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Person who writes and publishes poetry

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Best podcasts about poets

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Latest podcast episodes about poets

Poetry Unbound
Donika Kelly — In the Chapel of St. Mary's

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 14:57


Why do empty places sometimes lend themselves to reflection or contemplation? In this poem, a poet — describing herself as a nonbeliever — goes into a chapel to sit. In the corner there are some girls talking, there are stained glass windows, and the poet is at once at home in herself and far from the woman she loves. The high emptiness of the church seems to give a resting place for the emptiness she's feeling. While there's no resolution, the larger empty space offers a holding place for the poet.Donika Kelly is the author of The Renunciations and Bestiary, the winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Poetry, and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. A Cave Canem graduate fellow and member of the collective Poets at the End of the World, Donika has also received a Lannan Residency Fellowship, and a summer workshop fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center. Her poems have been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic online, The Paris Review, and Foglifter. She currently lives in Iowa City and is an Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa, where she teaches creative writing.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

The Well Read Poem
S6E4: “To a Poet, Who Would Have Me Praise Certain Bad Poets, Imitator of His and Mine” by William Butler Yeats

The Well Read Poem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 8:38


In this sixth season of The Well Read Poem, we will read a number of examples of classic satire in verse. English poetry is particularly rich in satire, and we will take a close look at some of the best instances of literary mockery that the past several centuries have bequeathed to us. Some of these are playfully teasing, while others are deliberately savage. All of them taken together, I trust, will provide a happy introduction to the fine art of verbal annihilation. Today's poem is “To a Poet, Who Would Have Me Praise Certain Bad Poets, Imitator of His and Mine” by William Butler Yeats. Poem begins at timestamp 7:01. To a Poet, Who Would Have Me Praise Certain Bad Poets, Imitator of His and Mine by William Butler Yeats YOU say, as I have often given tongue In praise of what another's said or sung, 'Twere politic to do the like by these; But was there ever dog that praised his fleas?

Urdunama
68: The Essence of 'Waqt' - It Flies, Stops, Changes, Heals, and is Priceless

Urdunama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 14:42


Philosophers have always argued about time and have viewed it with different theories. Poets, on the other hand, have made the time the essence of their work and worries.  When stuck in the past, it is the 'maazi' that the poet lives in his poetry. When hoping for a beautiful future, the poets are usually dreaming about the union or 'visaal' with their beloved. But, the present is what makes the poet wonder about these two points of time - the past and the future.   In this episode of Urdunama, we try to explore the different effects of time that Urdu poetry brings in it.  Tune in. 

Libromania
Jess Walter

Libromania

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 72:32


Walter is the author of seven novels, one book of short stories and one nonfiction book. His work has been selected three times for Best American Short Stories as well as the Pushcart Prize and Best American Nonrequired Reading. He's been published in, Harper's, Esquire, McSweeney's, Tin House, Ploughshares, the New York Times, the Washington Post and many others.He began his writing career in 1987 as a reporter for his hometown newspaper, The Spokesman-Review where he was a finalist for the 1992 Pulitzer Prize as part of a team covering the shootout and standoff at Ruby Ridge, in Northern Idaho. Eventually he wrote about this in his first book, Every Knee Shall Bow, in 1995. He has also worked as a screenwriter and has taught graduate creative writing at the University of Iowa, Pacific University, Eastern Washington and Pacific Lutheran.Walter has twice won the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award (for The Zero and We Live in Water), the Washington State Book Award (The Cold Millions) and was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize (The Zero) and the PEN/USA Award in both fiction (The Zero) and nonfiction (Every Knee Shall Bow). His novel Beautiful Ruins was a #1 New York Times bestseller and spent more than a year on the bestseller list. It was also Esquire's Book of the Year and NPR Fresh Air's Novel of the Year. The Financial Lives of the Poets was Time Magazine's#2 novel of the year and Walter's story collection, We Live in Water, was longlisted for the Story Prize and the Frank O'Connor Short Story Award. Walter's latest novel is the national bestseller, The Cold Millions, A BOOK OF HISTROICAL FICTION “Featuring an unforgettable cast of cops and tramps, suffragists and socialists, madams and murderers, The Cold Millions is a tour de force from a “writer who has planted himself firmly in the first rank of American authors” (Boston Globe). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tell Me Something True with Laura McKowen
The Shortest Episode, The Biggest Thanks

Tell Me Something True with Laura McKowen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 6:12


Laura offers two poems today: one of her favorites, one of her own. Happy Thanksgiving to those of you who are celebrating. And to all, a big heap of gratitude and mystery from all of us at Tell Me Something True. The Sleepless ones by Lawrence Tirnauer https://drkarinlawson.com/the-sleepless-ones/ You could be soft instead by Laura McKowen https://www.lauramckowen.com/blog/2019-3-11-you-could-be-soft Tell Me Something True is a 100% independent podcast. There are no corporations or advertisers backing this community. We are 100% funded by the TMST community. Support TMST today so you can hear the uncut interviews, attend private events with Laura and help keep TMST ad-free: https://tmst.supercast.com/

The Daily Message with Darren Mulligan

Welcome to the Daily Message & Happy Thanksgiving! Today Darren shares scripture from Matthew 7:24-27. Make sure to subscribe and listen every Monday-Friday for encouragement framed in the context of God's word.

Shakespeare and Company
Poets Richard Barnett and Luke Kennard in conversation

Shakespeare and Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 56:08


This week Adam is joined by poets Richard Barnett and Luke Kennard. Richard Barnet's WHEREVER WE ARE WHEN WE COME TO THE END is an imagining of the experience of the young Ludwig Wittgenstein in the First World War, recounted in the same austere and succinct statements as the philosopher's Tractatus Logico Philosophicus, the initial notes for which were taken during the conflict. The result is an affecting examination of love, duty and violence that had such a strong impact on me that it sent me back to investigate Wittgenstein's writing with fresh eyes. Sarah Bakewell called WHEREVER WE ARE WHEN WE COME TO THE END “ingenious, devastating and filled with emotional riches.” Luke Kennard's NOTES ON THE SONNETS, revisits Shakespeare's poetry in a chain of prose poems set in a British house party. The party is a contradictory beast—at once crushingly dull yet flecked with the absurd, at once sprawling yet intensely claustrophobic. Kennard's poems embody these contradictions too, they somehow manage to be superficial yet profound, charmingly insolent yet glacially serious, knowingly pretentious yet deeply insecure and self-critical, and they take in almost every subject under the stars. NOTES ON THE SONNETS was a Poetry Book Society recommendation, and recently won the Forward Prize for Best Collection 2021. Buy WHEREVER WE ARE WHEN WE COME TO THE END here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/I/9781912436583/wherever-we-are-when-we-come-to-the-end Buy NOTES ON THE SONNETS here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/I/9781908058812/notes-on-the-sonnets Browse our online store here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/15/online-store/16/bookstore Become a Friend of S&Co here: https:/.friendsofshakespeareandcompany.com * Richard Barnett is a poet and historian. He taught the history of science and medicine at Cambridge, UCL, and Oxford for more than a decade, and his history books include Medical London, a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week, and The Sick Rose, an international bestseller. His first poetry collection Seahouses was published by Valley Press in 2015, and was short-listed for the Poetry Business Prize. His next poetry publication was Wherever We Are When We Come to the End, a poetic experiment digging into the form and language of Wittgenstein's Tractatus, published in May 2021. Luke Kennard has published five collections of poetry. He won an Eric Gregory Award in 2005 and was shortlisted for the Forward Prize for Best Collection in 2007. He lectures at the University of Birmingham. In 2014 he was selected by the Poetry Book Society as one of the Next Generation Poets. His debut novel, The Transition, is published in 2017 by Fourth Estate. Adam Biles is Literary Director at Shakespeare and Company. Buy a signed copy of his novel FEEDING TIME here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/S/9781910296684/feeding-time Listen to Alex Freiman's Play It Gentle here: https://open.spotify.com/album/4gfkDcG32HYlXnBqI0xgQX?si=mf0Vw-kuRS-ai15aL9kLNA&dl_branch=1

Storied: San Francisco
Poet Shizue Seigel (S4E28P2)

Storied: San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:06


In this podcast, Shizue picks up where she left off in Part 1. Her paternal grandmother, Shige, had just located her husband in Stockton. Shizue goes into more depth about her grandmother's life. Her dad, Barry, grew up in Stockton and went to UC Berkeley. He was set to graduate in June 1942. But then Pearl Harbor was bombed in December 1941. The order to "relocate" Japanese-Americans to internment camps was issued in February 1942. Her mom's family had been in camp in Arizona. At this point in the conversation, we springboard to a larger, broader talk about the dominant, northern European culture in this country and what it's like not to be part of it. Shizue worked for many years at the J. Walter Thompson office in San Francisco. At first a fine arts student, she switched to commercial art at the Academy of Art here in The City and got the job in advertising. She describes a white, male-dominated work culture and how she navigated that. We rewind to talk about Shizue's early life. Her parents met shortly after WWII, when Japanese-Americans who had been forced into internment camps were now free. Her dad joined the Army and so the family moved around. Shizue was born in Baltimore. Around the time she was 12, they moved back to California and eventually up from the Santa Clara Valley to San Francisco, where Shizue went to high school. She describes being a shy, bookworm-ish kid who strove to fit into the "model minority" demographic. That ended when she was a teenager and had an existential crisis. After her work in advertising, she ended up doing HIV prevention outreach to folks living in subsidized public housing. It was through this work that Shizue started to turn her attention toward people of color. She also started writing poetry. We end the episode with Shizue's thoughts on our theme this this season: "We're still here." Shizue's personal site is https://www.shizueseigel.com/. Her creative writing for people of color website is https://www.writenowsf.com/. We recorded this podcast at Shizue's apartment in the Outer Richmond in November 2021. Photography by Michelle Kilfeather

Poetry Unbound
Lory Bedikian — On the Way to Oshagan

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 17:36


The exile's return to the motherland is the theme around which Lory Bedikian's poem “On the Way to Oshagan” circles. She, a proud Armenian, stops by a roadside stall on a trip to her home country; and is immediately understood as an Amerigatzi, even though she's speaking Armenian, not English. The poem could end with this awkward exchange, but instead pushes through, and a connection occurs between the returned-departed and the never-departed: there's a gift, an invitation, and a bridge across exile.Lory Bedikian received her BA from UCLA with an emphasis in Creative Writing and Poetry. She earned her MFA in Poetry from the University of Oregon, where she received the Dan Kimble First Year Teaching Award for Poetry. Bedikian's The Book of Lamenting won the 2010 Philip Levine Prize in Poetry. She currently teaches poetry workshops in Los Angeles.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Urdunama
67: Shayri on 'Pollution': How Poets See 'Aaloodgi' From the Prism of Poetry

Urdunama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 12:37


'Aaloodgi' meaning pollution, is a huge concern of worry for the not just the shayar but everyone. However, in poetry, pollution of any form stands for corruption, absence of lover, a great discomfort, or any negative emotion.  In this episode of Urdunama, we explore how pollution has caused distress to poets like Amjad Islam Amjad and Anand Narayan Mulla, among others.  Tune in. 

Radio Sweden
Government talks continue, teen gets 8 years for killing policeman, copyright payments for poets

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:01


A round-up of the main headlines on November 19th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Producer: Sujay Dutt Presenter: Frank Radosevich

Poetry Unbound
Nico Amador — Flower Wars

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 12:24


Telling some of the story of the Flower Wars of the Aztec era, Nico Amador's poem pits wars against creation. In a poem that begins by recalling creation myths from multiple cultures, he then poses questions about why: Why would people sacrifice their own people to keep a god happy? Why would any god benefit from people's deaths? Evoking how the Flower Wars contributed to the Aztec downfall, this poem also wonders about wars today: Who benefits from a war? Who decides who should die? Why?Nico Amador has been published in a number of journals and anthologies. His chapbook, Flower Wars, was selected as the winner of the Anzaldúa Poetry Prize and was published by Newfound Press in 2017. He is a grant recipient of the Vermont Arts Council, an alumni of the Lambda Literary Foundation's Writers Retreat and an MFA candidate at Bennington College.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Waves Breaking
Interview with Cody-Rose Clevidence

Waves Breaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:21


In this episode, I spoke with Cody-Rose Clevidence about their latest publication, Aux Arc / Trypt Ich, out with Nightboat Books. We dug into language, exploring motif, grief, love—all that good stuff.  Cody-Rose Clevidence is the author of BEAST FEAST (2014) and Flung/Throne (2018), both from Ahsahta Press, Listen My Friend This is the Dream I Dreamed Last Night from The Song Cave and Aux Arc / Trypt Ich as well as several handsome chapbooks (flowers and cream, NION, garden door press, Auric).  They live in the Arkansas Ozarks with their medium sized but lion-hearted dog, Birdie and an absolute lunatic cat.   Cody-Rose's Instagram Buy Aux Arc / Trypt Ich! Poets, books, etc. mentioned in this episode: Cody-Rose Clevidence's BEAST FEAST  Turquoise waters of the Ozarks "Apophatic" was the word I was trying to remember! I can't read this work because of the paywall, but it seems like it might be useful in exploring Manley Hopkins's contemplations of God.  H.D. Homer Algernon Charles Swinburne William Wordsworth English literature's Romanticism  Gerard Manley Hopkins Stephen Taylor's Building Thoreau's Cabin Jerome Rothenberg (editor), Technicians of the Sacred  Jerome Rothenberg (editor), Shaking the Pumpkin: Traditional Poetry of the Indian North Americas Guy Deutscher's The Unfolding of Language Guy Deutscher's Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's Metaphors We Live By   Editor and Social Media Manager: Mitchel Davidovitz Host and Producer: Avren Keating Sound of Waves Breaking: "Arkansas" by John Linnell. At last, one half of TMBG makes it onto the pod.

The Slowdown
545: Response, Years Later, to Two Male Poets I Overheard Discussing How Sick They Were of Women's Poems about the Body

The Slowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 4:44


Today's poem is Response, Years Later, to Two Male Poets I Overheard Discussing How Sick They Were of Women's Poems about the Body by Meghan Dunn.

Poetry Unbound
Darrel Alejandro Holnes — Amending Wall

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 17:08


In a poem that directly addresses Robert Frost's “Mending Wall,” Darrel Alejandro Holnes asks questions: who gets to build walls, or guard borders?. Do good fences really make good neighbors? Taking a poem that's been part of an American imagination both of poetry and of citizenship, Darrel offers a critique that places contemporary migrant experiences at the center, challenging contemporary ideas of territory, conquest, and expansion.Darrel Alejandro Holnes is the author of Stepmotherland & Migrant Psalms. Holnes is an Afro-Panamanian American writer, performer, and educator. His writing has been published in English, Spanish, and French in literary journals, anthologies, and other books worldwide and online. He also writes for the stage. Most of his writing centers on love, family, race, immigration, and joy. He works as a college professor in New York City, NY.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Rattlecast
ep. 118 - Ananda Lima

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 131:29


Ananda Lima's poetry collection Mother/land (Black Lawrence Press, 2021) was the winner of the Hudson Prize. She is also the author of the chapbooks Vigil (Get Fresh Books, 2021), Tropicália (Newfound, 2021, winner of the Newfound Prose Prize), Amblyopia (Bull City Press, 2020), and Translation (Paper Nautilus, 2019, winner of the Vella Chapbook Prize). Her work has appeared in The American Poetry Review, Poets.org, Kenyon Review Online, Gulf Coast, Colorado Review, Poet Lore, Poetry Northwest, Pleiades, and elsewhere. She has served as the poetry judge for the AWP Kurt Brown Prize, as staff at the Sewanee Writers Conference, and as a mentor at the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Immigrant Artist Program. She has been awarded the inaugural Work-In-Progress Fellowship by Latinx-in-Publishing, sponsored by Macmillan Publishers, for her fiction manuscript-in-progress. She has an MA in Linguistics from UCLA and an MFA in Creative Writing in Fiction from Rutgers University, Newark. Find the book and more at: https://www.anandalima.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write an apology poem. Nextx Week's Prompt: “A guy walks into a bar” is one of the most common joke intros. Write a poem that starts with that line. (It does not have to be a humorous poem.) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Walking With Dante
Of Prophets, Poets, And Pilgims: Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 1 - 12

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 28:19


It's almost mind-boggling to see the difference between INFERNO, Canto XVIII, and INFERNO, Canto XIX. Canto XIX opens with a proem: a prefatory poem, to set up the action ahead. It's dense with Biblical, folkloric, and classical allusions. It also includes not one but two direct addresses: first to Simon Magus, a figure from both the New Testament and folklore; and second to "highest wisdom," a nearer approach to addressing God. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as I begin to wrestle with one of the most complicated cantos in INFERNO: the denunciation of the church by its supreme follower, Dante. Here are the segments of this episode of WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:39] My English translation of INFERNO, Canto XIX, lines 1 - 12 (as well as a little bit from the end of Canto XVIII). If you'd like to read along with this translation, you can find it on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:38] The opening apostrophe (or direct address) to Simon Magus. No other canto in INFERNO opens as XIX does. [04:53] Who is Simon Magus? Let's explore both his place in the New Testament and in an apocryphal book about Saint Peter that had become a part of medieval folklore in Dante's day. [08:37] Metamorphosis! Turning the things of God into gold and silver. We're continuing the "Ovid" themes of the eighth circle of fraud. And we can see that the pimps, seducers, flatterers, and prostitutes of Canto XVIII are still with us. [11:52] A bit about the trumpet that sounds in the passage. It heralds the apocalypse--just as it has done before, back in Canto VI. [14:31] A narrative insertion of one tercet (three-line stanza) in the middle of all these direct addresses. Why is the "story" inserted briefly here? [16:12] The last tercet (three lines) of this passage is a second apostrophe (or direct address): but this time, not a denunciation, but a prayer. [18:19] Some historical background for this canto, including the problems that papal reform brought straight into the church. [22:49] Who says these lines? Is it the poet or the pilgrim? Or both, for perhaps the first time? Support this podcast

Poetry Unbound
Elizabeth Bishop — Sestina

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 15:33


This sestina poem considers a scene from Elizabeth Bishop's own childhood through the sounds of six repeating words: house, grandmother, child, stove, almanac, tears. These six words repeat — in different order — as the final words of the poem's lines, creating a kind of contemplation on how those repeated words informed her childhood: a childhood marked by loss, displacement, and a kind grandmother. “Time to plant tears” the poem states, in one of its most famous lines, as if the scene recalled has information about the future.Elizabeth Bishop was an American poet and writer. She served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1949 to 1950, was the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956, and won the National Book Award in 1970.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 346: Anna Akhmatova - Seventh Book

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 32:30


"If you only knew from what rubbish Poetry grows, knowing no shame." - Anna Akhmatova "You don't need friends everybody. Just have fun with yourself." - Me LINKS:Buy The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova here: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780939010271Order your greeting cards here: https://www.robynoneil.com/cardsandstickersBuy a ME READING STUFF shirt or sweatshirt to support The Trevor Project here: https://cottonbureau.com/products/me-reading-stuff#/1948499/tee-men-standard-tee-vintage-black-tri-blend-sVisit my work at the Dallas Art Fair here: https://www.dallasartfair.comMy website: www.robynoneil.comMe on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robyn_oneil/?hl=enHandwritten Notes: https://www.instagram.com/handwrittennotesontv/Me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Robyn_ONeil

Confessing Animals
Capsule Review Queen: film, origami & creativity with Leanne Kubicz

Confessing Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 58:19


Leanne Kubicz is an origami artist and tv & film critic based in Kansas City, MO. A person of many talents, she was an official statistician for the New York Red Bulls Major League Soccer team from 2001-2013, was founder of her own company -- 1898 House Nail Lacquer, and was also a reference librarian. Leanne is currently working on multiple origami projects and has a new Substack for capsule film reviews. https://leannek.substack.com/https://thepinksmoke.com/IG @leannekpaperTWITTER @lianemarieKSHOW NOTESFilm Review: Todd Haynes The Velvet Underground Documentary Capsule ReviewReview: Titane by Julia DucournauSuperstar: The Karen Carpenter StoryRainer Werner FassbinderCrash by David CronenbergShoah by Claude LanzmannRachel Getting Married by Jonathan DemmePERIOD Article https://medium.com/periodmovement/the-talk-for-the-middle-aged-2938c0b86ac2Seasoned and fresh-faced artists (of every genre) discuss how to make creativity work within the complexities and challenges of adult life. Confessing Animals podcast co-hosts Jen Harris + Vanessa Aricco, both working writers, unveil the secrets and struggles of creative living in a rapid fire capitalist society. One guest at a time, Jen + Vanessa ask, How Does Your Life Translate to Art?Intro & music provided by Ashley Raines www.ashleyrainesmusic.comFollow us on Instagram @confessinganimalspodcastListen, Love & Support Us!https://www.patreon.com/confessinganimalspodcastSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/confessinganimalspodcast)

Poetry Unbound
Major Jackson — Blunts

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 16:05


Some friends gather and smoke at a doorway in a city. There's Malik, and Johnny Cash, and Lefty, and Jësus. And the poet, Major Jackson. They've known each other their whole lives, and they wonder who they'll turn out to be. In a moment of disclosure, Major tells his friends he wants to be a poet, astonishing them, and himself too it seems. In friendship and ribbing, in desire and teasing, this poem wonders who a person is, and what it means to hope.Major Jackson is the author of five books of poetry, including The Absurd Man (2020), Roll Deep (2015), Holding Company (2010), Hoops (2006) and Leaving Saturn (2002), which won the Cave Canem Poetry Prize for a first book of poems. Major Jackson lives in Nashville, Tennessee where he is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in the Humanities at Vanderbilt University. He serves as the Poetry Editor of The Harvard Review.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

The 17 Verses Podcast: Distilling the Qur'an One Day at a Time
Surah 26 (Ash-Shu‘arã), Verses 52-68 (Year 7)

The 17 Verses Podcast: Distilling the Qur'an One Day at a Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 3:20


As-salaam wa-alaikum, brothers and sisters.  Today's selection is from Surah 26, Ash-Shu‘arã or the Poets, verses 52-68. These verses conclude this Surah's telling of Prophet Moses' and his battle against the Pharaoh of Egypt. It talks of the deliverance of the Children of Israel and the destruction of the Pharaoh and his chiefs.  If you enjoy the podcast, HELP SPREAD THE WORD! Tell your friends and family, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher and write us a review.  Show notes and text episode: http://www.17verses.com/y7-shuara-26-52-68.  iTunes - http://apple.co/1HwzXZS.  Stitcher - http://bit.ly/17vstchr.  RSS - http://bit.ly/17vrs-rss. 

Poetry Unbound
Andrés Cerpa — Seasonal without Spring: Autumn

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 16:38


Andrés Cerpa recollects how his father's early dementia was an increasing influence on his early years. As he grew, his father diminished. The burden of this was heavy on him — he stayed awake listening for information, and fell asleep at school. Older now, he looks at his younger self with tenderness and sadness. This poem gives attention to the experience of the growing presence of absence, and the ways that affects memory, family, and perspective.Andrés Cerpa is the author of Bicycle in a Ransacked City: An Elegy, and The Vault from Alice James Books. A recipient of fellowships from McDowell and Canto Mundo, his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Poem-a-Day, The Kenyon Review, The Rumpus, Puerto Rico en mi Corazón, The Breakbeat Poets Vol 4: LatiNext,  The Nation, and elsewhere. He holds degrees from the University of Delaware and Rutgers University Newark.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Talk of Iowa
Mic Check Poetry Fest brings spotlight to Iowa poets, young and old

Talk of Iowa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


A new poetry festival is aimed at building stages for the many Iowa poets looking for a mic. And a Buena Vista University student has published a book of poetry on his parents' journey from El Salvador to the United States.

The 17 Verses Podcast: Distilling the Qur'an One Day at a Time

As-salaam wa-alaikum, brothers and sisters.  Today's selection is from Surah 26, Ash-Shu‘arã or the Poets, verses 1-33. These are very, very short verses so that's why we're nearly doubling our average of 17 today. This selection speaks of the dedication of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) to the guidance of mankind. Then it discusses the assignment of Prophet Moses as a Messenger and his dialogue with the Pharaoh of Egypt as well as Moses' miracles.  If you enjoy the podcast, HELP SPREAD THE WORD! Tell your friends and family, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher and write us a review.  Show notes and text episode: http://www.17verses.com/y7-shuara-26-1-33.  iTunes - http://apple.co/1HwzXZS.  Stitcher - http://bit.ly/17vstchr.  RSS - http://bit.ly/17vrs-rss. 

Connections: A Podcast of the James L. Hamner Public Library
"Besides the Autumn Poets Sing" by Emily Dickinson

Connections: A Podcast of the James L. Hamner Public Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 1:28


Jill reads "Besides the Autumn Poets Sing" by Emily Dickinson.Contact Us: connections@hamnerlibrary.org

We Say What They Can't Radio
The Green Room - Poets Paradise feat Poets of the Kingdom

We Say What They Can't Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 59:20


Poets Of The Kingdom Stop by the GreenRoom as their first in house interview they share their gift with us speaking on life in the Gospel as a couple and their Aspirations as Spoken word Artist and How god has inspired them to inspire others

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Australian writer Elizabeth Guy has released a book about Russian poets - Австралийская писательница Элизабет Гай выпустила книгу о русских поэтах

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 11:34


Recently, Elizabeth Guy published a book about Russia in 1915. The main characters of "Take Ink And Weep" novel are four Russian poets: Boris Pasternak, Anna Akhmatova, Marina Tsvetaeva and Osip Mandelstam. This is a Russian language content. - Недавно у Элизабет Гай вышла книжка, действие которой происходит в России в 1915 году. Главные герои романа Take Ink And Weep “Достать чернил и плакать” - это четыре русских поэта: Борис Пастернак, Анна Ахматова, Марина Цветаева и Осип Мандельштам.

Poetry Unbound
Kaveh Akbar — How Prayer Works

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 15:16


A narrative prose poem about two brothers — one on a visit home from college — who are turning to face east in their small shared room. With seven years between them, one is a young man and the other, the poet, is nearing his teens. Their prayer is interrupted by a sudden surprising noise, and the sound of this makes them fall over each other in laughing. Their bodies, their joy, their uncontrollable delight is the prayer of their own lives.Kaveh Akbar is an Iranian-American poet and scholar. He is the author of Pilgrim Bell, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, and the chapbook, Portrait of the Alcoholic. His poems appear in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Paris Review, Best American Poetry, and elsewhere. In 2020, Kaveh was named Poetry Editor of The Nation.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Rattlecast
ep. 116 - Ernest Hilbert

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 137:52


Ernest Hilbert's debut poetry collection Sixty Sonnets (2009) was described by X. J. Kennedy as “maybe the most arresting sequence we have had since John Berryman checked out of America.” His other books include All of You on the Good Earth (2013); Caligulan (2015), which was selected as the winner of the 2017 Poets' Prize; and Last One Out (2019). Hilbert currently keeps a heavily-encrypted dark web poetry site called Cocytus and a more public website to promote emerging poets called E-Verse Radio. Hilbert graduated with a doctorate in English Language and Literature from Oxford University, where he edited the Oxford Quarterly. Hilbert later served as poetry editor of Random House's magazine Bold Type in New York City and editor of Contemporary Poetry Review, published by the American Poetry Fund in Washington DC. He works as an antiquarian book dealer in Philadelphia, where he lives with his wife, Keeper of the Mediterranean Section at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and their son, Ian. Find the book and more at: https://www.ernesthilbert.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a spooky poem for Halloween. Next Week's Prompt: This was a lot of fun last time, so let's do another random street view poem. Randomstreetview.com is a site that randomly generates photographs of streets all over the world. Find a photo that speaks to you and write a poem about it. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

美文阅读 More to Read
美文阅读 | 秋之边缘 Besides the Autumn Poets Sing (艾米莉·迪金森)

美文阅读 More to Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 28:25


Daily Quote Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up. (Thomas Edison) Poem of the Day Besides the Autumn Poets Sing Emily Dickinson Beauty of Words A Room with A View Edward Morgan Forster

What About Chicago?!
Hostel Poetry Volumes 1 - 4 prod. by What About Chicago & Hostel Earphoria

What About Chicago?!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 55:55


Hostel Poetry Volumes 1 - 4 prod. by What About Chicago & Hostel Earphoria - You can find the poem titles and name of the Poets at amateurarts.bandcamp.com for free!

Poetry Unbound
Gail McConnell — Worm

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 14:17


In a poem that addresses a worm directly as “you,” Gail McConnell considers how these tube-shaped beings live: ingesting the earth, aerating it, digesting it, making its nourishment accessible for all kinds of growth. The worm burrows, knows dead things, and knows underground ways. Tiny and segmented though a worm is, nonetheless it senses that “all there is // can be gone through.” The poem's close attention to the worm's tactics of survival seems to indicate that much could be learned from its underground ways.Gail McConnell publishes literary criticism and poetry and is curious about the living and the dead. Her writing interests include violence, creatureliness, queerness and the possibilities and politics of language and form. She is the author of The Sun is Open, Northern Irish Poetry and Theology, and two pamphlets of poetry: Fothermather and Fourteen.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 344: A.L. Snijders - Night Train (translated by Lydia Davis)

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:18


"Everything has its story." - A.L. Snijders"I'm a soap opera scholar." - MeLINKS:Buy Night Train by A.L. Snijders here: https://www.ndbooks.com/book/night-train/Register for my lecture here: https://finearts.wsu.edu/event/robyn-oneil-virtual-artist-talk/Visit my shop here: https://www.robynoneil.com/shopSupport The Trevor Project by buying ME READING STUFF shirts here: https://cottonbureau.com/products/me-reading-stuff#/1948499/tee-men-standard-tee-vintage-black-tri-blend-sMore on The Trevor Project: https://www.thetrevorproject.org

Poets at Work
S02E09 SPECIAL: Writing through Ghosts: An Interview with Diana Khoi Nguyen

Poets at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 65:50


In this special episode of Poets at Work, as a supplement to Foothill Poetry Journal's 2021 release, we talk to Diana Khoi Nguyen about ghosts, poetic form, prepositions, and writing through loss. The interview is in print in the 2021 issue of Foothill Poetry Journal, which you can read online at cgu.edu/foothill.   For a transcript of this episode, email cgupodcasts at gmail.com and include the episode title.

How'd You Get That Job?
S02E11 Women in STEM Featuring Juanita Dawson

How'd You Get That Job?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 19:29


What is it like being a woman in STEM? Listen in as Juanita Dawson (MS, Information Systems & Technology, '05) shares her journey of going from the only woman in her math and sciences classes to becoming the director of cybersecurity and compliance at Raytheon Technologies.   In this special episode of Poets at Work, as a supplement to Foothill Poetry Journal's 2021 release, we talk to Diana Khoi Nguyen about ghosts, poetic form, prepositions, and writing through loss. The interview is in print in the 2021 issue of Foothill Poetry Journal, which you can read online at cgu.edu/foothill.   For a transcript of this episode, email cgupodcasts at gmail.com and include the episode title.

Poetry Unbound
Romeo Oriogun — Pink Club

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 16:44


A club is a place for dancing, for abandon, for music, and for meeting strangers. Romeo Oriogun recalls a gay club that was for all those things, but also for escape. Living in a place where queer lives were under threat, he offers a praise song for this cathedral of safety and movement. Outside the world is silent, but inside the bar, people carry stories of their own desire, of their families, of their hopes; both for the future and the present.Romeo Oriogun is a Nigerian poet, essayist, and author of Sacrament of Bodies (University of Nebraska) and three chapbooks. He is the winner of the 2017 Brunel International African Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Poetry, Harvard Review, American Poetry Review, Poetry London, The Poetry Review, Narrative Magazine, The Common, and others. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, his poems have been translated into several languages.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

HYPE Podcast
Retroish T5e3: El azúcar

HYPE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 80:54


Puedo imaginar a Prometeo Robando una bolsa de azúcar del Olimpo En vez de fuego ¡Quién quiere fuego, cuando podemos tener azúcar! Música de este episodio: 1. "I Want a Little Sugar In My Bowl" (Nina Simone, 1967) 2. "Lips Like Sugar'" (Echo & the Bunnymen, 1987) 3. "Sleep" (Poets of the Fall, 2005) 4. "Lollipop" (The Chordettes, 1958) 5. "Azúcar negra" (Celia Cruz, 1993) 6. "Brown Sugar" (Rolling Stones, 1971) 7. "A Spoonful of Sugar" (Julie Andrews para el soundtrack de Mary Poppins, 1964) 8. "Sugar Sugar" (The Archies, 1969) 9. "Piel de azúcar" (José José, 1989) 10. "Candy", Iggy Pop y Kate Pierson, 1990) 11. "Orange Crush" (REM, 1988) 12. "Sweet Jane" (Cowboy Junkies, 1988)

And If Love Remains
Episode 85 - The Untold Story of C.S. Lewis: The Most Reluctant Convert with Michael Ward

And If Love Remains

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:19


Thrilled to welcome back to the show Michael Ward. Michael plays C.S. Lewis' Vicar in the upcoming movie (to be released Nov. 3, 2021) The Most Reluctant Convert. On this show he gives us beautiful insight on Lewis' conversion story with some history and lessons. Thank you Professor Ward for sharing this with us!  Find a theater near you: www.cslewismovie.com MICHAEL WARD, a Catholic priest, is Senior Research Fellow at Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford, and Professor of Apologetics at Houston Baptist University. He is the author of the best-selling and award-winning Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C.S. Lewis, co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to C.S. Lewis, and presenter of the BBC television documentary The Narnia Code. On the fiftieth anniversary of Lewis's death, Michael Ward unveiled a permanent national memorial to him in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey, London.

Urdunama
64: A Look Through Poetry: Themes of Different Type of Riwaaj, and How Poets Have Written About Them

Urdunama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:39


In this special episode of Urdunama, The Quint's Fabeha Syed decodes the theme of riwaaj meaning customs, through Urdu poetry. Poets have often commented over the riwaaj of corruption and social injustice. For this, Fabeha picks out Kaifi Azmi's Taj Mahal and explains the poets POV. And for the riwaaj  of our syncretic culture, the host reads Urdu classical poet, Nazeer Akbarabadi whose work is a reflection of our rich heritage. You will also hear from historian Pushpesh Pant, writer, Saif Mahmood, and poet, Azhar Iqbal who discuss what is it like have the 'Ganga-Jamni riwaaj ' as our legacy.  Host and producer: Fabeha Syed. Editor: Shelly Walia 

On The Ledger
#14 Pak & The Lost Poets NFTs explained by R. Schmidt (The Defiant)

On The Ledger

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 35:37


The Lost Poets, by the mysterious Pak, is the most exciting NFT project there has been in crypto space. The one you should definitely know about - even if it is so subtle that it is extremely hard to sum it up. In this second episode of our Creative Reflections, Robin Schmidt, Creative Director & host of our School of Block video series, explains it all for you and unveils a bit of the mystery about the anonymous Pak. An artist who has turned from being a prophet to being, now, our teacher of the infinite possibilities of NFTs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Let's Give A Damn
Joél Leon

Let's Give A Damn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 95:48


"Joél's words are where I go when I need some inspiration. And he never lets me down." Lin-Manuel Miranda (yes, that Lin) said these words about our guest this week. Joél Leon is a performer, author, storyteller, and Creative Director at T Band Studio at the New York Times who was born and raised in the Bronx. He writes and tells stories for Black people. He's been featured in the Columbia Journal, BBC News, Sirius XM, Forbes, Insider, Medium, Philadelphia Printworks, Blavity and the Huffington Post. He has spoken and performed at the Apollo Theater, Joe's Pub, Rockwood Music Hall, Columbia University, NYU and Webster Hall. He lives in Brooklyn and is the father to Lilah and West. NEXT STEPS: Follow Joél Leon on Instagram and Twitter. Buy a God Bless the Poets crewneck today! All proceeds go to support the Audre Lorde Project. Listen to Joél's brand new spoken word project, soundtrack to a riot. __________________________________________________________ Reach out to us anytime and for any reason at hello@letsgiveadamn.com. Follow Let's Give A Damn on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter to keep up with everything. We have so much planned for the coming months and we don't want you to miss a thing! If you love what we're doing, consider supporting us on Patreon! We can't do this without you. Lastly, leave us a 5-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts! Have an amazing week, friends! Keep giving a damn. Love y'all! Edited and Sound Designed by Sound On Studios.

Poetry Unbound
Imtiaz Dharker — Don't Miss Out! Book Right Now for the Journey of a Lifetime!

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:40


A love poem with a playful title that sounds like an ad from a travel agent unfolds into a poem about choosing to stay at home. Imtiaz Dharker's husband died in the years between this poem's setting and its publishing. The poem, too, moves from long lines across the page into shorter and shorter lines. In sensuality, locality, intimacy, and simplicity, this poem is all about the man she loved, and moves from noise to focus: “You Are / Here” its final lines assert.Imtiaz Dharker is a poet, artist and video film-maker. She was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 2014. Her poems are on the British GCSE and A Level English syllabus, and she reads with other poets at Poetry Live! events all over the country to more than 25,000 students a year. She has been Poet in Residence at Cambridge University Library, worked on a series of poems based on the Archives of St Paul's Cathedral as well as projects across art forms in Leeds, Newcastle and Hull. She has had eleven solo exhibitions of drawings in India, London, New York and Hong Kong. She scripts and directs films, many of them for non-government organizations in India, working in the area of shelter, education and health for women and children.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Sports in Depth
Sports In Depth:Sunday/Black Poets Day/Trust*In*GOD*

Sports in Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 91:00


'Sports In Depth' With,Dr.M.Lee''Doc'' Stanley Sr.,AKA Melvin''Doc'' Stanley and his sports posse members: Dusty,'NFL-Ed' and ''JumpShot-Jonesy'' is an in depth informative educational and historical look at the world of sports,on this his renowned and legendary award winning,radio show,'Sports In Depth'. Di-versing from both a daily and historical perspective,bringing also both an in depth look and perspective not only on the sports of our times, but too,of the players and performers of the said events, both now and of yesteryear. 'Sports In Depth',AKA SID, also brings us the unique strategies of sports from an intellectual prospective. Not just athletics because as it takes raw GOD given talent and conditioning it too takes a GOD blessed mind fueled with passion, determination,intellect and a belief of competing and accomplishing too. And with the in depth knowledge and diverse intellect, of Doc's iconic posse,'Sports In Depth' is too,''the world in Depth''. Thanks for joining us once again,where we always,''Rope the Rumors,Hog tie the Issues and Brand the Truth. We too recognize honor and salute today with it being on  October 17th 'Black Poets Day'. *TRUST*IN*GOD* ''I will be and go where GOD wants me to be and to whom he wants me to be.'' ''Sometimes good is simply not good enough.'' ''It's not that people can't change they simply refuse to don't want to and simply won't.'' ''How come the people who don't have to deal with the shit or are the ones that cause all the shit always talk about how bad the shit is or is going to be?'' 'Doc Stanley's Words of Wit Wisdom and Truth'

Poetry Unbound
No'u Revilla — Smoke Screen

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 18:01


The life of a sugar worker is the center of this poem: a worker whose body and person bear the imprint of that industry, with its demands and smoke and exhaustion. The worker in question is the poet's father, and No'u Revilla brings us into a consideration of how he takes pride in work that depleted him, how he needed to find ways to recover from work that exhausted him, how in his body he carries the story of Hawaii and its indigenous people.No‘u Revilla (she/her) is an ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian) queer poet and educator. Born and raised with the Līlīlehua rain of Waiʻehu on the island of Maui, she currently lives and loves with the Līlīlehua rain of Pālolo in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī on Oʻahu. She has performed and facilitated workshops throughout the pae ʻāina of Hawaiʻi as well as in Papua New Guinea, Canada, and the United Nations. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa and is proud to have taught poetry at Puʻuhuluhulu University in the summer 2019 as she stood with her lāhui to protect Maunakea. A winner of the 2021 National Poetry Series, her debut poetry book will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2022.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Poetry Unbound
BONUS: A Conversation with No'u Revilla

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:51


While preparing for this week's episode of Poetry Unbound, host Pádraig Ó Tuama began an email correspondence with the poet, No‘u Revilla. The exchange was so rich that Pádraig asked No‘u to join him in conversation. Together they talk about poetry, queerness and how Hawaiian language, culture, and history show up in her poetry.No‘u Revilla (she/her) is an ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian) queer poet and educator. Born and raised with the Līlīlehua rain of Waiʻehu on the island of Maui, she currently lives and loves with the Līlīlehua rain of Pālolo in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī on Oʻahu. She has performed and facilitated workshops throughout the pae ʻāina of Hawaiʻi as well as in Papua New Guinea, Canada, and the United Nations. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa and is proud to have taught poetry at Puʻuhuluhulu University in the summer 2019 as she stood with her lāhui to protect Maunakea. A winner of the 2021 National Poetry Series, her debut poetry book will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2022.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast
Win Me Something by Kyle Lucia Wu

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:26


Win Me Something by Kyle Lucia Wu by Poets & Writers

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast
Indigo: Arm Wrestling, Snake Saving, and Some Things in Between by Padgett Powell

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 4:00


Indigo: Arm Wrestling, Snake Saving, and Some Things in Between by Padgett Powell by Poets & Writers

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast
The Boundaries of Their Dwelling by Blake Sanz

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:44


The Boundaries of Their Dwelling by Blake Sanz by Poets & Writers

The Game Changing Attorney Podcast with Michael Mogill
78 — Dr. Katy Milkman — How to Change: The Science of Getting From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be

The Game Changing Attorney Podcast with Michael Mogill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 44:21


"If we can set goals, that make it bite-size to achieve the long run objective, then that brings forward also our motivation, because we can see what we need to do today and tomorrow." Katy Milkman What inspired Katy Milkman to become a behavioral scientist? What is 'present-bias' and why is it so common? How are habits maintained and built? What are the personal benefits of 'temptation bundling'? Jack of all trades: An illustrious career Behavioral scientist, professor of operations, economist; Dr. Katy Milkman can do it all. She's so versatile that in addition to being a Professor at Wharton School of Business, she has a secondary appointment at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine. Her research revolves around the process of decision-making and habit formation; essentially, how people change. With a range of academic interests and abilities, Dr. Milkman is one of the most reliable resources in the field. She's won awards through research, including an early career award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences. She was named one of the top 40 under 40 business school professors in the world by Poets & Quants, as well as a finalist for the Thinkers 50 2017 Radar Thinker Award. Katy's work is published on platforms such as The New York Times and The Harvard Business Review and is regularly featured on NPR. She's become something of a celebrity in academic circles. But it's her work translating the science for ordinary people that may have the most impact. She hosts the Choiceology podcast for Charles Schwab, has a TEDx talk, and her new book, How to Change, was named one of the Amazon's best of 2021. Dr. Milkman is not just researching change. She's making it available to everyone. Gaming the System: Exploring behavioral economics Throughout her career Katy has gained insight from the decision-making process of average people. Knowing what makes people tick and why can be life-changing. We look at what motivates people, internal and external barriers, goal pursuing and habits. We dig into the mechanics behind behaviorism as Katy tells us about devices like 'present bias' and 'gamification'. Gamification can be a powerful force for change. By creating game-like incentives for behavior, goal achievement can be more fun. This strategy can be applied to individual habits or to something larger like employee performance and government programs, like vaccine adoption. The possibilities are endless. Patience is a Virtue: Behavioral change takes time As a member of the Forbes Top 10 Behavioral Scientists of 2020 list, Dr. Milkman knows a thing or two about human nature. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Milkman argued that getting people to wear masks would have been easier if people had considered them as fashion items. This thesis closely relates to a term she coined: 'temptation bundling'. It's the idea of coupling something you enjoy with something you view as a burden to invoke the willpower to get things completed. As she says, "if we recognize we need to make it fun to pursue our goals, we're going to be much more likely to persist". In our discussion, Katy draws on the ways people find motivation to pursue their goals, self-discipline and social influence. Want to find out more about yourself? Katy has the answers. Key takeaways: Tick Tock: Behavioral and habitual change doesn't happen overnight. Take your time, understand the process Dilemma: Learn to address and overcome internal and external barriers Understand your surroundings: Recognize how your social environment impacts your decision-making Links And Resources The Game Changing Attorney Podcast Michael Mogill Facebook Michael Mogill Twitter Michael Mogill Instagram Michael Mogill LinkedIn Crisp Website Crisp Facebook Crisp Twitter Crisp Instagram Crisp LinkedIn Katy Milkman Website Katy Milkman LinkedIn Katy Milkman Twitter How to Change - Book Website