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Latest podcast episodes about monterey

Contacts
Luke Gromer, Coach, Creator, and Speaker

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 37:28


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:05:27]  Oftentimes we expect things that we don't define for our athletes and if we haven't defined it we can't really hold them accountable to it, or we shouldn't even be expecting that of them.[00:06:08] They have an acronym that they use that I love. That's Schape. S C H A P E  the S stands for spirit, the C for communication, the H for hustle, the A for approach, the P for precision and E for enhanced. I think most coaches would agree, man, if I had a team or if I had a player that actually lived out those six words, that'd be special.[00:08:33] find the models of the behaviors that you're looking for. Show them to them and praise them when they happen. [00:12:14]  coaches really need to be educated on child development and psychology just as human beings, like understanding how humans function, how groups function, group dynamics, the social dynamics.[00:13:41]  we need to equip coaches to provide an experience that's both good for them as a player and a person.[00:17:08] The quality of coaching that an athlete gets just has a massive impact on whether or not they stay with the sport long-term.[00:29:49]  Growth is messy, and if it looks pretty, then you're not really getting better.

Down In The Dirt Podcast
EP 22. - Doing Whatever It Takes To Play Pro Baseball with Brooks Benson

Down In The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 117:07


Brooks Benson joins the One Percent Academy Podcast to share his journey to Professional Baseball. Brooks went to Junior College at Garden City Community College, before transferring to the University of Nebraska at Kearney, and then transferring one more time to Southwest Oklahoma State University. Once he finished his College Career, Brooks drove around the country to attend Professional Tryouts before ending up in Monterey, California where he played with the Monterey Amberjacks, and would go on to play for another 2 years with the Road Warrior Blacksox and the Idaho Falls Chaukers. Brooks talks about the adversity that challenged him during the journey such as grades and possibly not being eligible, living on the road in a camper to save money, and also getting released and trying to manage a budget while determining the next step in your career. _________________________________________ TRYING TO GET RECRUITED? Send me a DM (@carsonlee5) to Pre - Order my College Course on how to maximize the College Baseball recruiting process _________________________________________ Thank you to the sponsors of the show One Percent Athletics “ONE PCT BTR” shirts are available now at… Onepercentathletics.com/collections Use Discount Code “PODCAST” at Checkout for 15% off your order _________________________________________ FOLLOW ME! www.instagram.com/carsonlee5 www.instagram.com/onepercent_athletics www.instagram.com/onepercent_academy https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYYHZ5UIKckYB2sc0WSIXRQ https://www.facebook.com/carsonlee15 https://www.twitch.tv/carsonlee5 __________________________________________________________________ MY DISCOUNTS Arm Care Bands - Discount Code “Lee5” - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078YF62MZ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_ep_dp_x4wPAbF8003H0

Contacts
Tyler Coston, SAVI Consulting

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 46:30


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:03:50] Innovation unbound by tradition.[00:03:59] The more you're bound by tradition, the less movement and growth you're going to have.[00:04:21] Most people coach the same season, 10 years in a row.[00:05:25] We don't have an information problem. We've got a transformation problem in today's society.[00:05:35] to improve is to change by definition.[00:05:45] To improve is to change and to perfect is to change constantly.[00:07:19] There's few other vocations where you can innovate daily.[00:10:02] If you want to get to the next level, find someone that's been at that level and just copy everything that they do.[00:12:09] When the daily process of improving yourself becomes more addicting than the outcome of winning a tournament or winning a championship, that's when you can be great.[00:15:09] Running towards fear, running towards embarrassment, as opposed to away from it is what I've learned…it's better to bet on yourself and do something that's really hard and scary because at the very least, even if you fail, you have gotten better out of it.[00:16:48] It takes unbelievable courage and humility for a coach to bring in a consultant or an outside expert.[00:19:10] Simplicity wins. You can go far and fast. If you simplify your message and simplify how many things you're working on.[00:19:55] Most people stop pounding the stone long before they see the breakthrough.[00:20:33] Adversity strengthens. When practice gets messy, when there's hard conversations, when there's frustrations and push back, that's the moment, you're onto something good.[00:21:38] You don't win by finding the easier path ever.[00:22:55] The only way to do something special is to find your victories in your processes, in your daily habits.[00:23:05] The Mamba mentality that Kobe taught us was just be better than you were yesterday.[00:24:41] The greatest distance in the world is the distance between knowing and doing.[00:24:51] you know that you're going all in, when you can act in opposition to your feelings.[00:29:04] If I were to line up your 12 players outside of your office. And bring them in and say, define your offensive transition number one, principle in seven seconds or less, and I wrote it down and brought those players in one at a time. Would all 12 players have the same definition? Yes, or no? If the answer is no, you haven't yet defined it.[00:30:10] So, what were three things that every coach should define here? It is simple, offensive philosophy, defensive philosophy, role.[00:31:08] Not every player can be the star of the team, but every player can start in the role, but they will never star in the role unless it's defined.[00:34:42] High clarity leads to high performance and creativity comes from constraint.[00:35:18] When you constrain and focus all of your energy on getting good at one skill, you get good at that skill a lot faster. [00:35:51] 75% is get good at what your current role is. Twenty-five. Sandbox time, try to get better at the skill you need for your next role.[00:36:40] No matter how great the strategy, one should occasionally look at the results.[00:42:19] Weekly wins, determine playing time.[00:42:37] When you have weekly wins and playing time moves according to the weekly wins your team gets better.

Kopec Explains Software
#77 What is a Memory Leak?

Kopec Explains Software

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 11:55


Memory leaks occur when a program allocates memory and fails to free it when the memory is no longer being used. They can cause the memory use of a program to balloon over time, eventually leading to performance problems or a crash. They are a common programmer error, that has been alleviated, although not eliminated, by modern programming languages. Programming languages like C and C++ use manual memory management, which requires the programmer to do some book-keeping. The programmer must keep track of all of the memory they allocated and must remember to free it. Programming languages with garbage collectors automatically free unused memory. In this episode we explain memory leaks and look at a recent case of a major memory leak in macOS Monterey as an example. Show Notes Episode 76: What is Protected Memory? More memory leaks in Monterey 12.0.1 Follow us on Twitter @KopecExplains. Theme “Place on Fire” Copyright 2019 Creo, CC BY 4.0 Find out more at http://kopec.live

Chewing the Gristle with Greg Koch

Jazz guitar potentate Bruce Foreman is not only a monster player. He is also an extremely funny and entertaining individual with some great stories. Dig in as Greg and Bruce chew it up good!2:12 - Monterey, California - the beauty, the mystique, and the home of one Bruce Foreman6:26 - Where and how it started for Bruce (guitar and music, that is)12:47 - Bruce's personal foray into jazz, and the importance of understanding and loving the music19:39 - Instagram, and life at home as a restless touring musician during a pandemic, and the amazing story of inheriting a legendary guitar41:22 - Don't hate - appreciate!  The importance of being open to different styles and sounds45:47 - Recording guitar with Clint Eastwood59:14 - Life on the road, and thoughts on the future of touringTotal Length: 78:46

Contacts
Jamy Bechler, Speaker, Former Coach and AD

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:28


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:07:25] I got to see playing from a different perspective. I was no longer a star. I was no longer a starter. And so, I started watching film sessions a little bit differently. I started being like, ok, I'm not playing, but I was maybe not mature, but I was mature enough to understand it's not always coach's fault. I just wasn't good enough.[00:09:52] Value relationships and to value people…we are in a people business as an AD, as a coach, you are in the people business.[00:10:55] Sometimes our best decisions are made by other people.[00:11:20] I'm completely devoted to the craft. I'm completely devoted to the players. I'm soaking in everything.[00:14:11] I wasn't ready to be head coach, but I was more prepared than a lot of other people. Even though I knew it was about people, even though I cared about people, I cared about my players. I wanted to give back, wanting to make a difference. I also was a pretty big fan of myself.[00:15:02] What they want to know is how can you help me achieve my goals, my dreams my desires. How can you help me look good?[00:15:15] I cared about them, but they didn't know that because I didn't demonstrate that daily.[00:15:55] It should be our program that you're putting first, not just my program.[00:16:24] Teenagers, especially having a difficult time, reconciling those two things that seemed to be an opposition can both be true, right? They're very black and white. There's no gray space at this age.[00:17:22] Every year I felt like I got to be a little bit better coach because I screwed up the year before.[00:17:55] We don't need buy-in from our place. We need them to take ownership and be invested in the whole process.[00:19:51] If they had the same opinion, as you will get that opinion before you tell them what opinion they should have.[00:22:16] We try to fix symptoms as opposed to getting people healthy.[00:23:03] I would Institute either character leadership, teamwork, some kind of training to equip and empower your athletes.[00:25:37] Even though we want our athletes to be coachable, we don't learn and we don't grow and we don't develop and become better ourselves, but we want our athletes to do that.[00:27:00] Being around people of influence people that help us get from where we are to where we need to be, that inspires people.[00:27:10] You inspire people when they feel like they can trust you when they feel like you're there to help make them better.[00:28:26] The coach wanted to make sure that he was adding value to this player and wanting to make sure that the player felt like he was part of the process.[00:31:23]One of the number one thing is how are you maximizing your strengths? How are you minimizing your weaknesses in any way?[00:34:21] You've got to put your people in positions to be successful no matter what sport you're coaching.[00:38:24] Buy in is essentially, you're trying to get someone to agree with you as opposed to all of you collaborating and taking ownership in the process.[00:39:11] Everyone's a verbal leader, one is everybody can inform. Secondly, everybody can remind, and everybody can encourage.[00:41:32] Kids are a product of their environment and we need to meet them where they are if we're going to help them achieve the success that we want them to.[00:44:10] There are all these things that go on in the back of the bus conversations that go on. In the back of the bus and that's when your culture is made or broken sometimes.[00:48:11] Lead in the way in which you wish it would have happened for you.

The Marshall Pruett Podcast
MP 1192: The Week In IndyCar, Nov 20, Listener Q&A

The Marshall Pruett Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 94:57


It's The Week In IndyCar Listener Q&A show using listener-driven comments and questions covering a variety of topics submitted by fans via Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit. The main conversations? Why is a 23-year-old F1 car faster at Monterey than a current Indy car; teams sharing data in a technical alliance; multiple chassis suppliers; which driver will win Rookie of the Year; Kyle Kirkwood's odds of success, an IRL cheating story, and more! Subscribe: https://marshallpruettpodcast.com/subscribe Join our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/MarshallPruettPodcast

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations
Thursdays with Bob: Popclip and More

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:22


Dr Mac joins Kelly with a Monterey update, and discussing Popclip among other “first tier” apps to install when starting fresh.

Consolation Prize
Beyond the Consul: Monterey

Consolation Prize

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 24:42


Gilmartin, a guide at Monterey State Historic Park, who told us about Monterey and how Thomas Larkin fit into its history.Show notes, including a full transcript, at consolationprize.rrchnm.org. Visit Monterey State Historic Park as well: https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=575.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

Contacts
Adam Lichter - Director of Athletics, St. Mary's of Stockton

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:30


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:08:05] You're always as good as the weakest link and you're always as good as the players on your team.[00:08:46]I feel like coaching is a calling. It's the same as a teacher.[00:09:02]You never want to be the smartest guy in the room.[00:09:22] When you're young, you think you know everything.[00:10:05] Winning is a by-product of basically building character in these young men and women.[00:12:17] If you love what you do, you don't work a day in your life.[00:16:26] Nothing great was ever accomplished without enthusiasm[00:16:36] Be passionate about something bigger than yourself.[00:16:42] If you care about people, they'll run through a wall for you.[00:17:40] What role do you have? How does that translate? It might not be the one that you want, but everyone's role is important.[00:20:20] That clear the mechanism that my baseball coach says when you're in the pitcher that's no different than clearthe mechanism when I'm at the free-throw line.[00:21:14] You have to think because you can't just make a call right away without thinking.[00:21:30] Now I think about every action. Every course of action, I think about, and I think about what's going to happen if I make this decision, or if I say this, what's going to happen?[00:24:25] Anytime you move up a level, you're in charge of more.[00:24:42] You went from coaching athletes to coaching adults and the messaging theme while similar, the delivery has to be different.[00:26:47] He said, you laugh, you think, you cry every day, that's a full day.[00:27:05] Never give up no matter what and the adversity.[00:27:20]We talk about ordinary people doing extraordinary things.[00:27:47]The relationships are what you need to pour your energy into and make that the focus, not the outcome.

Dr. Gameshow
73. A Double Luke Episode

Dr. Gameshow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 77:47


Hosts Jo Firestone & Manolo Moreno play listener-created games with callers!Games played: A Face For Radio submitted by Luke Phelan from Monterey, California, Name That Movie submitted by Kassie Gale from Rogers, Arkansas, and Vienna Can't Win with rules by Kai Weixelman from Norfolk, NebraskaCallers: Kristen from Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin;  Paul from Indianapolis, Indiana; Melissa & Jackie from Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York;  Santani from Frankfurt, Germany; Marian from Los Angeles, California;  Gregory & Anthony from Stamford, ConnecticutOutro theme by Steven Woodford from Mansfield, TexasThis episode sponsored by: Green Chef - Go to GreenChef.com/gameshow125 and use code gameshow125 to get $125 off including free shipping!

Draugasögur
71. Þáttur - Stokes Adobe Veitingahúsið

Draugasögur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:11


Bærinn Monterey er talin vera besti staðurinn til þess að búa á í Kaliforníu. En á horninu á Hartnell Street innan um tréin situr gamallt hús með ógnvænlega sögu. Það hefur gengið manna á milli og er í dag fyrsta flokks veitingastaður. En hvað segja fyrverandi eigendur? Og afhverju var húsið yfirgefið og á sölu í fjögur ár? Gæti verið að raunverulegi eigandi hússins sé bara alls ekki lifandi? Verið velkomin á veitingahúsið Stokes Adobe Skoðaðu myndirnar sem fylgja þættinum á draugasogur.com Fáðu aðgang strax að yfir 200 fleiri þáttum, heimildarmyndum, sönnunargögnum og endalausu öðru efni HÉR á Áskriftarsíðu okkar Þátturinn inniheldur auglýsingu frá sassy.is - notaðu kóðann Draugasögur fyrir 15% afslátt :)

Breakfast Balls Podcast
Episode 78: The Most Magical Time of Year

Breakfast Balls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:02


On Episode 78 we discuss Chris' trip to Monterey, CA and his round at Spy Glass Hill. Since Thanksgiving is right around we share what that are thankful for this year, well, Chris does. This is also our favorite time of year as the World's Most Festive golf outing is right around the corner! Follow us on social media for updated episode information and other original content! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breakfastballs.podcast/ (https://www.instagram.com/breakfastballs.podcast/) Twitter: https://twitter.com/breakfastballs2 (https://twitter.com/breakfastballs2) You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAJ8WB_CpoQOE5BOt69Z63Q (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAJ8WB_CpoQOE5BOt69Z63Q) All links: https://linktr.ee/breakfastballspodcast (https://linktr.ee/breakfastballspodcast)

Cupertino
Mejorando lo presente

Cupertino

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 33:49


Stock disponible para Navidades, Monterey arreglado, Apple Fitness en inglés, Face ID desactivado si cambias la pantalla, etc. Patrocinador: Pásate a TotalEnergies https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares y reduce tu factura de la luz y del gas. En su web https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares podrás ver directamente cuánto podrás ahorrar. Tienen un servicio de atención al cliente gratuito y con personas que te entienden. Si te apuntas estos días te ahorrarás un 10% extra en el precio de tu factura https://www.totalenergies.es/es/hogares. Dice Tim Cook que tiene criptomonedas, pero eso no significa que Apple vaya a ampliar su relación con esta tecnología/inversión/cosa. Damos seguimiento a los temas que hemos comentado las últimas semanas: stock disponible, Apple Fitness en inglés, FaceID desactivado si cambias la pantalla, etc. Christian Pérez on Twitter: "Muy listo quien decidió lanzar Fitness+ en España en inglés con subtítulos. Como pretendes que haga una sesión de meditación con los ojos cerrados y a la vez esté leyendo los subtítulos??" / Twitter https://twitter.com/xtianp87/status/1457984443260489735?s=28  Javi Losana on Twitter: "@somospostpc Alex, estoy escuchando el último Cupertino. Estás comentando que hay unidades de iPhone en algunas Stores. Me comentaron en la de Sol que son unidades que no han sido retiradas por los que las reservaron en su día y conforme pasan los días de reserva,la van sacando" / Twitter https://twitter.com/javilosana/status/1457833131009056774?s=28 Apple backs off of breaking Face ID after DIY iPhone 13 screen replacements - The Verge https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/9/22772433/apple-iphone-13-screen-replacements-face-id-software-update Apple Fixes macOS Monterey Bug That Bricked Macs After Update https://gizmodo.com/apple-fixes-macos-monterey-bug-that-left-macs-unable-to-1848011249 3nm Mac and iPhone chips coming as soon as 2023, Apple Silicon roadmap leaps ahead of Intel - 9to5Mac https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/05/mac-iphone-apple-silicon-future/ List of Apple codenames - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Apple_codenames Apple CEO Tim Cook says he owns cryptocurrency https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/09/apple-ceo-tim-cook-says-he-owns-cryptocurrency.html Original Apple computer hand-built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak sells for US$400,000 | South China Morning Post https://www.scmp.com/news/world/united-states-canada/article/3155480/original-apple-computer-hand-built-steve-jobs-and#Echobox=1636506899 iOS 15.2 beta 2 includes new communication safety feature in Messages - 9to5Mac https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/09/ios-15-2-communication-safety-features/ Dropbox lanzará su aplicación para ordenadores con procesadores M1 de Apple en 2022 https://www.europapress.es/portaltic/internet/noticia-dropbox-lanzara-aplicacion-ordenadores-procesadores-m1-apple-2022-20211029122220.html OneDrive tendrá soporte nativo en ARM, incluyendo los Apple M1 https://microsofters.com/180429/onedrive-tendra-soporte-nativo-en-arm-incluyendo-los-apple-m1/ Puedes ponerte en contacto con nosotros por correo en: alex@barredo.es Suscríbete al boletín de información diario en https://newsletter.mixx.io Escucha el podcast diario de información tecnológica en https://podcast.mixx.io Nuestro grupo de Telegram: https://t.me/mixxiocomunidad

Consolation Prize
California Dreaming

Consolation Prize

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:33


As Americans moved into California, the U.S. government wanted to provide them with an official representative. But the government also wanted California for the United States. So when Thomas Larkin was appointed as consul to Monterey, Alta California, he had the job of keeping the peace with Mexico---while other Americans tried to make war. But Larkin also wanted to bring California into the United States. He became a consul who literally worked himself out of a job, when California became part of the United States in 1847.Show notes, including a full transcript, available at consolationprize.rrchnm.org.

French Expat Le Podcast
Marjorie B. (Monterey, CA, USA) : Exercer son métier avec un diplôme non reconnu

French Expat Le Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 51:44


Aujourd'hui nous mettons le cap à l'Ouest direction le Nord de la Californie, à Monterey.Mon invité.e a rencontré le grand amour à Bali, et l'heureux élu, un beau surfeur californien, lui a fait découvrir le monde. Après quelques longs mois à compter les jours avant les prochaines retrouvailles, Marjorie et Dylan décident de se marier, et Marjorie de tenter l'aventure en Californie.C'est sans compter sur le collège de masseurs kinésithérapeutes américains qui lui donne du fil à retordre (et c'est peu de le dire) pour convertir son diplôme français et ainsi pouvoir exercer aux Etats-Unis. Comment on fait quand on a tout plaqué pour vivre à l'autre bout du monde mais que son diplôme n'est simplement pas reconnu ? C'est sans compter sur la détermination sans faille de Marjorie et le positivisme de Dylan.Allez, c'est parti, next stop Monterey, CA.Si vous avez aimé l'épisode, rendez-vous sur Apple Podcast, Tumult ou Castbox pour lui donner 5 étoiles et un commentaire. Retrouvez tous les épisodes, découvrez l'équipe et la mission du podcast, ainsi que tous les liens pour nous retrouver sur toutes les plateformes sur le site www.frenchexpatpodcast.com/Suivez les coulisses de French Expat Le Podcast sur les réseaux sociaux :

Infinitum
Trapavi prsti se plaćaju

Infinitum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 96:01


Ep 169Alek kupio novi Android telefon.Backblaze Is Now a Public CompanyPhoneswap — Swap Out Your Old iPhone for A Better Onesamsung_fanboy_: Galaxy Watch vs Garmin vs Xiaomi vs Apple Watch in measuring bpm while biking.Marques Brownlee:AirPods 3 Review: Easy Mode!Marques Brownlee: M1 Max MacBook Pro Review: Truly Next Level!Hardware Unboxed: Apple M1 Pro Review - Is It Really Faster than Intel/AMD?Rob Art Morgan tests M1 versions of Premiere Pro and After Effects.Judge Says Apple Has Until December 9 to Make App Store Change Letting Developers Link to Alternate Payment Methods — MacRumorsFacebook skirts Apple's App Store fees with custom subscription links for creators — The VergeThe Booming Underground Market for Bots That Steal Your 2FA Codes — ViceApple introduces Apple Business EssentialsMr. Macintosh:Heads Up!If you install the Big Sur 11.6.1 update on an M1 Mac, recoveryOS will be updated to Monterey.Disk Utility now has full features for managing snapshots — The Eclectic Light CompanyApple CEO Tim Cook says he owns cryptocurrency and he's been ‘interested in it for a while'Apple is looking for cryptocurrency experience in ‘alternative payments' job postApple Walks Back iPhone 13 Display Repair Restriction That Disabled Face ID — MacRumorsApple TV+ turns two-years-old with a lineup of more than five dozen titles high-end originalsChris Espinosa povodom 50 godina Unixa (3. Novembar 1971)The 20KB Computer Program That Changed The World — Stackbit BlogZahvalniceSnimljeno 15.11.2021.Uvodna muzika by Vladimir Tošić, stari sajt je ovde.Logotip by Aleksandra Ilić.Artwork epizode 70x50cmulje/oil on canvas2021.by Saša Montiljo, njegov kutak na Devianartu.

On the Job with PORAC
S4, E17 - Conference Presenter Sneak Previews (feat. Lt. Colonel Dave Grossman and Sgt. Jon Davis)

On the Job with PORAC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 27:38


On this episode of On the Job With PORAC, PORAC President Brian Marvel and Vice President Damon Kurtz connect with speakers Lt. Colonel Dave Grossman and Sgt. Jon Davis to get a sneak preview of what's to come when they present at our 69th Annual Conference of Members happening November 19-21 in Monterey.   Lt. Colonel Grossman, who will be presenting on November 19 from 1-4 p.m., will provide a recipe for ensuring that your mind is mentally prepared for combat encounters, and the life after. Titled The Bulletproof Mind, Colonel Grossman's discussion presents various topics such as how violence in our society has become prevalent, the responsibility of on and off-duty cops, how to prepare for and deal with the stress of violent encounters, and the role that law enforcement plays in serving as the protectors to those around them.   Sgt. Davis, who will be presenting on November 20 from 1-4 p.m., will be discussing his topic titled Legally Justified; But was it Avoidable? This discussion analyzes dozens of recent use of force videos and focuses on the totality of the interaction. Attendees will dissect the behavior of the offender and more importantly, the thoughts and behavioral processes of the officer(s) involved.   Click Here to learn more about the upcoming speakers and our 69th Annual Conference of Members in Monterey!   --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   About Lt. Colonel Dave Grossman   Lt. Col. Dave Grossman is a former US Army Ranger, paratrooper, and West Point Psychology Professor. He has a Black Belt in Hojutsu, the martial art of the firearm, and has been inducted into the USA Martial Arts Hall of Fame. Col. Grossman's research was cited by the President of the United States in a national address, and he has testified before the U.S. Senate, the U.S. Congress, and numerous state legislatures. He has served as an expert witness and consultant in state and Federal courts.   He helped train mental health professionals after the Jonesboro school massacre, and he was also involved in counseling or court cases in the aftermath of the Paducah, Springfield, Littleton and Nickel Mines Amish school massacres.   Click Here for full bio.   -------------------------   About Sgt. Jon Davis   Jonathan S. Davis is a senior instructor for Calibre Press, a nationally recognized law enforcement training organization that has trained more than 1 million officers over its 40-year history. Jon began his career in law enforcement 20 years ago. He served as a Granville, OH Police Officer for 5 years and has spent the past 15 years with the Ohio State Highway Patrol where he currently holds the rank of Sergeant.   Sgt. Davis has worked with Criminal Patrol Teams, Ohio State Patrol Investigations Division and is an Academy Instructor for the Ohio State Highway Patrol.  He is currently the Course Director for Emergency Vehicle Operations and designed and implanted an Emergency Vehicle Operations Training Program for the OHSP that was so successful, he now instructs other Ohio Law Enforcement agencies in this program.   Jon is a Subject Matter Expert in EVO and assisted in revamping the Ohio Peace Officer Basic Driver's Training Program designed to decrease agency liability and improve officer safety.   As an Executive Board Member of the nationally recognized “Below 100” campaign, Sgt. Davis has been instrumental in bringing that program to the State of Ohio. Jon is also on the Executive Board for the Association of Law Enforcement Emergency Response Trainers (ALERT) holding the position of Vice President.  Sergeant Davis is a Master Instructor and Train-the-Trainer for numerous training programs.   Sgt. Davis serves as a Subject Matter Expert Consultant for a nationally recognized Fortune 500 company that provides agencies and officers with support and resources designed to improve career and quality of life.   Click Here for full bio.

CarCast
Jeff O'Neill (Founder of Velocity Invitational) + SEMA Recap

CarCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


Adam and Matt are both here for this episode of Car Cast. The guys start off the show talking about Matt's Mach-E and Adam's plug-in hybrid issues. Matt gets into SEMA and Adam recaps his experience at the Simeone Museum. Matt talks about driving the new Bronco Off-Road as well as taking an underground Tesla ride. Lastly, the founder of the Velocity Invitational Jeff O'Neill joins the guys to talk about what to expect this weekend in Monterey. Thanks For Supporting Our Sponsors: Visit Geico.com Visit RockAuto.com and let them know you heard it on CarCast Visit TricoCatsAndDogs.com Visit LiveXLive.com

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations
Thursdays with Bob: Rocky Road

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 20:46


Dr Mac joins Kelly to discuss his rough upgrade path to Monterey, and point out some considerations you should make before clicking ‘upgrade.'

Loop Infinito (by Applesfera)
Bienvenidos a Monterey

Loop Infinito (by Applesfera)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 17:37


Un vistazo a las novedades de macOS Monterey tras unas dos semanas con él, una actualización menor, con algunas novedades interesantes, pero ciertas aristas por pulir. *** Loop Infinito es un podcast de Applesfera, presentado por Javier Lacort y editado por Santi Araújo. Contacta con el autor en Twitter (@jlacort) o por correo (lacort@xataka.com). Gracias por escuchar este podcast.

Mystic Magic
Be Love

Mystic Magic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:10


Rev. Celeste's guest is Leadership Development Coach, DEI Facilitator, Author, Workshop Presenter and Coach, Glodean Champion (GlodeanChampion.com). She helps her clients to move from where they are to where they want to be.Glodean's book is entitled "Salmon Croquettes". It is a novel about a 12-year old girl navigating through her sexuality. Glodean holds book readings where she also cooks a salmon croquettes meal! She does this as an homage to her mother who made them weekly.Ms. Champion became an educator after a career in mid-management corporate environments. She went where Spirit led her, and she loves teaching. After George Floyd died, she was led to do something to help. She knew she could give love, be love and teach love. She would tell people in Monterey that she loves them and paying forward in restaurants. After encouraging people to love themselves, she realized that she needs to love herself.The personal development work came from looking inward and being able to protect and take better care of herself. She knew she wasn't alone in giving to others while forgetting who we are. She started posting on social media and people would ask how. She realized that she should do the work. The personal development work and the DEI work became her focus in the last few months. She has been building her coaching work and attracting many more clients.Glodean grew up in the church but found that the people who were telling her to do things were hypocrites. She finally found Rev. Joan Steadman (https://www.agapebayarea.com) in the 90's at Oakland Center for Spiritual Living and had a transformational moment. It made sense to her and made a big change in the way she moved through the world.Glodean is also a Six Sigma Black Belt. Six Sigma is a quality and process improvement methodology. It eliminates variation and therefore defects. In Lean Six Sigma, the objective is to eliminate waste. Glodean pays attention to the people and not just the process.  She was chosen to do the work because she had good relationships and got things done. Glodean supports management in trusting people and empowering them. It moves people from "me" thinkers to "we" thinkers. Pete, who trained her, was truly a leader because he didn't make her feel bad for making a mistake. He helped her course correct in a way that was supportive.Glodean found her birth family this year. Her 16-year old birth parents were in love and allowed her adoptive mother to have her because they knew she was going to love her and take care of her. Her mother was one of 36 single Black women who was able to adopt at that time. (https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/adoption/nam/) Glodean shares Love messages on social media platforms. It started with the George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breanna Taylor murders. She felt we give nonsense so much power. When one recognizes Love, they wouldn't act that way. She chooses to help people who are willing, to love. Her upcoming webinar is DEI Done Differently on November 16th. Get more information about it here: DEI Done Differently | Glodean ChampionGlodean is on LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram.Listen to Rev. Celeste's Poem: Be Love. Support the show (http://paypal.me/rev107)

Contacts
Kevin Christensen and Pat Fuscaldo

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 72:17


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:18:06] So I had to look inside myself to know that I can do good things on the court. I'm being challenged every day in practice. I can't even dribble the ball across half court against the guys in practice, I'm turning it over every time. And so I had to work on that and develop that.[00:19:24] He was coaching me. He was challenging me in that time. And so I used that as motivation instead of using it and looking at it negatively[00:22:17] I think the takeaway here as a coach, one is that those feedback loops are super important and figuring out who you're dealing with as an athlete and as a coach to make sure the message is received in the spirit it is intended.[00:22:33] It was really important. And had that been a different player, maybe it lands differently.[00:23:28] So my plan was obviously I needed to put in extra work, which in the book I define as work outside of your normally scheduled practice. And I wanted to be intelligent about that.[00:29:29] And I always tried to do the best I could to be prepared for those opportunities. So I can help the team be prepared. I wasn't going to play much on game day, but I could help them in practice. And so I think that's a huge opportunity in practice for players.[00:29:44] I think this idea that I also touch on in the book is I said earlier, handling outside influences. So insiders and outsiders, so many athletes and I'm included, have people that care for them and love them and want them to do well, but they don't necessarily give them the best advice, especially if they're a bench player.[00:35:08] when you're on the bench, whether you have a chance to play or not, you have to stay mentally checked into the game.[00:38:52] I think you got to point out how important their role is just being on the team and what they mean to the team. And you got to try to get them to buy into that.[00:42:59] But I also realized too that if I was going to be on the end of the bench I didn't want to be out on the end of the bench on a bad team.What's that say about me? I can't get in the game on a bad team. I, I think figuring out what my role was and embracing it, it doesn't mean I'm gonna be stuck in that role forever, but just figuring out what it was. And like I said, early on, it was scout team. That was my role.  [00:44:16] I think it's all about your outlook and positive attitude. There's some days where your challenged and it just goes back to, I think the most important lesson in the book, is believe in yourself.[00:45:28] Everybody wants to start, let's be honest, but on any normal basketball team, there's more people that don't start than do start.[00:47:36] I think the biggest thing is I, and you touched on this is this, the communication between the coach and the player.[00:50:03]  There's certain sections, maybe there's four sections of a season. The conditioning, practice, games, postseason. And right now there's not a team in America who doesn't have a happy team. Right? Everybody's happy right now cause there's no roles been defined yet. [00:51:43] How do you keep those kids? He goes, sometimes you got to cut him loose. I go don't believe in that. Cause if somebody cut me loose, I wouldn't be standing here in front. He goes, and he said the word, the first time I heard this phrase, he goes, those guys are coach killers.[00:53:40] I think the biggest thing is that it's up to you to make it happen. Nobody's going to just hand you what you want.[00:57:47] I would tell the parents I'd be like, look, here's the difference between a parent and a coach. The coach wants the best five players to play, the parent wants the best four players and their son to play.[01:00:46] I'm just going to say one of the most important things you touched on and that's controlling the controllables. This is something I constantly talk to my athletes about now.[01:02:39] Failures is one thing, but mistakes you can control those mistakes by not making another mistake right away.[01:04:10] Over the 10 years since I've written Bench Rules, every year I hear about different teams using it. From college to high school, all throughout the country, and in several different countries as well. 

Command Control Power: Apple Tech Support & Business Talk
438: Interview With Adam Engst Of the TidBITS Content Network

Command Control Power: Apple Tech Support & Business Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 51:32


Topics: -This week we welcome back Adam Engst of TidBITS Content Network. -The supply chain issues are hitting many areas hard. -Finding people to hire is no easy task of late. Adam gives us his thoughts based on recent research. -Quality of life is affecting people's decisions to go back to work. -Adam uses Keyboard Maestro to automate specific tasks: https://www.keyboardmaestro.com/main/ -Sam is seeing customers that would rather pick up in store, even if the specifications are not exactly what they want, rather than wait for the supply chain delays. -Joe & Jerry were comparing new models but didn't quite pull the trigger. -Not just increased processing power and unified memory, but faster SSDs. -The 1080p HD FaceTime camera is still weak but better than the 720p camera in previous models. -Adam talks about ergonomics like desktop height and keyboard/trackpads. -He recommends a roller mouse from Contour Designs: https://www.contourdesign.com -Does virtualization change anything for people on Apple Silicon? -Gamers are still staying away from the Mac platform. -Monterey appears to be an easier upgrade process in comparison to the issues that have plagued Big Sur. -Upgrading from Mojave is still troublesome: https://mrmacintosh.com/macos-upgrade-to-big-sur-failed-stuck-progress-bar-fix-prevention/ -Get your Apple gifts on the early side as supply chain issues could affect timing. -If you aren't already a subscriber, get well written, professional Apple Content for you to use with your customers with TidBITS Content Network.

Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)
A Summit of Geeks

Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 85:32


MacMost's Gary Rosenzweig joins John and Dave today to share Quick Tips, Cool Stuff Found and, yes, to help answer all of your Apple-related tech questions. Topics include dealing with Monterey's “Load Content Directly” issues in Mail, Network Utility Replacements, Monterey image tricks, portable Apple Watch chargers, and much more! Press play and learn at least five new things with your three favorite geeks!

CocaTech
Mais 8 Novidades (Algumas Secretas) Que Você Precisa Testar Agora no Monterey

CocaTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 9:03


Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
You Know How To Use Fake Email Addresses to Stay Safe?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 64:01


If you follow my newsletter, you probably saw what I had in the signature line the last few weeks: how to make a fake identity. Well, we're going to take it a little bit differently today and talk about how to stop spam with a fake email. [Automated transcript follows] [00:00:16] Email is something that we've had for a long time. [00:00:19] I think I've told you before I had email way back in the early eighties, late seventies, actually. So, yeah, it's been a while and I get tens of thousands of email every day, uh, sent to my domain, you know, mainstream.net. That's my company. I've had that same domain name for 30 years and, and it just kinda got out of control. [00:00:46] And so we have. Big Cisco server, that exclusively filters email for us and our clients. And so it cuts down the tens of thousands to a very manageable couple of hundred a day. If you think that's manageable and it gets sort of almost all of the fishing and a lot of the spam and other things that are coming. [00:01:09] But, you know, there's an easier way to do this. Maybe not quite as effective, but allowing you to track this whole email problem and the spam, I'm going over this in some detail in. Coming bootcamp. So make sure we keep an eye on your emails. So you know about this thing again, it's free, right? I do a lot of the stuff just to help you guys understand it. [00:01:34] I'm not trying to, you know, just be June to submission to buy something. This is a boot camp. My workshops, my boot camps, my emails, they are all about informing you. I try to make them the most valuable piece of email. During the week. So we're going to go into this in some detail in this upcoming bootcamp. [00:01:55] But what we're looking at now is a number of different vendors that have gotten together in order to help prevent some of the spam that you might've been in. Uh, I think that's a very cool idea to have these, these sometimes temporary, sometimes fake email addresses that you can use. There's a company out there called fast to mail. [00:02:20] You might want to check them out. There's another company called apple. And you might might want to check them out. I'll be talking about their solution here as well. But the idea is why not just have one email address? And if you're an apple user, even if you don't have the hardware, you can sign up for an apple account. [00:02:42] And then once you have that account, you can use a new feature. I saw. Oh, in, in fact, in Firefox, if you use Firefox at all, when there's a form and it asks for an email address, Firefox volunteers to help you make a fake ish email address. Now I say fake ish, because it's a real email address that forwards to your normal regular. [00:03:10] Email address. And as part of the bootcamp, I'm also going to be explaining the eight email addresses, minimum eight, that you have to have what they are, how to get them, how to use them. But for now you can just go online to Google and this will get you started and do a search for Apple's new hide. My email feature. [00:03:30] This lets you create random email addresses and those email addresses. And up in your regular, uh, icloud.com or me.com, whatever you might have for your email address, address that apple has set up for you. Isn't that cool. And you can do that by going into your iCloud settings. And it's part of their service that are offering for this iCloud plus thing. [00:03:57] And they've got three different fi privacy focused services, right? So in order to get this from apple, so you can create these unlimited number of rather random looking emails, for instance, a blue one to six underscore cat I cloud.com that doesn't tell anybody. Who you are, and you can put a label in there. [00:04:21] What's the name of the website that, that, or the, the, a URL of the website, the two created this email for, and then a note so that you can look at it later on to try new member and that way. Site that you just created it for in this case, this is an article from CNET. They had an account@jamwirebeats.com. [00:04:45] This is a weekly music magazine subscription that they had. And apple generated this fake email address, blue one to 600 score Canada, cobb.com. Now I can hear you right now. Why would you bother doing that? It sounds like a lot of work. Well, first of all, it's not a whole lot of work, but the main reason to do that, If you get an email address to blue cat, one, two6@icloud.com and it's supposedly from bank of America, you instantly know that is spam. [00:05:23] That is a phishing email because it's not using the email address you gave to TD bank. No it's using the email address that it was created for one website jam wire beats.com. This is an important feature. And that's what I've been doing for decades. Email allows you to have a plus sign. In the email address and Microsoft even supports it. [00:05:53] Now you have to turn it on. So I will use, for instance, Craig, plus a Libsyn as an example@craigpeterson.com and now emails that Libson wants to send me. I'll go to Craig. Libsyn@craigpeterson.com. Right? So the, the trick here is now if I get an email from someone other than libs, and I know, wait a minute, this isn't Libsyn, and that now flags, it has a phishing attack, right. [00:06:28] Or at the very least as some form of spam. So you've got to keep an eye out for that. So you got to have my called plus, and if. Pay for the premium upgrade, which ranges from a dollar to $10. Uh, you you've got it. Okay. If you already have an iCloud account, your account automatically gets upgraded to iCloud plus as part of iOS 15, that just came out. [00:06:55] All right. So that's one way you can do it. If you're not an apple fan. I already mentioned that Firefox, which is a browser has a similar feature. Uh, Firefox has just been crazy about trying to protect your privacy. Good for them, frankly. Right? So they've been doing a whole lot of stuff to protect your privacy. [00:07:17] However, there you are. They have a couple of features that get around some of the corporate security and good corporate security people have those features block because it makes it impossible for them to monitor bad guys that might hack your account. So that's another thing you can look at is Firefox. [00:07:37] Have a look@fastmail.com. And as I said, we're going to go into this in some detail in the bootcamp, but fast mail lets you have these multiple email accounts. No, they restricted. It's not like apple where it's an infinite number, but depending on how much you pay fast mail is going to help you out there. [00:07:57] And then if you're interested, by the way, just send an email to me, me. Craig peterson.com. Please use that email address emmy@craigpeterson.com because that one is the one that's monitored most closely. And just ask for my report on email and I've got a bunch of them, uh, that I'll be glad to send you the gets into some detail here, but proton mail. [00:08:22] Is a mail service that's located in Switzerland? No, I know of in fact, a couple of a high ranking military people. I mean really high ranking military people that are supposedly using proton mail. I have a proton mail account. I don't use it that much because I have so much else going on, but the advantage. [00:08:45] Proton mail is it is in Switzerland. And as a general rule, they do not let people know what your identity is. So it's kind of untraceable. Hence these people high up in the department of defense, right. That are using proton mail. However, it is not completely untraceable. There is a court case that a proton man. [00:09:12] I don't know if you'd say they lost, but proton mail was ordered about a month ago to start logging access and provide it for certain accounts so they can do it. They are doing it. They don't use it in most cases, but proton mail is quite good. They have a little free level. Paid levels. And you can do all kinds of cool stuff with proton mail. [00:09:35] And many of you guys have already switched, uh, particularly people who asked for my special report on email, because I go into some reasons why you want to use different things. Now there's one more I want to bring up. And that is Tempa mail it's temp-mail.org. Don't send anything. That is confidential on this. [00:09:57] Don't include any credit card numbers, nothing. Okay. But temp-mail.org will generate a temporary email address. Part of the problem with this, these temporary email address. Is, they are blocked at some sites that really, really, really want to know what your really mail address is. Okay. But it's quite cool. [00:10:22] It's quite simple. So I'm right there right now. temp-mail.org. And I said, okay, give me email address. So gave me one. five04@datacop.com. Is this temporary email, so you can copy that address. Then you can come back into again, temp-mail.org and read your email for a certain period of time. So it is free. [00:10:48] It's disposable email. It's not particularly private. They have some other things, but I wouldn't use them because I don't know them for some of these other features and services. Stop pesky email stop. Some of these successful phishing attempt by having a unique, not just password, but a unique email for all those accounts. [00:11:12] And as I mentioned, upcoming bootcamp, and I'll announce it in my weekly email, we're going to cover this in some detail. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you subscribe to my newsletter. [00:11:25] Well, you've all heard is up. So what does that mean? Well, okay. It's up 33% since the last two years, really. But what does that amount to, we're going to talk about that. And what do you do after you've been ransomed? [00:11:42] Ransomware is terrible. It's crazy. Much of it comes in via email. [00:11:49] These malicious emails, they are up 600% due to COVID-19. 37% of organizations were affected by ransomware attacks in the last year. That's according to Sofos. 37% more than the third. Isn't that something in 2021, the largest ransomware payout, according to business insider was made by an insurance company at $40 million setting a world record. [00:12:21] The average ransom fee requested increased from 5,020 18 to around 200,000 in 2020. Isn't that something. So in the course of three years, it went from $5,000 to 200,000. That's according to the national security Institute, experts estimate that a ransomware attack will occur every 11 seconds for the rest of the year. [00:12:50] Uh, it's just crazy. Absolutely. Crazy all of these steps. So what does it mean? Or, you know, okay. It's up this much is up that much. Okay. Businesses are paying millions of dollars to get their data back. How about you as an individual? Well, as an individual right now, the average ransom is $11,605. So are you willing to pay more than $11,000 to get your pictures back off of your home computer in order to get your. [00:13:27] Work documents or whatever you have on your home computer. Hopefully you don't have any work information on your home computer over $11,000. Now, by the way, most of the time, these ransoms are actually unaffiliate affair. In other words, there is a company. That is doing the ransom work and they are pain and affiliate who are the, the affiliate in this case. [00:13:55] So the people who infected you and the affiliates are making up to 80% from all of these rents. Payments it's crazy. Right? So you can see why it's up. You can just go ahead and try and fool somebody into clicking on a link. Maybe it's a friend of yours. You don't productively like some friend, right. And you can go ahead and send them an email with a link in it. [00:14:20] And they click the link and it installs ransomware and you get 80% of them. Well, it is happening. It's happening a lot. So what do you do? This is a great little article over on dark reading and you'll see it on the website. The Craig peterson.com. But this article goes through. What are some of the steps it's by Daniel Clayton? [00:14:48] It's actually quite a good little article. He's the VP of global security services and support over at bit defender bit defender is. Great, uh, software that you've got versions of it for the Mac. You've got versions four of it for window. You might want to check it out, but he's got a nice little list here of things that you want to do. [00:15:13] So number one, Don't panic, right? Scott Adams don't panic. So we're worried because we think we're going to lose our job June. Do you know what? By the way is in the top drawer of the majority of chief information, security officers, two things. Uh, w one is their resignation letter and the second one is their resume because if they are attacked and it's very common and if they get in trouble, they are leaving. [00:15:47] And that's pretty common too. Although I have heard of some companies that understand, Hey, listen, you can't be 100% effective. You got to prioritize your money and play. It really is kind of like going to Vegas and betting on red or black, right? 50, 50 chance. Now, if you're a higher level organization, like our customers that have to meet these highest compliance standards, these federal government regulations and some of the European regulations, even state regulations, well, then we've got to keep you better than 99% safe and knock on wood over the course of 30 years. [00:16:27] That's a long I've been doing. 30 years. We have never had a single customer get a S uh, and. Type of malware, whether it is ransomware or anything else, including one custom company, that's a multinational. We were taking care of one of their divisions and the whole company got infected with ransomware. [00:16:50] They had to shut down globally for. Two weeks while they tried to recover everything, our little corner of the woods, the offices that we were protecting for that division, however, didn't get hit at all. So it is possible, right? I don't want you guys to think, man. There was nothing I can do. So I'm not going to do anything. [00:17:14] One of the ladies in one of my mastermind groups basically said that, right? Cause I was explaining another member of my mastermind group. Got. And I got hit for, I think it turned out to be $35,000 and, you know, that's a bad thing. Plus you feel just so exposed. I've been robbed before, uh, and it's just a terrible, terrible feeling. [00:17:37] So he was just kind of freaking out for good. But I explained, okay, so here's what you do. And she walked away from it thinking, well, there's nothing I can do. Well, there are things you can do. It is not terribly difficult. And listening here, getting my newsletter, going to my bootcamps and the workshops, which are more involved, you can do it. [00:18:03] Okay. It can be done. So I don't want. Panic. I don't want you to think that there's zero. You can do so that's number one. If you do get ransomware, number two, you got to figure out where did this come from? What happened? I would change this order. So I would say don't panic. And then number two is turn off the system that got rants. [00:18:29] Turn it off one or more systems. I might've gotten ransomware. And remember that the ransomware notification does not come up right. When it starts encrypting your data. It doesn't come up once they've stolen your data. It comes up after they have spread through your organization. So smart money would say shut off every computer, every. [00:18:56] Not just pull the plug. I w I'm talking about the ethernet cable, right? Don't just disconnect from wifi. Turn it off. Immediately. Shut it off. Pull the plug. It might be okay. In some cases, the next thing that has to happen is each one of those machines needs to have its disc drive probably removed and examined to see if it has. [00:19:18] Any of that ransomware on it. And if it does have the ransomware, it needs to get cleaned up or replaced. And in most cases we recommend, Hey, good time. Replace all the machines, upgrade everything. Okay. So that's the bottom line. So that's my mind. Number two. Okay. Um, he has isolated and save, which makes sense. [00:19:40] You're trying to minimize the blast radius. So he wants you to isolate him. I want you to turn them off because you do not want. Any ransomware that's on a machine in the process of encrypting your files. You don't want it to keep continuing to encrypting. Okay. So hopefully you've done the right thing. [00:20:00] You are following my 3, 2, 1 backup schedule that I taught last year, too, for free. For anybody that attended, hopefully you've already figured out if you're going to pay. Pay. I got to say some big companies have driven up the price of Bitcoin because they've been buying it as kind of a hedge against getting ransomware so they can just pay it right away. [00:20:25] But you got to figure that out. There's no one size fits all for all of this. At over $11,000 for an individual ransom, uh, this requires some preparation and some thought stick around, got a lot more coming up. Visit me online, Craig Peterson.com and get my newsletter along with all of the free trainings. [00:20:52] Well, the bad guys have done it again. There is yet another way that they are sneaking in some of this ransomware and it has to do with Q R codes. This is actually kind of clever. [00:21:08] By now you must've seen if not used QR codes. [00:21:12] These are these codes that they're generally in a square and the shape of a square and inside there's these various lines and in a QR code, you can encode almost anything. Usually what it is, is a URL. So it's just like typing in a web address into your phone, into your web browser, whatever you might be using. [00:21:35] And they have been very, very handy. I've used them. I've noticed them even showing up now on television ad down in the corner, you can just scan the QR code in order to apply right away to get your gin Sioux knives. Actually, I haven't seen it on that commercial, but, uh, it's a different one. And we talked last week about some of these stores that are putting QR codes in their windows. [00:22:02] So people who are walking by, we even when the store is closed, can order stuff, can get stuff. It's really rather cool. Very nice technology. Uh, so. There is a new technique to get past the email filters. You know, I provide email filters, these big boxes, I mean, huge machines running Cisco software that are tied into, uh, literally billion end points, plus monitoring tens of hundreds of millions of emails a day. [00:22:39] It's just huge. I don't even. I can ha can't get my head around some of those numbers, but it's looking at all those emails. It is cleaning them up. It's looking at every URL that's embedded in an email says, well, is this a bad guy? It'll even go out and check the URL. It will look at the domain. Say how long has this domain been registered? [00:23:01] What is the spam score overall on the domain? As well as the email, it just does a whole lot of stuff. Well, how can it get around a really great tight filter like that? That's a very good question. How can you and the bottom line answer is, uh, how about, uh, using the QR code? So that's what bad guys are doing right now. [00:23:26] They are using a QR code in side email. Yeah. So the emails that have been caught so far by a company called abnormal security have been saying that, uh, you have a missed voicemail, and if you want to pick it up, then scan this QR. It looks pretty legitimate, obviously designed to bypass enterprise, email gateway scans that are really set up to detect malicious links and attachments. [00:24:01] Right? So all of these QR codes that abnormal detected were created the same day they were sent. So it's unlikely that the QR codes, even that they'd been detected would have been previously. Poured it included in any security blacklist. One of the good things for these bad guys about the QR codes is they can easily change the look of the QR code. [00:24:26] So even if the mail gateway software is scanning for pictures and looking for a specific QR codes, basically, they're still getting. So the good news is the use of the QR codes in these types of phishing emails is still quite rare. We're not seeing a lot of them yet. We are just starting to see them, uh, hyperlinks to phishing sites, a really common with some of these QR codes. [00:24:58] But this is the first time we've seen an actor embed, a functional QR code into an email is not. Now the better business bureau warned of a recent uptick, ticking complaints from consumers about scams involving QR codes, not just an email here, but because these codes can't really be read by the human eye at all. [00:25:21] The attackers are using them to disguise malicious links so that you know, that vendor that I talked about, that retail establishment that's using the QR codes and hoping people walking by will scan it in order to get some of that information. Well, People are going to be more and more wary of scanning QR codes, right? [00:25:43] Isn't that just make a lot of sense, which is why, again, one of the items in our protection stack that we use filters URLs. Now you can get a free. The filter and I cover this in my workshop, how to do it, but if you go to open DNS, check them out, open DNS, they have a free version. If you're a business, they want you to pay, but we have some business related ones to let you have your own site to. [00:26:15] Based on categories and all that sort of stuff, but the free stuff is pretty generalized. They usually have two types, one for family, which blocks the stuff you might think would be blocked. Uh, and other so that if you scan one of these QR codes and you are using open DNS umbrella, one of these others, you're going to be much, much. [00:26:39] Because it will, most of the time be blocked because again, the umbrella is more up-to-date than open DNS is, but they are constantly monitoring these sites and blocking them as they need to a mobile iron, another security company. I conducted a survey of more than 4,400 people last year. And they found that 84% have used a QR code. [00:27:05] So that's a little better than I thought it was. Twenty-five percent of them said that they had run into situations where a QR code did something they did not expect including taking them to a malicious website. And I don't know, are they like scanning QR codes in the, in the men's room or something in this doll? [00:27:24] I don't know. I've never come across a QR code. That was a malicious that I tried to scan, but maybe I'm a little more cautious. 37% were. Saying that they could spot a malicious QR code. Yeah. Yeah. They can read these things while 70% said they'd be able to spot a URL to a phishing or other malicious website that I can believe. [00:27:50] But part of the problem is when you scan a QR code, it usually comes up and it says, Hey, do you want to open this? And most of that link has invisible is, is not visible because it is on your smartphone and it's not a very big screen. So we'll just show you the very first part of it. And the first part of it, it's going to look pretty darn legit. [00:28:14] So again, that's why you need to make sure you're using open DNS or umbrella. Ideally, you've got it installed right at your edge at your router at whoever's handling DHCP for your organization. Uh, in the phishing campaign at normal had detected with using this QR code, uh, code they're saying the attackers had previously compromised, some outlook, email accounts, belonging to some legitimate organizations. [00:28:43] To send the emails with malicious QR codes. And we've talked about that before they use password stuffing, et cetera. And we're covering all of this stuff in the bootcamp and also, well, some of it in the bootcamp and all of this really in the workshops that are coming up. So keep an eye out for that stuff. [00:29:03] Okay. Soup to nuts here. Uh, it's a, uh, it's a real. Every week, I send out an email and I have been including my show notes in those emails, but I found that most people don't do anything with the show notes. So I'm changing, I'm changing things this week. How some of you have gotten the show notes, some of you haven't gotten the show notes, but what I'm going to be doing is I've got my show notes on my website@craigpeterson.com. [00:29:35] So you'll find them right. And you can get the links for everything I talk about right here on this. I also now have training in every one of my weekly emails. It's usually a little list that we've started calling listicles and it is training on things you can do. It is. And anybody can do this is not high level stuff for people that are in the cybersecurity business, right. [00:30:07] Home users, small businesses, but you got to get the email first, Craig peterson.com and signup. [00:30:14] California is really in trouble with these new environmental laws. And yet, somehow they found a major exception. They're letting the mine lithium in the great salt and sea out in California. We'll tell you why. [00:30:31] There's an Article in the New York times. And this is fantastic. It's just a incredible it talking about the lithium gold rush. [00:30:43] You already know, I'm sure that China has been playing games with some of these minerals. Some of the ones that we really, really need exotic minerals that are used to make. Batteries that are used to power our cars. And now California is banning all small gasoline engine sales. So the, what is it? 55,000 companies out in California that do lawn maintenance are going down. [00:31:13] To drive those big lawnmowers around running on batteries. They're estimating it'll take 30 packs battery packs a day. Now, remember California is one of these places that is having rolling blackouts because they don't have. Power, right. It's not just China. It's not just Europe where they are literally freezing people. [00:31:37] They did it last winter. They expect to do it more. This winter, since we stopped shipping natural gas and oil, they're freezing people middle of winter, turning off electronics. California, at least they're not too likely to freeze unless they're up in the mountains in California. So they don't have enough power to begin with. [00:31:57] And what are they doing there? They're making it mandatory. I think it was by 2035 that every car sold has to be electric. And now they have just gotten rid of all of the small gasoline engines they've already got. Rolling blackouts, come on. People smarten up. So they said, okay, well here's what we're going to do. [00:32:20] We need lithium in order to make these batteries. Right. You've heard of lithium-ion batteries. They're in everything. Now, have you noticed with lithium batteries, you're supposed to take them to a recycling center and I'm sure all of you do. When your battery's dead in your phone, you take it to a recycling center. [00:32:39] Or if you have a battery that you've been using in your Energizer bunny, and it's a lithium battery, of course you take it to the appropriate authorities to be properly disposed of because it's toxic people. It is toxic. So we have to be careful with this. Well, now we're trying to produce lithium in the United States. [00:33:06] There are different projects in different parts of the country, all the way from Maine through of course, California, in order to try and pull the lithium out of the ground and all. Let me tell you, this is not very green at all. So novel. Peppa Northern Nevada. They've started here blasting and digging out a giant pit in this dormant volcano. [00:33:38] That's going to serve as the first large scale, lithium mine in the United States and more than a decade. Well, that's good. Cause we need it. And do you know about the supply chain problems? Right. You've probably heard about that sort of thing, but that's good. This mine is on least federal lands. What does that mean? [00:33:59] Well, that means if Bernie Sanders becomes president with the flick of a pen, just like Joe Biden did on his first day, he could close those leads to federal lands. Yeah. And, uh, we're back in trouble again, because we have a heavy reliance on foreign sources of lithium, right. So this project's known as lithium Americas. [00:34:25] There are some native American tribes, first nation as they're called in Canada. Uh, ranchers environmental groups that are really worried, because guess what? In order to mine, the lithium, and to do the basic processing onsite that needs to be done, they will be using. Billions of gallons of groundwater. [00:34:48] Now think of Nevada. Think of California. Uh, you don't normally think of massive lakes of fresh water to. No. Uh, how about those people that are opposed to fracking? Most of them are opposed to fracking because we're pumping the water and something, various chemicals into the ground in order to crack the rock, to get the gas out. [00:35:11] Right. That's what we're doing. They don't like that. But yet, somehow. Contaminating the water for 300 years and leaving behind a giant mound of waste. Isn't a problem for these so-called Greenies. Yeah. A blowing up visit quote here from max Wilbert. This is a guy who has been living in a tent on this proposed mine site. [00:35:38] He's got a. Lawsuits that are going, trying to block the project. He says blowing up a mountain. Isn't green, no matter how much marketing spend people put on it, what have I been saying forever? We're crazy. We are insane. I love electric cars. If they are coolest. Heck I would drive one. If I had one, no problem. [00:35:57] I'm not going to bother to go out and buy one, but, uh, yeah, it's very cool, but it is anything but green. Electric cars and renewable energy are not green, renewable energy. The solar and the wind do not stop the need for nuclear plants or oil or gas burners, or cold burners, et cetera. Because when the sun isn't shining, we still need electricity. [00:36:29] Where are we getting to get it? When the wind isn't blowing or when the windmills are broken, which happens quite frequently. Where are we going to get our power? We have to get it from the same way we always have from maybe some, uh, some old hydro dams. Right. But really we got to start paying a lot more attention to nuclear. [00:36:53] I saw a couple of more nuclear licenses were issued for these six gen nuclear plants that are green people. They are green, but back to our lithium mine. They're producing cobalt and nickel as well as the lithium. And they are ruined this to land, water, wildlife, and. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. Uh, we have had wars over gold and oil before and now we're looking at minerals. [00:37:27] In fact, there's a race underway between the United States, China, Europe, Russia, and others, looking for economic and technological dominance for decades to come by grabbing many of these precious minerals. So let's get into this a little bit further here. Okay. So they're trying to do good, but really they're not green. [00:37:53] They're they're not doing good. And this is causing friction. Okay. Um, first three months of this year, us lithium miners raise nearly three and a half billion dollars from wall street, seven times the amount raised in the last six months or 36 months. Yeah, huge. Money's going into it. Okay. They're going after lithium from California's largest leak, the Salton sea. [00:38:23] Yeah. Yeah. So they're going to use specially coded beads to extract lithium salt from the hot liquid pumped up from an aquifer more than 4,000 feet below the surface. Hmm. Sounds like drilling aren't they anti drilling to the self-contained systems connected to geothermal power plants generating emission free electricity. [00:38:44] Oh, that's right. They don't have a problem with the ring of fire in California with earthquakes and things. Right. Ah, yeah. Drilling on that and using the, the, uh, It's not going to be a problem. Uh, so, um, yeah, so that you're hoping to generate revenue needed to restore the lake fouled by toxic runoff from area farms for decades. [00:39:08] So they're looking to do more here. Lithium brine, Arkansas, Nevada, North Dakota, as I mentioned already, Maine. Uh, they're using it in every car that's out there, smartphones, et cetera. Uh, the us has some of the world's largest reserves, which is, I guess, a very good thing. Right? A silver peak mine in Nevada is producing 5,000 tons a year, which is less than 2% of the world's supply. [00:39:40] Uh, this is just absolutely amazing going through this. Okay. Um, I know bomb administration official, Ben Steinberg said right now, China decided to cut off the U S for a variety of reasons. We're in trouble. Yeah. You think. Uh, the another thing here in the New York times article is from this rancher and it's a bit of a problem. [00:40:06] He's got 500 cows and calves. Roaming is 50,000 acres and Nevada's high desert is going to have to start buying feed for. This local, mine's going to reach about 370 feet. Uh, here's another kind of interesting thing. This mine one mine is going to consume 3,200 gallons of water. Per minute. Yeah. In, in Baron Nevada, I I'm looking at a picture of this and it is just dead sagebrush. [00:40:37] Oh my gosh. So they're expecting the water table will drop at least 12 feet. They're going to be producing 66,000 tons of battery grade, lithium carbonate a year. But, uh, here we go. They're digging out this mountain side and they're using 5,800 tons of so FERC acid per day. Yeah. They're mixing clay dug out from the ma from the Mount side with 5,800 tons of clay of sulfuric acid. [00:41:10] I should say every day, they're also consuming 354 million cubic yards. Of mining waste. I'm not consuming creating 354 million cubic yards of mining waste loaded with, uh, discharged from this sulfuric acid treatment and may contain. Modest amounts of radioactive uranium. That's according to the permit documents, they're expecting it'll degrade quote unquote 5,000 acres of winter range used by the antelope herd, the habitat of the Sage groves nesting areas for Eagles. [00:41:48] It just goes on and on. It is not. BLM is not, of course stumbled the bureau of land management, but I guess both PLMs are not, and this is a real problem and the tribes are trying to stop it. The farmers are trying to stop it, but Hey, California needs more lithium batteries for their electric cars. [00:42:10] They're electric lawn mowers, leaf blowers, et cetera. So we've got to get that lithium. We've got to get it right away, uh, in order for their green appetite in. Hey get some sanity. Craig peterson.com. Sign up for my newsletter right now. [00:42:28] Doing a little training here on how to spot fake log-in pages. We just covered fishing and some real world examples of it, of some free quiz stuff that you can use to help with it. And now we're moving on to the next. [00:42:44] The next thing to look for when it comes to the emails and these fake log-in pages is a spelling mistake or grammatical errors. [00:42:56] Most of the time, these emails that we get that are faking emails are, have really poor grammar in them. Many times, of course the, the commas are in the wrong place, et cetera, et cetera. But most of us weren't English majors. So we're not going to pick that up myself included. Right. That's why I use Grammarly. [00:43:17] If you have to ever write anything or which includes anything from an email or a document, uh, you, you probably want to get Grammarly. There's a few out there, but that's the one I liked the best for making sure my grammar. So a tip, I guess, to the hackers out there, but the hackers will often use a URL that is very close to. [00:43:41] Where are you want to go? So they might put a zero in place of an O in the domain, or they might make up some other domain. So it might be a amazon-aws.com or a TD bank dash. Um, account.com, something like that. Sometimes the registrars they'll catch that sort of thing and kill it. Sometimes the business that they are trying to fake will catch it and let them know as well. [00:44:16] There's companies out there that watch for that sort of thing. But many times it takes a while and it's only fixed once enough people have reported it. So look at the URL. Uh, make sure it's legitimate. I always advise that instead of clicking on the link in the email, try and go directly to the website. [00:44:38] It's like the old days you got a phone call and somebody saying, yo, I'm from the bank and I need your name and social security number. So I can validate the someone broke into your account. No, no, no, no, no, they don't. They don't just call you up like that nowadays. They'll send you a message in their app. [00:44:55] That's on your smart. But they're not going to call you. And the advice I've always given is look up their phone now. And by the way, do it in the phone book, they remember those and then call them back. That's the safest way to do that sort of thing. And that's true for emails as well. If it's supposedly your bank and it's reporting something like someone has broken into your account, which is a pretty common technique for these fissures, these hackers that are out there, just type in the bank URL as you know, it not what's in the email and. [00:45:32] There will be a message there for you if it's legitimate, always. Okay. So before you click on any website, Email links, just try and go directly to the website. Now, if it's one of these deep links where it's taking new Jew, something specific within the site, the next trick you can play is to just mouse over the link. [00:45:57] So bring your mouse down to where the link is. And typically what'll happen is at the bottom left of your. Your screen or of the window. It'll give you the actual link. Now, if you look at some of them, for instance, the emails that I send out, I don't like to bother people. So if you have an open one of my emails in a while, I'll just automatically say, Hey, I have not opened them in a while. [00:46:25] And then I will drop you off the list. Plus if you hit reply to one of my newsletters, my show notes, newsletters. That's just fine, but it's not going to go to me@craigpeterson.com and some people you listeners being the best and brightest have noticed that what happens is it comes up and it's some really weird URL that's so I can track who responded to. [00:46:53] And that way I can just sit down and say, okay, now let me go through who has responded? And I've got a, kind of a customer relationship management system that lets me keep track of all of that stuff so that I know that you responded. I know you're interacting, so I know I'm not bothering you. Right. And I know I need to respond to. [00:47:13] Well much the same thing is true with some of these links. When I have a link in my newsletter and I say, Hey, I'm linking to MIT's article. It is not going to be an MIT. Because again, I want to know what are you guys interested in? So anytime you click on a link, I'll know, and I need to know that, so I know why, Hey, wait a minute. [00:47:37] Now, 50% of all of the people that opened the emails are interested in identifying fake login pages. So what do I do? I do something like I'm doing right now. I go into depth on fake login. Pages. I wouldn't have known that if I wasn't able to track it. So just because the link doesn't absolutely look legit doesn't mean it isn't legit, but then again, if it's a bank of it involves financial transactions or some of these other things be more cautious. [00:48:13] So double-check for misspellings or grammatical errors. Next thing to do is to check the certificate, the security certificate on the site. You're on this gets a little bit confusing. If you go to a website, you might notice up in the URL bar, the bar that has the universal resource locator, that's part of the internet. [00:48:40] You might've noticed. There's a. And people might've told you do check for the lock. Well, that lock does not mean that you are saying. All it means is there is a secure VPN from your computer to the computer on the other side. So if it's a hacker on the other side, you're sending your data securely to the hacker, right? [00:49:07] That's not really going to do you a whole lot of good. This is probably one of the least understood things in the whole computer security side, that connect. Maybe secure, but is this really who you think it is? So what you need to do is click on their certificate and the certificate will tell you more detail. [00:49:32] So double-check their certificate and make sure it is for the site. You really. To go to, so when it's a bank site, it's going to say, you know, the bank is going to have the bank information on it. That makes sense. But if you go for instance on now, I'm going to throw a monkey wrench into this whole thing. [00:49:51] If you go to Craig peterson.com, for instance, it's going to say. Connection is secure. The certificate is valid, but if you look at their certificate and the trust in the details, it's going to be issued by some company, but it's going to just say Craig peterson.com. It's not going to give a business name like it would probably do for a bank. [00:50:17] So you know, a little bit of a twist to it, but that's an important thing. Don't just count on the lock, make sure that the certificate is for the place you want to contact. Last, but not least is multi-factor authentication. I can't say this enough. If the bad guys have your username or email address and your password for a site, if you're using multifactor authentication, they cannot get. [00:50:56] So it's going to prevent credential stuffing tactics, or they'll use your email and password combinations that have already been stolen for mothers sites to try and hack in to your online profile. So very important to set up and I advise against using two factor authentication with your, just a cell phone, as in a text message SMS, it is not secure and it's being hacked all of the time. [00:51:26] Get an authorization. App like one password for instance, and you shouldn't be using one password anyways, for all of your password. And then Google has a free one called Google authenticator. Use those instead of your phone number for authentication. [00:51:43] I've been warning about biometric databases. And I, I sat down with a friend of mine who is an attorney, and he's using this clear thing at the airport. I don't know if you've seen it, but it's a biometric database. What are the real world risks? [00:52:00] Well, this " Clear"company uses biometrics. It's using your eye. Brent, if you will, it's using your Iris. [00:52:08] Every one of us has a pretty darn unique Iris, and they're counting on that and they're using it to let you through TSA very quickly. And this attorney, friend of mine thinks it's the best thing since sliced bread, because he can just. Right on through, but the problem here is that we're talking about biometrics. [00:52:30] If your password gets stolen, you can change it. If your email account gets hacked, I have another friend who his account got hacked. You can get a new email account. If your Iris scan that's in this biometric database gets stolen. You cannot replace your eyes unless of course you're Tom cruise and you remember that movie, right. [00:53:00] And it's impossible to replace your fingerprints. It's possible to replace your face print. Well, I guess you could, to a degree or another, right. Some fat injections or other things. Could it be done to change your face sprint, but these Iris scans fingerprints and facial images are something I try not to provide any. [00:53:27] Apple has done a very good job with the security of their face print, as well as their fingerprint, because they do not send any of that information out directly to themselves, or do any database at all. They are stored only on the device itself. And they're in this wonderful little piece of electronics that cannot be physically compromised. [00:53:56] And to date has not been electronically compromised either. They've done a very, very good. Other vendors on other operating systems like Android, again, not so much, but there are also databases that are being kept out there by the federal government. I mentioned this clear database, which isn't the federal government, it's a private company, but the federal government obviously has its fingers into that thing. [00:54:27] The office of personnel. Uh, for the federal government, they had their entire database, at least pretty much the entire database. I think it was 50 million people stolen by the red, Chinese about six years ago. So the communists. Uh, copies of all of the information that the officer personnel management had about people, including background checks and things. [00:54:55] You've probably heard me talk about that before. So having that information in a database is dangerous because it attracts the hackers. It attracts the cybercriminals. They want to get their hands on it. They'll do all kinds of things to try and get their hands. We now have completely quit Afghanistan. [00:55:19] We left in a hurry. We did some incredibly stupid things. I just, I can't believe a president of the United States would do what was done here. And now it's been coming out that president Biden completely ignored. The advice that he was getting from various military intelligence and other agencies out there and just said, no, we're going to be out of there. [00:55:46] You have to limit your troops to this. And that's what causes them to close the airbase bog that we had had for so many years. Apparently the Chinese are talking about taking it over now. Yeah. Isn't that nice. And whereas this wasn't an eternal war, right? We hadn't had anybody die in a year and a half. [00:56:05] Uh, it's crazy. We have troops in south Vietnam. We have troops in Germany. We have troops in countries all over the world, Japan, you name it so that we have a local forest that can keep things calm. And we were keeping things calm. It's just mind blowing. But anyhow, politics aside, we left behind a massive database of biometric database. [00:56:40] Of Afghanis that had been helping us over in Afghanistan, as well as a database that was built using us contractors of everyone in the Afghan military, and basically third genealogy. Who their parents were the grandparents blood type weight, height. I'm looking at it right now. All of the records in here, the sex ID nationality. [00:57:13] Uh, date of exploration, hair color, favorite fruit, favorite vegetables, place of birth, uncle's name marker signature approval. Signature date, place of birth. Date of birth address, permanent address national ID number, place of ISS. Date of ISS native language salary. Date of salary, group of salary, police of salary education. [00:57:38] Father's named graduation date kind of weapon. And service number. These were all in place in Afghanistan. We put them in place because we were worried about ghost soldiers. A gold soldier was someone who we were paying the salary of taxpayers. The United States were paying the salaries of the Afghan military for quite some time. [00:58:06] And we were thinking that about half of the. Payroll checks. We were funding. We're actually not going to people who were in the military, but we're going to people who were high up within the Afghan government and military. So we put this in place to get rid of the ghost soldiers. Everybody had to have all of this stuff. [00:58:33] In the database, 36 pieces of information, just for police recruitment. Now this information we left behind and apparently this database is completely in the hand of the Taliban. Absolutely. So we were talking about Americans who helped construct Afghanistan and the military and the Teleman, the looking for the networks of their Poland supporters. [00:59:07] This is just absolutely amazing. So all of the data doesn't have clear use, like who cares about the favorite fruit or vegetable, but the rest of it does the genealogy. Does they now know who was in the police department, who was in the military, who their family is, what their permanent address is. Okay. [00:59:31] You see the problem here and the biometrics as well in the biometrics are part of this us system that we were using called hide H I D E. And this whole hide thing was a biometric reader. Well, the military could keep with them. There were tens of thousands of these things out in the field. And when they had an encounter with someone, they would look up their biometrics, see if they were already in the database and in the database, it would say, yeah, you know, they're friendly, they're an informant. [01:00:08] Or we found them in this area or w you know, we're watching them. We have concerned about them, et cetera, et cetera. Right. All of their actions were in. Well turns out that this database, which covered about 80% of all Afghans and these devices are now in the hands of the Taliban. Now, the good news with this is that that a lot of this information cannot be easily extracted. [01:00:40] So you're not going to get some regular run of the mill Taliban guide to pick one of these up and start using. But, uh, the what's happening here is that we can really predict that one of these surrounding companies like Pakistan that has been very cooperative with the Taliban. In fact, they gave refuge to Saddam, not Saddam Hussein, but to bin Ladin and also Iran and China and Russia. [01:01:13] Any of those countries should be able to get into that database. Okay. So I think that's really important to remember now, a defense department spokesperson quote here, Eric Faye on says the U S has taken prudent actions to ensure that sensitive data does not fall into the Tolo bonds. And this data is not at risk of misuse. [01:01:38] Misuse that's unfortunately about all I can say, but Thomas Johnson, a research professor at the Naval postgraduate school in Monterey, California says, uh, not so fast. The Taliban may have used biometric information in the Coon dues attack. So instead of taking the data straight from the high devices, he told MIT technology review that it is possible that Tolo bond sympathizers in Kabul provided them. [01:02:11] With databases as a military personnel against which they could verify prints. In other words, even back in 2016, it may have been the databases rather than these high devices themselves pose the greatest risk. This is very concerning big article here in MIT technology review. I'm quoting from it a little bit here, but there are a number of databases. [01:02:39] They are biometric. Many of these, they have geological information. They have information that can be used to round up and track down people. I'm not going to mention world war two, and I'm not going to mention what happened with the government before Hitler took over, because to do that means you lose that government had registered firearms, that government had registered the civilians and the people and Afghanistan. [01:03:13] The government was also as part of our identification papers, registering your religion. If you're Christian, they're hunting you down. If you were working for the military, they're hunting new day. And this is scary. That's part of the reason I do not want biometric information and databases to be kept here in the U S Hey, make sure you get my show notes every week on time, along with free training, I try to help you guys out. [01:03:50] Craig peterson.com. Craig peterson.com. Here I am. Cybersecurity strategist and available to you.

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Cupertino

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 32:05


Los problemas de abastecimiento en los productos de Apple, Monterey brickeando Macs y la llegada por fin de Fitness+ Patrocinador: BluaU de Sanitas http://bluau.es/ es el nuevo complemento digital del seguro médico de Sanitas que incorpora la más alta tecnología para ayudarte en el cuidado de tu salud y la de tu familia. — BluaU lanza Conecta con tu Salud http://bluau.es/, un nuevo servicio que te permite comunicar directamente tu actividad y estado físico con tus médicos, psicólogos, nutricionistas y entrenadores personales. Con Fitness+ nos vamos a poner bien musculados y en forma, todos los integrantes de este podcast: Matías, Álex y Jony Ive también. Repasamos los problemas que están viendo los usuarios de Mac al actualizar a Monterey que están quedándose con sus ordenadores inutilizados. Buscamos soluciones para restaurar o restablecer el firmware, mientras Apple encuentra una solución. También comentamos los problemas de abastecimiento que está teniendo Apple con sus productos, con retrasos de 3 ó 5 semanas, incluso algunos sin stock hasta 2022. Apple se ha quedado sin 6000 millones en ventas por problemas de suministro https://es.gizmodo.com/apple-se-ha-quedado-sin-6000-millones-en-ventas-por-pro-1847962038 Apple ha considerado lanzar su propio servicio de juegos en la nube para competir con Stadia, según Gurman https://www.applesfera.com/servicios-apple/apple-ha-considerado-lanzar-su-propio-servicio-juegos-nube-para-competir-stadia-gurman Apple prioriza la producción de iPhone 13 y recorta hasta un 50% la de otros dispositivos ante la falta de componentes | Tecnología - ComputerHoy.com https://computerhoy.com/noticias/tecnologia/apple-prioriza-produccion-iphone-13-recorta-50-otros-dispositivos-falta-componentes-957797 El stock de I Phone 13 se vacía en España en plena crisis por la falta de microchips https://www.lainformacion.com/empresas/stock-i-phone-13-se-vacia-espana-plena-crisis-falta-microchips/2851373/?autoref=true Why macOS updates might brick your Mac, and what you can do about it | Ars Technica https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/11/why-macos-updates-might-brick-your-mac-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/ Restablecer o restaurar un Mac con procesador Intel con Apple Configurator 2 - Soporte técnico de Apple (ES) https://support.apple.com/es-es/guide/apple-configurator-2/apdebea5be51/mac Dear Tim: Macs are getting bricked and your geniuses are failing | Philip Elmer‑DeWitt https://www.ped30.com/2021/11/02/apple-mac-brick-genius-fail/ Apple Wants iPhones to Detect Car Crashes, Auto-Dial 911 - WSJ https://www.wsj.com/articles/apple-wants-iphones-to-detect-car-crashes-auto-dial-911-11635768001?mod=djemalertNEWS 2021 MacBook Pro Teardown: A Glimpse at a Better Timeline | iFixit News https://www.ifixit.com/News/54122/macbook-pro-2021-teardown?vgo_ee=ySu4R7j5SamctqPlqHd23PGY19%2BxDGySD7wFrbFg6FU%3D Apple co-founder: 'I got the new iPhone; I can't tell the difference really' https://finance.yahoo.com/news/apple-co-founder-wozniak-cant-tell-the-difference-between-i-phone-13-and-previous-phones-211847252.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93Y2NmdGVjaC5jb20v&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAC24JEZW1Tst7zo6fU4NRf4s9CxOQ3G_WB8i1jTqRBfN68kSb8PTiXhLzcrQxbSp84jTpi6d2NzSpctcQFIbr1UlLOqqdKGSTvo1uo4QdQ3yvf67IskrjoRiBkbmy4qTDUnJkveruU9uQGTD_zf4xDpTlj0EAJxBmhaWN4gyAwSE Puedes ponerte en contacto con nosotros por correo en: alex@barredo.es Suscríbete al boletín de información diario en https://newsletter.mixx.io Escucha el podcast diario de información tecnológica en https://podcast.mixx.io Nuestro grupo de Telegram: https://t.me/mixxiocomunidad

TRUST & THRIVE with Tara Mont
145: Dismantling Diet Culture & White Supremacy - with Dr. Hortencia Jimenéz, Sociology Professor & Health Coach

TRUST & THRIVE with Tara Mont

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 50:50


Dr. Hortencia Jimenéz was born in Nayarit, Mexico and raised in the agriculture community of Watsonville CA. Dr. Jimenéz spent her childhood years working in the fields and learned the ethic of hard work and perseverance. She holds a BA, MA, and Ph.D in Sociology and is also a certified Health Coach and Fitness Instructor. Dr. Jimenez is a full time tenured Sociology professor teaching at a local community college in Monterey, County. Dr. Jimenéz signed a book contract with SAGE Publishing, a leading press in the social sciences to co-author an undergraduate textbook on Latinxs. Her research writing has appeared in academic publications and in 2017 she published her book Challenging Inequalities: Readings in Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration by Cognella Academic Publishing.  Dr. Jimenéz has numerous awards and recognitions for her work in the Latinx community. Her most recent recognitions include the Community Achievements Award by the Latino Network of Monterey County, a Certificate of Recognition by the Monterey County Board of Supervisors, and a Certificate of Recognition by California Legislature Assembly, Anna Caballero. Dr. Jimenéz transitioned to social media during the pandemic and created her instagram account as a response to the lack of Latinx representation and conversation of an anti-diet approach in the Health and Wellness industry. Her work centers on dismantlingdiet culture and helping Latinxs heal their relationship with food. In this episode, we discuss the connection between food and culture, how diet culture capitalizes off of silencing one's culture, breaking generational cycles, honoring our ancestors, and more.FOLLOW DR. JIMENEZ:INSTA: @drhortenciajimenezWEBSITE: www.hortenciajimenez.com STAY CONNECTED: INSTA: @trustandthrive TIKOK:@trustandthrive TWITTER: @trustandthrive FACEBOOK: bit.ly/FBtaramont WEBSITE: www.tara-mont.com EMAIL: tara@tara-mont.com 

Dr. Gameshow
72. Chat's Dead

Dr. Gameshow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 80:19


Hosts Jo Firestone & Manolo Moreno play listener-created games with callers!Games played: Unpitch A Movie submitted by Jay Frosting from Los Angeles, California, When You Wish Upon A Manolo submitted by Luke Phelan from Monterey, California, and Sandwich Kittens submitted by Marceline GotharCallers: Cyrus & Lolo from Dummerston, Vermont; Amy from Brisbane, Australia; Vienna & Channon from Monroe, Connecticut; Priscilla from Brookings, Oregon; Tamara from London, England; Alyssa & Mark from St. Louis, MissouriOutro theme by Bill Ferullo from Brooklyn, New YorkThis episode sponsored by: Magic Spoon - Go to magicspoon.com/GAMESHOW and use the code GAMESHOW to save $5 off!

Apple News Radio ワンボタンの声
2143回Montereyに行くのも待つのもあなた次第

Apple News Radio ワンボタンの声

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 28:46


2143ANRワンボタンの声ダウンロードリンク■11/4配信 iOS 15.1配信ProRes撮影機能、AppleがwatchOS 8.1をリリース、Intel Macで使用できないmacOS Montereyの新機能、iPod20 周年で発表時のおもいで、初代iPodのリリース直前プロトタイプ、超大型でダサいスイッチものニュースをとりあげました。 後半はリスナーからのコメントをご紹介しています。★Podcast番組"Apple Clip #465 iPhone 13&13 ..

Coder Radio
438: The Oppenheimer Problem

Coder Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 55:09


After a little async Ruby chat and developer morality struggle, Chris explains how macOS Monterey has lapped Linux with a critical workstation feature.

kompot
158 macOS 12 Monterey – system dla dojrzałych jabłek

kompot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:34


Choć (póki co) nie znamy udziału procentowego w rynku najnowszej wersji systemu operacyjnego macOS 12, to sądząc po usprawnieniach oraz stosunkowo wysokiej „bezproblemowości” wróżymy, że Monterey zdobędzie serce większości użytkowników kwalifikowanych komputerów z jabłuszkiem. Postanowiliśmy więc podyskutować wspólnie co nam się podoba a co nie, na przykładzie wybranych, zarówno spektakularnych jak i tych drobnych nowych funkcji w nowym systemie. W końcu to najważniejsze oprogramowanie, od którego zależy wygoda, bezpieczeństwo i wydajność pracy. Witryna systemu Apple macOS 12 Monterey Wszystkie nowości w macOS Monterey Lista komputerów wspieranych przez system macOS Monterey Witryna programu Yoink od Eternal Storms Software Program Yoink na platformie Setapp Partnerem applejuice i sponsorem podkastu kompot jest Setapp. Nasz podkast znajdziecie w Apple Podcasts (link), możecie też dodać do swojego ulubionego czytnika RSS (link), wysłuchać w serwisach: Spotify (link), Google Podcasts (link), TuneIn (link), Overcast (link), Castbox (link), PlayerFM (link), Pocket Casts (link), myTuner (link) lub przesłuchać bezpośrednio w przeglądarce (link). Zapraszamy do kontaktu na Twitterze: Remek Rychlewski @RZoG. Marek Telecki @mantis30. Natomiast całe przedsięwzięcie firmuje konto @ApplejuicePl.

Contacts
Chad Songy - Coach, Entrepreneur, Investor, Creator

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 60:37


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:10:34] In your first two weeks of practice you want to establish, what is your culture? How are we going to do what we're going to do?[00:11:15] NITE communication, which is the PDC concept of names, information, tone, and eye contact.[00:11:55]Culture eats skill for breakfast, in my opinion if all else is equal.[00:12:49] A lot of rebounding being able to read the likelihood of the track of the ball and where it's going to go.[00:13:27] Assigning very clear responsibilities to assistant coaches, most assistant coaches aren't utilized.[00:15:23] The assistants have a notepad and you're writing down what you see.[00:15:56] Keep the main thing the main thing.[00:16:10] Every practice, your assistant should know exactly what they're doing for every activity.[00:17:42] At this age of stage, they just need more kinesthetic reps.[00:20:47]When a player comes in late, greeting them with I'm so glad you made it rather than like, why are you late? What makes really exceptional cultures is safe spaces.[00:21:15] I need a space where they feel like not only, they can make mistakes, but they know that I want them to make mistakes with the correct technique and at the right effort level.[00:22:44] Hey, you just got better. Hey, I like that mistake. You just got better.[00:23:25] I think communication is a skill like shooting.[00:25:08] You're going to play worse while you learn how to communicate for a couple of weeks, and then you'll be able to do both and you'll be back to normal speed.[00:25:38] Take 20 seconds. Tell your partner one thing they're doing well. And one thing they can get better at and then switch.[00:26:32] You have to teach them what to say, then you have teach them how to say it, and then you have to give them an opportunity to practice it.[00:28:07] Do you want feedback right now? If you want it a little bit later, do you want not at a want at all?[00:32:10] You have to be organized ahead of time to actually serve each player where they're at. You have to anticipate errors.[00:32:24] From an athlete perspective I'm never afraid to group them.[00:34:05] I would celebrate that in front of the whole team and say, this is what I respect.This is what I want my players, this is what I'm going to play. This is what's meaningful is players who are trusting the process where they are.[00:35:07] Basketball is wicked. Every possession is slightly different.[00:38:36] What's your objective in doing shell drill? Let's start there and reverse engineer.[00:41:32] How much time you spend thinking?[00:42:35] I love triangulating strategy of like, I get multiple opinions from multiple people, whether that's books or mentors, and then I need to process and I need to think and find the truth in between for me.[00:44:40] Sports makes you solve complex challenges.[00:45:38]Everything is just sales and basketball, maybe you're selling fakes and selling…that sort of stuff…All the things I've accomplished. It's like none of it has been by myself. None of it.[00:47:25] Everything is practiced for life, and then do not waste the resource of people that sports is giving you and stay in touch with as many people as you can.[00:50:57]But I think we're evolving to a place where the tribe wants your full self, the tribe values, your vulnerability and authenticity.[00:52:31] Why are sports so important? They just expand the possibility of who the tribe is.[00:52:51]I have five or six differing opinions that I find my truth in between.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Un bot para cachalotes / Estimulación cerebral contra la depresión / Ladrillos de Monterey / Almacenamiento óptico / Educación entre talibanes / Vaqueros de Samsung Patrocinador: Kärcher presenta su nueva colección de hardware de limpieza para tu hogar. En su web https://www.kaercher.com/es/ encontrarás una potente fregona eléctrica sin cables https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/fregonas-electricas/fc-7-sin-cable-10557300.html, una limpiadora de vapor https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/limpiadoras-de-vapor/sc-4-easyfix-15124500.html para eliminar el 99,999% de bacterias, o sus aspiradoras multi-uso https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/aspiradores-multifuncionales/aspiradores-multiuso/wd-6-p-premium-13482710.html para limpiar garajes, sótanos y mucho más. — Si los compras antes del 15 de noviembre te llevas gratis su escoba eléctrica KB-5 https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/escoba-electrica/kb-5-12580000.html. Un bot para cachalotes / Estimulación cerebral contra la depresión / Ladrillos de Monterey / Almacenamiento óptico / Educación entre talibanes / Vaqueros de Samsung

Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)
macOS Monterey Quick Tips, M1 Choices, and Cool Stuff Found

Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 90:08


It's been a busy week in the Apple world: the new M1 Pro/Max-based MacBook Pros began arriving, Monterey dropped for most, AirPods Gen 3 arrived, you had questions, and your two favorite geeks have answers! Listen as John and Dave help try to sort through all of this, deciding what's important, what's not, and which macOS Monterey Quick Tips you might've missed in the mayhem. Press play and learn at least five new things together with the MGG family!

CocaTech
8 Novidades (Algumas Secretas) Que Você Precisa Testar Agora no Monterey

CocaTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 15:53


Cupertino
La meta-vendetta de Facebook

Cupertino

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 35:21


Facebook y Apple van camino de enfrentarse mucho más a fondo los próximos años: plataformas de publicidad, domótica, mensajería privada ý más. Patrocinador: BluaU de Sanitas http://bluau.es/ es el nuevo complemento digital del seguro médico de Sanitas que incorpora la más alta tecnología para ayudarte en el cuidado de tu salud y la de tu familia. — BluaU lanza Conecta con tu Salud http://bluau.es/, un nuevo servicio que te permite comunicar directamente tu actividad y estado físico con tus médicos, psicólogos, nutricionistas y entrenadores personales. ¿Conseguirá Facebook liberarse de las garras de la App Store con su cacareado metaverso? El caso es que parece que las empresas van a competir más a fondo los próximos años. Repasamos las novedades de Monterey, que no son muchas pero hay algo interesante. Y por último, pasamos de los nuevo MacBook para hablar de los futuros iMac con M1 Pro porque Matías quiere uno, y Apple no se lo quiere vender. ENLACES La meta Vendetta https://twitter.com/chetfaliszek/status/1454122167688253440?s=20 Se filtra una imagen del smartwatch que desarrolla Facebook | Digital Trends Español https://es.digitaltrends.com/vestibles/filtra-imagen-smartwatch-facebook-meta/ macOS 12 Monterey: The Ars Technica review https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/10/macos-12-monterey-the-ars-technica-review/3/ macOS Monterey tiene un nuevo modo de borrar todos los datos de un Mac: así puedes hacerlo sin tener que formatear https://www.applesfera.com/os-x/macos-monterey-tiene-nuevo-modo-borrar-todos-datos-mac-asi-puedes-hacerlo-tener-que-formatear eSavants - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcUr_9FT9kFwSY_iP3Yh8Ig Questionable 'AirPods Pro 2' pictures surface showing only minor changes | AppleInsider https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/10/22/questionable-airpods-pro-2-pictures-surface-showing-only-minor-changes Apple Watch Series 8 Suppliers Developing Blood Glucose Monitoring Components - MacRumors https://www.macrumors.com/2021/10/25/apple-watch-series-8-blood-glucose-sensors/ Leakers Claim Next MacBook Air Will Have White Notch and Bezels, Here's Why They Could Be Right - MacRumors https://www.macrumors.com/2021/10/28/next-macbook-air-white-notch-bezels/ Mark Zuckerberg wanted Facebook to 'inflict pain' on Apple: report https://nypost.com/2021/02/16/mark-zuckerberg-wanted-facebook-to-inflict-pain-on-apple-report/ Apple Discontinues Intel-Based 21.5-Inch iMac - MacRumors https://www.macrumors.com/2021/10/30/apple-discontinues-intel-based-21-5-inch-imac/ Dylan DKT contando los nuevos iMac en Twitter https://twitter.com/dylandkt/status/1454461506280636419?s=28 Microsoft passes Apple to become the world's most valuable company https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/29/microsoft-passes-apple-to-become-the-worlds-most-valuable-company-.html Puedes ponerte en contacto con nosotros por correo en: alex@barredo.es Suscríbete al boletín de información diario en https://newsletter.mixx.io Escucha el podcast diario de información tecnológica en https://podcast.mixx.io Nuestro grupo de Telegram: https://t.me/mixxiocomunidad

More Than Just Code podcast - iOS and Swift development, news and advice

Marin Todorov joins Tim to discuss his work on Swift Concurrency and Apple's DocC. He has just finished contributing to the RayWenderlich book, Combine: Asynchronous Programming with Swift and has an upcoming book on Modern Concurrency in Swift. He is also one of the original contributors on Apple's open source DocC. Special Guest: Marin Todorov.

Intego Mac Podcast
Episode 211: Say Hey to macOS Monterey

Intego Mac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 29:46


Apple releases macOS Monterey, the company's newest desktop operating system, along with a number of security updates. We discuss Apple's new M1 Pro and M1 Max MacBook Pro models, which may be too powerful for most users. And if you're getting a new Mac, we discuss which is better: migrating your old system, or doing a clean installation. Show Notes: A full history of macOS (OS X) release dates and rates Apple releases macOS 12 Monterey, iOS 15.1, watchOS 8.1, and more How to keep older Macs secure: a geeky approach (run Catalina on unsupported Macs) Josh's tweet showing macOS updates by version UK phone networks to [attempt to] block scam calls from abroad M1 Pro vs. M1 Max: Why the fastest MacBook ever might be overkill Intel CEO: My job is to win Apple back Pre-release Intel 12th-gen Alder Lake chip allegedly beats Apple's M1 Max How to choose the right Mac for your use case Setting Up a New Mac: Should You Migrate or Do a Clean Installation? Intego Mac Premium Bundle X9 is the ultimate protection and utility suite for your Mac. Download a free trial now at intego.com, and use this link for a special discount when you're ready to buy.

Contacts
Omar Sanchez - Director of Athletics, St. Mary's College HS

Contacts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 37:11


This episode is brought to you by Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market, a revival of the community market promising you an uncommon shopping experience and the finest of groceries and prepared foods. When Chloe and I first envisioned what Elroy's fine foods would become. We wanted to build a market that was focused on building community, a beautiful store that not only sells incredible foods, but also prioritizes environmental and social responsibility and provides the community with a safe space to shop, eat, and hang out. Elroy's fine foods is located in Monterey, California, offering the most delicious prepared foods, curated grocery certified organic produce, a full service bulk food section fine cheeses, natural wines, local beers, and humanely raised meats and sustainably caught seafood. Elroy's fine foods. The uncommon market. 15 Soledad drive. Monterey, California.We're proud to be sponsored by Delta wines, our everyday go-to with sustainability built in. Delta wines are vibrant yet balanced, made to be enjoyed on special occasions like Tuesday. And in addition to tasting good, they also help you feel good with eco-friendly packaging, and environmental nonprofit donations from every purchase. Buy online at winesforchange.com. As a Contacts listener, please use the code CONTACTS at checkout for a discount.This episode is brought to you by LMNT! Spelled LMNT. What is LMNT? It's a delicious, sugar-free electrolyte drink-mix. I tried this recently after hearing about it on another podcast, and since then, I've stocked up on boxes and boxes of this and usually use it 1–2 times per day. LMNT is a great alternative to other commercial recovery and performance drinks. As a coach or an athlete you will not find a better product that focuses on the essential electrolyte your body needs during competition. LMNT has become a staple in my own training and something we are excited to offer to our coaches and student-athletes as well. LMNT is used by Military Special Forces teams, Team USA weightlifting, At least 5 NFL teams, and more than half the NBA.You can try it risk free. If you don't like it, LMNT will give you your money back no questions asked. They have extremely low return rates. LMNT came up with a very special offer for you as a listener to this podcast. For a limited time, you can claim a free LMNT Sample Pack—you only cover the cost of shipping. For US customers, this means you can receive an 8-count sample pack for only $5. Simply go to DrinkLMNT.com/contacts to claim your free 8-count sample pack.[00:09:06] They say it's a world of different six inches over and it is a world a difference.[00:10:01] I wasn't secure in myself enough to just give the reigns up to say, all right, you're going to make a decision.[00:10:34] The best advice I got when I became a head coach is that you don't know anything, your first five years of coaching.[00:11:05] The sooner you can realize you don't know anything. And that's okay. And ask the people around you. You will have a lot more success quickly.[00:12:12] My biggest thing with life is doing things that put me in a position to serve others. That's my number one thing is I want to serve others.[00:13:11] I was coaching players. Now I'm coaching coaches and I'm trying to figure out how to serve them in the best way I can.[00:15:36] Let's be real, we all steal everything. Right?[00:16:37] Proceed with as much positive energy as you can and put into it and move forward with it?[00:17:07] The idea of process versus outcome. How do we stay married to the day-to-day process of what we're trying to accomplish, which will then deliver the outcomes that we want versus focusing on the outcome, which gets in the way of doing the daily work.[00:18:26] The premise of coaching is to serve others. It always will be.[00:19:52] How do you filter that information to make it your own is what's key.[00:20:42] My mom and dad had the second and third grade education. They came here from Mexico to create a better life for their family. And one thing I learned from them is the work ethic piece.[00:22:14] Figuring out intentions and what people are going through builds on planting seeds of care and then nurturing that relationship to hopefully make it better.[00:24:50] The formula for success and failure is ability plus effort will give you success and failure.Some of us are born with enormous amount of effort and have no ability and fail. Some of us have great ability, but shall no effort and still fail. The key thing is that effort has to be constant.[00:26:24] Failure is just an opportunity to recalibrate.[00:27:46] But those moments of patting someone on the back have to be deliberate. They can't be forced…you also have to invite failure into your teams because if you don't fail, you're going to fail at the wrong moments and usually the wrong moments are in a game or in a game that matters.[00:30:49] Like Bruce Lee said, you got to be like water, and it's so important because things change so much.[00:34:19] I just didn't know how to ask for help. I felt like I should've known things and I needed to figure them out.[00:37:04]I want to lead by faith and not by fear.

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations
Monterey and Other Updates

The Mac Observer's Daily Observations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 18:22


Jeff Butts and Bryan Chaffin join host Kelly Guimont to discuss the new version of macOS, including new and future features.

Mac OS Ken
Mac OS Ken: 10.26.2021

Mac OS Ken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 18:05


- As Promised, Everything Apple Gets an Update - MacRumors Looks at a Few SharePlay Enabled Apps - Fitness+ Gets SharePlay Ahead of Global Expansion - Apple One Premier Hits 17 More Countries Next Wednesday - iOS 15.1 Lets iPhone 13 Pro/Max Owners Turn "Auto Macro" Off - Changes for Home, Translation, Shortcuts, and More in iOS/iPadOS Updates - iOS 15.1 Lets Users Put COVID-19 Vaccine Cards in Apple Wallet - Apple Releases macOS 12.0.1 Monterey - 9 to 5 Mac Weighs Pros and Cons of Updating to Monterey - Apple Releases Security-Focused macOS Big Sur 11.6.1 - Apple Releases watchOS 8.1 - Apple Updates HomePod Software - Apple Releases tvOS 15.1 - Apple TV+ and Apple TV 4K Heading to South Korea Next Week - Upstart - Fair & fast personal loans. Learn more and check your rate at Upstart.com/macosken. - Comet Backup - a fast, flexible backup platform for business and IT providers! Get a $50 free credit when use promo code MACOSKEN at cometbackup.com. - Power what we do next for as little as $1 a month. Join the Mac OS Ken Test Kitchen at Patreon at Patreon.com/macosken - Send me an email: info@macosken.com or call (716)780-4080!

Queens of the Mines
Indentured Servitude in Sonora

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 17:11


Until february of 1850, Sonora was known as the Sonorain camp, then named Stewart, then to Sonora. The History of Tuolumne stated that according to the California blue book the word Tuolumne meant “many stone houses or caves” having a similar meaning as the word Shasta in another native tongue. I love this because Shasta is my sister's name!      Tuolumne County was a wild and rough country in the gold rush days, and not all of the local history was squeaky clean. The region was full of diversity among the merchants, miners, gamblers, drunkards and women of leisure. From the research that lead up to todays episode, I was thrilled to learn how Sonorians had came together in the past to push back against any discrimination that came to the town's attention.    During America's largest migration, the gold rush, indentured servitude was one way people secured their passage to California. By their own choice, they would barter their labor for a specific amount of time as collateral with their chosen Master. The Master paid their fare to California and boarded them while they were working for them. Today I will share two stories of indentured servitude from Sonora, California in the 1850's. I found these stories in an old book called Justice in Sonora from my grandpa's collection. I am not sure if I have ever mentioned it, but my grandfather was Tuo Co sheriff Wally Berry circa 1980s. “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. I'm Andrea Anderson. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out. We now have the opportunity to incorporate the racial and patriarchal experience in the presentation of American reality. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   It was a hot August day in the gold rush town of Sonora, California. On a crowded Main Street, which is now known as Washington, bookstore owner and City Council member W.H. Mintzer walked past the tented hotels and busy saloons that lined the dusty street in 1850. In the sea of people from all over the globe, Mintzer was approaching a crowded cluster of poverty-ridden brush covered ramadas when he heard a miserable sound. Mintzer stopped to see if he could make out the noise among the multiple languages murmuring and shouting in the streets. It was the sound of a person groaning. Someone was in trouble and he knew he had to find them. Mintzer moved closer to the makeshift homes in the Mexican neighborhood, following the sound of someone in pain.   Eventually, he found the tent that the tragic moaning was coming from. Lifting the flap that served as the door to the tent, Mintzer became overwhelmed by a cloud of flies swarming so thick, he could hardly see who was inside. As his eyes adjusted, he moved closer. Crouching in the corner, was a young Mexican boy, without clothes. Estás bien? He asked the boy, who motioned to the other side of the tent, Mintzer swatted the flies away, revealing another boy, lying in the fetal position. The child was about 12 years old and it was obvious to Mintzer that he was dying.   Mintzer knew that he did not have the supplies or knowledge to help the boys and in a panic, he rushed to the nearby shop of Dr. Marius Chapelle.   He yelled to the doctor to hurry, and showed him the way to the tent. When he found the boy, Dr. Chapelle realized he himself was also helpless. The boy was close to death. The two men sat with the boy, as he took his last breaths, and then comforted the other child, who was his brother.    Word spread around the town about the two boys as quick as wildfire. The streets were buzzing with townspeople as they joined forces to search for the responsible party. It was a man named Bryan, and he was soon found and put on trial before acting judge, justice of the peace, Richard C. Barry. In the early 1850's, Major Richard Barry took on the role as one of the justice of the peace of the towns, alongside Judge Tuttle and John G Marvin. Barry was born in Ireland, and immigrated to Texas. This was while Texas was still a province of Mexico and while there, he dedicated himself to the struggle for independence and became a Major for the Texas Rangers. Barry had a tenderheart for the suffering.   There was a trial, on August 15, 1850, Judge Barry confirmed the conditions of the boys were awful. Simply proven that one boy was naked and the other boy was very sick. The first witness put on the stand was the young surviving boy. He told the judge that his father had given Bryan consent, against the wishes of his mother for indenturement. Without shoes, the two boys, brothers walked for 50 days from Mazatlan to San Jose and then to the plains. Once arriving in Sonora, Bryan left him and his brother alone.    The court then called bookstore owner W.H. Mintzer to the stand.  Mintzer explained how he had discovered the condition of the boys after hearing the groans while walking up Main street. The Frenchman Dr Chapelle then testified that after the boy's death, he took the surviving boy to his  shop, cleaned him up, had his hair cut and gave him clothes and plenty of food. He gave the boy a job washing dishes and he stayed out around the store, selling Chappele's french luxury items. There was no doubt the boy was in good hands. A man named H.E. Masden corroborated statements of the two men.   Uinte Zapedu, who lived in the front of the tent where the boy died, was called to the stand. She testified that the boys were without clothes. A week before his death, Zapedu said the boy did have a sore throat. One of the boys told her he was sick, the other said he was hungry. She would have helped, but her own condition was equally poor and bare.    Next to be sworn in was the countryman Bien Tauster, who was acquainted with the man in charge of the boys, his name was Bryan. Tauster and Bryan had known each other since birth and the two men had come to California on the same ship. He also told the judge of the possessions the boys had, the sick boy had a pair of white pants and a shirt which he had worn since leaving Mazatlan, the younger boy had a hat and a mat. He told Judge Barry that Bryan was kind to the boys and treated them as if they were his own. With the assistance of an interpreter, some members of the local Mexican community then testified that the boys were being treated well.   Tauster also knew the boy's parents in Mazatlan, and explained they were brought here in indentured servitude with consent from the boy's parents. A contract was signed, to keep the boys, providing food and shelter for them. If Bryan did not find gold during this trip, he was to bring them back home. Two young boys, far away from their family and home, dependent on a stranger striking gold.    Bien Tauster attended to the brothers every night, he was one of the people that Bryan had delegated to take care of the boys. Soon the older boy had swelling in his throat and could not work. Tauster told Judge Barry he gave the sick boy sago, a starch extracted from palm stems and rice. He believed the food to be suitable for a sore throat. Tauster did not call for a doctor.   Henry Angill, the area's official grave digger was called to testify. Angill told the court he did not know Bryan, but he had seen the sick boy the day before his death in horrific condition. The following day, two Americans called upon him to tell him the boy was dead and that they wished to bury him. Bryan was in Monterey when the boy became sick and there is no statement from him in the court records. When the evidence portion of the trial was concluded, The Court ordered Dr Chappelle to take care of the young boy until a new guardian could be appointed. Bryan was taken to the jail and was charged $12.50 (428 in today's dollars) for Judge Barry was always alert that cost should be remembered.  What was it like for the women in California during the 1850's? What hardships did they face? What victories were they able to realize? Who were the first women who came to California, and who was already here? Explore the lives of ten brilliant people who made their own way, in a time where women were not so welcome to do so. Their stories contributed to the shaping of the future of California and the United States. The undermined people were often rendered voiceless, leaving them ghosts of our past, dismissed and forgotten. They are rarely heard of, and I want you to know their names. Queens of the Mines, the Paperback Novel is available. I am booking a winter book release tour. If you or your town would like to host Queens of the Mines, let us know! Find it on  queensofthemines.com Now, back to Sonora...   In the summer of 1849, a year prior to the discovery of the young Mexican brothers, the majority of the population of Sonora were Chileans who were working in the mines. The Chileans were the first miners in California to start to extract gold from the quartz once the placer gold ran out around Sonora. Our last quick story for the day is about Sofia, a beautiful Chilean young woman who wanted to get herself to the goldfields in the Mother Lode. So Sofia made a deal back home in Chile. She would travel north to California, via an indentured servitude contract with an older couple living in Sonora.   The arrangement was that Sofia was to repay the cost of her passage to California over time with her labor. For over a year, Sofia worked hard for her Masters. Yet the balance she owed never seemed to get any smaller. She was accomplishing so little towards her own freedom. Her master was taking advantage of her, and not only that, her master was abusive to her in many ways. Sofia did not know how to get out of the trap she was in, and continued to do the couple's chores. One chore that Sofia did find rather pleasant, was accompanying her mistress to the Mexican tienda, or shop on Main Street. A young handsome Chilean man helped around the shop and Sofia found herself thinking about him often. Sofia began an eye to eye courtship with the man she often saw at the shop. A susceptible young man in the country does not keep his eyes on the ground and even a girl with her eyes lowered is not blind. They found a way to communicate directly with each other, and it was quickly decided, they were in love, and they would be married.    One night, he snuck her out of the older couple's home. He was devastated to find that she had been beaten and bruised and that her life at her new home had been utterly miserable.    Her master noticed she was missing, and immediately suspected the young man from the shop had taken her.  He stormed into the sheriff's office and reported the crime. He went to the casa with the support of a constable and violently hauled Sofia back to his house.    The young chileno man was in a rage and turned to his American friends who eagerly briefed him on American ideas of liberty and justice. So he went and made a complaint himself. The young man had made it clear to the judge that he wanted to marry Sofia. Justice Jenkins was not a slave to legal patterns nor would he let a young woman be maltreated. Judge Jenkins then issued a subpoena for Sofia's presence in court.   To everyone's annoyance, the wrinkled old man who kept her appeared instead and he insisted that he was her compadre. He told the judge that he had jurisdiction over her. This was a distasteful idea to the Americans who swarmed the courtroom. A constable with a more forcible order was sent to fetch the girl.   When she arrived, Justice Jenkins performed the marriage ceremony right there and then. The whole town celebrated the outcome and they wished the young couple well. Their next step was to sue for back wages which he considered due to his mujer. Lewis C Gunn, displayed his pleasure in the story with a happy ending in his May 7, 1853 edition of the Sonora Herald. -a poem taken from The early history of Tuolumne County, California   Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more. 

La Manzana Mordida
¡Hoy sale macOS Monterey!

La Manzana Mordida

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 5:33


La actualidad de Apple se ha seguido moviendo durante este fin de semana y además hoy se producen varios lanzamientos de software de la compañía muy esperados.- Hazte suscriptor VIP de La Manzana Mordida en https://bit.ly/lmmpremium - Visita nuestra web de noticias en lamanzanamordida.net- Suscríbete a nuestro canal de YouTube en https://bit.ly/YTLMM

Core Intuition
Episode 485: Everybody's Dying On That Hill

Core Intuition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021


Daniel and Manton talk about Apple's just-announced Tech Talks, and whether this is a clue to the future of WWDC. They celebrate the announcement of new Apple Silicon based MacBook Pros, and compare notes on their buying plansa. Finally, they take stock of the state of macOS as Monterey is about to be released, and revisit their ongoing grief over Apple's strategy with respect to Swift UI, Catalyst and AppKit. The post Episode 485: Everybody's Dying On That Hill appeared first on Core Intuition.

Accidental Tech Podcast
453: As the Prophecy Foretold

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 165:43


Apple’s “Unleashed.” Event Start Up John’s Tweet Apple ✔️s (scroll way down) Monterey quick hits Monday, 25 October Tabs that look like tabs!! Snell’s coverage M1 Pro & M1 Max John’s “City of Chips” tweet John’s Self-FU John’s “City of Chips” diagram Anandtech’s Coverage M1 floorplan comparisons M1 Pro Floorplan M1 Max floorplan WildCrack’s tweet Mike Goldsmith’s tweet Six Colors’ coverage of M1 Pro/Max variants Scott Perry on DRAM Josh Rogers on GPU comparisons Review of MSI GE76 Raider New MacBook Pros PORTS (courtesy chatroom user rmorey) Snell on charging quirks Jeff Nadeau’s tweet David Schaub’s Nostradamus Moment Linda Dong’s Twitter thread HIG documentation Full-Screen Mode Menu Bar Menus Our orders Marco 14”, M1 Pro, 16-core GPU 16GB RAM 1TB SSD Casey 14”, M1 Max, 24-core GPU 64GB RAM 4TB SSD John …AirPods. Post-show: Rumor round-up 9to5Mac on the ransomware leak Bloomberg/Gurman’s Roundup Which Intel Macs remain? Mac mini 27” iMac 21.5” iMac Mac Pro Sponsored by: Squarespace: Make your next move. Use code ATP for 10% off your first order. Stripe: Learn more about how Stripe can support your business. Linode: Instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the Linode Cloud. New accounts get a $100 credit. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed! Check out our store to get some sweet //////ATP merchandise!

Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)
Monterey On The Horizon

Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 78:40


Your macOS Monterey questions are starting to trickle in, and your two favorite geeks have your answers. That's not all, though! This episode's got Quick Tips about webpage screenshots, Safari 15 tabs, Internet Recovery, and making your music sound better for YOUR ears. Plus, John and Dave answer your questions about all kinds of things…and they share your recommendations for new keyboards, too! Press play and enjoy learning at least five new things.