected with only around 40% of the popular vote, although he did get a majority of the electoral college votes.  There was no question America was deeply divided.  He wanted not just to save the physical boundaries of America, but he wanted to heal the wounds that were making people hate each other.  Lincoln's father was anti-slavery and raised in an anti-slavery Baptist congregation.   Lincoln But his mother was from a Kentucky slaveholding family.  Lincoln later recalled that the reason his father left Kentucky and the South because of his strong feelings about slavery. Lincoln himself saw many cruel things while visiting his grandparents, not the least of these being once when an African-American family was separated on a boat and sold to different owners.  He later recalled that ‘the sight was a continual torment to me…having the power of making me miserable.”  However, Lincoln's mother's family were people he knew intimately, and somehow he understood how someone could support slavery and not be an evil person.  This sounds crazy to us and difficult to understand, but Lincoln expressed on more than one occasion to men across the North that if they had been born in those circumstances in that place and in that world, they likely would have had those same views.  This way of seeing one's fellow man is more radical than most of us can even comprehend.  It's a strange idea to assert that a person could believe something is morally wrong so strongly that he would be willing to lead a nation to war to end it, but simultaneously judge the perpetrators of this evil redeemable human beings.  95% of humans today can't think like that-       Well, it's something Whitman could do as well.  Whitman didn't fight in the Civil War, but his brother George did.  His brother fought for the Union.  Whitman's significant other fought for the Confederacy at one point.     The first shots of the Civil War were fired by the South on Fort Sumter in Charleston, SC, in April of 1861.  Lincoln had been president for just a few weeks.       In December of 1862, Whitman saw his brother's name on a list of casualities.  He got on a train and headed South to look for him. He ended up in Fredericksburg.  The good news was his brother had only suffered a flesh wound.  But outside the hospital Whitman saw something that struck horror and terror into his being.  Let me read his words after he came to the building being used as a hospital, he saw, “a heap of amputated feet, legs, arms, hands, etc….a full load for a one-horse cart…human fragments, cut bloody, black and blue, swelled and sickening…nearby were several dead bodes each covered with its brown woolen blanket.”  Now you have to remember, think about Leaves of Grass and “I sing the Body Electric”.  This is a man who had been trying to convince America to celebrate our bodies- all of our bodies- we read just the excert about African-Americans, but he celebrated all bodies and wanted us to see ourselves in other people's bodies- to recognize the sanctity in all bodies- and here he's staring at these body parts scattered around, cut off and thrown into piles.  I can't even imagine how things would smell.      Whitman's reaction to what he saw on the battlefields and field hospitals of Frederickburg, led him to a decision that altered the course of his life.  It would lead him to move to Washington DC and honestly, his war actions to me make him something of a saint.  Just in Frederickburg, he stuck around to visit and help bury the dead of the over 18,000 dead soldiers that were just lying on the ground.  But, then he started visiting hospitals.  These visits deeply affected him.  He had planned on going back to New York after he found his brother, but he couldn't do that anymore.  Instead he changed courses and went to Washington DC.  He got a job as a clerk where he would work during the day, but then he would spend the rest of his time in the hospitals.  And he would just sit with soldiers.  He didn't care if they were union of confederate.  He brought  with him bags of candy.  He wrote letters to their parents.  He played twenty questions.  If they wanted him to read the Bible, he read the Bible.  If they wanted a cigarette, he'd scrounge up a cigarette. Many of them were teenagers.  He kissed  and hugged them; he parented them in their final moments of life.  For many, he was the last tender face they would see on this earth.  The numbers range, but documentation reveals he visited and helped anywhere from 80-100,000 soldiers.      Let me interrupt you for a second to highlight how bad it was to be in a hospital during this time period.  No one at this time understood the importance of anticeptics or the need to be clean.  The Union Army lost 300,000 lives in combat.  But, they experienced an estimated 6,400,000 cases of illnesses, wound and injuries.  Hospitals were filthy and dangerous places.      For many of those young men, Whitman was the last touch of kindness they would ever experience on this earth.  He said later that those years of hospital service were and I quote, “the greatest privilege and satisfaction..and, of course, the most profound lesson of my life.”  He usually left the hospital at night and slept in a room he rented but if a soldier needed him or asked him to stay, he would often stay up all night with wounded and dying men and then head from the hospital to the office.  Here are his words "While I was with wounded and sick in thousands of cases from the New England States, and from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and from Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and all the Western States, I was with more or less from all the States, North and South, without exception… "I was with many rebel officers and men among our wounded, and gave them always what I had, and tried to cheer them the same as any. . . . Among the black soldiers, wounded or sick, and in the contraband camps, I also took my way whenever in their neighborhood, and did what I could for them.”        Well, let me also say that Washington DC was a nasty place to be living at that time.  Physically, it was a construction zone, nothing like the beautiful collection of buildings and streets designed by the French architect Pierre L Enfant that we see today.   It was muddy; it noisy; it was full of the noises of building and killing.  It was political.  Abraham Lincoln stated that during those days, “If there is a worse place than Hell, I am in it.”      Dang, because DC, the city, was so bad?    Because being president in the Civil War was so bad.  Lincoln had a different view of his role of leadership than most people today understand.  And we need to go back to when he was elected in 1860.  The country was divided- and even if you didn't believe in slavery, the question of how to get rid of it wasn't something people agreed on.  Many thought it should just be abolished. Others thought you should just keep it from expanding and let it die slowly.   Lincoln was surrounded by people on all sides who all wanted him to have “bold leadership”- do radical things- whatever those were to them- but Lincoln liked to respond to his critics by referencing an entertainer who was known for tight walking over water.  Sometimes, he even would push a wheelbarrow across these ropes; one time he stopped in the middle of the river to eat an omelete on his tightrope, sometimes he'd carry someone on his back- all crazy stunts that didn't seem survivable.  Lincoln had seen him perform walking a tight rope across Niagara falls and he thought it was a perfect metaphor for how he saw himself.  Let me quote Lincoln here- the artist went by the name Blondin. Suppose,” Lincoln said, “that all the material values in this great country of ours, from the Atlantic to the Pacific—its wealth, its prosperity, its achievements in the present and its hopes for the future—could all have been concentrated and given to Blondin to carry over that awful crossing.” Suppose “you had been standing upon the shore as he was going over, as he was carefully feeling his way along and balancing his pole with all his most delicate skill over the thundering cataract. Would you have shouted at him, ‘Blondin, a step to the right!' ‘Blondin, a step to the left!' or would you have stood there speechless and held your breath and prayed to the Almighty to guide and help him safely through the trial?”    Lincoln saw himself on a tight rope and going too far one way or the other would make the entire thing collapse.  He wasn't trying to crush and destroy his fellow man, even his Southern brother,  although he was trying to win the war and emancipate the slaves, which he did do.  He was trying to heal a nation- to bring brother back to brother.  And we must never forget that brothers WERE literally killing their brothers.  Uniting and building a country that was this morally divided was a seemingly impossible task- and he could see from his perch in Washington that this was hell.    Whitman would stop to see him going in and out of the White House.  This was in the days when you could do that.  They didn't even have secret service for the president. Whitman looked at Lincoln and saw sadness in his eyes.  But Whitman always believed Lincoln was the right man.  If anyone could bring America together, it was Lincoln. Lincoln didn't hate his enemy.  He loved his enemy.  Just like Whitman.  This was the attitude where Whitman saw hope and a future as he sat with both confederate and Union soldier, black soldiers and white soldiers, mending their wounds, writing their final farewells.      But make no mistake, Lincoln was committed to emancipation and as the war came to the end and reconstruction was in sight, he was preparing America to grant full citizenship that included voting rights to All American males- including African-American ones.  In one letter he said, “I am naturally anti-slavery.  If slavery is not wrong; nothing is wrong.  I cannot remember when I did not think so, and feel so”.     And yet this is the same man who could say during his second inaugural address, one month before General Lee will surrender at Appomatox and 41 days before he will be murdered…     With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan -- to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with the world. to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with the world. all nations.    There was one man in the crowd that day, who was actually so close to Lincoln he shows up in the inauguaration picture.  This man heard those words and was committed to stopping Lincoln from fulfilling this pledge.  John Wilkes Booth was standing not far from Lincoln that day.  On April 11, what we now know was to be his last speech, Lincoln called for black suffrage.  Booth was in the audience that day as well, after hearing Lincoln make that statement Booth is known to have said, “that is the last speech he will ever make.”    On that fateful day, April 15, 1865 Whitman was visiting his family.  However, his significant other, Peter Doyle was in Washington DC and heard that the president was going to Ford's theater to see a performance of the comedy “My American Cousin.”  It was Good Friday, the sacred day where Christians celebrate the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.  This is what Peter Doyle  said later about what happened that evening.     I heard that the President and his wife would be present and made up my mind to go. There was a great crowd in the building. I got into the second gallery. There was nothing extraordinary in the performance. I saw everything on the stage and was in a good position to see the President's box. I heard the pistol shot. I had no idea what it was, what it meant—it was sort of muffled. I really knew nothing of what had occurred until Mrs. Lincoln leaned out of the box and cried, "The President is shot!" I needn't tell you what I felt then, or saw. It is all put down in Walt's piece—that piece is exactly right. I saw Booth on the cushion of the box, saw him jump over, saw him catch his foot, which turned, saw him fall on the stage. He got up on his feet, cried out something which I could not hear for the hub-hub and disappeared. I suppose I lingered almost the last person. A soldier came into the gallery, saw me still there, called to me: "Get out of here! we're going to burn this damned building down!" I said: "If that is so I'll get out!"     Whitman used Doyle's account to help pen the only poem that I know of where Whitman  used traditional poetic forms.  It is an Elegy for the death of Abraham Lincoln, titled “O Captain My Captain”.  He actually wrote two elegies- one speaking for the nation- in the voice of a common sailor- it he wrote in a formal style of poetry acceptable to the people of his day.  The second, in some ways more personal because it is in a style similar to what we see in the rest of Leaves of Grass.  The second poem, When Lilacs …”is often thought be be written after O Captain” Although I'm not sure it is.  It is more epic in its feeling- it uses symbols that are more archetypal and timeless- although that term wasn't invented in his day.  In O Captain my Captain, Whitman takes on the persona of a soldier, a sailor.  In the second, he uses his own voice- that universal “I” like we see in Song of Myself.  We don't have time to read the entirely of “O Lilacs When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom' , it has over 200 lines, but we can Read a little bit of it.  Instead we will focus on the only poem anthologized during Whitman's lifetime- O Captain my Captain.    The one I know from that famous scene in Dead Poet's Society where the students stand for their fallen teacher, John Keating, immortalized by Robin Williams.     Agreed- I can't read this poem without thinking of Robin Williams, but we should probably try since we spent quite a bit of time setting up the image of Lincoln.       O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,  The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,  The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,  While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;                           But O heart! heart! heart!                              O the bleeding drops of red,                                 Where on the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;  Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,  For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,  For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;                           Here Captain! dear father!                              This arm beneath your head!                                 It is some dream that on the deck,                                   You've fallen cold and dead.    My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,  My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,  The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,  From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;                           Exult O shores, and ring O bells!                              But I with mournful tread,                                 Walk the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    As we have clearly expressed, Whitman the defender of the common man, does not usually elevate one person over another- but For Lincoln he makes a notable exception.  O Captain my Captain is written from the point of view of an insider. We can imagine a young soldier, a sailor.   He's on the ship- Of course, the captain is President Lincoln- the ship is the country.  The tone is one of exultation then distress.  We had finished- the fearful trip was done!!!  We had made it then….    Christy, and it's important to note that it WAS done.  Lincoln did bring that ship to harbor.  On April 2, right before he died on the 11th The confederacy vacated Richmond.  On April 4, President Lincoln together with his ten year old son Tad walked through the streets and into Jefferson Davis' office.  “Admiral Porter who was with him had this to say, “No electric wire could have carried the news of the President's arrival sooner than it was circulated through Richmond.  As far as the eye could see the streets were alive with negroes and poor whites rushing in our direction, and the crowd increased so fast that I had to surround the President with sailors with fixed bayonets to keep them off.  They all wanted to shake hand with Mr. Lincoln or his coat tail or even to kneel and kiss his boots.”  Later on Admiral Porter said this, “I should have preferred to see the President of the United States entering the subjugated stronghold of the rebel with an escort more befitting his high station, yet that would have looked as if he came as a conqueror to exult over a brave but fallen enemy.  He came instead as a peacemaker, his hand extended to all who desired to take it.”  Christy, at one point, it is said that an older African American gentleman bowed before Lincoln and Lincoln went to the man, took him by the hand and raised him up and told him he didn't need to kneel to anyone, he was a free man.  I cannot imagine the emotion.    And so we try to imagine the emotion – after so much carnage, who could walk the tightright and heal the utter hatred still inherent in the heart of both victor and defeated.  Notice there is meter, each stanza is composed of iambs which may or may not mean anything to you.  It just means there's a beat- like a drum beat, like a heart beat- “The ship has wethered every rack, the prize we sought is won.  The people are exalting.    But then he dies…in the first two stanzas, the boy addresses the captain as someone still alive, but by the third stanza he has accepted the reality.  And of course, this is exactly has grief strikes.  We never accept it initially, at least I have that problem.  I'll share my personal experiences in a different episode, but it's natural.  He says, “Rise up, Father.”  We feel a sense of desperation- the idea- of = no,  no, no, this can't be happening.  It's not possible.  Not now. Not after all of this.   But by the third stanza, the sailor unwillingly switches to the third person.  My captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still.”   There is a sense of intimacy, “MY father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will”.  We also see that that formality of the meter breaks down in that last line, “Fallen cold and dead”.  The sailor has broken down.   America is not just devastated because their leader is dead, but they are now vulnerable- what's going to happen to us.  Who can lead us?  Who can walk the tightrope?    And that of course, is the ultimate tragedy.   We will never know what might have been had he lived to complete his second term, but one statesman grasped fully the tragedy when he predicted that “the development of things will teach us to mourn him doubly.”  And of course he was right, even Jefferson Davis, the leader of the conferederacy, although I point out that Lincoln never one time acknowledged him as preside,  bemoaned Lincoln's death after losing the war and for good reason.  After Lincoln''s death, profiteers, corruption and all kinds of chaos descended on America.  Grant, who was a sincere and an incredible advocate for African Americans, was able to defeat the confederate armies but not able to contain the host of corruption that plagued our nation during reconstruction.    And so we end with Whitman's final poem- his most personal tribute to Lincoln and the one that many consider the better if less famous work, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom”.  In this poem, Whitman reverts to his usual style of free verse and strong metaphors.  It's beautiful and for me, it's where we see the universal truth of lost moral leadership and grief emerge- he expresses loss well beyond the moment of Lincoln.  Let's read just the first little bit.  It's long, and references the journey of Lincoln's casket to its final resting place without ever mentioning Lincoln's name.     When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd,  And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,  I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.    Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,  Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,  And thought of him I love.    2  O powerful western fallen star!  O shades of night—O moody, tearful night!  O great star disappear'd—O the black murk that hides the star!  O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me!  O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.    There are three big symbols in this poem= the lilacs, the sun and then a bird.  But since we read only the first two stanzas, I want to focus on those.  Lilacs are flowers that have a strong smell and were blooming at the time of Lincoln's death.  They are beautiful, but they also return every spring.  The star is an obvious symbol for Lincoln.  I want to point out that Whitman never really used stars as positive images for leaders because he didn't like the idea of a ruler just hoarding over us- but again, in this case, he made an exception.  Lincoln was the powerful star- and of course, we are left to answer, why would a man, so bent on equality of humans, elevate this one man- the only man he would elevate- it wasn't just because he was the president.  It was because he embodied what a great leader truly was- and this is the nice idea that I think resonates through the ages.      Agreed, average leaders and I will say most leaders give lip service to serving all people, but we can see by their actions, that a lot of that is propaganda.  Most are in it to win it.  It's easy to get to the top and view oneself as better than the rest of us.  It's just natural to do what's best for me or my team, so to speak.  It's natural to want to put enemies in submission- prove own own power and greatness.  But Lincoln was different- his compassion for his enemy, his unwavering commitment to integrity, his ability to see beyond his current moment, is a star- something that outlasts us all.  The South as well as the North mourned deeply Lincoln's loss.  The procession described in this poem where the casket was taken from Washington DC back to Illinois was something that had never happened in the history of the United States and has not happened since.      It is a legacy of leadership that Whitman not only admired but also immortalized.  It's also a legacy that I find inspiring no matter how great or small our little ships are, if we are ever called to be a captain.  It's something to think about when we smell lilacs in the Spring.  For Whitman every time we smelled those flowers, we grieve, but also we remember- because just as lilacs return every Spring, so does a new opportunity- the end of the Lilac poem looks to the future.  In another of Whitman's great poems, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” he says this, “We use you, and do not cast you aside-we plant you          permanently within us,       We fathom you not-we love you-there is perfection in          you also,       You furnish your parts toward eternity,       Great or small, you furnish your parts toward the soul.”  It's a nice idea, Lincoln was a man, but for Whitman he embodied an ideal we can all aspire to: integrity, humility, compassion and grace- in defeat and death but also in victory.  Whitman believed in those ideals in leadership- leadership that embraces those things can lead a ship to harbor in scary waters.  Perhaps, when we smell the lilacs, we can be reminded that those ideals are also planted in us.     Thanks for listening.  We hope you enjoyed our discussions of Walt Whitman.  Next episode, we will look farther into the American past to even deeper roots of democracy on the American continent, the Iroquois constitution.  So, thanks for listening, as always please share a link to our podcast to a friend or friends.  Push it out on your social media platforms via twitter, Instagram, facebook or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend, and if you are an educator, visit our website for instructional resources.  Peace out.                 

Wretched Radio
Can a Christian be Physically Hurt by a Demon?

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 54:56


Wretched Radio | Air Date: November 19, 2021 Segment 1 Welcome to Mailbag Friday, where Todd answers your questions. Why does there seem to be more sin in cities vs. rural areas? Segment 2  Can a genuine Christian be physically hurt by a demon? This and more. Segment 3 From William – Since obviously God perceives […] The post Can a Christian be Physically Hurt by a Demon? appeared first on Wretched.

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace
Returning to Purpose & Self Love After Struggling Mentally and Physically

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:47


Today we're joined by Holly Joy McCabe. She is a leader in holistic and wellness with a company called Zen in a Bottle. She will be sharing her story with us and shows up so authentically with her knowledge of an understanding of the healing that the body is capable of. And how she helps thousands of women transform their own patterns, they're bodies and it's really beautiful!   In this episode, we discuss: Suicide attempt in her teenage years Being curious about religions Her traumatic younger years - Her ‘Runaway Story' Disordered eating and mental health ‘Living for myself' When Holly's health plummeted and how she shifted into physical healing and the nervous system Western medicine vs. Holistic health The subconscious programs and patterns Defining her work, how she she shows up, and what she's really doing Truth Be Told is an organization, providing transformational trauma healing and programming for women behind and beyond bars. Let's raise each other up! I Want To Donate!   Work with Jennifer Get 25% Off a Private Coaching Session with me Sign-up for the Newsletter and stay up to date on my latest workshops, services, and speaking events.  Become a Member & Support the Illuminated Podcast on Patreon FREE 1 Year Supply of Vitamin D + 5 Travel Packs from Athletic Greens when you use My exclusive offer: AthleticGreens.com/Illuminated    Work with Holly Hire Holly to speak at your next event → Book Here See the different ‘Healing Paths' Holly has to offer Check out her Supplements and CBD Line   Connect with Jennifer Website Patreon YouTube Facebook Instagram   Connect with Holly Website     Instagram - @spiritualfitchick   Instagram - @zeninabottlehealth  Facebook Podcast

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
Felix Rommens - Living with hearing impairment, keeping hands busy with art, and growing up during WW2

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:42


Episode #30 - Felix Rommens is 97 years old.  If you are wondering what keeps him young and loving life at The Village of Winston Park in Kitchener, it has to be his art. Erin Davis and guest co-host Doug Reed welcome Felix to the green bench to share in a conversation about his art and about his hearing impairment, which has formed the life is living today. Nearly 50% of people 75+ have trouble with their hearing.   "Being deaf, I was kind of a loner.  So, in order not to get completely bonkers, I started working with my hands and my mind." - Felix Rommens Felix was working in Belgium at the highest he was able to go in office work (hating office work), so he decided to move the whole family to Canada at the age of 41.  A visit to the employment office on the day he landed and went directly into the building process, building homes, working 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.  On the 7th day, he would do work at his own home. When he retired at 71, he looked forward to the arts and crafts that he enjoyed.  "The whole idea about my art is to keep something for tomorrow, so you keep going." - Felix Rommens "I have only one life and I want to live it to the end." - Felix Rommens finds projects he looks forwards to with art and continues to use his hands as he did when he was 20. Felix has the use of a woodshop at the Village to keep active in his art but also works in his suite, finding a way to continue working on projects. "Keep on the positive side, think of all the good things that have happened to you." - Felix Rommens Felix was captured by the Nazis during World War II, made to work in factories, awaiting liberation after 2 years in Germany, and then ran at the age of 18 on foot to make it home.  His father was an officer in the Belgian army, shot at 40, and Felix as a child had to take care of him for the next 15 years due to his injuries. "There are always two sides on a coin - I only took the good ones." - Felix Rommens Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions  Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com  Learn more about co-host, Lloyd Hetherington  Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

Professional Tennis World - Mindset & Motivation
How To Get Ready Physically For Competitive Tennis (Episode 43)

Professional Tennis World - Mindset & Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:23


On this TENFITMEN podcast episode, Milan shares important elements for getting in the best possible physical shape for playing competitive tennis.

If This Mic Could Talk
Episode 191 | "No Silent Sex"

If This Mic Could Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 99:53


***ALL THE VIDEOS, SONGS, IMAGES, AND GRAPHICS USED IN THE VIDEO BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS AND I NOR THIS CHANNEL CLAIMS ANY RIGHT OVER THEM.******THIS SHOW IS INTENDED FOR ADULTS AND MATURE AUDIENCES!!!***LORD WE THANK YOU FOR OUR GIFTS!!!Mic Talkers, we had a blast on this one! Special guest, King Kyle Lee and special Co-host, Shakiya on this one. Topics include: Get to know King Kyle Lee. Just because a man and woman are hanging out, doesn't mean they are having sex; true or false? In sex are vocal sounds needed for you to feel the other is enjoying it? Tami Roman. Do weekends mean more than the weekdays? Physically speaking, is there a difference between being attractive and being sexy? A woman loses interest the moment a man tells her ____? A man loses interest the moment a woman tell him ____?Segments: "Things That Make You Go Hmmm", "Hot Seat", "LB Moment", "Black Excellence", "Each One, Teach One", and MORE!!! MIC TALKERS, THIS IS FOR YOU!!!

Bodega Babiez Podcast
Ep. 111 "Lets Read The Comments"

Bodega Babiez Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 116:37


Welcome back to another episode of Bodega Babiez Podcast. Mahmud steps in for Carbs again this week. They start off by reading the comments and trolling left in BBP tiktok. They speak on the Kyle Rittenhouse verdict. Zac Stacy getting locked up for Physically abusing his ex girlfriend and much more. Follow us on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/bodegababiezpodcast Era https://www.instagram.com/iamnewera_ Papijohnson https://www.instagram.com/papijohnson Carbs https://www.instagram.comstevenc___ Mahmud https://www.instagram.com/theredpilldealer Just Believe Entertainment https://www.instagram.com/justbelieveent

Living Life Naturally
LLN Episode #76: Brandt Passalacqua - How Yoga Therapy Can Improve Your Health - Mentally, Physically & Emotionally

Living Life Naturally

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 26:43


About Brandt Passalacquoa: Brandt Passalacqua is the creator of Breathing Deeply Yoga Therapy. He has been enjoying yoga and the healing arts since 2001 after overcoming obesity and a life-threatening autoimmune illness. His personal journey serves as an inspiration to countless others and informs his compassionate, humorous, and down-to-earth teaching style. Brandt has maintained a private practice since 2002 integrating yoga therapy in the tradition of Krishnamacharya and Structural Yoga Therapy, Medical Massage, a variety of meditation lineages, and plain-old common sense to help people realize their goals. He works with individuals suffering from a wide variety of diseases including obesity, eating disorders, acute and chronic physical complaints, trauma, chronic and mental conditions. He also serves as a meditation teacher with an emphasis on finding the most efficient practice/s for an individual's evolution. Brandt shares what he knows through training programs in Breathing Deeply Yoga Therapy, Being at Peace with Food, and the Breathing Deeply Meditation Sangha. He lives in Western Massachusetts with his wife and two children.   What We Discuss In This Episode: Brandt shares his work with yoga therapy and how it's different from other forms of healing. In his own life as well as the lives of his clients, he's seen first-hand how this form of therapy has improved trauma, mental health, autoimmune disorders as well migraines, obesity, and other disorders. Brandt also shares how the art of meditation and breathing can be life-changing for people and can connect the mind, spirit, and body in a way that effectuates change and healing. Although it's individualized to all those he works with, the simplest forms of meditation can be implemented to help his client's immediate needs. Yoga can also be for people with little ability to move, or the elderly with poor balance, to the person who is more experienced with yoga practices. It helps people on all levels – and the good news is, you don't have to be in a group setting if that doesn't meet your needs during the pandemic. I'd invite you to check out what Brandt has to offer in the online world that can help improve your health and well-being. He has lots of offerings on his Website that can help you improve where you're at, so check out the links below.   Connect with Brandt Passalacqua :  Website: http://breathingdeeply.com YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFZKaTim6Cfms703582MTeA LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandt-passalacqua-15298146/ Twitter: breathingdeeply Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/breathingdeeply/ Instagram: breathingdeeplyyoga   Connect with Lynne: If you are looking for a community of like-minded women on a journey - just like you are - to improved health and wellness, overall balance, and increased confidence, check out Lynne's private community in The Energized & Healthy Women's Club. It's a supportive and collaborative community where the women in this group share tips and solutions for a healthy and holistic lifestyle. (Discussions include things like weight management, eliminating belly bloat, wrangling sugar gremlins, and overcoming fatigue, recipes, strategies, and much more so women can feel energized, healthy, confident, and joyful each day. Website:  https://holistic-healthandwellness.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/holistichealthandwellnessllc The Energized Healthy Women's Club:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/energized.healthy.women Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lynnewadsworth   Free Resource: Hot flashes? Low Energy? Difficulty with weight management? If MID-LIFE & MENOPAUSE are taking their toll then I've got a solution for you! I've taken all my very best strategies and solutions to help you feel energized, vibrant, lighter & healthy, and compiled them into this FREE resource! Thrive in midlife and beyond - download my guide here: https://holistic-healthandwellness.com/thrive-through-menopause/   Did You Enjoy The Podcast? If you enjoyed this episode please let us know! 5-star reviews for the Living Life Naturally podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pandora, or Stitcher are greatly appreciated. This helps us reach more women struggling to live through midlife and beyond. Thank you. Together, we make a difference!

Out of Character
20 - Moving

Out of Character

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 69:38


I am moving. Physically and mentally. Kumbaya. Many stories from my childhood. Where is Aaron, my babysitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The You Project
#629 What Works For You?

The You Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 40:57


It's the ever-present challenge; learning to ‘operate' me (you), optimally. Physically, mentally, emotionally, socially, practically. This is part two of a stupidly-long chat around the idea of creating our own optimal (specific to us) health plan. Keep in mind that there's no universal ‘best' workout, diet, lifestyle, protocol or operating system but rather a million ‘bests', depending on a broad range of personal variables including (but not limited to) genetics, age, fitness level, training history, injuries, medical issues, goals, resources, lifestyle, sleep habits, career, mindset, dietary habits and lots more. Enjoy.

Baskin & Phelps
Megan Olivi: Baker's injuries aren't just physically affecting, but mentally as well

Baskin & Phelps

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 12:42


Megan Olivi of FOX Sports joined Andy Baskin and Dan Menningen ahead of this Sunday's game between the Cleveland Browns and the Detroit Lions. Megan and the guys discuss if the Browns should have rested Baker Mayfield, and other topics heading into Sunday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The JayMac Podcast
How my anxiety affects me physically and stops me from doing things

The JayMac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:55


This is me: Many people think that social anxiety is all in your head. For me anxiety has very strong physical symptoms on my my body that make it hard to function in many situations. I've developed many coping mechanisms over the years but unfortunately it seems to be getting worse as of late.  Support the JayMac Podcast https://www.jaymcfarland.com/jaymac-support    Get your JayMac Merch https://streamlabs.com/joeysmith-svBAdy/merch  

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Daryl Ruiter: Baker is struggling physically and on the field; I would give him the week off

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:17


Daryl Ruiter with the very latest on the health status of Baker Mayfield. Daryl on why Baker should take the week off to recover from some of his injuries. Getting Jarvis Landry more involved offensively. Why the defensive players need to play better.  Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy App! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How To Be Awesome At Everything Podcast
179. How To Be Awesome At Pushing Yourself Physically

How To Be Awesome At Everything Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:02


Lindsay is obsessed with finding the extra gear in life.  That shift that you make that takes things in your life to the next level.   She believes that most of us are capable of a lot more than we think we are.  Like we literally have an extra gear. Most of us still have more in us.  But we often put up these invisible hurdles and tell ourselves that this is the most we can do with this or we can't even attempt this because of this. Lindsay's favorite way to push herself in all aspects of life… is to push herself physically. Because it pours over to alllll other areas of your life.  Because you've proven to yourself that you CAN do more than you thought you could. A physical change is the best way to push yourself in all ways of your life. Whether you feel like you're in a rut, or just low on energy or patience with things you have to deal with… Lindsay thinks pushing yourself physically could be the answer, or part of it. Today, we are talking about ways you can push yourself physically to not only improve your health, but improve your overall fulfillment in life.   We get all these arrows shot us at all day.  You're always dodging arrows.   This is why we need a few hours to ourselves to have the patience to deal with all those arrows. We have to push ourselves physically so we can be tough mentally. It's that mental toughness… helps you push through. How do you identify if you are in a rut? When you want to get better and you are not. It's easy to fall into comfortable habit.  It's super difficult. Examples of pushing yourself physically …. -Running up hills -Running stairs -Taking the stairs at the doctors office -Cold showers -Stretching -New/hard workout class -Sauna CHEERS!!! To pushing yourself PHYSICALLY!

Thriving Beyond Belief with Cheryl Scruggs
Special Holiday Episode with Cheryl Scruggs

Thriving Beyond Belief with Cheryl Scruggs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 23:41


The holidays can be tough when it comes to family dynamics and lots of other things we are dealing with in life! But today, I want to encourage and challenge as we move in to this wonderful time of year! Let's go there and talk about where you are; emotionally, spiritually, physically, and mentally during the holidays. Related Links: Facebook: @CherylScruggs Facebook group: FOR Women ONLY Group Instagram: @cherylscruggs Website: Jeff and Cheryl Scruggs

Church of Lazlo Podcasts
Maybe don't physically pick up a CEO at a party?

Church of Lazlo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 10:59


Part 2 of Doom Scrolling is a doozy!  You ready? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Governor Hochul says New Yorkers need to physically go back to work for the new year, Mayor De Blasio wants to tax big businesses to pay for year-round school, People might have something other than a turkey as a centerpiece this Thanksgiving, A 4 month-o

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 8:06


(cont'd) Public schools in Newburgh, NY were closed today due to yesterday's shooting, Crime is down in Brooklyn, The hearing to exonerate 2 men convicted of killing Malcolm X happens today, and NY Cares is hosting its 33rd coat drive. All Local for 2pm, 11/18/2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Let's THINK about it
Step 50: The Hero Trendency

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:11


The Hero Story Perhaps there has always been an effort towards optimization, and it generally looks like technology. When speaking of self optimization, or overcoming , we are speaking of the hero's journey popularized by Joseph Campbell. Campbell spoke a lot of the parallels of the external journey and the internal journey… the external circumstances gave the individual the opportunity to react and grow.In the 50's-70's there was a wave of belief in unlocking human potential through psycho-science-type things like intensive practice hypnosis and subliminal training… or just LSD. Some of these practices were previously used in religious awakening, but we wrapped them up under the guise of science, and then they were abused by programs like MK Ultra.During this time, people thought of the human as a blank slate that could be written, molded or shaped. (optimized?) An example of this is Laszlo Polgar, born in Hungary, and with an idea about raising children, ended up getting married and having his first child in 1969. He and his wife Clara, raised children around the idea that they could create a genius through specific narrow focus. They had three children, the Polgar sisters, who all excelled at chess, reaching amazing heights, and were declared National Treasures. In fiction, chess is too boring, so the blank slates are in the genre of assassin Killers: examples are Kill Bill, Atomic Blonde, or Leon the Professional where they are trained, usually for revenge or duty. On the darker side you have children raised by handlers or governments as weapons, like in John Wick, Black Widow, Hannah, or Kate. So what if instead of being a badass with Kalashnikovs and stilettos you're a phenom with golf clubs? This is the Tiger Woods story, a history of brutal authoritarian parenting generating mental resiliency and overcoming. A lot of success, but a lot of trauma.Physically, many of us are not capable of such heroic heights: we cannot optimize enough to overcome our genetics, despite how much protein we consume. Enter science to the rescue as the mythical augmented man: Perhaps the Six Million Dollar Man or the darker side of Robocop, more of an automaton cyborg. Talk about efficiency: just turn the man into a machine. We are culturally conditioned to accept this is the way of the future as far back as cartoons like Inspector Gadget: the bumbling doofus with all sorts of extensions and rockets and wheels that both saved the day and naturally lead to slapstick pratfalls.Backtrack: This takes us back to an earlier podcast, step 28, in which I mentioned Henri Bergson, and his summary of what makes something funny, which is “the mechanical encrusted upon the living.”Of course, the real warning: when we lean too heavily into external power, technology, optimization (or even habits and productivity), we cease to be human in a certain way. We trade in the hard path of “overcoming” for the easy path of instant power, and in that substitution, we lose something. Yet, an alternate form optimization technology exists: Arcane Magics. I'm going to suggest, this path of learning the secrets of Arcane magics of habit stacking and personal productivity is the most alluring current path to be super, to achieve your potential. From Fiction to Fact While I have been talking about science through fictional stories, in many ways it has stepped into reality.You want to see something insane: look up clips from the 1920's Olympics compared to todays Olympics: Over 100 years the science of optimization and dedicated practice works… physically at least… until they turn into that unhinged balance beam killer super model from “The Spy who dumped me.” In America, we seem to live in a society that links success and progress and achievement with wealth and appearance. This is the manifest destiny of self-actualization woven into the Protestant work ethic, capitalist, American Mythos… and technology is often the vehicle and the key.But dedication to science and technology is problematically deterministic and class eugenics can spring up from it, as played out in the movie Gattaca. The secret to tricking an unjust technocracy? Keep secrets, and work harder than everyone else.But in this age of the internet we need to know exactly how: what was his diet? What drugs was he on? Boxers or briefs?And this is the trap we are in today: there are so many paths laid out before us by the millionaires and self-hacking crowds that we have a myriad of paths to successful optimization. Yet when someone, like in Gattaca, has an overpowering, all-consuming goal to be more… or in Kill Bill to kill more… we find their dedication and focus grants results. This can be called “dedicated practice” and myths of a 10,000 hour rule to mastery circulate around it. The beauty of it is that maybe we don't need neural implants and bionic arms. Maybe the new magics are habit stacks, routines, the mystical arcana of time-blocking and flow state. The only thing left is to find an all-consuming, overpowering desire that we can shape our life around… and that is not so much hero stuff, as a very old question of all of mankind: what is my purpose? What is my mission?  The Superman, the Ubermensch, Nietzsche How can we do an episode on superheroes, and overcoming without at least bringing up Friedrich Nietzsche. He popularized the concept of Übermensch or Overman or Beyondman… now most commonly seen as Superman.(By the way, this concept is affiliated with the Nazi party due to Nietzsche's sister misusing his texts.)The Overman is really a man of overcoming… and to confuse it with physical power as the Superman warrior is quite superficial. In our society many people appear superhero, overcoming physicality, but staying in vanity. The hero's journey is ultimately a journey towards self-integration, towards wholeness, and as Jung said “individuation” through the unification of opposites.In Nietzsche's book thus spoke zarathustra the prophet Zarathustra, who comes down from his mountaintop to share his knowledge with masses is spurned by the people. He attempts to tell them of the Ubermensch, but they reject this hard life of overcoming. All spiteful and disappointed, Zarathustra decides to prophesy the disgusting concept of Last man: a lazy decadent person, born of a civilization incapable of standing up to challenge or hardship, only interested in comfort. The last man takes no risks, preferring security. This is the soft and secure rationalist who has forgotten how to dream and everything the Ubermensch would do appears as illness, or madness.Intentional hardship? Are you crazy? So, how do we push back against the zombie conformity of security that seems so rational? It seems – indeed – to be illogical to try. Isn't it in our best interest to protect ourselves and stay comfortably in the middle of the herd? Yes, for survival maybe, but what about thriving? What about self-actualization?One way is to find something external to ourselves that is more important, someway we can help: A hero uses the challenge, the tension and hardship, to manifest creativity, to innovate. Are scientists and technologists our superheroes, the innovators or our time? How about the optimizers, the overcomers?  The guys and gals hitting flow state, or testing intermittent fasting: testing, and testing, and suffering, and sharing all this data with us. Are they climbing the mountain and coming back down with the mountain-top insights? Perhaps. But what if their motivation is internet rewards, or just a whole bucket full of hacks? That would be a less than noble goal.Experimentation can happen culturally, too. Can we not appreciate the heroism of the alternate lifestyle?The real challenge, the wisdom handed down to us through some religion, philosophy, and myths is to blend all opposites: overcome and move beyond dualities of good and evil, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and earthly… this is how you become an individual.Most of us are what is called a “dividual”, not undivided, as an “individual.” We are the divided self. Fragmented. We have not overcome or transcended, or as Hegel would say “subsumed.” Sure, we might be fit, we may look like the image of the superhero, but is maintaining appearances more like the act of the lastman? I am not saying they cannot coincide, but the motivation is a vital distinction to understanding conformity and overcoming.What I do know, is we -in our society- are really good at superficial appearances… placing the signifier before the signified.  The point, I think, is that to become a real human, a whole and integrated self, is a harder and a more heroic a journey than scientific shortcutting or following formulas that guarantee results. Sure, science/tech is great and helpful, but it shouldn't do the overcoming for you: you have to do that. Also, the hero is often portrayed alone, the monk ascending the mountain to find enlightenment or Superman in his Fortress of Solitude after keeping secrets, but you do not have to do this alone. Sure, you will have to work and push back against mindless conformity, but take the journey with others and avoid the solipsistic individuality of the shallow villain. 

The You Project
#628 What Works For You?

The You Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:11


It's the ever-present challenge; learning to ‘operate' me (you), optimally. Physically, mentally, emotionally, socially, practically. Exercise Physiologist Russ Jarrett is back at TYP HQ (along with Tiff) and this time we have a stupidly-long two-part chat around the idea of creating our own optimal (specific to us) health plan. Keep in mind that there's no universal ‘best' workout, diet, lifestyle, protocol or operating system but rather a million ‘bests', depending on a broad range of personal variables including (but not limited to) genetics, age, fitness level, training history, injuries, medical issues, goals, resources, lifestyle, sleep habits, career, mindset, dietary habits and lots more. Enjoy.

The More Than Fitness Podcast With Matt McLeod
How To Approach Dieting Around The Holidays (Mentally & Physically) | Minisode #160

The More Than Fitness Podcast With Matt McLeod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:21


Holidays are around the corner and it can be tricky to navigate your fitness goals during this time. Do you let loose and eat whatever you want? Do you keep it tight and stay on track? What about when random relatives comment on what you eat or how you look? How do you prevent yourself from saying "screw it" and gaining tons of weight by the new year? Like I said: it gets tricky. And in this Minisode, I try to help you clear these things up and show you how to approach the holidays with confidence. I hope it helps! **PS: If you could rate and review the podcast, it would mean the world to me and it would help get the word out to others just like us so we can continue building this amazing, one-of-a-kind community.** Submit your question here: https://forms.gle/T94afcNxyrviH3we7 WATCH this Minisode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Z92uDMc4yhc Connect with Matt: [Free] 30-Day Ultimate Physique Development Manual: https://bit.ly/UltimatePhysiqueDevelopment Hire Matt For Coaching: https://mattmcleod.org/online-coaching Twitter: @mattmcleod6 Instagram: @mattmcleod6 Website: https://mattmcleod.org ---- Produced by: David Margittai | In Post Media Website: https://www.inpostmedia.com Email: david@inpostmedia.com Social: @_margittai

The Forever Woman Podcast - Matthew Coast
8 Signs He's Emotionally Attracted to You (Not Just Physically)

The Forever Woman Podcast - Matthew Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 8:53


8 Signs He's Emotionally Attracted to You (Not Just Physically) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/matthew-coast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matthew-coast/support

The Masked Man Show
The Physically Married SGG! Plus Bianca and Montez Ford. | Cheap Heat

The Masked Man Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 96:07


Recently returned from Mexico for SGG's wedding, Rosenberg, SGG, and Dip recap the weekend, which leads Rosenberg to tell a story about his divorce. Then, the guys reveal their strong feelings about 'Full Gear' before previewing Survivor Series (31:20) and answering mailbag questions (54:32). And a few days ahead of Survivor Series, Rosenberg sits down with Bianca Belair and Montez Ford (1:14:20). Remember to join Rosenberg on Sunday night! Download the Spotify Greenroom app today. Hosts: Peter Rosenberg, Stat Guy Greg, Diperstein Producer: Troy Farkas Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Get Attitude Podcast with Glenn Bill
S2 #36 - Todd Bookspan

Get Attitude Podcast with Glenn Bill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 57:54


3:36 - What is your definition of attitude? Win By Noon for personal finances as well? Commit to getting things done. Physically write them down.  11:07 - Is there a minimum amount of important things per day to be successful? Tom Hopkins. Do the things you enjoy. How do you approach life?  15:59 - Modern Mortgage Summit and Modern Real Estate Summit. Rene F. Rodriguez 19:34 - Presidents of some large companies. What are the biggest challenges that those folks have when it comes to attitude? What have they done to change it? What are the solutions? What can we do to eliminate the negative voices? Be aware. Reframe the negative thoughts into something positive.  25:07 - What would you tell the entrepreneur that's thinking about starting a new business? Have a written plan to go along with the vision. Racers Edge in Tuscan, AR.  31:34 - Who was the most famous or most impactful person that you've ever interviewed? Josh Mettle. http://www.WinByNoon.com . Planner with inspirational quotes. Digital calendar vs written calendar. Death by notification.  39:52 - What's the biggest challenges going forward. So many distractions. Idea list.  42:08 - Forty CMAs in forty days. What is the one thing you can do to be profitable. Win By Noon private group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/WinByNoonUserMastermindGroup 44:55 - Knowledge through the decades. What is the attitude lesson at birth? Scream and get what you want.  46:04 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 10? Mr. Wagner playing ABBA record. Being awkward when making friends. If you smile it will be easier to make friends. 46:59 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 20? Racing bikes and coaching UoA cycling team. Win at practice but couldn't win the mental game when it mattered. Visualizing what it feels like to win. The best athletes were also the best students because of their discipline. Lance Armstrong.  51:27 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 30? Rediscovery. Transitioning to the mortgage business.  52:11 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 40? You're not as good as you thought you were. Be humble. Humility. Gary Vee.  53:57 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 50? You can reach your potential. What are those next steps. If you're intentional, you can achieve.  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  SUBSCRIBE / RATE / REVIEW

SuperFeast Podcast
#142 Honouring Masculine Strength and Spirit with Aaron Schultz

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:06


Today's episode is one of the most important conversations we've had on the podcast all year. In this first of our Brovember episodes, Mason chats with Aaron Schultz, the founder of Outback Mind, A mental health and wellbeing programme that helps men from regional Australia manage anxiety and develop the right skills to stay healthy in the body, mind, and spirit. Growing up in regional Australia himself, experiencing the downward spiral of mental health issues, unfulfillment, and toxic environments, Aaron knows first hand the challenges men can face. A healing journey ignited by an introduction to Buddhism and self-love, Aaron has spent the past 20 years building a career around helping men to become more conscious and connected to their true selves. Today, Aaron is a leading Anxiety Management teacher, meditation/yoga teacher, and a specialised mind/body coach, with a great ambition to help others; Particularly men from regional areas. Aaron works to bring about a level of consciousness and understanding to a whole collective of men, born into an environment where a natural trajectory is to work for the economy and serve the colonial system; With little to no cultural ideologies in place that nurture them connecting to their true purpose. His organisation, Outback Mind; Focuses on creating a culture and lifestyle that gives these men the tools and solid foundation needed to deal with emotions and realise their heart purpose. In this soul-centred conversation, Aaron talks a lot about untying the embedded emotion of fear in society. An emotional response instilled in most of us; Fear permeates the colonial structure and has become a default operating system for so many. Fear of judgment, being different, or being vulnerable inhibits a lot of men from discovering their true purpose and potential. This is a beautiful conversation about masculinity, vulnerability, and the destructive cultural ideologies placed upon men. Mason and Aaron dive into Men's holistic health, the changes we need to make in society so men can thrive, and why we can't wait for a system that's not serving us to bring about the changes we need. If we want to change, we have to activate it ourselves by supporting each other and our communities in the areas that matter. This episode honours the strength, spirit, and wellbeing of men and is a much larger conversation about humanity. Tune in.     "It's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others, because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever. I believe my job here is to try and create light so these men can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves". -Aaron Schultz     Host and Guest discuss:   Men's circles Yin Yoga for men. Men's mental health Self love and acceptance. Resources for a purposeful life. Processing anger in a healthy way. Learning from indigenous cultures. Using physical exercise to process anger. Compassion for ourselves and each other. The prison system as an industry to make money. Developing a relationship with the masculine and feminine. The power of daily routine for a purposeful and productive life. Getting in flow with the seasons, cycles and our circadian rhythm.   Who is Aaron Schultz? Aaron Schultz is a leading anxiety management teacher, speaker, and private coach. He focuses on practical solutions to help individuals improve mental wellbeing and overcome anxiety. Aarons vision is to empower people to take a proactive approach to wellbeing, feel safe and supported, and become free of physical and mental illness by building healthy lifestyle behaviours that help individuals become self-aware, live more consciously, and thrive. Aaron is the founder of Outback Mind, a yoga, and meditation teacher (with over 5000 hours of practical teaching experience) specialising in Yin, Hatha, and Kundalini Yoga and transcendental meditation. Aaron also has extensive experience training individuals and groups in high-stress industries to manage anxiety in and out of the workplace. Aaron was recently awarded the People's Choice Award at the Queensland Men's Health Awards for his work creating a healthier future for men and boys.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Shen blend Cordyceps Deer Antler Ashwagandha Eucommia Bark Outback Mind website Outback Mind podcast Yin Yoga with Anatomist Paul Grilley     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Aaron, thanks so much for joining me, mate.   Aaron Schultz: (00:02) Pleasure, Mason. Thank you for having me.   Mason: (00:03) Yeah, well, yeah, my pleasure. My pleasure. Good. Do you want to just like give everyone a little up to date, little download on what you're doing at the moment, where you're focused at the moment is, and what the grander vision is for yourself and likewise, Outback Mind.   Aaron Schultz: (00:19) Yeah, thank you. I guess I come from a rural background in country Victoria. I was brought up traditionally, getting all the trauma that the education system sort of laid upon me, and that took me into poor lifestyle behaviours and believing what the TV told me. So, I started drinking and doing all the wrong things, and I disconnected from my real purpose and my soul pretty early because of the way society was sort of gearing me. So, sort of went into those poor lifestyle behaviours, and I knew underneath all that there was something greater, but I had to follow the breadcrumbs society had sort of laid out for me and worked hard, did all the things, bought the houses, and had the material stuff, and all that too.   Aaron Schultz: (01:15) And yeah, basically ended up a bit of a mess in my thirties and had to redirect myself. But following that, I've sort of had a real vision to be able to help guys like myself from rural communities to be able to find out who they really are and follow that. Everyone's got something inside them that maybe they haven't had the courage to dive into. So, I've been able to help others through my own experience to fast track that basically by giving them some tools and some guidance and advice around following their true purpose in this lifetime, I guess, at the end of the day, and not having to go through all the shit that I went through, but that's also beautiful in its own essence because we do learn from that sort of stuff. But to be able to help a young man or to help someone get some direction, I think's my real purpose here, and to be able to explore all the beautiful things that humanity has to offer without going into all the negative stuff that takes us away from our true alignment at the end of the day.   Mason: (02:27) With this young, colonised Australian culture that we've got here, I mean, especially in the tribe, what do you see as the biggest thing? You are a part of that culture, and you and others are emerging to fill these gaps that are allowing such big mental health challenges, or just generally not being able to get onto your purpose and everything that kind of comes with that. If you look overall at our culture, what do you think is the biggest thing that we're yearning for, or that's lacking, or there's a blockage around that's enabling all these things that you're solving? What's enabling it to become an issue to start with?   Aaron Schultz: (03:11) Yeah, really. I always say to people "What are traps that are holding you back?" And it's primarily the underlying fact that is fear. We get put into fear early and that pretty much becomes our default. You always keep going back to fear all the time. But to be able to help people understand what helps them feel calm, I need to be able to create a culture and a lifestyle around that because that's really the heart purpose and the soul journey, I guess, at the end of the day which a lot of guys, including myself, never understood or don't understand, and I don't like seeing people go through the whole lifetime without having that connection.   Aaron Schultz: (03:58) I think we've all got something within us which is our true purpose and our true calling. We've got a job here to do, many of us, and to be able to find what that is, to be able to direct your life around that I think's really, really important to be able to make it simple to people. I go back to my own sort of journey. I was sort of messed up in my thirties, and I went to a doctor, and all he wanted to do was tie me up in knots. But I basically just had to take direction for myself and then start to work on myself again and get back to that little boy that was never really nourished, I suppose, at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (04:35) So, that sort of resonates with guys when you talk to them because they sort of see that within them when you're done, and to be able to give them real-life experiences and stories about it but to do it vulnerably I think's really important. I was never courageous enough to be vulnerable about the way I felt as a human, come from a very judgemental environment which most rural communities are. It can be very much like that. And you touch on the colonial model. The colonial model is pretty much all about fear, force, and control, and ourselves are really penetrated with that early on. To be able to release that I think is really important. It's our birthright to feel that freedom, I guess, at the end of the day.   Mason: (05:23) When you work, so especially, I mean this isn't just going to be rural community, but that's where you are predominantly working, when you're working in rural communities with the lads and you start looking at purposefulness, soul journey, I'm sure there's different for them, they resonate with different ways of the connecting with that, and talking about that, I'm sure you've got lots of ways of approaching, what's the outcome? Do you find that it's different where you go? Everything's going to be unique, but for some people, is that purposefulness something that's a big life goal? Are you seeing at the moment, is it just them dealing with some inner turmoil so that they can just do their job purposefully and enjoy where they're at? What do you see the biggest outcome of how they actually feel their purpose, and what does it look like? I'm just thinking for some blokes and women, but blokes that are listening that are like, "What is that?" Is that, all of a sudden, I know my purpose is ABC or how does it look?   Aaron Schultz: (06:23) Yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (06:25) Men are confused, to be perfectly honest to you. We're educated to support the economy really at the end of the day. We come out of school, we go into uni or work, and we sort of have lost that real connection with our true self. That takes us into poor lifestyle behaviours, getting into relationships which we aren't aligned with. Really, once you start to explain this to people in a men's circle or one on one or whatever it is, people start to actually realise that not so much that they're fucked up, but they've actually taken themselves away from their true alignment to be able to do what society's expected of them or what their community's expected of them, and I was very much like that. I was always trapped in this thing of what other people thought about me and a lot of guys are the same.   Aaron Schultz: (07:21) They're very much at that entrapment of expectation of others. To be able to start to give them tools, to unpack that so they can feel safe within themselves because a man very, very rarely feels safe with who he actually is, to be able to develop a relationship with this masculine, feminine energy too, which took me a lot of work to be able to understand that as well, to be able to release anger, but then also to be comfortable with that anger too so you can develop a relationship with both sides of you and humanity, I guess, at the end of the day. But I think we have this lack of awareness within ourselves about who we truly are, and we're not just put in on this planet to be able to work, pay taxes, get a super, and die, and to be able to bring that back into real-time for people so they can start to work towards their true alignment.   Aaron Schultz: (08:24) One thing that really changed me a few years ago was going and talking to old men at the end of their life about had they had a successful life and nine out of 10 said no because they were never able to reach not so much their potential, but who they really wanted to be and be able to follow their passions because of expectation of fear, judgement , all that type of stuff in these rural communities where I come from. So, that's been said to me. I'm not going to wait. I want to try and fulfil my life well and truly before then, but also to help others do the same. We've all got that ability within us. It's just about sort of untying the knots and the tangles to be able to get some structure on how we live our lives a bit more functionally and freely moving forward, I guess, yeah.   Mason: (09:11) You brought up men's circles. It's an offering. It's an ancient happening. It's something logical, and to be honest, something I've been engaged in a lot, but have kind of just a bit, I think, steered clear of a little bit, while especially the Byron Bay scene kind of figures out without the political correctness, just open a space where you can truly explore what it is for you as a man, without dictating the outcomes and trying to say what a man is necessarily. But just how important are these, not just in rural communities, in metropolitan cities? Is this just a novelty, something we're doing in Bali and Byron? Just how important is this to the emerging and evolving culture of Australia and around the world?   Aaron Schultz: (10:10) Yeah, and you think about it because I had a good core group of friends in primary school, right? It's just been high school, the egos and everything open up, right? You just become cynical, critical, judgemental, all those sorts of things, right? But at the end of the day, strip everything away, you've got a heart connection with your brotherhood, I guess. When you see the egos of others and their judgements and opinions of the mind and all those sort of things, but once you strip away that, all the work's got to be done in the privacy of their own heart.   Aaron Schultz: (10:47) I start a men's circle with a meditation, and I take them on a journey for 11 minutes, and I stripped them away from big citation of the mind and all the things that are going on. We get back to this true purpose again. Okay. After that 10 minutes, we're de-escalated and we're right, and then we can start to open up about what's going on here. So, what I'll do is I'll talk, I'll bring a topic in. I'll pair people up. They'll go and talk about that topic, come back, then they're de-escalated even further. Then we go into a circle and we talk about what's going on in our lives to be able to unpack that and have that support of others as well. So, the vulnerability is the biggest thing for a man actually be able to be vulnerable. As I said, it was a tough thing for me.   Aaron Schultz: (11:33) When new people come along, I'll talk about that sort of stuff so they actually feel safe. That's the thing with a man. We're in this protection mode consistently. We're in this fight and flight, this fight mode. Once we can be free of that protection and start to open up, that's when we can start to unload and start to unpack some of the challenges that we have going on within ourselves, and a great way to do that is to express that around other men, to be able to be vulnerable, but also to be able to tap into the feminine side which we don't understand, which can really help us create great levels of self-awareness at the end of the day which many of just don't have.   Aaron Schultz: (12:13) As I said, we're constantly on chasing the bread crumbs and all the material things that society now thinks that we need to help us feel good. But once we sort of get away from that and start to talk about the way things are and the way things are going on with us, I just think we can start to be more conscious about the way we live our lives at the end of the day.   Mason: (12:36) I mean, it is quite simple. It's amazing, but when you dip in, when you sink into that space, even just that intention, and you can just see. Sometimes, yes, whether it's a group of mates that we have, or if you have a partner, it's incredible to be able to be vulnerable to that partner and share. There's sometimes so much to unpack, it doesn't feel like it's overly appropriate for your lover to be that person that has to cop all of it and hold it, and that's the biggest thing. Having a group of men, strong men, men that can be soft as well just to feel supported in that, that you don't have to bottle it in to protect the people around you as well.   Mason: (13:21) Then also, you mentioned anger. I think it went from that culture where men are just aggressive and angry to that's bad and that's toxic, and then to this point now where no, it needs to be felt. If you've bottled it up that long, it's going to be raging and wanting to come out, and to know that you're in a space of other men that understand it, and ideally a space where you feel you're not going to get judged for it, it feels, yeah, it's obviously very sacred. And just going through your website, I've just gone, "You know what? That's really something that could be healthy for me right now."   Aaron Schultz: (14:01) Yeah, yeah. I appreciate that. I just share a bit about my own journey. I had these little traumas going on in my childhood which I've never dealt with, and that sort of took me into drinking and masking all that sort of stuff. When I hit 37, I was at the stage where I could take my life or I could change and move through that. So, I had that seesaw going on, and the easy thing was to go, "Okay, I've had enough of this. I'm out of here." And that's what happens to lot of guys. I lost my job and I felt worthless because I was attached to that title and that outcome, and yeah, as I said, I've never got to know myself.   Aaron Schultz: (14:51) So, put my foot into the gym and fitness, and a lot of that anger came out with the fitness and lifting more and more chin-ups, and all that sort of stuff, and I went from an average body into a pretty strong, fit body, and all the accolades and everything that came with that. Then I started to win things, and then I started to do these unbelievable athletic pursuits. And I had this moment where I could have went further and went to America and done all this sort of great stuff, or I could have said to myself, "Okay, Aaron, you've done well here. You don't need to do that anymore." That's what I did. I didn't keep pushing.   Aaron Schultz: (15:32) So, that took me into Buddhism, and Buddhism taught me to be kind to myself and be vulnerable. That's where the healing started to happen. With men, we'll keep pushing. That masculine side is very strong. That was the opportunity and the learning curve for me to be able to retreat from that, and then start to find that side of myself which had never been explored or never understood. To fast track things a bit, yin yoga was the thing for me which basically helped solve a lot of problems that I had because it just taught me to settle down, slow down, be accepting of myself, and then to be able to, yeah, learn how to use the body to settle the mind at the end of the day, to be able to develop a relationship with yin and the yang of life.   Aaron Schultz: (16:32) So, if I hadn't kept pushing fitness, that would've pushed me into this yang space, and the ego would've been dominant. To be able to understand the ego and become teammates with the ego, rather than just living that mindset consistently because I think that's what a lot of us try to do. We just think we've got to be a performer consistently to be able to have the vulnerability which was very hard for me with yin yoga because my body was so tight and that. But over time, I just had to keep showing up, and now I teach others, but also, it's part of my daily practise to be able to use the yang and use the yin together and have that harmony to develop that neutrality, I guess, at the end of the day and a high level of awareness.   Aaron Schultz: (17:22) Your mind, the way you are feeling on a basis changes, but if you can provide yourself with the practical tools to manage that better, I think you're not only going to be a better individual personally, but that's going to help spread light to others as well.   Mason: (17:41) How does that go down when you... I know we were talking just before we jumped on the podcast and when you're working in the prison system. Are you still working in the prison systems?   Aaron Schultz: (17:49) Oh, well not really. I don't work for the government, but I was going and teaching yoga in the prisons and doing some self-awareness training for prisoners. That may change now that we've got to be double jabbed so I'm not too sure about that one. Yeah. So, what we do is I'll just talk or the guy from WA will go and help guys come out, put them into a job, and then give them that pathway so they haven't got that vulnerability when they're out. The whole system is about bringing people from punishment or trauma, giving them more punishment, and then they're on their own when they get out. That doesn't work. We actually are able to go in, help identify the right people to match them up with the right employer, give them stability, but my role is to be able to keep them self-aware through mindfulness practises before they're released, so they come out and they've got a daily practise they can tap into so they can keep their job, don't get caught up with all the old belief systems and stay on track.   Aaron Schultz: (18:54) So, we don't get funding for any of this. We're trying to create something here which is going to help humanity in many ways, and that's something I'm really passionate about. That's primarily helping guys that have got lots of issues. We're punishing people consistently for trauma that's not their fault. To be able to help guys identify that, to help them feel safe, and it's okay, they can start to rebuild their lives again, this is something that's groundbreaking, that hasn't been explored before. So, to be able to take a young 25-year-old that's had a terrible life to help them reinvert that or a 55-year-old which has had this constant cycle of incarceration to be able to feel sacred in themselves, to learn some of the life skills which can keep them balanced is really beautiful at the end of the day because everyone's got a purpose in this lifetime and be able to help them become more stable and self-aware about their emotions, I think it's really important, and that's something that I want to try and do more of over the next period.   Aaron Schultz: (20:06) But I've got higher things that I want to do later on. It's just the stepping stone, and I keep getting downloads about this when I do my meditation in the morning that this is my journey and this is my purpose for this time. So, trying to be true to that, I guess, at the end of the day, rather than chasing money and all those sorts of things because I think if you're working in alignment with yourself, then everything else will take care of itself.   Mason: (20:33) What do you see is the biggest consequence here with the trauma? Obviously, the same is happening in various ways for women, but sticking to men, this lack of capacity or want or willingness or ability of our culture, the system, especially the corporate system to identify with a lack of initiations, a lack of support to identify traumas, having men being comfortable in themselves, what's the biggest... When you look at our country and our world, what do you see is the consequences that are rolling out of this being the case of us having this unwillingness and deficiency to support men to get in touch and on that path?   Aaron Schultz: (21:19) Yeah, yeah. Yeah, look, I just think that the whole system is working against this at the end of the day. You say, for example, that someone is experiencing self-doubt consistently. Well, as soon as they drive around a corner, they're seeing a billboard to drink beer. It's going around the other side, they're seeing a billboard to eat junk food, all this type of stuff. So, we're getting mixed messages consistently. Your body is smarter than you. Your body's always trying to give you the truth, but we're blocking that consistently because of the domination of the mind. We haven't been taught how to read what's going on below the shoulders and the message that that's consistently sending us.   Aaron Schultz: (22:06) So, yeah, to be able to find ease within yourself and ease with that trauma, some of the things that have held you back, this has happened for a reason, whether it be good or bad, and then to be able to accept that, and self-acceptance is such a hard thing because we are so geared to keep consistently beating ourselves up. We're consistently beating ourselves up, and I have that issue, not so much now, but I know it pops in every now and then. That is not a bad thing because it's there to protect me and keep driving me in some ways, but sometimes I really need to recheck myself and be kind to myself at the end of the day, and that's a skill that we're lost that ability to be able to nurture ourselves and be kind of to ourselves I think's so important because we've got the foot on the pedal consistently where we're not actually taking that off.   Aaron Schultz: (23:03) So, yeah, to be able to dive into some of those traumas, through my meditation practise now, I'll go into some things that happened to me when I was younger which gave me trauma, and then I'll be able to say thank you to that because it actually helps me move forward. That's a big thing for a guy that's new to this sort of stuff to learn, but you can give them simple things that actually help them on a journey of self-acceptance, then all of a sudden, they're on a pathway to transformation rather than being stuck in the old patterns all the time, if that makes sense.   Mason: (23:39) I mean, it completely makes sense. I mean, it's funny. I know I can go really sinister right now and talk about the motives of a keeping a culture this way and keeping everyone kind of huddled down, and kind of like a commodity, as long as they're just designed and as long as it's all working to design, just working, being in the workforce, and doesn't matter. We can deal with all the issues. And then you add the confusion of there's a lot, and some of it kind of rightfully, some that's gone absolutely too far is the bastardization of men and masculinity kind of thrown in there at the moment, and I'm not sure what your position is around this. It's something that's been obviously going on for years and super prevalent at the moment.   Mason: (24:29) I'm just saying with that perfect storm, for the efficiency's sake, for the resources's sake of our country and our culture, it makes complete sense to put energy in into this, and I guess I can just say for people listening as well, I get the sinister intentions and also get the fact that you're looking, I don't know, looking through the matrix and being like... Even if you guys can't see that this is the greatest thing to bring love, getting people on purpose, men on purpose, better for families, better for women, better for everyone yet you're fighting for funding.   Mason: (25:08) I mean, it always perplexes me, but then it doesn't because I go, "I know if I can have a..." I don't know why it's surprising, but it does still. It's baffling because the yield of benefit from... You imagine rolling out what they've done with PCR testing and vaccination, what they've done in such a small amount of time, if they rolled out with half of that, a quarter of that resource and intention towards let's get everyone properly rehabilitated, feeling purposeful, and getting over the traumas, the amount of efficiency that would be put into our culture, the amount of stress that would come off our medical system from all these mental health... Suicide comes off. All of a sudden, you got all the stress that goes into families when that happens. It really kind of brings it. It makes me really quite emotional. With the work you're doing, I'm sure you feel the gravity of it. Just how much, the utopia, that we're knocking on the door of?   Aaron Schultz: (26:20) I don't get angry about it. I see with compassion because I know there's such a better way. So, the whole government model is keeping people DDC which is dumb, docile, and compliant. Right? The whole system is around keeping people unhealthy because it's good for the economy. We've actually fucking become topsy-turvy here with the way that we really should be directing humanity. You're right. Giving people the tools and skills to be able to deal with those things rather than pushing it the other way is really the key to that.   Aaron Schultz: (26:54) Now, I believe that there's going to be a moment in time over the next, maybe 10, 20 years where there will be a real shift. We can't keep going down this role of basically pushing people away from what we're meant to be doing here as humans. You think about it. At the end of the day, it's only been the last 20, 30, 40 years that we've had so much domination. People were living in those days where they were sharing. Things were much more aligned with the way we're meant to be functioning here as humans, but they've taken away our vegetable gardens, our fruit trees, all those sorts of things to direct us to go to the supermarket. Convenient has become so much more common these days because really, at the end of the day, what it is mostly is it's the economical support and stimulus that goes with it.   Aaron Schultz: (27:49) So, if you look at a person that's incarcerated, that's an industry. The prisons have become an industry. The junk food has become an industry. All these different things have popped up. When I was a young fellow, pubs closed at 10 o'clock. Now, they're free for all because they realise they can keep more people employed. There's emergency services that are going to be employed to compliment all the pisspots, all those sorts of things. So, keeping people mentally unbalanced and physically unwell has become an industry, an entity of its own so that's continually stimulating the economy. But you're right, the counterbalance that is to be able to create a wellness culture which is going to be so much more beneficial at the end of the day, they can't see that at that level. The whole draconian thinking and the draconian model is really wrong.   Aaron Schultz: (28:45) My job here and I believe your job here is to try and create light so people can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves so they can actually start to think, "Well, maybe what I've been fed is bullshit. Now, I'm going to put some decent fertiliser onto my body, and around me that's going to help nourish me," rather than sort of punishment at the end of the day because we're really directed into a world now of self-punishment. Most people are feeling like a shithouse on a daily basis, physically and mentally, and that's the only way that they know. So, where I live, there's a coffee cart. People are lining up there consistently to get their energy. I'm going down and I'm doing meditation on the beach and getting energy from the earth and the sun. People don't see that because the TV's telling them to go and get their fill of coffee, and then at the end of the day, drink beer to find that balance, and I was brought up in that.   Aaron Schultz: (29:42) So, I understand what it's like, but I see that with compassion. I see these people that are making decisions with compassion. I spend time in Parliament House in Canberra, and I've been around the government, and I understand how it all works. I have people that are in fairly high-level roles come to me consistently because they're actually empty and lost with themselves. They're putting energy into all the stuff that they think is real and right, but at the end of the day, it's taking away from their true alignment, and I don't want to see them get to the end of their lives and think what if. We can actually create a culture of self-autonomy and well-being now for them. That's why it's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever.   Mason: (30:38) I mean, you brought up again, getting to the end of your life, whether or not there's regret or whatever. I always like to sprinkle in that it's going to be diverse, I imagine very diverse in terms of little regrets and tweaks, or was I on track or not. It's not just black and white. But I was just thinking, for everyone listening, especially the boys listening, tracking to the end of their life which I think you've been with your meditation practise. I'm sure there's a lot of work in acknowledging your death and the impermanence, and I always find that most of the time, ultimately, my most rewarding and favourite part of my own inner practise is facing my own mortality and always going into that darkness and seeing what emerges.   Mason: (31:32) But I always love thinking about that, either that deathbed or my 80-year-old self, and using that as a lighthouse, and that always gives me insights, and can I map somewhat or an understanding of the terrain. Well, I can feel it. I can feel the terrain and how many things are going to change in all those years. For you in your work, for the guys listening, when they think about themselves kind of on that deathbed, or when they're an elder, hopefully an elder, and they're tracking back, what resources would you recommend for them to have in place which would be the fertiliser to give the capacity for that rich garden of a purposeful life to come about?   Aaron Schultz: (32:15) Absolutely. Look, we're only on this journey in this body for a period of time, but primarily, if you can keep yourself in routine on a daily basis, you will not age. Physically, you may change, but mentally and spiritually, you will stay coherent. So, to be able to utilise a physical body in a manner where it's being nourished on a daily basis, externally by movement, those types of things, to be able to nourish it with the right nutrients externally that come into the body to be able to help it survive and thrive really well.   Aaron Schultz: (32:57) But also, to be conscious and connected to nature and all the things that are beyond that, I think that that will hold you in high regard so you don't leave this life feeling unfulfilled because every day for me is an opportunity to have an opportunity that I've ever had before and I've got to remind myself consistently that every day has been different, and I'm grateful for the days that have gone before because yeah, once you've got that, you will not have any regrets, and every opportunity, every moment is unique, and it's something that we've actually become disconnected with because we're so dominated by the mind and what we think is real.   Aaron Schultz: (33:45) Humans are the only creatures on this planet which are working away from our alignment. Look around at everything else and they know what they're doing. They're sourcing the food. They're doing all the things that nature intended and provided for them, but humans have become disconnected and lost from that. There's so much we can learn from our indigenous cultures that can give us that connection again. You and I are on this land through other entities, by people that have come from other lands that have come here and created us so we've actually lost a sense of purpose as men as well because we haven't got that connection with something.   Aaron Schultz: (34:27) I've learned so much of indigenous people from when I was a young boy, but to also what I'm doing now to be able to really connect and learn from them, and I'm helping indigenous guys connect back to their culture because that's the most powerful gift that they could have while they're in these bodies in these times primarily at the end of the day because that is human, isn't it? You know where you're living, you're living in a community, you're sharing, you're in a tribe, all that type of stuff. This is what I believe we're meant to be doing as humans. We're actually just lost touch with that at the end of the day. To be able to be grounded on a daily basis is so important.   Mason: (35:06) Yeah, I think it's kind of one of those things. I've done a few podcasts lately with some... I just did one with Jost. So, I don't know if Jost from-   Aaron Schultz: (35:17) No.   Mason: (35:17) He's a German Daoist and acupuncturist and can go in all kinds of direction. And again, in this podcast, we just came back to sleep in terms of the ultimate thing to bring that armour in terms of what's going on in the world at the moment and love. It's so often, and that racing part of my mind is like, "All right. So, what's that thing?" And asking you that question, you're like, "All right," that consistency through your day, that routine through your day so that you're grounded. It just landed again. I've tightened it up so much this year, and I'm one of those people that I'm like, "Oh no," if I've got that scheduled dialled and I'm refining it and it's all scheduled and locked in, it means I'm not free, and I've got that little Peter Pan syndrome kind of going on.   Mason: (36:03) But I've just watched what happened to my mental health this year when I just dialled in to that calendar and not really respecting, when I have a meeting, respecting the clock, respecting that I've put that in my schedule for a reason, and keep on refining, don't get down on myself. I can't believe what's happened to my mental health and stability just through that, with movement, with breathwork, with meditation. And again, I'm one that stumbles a lot in that and it quite often doesn't go well, but then just to not give up and just remember, that is the key. You've just given us that that's the key for when you're an old codger. That's what will get you feeling really purposeful when you get there. I find that potent.   Aaron Schultz: (36:48) Yeah, absolutely. It's called [inaudible 00:36:53] on a daily basis if you can do something for 10% of your day. I like to do it early in the morning so you can get connected. If you can have a practise every morning which grounds you, then you get rid of all the uncertainty, the fears, the worries, all that sort of stuff, and get back to okay, this is what it's all about, and then you start to live more from your heart. Yeah, I just think that is ancient wisdom which is much needed in modern times. All the ancient traditions talk about it. And in Kundalini yoga, we talk about juts, so just repeat. You repeat on a daily basis., you've got that foundation for your life. It's so important. It's so easy to get up in the morning and go to the coffee machine and get stimulated straightaway. The average man's going to the TV or the radio, and they're putting the fear in the first five minutes of their day, But if you can say, "No, I'm disconnecting from that. I'm going to do something which nourishes myself." That's turning inward primarily to be able to connect.   Aaron Schultz: (37:56) Physical movement is a great way of doing that. I had to do it through fitness to really push my body and learn to connect with myself again. But really, that took me into meditation. It took me into okay, now I've got rid of all my anger, now I can be still. That stillness, it's come from yin yoga now to be able to help the mindset also. I used to be really rigid on a daily basis with regards to what I had to do, but now I wake up and I have all these tools that I can use. So, I wake up and okay, this is how I feel. This is what I'm going to do, and my practise every morning goes for a couple of hours or more, depending on what's happening on that particular day. But that's my rock and my foundation that I've worked on over the last sort of 10 or 12 years.   Aaron Schultz: (38:48) It's a journey because most guys, they want to get to the end of the marathon before they start. The whole thing is to be really in love with the journey. Don't worry about the outcome. Really be in love with the journey and what's happening because every day is unique, and it's a new opportunity to learn about yourself and others. You've got new experiences going on in your day on a daily basis. So, to be able to be in love with that, rather than the outcome, we're so attached to the outcome. I want the beautiful wife. I want this and that and the other, but just be in mind and love with yourself and work within your own truth, and everything else will take care of itself I guess at the end of the day.   Mason: (39:35) And quite often, I mean, in my experience, it's still those things which you perceive to be superficial in terms of your wanting. They're still there. They are created in your life with substance. Beautiful partner, the ability to get on purpose, get some cash in the bank, build some assets, maybe be a provider, maybe not fall into... Whatever it is, it's still that superficial stuff. From what I could see, it's still there. It's just got something in the middle of it.   Aaron Schultz: (40:09) Oh, a hundred percent. It's really interesting. I'm not huge with social media, but I have these memory popups come up, right? And what I was doing three years ago, five years ago, eight years ago, it's amazing. This is one thing that we don't understand as men, right? I believe that we have this cyclic thing going on within us that we're actually engaged in this type of stuff at particular times of the year. I looked at these popups that have been coming out recently. They're exactly how I'm feeling now. These are just reminders of what's happened at the same time throughout a year in years gone. So, these seasons and cycles that we're going through, we actually don't have any awareness and consciousness around that to be able to be in alignment with that.   Aaron Schultz: (41:00) I think that is something that's really powerful and next level with regards to reaching our potential as humans, but also to be able to be more responsive and conscious of what's going on within our lives at any particular moment throughout the calendar year or whatever that may be. It's been a real light bulb for me to actually observe that. That's been a gift as a reminder to show me those sorts of things. And when your emotions and so forth are out of check, it's usually probably a lot to do with what's going on in nature which we don't really understand that much. The mental health industry doesn't probably understand that much about either because it's all about interventions rather than proactive solutions I guess at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (41:50) So, they're the things I want to try and help people understand. Maybe you're feeling like this because of this reason. How many men know about moon cycles and how that works? None. That's the feminine side of them that they don't want to have anything to do with, but if we could start to educate guys more about this sort of stuff, and how this might be affecting their sleep and their circadian rhythm, and all those types of things which we're unconscious of, I think that's really, really important. That's how we can start to be proactive about mental health rather than being reactive like the whole model is currently because that model is about making money out of people.   Mason: (42:34) Isn't it just? So, you've just touched a lot on circadian rhythm connecting to the land. Something I've been, yeah, saying for a few years now is that it's just very obvious and has been obvious for many people for a long time, and there's somewhat many diversions, but there's especially a diversion. I can see a diversion in the genetics and the way that people want to live right now. One I see is those communities wanting to keep at least a foot but two feet grounded on the earth, and then those that I think I kind of see more going up into the cloud, and wanting to plug into a smart city in a technological way of living that doesn't abide by any connection to nature and circadian rhythm.   Mason: (43:20) I mean, we don't have too much longer. I'm sure you've got some resource, or if you want to quickly share your practises for staying tuned in to that natural rhythm so that you can stay tuned into reality, and maybe the reality of what's going on with you. But I also just wanted to touch, and you mentioned mob indigenous culture, any indigenous lads listening, you've already recommended, it's the number one thing. It's kind of in the faces, connect back to culture, connect back to the song and your dance and language. For the Western lads listening because I kind of find it still a little bit icky around here in terms of still a little bit of spiritual just taking of indigenous culture.   Mason: (44:08) Have you got recommendations or just a reminder of how we can also, through connecting with the land, also connect or respect or learn about indigenous culture in a way that... It's energetically. You can feel it's still like a hive there. There's karmic stuff there. Obviously, there's a lot of developing and forming that energetic relationship where we're living harmoniously together. It's still unravelling. Have you got any tips for guys to how approach it, how approach that?   Aaron Schultz: (44:43) Yeah, definitely. A lot of us have had no connection with spirituality because it's combined with religion, and a lot of us have had religious trauma. So, a lot of this stuff that we believed was right about connection is probably not really filling us anymore. So, to be able to, I wouldn't say disregard that, but just to let go of that now what your beliefs probably were, to be able to be more aware of the universal consciousness is key. What's in this life and what's beyond this life is taking your awareness and dimension to another level.   Aaron Schultz: (45:26) And for me, that came from pushing my body really hard and going running early in the morning before the sun come up because I had no noise. It was no life. All you heard or all you saw was the sky and silence. So, I'd go running at 4:00 in the morning, and lot of the ancient traditions talk about the ambrosial hours as being the best time to connect with yourself because you've got no domination from anything. Yeah, so for me as an individual, it was actually using that time in the day to get grounded. You hear a kookaburra wake up at five o'clock, and then all of a sudden, life starts to evolve. You start to realise that life's so much bigger than yourself, once you actually have got that time for connection.   Aaron Schultz: (46:18) So yeah, if anyone's wanting to challenge themselves, let's say get up in the ambrosial hours. Get outside. Do some meditation, whatever it may be. Get connected with the land somehow so that it can actually give you an appreciation of the gift that we've actually in this lifetime. To be human in this lifetime's a pretty unique opportunity and a unique gift. As I mentioned before, we're going about life incoherently to what was really expected of us or what we're meant to be doing here. So, to be able to connect with the fundamental things I think are really key because that'll keep you grounded on a daily basis, and once you've got that foundation, then the rest of your life will evolve around that.   Aaron Schultz: (47:04) We have this innate connection with ourselves, but also humanity. Once you start to get out of the lower levels of consciousness of fear, shame, guilt, greed, and get into the higher levels of consciousness of gratitude, love, kindness, compassion, all those sorts of things, if you can start to tune into those sorts of things on a daily basis early, then that will spread, and you'll have that connection with yourself but also connection with others as well. I think that's really key, and they're the skills that we don't know as men, we don't understand as men because we've been pushed the other way to be sort of in those lower levels of consciousness of society, as I mentioned.   Aaron Schultz: (47:45) But we think that happiness comes from greed and all those sorts of things where really the happiness comes from love and kindness and compassion and all the things that we're meant to be doing here as humans. We're not meant to be in fear all the time. It's a small part of our life, rather being a major part of our life. That fear's here protect us occasionally, but we're not meant to be living in it consistently. So, use the time you have early in the morning if you can to be able to become connected to what's really important. Then, you do this consistently, and over time, you'll develop these habits which become part of your foundation, part of your strength moving forward.   Mason: (48:26) I love it, man. The little simple reminders that are just how profound the outcomes are there. It's just a beautiful, beautiful reminder.   Aaron Schultz: (48:38) Yeah.   Mason: (48:39) For everyone listening. I mean, outbackmind.com.au is your website. Where are you currently at with your offerings and how people can engage with you, besides your podcast, Outback Mind podcast, is that right? Yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (48:55) Yeah. You know, mate, there's not much really. It's something I'm not really strong at. I probably need to be able to do more in this space to offer up things for people. So, really at the moment, we're trying to set up the Outback Minds and foundation side to be not for profit. What we want to do, I've got a friend here that's helping set up a training platform. So, we want to be able to develop men's circles in regional communities throughout all Australia to be able to train guys in those communities so they can run these heart-based circles of men's circles for many years. And I ran them in Victoria and Tassie, and a lot of them are very ego-driven. It's very much in the masculine which is okay, but I just think if we can actually start to build capacity for people through these things, rather than using it as a tool to get things off our chest, to actually be okay to explore what's been going on with their own lives, but also to be able to build our capacity, and that helps us as a man, but also helps us as a family member and members of our community at the end of the day, and that's a proactive way that we approach mental wellbeing, I guess, to be able to provide people with tools.   Aaron Schultz: (50:09) So, yeah, I bring meditation. I bring yin yoga into the men's circles. So, to be able to train guys with some of the simple tools on how to do this, and that I think's really important to be proactive in that space, yeah, so to do that. And I guess I want to get out into regional communities and talk more, try and get into places where they don't have access to great advice or help. The online stuff's been really good for that, but hopefully, once things open up more, I can get out and start to connect with more people out there.   Aaron Schultz: (50:51) Yeah, as I mentioned to you earlier, my real vision is to be able to set up a Vipassanā centre where I can help people come and be still inside for three and 10-day retreats so they can reconnect with themselves because I believe that's a functional thing for humans. It's just to be silent and still for parts of our year. If we can do that twice, three times a year, that's got to be good for our mental wellbeing. We've got to be able to give our mind a rest, and the mind isn't king here. The heart is king. If you can reconnect with the heart, that's really what it's all about. That's how we can improvements health in Australia rather than be too dominated by what's going on above the shoulders.   Mason: (51:30) I love it, man, and I love your work. Encourage everyone to go and at least subscribe to the podcast, stay tuned in on that way, and yeah, it looks like you've got lots of things kind of planned. I can see there's little life experience, adventures there, and workplace wellbeing, all kinds of things. So, yeah, exciting to see the rollout.   Aaron Schultz: (51:51) Yeah. That's the other thing. The workplace has got such a strong opportunity to be able to help people. We're not just going there to get a paycheck. I want to try and engage more with more of our better employers that are ethical to be able to help people, particularly men in their workplace to feel safe, feel secure, feel supported and really valued in the workplace because that's a problem that a trap we've had as humans is to be able to use people by paying them money, but not really give them any care and support, and that's a huge problem with regards to understanding ourselves and our mental health because if we're not feeling good about ourselves in the workplace, then we take that home with us and that creates issues with domestic violence and drinking, and all that sorts of things.   Aaron Schultz: (52:45) So I just think the more employers that I can engage with to be able to help builds a culture I think's really important. My background, I ran labour hire companies. So, I worked with lots of organisations and industries throughout Australia, and I didn't see many employers that were doing it well. So, now, starting to connect with more employers and give them platforms on how to be able to develop a culture which is coherent in the workplace and starting their day with meditation, and all these sorts of things so people can feel grounded before they start their work, rather than just going there, and working to lunchtime, and then going and finishing their day off just to get home, but you actually feel part of something I think's really important. That's [crosstalk 00:53:33] improved capacity for sure.   Mason: (53:36) Yeah. Integrating the workplace back into cultivating a society and a culture that isn't just... Yeah. It's a funny dynamic. I'm an employer, and the amount of energy that needs to go in at each new evolution of the business, all of a sudden, it's not the same as when you were just a small little crew where all your values and these principles just seem automatically known. There needs to start being an unravelling of some structure so that there can be that flow of humanity and that flow of purposefulness, and there needs to be little checks in place. It needs to be integrated into a HR department. For a lot of people, it's beyond what they can handle. I don't endorse it, but I definitely can see how companies get to that point, and they go, "You know what? There's no actual cultural requirement of me to do this. So I'm just going to go to the efficiency route or the easiest route and just do the whatever culture thing." And you just end up using people. It's crazy.   Aaron Schultz: (54:48) Yeah. That's what it's all about. The whole model to do with MBA and human resources, and that's really about what can you get out of people, all the fear you can put into them, all that type of stuff. Oh, there's an EAP at the end of that. If we fuck them up. I'm saying organisations, and I have been for years, that is a last resort. You've got to be really proactive rather than reactive. If you're fair dinkum about what you're doing, if you can look after people, the results will take care of itself.   Aaron Schultz: (55:17) It's the same as with our wellbeing. If we can show up at a value basis as individuals and do things which nourishes, then the results will take care of itself. So, don't worry about the outcome. You worry about the journey. Help people on the journey and then things will evolve. That's where I believe at sports clubs. I've done a lot of work with sports clubs as well to be able to help them become successful, but not worrying about the outcome. If this is the process that we've got to do, so you can start to tune in with what's really real here, and enjoy the process of the journey rather than the outcome at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (55:51) I've worked for businesses. It's all about KPIs and budgets and all that type of stuff. If people are really in flow and intuitive and enjoying what they're doing, then everything will take care of itself because they're engaged, and the output is significant that way rather than sort of worrying about the results so much, you know?   Mason: (56:13) Yeah, and what I've experienced is when the culture is put in place, all of a sudden, something like a KPI or a budget doesn't have that disciplinary... This is a very hard line. To have optics through the business, like a KPI, have them available so that everyone in the team can see what's going on in other departments and for the benefit of the person who's in that, say, my position as a CEO to have those things be present and then to have it entrenched, not just say it, but so it's felt this isn't about making me wrong or bad. This is genuine feedback loop and genuine neurofeedback so that I'm aware of what my team is doing. I'm aware of whether I'm in a place where I'm flowing or not.   Mason: (57:07) And if, this is the hard one, if there's enough trust that you're not getting in trouble, but if there's something starts not going well, it's really great for us to know it so that we can all rally and be like, "What's happening here? Do you need some support?" It seems simple, but my goodness, it's a bit of a difficult task, I think just because we're all so programmed to be like, "I'm being judged. If I don't get the answer right, I'm marked wrong, and I don't get given other opportunities." It's a pretty insidious little parasite of the culture.   Aaron Schultz: (57:54) Get excited, and if you can get rid of that competition or that competitive nature, and give back more compassion, that's where you can grow. I've worked with business. It's all about achievements on a monthly basis and you're competing against others and all those sorts of things. It's really wrong. Yeah, being able be supportive and nourishing of yourself and nourishing your others, I think that's work.   Mason: (58:17) Because when you don't enlist them, them, me, people, whatever in competition, for me, this competitiveness from this jovial place and this playful place, and often, quite a serious place for me, I can drop into the gravity of which I enjoy around, look, in terms of my life vision, this is what's actually on the cards right now in terms of whether I get this project done in time or not. I've only got a certain amount of time here, but that's an emergence, that competitive charge. I'm not trying to beat down anyone else. That's something I think we've got wrong. We try and project something which is going to get us the result, like competition onto a company structure which then brings about reprimanding kind of culture, therefore for fear verse hey, it's really takes a lot of vulnerability to get this feedback and be vulnerable to your team and how you're performing and how you're doing.   Mason: (59:15) But if you come from a place of trust and you give trust willingly or have conversations to get yourself there to where you give trust, all of a sudden, that natural and organic, that's the fertiliser, then that competitive edge, appropriate for you and your nervous system, can rise up and then go back down as well when it starts getting a little unhealthy. It's a hell of a thing, business culture. I'm aware of the time though. I think we'll go on with this for ages.   Aaron Schultz: (59:46) Just remember, it's a friendly universe and everything's trying to work for us, not against us. If we can just work with that, the flow of everything, then everything will be okay, will take care of itself. When we're forcing where we're getting forced against and that's what competition does, it really does put us into a short-term fix, but really the long-term outcome is not great, but the more you can be able to work with the universal charge, if you've got a product, you let products go without any attachment. You've got something great. You're not producing it because you want to get these outcomes. You're producing because it's something which is going to help people. If you've got that belief, that energy goes into that product, and then it goes out and expands.   Mason: (01:00:40) Yeah. That faith, I mean, I've got a bit of trauma around religion, going to a Catholic school as well, but then when I've reconnected to the natural state of faith for me versus institutional faith, as you said, I'm like, "Oh wow. What freedom." I've got an intention and I trust my intention around herbs and education, and I'm sure you have the same experience, and watch it open up as long as you give it... When you keep on turning up and staying consistent within it. Yeah. It's fun. It is fun. It's a great reminder. And I love your work. I really appreciate you coming on and chatting to all of us during Brovember.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:26) Thank you, mate. I've given a listen to it and we really appreciate what you've done and what you've created here and the great products that you have. I've only started using Mason's Mushrooms and I'm not consistent. I'm only using them every few days. Maybe I need to have it more up, but I like it with cold water rather than hot.   Mason: (01:01:46) In a smoothie. You got the tropical fruit up there I think coming on at the moment. Yeah, it's all good, goes with it. Whatever, a bit of mango, a bit of mango sorbet.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:57) They'll be out in a couple months so I be into there, I reckon for sure. So, appreciate it.   Mason: (01:02:00) Yeah, well, yeah. It is that consistency with the mushies and the tonic herbs and even do a little bit more than you think you should be doing. Go up the dose a little bit. With your meditation practise, You'll definitely have a greater capacity for the dose.   Aaron Schultz: (01:02:18) Yeah. Yeah, awesome, mate. I appreciate that. I haven't used any drugs for 25 years, marijuana, or any of that sort of stuff. I've never used magic mushrooms and everyone else around the same seems to. Yeah, this sort of stuff is new to me. I was a raw vegan guy for a long time. So, I know it's like to feel dialled in. It felt amazing consistently, but I just couldn't get the product to keep myself sustained. So, I have to find different things now that can help me, I give it a stab.   Mason: (01:02:51) Nice one. Yeah. That was me. I was raw vegan basically, and a yin yoga teacher, funnily, when I was like, yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:01) Unreal.   Mason: (01:03:03) Yeah. So, I definitely relate to what you're saying. My wife is a yin yoga teacher and goes over and studies with Paul and Suzee Grilley, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:10) Yeah, yeah. Cool. It's interesting. I was to go over there in 2019, but that got stuffed up, and I've done training with four, five other teachers that have all studied with Paul, but I haven't actually gone and studied with him myself. So, yeah. It'll happen at some stage, I reckon, but yeah.   Mason: (01:03:32) For sure.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:32) Yeah. [inaudible 01:03:33]. It's been something like I come from Bikram yoga to hatha to Kundalini to yin so I've gone through all those journeys. The Kundalini yoga is very powerful as far as creating connections and that type of thing. It's amazing what the energy that comes from the practise actually can do for you. Yeah, so I was really grateful to sort of fall into that too, but it's all these tools that have sort of popped up over the journey.   Mason: (01:04:03) Yeah, they all fit into a piece of the puzzle.   Aaron Schultz: (01:04:06) That's true. Clearly.   Mason: (01:04:09) Beautiful mate. Well, I look forward to chatting to you on your podcast, and yeah. I'll keep an eye up for everything you're up to. Thanks for coming on.   Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

The Key Nutrition Podcast
KNP303 - The Healing Power of Food Mentally, Emotionally, and Physically 

The Key Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 58:28


Michelle and I discussed eating foods that help with mood disorders such as anxiety and depression on today's show. We often talk a lot about balance and not including your favorite foods such as sugar, but, in Michelle's case, for example, moderating those foods and possibly even eliminating, for the time being, has proved considerable dividends in her mood and overall happiness. We gave you specific foods that help with anxiety and the why behind it. Enjoy the show!   Next Level Wait List -> http://mynextlevelexperience.com/wait-list/   Discount code: keynutrition for 20% off your first Legion order. Order Legion Supplements -> https://bit.ly/3mHRqYV   Connect with us on Instagram Host Brad Jensen – @thesoberbodybuilder Co-Host Michelle Raines  – @thebreathwithinyou Key Nutrition – @keynutrition

Bottom Line Wrestling Cast
E132 - Physically Provoked: July-Aug '03

Bottom Line Wrestling Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 114:53


Episode 132 - Physically Provoked: July-Aug ‘03 This week Mike & JV will discuss the following events on Raw from July 21, 28, & August 4, 2003. RAW 530 - 07/21/03 - Promo - Part I - Eric Bischoff & Linda McMahon (03:51- 07:40) RAW 530 - 07/21/03 - Audio - Promo - Part II - Stone Cold Arrives (08:32- 16:26) RAW 530 - 07/21/03 - Audio - Backstage - Stone Cold & Eric Bischoff (24:18- 25:15) RAW 530 - 07/21/03 - Match Results - Rob Van Dam vs. Kane (01:22:51-01:28:45) RAW 531 - 07/28/03 - Promo - Mr. McMahon (03:55 - 05:51) RAW 531 - 07/28/03 - Backstage Segments - Eric Bischoff & Security RAW 531 - 07/28/03 - Promo - Part I - Mr. McMahon & Kane (01:22:15- 01:26:24) RAW 531 - 07/28/03 - Audio - Promo - Part II - Stone Cold Confronts Mr. McMahon & Kane (01:26:40- 01:30:13) RAW 531 - 07/28/03 - Promo - Part III - Shane McMahon Returns and Attacks Kane (01:30:13- 01:32:28) RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Promo - Part I - Shane McMahon & Eric Bischoff (04:45- 11:36) RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Audio - Promo - Part II - Stone Cold, Shane McMahon, & Eric Bischoff (12:15- 17:44) RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Backstage Segments - Eric Bischoff & Triple H RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Audio - Backstage - Eric Bischoff & Rodney Mack - Austin pops in (35:05- 37:05) RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Audio - Post Match - Ric Flair vs. Goldberg - Stone Cold has an Announcement (53:40- 55:42) RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Backstage - Shane McMahon & Bischoff releases Kane (01:06:12 - 01:06:41) RAW 532 - 08/04/03 - Match Results - No Holds Barred Match - Eric Bischoff vs. Shane McMahon (01:26:59-01:32:10) Check out "Talking Taker” Alex & Travis are "digging up" the career of the Undertaker. You can now dig deep back into their archives of  episodes and explore the entire run of the Deadman. Give them a follow on Twitter @TalkingTaker and follow their YouTube page!  This month is Ep 193 - Escape the Undertaker Booking the Territory: The Unprofessional Wrestling Podcast - Mike Mills, along with his hilarious & informative team of Doc Turner & Hardbody Harper, break down episodes of NWA WCW Saturday Night from 85-90. This Thursday on the NWA/WCW episode they cover June 16, 1990  Join the Booking the Territory Patreon Page at Patreon.com/BookingTheTerritory at the $5 Tier to join JV & Mike on the “Extreme ECW Live Cast”.  This past week, Extreme ECW Live Cast: Extreme ECW Live Cast - Ep 49 HCTV 103 & 104 -  April 11 & 18, 1995 (Three Way Dance & Hostile City Showdown) Check out Our Vantage Point: Retro Wrestling Podcast with Joe Marotta & Michael Quinn, this week is Ep 246 - Anywhere But NY: Jim Cornette , Royal Flush Week 3 -  Worst WWE PPV's (IYH October 95 - Great North, Survivor Series 93), Review of ECW 6/10/97  Please reach out and support us on Twitter  @bottomlinecast, @MPRU83 & @JOHNVANDAMAGE Please take the time to Subscribe and write a Five Star Rating at Apple Podcasts! Please Subscribe to our YouTube channel, Bottom Line Wrestling Cast. Thank you for listening! Find out more at https://bottomlinecast.pinecast.co Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/bottomlinecast/d79eb050-c030-4085-ba14-c2305ba6cd55 This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Holding Down the Fort Podcast
122: “If the family can't be physically together during the holidays, how do we still get that connection?” Managing holiday expectations with Dr. Leah Blain & Joanna Goldstein

Holding Down the Fort Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:18


122: “If the family can't be physically together during the holidays, how do we still get that connection?” Managing holiday expectations with Dr. Leah Blain & Joanna Goldstein Dr. Leah Blain & Joanna Goldstein join us from the Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at the University of Pennsylvania to help military families prepare for the holidays. Together, they share how they help veterans and military family members make it "back to better," how serving the military community has personally kept them going during the pandemic, and the importance of taking care of your mental health during the holidays. Resources If you're a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one, there are caring, qualified Veterans Affairs responders standing by to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1 or visit https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/ (https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/) Vets4Warriors provides sustained, confidential peer support to any veteran, service member, family member, or caregiver whenever they have an issue, wherever they are in the world. We help before challenges turn into crises. Call 1-855-838-8255 or visit https://www.vets4warriors.com/ (https://www.vets4warriors.com/) Military OneSource from the Department of Defense is your 24/7 gateway to trusted information, resources and confidential help. When MilLife happens, it's your “first line of support” — giving service members and military families tools to stay well and thrive. Learn more at https://www.militaryonesource.mil/ (https://www.militaryonesource.mil/) Brought to you by CVN and Blue Star Families, Tools for Managing Stress and Worry provides research-based strategies, tools and techniques to help manage stress and worry. The course was designed by mental health experts with input from military family members themselves. Learn more at https://www.cohenveteransnetwork.org/toolsforstress/ (https://www.cohenveteransnetwork.org/toolsforstress/) In addition to providing vital mental health services, each Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic has become a pillar in its community in part due to a wide variety of workshops, seminars, partner gatherings, and other events held in the community rooms in each location. Learn more at https://www.cohenveteransnetwork.org/cvnpresents/ (https://www.cohenveteransnetwork.org/cvnpresents/) To find a Cohen Veterans Network clinic near you, visit https://www.cohenveteransnetwork.org/clinics/ (https://www.cohenveteransnetwork.org/clinics/) For our latest updates: https://mailchi.mp/8bfc59e06fa5/holdingdownthefort (https://mailchi.mp/8bfc59e06fa5/holdingdownthefort) -- Support free art and comedy classes to veterans, service members, military family members, and caregivers by attending Jen's Storytelling Bootcamp Graduation Show by the Armed Services Arts Program on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 8 PM (EST) via Zoom. Purchase your ticket for "Storytelling Bootcamp Grad Show – Bravo" at https://asapasap.org/attend-a-show/ (https://asapasap.org/attend-a-show/) Special thanks to The Rosie Network for the invitation to participate in the ceremony, congratulate the award winners, and update the community on our journey since we won 2020 Media Professional of the Year! Watch now at https://youtu.be/pd9agrNEpUQ (https://youtu.be/pd9agrNEpUQ) -- -- Guest Applications are now open! Apply to be on our show at https://forms.gle/YdoNX9aR8RTEKpnCA (https://forms.gle/YdoNX9aR8RTEKpnCA) Stay updated! Subscribe to our newsletter http://eepurl.com/gTTOdT (http://eepurl.com/gTTOdT) Connect with our co-hosts Jen Amos jen@holdingdownthefortpodcast.com and Jenny Lynne Stroup https://jennylynnestroup.com/ (https://jennylynnestroup.com/) or jennylynnestroup379@gmail.com Visit our website https://www.holdingdownthefortpodcast.com/ (https://www.holdingdownthefortpodcast.com/) This show is sponsored by US VetWealth Get FREE access to the Military Spouse's ToolKit for Agile and... Support this podcast

Still A Part of Us: A podcast about stillbirth and infant loss
After Daughter Hazel's Stillbirth, Dad Tad Advises to Take Care of Oneself Physically

Still A Part of Us: A podcast about stillbirth and infant loss

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 15:07


Dad Tad shares in the interview what helped him to grieve the loss of his daughter Hazel, who was born still at 36 weeks. He found that taking care of himself physically helped him emotionally. Tad also thinks about how they'll celebrate her upcoming 1st birthday, and Lee advises Tad to be gentle on themselves that day. Tad and his wife Taylor also have a dedicated spot with all of Hazel's things that helps them feel close to her. Watch Tad's account of Hazel's birth: https://youtu.be/jSbs1zUKY5g Watch Tad's wife Taylor's account of Hazel's birth: https://youtu.be/6CZCGoBk52c Watch Taylor's advice episode: https://youtu.be/bWw6qu6Dg7A DONATE $5 (aka "buy us a coffee/hot cocoa") to support the continued production of these stories. We appreciate all the help toward production and hosting costs. Donate: https://ko-fi.com/stillapartofus Or if you want to purchase an "Always a Part of Us" Legacy Gift for $20, you'll be providing to one of these families that shares their story, full transcriptions, mp3s, and mp4s of the recordings of their baby's birth story and advice episodes for their family history records. You will also get a shout-out on an upcoming episode. Thank you! Donate: https://ko-fi.com/stillapartofus Time Stamps: 00:00 Welcome 00:52 Upcoming first birthday 02:54 What's helped Tip #1 07:10 Physical reminders 11:46 What's helped Tip #2 12:27 What's helped Tip #3 SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more birth stories from families who have experienced a stillbirth or infant loss. We're grateful that you're part of our community! https://www.youtube.com/stillapartofus SUBSCRIBE to our podcast Still A Part of Us, wherever you find podcasts. Links (some of these links are affiliate links, which means we may get a small commission off your purchase, at no extra cost to you): Website: http://stillapartofus.com/ Grief Support Groups: https://nationalshare.org/

Commit First w/ Sagi Shrieber (Feat. Pat Flynn, John Lee Dumas, Jason Zook, Paul Jarvis, and more)
Episode 105: Become Physically and Mentally Fit, before you hit 40! (w/ Dr. Anthony Balduzzi)

Commit First w/ Sagi Shrieber (Feat. Pat Flynn, John Lee Dumas, Jason Zook, Paul Jarvis, and more)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 40:55


Sagi Shrieber on The Commit First Podcast Presents:BECOME PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY FIT before you hit 40! (w/ Dr. Anthony Balduzzi)SUBSCRIBE HERE:http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=sagishrieberYou can also find the show in audio, on your favorite podcasting app:- Spotify: http://sagishrieber.com/spotify​​- - on iTunes: http://sagishrieber.com/itunes​​- Stitcher: http://sagishrieber.com/stitcher​​Check out the Commit First Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/commit.first​​Join our WhatsApp community!: https://chat.whatsapp.com/JNE8exuBCDtAm7R9qZYmbkIf you want to stay up to date with my posts and values, follow my Instagram account too: https://www.instagram.com​​/sagishrieber------------------------********Episode 105 - BECOME PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY FIT before you hit 40! (w/ Dr. Anthony Balduzzi)********"Our lives are constantly throwing different variables at us, and we have to learn the art of fluxing with it." - Dr. Anthony BalduzziHey guys!On this episode, I brought Dr. Anthony Balduzzi into the show to talk about the many ways to maintain a healthy entrepreneurial lifestyle and how to achieve peak fitness before hitting your 40s - 50s. Today's talk covers LOADS of health advice, and also debunks a lot of popular health "myths" that most of you might still even believe in! Check this episode out to find out what they are...Dr. Anthony Balduzzi is a health and weight loss expert, and the founder of the Fit Father (and Fit Mother) project. He leads various fitness programs for busy men and women around their 40s, holding dual degrees in health and neuroscience from the University of Pennsylvania (doctorate of neuropathic medicine.) A former national champion bodybuilder, Anthony and his programs have proudly helped over 40,000 families lose weight in over 100 countries.Enjoy!********Topics discussed on the show:********IntroductionAnthony's StoryThe Right MindsetMake Health a PriorityBalanced Exercise and DietA Mindset TrapThe CalendarThe Hierarchy of ImportanceDeveloping Sleeping HabitsModerating Light ExposureGet Up In The MorningCreating The SpaceThe Nervous System BranchesMeal Timing Schedule SetupThe Anchor RitualBreaks are ImportantConsistency and VarietyFasting Before SleepMaintaining Daily MovementWrapping Up********Where to find Anthony********His Website: fitfatherproject.comThe Fit Father Project - YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FitfatherprojectInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitfatherproject/********Links Mentioned********Oura Ring: https://ouraring.com/pre-orderFlux: https://justgetflux.com/Iris: https://iristech.co/

The Wealth Standard – Empowering Individual Financial Independence
Physically Mastering Wealth Series: Part 2

The Wealth Standard – Empowering Individual Financial Independence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 21:32


Welcome back to the third part of the three-part series on physically mastering wealth. Today, Patrick Donohoe is going to talk to you about two very different stories. One is about a family that saved too much money, the other is about a family that spent it all. Join in and learn from these stories so that you can apply the three financial habits for a happier life. Force these habits into your life today!   Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Join The Wealth Standard community today:

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
Dr. Rea Brown - McGill University student, professor & athlete, remarkable medical career and surgeon during the Montreal massacre

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 31:38


Episode #29 - Dr. Rea Brown shares his story from the green bench of a career nothing short of remarkable, from growing up with a critically ill brother to finding himself in the world of medicine surrounded by pro athletes and on December 6, 1989 in Montreal saving the lives of several women after the École Polytechnique Tragedy (Montreal Massacre). He joins us from his home at The Village of Humber Heights in Etobicoke. Erin Davis is joined by our guest co-host Doug Reed (Episode # 9) at The Village of Arbour Trails in Guelph while Lloyd takes the rest he needs. Dr. Brown shares the story about his brother's illness after having pneumonia - learning about a new antibody that was coming available now that the war coming to an end - Penicillin was the drug spoken of which helped him within a week at the Montreal Western Hospital. "My first successful surgery was on a cob of corn." -Dr. Rea Brown His education in a one room school shared in stories that encouraged him to read.  What is one book that you remember reading while growing up?  1954 - Dr. Brown was accepted into McGill University with the goals of getting a degree and playing football.   Drafted by the Tiger Cats in 1957, but didn't want to play professional football, and decided he wanted to be a doctor.  1958, joined the faculty of medicine students and continued to play football winning the 1960 Churchill Champions.  Graduate in 1962 and applied to training program for surgery and segued into sports medicine and many accolades and awards. December 6, 1989 - the day of the massacre at École Polytechnique in Montreal, Dr Rea Brown was present and available to support as the women came in for care.  In 1991, the Parliament of Canada declared 6 December to be a National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. It is also known as White Ribbon Day. Doctor for the Montreal Alouettes and shares a couple stories along with one he recalls with quarterback, Turner Gill. Erin Davis asks, 'who was your favourite patient?' Dr. Brown names John Beliveau (Montreal Canadiens from 1950 to 1971) as his favourite patient - hear why at the 24 minute mark Advice to listeners to have hope: "I HOPE it is going to be better tomorrow." -Dr. Rea Brown Dr. Brown reflects on funding a residents space on the 18th floor of the Montreal General Hospital called 'The Brown Room'   Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions  Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com  Learn more about co-host, Lloyd Hetherington  Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

Probably True Podcast

Good cuddles don't have to mean adequate diddling. Physically touching another human is extremely good for your mental health. It's got something to do with sea creatures. Possibly.Thoughts on non-sexual physical contact, intimacy, and an epiphany in crushed velvet.---Stories of queer life and even queer-er sex. The repeatedly award-winning, slightly filthy storytelling project tackling LGBTQ issues in a fun and engaging way. Created to remind all of our queer siblings that we are none of us alone.Much like its creator, it's a smutty-but-charming collection of personal misadventures working to make the world a better place, one silly, sexy story at a time. For early access, exclusive content, stickers and more, support Probably True on Patreon at Patreon.com/ProbablyTrue Transcripts, story submissions, and all things Probably True can be found at ProbablyTruePodcast.com Some fool on Twitter: @ScottFlashheart See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bledsoe Show
How to Use Language for Your Benefit

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 58:11


00:00.83 mikebledsoe Today we're talking about language. Some people may say that's boring and the reason and and ah I won't name the show language probably for that reason. Well, we'll say something clever on this episode between max and myself. And and then name it that but we wanted to really talk about it because we found it to be a very important subject for us to focus on I know for myself. It's helped me to ah. Not only communicate better with other people I think most people go oh you're better at language you could probably communicate better and in ah in an effective way that other people will will hear what you have to say in the way you want it to be received but also just for myself just for. Deliberately using language to reduce the own confusion I have in my own mind to work things out to become more certain about ah how I am approaching things and about what's going on in the world and I think anyone who does not put their attention into language. Um. Is going to be extremely limited in their ability ability to be productive and effective in the world today. So I always think about language is a major component in the expansion of consciousness and if someone's interested in that and they leave that part out then there are. Ah, they're missing out on on a huge huge piece Max. What? what got you into focusing in on language and going. Wow this is something important to pay attention to. 01:45.43 Max Shank It's the only tool we have for interaction other than physical touch which can be violent or nonviolent or body language. So everything. We communicate to ourselves and 1 another is done with this framework of language you have the deeper stuff which is ah feelings which don't necessarily need language to exist like you can be afraid or you can be aroused or you could be a little bit of both. For example. Um, I feel like the way that we are taught language is probably the worst way possible. So it almost sets you up for failure and you know I've always wanted to get as powerful as possible. And you realize at least I realized I was spending like hours and hours and hours in the gym and in a fighting gym doing kickboxing and Moai and kravmiga and all this stuff and you know you realize like that's not very practical like the. The likelihood of a violent interaction is really low Plus if you really want want to be good at that. You should just get a a weapon and get really good with that and then take it a step further. It's like ah some guy will just write a check and like win. Everything. 02:59.86 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, as. 03:16.10 Max Shank Like if you're able to communicate really well and put deals together and organize a group of people toward the same goal. That's where that pen is mightier than the sword comes from. So yeah, exactly So the the whole ah premise of getting. 03:24.10 mikebledsoe You can just hire somebody to beat somebody up, you know at that point. 03:35.47 Max Shank Physical power is like ridiculous ninety nine percent of the time now I do think it's very worthwhile to cultivate physical strength and mental strength can stem from physical challenge like if you carry a pack up a mountain. It's going to be. Physically challenging but that physical challenge is going to give you a huge mental challenge as well. Um, with communication There's only 1 goal really which is to transmit the message you intend. And that's I think the first place that people get gummed up is they don't even know what they're trying to communicate and you have to consider the audience so there needs to be just like a computer There's a sender and a receiver and it has to be. Um, understandable and in order for a human being to understand it has to be communicated to them in a way that resonates with them has to be communicated in a language that they clearly understand and you can't have too many bits. In a short amount of time. So like for example, when you download something off the internet. There's a download rate essentially and you can't go beyond that because the computer will start to miss things like you can't give too many bits. Per unit of time and so if I tell you hey mike remember this sequence of numbers. It's a 4 7 q l 1 2 3 8 11 b 1217 you're going to be like I don't know what the heck you're talking about now. 05:23.80 mikebledsoe She. 05:26.10 Max Shank If I stretch that over a much longer set of communication I can probably get you to remember all those things especially if I tell it to you in a story but by and law which is why? Ah so many stories were just. Told they weren't even written so we can go like way back like the way before we had written language we had spoken language so you have to be really clear on what you're trying to communicate and you can't give too many bits. Otherwise it gets lost So that's. I think 1 of the big things I've noticed both professionally and personally is people try to say too much and their core message gets lost right. 06:14.83 mikebledsoe Right? Well I think um, 1 of the key things that you said there is that I'm not going to repeat you verbatim. But basically what I heard was people don't people aren't considering. The result of their communication before they communicate or while they're communicating my experience is that most people are trying to satisfy a feeling if I when I speak I Want to feel a certain way. 06:37.85 Max Shank Right. 06:51.73 mikebledsoe And it might be ah exactly the yeah, the feeling the the desire to be heard and understood is ah is a very common 1 when we study sales and marketing we go. Oh if you can just make the customer feel heard and understood. 06:52.14 Max Shank Like a desire to be heard kind of thing. 07:08.27 Max Shank Right? totally. 07:09.83 mikebledsoe They'll buy almost anything from you. Even if you know as long as they if you people feel hurt and understood so infrequently that if when it happens it's a standout experience and there they they then. 07:23.37 Max Shank And that's. 07:28.69 mikebledsoe Get into this place where they know like and you know they like and trust you at least in that in that situation but 1 1 of the things I've come to ah realize is so many people are communicating for to solve for short term insecurities. They don't understand the long-term consequences of their communication most of which is there just communicating things that are like you were saying confusing people are confused by it and ah 1 of the ways that I that I have improved. My ability to communicate is really thinking. What is what is the result I'm trying to achieve with this information and the the more knowledge I've accumulated the the less knowledge I tend to lay out for someone to take on at a time. Spread it out as you were saying you know I could give you everything that you need to know in a weekend to to run your business effectively. But your ability to grok that and then put it into practice. It's just it's too much too Fast. It's not. Not going to get the desired result. 08:43.34 Max Shank Yeah, So if you're communicating for self-gratification instead of conversion I think it's a really big mistake and I think it shows a lot of insecurity people tend to use a lot of 10 dollars Words. Or twenty dollars words it doesn't matter how much the words are but complicated words that people don't really understand as well and the more confident you are the less you feel a need to talk just to talk. And the less you feel a need to fill up the gaps in silence because you're like oh I'm I'm afraid the other person will start talking and then I'll lose my turn. So. 09:25.75 mikebledsoe I used to do that I used to I would like I would throw a lot of ums in there. So I could stretch out what I was saying so no 1 could interrupt me I was signaling. Oh don't don't speak because I still have something to say. 09:40.71 Max Shank And if you're smart It doesn't come out as an um, it's just another bit. You may not say um or Hm or and ah ah you it may just be I start talking about something else. So I keep the the conch shell right? the. 09:44.70 mikebledsoe A. 09:59.40 Max Shank The the talking stick. Ah, if you don't have a ah goal. It's fine. You know you don't want to like over analyze your whole life like I do in every word you say. But if you're just having um, if. You're communicating with someone. There should be a goal like I have a little checklist actually I can pop through real quick. So um, step 1 is who are you sending this to which is your audience step 2 is what do you want them to change or do which is the call to action. Ah, why should they which would be the benefits plus the supporting Features. What are the consequences. So the heaven or hell how will you inspire hope which are stories and steps make it feel easy and possible and how much. Time effort and cost will it take so what is the cost of what they're doing and when you realize that basically every bit of communication is you're you're trying to get someone to take a specific action at least when you start getting into ah writing and sales. Which is persuasion relationships are the same thing like I think you should take out the trash and I will do this instead and there are all kinds of ways that you can break it down. But if you don't know what you're trying to achieve at the very outset then it's it's fun. It's a conversation. It's a stream of consciousness boom boom boom back and Forth. There doesn't have to be a clear outcome involved. But I think that's where writing gives you a lot of clarity because you start structuring your ideas with. Supporting arguments. You know you have a premise like I think you should exercise in the morning for x y and z and here's the benefits that you get from it and you realize that you can't put. Too many bits in there and it forces you to consolidate your ideas into something that is digestible. 12:08.98 mikebledsoe Yeah, and you said you said maybe you should not do what I've done which is put your your communication and and thoughts through constant analysis. But I found a lot of successful people. They may not be doing. Putting their thoughts through constant analysis currently or or putting a lot of attention into it. But I think going through a period of time where that happens ah a little a little thing that I've done and and I've challenged other people to do is to. Get rid of words in your vocabulary for a period of time and a word that gets Overused. So if you're using over usinging a word a word that I I think I still overuse. But I've got a lot better which is the word like. Which is extremely common for our generation. There's a lot of likes and you cut that 1 word out and you go well, that word's useful, but then you start when you cut it Out. You realize the majority of the use of that word that I I use it for is not Useful. It's wasted space. 13:23.37 Max Shank It's filler. It's filler. 13:24.36 mikebledsoe It's filler and and it can be confused if any filler creates more confusion by the way. Ah, and yeah, and so by removing that sometimes when it is useful I then have to go search for another word. And it's in its place. So 1 of the ways that I I train myself is I put a rubber band around my wrist and if I if the word slips through my lips I take a little band and I snap it on my Wrist. So I give myself a little little feedback. 13:49.14 Max Shank Ah. 14:01.70 Max Shank Do you worry that? um, you'll have to eventually upgrade to a shot collar just to get the same sensation. 14:01.39 mikebledsoe On that. Ah. 14:07.59 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, I've thought about that I actually was thinking about taking 1 of those shot collars and just putting it on my my nether regions in that just to really you know drive the point home now. How far does it go? ah. 14:14.21 Max Shank Oh wow. 14:20.32 Max Shank It um, it only goes 1 way typically. 14:24.50 mikebledsoe Ah, well the the rubber band The rubber band is good because I've also been in I've been on stage before and snap my wrist. Ah and people go you know and I point out this is what I'm doing so it it becomes a social thing too is. 14:37.69 Max Shank Right. 14:41.77 mikebledsoe Oh I'm I'm showing everybody that I'm I'm making this mistake it. It brings it. It brings more of like a social awareness say I just said it a social awareness around what's going on and which brings more attention to it which causes me to be better about it. 14:53.22 Max Shank Um. 15:01.63 mikebledsoe So. 15:02.50 Max Shank What's also fascinating is that when you appear more fallible people like you more like the thing that people hate most is the perfect guy. So interestingly enough so if you use. 15:05.59 mikebledsoe Yeah. 15:18.30 Max Shank Language like the common man and you go and um, you know what is that word? Oh yeah house like what's a you, you just? um, kind of develop that persuasion through affect. Rather than just having the simplest and most direct message possible because usually you are talking about persuasion of some kind you're persuading them to buy to try or to cry or to laugh or something like that. There's ah, there's a goal there. 15:48.94 mikebledsoe Well people really value your intent I think a lot of people value intention over results. So even if you are fallible and you're you're going at least I'm trying people go oh you know, give you a little golf clap. 15:51.36 Max Shank And just having. 16:04.25 Max Shank Well whatever they believe your intention is right? So I think for your own psychological organization. You want to have the most clarity possible. 16:08.26 mikebledsoe No. 16:21.64 Max Shank Like essentially you want to have a triangle your triangle describes the main point and then each point of the triangle is the 3 like sub points of that. So. There's ah, a really solid clear precise structure to everything you're saying. But just communicating something in the simplest way possible isn't necessarily the most persuasive using stories and analogies that really make you feel certain things can be really beneficial even though they might seem. Superfluous or unnecessary like that word superfluous is a fun word to say but the fact that it means unnecessary and it's unnecessarily complicated is really hilarious. 17:21.77 Max Shank These long pauses are really good for podcasting. You told me. 17:24.77 mikebledsoe I did but then zencastr put this this little thing in the production where it cuts out anything over 1 point, 2 seconds it cuts it down in 1 point, 2 seconds. So it makes makes the pauses actually. Okay. 17:38.90 Max Shank Whoa. So the folks at home won't get the full experience of that awkward pause. 17:46.96 mikebledsoe Ah, 1 thing I find very interesting is when I when I started getting hip to the power of language I ah was really disgusted At. You know, maybe people aren't doing it on purpose. Maybe they are who knows yeah I was I was disgusted with well I stay disgusted about this. So. It's not like it's not as if this was a new feeling about this but education the the systematic government run. 18:05.94 Max Shank It's a really strong emotion. 18:22.50 mikebledsoe Education system really focuses on spelling things correctly and grammar. But what I notice is there's a ah lack of focus on definition of certain words. 18:29.41 Max Shank Oh. 18:41.90 mikebledsoe Ah, it's more about can we make it look pretty or are we following the rules of of ah you know don't put this word in front of this word and don't put this word at the end of the sentence and while completely leaving Out. You know how words shape our thoughts which shape our mind and and which words are helpful and which words won't be might be harmful and if you put them. You know if you follow this word with this other word. What's that doing to your mind and you know it. That hits me along with you know we teach algebra which no 1 hardly ever uses once they get out of high school. But no 1 knows how to balance their books. No 1 understands money the thing that they're constantly surrounded by so my my experience of language in regard to education is similar to that. 19:23.74 Max Shank So so. 19:36.71 mikebledsoe Mathematics and that ah you learn how to jump through all these hoops for the purpose of getting a good grade. But how are these things impacting your your life and being successful and so most of what I learned I was a very like reading and writing was. Was what I did. That was my best subjects and math was you know a little bit tougher for me but I look at all that and I go as as much as I learned about reading and writing and I was gotten these amazing grades. 19:57.70 Max Shank So. 20:13.53 mikebledsoe It wasn't until I was in my thirty s that I really started learning language in a way that was actually helpful for me. It's not complicated. 20:20.37 Max Shank And it's not complicated. Good good communication either. I think what you said at the beginning about understanding how language shapes thought and that's the truth is language shapes thought. And of course your thought shapes the language that you use so it's a feedback loop but what I tell people is that everything about you that is not an animal is laid out with language. So every. Concept above your instincts is language driven. What is okay to do and what is not okay to do what is good to do what is bad that whole ah knowledge of good and evil thing that's all that's all language. That's it's basically. Anti-instinual pretty much so everything that we do that is not just pure animal instinct is laid on a foundation of language so you have to be really or you don't have to be but it's good to be very considerate of what language. You accept I mean we've talked about it I think in a past podcast even the concept of slavery is heavily based on the definition like that is a possibility so every every like thing we have and everything we have in place. Is laid out using words. It's conditional phrases if this then this every law is there's no such thing as ah laws. It's more crimes are defined. And punishments are also defined and sometimes they're left up to the discretion of the judge or something like that. But usually we define a crime we define a punishment we define a contest and we define a prize for that contest but everything. Outside of your base instincts is language so getting clear on how you would like to be and realizing that it's all just your perception that colors the world outside of instinct so you have instinct and then you have your. Individual perception. That's a that's a huge revel is revelation. That's enough to make anyone go crazy. Basically. 22:54.44 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, and and there's language shaping thoughts. So first I think most people think about language and they think about communication and but the the shaping of thoughts and really. Going inwards and go what is the language of my mind. How is the language of my mind playing out when I sit quietly when I say quietly and I notice oh these are not words that are coming out of my mouth but these are words that are running through the mind. What is. 23:28.44 Max Shank Right? what. 23:32.30 mikebledsoe How is that shaping my perception of this moment. What is what feelings? What feelings are associated with those words those words create a feeling um and and being curious about that and anyone who starts diving into how language shapes their thoughts. 23:35.27 Max Shank Totally. 23:51.85 mikebledsoe And you start making small tweaks. Oh I'm going to remove this I'm going to add this a game we call Play is with our coaching is the 1 word game is bring up a a common thought that comes up in your mind in this situation Cool What if we just changed 1 word. And we have them write out the thought right now write it out with 1 word change does that change how you feel and almost every time someone goes. Yeah I feel different because I took the not out of that is it accurate. Yes, or no, maybe yes, maybe no okay. 24:12.43 Max Shank And. 24:31.27 mikebledsoe What's the next word we would have to change to make this a more accurate statement. So what we do is we if if I I think a mistake that happens with in coaching that I see a lot of times as people go, you're doing it like this. Why don't you just try it like this and it's like and it's as if you changed 10 words of their. 24:33.35 Max Shank Have. 24:50.36 mikebledsoe Thoughts all at once going back to what you were saying before giving them bits giving them small bits so large and so shaping the mind 1 word at a time I'm going to use a piece of sandpaper to get us there instead of an axe and. 25:06.49 Max Shank Like challenge change to ah but opportunity. For example, that's ah, that's a good 1 Yeah feels different. 25:08.33 mikebledsoe Ah, exact. Yeah, exactly. So yup, that feels different when you say and then all of a sudden the ability to see opportunity opens up whereas challenges that word tends to focus possibility and. And just vision so really getting in the practice of recognizing how these thoughts shape how we think which shape how we perceive the world and and what our options may be and then we have language outside of ourselves which was I think about the thought of culture. 25:47.24 Max Shank Spot Then what. 25:48.11 mikebledsoe So all these concepts that I've used to look inwards in my own ability and then you know communicating with people who are closest to me in relationship. But then I start looking at the thought of culture. What are the what are the memes that come and. Not the memes you see on Instagram I mean those those do qualify those are a a version of these memes but a meme is a is it is a snippet of narrative. There's a meme in our culture of this and that and this yeah. 26:06.91 Max Shank 1 26:17.81 Max Shank Like sorry tourette's sorry to write oh sorry? Sorry oh I'm sorry I'm sorry oh my god Jesus like is everyone really so sorry, all the time I used to do the same thing I have now gone. 26:24.21 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah, maybe. 26:37.81 Max Shank Completely the other way where I'm really cautious anytime I do say that because I'm not sorry like really. 26:45.61 mikebledsoe No well I had someone recently is that I don't mean to cut you off, but and then and then just start kept talking I go I stopped him and I said yes you did and they go and there's a ah group of people in they go. 26:55.89 Max Shank No yeah. 27:04.76 mikebledsoe I Did what you meant to cut me off and they go and they kind of go. Ah, you said that and then you just kept on talking and they go oh shit I go I Go don't feel bad about it I'm just bringing this to your awareness you can cut I cut people off all the time but I don't tell people I don't. 27:09.95 Max Shank Right? You know. 27:20.71 Max Shank Um, right. 27:23.95 mikebledsoe Started off by saying don't mean to cut you off cause like it's bullshit. 27:28.76 Max Shank I'm not sexist but ladies are way better at cooking. 27:33.39 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, so so I start thinking about the thoughts of culture. Ah you know in the last year and a half it's been very. It's been on loudspeaker on social media. The the memes that the Instagram memes are are somewhat like those are cultural memes as well. 27:39.53 Max Shank Ah. 27:50.33 Max Shank No doubt. 27:51.74 mikebledsoe Ah, and I think that if we when we go down to the core of culture. We actually do find law and those are the words that are laid out. They're not. It's not really law I Hate calling it law. It's it's policy So a group of people got together. 28:08.29 Max Shank Crime and punishment. 28:11.37 mikebledsoe Yeah, the kind of punishment conversation. You're having they they create a policy and you know they argue about which words we should use and what order and and we put them on this piece of paper and then and then we'll convince these policy enforcers that will tell you that they're here to protect and serve. But. 28:19.89 Max Shank Her. 28:31.28 mikebledsoe Really their job is to enforce policy and what you end up with is people don't really I don't think they actually recognize how important how our law is the foundation of culture and. 28:46.63 Max Shank Ah, it's weaponized language. 28:50.92 mikebledsoe Exactly I like that it's policy slash Weaponized language. 28:55.62 Max Shank I Mean there's nothing.. There's nothing more ah like sneaky and coercive than drumming up these ah rules with punishments attached. In a language that the average person can't understand and when you think about how people have tried to control each other it really did go from the stick to the pen. You know the big guy with a big stick was like ah so like suppose I'm. Like a 200 and fifty pound monster with a club and you're just whatever your size is what are you like 1 sixty or something. Okay, so so suppose I'm like a yeah suppose I'm like a viking monster and I'm like hey there Mike ah I was just thinking I would I would take your house and your wife. 29:38.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, 5 8 1 sixty not a big guy. 29:51.87 Max Shank And ah and if you're not cool with that I'll I'll hit you with this stick until you're dead and for a long time that was how it worked basically. But then 1 day you were very clever and you were like hey hey hey whoa you don't want to do that because then you'll burn in hell forever. 29:58.25 mikebledsoe E. 30:10.38 Max Shank I Mean you've heard about fire right? It's really hot burns it hurts and plus if you if you don't kill and murder then you go to heaven which is the it's the best I mean what? what do you like. 30:13.90 mikebledsoe Ah, well this is this is what the catholic. 30:21.27 mikebledsoe Well, this is how the Catholic church got a hold of the Knights The Knights were an unruly crew. So the. 30:28.66 Max Shank I mean you would be too if you had ultimate power to stick somebody anytime. 30:33.10 mikebledsoe Yeah, they the Knights ah a knight on a horse with armor could take out a Hundred peasants with ease. Ah and there's um, there's a. 30:44.23 Max Shank A Hundred I think if those Hundred peasants had stick hundreds a lot I don't think so. 30:54.54 mikebledsoe There's ah I was surprised by the statistics I was reading in That's to say he's on a horse a Knight a knight on a horse with let's say like a broadsw sword or something like that like most peasants aren't gonna touch him. He's gonna. 30:57.50 Max Shank Maybe it feeds on a horse. 31:05.90 Max Shank Ah. Most will run away. That's true. That's what happened with the the I think it was the Incas or something. It's a big It's a big difference I was talking about this at a party. Yeah. 31:11.35 mikebledsoe Run right through him anyways, even if we say 25 whatever to huge difference so difference between like ah having a gun and a tank. 31:28.28 Max Shank I Mean the difference between stick and no stick is actually pretty huge already. So it's just an arms race. But then we have this now instead of the rules of engagement of physical battle. It's the rules of engagement of stories and that's how we got to cooperate in. 31:43.60 mikebledsoe Yeah, look yeah and and going back to what you're saying is the well what I was saying is the ah you come about making up a story of you're going to burn in hell. 31:47.00 Max Shank In such big groups. We believe in the same tree spirit or something like that. 31:58.60 Max Shank Right. 32:00.49 mikebledsoe Which is basically what the catholic church did the catholic church came to the Knights and said hey you guys are doing a lot of raping and pillaging we got to get us under control so they created what's it called ah chivalry. 32:06.00 Max Shank Right. 32:16.50 Max Shank So so. 32:18.51 mikebledsoe They created Chivalry so Chivalry Chivalry is a narrative like oh you want to be a chivalrous Knight because if you're chivalrous then you'll get the reward that you're looking for well being ah having Chivalry is the modern day citizen. 32:21.79 Max Shank Ah. 32:29.78 Max Shank It's like ethics right? we were talking about a few podcasts ago. 32:36.86 Max Shank Um, ah. 32:38.48 mikebledsoe So being a chivalrous knight is the same thing as being a good citizen today. Oh aka good slave and so the yeah, an obedient slave. 32:42.37 Max Shank A good citizen right? right? obedient I Think yeah yeah. 32:54.98 Max Shank I Mean you don't want a disobedient slave that like totally defeats the purpose if you can't see the value of owning a slave then you're just kidding yourself I mean I can totally understand everyone has tried to enslave not everybody. But. 32:59.62 mikebledsoe Yeah, it makes they're difficult hard to. 33:14.68 Max Shank Ah, so many so much slavery in the history of mankind. It's like hey do I want to do this work or do I want to sit on a horse with a whip while this other guy does the work I get it I get it. 33:24.45 mikebledsoe Yeah, if you look at Western Society We have the least amount of slavery where I'd say we have the least where we're sitting in the in a world of like the least harsh slavery in all of human history. 33:36.25 Max Shank And probably best for women's rights ever I mean you know about the bros before hose amendments. That's what I That's just what I call them So it's easy to remember we gave. 33:43.55 mikebledsoe Now. 33:53.30 Max Shank We're really losing her female audience right now. Ah we gave ah black guys. The ability to vote before women before white women and I just I just find that pretty funny because just before that black people were enslaved here. 33:59.86 mikebledsoe Oh that's right. 34:11.90 Max Shank But women were not enslaved but we just fast-track dudes to like yeah you can you could call the shots with a not you ladies though, you ladies no no and so you think about how that has accelerated so much and then in other parts of the world like I don't know. 34:11.48 mikebledsoe E. 34:30.17 Max Shank The middle East For example, it's very clear pecking order right of who's in charge. But I think there have been some costs of that like for example, like ah in the. 34:33.27 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 34:48.32 Max Shank Normal hollywood stories. Let's say the simpsons you know Homer simpson is an oaf married with children al Bundy is an oaf. So I think 1 of the things that is quite harmful and a little bit insidious is this. Male weakness where he's like always trying to like get sex with the lady and he's a dumb guy and he's like I mean even at the highest level we do this weird thing where presidents will be like oh well I got to check with the wife first to see if it's okay and you're like whoa this is like. What is going on here like this weak. Ah male figure is probably pretty destructive to the hearts and minds of our culture. 35:39.22 mikebledsoe Yeah I ah um, will get away from such touchy subjects for a secondc I'll make it maybe a little more palatable here. Ah yeah, 1 of the. 35:51.94 Max Shank I Think that's what you're here for. 35:57.96 mikebledsoe But we ah if we want to look at the power of narrative if we look at tv shows we look at ah what happens in Tvs and movies who's always the oaf it like that. It's the personal trainer if you're the personal trainer. The coach you're you're dumb. He's a dumb meathead. 36:14.92 Max Shank I am. 36:17.52 mikebledsoe But then they make entire television series about these Genius doctors that are saving. People's lives in the Er emergency room but and so and on what the narrative is personal trainers are dumb miaheads and on the other end is these doctors are are complete geniuses. 36:26.31 Max Shank Um, ah but. 36:37.29 mikebledsoe And so we have an entire culture that doesn't want to listen to people who are telling them how to be healthy but will do anything somebody Lab coat will have on and it's really how it's been played out. That's the narrative but the yeah and. 36:49.51 Max Shank Um, that's the appeal to authority that's that's 1 of the 2 main fallacies that we make appeal to authority and ad hominem attack and that goes right back into our language conversation because those are the 2 main things you see. 37:00.49 mikebledsoe Well well couldn't the narrative be couldn't the narrative be that people who are say health coaches are fucking geniuses and they have the authority and you should listen to them because they know better. And medical doctors are are there just in case, you don't listen to the Health Guys. You know, just in case you were you were making poor decisions Now you got to go see this guy. You dumb Ass. So what? Ah what would it take for that that narrative to be painted. 37:30.60 Max Shank Well. 37:36.83 mikebledsoe And I mean I think we go back to law right? There are laws regulating Medicine way much more heavily than they are the health industry. So I see that I see the health and well there's ah, there's a way. Ah, okay, let's get into semantics here right? until we have yeah. 37:44.72 Max Shank Oh yeah. 37:54.79 Max Shank That's all we've been doing. 37:56.47 mikebledsoe The Healthcare care industry right? people talk about Healthcare industry and then you know people go? Oh it's not the Healthcare care industry. It's the sick care industry and which is more accurate. Um, and people don't want to hear that they they like oh that's true, but they don't really dig into it. 38:06.35 Max Shank No. 38:16.50 mikebledsoe But ah, the way I've been thinking about more lately is we have a medical system and then we have a health system where we have a health industry and then we have a medical industry and the medical industry is not the health industry and the health industry is not the medical industry and the medical industry is getting all the attention it gets. People are listening to medical doctors are listening to all this but the the health industry has got if anything ah a more diminished voice ah over the yet last year and a half people like people who are more health oriented and preventative like. 38:36.26 Max Shank And. 38:55.50 mikebledsoe Mercola or rob wolf or abel james all these I I have many personal friends who have been censored and ah, what's it called shadow band. 39:09.42 Max Shank We could do. We could do a whole show on censure censorship I think it's always bad though I think that is such a slippery slope because as Thomas Soul rightly Puts its. Not about what will we do? It's who will decide what we do so who gets to be the arbiter of what is true and what is not true and just from ah an uncommon sense standpoint What is the gain. 39:35.60 mikebledsoe Yeah. 39:49.11 Max Shank From silencing people why why would that happen in the first place 39:56.73 mikebledsoe You don't want competing narratives. 39:59.83 Max Shank Yeah, you have to protect your authority right? because the reality is people are very uncomfortable taking responsibility for their own lives. We've been taught from a young age. Let's put that responsibility on someone else, but. Where goes the responsibility also goes the power. So the reality is in America most most death maybe like 80 percent is self-caused by ah by a variety of things and that's a really high number. People commit suicide directly way more than they murder each other which I think shows how kind we ah really are at heart we would rather kill ourselves way higher. Yeah, it's like four x yeah, it's like. 40:46.30 mikebledsoe We have a higher suicide rate than a murder rate is that what you're saying um I'm not familiar with these stats I'm not familiar with murder rates. 40:57.50 Max Shank Yeah, it's not high. It's really low like we barely murder people at all relative to how much we kill ourselves directly with like a toaster in the bathtub or a bottle bottle of pills. 41:05.10 mikebledsoe Yeah I think we've lost more more soldiers in the united states more soldiers to suicide than than battle in the last twenty years 41:14.74 Max Shank Yeah war seems really really tough and then so I have to add on to that statistic people would be like wait 80 percent of people get self-destruct yeah because if you sit on a couch for. 40 years and eat tons of cheetos or whatever your snack of choice is and you become very very fat like you're responsible for when you get diabetes didn't kill you you killed yourself and diabetes was just the way that you ultimately died. So. Most people kill themselves with their choices and there's a distinction I want to make and it's between fault and responsibility because I think if you see a fat kid. That's the parent's fault for sure. But if that. Fat kid grows up to be a fat adult then it's still their responsibility to decide whether or not they want to get healthy so it may not be their fault that they were set up in that situation I mean a lot of people have challenges or opportunities and. 42:17.85 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 42:29.61 Max Shank Think it's going to be tougher. No question but you still have to accept that responsibility and once you realize that most people kill themselves quickly or slowly you start feeling that responsibility once again. For your own life and I think that's extremely valuable in terms of how how you live. 42:54.41 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the fault and responsibility distinctions. Great. That's something um you know at our previous Conversation. We talked about collapse distinction and what you're saying there is people that there what I What we've seen is a collapse distinction around fault and responsibility. And ah, it's a common phrase I've used in coaching which is and may not be your fault but it is your responsibility and I think's I think it's good for people to hear that because fault comes with a lot of times associated with guilt. 43:21.50 Max Shank Great. 43:32.70 mikebledsoe Um, it's my fault now I feel guilty about it when someone stuck gets stuck in and dwells in guilt. They usually have a hard time making the change necessary because now they start now when guilt arises a lot of the behavior that comes out of guilt is punishing 1 ne's self and. 43:49.21 Max Shank You know for 1 43:50.97 mikebledsoe You're going to punish yourself by either making it worse or not changing so you have to get to a place of like looking at fault even if it is your fault is getting to a place of of forgiveness and then that way you can move into being responsibility and I think about responsibility as. Simply the ability to Respond. Do you have the ability to respond yes or no, okay, well then you're responsible now you can choose whether you're going to respond or not, that's that's up to you but again, we're back at choice and so I I think what you said was really important for people to hear is. 44:15.22 Max Shank Great. 44:27.97 mikebledsoe Fault and responsibility because when we look at if I look at Politics. For instance, there's a lot of people. What what? you'll hear them say is when something goes wrong. They we need to figure out who's responsible but they don't actually go look for responsibility. Because they would all have to look at themselves what they do is they they start looking at who to blame? Yeah, so it's like now they're looking at whose fault it is and who they can blame so they can they can ah externalize the shame and guilt so that they can then. 44:49.44 Max Shank The whipping Boy. Right. 45:04.66 mikebledsoe Keep doing whatever the fuck they wanted to do in the first place and while making the public at large you know angry at somebody and manipulating them. So so it's yeah. 45:11.69 Max Shank Doesn't work. It doesn't work once you once you blame,, There's no end to the blaming. That's it. It's 2 Thousand year old book says that we it's It's not that we don't have access to the information. It's that. We let our ego get in the way we want to find retribution. We want to put the responsibility onto somebody else. We want to get ourselves as far away from the bad thing as possible because we want to think of ourselves as good and. That's also the primary barrier to change is we get so attached to the story that we've built up for ourselves I'm good because X Y Z or even I'm bad because X y Z people tend to hang onto them just as tightly which is so. 46:00.42 mikebledsoe E. 46:05.39 Max Shank Fricking Weird right? You are stuck in this story of you and you are trying to get as much permanence as possible. That's what people mostly chase is they want permanence.. That's why um. When we're Dead. We Want little condos for ourselves. Still we want We want to like sit in a graveyard. We're like I'm still here I'm still here hey story of me still here not going anywhere I will last as long as this funny shaped rock and it's a crazy thing that we do So Everything comes back To. Story Story Story. The mass behaviors are story driven everything that we do professionally is often just to find Love. That's what's so funny if I show. That I can protect which in our era now is a house car and a retirement fund and you know you go up a boat a plane an island. 47:12.49 mikebledsoe I'll tell you this yeah, that's accurate and when ah when ah dating my my girlfriend. Ah when she first saw me with with firearms and she saw how good I was with them. She was like oh my god I'm um. Just so turned on right now and I yeah, ah okay I was just I'll just trying to show you how to shoot. But. 47:37.18 Max Shank That's very natural desires to be feel protected and I think that would you say that's the primary reason that ladies go for a wealthier. Dude It's for protection. It's for safety. 47:48.89 mikebledsoe Yeah, well, there's there's but there's protection and then there's provision as well as so ah and they go hand in hand First you got to protect? Yeah, but well. 47:51.36 Max Shank You know that's the that's the bottom of Maslow's hierarchy 48:01.18 Max Shank We don't want to collapse distinction. Those. 48:07.63 mikebledsoe You protect first and then provide second you know yeah, all that all that comes down to safety. Yeah. 48:08.74 Max Shank Um, well we could just call it safety Can you keep me can you keep me safe. Can you keep me safe and well you know the more simple language we can use in this particular case the better it is and. 48:23.90 mikebledsoe Well, there's ah I've also ah gone on the other side of that which is looking at not so much about ah a lot of the safety he has to do with what we want to avoid but also ah how you were how you experienced love as a child. So some people. 48:38.75 Max Shank Ah. 48:41.48 mikebledsoe Especially the the experience with their father whether you're a man or a woman your experience of your father. What was his how did you experience him? What was your fondest memories of him right? So ah for me. Ah I first. 48:52.28 Max Shank Here. 48:59.50 mikebledsoe Remember my my father as as a teacher whereas I noticed some people they saw their father as a provider or a protector and so that's how they show up in relationship so they'll show up because that's how they experience love so on the safety side that's well, it's about avoiding things but on the love side. 49:00.78 Max Shank Earth. And. 49:18.89 mikebledsoe About what we want to move towards and so if you can create safety then the next thing we we look at is well how did you experience your father and ah, how did you experience love from. How did you know that your father loved you like I know that my father loved me because of the way because he taught me and here I am I become. My primary role in my my work is to be a teacher and that's that's my way of showing love and so I also recognize the women that I date tend to be teachers in some way or or they lead in some way instead of I don't care if they make a lot of money because I Never really saw my dad as like. 49:40.16 Max Shank Earth. 49:56.88 mikebledsoe The primary role in him his life wasn't to provide for me but I'm not a lady in a lot of women I talked to that's how they experienced their dad as oh they provided me protected me all that and so that's what they look for. 49:58.77 Max Shank But you're also not a lady. 50:09.10 Max Shank Right? That makes a lot of sense I think we should call our podcast traps and treasures I really do I thought about it a lot I think that's the best 1 we have and it describes look. The reality is. 50:20.47 mikebledsoe I Think it is too. 50:27.90 Max Shank The average person could never listen to another podcast again and live totally well like that's what's so ironic about this experience for me is a lot of the time I feel like people just need to stop taking in so much input just just sit there. Quiet. With a piece of paper and think about what you really want like what is what is treasure mean to you? What does trap mean to you and that's what's so interesting about nurturing is we're implanting watch out for this look out for these. You're going to like these These are really bad. 50:50.69 mikebledsoe Yeah. 51:05.20 Max Shank And as I've said before for Gorillas it's so simple because they're like don't eat this green plant do eat this green plant and it's just do this Don't do this do this don't do this so that's what learning that's how learning can let you skip the line a little bit. Otherwise you have to experience every pain and fire Firsthand. That's the the big advantage of learning secondhand hey if you touch the fire you'll burn your hand now you can believe me. You can burn yourself on the fire and learn for yourself and I think we would agree that you do learn better through Firsthand experience but some things you don't want to risk you don't want to risk it for that traps and treasures. 51:55.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, we now have the name the show traps and treasures now that's right, it's not it's not mike and Max or does a Maxim mike which 1 of us was first. Um. 52:02.31 Max Shank With max and mike with Max and mike by the way I will um I I quit I quit unless my name is first. 52:14.70 mikebledsoe Ah, um that's okay that's okay um I actually don't care that much I I care like I care like 1 percent. Yeah I like 1 percent. Maybe yeah. 52:24.81 Max Shank He cares? he he cares. He just wants to look cool. He cares. 52:33.78 mikebledsoe If I if if you didn't care at all my name First you care if you care 2 percent like I fucking give it to them. Um, so we got to subtitle this there's got to be like what's our. What's our mission statement here. 52:34.28 Max Shank Um. 52:49.47 mikebledsoe Is for traps and treasures. Yeah, who's the audience. What are we helping them with. 52:49.79 Max Shank For for traps and treasures. 53:01.96 Max Shank I mean maybe we can think about this a little bit before we just kill our airtime today. Yeah, let's do some more long awkward pauses I like it. 53:06.29 mikebledsoe Um, it's the best way to end the show and the show with that. We're gonna do some ah research on this if anyone has any suggestions fire him over. So um, yeah in it. 53:20.83 Max Shank That's ah I was thinking that you know there are there are traps and treasures within and without we can go into what to look out for. In a business partner or a romantic partner and we can also look out for what kind of thought patterns that we engage in and how we communicate with ourselves and how we I always talk about framing the experience. How you frame the experience. So for example, it's pretty windy and cloudy today in Southern california but I like it and I appreciate a sound such like a hippie but basically I really appreciate the the difference I like to see the. The wind blowing the leaves around and it looks very textured and cool and it's it's a nice change of pace and then the other experience the other frame of that experience is oh it's it's cold and I I hate this cold weather and it's so windy today and I think. The way that we frame our experience with language is really the only way to be happy ultimately because happiness is sort of like a fleeting feeling and it just depends on what you compare it to probably a better. Goal would be to remove as many of the ego barriers as possible and just flow with the natural rhythms of nature which is what we talked about last week so I think the traps and treasures within and without are. Totally framed by language so it can be languages like a knife you can stab yourself with it or you can perform surgery and save life. 55:30.23 mikebledsoe Beautiful. 55:31.69 Max Shank Language is also the ultimate leverage tool of human beings more than anything by far because it's allowed us to transcend space and time with our ideas and build upon them progressively. So if you want to learn how to use the best. Leverage tool we've ever come up with that's probably a good return on investment for your time. I mean if you just practiced your ability to communicate really practiced for like 2 hours a day within a year you'd be in the top five percent. So no matter what your personal interests were. You could be successful at them. I mean that's how that's how powerful it is I mean you don't need to do anything else you you can have the little phrase you can tell or be told. 56:15.32 mikebledsoe You'd probably be in the top 1 percent. 56:29.46 Max Shank And if you want to dig a hole That's great, but wouldn't you rather come up with a good plan and tell someone else where to dig the hole. But either way you got to tell or be told that's language. 56:35.15 mikebledsoe Um, but you know the highest paid highest paid positions in the world would be salespeople and ceos job. 56:47.10 Max Shank Because they can move people. 56:50.49 mikebledsoe Yeah, and well the job as Ceo is to communicate a vision that enrolls people into gets them excited to do a thing to create the future which he made up with his words or she and then the same with a salesperson I mean sales is just a conversation. 57:00.93 Max Shank Ah. I Love that in a lot of companies. The person who sells the most gets more than the Ceo because that a lot because that is the most important thing and once you realize that that interaction. 57:12.47 mikebledsoe That happens a lot. 57:24.87 Max Shank With the customer I mean you and I have some experience in salesmanship and marketing and what's correct I bet you do ah the the value of being able to. 57:31.76 mikebledsoe I Crush sales now. It's so much fun. 57:44.15 Max Shank Put together a message that converts that you can leverage is crazy because it's not something that everybody can do ah language everybody most powerful tool We have. 57:52.77 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's rare. Yeah yep, or we'll call it there call it there make sure to go to Maankank Dot com. 58:02.24 Max Shank Available to us. Call it there I like it. 58:12.37 mikebledsoe And Max shank and all the other platforms. 58:15.74 Max Shank Make sure you check out mike underscore blood. So on Instagram thank you for joining us for traps and treasures with max and mike. 58:20.54 mikebledsoe I Sure that's me. 58:30.45 mikebledsoe Um, later.

The Wealth Standard – Empowering Individual Financial Independence

Is it possible to physically master wealth? For the first part of the Physically Mastering Wealth Series, Patrick Donohoe discusses why understanding how habits are formed and how behavior is conditioned helps in creating more wealth. It's all about figuring out what works best and leveraging your resources to produce optimal results. And then doing it again and again. Want to learn more? Tune in for more insight on how you can make creating wealth a habit!   Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Join The Wealth Standard community today:

Built By Vitality
Dealing With Injuries Mentally And Physically - (Episode 61)

Built By Vitality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 37:59


ALFC Podcast
How to Heal Physically Pt 5 | Pastor Diego Mesa

ALFC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 44:12


Welcome to ALFC Podcast! We are so excited for what God has in store for you through today's message.If you are NEW here please click this

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW
THE DAILY DROP. EPISODE # 152. Strategy, tactics and implementation. An examination of our exclusive infographic - FEEDBACK. What are the correct medical biometrics to track in order to become classified as physically healthy?

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 16:11


In the New Science of Physical Health, the goal is simple - how do we bring two groups together. Those people that are completely disengages with their personal physical health status, and those that are already in love with improving their personal physical health status? The first group is the overwhelming majority. It's up to the second group to help inspire all of those who have not yet lowered their risk of disease so they can feel amazing.Today's episode is all about one of the critical diagrams in our feedback module from the health lab. In today's episode I also talk about a 26 year old host of the Ultimate Global Podcast. https://linktr.ee/ultimateglobalpodcastTo access our brand new book and a special offer for to access The Experts Health Blueprint : click this link.https://expert62e801.clickfunnels.com/new-home-page1632958755227To access the six courses please click this link.https://newscience.podia.com/the-experts-health-blueprint-full-course

Liberate and Lather: A Journey to Self Care
Keeping The Well Full Mentally and Physically

Liberate and Lather: A Journey to Self Care

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 36:21


Her name is Jennifer Ellis Jackson. She trains beauty professionals and small business owners on how to market their businesses online so they can grow their brands, generate more leads and make more money. One thing that drives her is what motivates people to become passionate about a certain thing and what is required to become and remain successful in life. Connect with Jennifer on Instagram: @simplemantramktg Facebook: @jennifer.ellis1 Website: http://simplemantramarketing.com/

She Handled It! with Arwen Becker
050: The Love of God is Everything with Arwen Becker

She Handled It! with Arwen Becker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:28


Just when she thought that 2021 had presented enough challenges to deal with, Arwen's left arm started going numb. In addition to finding out that both of her parents were diagnosed with cancer, and supporting them as best she could, now Arwen needed medical attention as well. After several hours of testing, the E.R. doctors thought Arwen had a blood clot or was potentially suffering from a heart attack before discovering that she had developed a rare condition called Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. And if that wasn't enough, shortly after receiving this diagnosis, her entire household tested positive for COVID-19. Physically and mentally exhausted, she curled up, bawled her eyes out, and asked, “God, how much more can I handle?” And as you'd imagine, the answer was she can handle all of it. In this episode, Arwen explains how “she handled it” and why she's decided to take a pause from the podcast, how her faith carried her forward in a very challenging year, and the beauty of letting go of expectations to become the person she's truly excited to be. Overcomer Playlist Recommendation Hillsong Worship - Seasons   Pearls of Wisdom Let go of the expectation of perfection. In moments of crisis when everything is stripped away, we can discover our higher power. The power of getting out of your comfort zone and understanding the love that God has for you. Renew and reignite your passion and your faith in God. Start walking in it and draw people into it with you. Show Notes To get access to the full show notes, including links to all the resources mentioned, visit LifeWithArwen.com/50 Get The Book! She Handled It, So Can You!: An Inspiring and Empowering Financial Guide for Women Connect with Arwen Becker Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter Rate & Review If you enjoyed today's episode of She Handled It, hit the subscribe button in Apple Podcasts, (or wherever you listen) so future episodes are automatically downloaded directly to your device. You can also help by providing an honest rating & review over on Apple Podcasts. Reviews go a long way in helping us build awareness so that we can impact even more people. THANK YOU!

Stiff Crowd with The Boner Sisters
106 - Not Like Physically, Internetly

Stiff Crowd with The Boner Sisters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 21:20


The Boner Sisters cover the disappearance of Hang Lee. Blog - www.stiffcrowdsisters.com Twitter - https://bit.ly/2XeQR92 Facebook - https://bit.ly/2VSIEpz 

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
Donna Duncan - reimagining long-term care, building community, and combatting ageism

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 33:03


Episode #28 - Erin Davis & Lloyd Hetherington welcome the CEO for the Ontario Long-Term Care Association, Donna Duncan to the green bench.  A passionate conversation about what aged care is, building community, combatting ageism, and reimagining what long-term care can be in the future. Donna first experienced long-term care in the 1980s with her grandmother and then again with her father living with alzheimers in 1999.  She brings a personal view to what it is and what it can be as we look at some of today's challenges in front of us: Staffing challenges Older buildings Higher care needs "We dream of a day that it is okay to go into long-term care, where people aren't frightened, families don't feel guilty, staff take great pride, and they are physical living environments where people want to be." -Donna Duncan "Let's reimagine it (long-term care), let's rebuild it and rethink it with residents, families and staff. Anything is possible, especially if we work together." -Donna Duncan What is a home with dignity and what is a care environment? The pandemic has brought Mental Illness and Long-term Care to the forefront, two topics that Donna has a passion to work with. "Aging is visible and I think it's time we take pride in the aging process and that we don't isolate people as we age." -Donna Duncan "Honesty, integrity, genuine interest in people - we've got to bring these to the forefront and take the lead in sharing these concepts." -Lloyd Hetherington "There has to be so much more WE in this and less compartmentalizing in the whole demographic picture." -Erin Davis What does a community model look like for long-term care? "You are never too old to set a new goal or to dream a new dream." -C.S. Lewis   Have a listen to this podcast by OLTCA Coming of Age: Meeting the needs of our ageing population   The pandemic was driving many stories of darkness coming out of long-term care, rather than focussing on the people and their stories. The podcast anchors us in hope and broadens the conversation of what aged care is and what it can be.  Conversations with like minded individuals to build a movement. "Fear of dying is human, but fear of aging is cultural." -Ashton Applewhite "We are in it together. We have a message to get out and the more voices we can find, the better is it." -Lloyd Hetherington Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions  Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com  Learn more about co-host, Lloyd Hetherington  Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #42 Meg Gibbs "Makes Magic Happen"

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 36:28


Pulled from the Tools For A Good Life Summit interviews.  Meg Gibbs guides us through a heavy time.  Meg pulls strategies from Shamanism, ceremony, and sacred ceremony to give us her answers.  1) stop doing and slow down.   2) gratefully put your feet on the earth.  3) Ask for help.  And trust yourself.  Write down 20 things that you know.  End the day with gratitude.  And then there's nature :).Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: 0:00:00.1 Speaker 1: Welcome back, everybody, to the Tools For a Good Life Summit. And right now, I would like to introduce to you, Meg Gibbs. Welcome, Meg. Before I read your official bio, I just want to say that... You know what, I'm gonna start with your official bio and then I'm gonna shower platitudes on you. How about we do that?0:00:25.2 Meg Gibbs: Great, I love it. A compliment at the end, sounds good.0:00:28.8 Speaker 1: Okay, good, good, good, good. So Meg Gibbs is a shamanic spiritual guide and somatic coach who helps people heal their relationship with their body and spirit. She has over 20 years of experience, studying with indigenous teachers from the US and South America, specifically working with the Lakota medicine wheel, which I freaking love, and the Q'ero. Am I saying that right? Q'ero.0:00:58.6 Meg Gibbs: Q'ero.0:01:00.9 Mischa Z: Q'ero. And the Q'ero lineage from the Andes of Peru. Her work weaves together ancient wisdom, experiential coaching and leadership techniques, and is grounded in embodied practice... And is grounded in embodied practice and intuition. She holds space for her clients to uncover the truth of who they are and how they want to share that with the world. She offers sessions remotely, for scientific fingerprint analysis, customized coaching, sacred ceremony and soul-aligned branding, to meet her clients where they are, on their personal or entrepreneurial journey?0:01:39.7 Meg Gibbs: Absolutely.0:01:41.5 Mischa Z: Absolutely. Welcome, meg. So, serendipitously, I think our relationship speaks to a willingness to have an open mind and willingness to perhaps embrace and work with somebody that you might not normally go to. Yeah?0:02:01.8 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, absolutely, for sure.0:02:03.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. So we met through serendipitous events, perhaps five, six... Four, five, six years ago, somewhere in there, and sort of forced cohabitation almost, for a weekend. Yes. And then normally, I think, in the outside world or however you wanna say that, we wouldn't have had an opportunity to work together. But we did, and you have been such a massive, massive part of my personal journey and my transformation. And I just was writing down some of the amazing things that we did together, that you brought me on the journey of. You're like, "Hey, Misha, here's... Let's do this, let's do this." And so, I... Movement exercises, writing exercises, meditation exercises, these ridiculous visualization exercises. And when I say ridiculous, just like ridiculous in a magical way.0:03:06.3 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.0:03:09.7 Mischa Z: And then we did some really cool group stuff via Zoom, which I was pleasantly surprised with, where you had put together some... Almost an online class structure, and people from Canada jumped in, I was in there, we just did all this cool stuff and you've... Again, you bring the magic. Simple as that.0:03:35.9 Meg Gibbs: Thank you. Yeah, it's so fun to be able to support people in that way. And it's funny, because you can read my whole bio and we can talk about what I do, and here's the bullet points, but the truth is, if someone was like, 'Meg, what do you do?" and I was like, "Oh, I make magic happen." And I can't really say that when I shake somebody's hand, but I know that that's part of my truth and part of my gift, is to show up and hold space for magic to happen, for other people. That's the fun part for me. For sure.0:04:05.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, and as I was going down that list, I was literally getting chills, and my hair was standing up even more than... So powerful, so powerful. And again, it just speaks... I don't mean audience, thank you for indulging us, but to have that open mind and to try... If an opportunity falls in front of you like this now, take advantage because it can be transformational, and I think one of the great things you said about me, Meg, not to make this about me, I apologize. But I'm a gamer and willing to jump in the fray and try different things. So I would encourage anybody watching and listening, jump in the fray, take a risk, if somebody on this summit resonates with you, but they're outside of who you might normally think is in your wheelhouse, just go for it.0:05:02.7 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, absolutely. And I think that speaks to something that we'll talk about, which is for me, the connection to the body and really listening intuitively for what comes up for you. And so, when I think of when we met and how we've worked together, there's a sense of trust or expansion or listening, and that's the piece that when I tell people, "Oh, you're looking for a coach or a healer or whatever, a mechanic," it doesn't really matter. But if you can tune in and listen, "Oh, does that person feel good to me?" and it might not even, like you said, logically makes sense of like, "Oh, they're a different gender, or they have this woo specialty that I am not so sure about or whatever," but if it feels like, "Ooh, there's a little something there to play with," that's the piece that I encourage people to follow.0:05:50.6 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, I love that. Thank you. So, quickly, somatic. What's somatic coach? When you say it... When that's...0:06:02.8 Meg Gibbs: Yeah. Real simple. Somatic is just meaning, being in your body. So what I do is, I coach people around being in their body, and for me, being in your body is a sacred practice. So it's like building a muscle. We talk a lot about going to the gym and building physical muscle. And so, when you haven't had practice to be in your body, because our society doesn't teach that, you're not asked on a daily basis, "Mischa, how is your heart feeling in your body right now? What does it feel like?" You even named the goose bumps, noticing your physical sensation, noticing when emotions come up, because there's so much wisdom there, and 90% of our world is run from here up. That's it. So imagine, you have access to all of this other information and transformation, and that's what I feel like the body provides. So somatic coaching or somatic wisdom is just being in your body, checking in with your body, learning from your body, all of that is in there. So it's just a fancy word for it. But, yeah.0:07:08.0 Mischa Z: Okay. I love that. Thank you for that. That's a beautiful explanation. And as you were talking about it, literally, I was sensationally in the body, like...0:07:19.0 Meg Gibbs: Right. I could see it in your eyes too. [chuckle]0:07:22.0 Mischa Z: So I wanna talk to... Just quickly too, and maybe three-minute version, but this... You... And I love this about you. It's one of my favorite things about you, is just the fact that you didn't five years ago, decide, "I'm gonna go explore shamanic ideas or this or that," and then bring that to the world. You grew up in it, due to the nature of your family. So when you say 20 years, that means... Yeah, when you were a teen, when you were young, you were... Due to the nature of growing up within it, you're doing this practice. Yeah?0:07:58.2 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, absolutely, yeah. I'll give you the short version. So my mom started working with a Lakota teacher when I was young, and I started working with that teacher when I was 11. So I've been studying shamanic wisdom and lineages for over 20 years, since I was a kid, and I am a white woman, and I like to say that because it's important to know that this is a spiritual lineage for me, it's not a genetic lineage. And honoring that and honoring my teachers, and part of what I believe in, is giving money back to the people who created the space for me to do the work that I do. And with that, what happens for me is this balance of holding what is true, even if it doesn't match up with the outside. And what I mean by that is like, "Yes, I'm a young white person, and I also have this really deep soulful appreciation and carrying of this work inside of myself," and it's integrated into how I see the world and how I relate to people, the work that I do, how I show up, even when I go to the grocery store.0:09:11.1 Meg Gibbs: It's in me, in a way that is not just, "Oh, I took a workshop and now I'm a shaman." And we talked about this, but I don't actually call myself a shaman. Some other people call me that, but I say I'm a shamanic practitioner, and that I do energetic and emotional healing and support with people. But holding the two lineages that I hold spiritually, are the Lakota and then this Andean tradition from the mountains of Peru, and my teacher is Don Mariano. So I've been initiated into these teachings, and it's an extremely... Or it has been, in the past, an extremely private world. And so, growing up with this really disciplined spiritual approach made me, obviously, pretty different from the other kids in middle school, who were talking about sports, and I'm talking about talking to trees on the weekends.[laughter]0:10:06.2 Meg Gibbs: The short version is just that this is very much a part of who I am and how I show up, and it's important to me, that people are honoring the root of where this comes from as well.0:10:20.6 Mischa Z: Perfect, thank you. Beautiful. Well done, in three minutes too, the three-minute version.0:10:25.0 Meg Gibbs: Perfect.0:10:26.9 Mischa Z: And you were saying studying and I'm gonna add to that, implementing. So studying and implementing. So, beautiful. I think we get to it. I say we get to the question. What do you think?0:10:37.7 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, take me. Let's go.0:10:38.9 Meg Gibbs: Alright, fantastic. So I'm gonna lay out a scenario, and then I'm gonna askyou a question, and... If we think of life as that three-legged stool, relationships, finance, health, it's when two of those legs go out, that it really can get... Life can get lifey, if you want to say. And so, for me, my parents passed away in rapid succession, divorce, further failed relationships. Physically, I was fine. I would tell you that. I looked physically fit. I had no stressors going on, physically, but that... For other people, that might...0:11:31.5 Mischa Z: Anyway, you get what I'm saying. But the fact of the matter was, things got so heavy that my normal tools for working through emotional upheaval or through stressful times weren't enough, so I couldn't success my way through it, or work at it, work harder, fix it. So that being the case, and... Oh, here, I'm gonna get back to script. That helps me. I'm gonna get back on script. So to top it off, the pull yourself up from your bootstraps, fix it and push your way through it methods that served me so well, were no longer working. I needed new tools.0:12:15.8 Mischa Z: By the grace of God, I had an open mind for new tools. Hence, Meg dropped into my life. This is my question to you. Thinking of shamanism, ceremony, sacred ceremony, what are the exact next steps you would offer this person, so they know they are headed in the new right direction, that they will have positive momentum towards getting their life back on track?0:12:43.1 Meg Gibbs: Yeah. So the first thing honestly, is take a breath, [chuckle] acknowledging where you are, checking in, noticing what it's like to be you in this moment, is a really powerful tool, and almost zooming out and looking at yourself with love. So I say that because so often, when we're in that space of life crumbling or struggling or whatever, especially if you're holding on from the inside, like if you are someone who is still high achieving and making money and doing the thing, so people don't think there's anything wrong, you're holding a lot, there's a lot of that hamster wheel going on. And so, that breath and that acknowledgement to even just go, "I'm having a hard time right now. Wow. What is it like to meet myself with some compassion?"0:13:42.9 Meg Gibbs: So I think, so often, we launch into action and action steps, and, "How do I do x, y, z?" And here's the thing, you can read books, you can listen to podcasts, you can go to therapy, there's like... Here's 29 things you can do it. But the other side of it is, how you be, how you be in yourself, how you be in the world, how you show up for people, how you need people to show up for you.0:14:11.1 Meg Gibbs: So this is just general sort of life advice, container energy stuff. So to answer your question more specifically around the shamanic piece or around ritual, I like to really use small intuitive rituals. And what I mean by that is, I'm gonna show you. So I brought some tea to our call, I don't know if you can read this.0:14:34.4 Mischa Z: Yeah. Sending you a socially distanced hug in a mug. Nice.0:14:38.5 Meg Gibbs: I love this. It's a happy mug. And so, what I really like to do that's simple is, in the morning or when you have your tea or your coffee or whatever, and you can do this with me if you have some water with you, whatever you're drinking, and so you're just gonna place your hand over it, and we're gonna check in and just for a moment, you can close your eyes, and put your intention from your heart, imagine it reaching out and meeting that cup and that heart space moving through your hand, down into the substance, down into the water, the tea, the coffee, whatever, and placing an intention in there for yourself. "I wanna be kinder to myself today. I wanna give myself space to breathe. I really need some support from the Earth. I wanna be more grounded. I tap into my strength," whatever that is for you. And then when you're ready, you open your eyes and you simply drink it in.0:15:44.8 Meg Gibbs: Small small things.0:15:46.9 Mischa Z: Small, small things. So juicy. That was good.0:15:52.6 Meg Gibbs: Yeah. And there's one that... I don't know about you, I kinda listen to things and then adapt them. And so, I heard years ago, Oprah said something about, "Before your feet hit the floor in the morning, say thank you." And she said, "Say thank you three or four times." And I remember being like, "Oh, I like that. That's catchy. Let me think about it." And so, as a self-identified not-morning person, when things are kind of blowing up in your life, when there's a lot going on, I think one of the most powerful things to do, is to put your feet on the Earth, literally. And if you can, go out your door in the morning, before you talk to anybody... This is like, yes, if you have kids or a spouse or somebody who is with you or your dog or whatever it is, sometimes we talk to people first, which is understandable, but when I can, I will intentionally take myself outside, take my shoes off and put them on the Earth, so that there is an ignited connection. So these small moments, that's what I wanna focus on today, is how you can breathe into the support within and around you. I just felt myself, show up, here we are.0:17:16.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, me too. Yeah, that's good. I love it. Continue.0:17:23.8 Meg Gibbs: Yeah. And so, with that gratitude... So when I say prayers, not everyone says prayers, and whatever you refer to, if you believe in a higher power or something bigger than us, that's how I like to talk about it, something bigger than you. And some of my friends believe that something bigger is our community, it doesn't have to be God or the universe or whatever. So I, because of my spiritual lineage, use the words great spirit, when I'm praying to something bigger than me. So when I'm out there and I put my hands and my feet on the Earth, part of what I'm doing is, I'm giving my energy down into the earth before I take. Because so much of what we do, when we're struggle bussing, is like, "I need support, I need help, I need," whatever, whether that's internal or you're voicing that externally. And so, being able to put your hands or your feet on the Earth for literally three seconds and just say, "I'm so grateful to be here today." And giving that energy down to the thing that gives us life. So, yeah.0:18:35.0 Mischa Z: Meg, that was beautiful.0:18:37.3 Meg Gibbs: Yeah. I've been thinking about it in the shower, what to say.[laughter]0:18:47.5 Mischa Z: So, when you... I love the gratitude, the give to the Earth before we take, or it gives back. Do you do the thank you, thank you, thank you, or that as well, sort of that... You were talking about the little Oprah trick or...0:19:03.4 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, so it sort of depends. This is part of my personal philosophy, is around designing things intuitively, that work for you, because I think some people really need specific practice, and I'm happy to say, "Do this thing, do that thing," but the truth is that, we can then get hung up on the indoctrination of how to do the right thing, instead of trusting yourself. And my goal in life is to help people trust themselves more, 'cause when you trust yourself, that's when you're able to make those split-second decisions, you grow a career you love, you relate to people differently, you connect with things in your world that feel like aligned and exciting.0:19:42.8 Meg Gibbs: So yes, you can get up and say thank you four times, if that's what feels good to you. But for me, for instance, when I pray and I say... The beginning of my prayers are always, "Aho, great spirit, I am grateful for my life and for this day," and that's how I start my prayers 'cause that's what was taught to me. But there are times where I can come in and just kind of feel into my body and feel into myself and say, "Great Spirit, I'm showing up the best I can today." We have to just listen to what's true.0:20:24.1 Mischa Z: You know what I love about just what you were saying too is... I like this, it's like... For me, I had this incredible confidence and was moving through the arc of life so powerfully, and then when the wheels came off, that confidence was shattered. So, to re... I like how you're talking about... It's like you use that as a tool to slowly start rebuilding some confidence. Yeah?0:20:56.0 Meg Gibbs: Yeah. Well, and I would say also, that true alignment of self, where we meet ourselves where we are, and that sounds like a little bit big, so let me see if I can put it a different way. Just to acknowledge what's happening, to be honest about what's happening, because when you say the wheels are coming off, we can intellectually understand that, but when it's like, "I'm having trouble eating because my appetite is gone because I'm so stressed. My relationships are falling apart because I feel lonely, and I'm not sure how to share that with someone. I am worried about interviewing for a new job, because now I feel like crap because this and this and this happened."0:21:41.6 Meg Gibbs: So it's like when you get into the truth of what's happening and honor that you continue to show up, that you're here, you're here at the summit, because you want to experience a new way to face these issues or solve things, and then understanding where you are right now. That's... For me, that's the path forward, 'cause if not, then you're going, "Oh, well, I should feel fine because I have money, and I have this, and I have this, and I have my health and I'm okay," instead of going, "Oh my God, my world. What am I doing?" 'Cause the moment you allow yourself to go, "Hey, I'm feeling lost and alone right now," and somebody else goes, "Oh my God, me too." That's that togetherness.0:22:28.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. Very cool. What other sort of tips and tricks and tools were you... So I love it. So we had... Step one was sort of acknowledge or however you said that, and then we had a next thing is like, go out, connect to the earth. I love that. Find that moment if you can, when appropriate. Preferably sooner, the better. And take your shoes off, connect to the ground, feet, hands, whatever, that little gratitude exercise and such, was what was next on your...0:23:13.2 Meg Gibbs: On my list. Yeah, so I also... I think, with intuition specifically, which is a big part of my work is helping people tap into what they know to be true, because often, when we go to someone, when we're asking advice or we hire a helping professional, I believe we actually do know the answer. It's in there and instead of piling on lots of people's information, being able to check in and see what is true for me in this moment, and what do I actually know. So one tool that I use when somebody is kind of confused or trying to understand a situation is, instead of saying, "Well, I'm facing this huge unknown and I'm really scared and I don't know where to go next," we tap into what do you know. In what do you know, you even feel that energy shift of, "Okay, I'm gonna name some things that I know out loud," which is hard for people, and you can do this writing, this is a great exercise writing, is to write down 20 things that you know.0:24:18.7 Meg Gibbs: And here's the thing, the reason that it's 20 is 'cause you'll get three to five that are pretty easy, where you're like, "I know I'm safe, I know I'm okay, I know I like sandwiches," whatever it is. But there's something that changes, when you get beyond your comfort zone of, "Oh, here's the initial thoughts," and then you start to go deeper. So this is like a self-coaching tool, where you can really listen, to see, "Oh my gosh, I know... Let me think of something in this moment. I know I do better when I connect with nature. And so, if that's one of my things and that's say, number 17 on the list, I might go, "Oh, after I finish this list, I'm gonna go outside." And the reason I keep bringing up nature, I should say, is because in the Native American spiritual practice and in the Peruvian practice, all of this is connected to earth, earth is mother, Mother Earth, it's called Pachamama is another word for it. And so, when I connect to the great mother, the sacred one who created us all, however you believe that, is that then I'm connecting to my essence self, I'm giving that space of my truth in relationship, in right relationship with where we came from. Does that make sense?0:25:43.9 Mischa Z: It does. Yeah. It does. Any way you would reframe that, just in case? I was viscerally internalizing that. So I... It was going in... That's why I say that. So I'm like, "Yeah, I get it," 'cause I viscerally felt it.0:26:09.6 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, yeah. So that question of, "Where do you feel most connected?" It might not be nature, it might be on the dance floor, it might be taking a walk, it might be staring deeply into somebody's eyes, there's all these different... Taking a bath, I love taking a bath, it's like a sacred ritual. And so, lighting candles, maybe putting something in the water, that feels good to me, and it's like we can do it with so many different things. Sensation is really helpful for being present. So smells, touch, taste, sound, any of that, to really get into the moment.0:26:46.2 Meg Gibbs: So when you're feeling anxious or you have this experience of, "Oh my God, my life is falling apart. What do I do?" If you can take that initial beat to connect to something, it helps you feel connected. And I know that sounds like, "Oh no, no... What does she mean?" But you feel it, you know when you feel connected. And I recorded a really short video that was seven seconds, the other day, that I put on Instagram, and I said... I was talking about connecting with the trees and nature, and I said in there, "If you don't have time or you don't have access to connect with the trees, watch my hand connect to the tree in the video, and tap into the energy that you feel, that's connecting between our human self and I would say our divine self." So I'm getting very "woo". Are you still with me?0:27:41.7 Mischa Z: I'm still with you. Thank you. Hang in there, everybody. Hang in there. No, I think it's an opportunity for us, to explore the "woo". Let's be real, sometimes a little "woo" in our lives can be good. For me, I think... I can get very contempt, prior to investigation, if you wanna say those types of terms, or very myopic in my... I'll speak for me. I'm sure everybody else watching, is always open-minded and...0:28:20.7 Meg Gibbs: Oh yeah, yeah, none of us... We don't have any hang-ups over here, clearly.0:28:23.6 Mischa Z: Yes. But it's alright. A little "woo" is good. Don't worry. There's plenty of non "woo" on this summit too. So we're bringing the balance right now.0:28:33.3 Meg Gibbs: Well, it's... For me at least, part of what I pride myself on is having grounded "woo", that's... Practical, grounded, engaged, spiritual spirituality. That's the part for me. And you know this about me, I'm not... No shade to anybody else, but I am not a crystal worshipping, connect with... That's not my vibe. I really do want people to be grounded in themselves, in their body, because that's the difference. When you meet people who are just in like, "I made a crystal grid so I could manifest millions of dollars." Great, sure. That might work. But the truth is that we have to meet both, our divine self and our human self.0:29:15.7 Meg Gibbs: And so, in here, for me, that's where the magic happens. That's like... When I say, when I work with people, "It's you, me and spirit. It's the three of us, connecting and co-creating." So I'm not here to have all the answers, and the truth is, I think the answers are within you from a divine perspective, that we can pull out that spark. So, that's the point that... If people tune out because they're not interested in this language, what I love is that every single teacher speaks to certain audiences and certain people, because there's a resonance. So, just notice if this resonates or not. It's not personal.0:30:00.1 Mischa Z: Yes, yes. Beautiful. Yeah, that's well said. Is there further? Did you have further... I wanna make sure we keep... Or...0:30:09.5 Meg Gibbs: Well, so your question around the, "Do I say Thank you four times." The one thing that I do that I enjoy, so I live by myself with my dog, currently. I have done this with partners in the past or with friends, is before bed, I do like to say three things that I'm grateful for, out loud, and I used to write them down, and I think writing is a beautiful way to express and hold that energy. But there's also something also delightful and silly to me, about telling my dog what I'm grateful for, from the day, and often, I say, "And I'm grateful for her health and her well-being." And so there's that sense of even if it's not another person, even if you're completely on your own, that you can witness yourself doing that, just by doing it out loud and honoring, "Here's three things I'm grateful for, before I rest tonight." So I like that, as a closing practice. So I've given you some beginning, end of the day and some stuff to do in the middle.0:31:07.8 Mischa Z: Yes, so good, I love it. I think that's a beautiful place to end this session. So, everybody, if this interview with Meg was fantastic, and you want to get even more content from Meg, upgrade to the all-access pass, because Meg and I are gonna be doing round two here, which is going to be fantastic. I can't wait to see what comes up. So yeah, be sure to upgrade to the all access pass for the bonus interview. There should be a button here somewhere, not sure where it is yet. Any final thoughts to share, that we did not get a chance to cover, Meg? .0:31:51.4 Meg Gibbs: Just the power of... What do I wanna say? That there's... For me... This is a little bit of an advanced concept I'm throwing in at the end, but I think it's important, is, for me, there are three layers of connection. There's the connection to our selves, the connection to others, the circle around us, the collective, and then the connection to what's bigger than us, the earth, spirit, etcetera.0:32:17.3 Meg Gibbs: So if you're here in the summit, I imagine that you're on a path, and that you're on a path seeking relationship and healing with yourself, with the people around you and/or with spirit. So that's my invitation, is just to start to notice and track what resonates with you, to find what expands and what contracts that connection. So what feels good, and just to notice, again, how it feels in your body. So that's my... Rooting for people. Yes. Yeah.0:32:47.8 Mischa Z: That was amazing. Everybody can find Meg, at www.Megibbs.com. Imgonna spell it too, just to make sure there's no confusion, M-E-G G-I-B-B-S dot com. So Megibbs.com. Click the button on the all access pass, to get unlimited access to all the interviews, to get access to Meg and I's round two, which is coming up, and then also, Meg so graciously, is going to be offering up, as a bonus for everybody who upgrades a session, that there'll be a link, so you can go deep with Meg, if you want to, for free. Meg, yeah. Thank you so much, Meg. We'll end there. Yeah?0:33:38.6 Meg Gibbs: Yeah, that sounds good. Thank you. Nice to meet you.

SuperFeast Podcast
#138 Nurturing All Phases of Birth with Nutritionist Tahlia Mynott

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 67:34


Holistic nutritionist and author Tahlia Mynott understands the importance of nourishing the mother through every phase of the birthing journey; So much so, that she has dedicated her career to it, along with women's health. In this very special Women's Series episode, Tahnee and Tahlia (both mothers) take us on a journey through the beautiful expanse that is motherhood. From the highs of postpartum oxytocin joy to the depths of menstrual healing and processing miscarriage (a topic that isn't talked about enough). In 2021 Tahlia self-published her first book, Nourishing Those Who Nurture, co-authored with doula and trauma-informed kinesiologist Caitlin Priday; The book is both a bible and an accessible guide for all women, regardless of their circumstances. The beautiful intention behind Nourishing Those Who Nurture is to take the overwhelm out of the postpartum rollercoaster through easy, nourishing, warming recipes (tailored to the needs of the postpartum mother) and preparation guidance for managing the massive shifts mother's traverse in their postpartum period. Tahlia and Tahnee dive deep into prenatal preparation, PCOS and menstrual cycle healing, the power of food as medicine, restoring the integrity of the pelvis after birth, postnatal care, and the emotional/physical complexities that come with experiencing a miscarriage. Tune in!   “I think it's important to be real that it does happen and that there's a spiritual aspect to miscarriage as well. You can be totally supported in what you've done, in terms of detoxing, nourishing, and it could still happen”.    - Tahlia Mynott     Host and Guest discuss: Healing PCOS. Dysmenorrhea. Preconception. Miscarriage and healing. The Postpartum phase. Restoring the pelvic floor. Seed Cycling for hormones. Healing the menstrual cycle. Phases of the menstrual cycle. The transition from maiden to mother. Supporting hormonal health through food.   Who is Tahlia Mynott? Tahlia is a Mother of two beautiful boys, Luca Mayar and Oka Sol. She birthed both of these beautiful beings into the world at her rainforest home at the base of Wollumbin. Tahlia is a clinical nutritionist specifically interested in women's health; however, she brings much more than nutrition information to her clinic. She conducts her work through her online clinic and workshops, online booklets, and podcasts with both her businesses Luna Holistic Nutrition and Living Hormoniously. In 2021, Tahlia released her first book, "Nourishing Those Who Nurture" - More than A Food Bible for New Mums.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: @livinghormoniously @lunaholisticnutrition @nourishingthosewhonurture www.lunaholisticnutrition.com Reishi for helping heal PCOS Schisandra for preconception Seed Cycling for hormone balance Nourishing Those Who Nurture Book Mothering From Your Center Book Brighton Baby book by Roy Dittmann Spirit Babies book by Walter Makichen Pregnancy Preparation with Tahnee (EP#14)     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast?   A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi, everybody. Welcome to the SuperFeast Podcast. I'm here today with Tahlia Mynott, and she's the mama of her two gorgeous boys, Luca and Oka, who were birthed up near our magical local mountain, Wollumbin. Tahlia's a clinical nutritionist and she has a special interest in women's health. She's bringing all of this work that she's done in clinic but also her work that she does workshops and offers a lot of support and coaching through her partnerships. You do some yoga stuff. You do a whole bunch of awesome things.   Tahnee: (00:32) Now she's an incredible author of this book, Nourishing Those Who Nurture, which I'm really happy to have beside me and I've just finished reading this week. We're going to talk a little bit about the book today and about Tahlia's journey toward health and wellbeing, so thanks for having us here. I'm saying that backwards. Thanks for being here.   Tahlia Mynott: (00:50) Thanks for having me. I know, that was a lot. I mean, my bio, there's a lot going on in my life at the moment. So when I hear it, I'm like, "Whoa, there's little bits and pieces everywhere."   Tahnee: (01:01) I always feel like that too. I'm like, "I've done a thousand things." But I really love you guys. You had your really beautiful business made with your love and you brought that sort of clinical nutrition aspect to crafting product. And now you're more supporting women, so I think there's this really beautiful journey you guys have been on and now being a mummer of two.   Tahnee: (01:22) Yeah. Tell us a little bit about how did you come to be a clinical nutritionist and how did you end up being where you are right now talking to me? How did we get here?   Tahlia Mynott: (01:30) Yeah. Cool. Love this. I actually, well, I say I was gifted or blessed. Because well, I chose, I guess, and they chose somewhat to be in a family that was quite health conscious. So growing up, particularly my mom, and that's because of a story that she's had with the medical system in her life. She had something happen there that was quite intense, so then she went down a more natural course herself.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:59) When she had me and my two sisters, she brought us up really natural. We had a lot of homoeopaths and naturopaths and all those awesome things that I'm so grateful that I was introduced to so early. I actually did my first liver cleanse, which is hilarious, in year 10.   Tahnee: (02:19) Oh, no.   Tahlia Mynott: (02:21) Which is so funny. At the time it didn't seem that big, but when I look back on it, I was like, "Wow, so I did my first liver cleanse in year 10." Probs didn't need it, but it was a thing we did as a family. That's, I guess, a little bit of background of my growing up. When I went to uni, it just made sense. I actually first started studying psychology and, oh gosh, I can't even remember the name of it. I think it was neuropsych, so a lot of brain stuff.   Tahlia Mynott: (02:50) But I just still had so much interest in health and nutrition, so I actually switched degrees and actually did a double degree in psychology and nutrition thinking that I was going to finish and work with eating disorders, which I did do a little bit of work with, but it definitely wasn't where I saw myself. It didn't fit. I went there, did a little bit of work there and it didn't quite fit. Actually, in relation to women's health, it wasn't until about six years ago. So I actually graduated in 2018, which seems like aeons ago now. No, 2008. Sorry, not 2018, 2008.   Tahlia Mynott: (03:33) It wasn't until roughly five or six years ago that I actually found the niche with women's health. The reason I found it is because I had suffered through my menstruating years a lot with dysmenorrhea, which is a really painful periods. And I also had amenorrhea for years, so that was absence of a cycle for... probably actually was more than a year. It was probably closer to 18 months. I was diagnosed with PCOS in my early 20s. And then around about the time that I really stepped into this work, I was going on my fertility journey. So I had started my preconception journey around that time, and I was just... I guess I wanted to heal parts of my menstrual cycle and then the things I was learning, I was just like, "Oh my gosh, how is this not taught to us? How as women do we not know these?"   Tahlia Mynott: (04:22) I remember being with my mum one day walking, and I was like, "Mum, did you know there was four phases to women's menstrual cycle?" She was like, "No, I had no idea." I'm like, "How? How are you a 50-year-old woman and you have no idea about this?" I was like, "Okay, this is it." I was just so passionate about it that I was like, "This is where I'm meant to be.   Tahlia Mynott: (04:46) Once I get passionate about something, I'm in. I'm all in. It was like podcasts, books, scientific literature, everything I could possibly read and get stuck into. It was my life. Yeah, I guess that's where I'm at today in many little facets, like you said. I do workshops with living harmoniously and also I do postpartum workshops with Esther, a friend of mind, but then I also have my clinic, which is Luna Holistic Nutrition. Now I have a postpartum book that I've co-authored, Nourishing Those Who Nurture. I mean, I guess there's a main section there, but there's all these little divots, which if I look back in my life, it's how my life has always been.   Tahnee: (05:33) Yeah. I think it's so funny, though, every time I talk to people, I see this tapestry of... You can see the dots that connect when you look back, but when you're in it, I mean, I know for me it's like, "I don't know where I'm going." Then you turn around and you're like, "Ah, that led to that, which led to that." You know?   Tahlia Mynott: (05:51) Totally.   Tahnee: (05:51) I think I just see that in your journey. You've had that background in health, but then you still had some things to work through. And so you've used that kind of catalyst to develop your own offerings. Yeah, it's really beautiful. Because coming full circle like you've had to, really healthy boys, and you've got this gorgeous book and you're working with all these women. It's just yeah, it's a really exciting time for you, I think.   Tahlia Mynott: (06:14) Yeah. Lots of birthings.   Tahnee: (06:17) Yeah. I feel like you spoke a little bit about preconception there and it's a question we get asked a lot at SuperFeast. I had my own journey with that, but I'm curious, for you, how long was that period of time and what did you really focus on in terms of your preconception? Was there sort of a practise or protocol you followed, or was it just a bit more intuitive? How did you navigate that?   Tahlia Mynott: (06:39) Yeah. I've actually listened to your... Was that one of your first podcasts that you did?   Tahnee: (06:43) I think it was my first ever podcast.   Tahlia Mynott: (06:45) Yeah. I loved that.   Tahnee: (06:46) The weak and worst into it.   Tahlia Mynott: (06:48) I actually think I've listened to that podcast twice. For those of you who haven't listened, if it's still up, it's amazing.   Tahnee: (06:55) We will link in the show notes.   Tahlia Mynott: (06:57) Yeah. I actually think I had quite a similar preconception journey to you and even the same book was gifted to me, so the Brighton Baby Method. I hope I've said that correctly. It's been a while since I've looked at it. I guess a little background. I was in my late 20s, early 30s, when I really decided that I wanted to have kids.   Tahlia Mynott: (07:22) Pre-that, I actually wasn't sure that I wanted to have children. I didn't know if it was going to be part of my journey. But my partner who I'm with now, we actually thought we were pregnant very early on in our relationship, and the pregnancy test came back saying negative. The feeling I had was like a disappointment was the initial first feeling that was like, "Okay, I actually want to have kids."   Tahlia Mynott: (07:50) I'd grown up really healthy, but I definitely had gone through my 20s with some partying, which was really fun at the time. But I knew there was a bit of detoxing to do. For me, the Brighton Baby Method was a beautiful book but a little bit overwhelming. It's quite in depth. So I guess I did gentle forms of that, I would say. It was around about 18 months, the whole preconception journey for me, 18 months to two years, roughly. I did a bit of gentle detoxing of the liver, a little bit of the kidneys, and then I did some focus on my colon as well and my gut health because they were places that were quite sensitive for me.   Tahlia Mynott: (08:38) Oh, and something that's really important, I definitely did some heavy metal detoxing. But I guess the biggest thing for me was actually learning how to chart my cycle and learning much more in depth about the phases of my cycle and how to support those phases in terms of nutrition and movement and emotionally and just knowing exactly when I ovulated each month and knowing how long my phases were and supporting my hormones through those phases was probably... Well, I mean, I guess every element was big, but that was probably the biggest element for me and really healing those parts of my menstrual cycle that I'd had issues with previously.   Tahlia Mynott: (09:21) I'd say I first got my first bleed when I was around about 15. I would say pretty much every bleed I had, so I never went on contraception because, thankfully, looking back, I actually turned into an absolute psycho when I was on it. I did try it, but mentally, it just didn't work for me so I actually didn't do it. I think every bleed I had up until I started healing was probably extremely painful. I had dysmenorrhea the whole way through. It would be really foreign to have a monthly bleed that didn't cause me pain.   Tahlia Mynott: (10:01) In terms of the pain, it was like I'd have to take a day off work, for sure. There would be sometimes I vomited, but that wasn't often. But definitely enough pain to just keep me bedridden. So I knew that there was something not quite aligned, but I hadn't really had the support from doctors and I guess the people that I was seeing. I actually worked really closely with an acupuncturist and that was definitely just working out my hormones and my gut health and all of those things that were, I guess, the root cause of that was really pivotal for me.   Tahnee: (10:38) I mean, in terms of did that resolve before you conceived or was it something...   Tahlia Mynott: (10:44) Yes, yeah. I think, gosh, it's a while now ago before my first conception. Because my first conception too, I actually did miscarry, so that was around about five years ago, I think. I think I roughly had pain-free cycles for one to two years, which was incredible for me because I had gone around 14, 15 years of quite debilitating pain.   Tahnee: (11:11) Yeah. It's one of these things I'm super passionate about communicating to women is you don't have to be in pain. But I also really appreciate the effort and the energy involved in transforming that, and it's this touchy subject, I think, because you don't want to be like, "You don't have to bleed and suffer. I don't bleed and suffer." I'm not trying to be a patronising pain in the ass, but it's an option to dig really deep and work out what's going on.   Tahlia Mynott: (11:39) It's such and important thing you've said there too, because for many of those years too I thought it was normal. Because it's almost considered to be a normal aspect of your menstrual cycle, and it simply is not. It's okay to be having probably 30 to 60 minutes of very light cramping at the start where the uterus is starting to contract and the lining is shedding, but that really significant pain which quite a few women experience is simply not normal. We shouldn't be putting that in that category at all.   Tahnee: (12:15) Yeah. You're absolutely right in terms of how we culturally... It's such an interesting thing because you see... I remember tampon ads growing up and these girls like, "Woo," with their tampon or whatever. But then also, the flip side of that is all of my friends, my mum, everyone bitching about their period, how much pain they're in, their emotional state. It's like you grow up in this context of suffering and even the monthly curse and all of this is a narrative, certainly for me in the '90s.   Tahnee: (12:47) Then I get to university to study biology and the lecturers are telling us, "You don't need to have periods. Just use the pill to stop them." It's this really kind of interesting cultural thing around periods being so negative. And then full circle, here I am in my mid-30s going like... When my period came back after, I was like, "Oh. Hello, old friend." It's this really welcome visit.   Tahnee: (13:14) For me, it's become so much of a, Lara Briden uses the term report card, but it's this sense of if I get my period and I'm angry or I'm feeling stressed or I get a headache or something, I know I've pushed myself too hard the month before. And I know that I've overdone it, and it's just a reminder for me that this is coming up for me and I need to address this with my next cycle. I've found that to be such a useful kind of personal development tool, I suppose, in just being really conscious of those warning signs. I've never had worse than a headache, and I think it's such a helpful thing to know how to come back.   Tahnee: (13:55) So you did acupuncture. Were there other things? Like, you said you addressed your gut health, those kinds of things. What else was there that helped, do you think?   Tahlia Mynott: (14:05) Yeah. I think that in terms of are you speaking just in relation to my menstrual cycle or the preconception more so?   Tahnee: (14:11) Yeah. More the menstrual cycle healing. I guess I'm just really interested in if you have any tips or-   Tahlia Mynott: (14:18) Definitely, I mean coming from a background of nutrition as well, definitely the food aspect was really important for me. I had been vegetarian for about 20 years, maybe slightly less, and also vegan and raw vegan for around five or six years, so raw vegan for about 12 months of that. I started introducing animal foods back into my diet, which was definitely really important and quite gradual for me. First fish, then eggs, then liver capsules.   Tahlia Mynott: (14:52) Then actually not until I was pregnant with my second child did I actually start actually consuming meat, but that was definitely really supportive of my hormonal system just for me as an individual. I know that's really important to state probably while we're chatting is that everyone's very different. So for me as an individual, that was really supportive for me. Also, just specific foods that are in relation to hormones. It's just amazing. I'm always so amazed with myself and with clients and friends and all of that how powerful food as medicine is.   Tahlia Mynott: (15:32) There were specific herbs that I was taking. Specifically, Schisandra I found to be really incredible, and I got quite into all the medicinal mushrooms, which is actually how you and I first met many, many years ago. They definitely, particularly reishi, there's been a lot of studies around reishi and PCOS. Which just quickly on that topic, I didn't have any PCOS symptoms for around about two years prior to conceiving as well, so I believe I completely healed all of that as well.   Tahlia Mynott: (16:11) Some of the really amazing foods that I recommend for a lot of my clients are cruciferous vegetables in relation to hormonal health and always having them warmed or heated, cruciferous vegetables, trying never to have them raw. So things like broccoli, kale, cabbage, mustard greens. I know I'm missing some.   Tahnee: (16:32) Cauli.   Tahlia Mynott: (16:34) Yeah. There's such a big list of them. You can simply Google cruciferous vegetables. So ensuring that I had at least half a cup of cooked cruciferous vegetables daily and then also using specific seeds, which you would probably know about seed cycling. I actually have found that in my journey to be a really supportive tool too. So using specific seeds in the first two stages of the cycle and then others in the second two stages of the cycle to support both oestrogen and progesterone.   Tahlia Mynott: (17:07) For me, I had, which is quite common, I had more of an oestrogen dominance so I focus more on supporting progesterone and ensuring that I had really good luteal phases, which is that phase just before the bleed. Because if that phase isn't supported, then conception is really challenging. Also, you want it to all be in flow as well, but specifically for the preconception journey, it was important for me to have that phase really supported.   Tahnee: (17:38) Yeah. Seed cycling is sunflower seeds and pepitas. Actually, I've never personally done it, but I've read about it. But yeah, does it vary depending on the hormonal profile or is it pretty standard for the two phases? Or how do you approach that?   Tahlia Mynott: (17:53) No. It's standard for the two phases, and I hope I get this right.   Tahnee: (17:56) I won't hold you to it.   Tahlia Mynott: (18:00) I'm pretty sure and you could Google seed cycling. It's flax seeds and pepitas for the first phase, which is more about oestrogen support. And then it's sunflower and sesame seeds for the second phase, which is more about progesterone support. It's such a simple... I recommend usually a tablespoon of ground seeds per day and a mix of both of those.   Tahlia Mynott: (18:25) I say to my clients, "Just get a jar, roughly a 50/50 mix of your flaxseeds and your pepitas. Ground them up and then every day for those first two phases, so the follicular and the ovulation phase, be having a tablespoon of those seeds in whatever you can." Then similar with the sesame and sunflower in the progesterone supporting phase. So in your luteal and your menstruation phase, have a tablespoon of those ground every day.   Tahnee: (18:53) Typically, if people have longer luteal phases or whatever, it doesn't matter? They're just still carrying on with that process through the whole time?   Tahlia Mynott: (18:59) Yes. I still usually get them doing those things just because they're supportive overall anyway of colon health and zinc levels, which are really important for the menstruation cycle as well. Yeah, generally speaking, I would have them doing that whichever way their hormonal profile is going.   Tahnee: (19:20) Yeah. I think seeds are such an underrated superfood. We're all into these bougie and expensive things, but it's like you've got this incredibly nutritious, easy to obtain, quite cheap products there. Yeah, really excited to talk about those. One thing, I mean, I really got out of your book is the simplicity of, and I don't mean this in a negative way, but I mean it in a, thank God, I don't have to spend hours in the kitchen kind of a way.   Tahnee: (19:50) But I think being a mum yourself and actually, yes, you're a clinical nutritionist, but you know what it's like to be busy and you know what it's like to have a business and kids. It's like there was a real sense of reality in the book. Everything I could make and I could see myself making. I'm a good cook, but I'm like, "I don't have time." I get home at 5:00 and I have to have dinner on the table really fast. Yeah, is that something you've picked up from clinic is that you have to be realistic about what people can achieve?   Tahlia Mynott: (20:20) 100%. Honestly, it starts with yourself, right? So even myself, I'm very similar to you in that it's like I don't have the time to be creating extravagant meals. And if I'm frank, I actually don't enjoy it. I would prefer to be reading a book, doing some yoga, going for a swim in the beach, all those types of things rather than just spending hours in the kitchen. I mean sure, every now and then I love spending it, but on a daily basis that's not where I want to be focusing most of my time.   Tahlia Mynott: (20:50) I'm so glad that you found that with the book. Because that was something that was really important to both Caitlin and I, who wrote the book, was that the meals, although we ensured that the nutrition profile was there and that the meals, they have the ingredients to support the postpartum phase, we wanted to ensure that they were simple and the ingredients were easy to obtain. And also, that they wouldn't take long in the kitchen and yeah, so that they weren't overwhelming because I think that's really important during this time.   Tahlia Mynott: (21:24) You don't want to be opening a book, and any time in a mother's life, you don't want to be opening a recipe book or any type of book and looking at the recipe and just feeling totally overwhelmed by 20 ingredients and a method that goes over three pages. And you're just like, "Oh my God."   Tahnee: (21:42) I mean you've had the raw phase, I've had the raw phase, the sprouting. God bless us and I mean, I still value that kind of food. We eat sprouts and things, but we do tend to buy them more these days. But I think there's just this reality around how much time food prep can take. The thing I liked is everything's really nutritionally dense. It's not like it's toast and toast for dinner. But yeah, it's really nutritionally dense.   Tahnee: (22:10) I loved the key that you guys had with anti-inflammatory and all the different things. I thought that was really helpful. And I really liked how you classified the three sections of healing as well postpartum, to get a little bit into the book, but that was something I thought was really smart. Because yeah, there are really quite different phases, and I can even think about them even now. I have had these times where I've been like, "Oh, I'm back in this quite depleted state and I almost need to address myself like I'm postpartum again." Then it's like, no, I'm really abundant and vital and I can be a bit more loose with eating cold foods or whatever.   Tahnee: (22:48) I think it's something people can take into their lives and be like, if you're convalescing or you've just been through some kind of big emotional process, lost somebody, whatever, you can go through using that same structure. Yeah, I thought that was a really cool way and a bit different for me. I've not seen that in other postpartum books.   Tahlia Mynott: (23:05) Yeah. That was... Sorry.   Tahnee: (23:08) How did you get to that? No, no.   Tahlia Mynott: (23:09) I was just going to add to your question without you asking.   Tahnee: (23:11) Well, you're reading my mind, so just go for it.   Tahlia Mynott: (23:17) That's actually Caitlin had thought of that. That was an element that she brought to the book which I really loved as well. Yeah, we talk about four stages of the healing stages of the postpartum over the period over five weeks. Yeah, we've segmented different recipes into each phase as to what's going on during that phase. Obviously, it's amazing that you've actually...   Tahlia Mynott: (23:47) What we were envisioning too is that, of course, this book is for postpartum, but this book can be used at any time that you are feeling slightly overwhelmed or depleted or your immune function is low. Whatever is going on, these types of foods are really supportive of that phase. The reason, I guess, why we segmented it as well was because for me personally, and I don't know if you can attest to this, but in the phase of postpartum, making decisions for self, because we've got so much going on, is sometimes tricky.   Tahlia Mynott: (24:23) Even segmenting it is like, okay, there's not as many recipes so you're not going to open up the recipe part section of the book and be like, "Oh my gosh, there's 50 recipes. Which one do I do?" Each section has, I think it's around 10 recipes in each section, so it also takes a little bit of the overwhelm out of it as well and the decision making. But you can switch to any of those sections and we do say at the start to use your intuition about what you're feeling as well. I don't like being rigid at all, so we're not saying, "Hey, you have to be doing those recipes in that week and then when you switch, you need to be doing the recipes the next week." But if it's supportive of you to actually just be sticking to those weeks and those recipes, then absolutely.   Tahlia Mynott: (25:07) As it gets further on, so in week five we do talk a little bit more about recipes that are a little bit more cooling on the system, like smoothies and salads, which we always say to try and have room temperature. But those types of recipes you probably, majority of people, again not all but majority of people really don't want to be doing those types of recipes in relation to healing and all of that in those first two weeks or three weeks which are really vital for the healing of the body.   Tahnee: (25:36) Yeah. I mean, I picked that up from your book and it's great. There's such an emphasis on it because we both know from all the traditions, staying warm is so important postpartum. Can you speak a little bit to that just from your experience and what you've seen in clients and your own research? What's the meaning of that?   Tahlia Mynott: (25:57) Yeah. It comes from a couple of traditions, mainly the TCM background and the Ayurvedic, which I can't speak to too much because that's definitely not where I've come from in terms of my learnings. But obviously, I've had a browse over them over the years. But all of the traditions just speak of the importance of staying warm during this time, and the reason is to keep the warmth inside the body in relation to healing.   Tahlia Mynott: (26:24) That cool energy can cause, is it vata in the system? I think it's more vata in the terms of Ayurveda. That can be that feeling of feeling quite ungrounded or a little bit sketchy, and that can already be there in that postpartum phase, so you also want to calm that as well. Yeah, it's important for healing not just of the organs and everything that's going on in relation to the uterus and all of that, but it's also really healing in terms of the mental state as well and for production of milk if you are breastfeeding. There's many elements to keeping warmth in.   Tahlia Mynott: (27:05) Obviously, we talk of it in terms of food and in the front section we do talk a little bit in terms of some traditions where they use scarves and beanies and all of that. Obviously, it's relative to your climate. So where we are, it's a little bit more tropical. When I birthed both my boys, it was beautiful spring and summer days. I definitely didn't want to be getting a beanie and scarf on, but I'm sure that I kept warm in terms of...   Tahlia Mynott: (27:32) Actually, even one thing I'd love to chat about is the postpartum pads. Even with the postpartum pads, I see a lot of people talking about them now, which is incredible in terms of using witch hazel and aloe vera, all of these things, which are amazing. But there's quite an emphasis about putting them in the freezer I've seen going around. Even something like that, I think it's really important that women are actually not putting them in the freezer and actually having them warm so that the warmth isn't getting inside the uterus, which then can affect the healing somewhat.   Tahlia Mynott: (28:09) Yeah, you don't necessarily have to be covering yourself up completely but just little elements of your postpartum phase, thinking about trying not to allow coolness into the system.   Tahnee: (28:22) Yeah. I mean, that's a real issue. Even icing of injury is not okay in Chinese medicine, which obviously is really common practise here. They say that it causes chi and blood stagnation, which leads to slow healing. I've had the experience of twisting my ankle, so I didn't ice it. I actually heated it and I had heaps of acupuncture, and it healed really, really fast. We took lots of herbs and all those things. I'm like, really had that experience of the warmth is super important. And like you, I had Aiya in the bloody peak summer. It was impossible to wear clothes, but I did make an effort to still wear socks and stay pretty warm and obviously try to keep the food as warm as possible as well.   Tahnee: (29:04) Yeah, I think it's just I've noticed a huge difference in my digestion from my 20s when I'd drink smoothies at least a couple of times a week, maybe daily, and cold, icy, thick, those delicious smoothies. But yeah, they just ruined my digestion and I'd be bloated. I'd have cold poos. It was just not a good situation. Yeah, I've really noticed a difference with myself. You mentioned that in the book that postpartum is a time of weakened digestive fire, so it's a time of convalescence and recovery. It's not a time to be using your resources digesting or using your resources doing even too much thinking or anything else. Yeah, I think it makes a lot of sense to be mindful of that kind of stuff.   Tahlia Mynott: (29:48) Yeah. It's really like gentle, gentle, gentle with everything is how I think of it. Gentle with the food that you're consuming. Gentle with the visitors that you're allowing. Gentle with the warmth that's around you. Yeah, just keeping yourself in that beautiful cocoon for as long as possible.   Tahnee: (30:07) Yeah. That's actually, non-visitor boundaries were really great and I think a really important one to read to everybody.   Tahlia Mynott: (30:15) That was actually a big learning for me and why I really wanted to add that in there. So yeah, there is a page about visitor boundaries and we make some suggestions and questions in there. Because that was a big learning for me in my journey of postpartum with my firstborn, Luca, where I allowed people. And it was only family, but I did allow family. He was born at 2:00 AM after 30 hours of labour, so I was obviously exhausted but also running on a lot of adrenaline.   Tahlia Mynott: (30:42) I had family come for the next couple of days, and I significantly noticed my depletion more so after having visitors there. I'm a very hostess of the house too, so it was me going up and getting cups of tea and all those types of things. So the second time round we didn't even have really family or visitors for I think around three to four weeks. We had beautiful people dropping food to us, but they rarely came in or we might just say hi through the door. Just looking at both those postpartum journeys and the second one I also had a toddler running around too, but I actually felt so much more supported in that second postpartum journey than the first.   Tahlia Mynott: (31:29) It's a big learning. I went into that first one with... I had read a lot and I had studied a lot around it, so I had some ideas about it. But it's not until you go through it that you actually really understand how significant and dynamic that phase is.   Tahnee: (31:48) I was chatting to Caitlin about that when she came round the other day to drop the books off, your co-author. And I thought, it's beautiful that you have both perspectives. You have someone who's a doula and who cares for women but who hasn't really had the experience, and then you've been through it and you have that lived visceral experience of what's happened. Yeah, I actually think it's a really beautiful combination of energies because you've got that maiden energy in there and then the mother energy. I think it's really special.   Tahnee: (32:18) I think that transition, and you speak to that in the book as well, Caitlin and I were talking about it. It's like you know it's going to be big, but until you actually live it, you don't know how it's going to be big and what's going to show up for you. Yeah, I was surprised. I felt a little grief actually before Aiya was born, not so much when she was born. But I do remember looking at her and being like, "Oh my God, I've signed up for a lifetime of care and maybe I'm not ready for that."   Tahnee: (32:43) I was like, "Ah!" And I didn't have all these blissful... I mean, I had a little blissful feelings, but I wasn't feeling them toward to her at the time. I was like, "Oh my God, this is a big commitment." That shifted over a few days, but I'll never forget that. And I was like, "Well, that's not what I expected when I looked at my new baby." Yeah, I think it's a really interesting-   Tahlia Mynott: (33:09) But it's real and I'm sure that a lot of women experience that too. I actually remember my partner very significantly experiencing that. So like I said, Luca was born at 2:00 AM, and we birthed at home. It was all beautiful and amazing. We blissfully feel asleep. We woke up in the morning and I remember him looking at Luca. I still remember this and Luca's now nearly four, so this was nearly four years ago. He looked at Luca and looked at me and he's like, "Whoa, this is a lot, isn't it?" I'm like, "Um, just processing this now? Great."   Tahnee: (33:49) Well, it's funny because I think too, and I've had a really different journey in each pregnancy and I'd love to hear a little bit about the differences, other things you learned from postpartum that was different for you from Luca to Oka and also your pregnancies. I had such, honestly, blissful pregnancy with Aiya. I was floating around like a fairy the whole time just being like, "Life is so magical." I just was in awe of my body and it was a very psychic experience for me. It was really different.   Tahnee: (34:24) Whereas this one, I've been angry. Physically, I feel fine but I've been an emotional kind of machine of rage. Yeah, it's such a different pregnancy for me so I'm curious for you, how did those pregnancies alter your perspective and clinical practise and what you're sharing with us today? How did that change for you?   Tahlia Mynott: (34:44) I'm always so grateful for every experience I have, particularly in this women's health region, because it allows me to have so much more empathy for other women, although I did hit a point a couple years ago where I was like, "Okay, I'm done with the lessons. Let's just stop for a little bit, universe. I think I've got enough empathy right now." But I actually, so I've been pregnant three times.   Tahlia Mynott: (35:09) I miscarried the first pregnancy and that was such a pivotal moment and experience for me, which actually had a really positive outcome. Obviously, at the time there was a lot of grief, but I now can see why that was part of my story and why I needed to have that as part of my story.   Tahnee: (35:29) Do you mind speaking to that a little? I really feel passionately that we don't talk about miscarriage enough, and you don't have to share anything that you're not comfortable with. But it's this one in four women, you say it in your book, experience miscarriage. That's a quarter of us walking around with this story. We don't speak of spirit babies as real babies even though they are. I know in certain circles we do, but it's something I've really observed.   Tahnee: (35:56) I did a women's circle with 60 women last year in November two days before my wedding. I reckon at least 45 of those women had had a miscarriage or some kind of traumatic stillbirth or something that just was huge and so much to carry. I was humbled, really humbled by how common it was and how many women in that room had shared that. I'd be really interested if you could go deeper on that topic. I know it's a bit of a segue.   Tahlia Mynott: (36:30) Yeah, absolutely. I'm very open with my life.   Tahnee: (36:30) Fortunately.   Tahlia Mynott: (36:37) Yeah. You're right, it's not something that's really commonly talked about and happens to so many women and I think something that we need to be more open about and real about. It was actually such a healing component for me was I just remember getting onto the computer and Googling miscarriage stories and trying to find as many miscarriage stories as I could to read. I was ringing friends that I knew who had had it and I also had friends reach out to me who I didn't know who had had it say, "Oh, I had a miscarriage too. I would ring them and just listen to their stories. And actually, having those women and their journeys actually really helped me as well.   Tahlia Mynott: (37:20) I guess it was an interesting time because there it was definitely I had done the preconception journey, so in my head I was like, "Yeah, I've got this. I'm all good. Everything's sweet." Then I actually even got through the first trimester, so I miscarried the baby at 14 weeks so I was just into that second trimester. I guess also I'd hit that point of thinking, "Everything's totally... " The first trimester can be a little bit like, "Oh, I hope it's okay. Yeah, everything's fine." But once you get into that second trimester there's definitely a relief, I guess, or for me a little bit of relief like, "Okay, yeah. Everything should be sweet from here on in."   Tahlia Mynott: (38:02) So miscarrying at 14 weeks was definitely a surprise, but I actually intuitively knew that something wasn't right at about nine weeks. When I miscarried at 14 weeks, they did an ultrasound. And when they did the ultrasound, they actually, the guy said, "Oh, the sac's only actually nine weeks old." It was such an interesting... At the time, obviously I couldn't really focus and think about all that. But looking back on it, I was like, "Wow, I intuitively knew that something wasn't right from that nine weeks."   Tahlia Mynott: (38:35) I started bleeding a couple of days before I miscarried, and I had a bit of cramping throughout that first trimester, which can be completely normal. I actually had quite a bit of cramping with my recent pregnancy, Oka. It can be completely normal, so for anyone listening that's like, "Oh my gosh, I'm cramping," that's okay. I just want to say that so no one's freaking out. But yeah, I had quite a bit of cramping leading up.   Tahlia Mynott: (38:59) Then I remember we were at a friend's house and I'd had a bit of brown spotting. I knew deep down but I was also being optimistic and hoping that it wasn't just my mind playing tricks. I was like, "Oh, maybe that's just a bit of stagnation from my last bleed and that's okay just because there's obviously a bit of weight with my uterus and baby and all of that kind of stuff." Then I remember yeah, being at a friend's house and wiping and seeing the red blood, and I knew. I did have quite a bit of cramping as well, and I knew red blood, cramping, those two together probably not a good sign.   Tahlia Mynott: (39:34) Over the course of the next 24 hours, it did take a while, the bleeding started to intensify. We went to hospital just to confirm that I was having a miscarriage and then went back home. It was actually a full moon the day that I miscarried, which being in this field as well and very connected to the moons and the menstrual cycle, and the full moon is often, as you would know, in spiritual talk the letting go.   Tahlia Mynott: (40:06) It was a full moon and I'd found out that the baby, there was no heartbeat. But my body was still holding on to the baby, so we went to the beach that day and obviously cried and kept setting intentions of... I really wanted to miscarry naturally. I didn't want to have to go to hospital, although I had booked in for a day in say two days later. The doctor really wanted me to book it in the next day because it was actually a Sunday that we went in, so they couldn't do it on a Sunday. I was like, "No, no. I just want to give it a little bit of time and see if this can happen naturally."   Tahlia Mynott: (40:42) So yes, we went to the beach that day, got home that night. Then I really started to bleed quite heavily. There's two really significant parts to it. I still remember bleeding. For some reason, Scott and I had not got pads. Even though we knew I was going to miscarry, we hadn't got pads. So he went out to get pads, and I was sitting on the bed just on some towels. I actually just remember I had beautiful music on and so it was like we'd set up this space for a home birth almost but obviously thinking of it as a miscarriage.   Tahlia Mynott: (41:21) Mentally, we were somewhat prepared. I remember sitting on the bed and when the bleed really came actually feeling a sense of relief and just a real letting go. It happened on that full moon, so letting go and actually felt really at peace with it. I can still significantly tune back into that moment. Most of my miscarriage did happen at home and I passed the sac at home, which was really beautiful that that happened there.   Tahlia Mynott: (41:51) But it did get quite intense and that can be quite normal for... I've forgotten the phrase exactly. Oh, a missed miscarriage is what they usually call it where the sac is actually or the baby has actually passed a lot earlier than what you've miscarried. So there can be a lot of tissue and stagnation and a lot of things happening in the uterus. The bleed was very substantial for me. I was losing clots the size of my hand nearly every 15 to 20 minutes, so we did have to go to hospital. I spent 16 hours in emergency, but that also was a very significant time for me.   Tahlia Mynott: (42:35) I had had quite an aversion to hospitals in general growing up with what my mom had been through. Yeah, I actually felt, anxiety is not something that I really attune to too much, but I actually would have anxiety going near hospitals. When I fell pregnant that first time, I had a planned home birth, but I definitely had this fear around hospitals. And even when I was miscarrying, I really was trying to stay at home, but I did call my home birth midwife and she was like, "Look, you're bleeding a lot, losing these clots. It's definitely important for you to get to emergency now."   Tahlia Mynott: (43:12) My partner was like, "Look, we really need to go." And I was feeling quite light-headed obviously and not amazing. Just even actually going to emergency was a big component for me, but the women that I had, the nurses that I somehow manifested on that night were just the most beautiful women and they were like my mothers. My mum wasn't near. Just my partner was with me at the time. They really, their support was just so pivotal in my journey.   Tahlia Mynott: (43:43) Also, I had quite a significant amount of pain, which can be similar if you've had a missed miscarriage and even for other miscarriages because the uterus is really contracting to get out that stagnation and tissue and all the blood. But I was really rejecting the pain medication. I was like, "No, no, no." And they actually had to transfer me to a hospital because they thought I might have to have a blood transfusion, so they transferred me to the hospital. And during the transfer I had this really beautiful ambulance nurse, doctor, whatever he was, next to me, probably nurse or paramedic. I was breathing through them and I was like, "It's okay." Because I was having almost contractions, and I was just breathing through them.   Tahlia Mynott: (44:28) He could obviously tell I was in some kind of discomfort, and he's like, "Would you like some pain relief?" I was like, "No, no." I still remember this. He said to me, "Look, I understand where you're coming from, but there is a time and a place, and I have a feeling that for where you are now, this would be really supportive of you." I just remember being like, "Okay, yep. I think that the pain relief would be really helpful." I'm so grateful for that because it was really helpful for that, and I went on for another 16 hours of that so it was quite intense. Yeah, it was really supportive of me.   Tahlia Mynott: (45:08) I left that experience with just seeing the way that in crisis the medical system can be really amazing and supportive. I let go of a lot of fear, so I believe that my next two home births were so magical and amazing because I really had dispersed that fear of the hospital system during that miscarriage. So it was such a pivotal component of my entirety of birthing, I believe.   Tahnee: (45:39) Yeah. It's really powerful, I think, and something I pick up a lot on in this community that we're in where there's this right and wrong way to birth or to miscarry or whatever. Really, to actually have the freedom to do the thing, the home birth or whatever, you do need to have, I think, an acceptance of the potential outcomes which might mean transfer and might mean being in a hospital.   Tahnee: (46:08) I know for me, that was a big part of my home birth journey was really sitting in, am I going to be okay in myself if I end up birthing in a hospital? It took me a few days of really sitting with that to get to a place of like, yes, that's a yes for me. Because there was resistance and, I guess, an ego attachment to birthing in a certain way and all that kind of stuff and also not even wanting to let it in because I didn't want to pollute my mind with that kind of thought or whatever.   Tahnee: (46:40) I've spoken to a lot of women that have miscarried, especially in the last 10 years, and a lot of them say that it's more painful than childbirth, which I find really interesting. But I imagine the hormonal cascade is different. There's not that sort of trigger from the baby and all of those other things that happen with birth and how long the process can be and how tricky it can be. It's not always straightforward miscarriage, so I really appreciate you sharing all of that because I know it's a lot. But, yeah.   Tahnee: (47:13) So you had the miscarriage. How much longer after that was Luca conceived? Is it another year? I'm trying to remember your timeline.   Tahlia Mynott: (47:24) I conceived Luca about eight months after that miscarriage. I did another six months of rebuilding myself, so abstained from intercourse for six months and I really didn't want to conceive straight away. But I definitely have many clients and friends, and I have a lot of compassion around this, which again, I'm really grateful for, I can understand why women want to conceive the next month because this bizarre timeframe lapse where you're like, "Oh, I should be 14 weeks pregnant and I'm not pregnant. Oh, I should be 15 now and I'm not pregnant at all." So I have compassion around that, but for me it was really important to wait for...   Tahlia Mynott: (48:11) The egg that is released from the ovary, the largest stage of maturation, is around 90 days, so it was really important for me to wait at least one of those cycles of 90 days. But I actually decided to wait two of those cycles of 90 days. Because I had such an extensive bleed, I actually was anaemic as well, so there was a lot of blood building that I was doing during that time as well. So lots and lots of building in those six months and then yeah, it took about two to three months to conceive Luca.   Tahnee: (48:42) That's interesting. So you've done the preconception and a lot of that is detoxifying and cleansing. And then you've had the miscarriage and then you're rebuilding, so you've had this kind of... Because that's something Mason and I talk about a lot with people, it's like, "Yes, it's great to cleanse, but if you don't have that phase of making sure your tissue's really strong, making sure your nutrition is really high, to go from cleansing into conception can be, I think, not a great thing."   Tahnee: (49:11) Yeah, have you had that experience with... Because I've seen it with a lot of people we know who live a really high alkaline, clean diet, and then have a lot of trouble coming to conception time. I'm like, "Good time to build up some fat tissue and some muscle and reserves."   Tahlia Mynott: (49:28) Yes. That was definitely a component of my preconception was building as well, but I have to admit that definitely I was more focused on the building between those two pregnancies and the importance of that 100% and ensuring fat tissue and iron and blood building and zinc. Yeah, there's so many components of that building that are really, really important, definitely.   Tahnee: (49:58) And do you work with someone or do you do your own care? Because I mean, I'll usually order blood tests and stuff but typically do the interpretations and things myself. What's your approach to that? Do you tend to... Other people love support, so I don't want to say there's a right or wrong. Yeah.   Tahlia Mynott: (50:14) Yeah. I do, absolutely, that. I actually work with an incredible doctor up here. Well, in terms of working with her, I'm not working in clinic with her, but she knows who I am and I send a lot of clients to her. Yeah, we're looking at people's blood profiles and then suggesting from there, so she'll do all the blood profile panels for me.   Tahlia Mynott: (50:34) I think it's important in these phases too, so whether you've had a miscarriage or you're in your preconception phase is actually finding a team of support. I don't think you can support all elements that need to be supported with just one person. I think it's important to have a team of either an acupuncturist or a naturopath or a nutritionist.   Tahlia Mynott: (50:57) Yeah, there's so many elements to this. A lot of women come to me and they want to fall pregnant in the next month. That's not my ideal. My ideal would be probably six to 12 months to work on some things, but you've got to also be supportive of where that person is at as well. Yeah, if they have the time and the space, then having a support team I think is really crucial.   Tahnee: (51:23) Yeah, I agree. I mean, I'm big on having those. Especially body work practitioners and energetic practitioners, I think to me are amazing. I see an acupuncturist fortnightly for this pregnancy and I did similar with Aiya. I guess I'm curious about that with Oka, did you guys do a similar preconception? We were a lot gentler, I noticed, with this baby in our preconception approach that we just really took it a lot easier. I wonder if you guys were the same or if you still had quite an intensive preconception phase?   Tahlia Mynott: (51:54) No. We were exactly the same. I actually was still breastfeeding Luca when I fell pregnant with Oka as well, so there was definitely no detoxifying happening there. But pregnancy and birth is one of the biggest detoxifications of a woman anyway, which is why I really like to support women in trying to do some gentle detoxifying before that. But because I'd had the miscarry as well, I actually felt like, and this might for some people be quite triggering, but for me it was almost a bit of a cleanse as well. Obviously, at the time not so much but in hindsight.   Tahlia Mynott: (52:39) Because I'd had those processes as well, yeah, I was super gentle with Oka. It was more about building because I was still breastfeeding and obviously giving a lot to Luca at that time, which in hindsight, I'm not sure that I would fall pregnant again while breastfeeding because I definitely noticed the difference in my pregnancies. And potentially, I was still slightly depleted from the breastfeeding, so going into Oka's pregnancy, yeah, it was different to Luca's.   Tahlia Mynott: (53:15) Luca's was more like your Aiya's one that you mentioned, so really blissful, felt amazing. Was doing hill walks all the time around our property. Was just in love with life and just actually wanted to be pregnant forever. I was like, "This is incredible. I feel amazing."   Tahnee: (53:29) Right. I know.   Tahlia Mynott: (53:30) Yeah. I actually was worried at the end because he was 41 plus five. I was a little bit concerned that I was holding onto him because I was loving it so much. I was definitely not like those women that are like, "Okay, I'm so ready to birth." I was actually like, "No, I love this. I'm not sure I want to get rid of this."   Tahnee: (53:48) Yeah. Aiya was 42 and I wanted the same. I'm like, yeah, it was such a nice experience.   Tahlia Mynott: (53:55) Yeah. I mean, Luca... Sorry, Oka. Oka still had its beauty, but I definitely felt more tired. And I definitely felt that real hormonal surge at the start, and emotionally that was quite challenging for me, particularly for that first trimester. I didn't have anything severe, but there was definitely a lot more niggles with Oka.   Tahlia Mynott: (54:25) I did prenatal yoga with both my babies, and I remember the first one. Our teacher, Esther, who's incredible, she would go around and just say, "Is anyone experiencing reflux or hip joint pain," or whatever it was. With Luca, I was like, "No, no. I feel great." Then with Oka, I was like, "Yep, yep. Oh, yeah. That's me. Yep, that's me again."   Tahnee: (54:50) All of the above.   Tahlia Mynott: (54:52) Yeah. Very minor but still, there was just a lot more niggles with him. Obviously, the body had done it all before, and I obviously didn't have the strength that I'd had going into Luca's in terms of my movement. Yeah, I'm sure there were many elements to that, and I was a little bit older as well.   Tahnee: (55:12) Did you approach Luca's postpartum with all that in mind? I'm sorry, Oka's postpartum, a little bit more, I guess gently? Because that's something I remember with Aiya, being very aware of all of the should-dos and then still, "But it's such a nice day. I'm just going to go to the beach." Or, "Oh, I'm going to go to the markets and catch up with people." Just letting it slip a little bit because I felt so good and it felt easy.   Tahnee: (55:41) But I think in hindsight, I'm like, we travelled when I was three months for a month and things like that, which they were really exhausting times. I think I'm definitely gearing up to be a lot more low energy this time around, so I wonder if that was the same sort of thing with you?   Tahlia Mynott: (55:57) I absolutely did that and was very similar. We've got very similar journeys. I felt so great with Luca that even when I was having the visitors, I continued to have the visitors because I felt really good. But in hindsight, yeah, it was definitely taking a lot from me. So with Oka, I was much more gentler. We didn't have the visitors. The foods I was consuming were definitely slightly different to what they had been with Luca.   Tahlia Mynott: (56:27) I was asking, so that was a big thing for me, so I really struggled to ask for support from people. But with Oka, I was definitely asking for more support. We actually even got a cleaner, which our house is tiny, so I was a little bit embarrassed by this one. But just the support of that cleaner once a week was really important for us. I just didn't have to do those things and could solely focus on the children.   Tahlia Mynott: (56:52) One thing that was really important for us was just really encapsulating that family unit. And for Luca as well, he'd just become a big brother and I didn't want too many people coming into that energy and space. I really wanted him to feel included and that he was also really important and also for him and Oka to form their bond. So we encapsulated our little space or house for that month. Yeah, that was very different to how I was with Luca.   Tahlia Mynott: (57:22) Even with my movement, I think with Luca, because I felt so amazing, I started not vigorous movement, but I started walking probably a week postpartum, doing walks. It's quite hilly where we are, but with Oka, I was just so much more gentle. I did a lot of five minutes of stretching and yoga, but really hardly moving. Yeah, I noticed such a significant difference in just that, in my movement practises and how that supported me in that second postpartum.   Tahnee: (57:51) It's such a shift and I think I relate to all of that. I've had to let go of how, I guess, pre-children and being a yoga teacher, because I was full time moving seven days a week a lot of the day. It's been full circle for me back to an office job, back to having a kid to run around after but not as much time to practise. It's like I might get an hour in a day if I'm lucky these days. I think it's a really humbling experience and also, yeah, recognising how much the body changes after birth.   Tahnee: (58:24) I loved that you guys address that in the book where you speak about closing the bones and how important that is. Because that was one of the things for me, I think my pelvis changed dramatically after having Aiya, and I just think those things, they're not addressed enough in our culture around... You guys emphasise this a lot. It's like birth and the child and the baby is really emphasised, but there's culture in France where they give women pelvic floor rehab for, I think it's six sessions for free as a part of their government healthcare. It's like I've had to pay for that. It's fine, but it's like, that's not cheap.   Tahnee: (59:02) It's made a huge difference to my overall wellbeing, but it's like if I didn't have that education and know to seek out that care... I have friends that have whispered to me like, "Oh, yeah. I'm 45 and I still wet my pants most of the time." It's like, why aren't we talking about this? You can't go back and jump up and down at the gym without a pelvic floor. You need to restore that tissue. Yeah, I think it's a really big and challenging conversation.   Tahnee: (59:29) But yeah, a lot of the stuff you speak about, the rebozo, which I hadn't actually heard of, that sounds cool. These things are all designed to restore the integrity of the pelvis and the SI joint and to help to start to bring that pelvic floor tissue back into place.   Tahlia Mynott: (59:44) There are so many amazing supportive tools from many traditions and even what's available here. But yeah, many women aren't really aware of all these supportive tools, so we definitely have tried to encapsulate them in the front section of the book. I'm sure we've missed something. I'm sure there's other amazing supportive tools, but they're the ones that we know of. Yeah, it's so important.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:00:08) It's that whole concept too of a nourished mum nourishes her family and children. Yeah, I just want to scream that every day. I just think that's so important to ensure that the mother is nourished. It's not just about what food she's eating. It's about the people that are around her and it's about her body, which you would know more about than me with your line of expertise. But yeah, all those elements are just so significant and so important.   Tahnee: (01:00:36) I think that's what I really enjoyed about your book was yeah, I guess I had read a lot of postpartum books and they're either a lot of theory, which is really great, or they're sort of... But it's almost yeah, it's written by women who know it, who've been through it. And I think the things you've chosen and highlighted are really, like belly binding, those kinds of things, they're really accessible. Abhyanga postpartum, really accessible. These are all things that you don't need to spend a lot of money on. You can tend to yourself or have someone tend to you easily at home. Yeah. I'm really happy for you guys.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:01:13) Thanks, darling. Hopefully, all those things are really simple too. That was a really important... along with the recipes. All of it, you can go into so much detail in all these areas and aspects of everything we talked about today, but I don't actually like to do that. I don't like going into such detail because I sometimes believe you're speaking to the minority when you go into all that and it can be a little bit overwhelming.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:01:37) So I like to take it back to what's really, really simple, and that's a lot of the basis of the book too. I hope that all these things are accessible and simple because the last thing we want to do is overwhelm any woman with these tools and practises and food.   Tahnee: (01:01:53) Yeah. No, I definitely feel that. It's in depth, but it's an easy read. It's digestible. It's not, like you were saying before we got on this call, often you get a postpartum book and it's like, "Wow, that all looks amazing, but I'm not going to do any of it." I'm sitting here with a baby and I can't move for the next two hours.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:02:16) Totally.   Tahnee: (01:02:17) Yeah. Gotta keep it realistic, I think. Yeah. So, where can people get a copy of this? Because you guys self-publish, which is awesome and the way of the future for someone who's from publishing.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:02:28) Which is quite a journey in itself, which you obviously know, but an incredible one. We learn a lot of lessons on the way. We're still learning all the time. But you can purchase it via our website, which is www.nourishingthosewhonurture.com. We've had such an overwhelming amount of support, which has been absolutely beautiful, so we've actually had a few wholesalers take us on. Yeah, which is incredible.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:02:58) We actually haven't reached out to anyone because we've just been overwhelmed by all the support we're getting. There's a few fertility practitioners and actually TCM practitioners and a few other places you might see us, but mainly via our website at this point.   Tahnee: (01:03:15) Yeah. That's so great. And you guys are on social media. I'll link to all of your different platforms, but, so your work, if people want to talk to you about your nutrition work, that's through Luna Holistic, yeah?   Tahlia Mynott: (01:03:27) Yeah. That's @lunaholisticnutrition. I've actually in my bio got all my other little avenues in there as well, so you can link to me through all those spots. Yeah.   Tahnee: (01:03:38) Okay, awesome. Yeah. Well, I think we're going to have Caitlin on the podcast as well because-   Tahlia Mynott: (01:03:42) Amazing.   Tahnee: (01:03:42) ... she's got her own crazy journey to share.   Tahlia Mynott: (01:03:45) And she is so incredible, Caitlin, who I co-authored it with. She's just, you know those women who

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®
Not Physically Attracted to the Romantic Partner. Can It Work?

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 36:35


High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Low Carb VS Low Calorie Dieting: What's Best Way to Lose Fat, Scientists Explain

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 33:08


When it comes to weight loss, there's two primary models to explain the best strategy: The carbohydrates-insulin model and the calorie imbalance, also known as the CICO model. In this show we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these models and how to best approach fat loss. Support Healthy Hydration and Exercise Performance with new Electrolyte Stix by MYOXCIENCE Nutrition: https://bit.ly/3uAWrV6 *Buy Buy One-Get-One-Free Pre-Sale now through October 30th 2021* Link to Show Notes, Video and Articles: https://bit.ly/3BxR63o Time Stamps: 01:35 Physicians are taught that weight loss is only triggered by caloric restriction. It is the traditional energy balance model. 02:00 The traditional energy balance model does not consider your circadian rhythm or phenotypes, like those of us who over-excrete insulin, have epigenetic factors, or have adaptive thermogenesis. 02:20 Cyclical dieting down regulates your resting metabolic rate, adaptive thermogenesis. 03:20 The carbohydrate/insulin model of obesity is centered around insulin. Hyperpalatable ultra-processed high glycemic foods increase the energy circulating in your blood, causing a compensatory hyperinsulinemic physiologic state. This causes a decrease in the amount of nutrients in your bloodstream after you eat. Your blood energy reduces to levels below before you ate, causing hunger and over-eating at the next meal. 05:35 Cellular semi-starvation: In a high sugar/high insulin state, fat cells accumulate energy intended for the now insulin resistant muscles, they undergo lipogenesis, storing lots of energy. Therefore, there is a lack of energy in the bloodstream. Your brain believes that your critical tissues are starving. 06:40 Hormones surge in this state of cellular semi-starvation; there is a surge of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol. 07:10 In drugs that increase insulin, insulin signaling caused fat gain of up to 5 pounds in a 2-month period. 07:35 The energy balance model considers all calories as metabolically equal. 08:05 Hyperpalatable ultra-processed high glycemic foods lend themselves to overconsumption and hormone alteration. 08:20 Energy intake is regulated by insulin, hunger satiety cues from the brain, leptin, ghrelin, and habits. A few nights of poor sleep increases hunger. 09:00 The more lean muscle mass you have, the more you increase your resting metabolic rate. 10:00 Insulin is pleiotropic, meaning it does many different things within your body. 13:50 Biggest Loser 6 year follow up study revealed that many participants continued to gain wait after their participation in the program's rapid weight loss. When they regained their weight, their resting metabolic rates were depressed lower than when they started. 15:45 The energy balance model works best for young fitness competitors and bodybuilders. 16:40 A high glycemic diet increases levels of glucose in the blood, causing alterations in gut hormones and the insulin to glucagon ratio. 17:10 To get into a fat burning physiologic state, you need low glucose, low insulin and elevated glucagon. The insulin to glucagon ratio helps to unlock stored fat, increases your liver's synthesis of ketones, and helps your white fat behave more like brown fat, increasing your resting metabolic rate. 20:00 Weight centered approaches to weight loss does not lead to lasting improvements in muscle mass or cardio-respiratory or favorable changes in overall health risk. 20:43 Sustainable changes are made when focusing on improving fitness, strength, muscle mass, sleep quality, HRV lead, independent of weight loss. 21:00 Physically fit people, no matter their weight, have a significant reduction in all-cause mortality compared to unfit individuals of the same body weight category. 22:34 Weightlifting and interval training are better ways to reduce all-cause mortality and risk for severe COVID, improve cardio-respiratory fitness and better way to help with fat loss. 26:20 Eating less causes adaptive thermogenesis. Instead, you could practice time restricted feeding and eat higher quality food.

The Bert Show
We Don't Understand Why This Celeb Isn't Physically Attracted To her Husband's Twin

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 5:46


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