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  • 1,229PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Royal College

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Latest podcast episodes about Royal College

Near Future Laboratory
N°41 — Design Fiction with Elliott P. Montgomery

Near Future Laboratory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 46:24


Elliott and I discuss some meta topics related to speculative design generally speaking and design fiction, the way its practiced, taught, and received in academic as well as commercial contexts. We also discuss the map he created 'Unresolved Map of Speculative Design' which should not be taken as literal rather as a provocation and conversation starter to discuss (not resolve) the role, relationships, situatedness, and purposes of futures thinking and the futures mindset. This map has been generative some others whose practice operates in the general space of futures design (https://blog.tobiasrevell.com/2020/08/05/box-006-gadget-realism/, https://futurehumanbydesign.com/2019/09/futures-thinking-and-design-thinking/) and recently I found it quite helpful for describing the 'Where' of design fiction in a conversation with a c-level executive who wanted to have a better sense of where it 'fit' alongside other practices within their innovation design teams. I discuss this further in the Issue 32 of the Design Fiction Newsletter. Elliott P. Montgomery is a design researcher, strategist and educator whose work focuses on speculative inquiries at the confluence of social, technological and environmental impact. He is an Assistant Professor of Strategic Design and Management at Parsons School of Design, The New School, teaching in the MFA Transdisciplinary Design Program and across the School of Design Strategies. He is also the co-founder of The Extrapolation Factory, an award winning design-futures research studio based in Brooklyn. He was previously a design research resident at the US Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency, Energy as well receiving the Graham Foundation's Individual Grant and The Shed's Open Call commission. He holds a Master's in Design Interactions from the Royal College of Art in London and a Bachelor's in Industrial Design from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

Woman's Hour
Policing & domestic abuse, Breastfeeding, Football, The business of porn

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 57:25


A joint investigation by The College of Policing and Fire & Rescue Service and the Independent Office for Police Conduct has found that there are ‘systemic deficiencies' in the way some police forces deal with allegations of domestic abuse against their own officers. We discuss with Deputy Chief Constable Maggie Blythe, National Police Lead for Violence Against Women and Girls; David Tucker, Head of Crime and Criminal Justice, College of Policing and Nogah Ofer from the CWJ. It's a big year for women's football and the Women's Euros begin on Wednesday but women have long been playing the beautiful game. An exhibition at Brighton Museum called Goal Power! Women's Football 1894-2022 features the stories of veteran players and Charlotte Petts asked them for their memories. A new study has shown that children who are born at or just before the weekend to disadvantaged mothers are less likely to be breastfed, due to poorer breastfeeding support services in hospitals at weekends. Co-author of the study, Professor Emla Fitzsimons from the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies and Clare Livingstone, professional policy adviser and lead on infant feeding for the Royal College of Midwives join Emma. It's probably no surprise to hear that porn is a multi-billion dollar business and a huge monopoliser of the internet. A new podcast series, Hot Money by Financial Times reporters Patricia Nilsson and Alex Barker explores how the business of online porn works and finds out who is actually in control. Patricia Nilsson joins Emma. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Mizog Art Podcast
Ep.180 Gavin Turk - Ministry of Arts Podcast

Mizog Art Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 61:30


In this episode Gary Mansfield speaks to Gavin Turk (@thisisnotgavinturk) Gavin Turk (b 1967) is a British born, international artist. He has pioneered many forms of contemporary British sculpture now taken for granted, including the painted bronze, the waxwork, the recycled art-historical icon and the use of rubbish in art. Turk's installations and sculptures deal with issues of authorship, authenticity and identity. Concerned with the ‘myth' of the artist and the ‘authorship' of a work, Turk's engagement with this modernist, avant-garde debate stretches back to the ready-mades of Marcel Duchamp. In 1991, the Royal College of Art refused Turk a degree on the basis that his final show, ‘Cave', consisted of a whitewashed studio space containing only a blue heritage plaque commemorating his presence ‘Gavin Turk worked here 1989-91'. Instantly gaining notoriety through this installation, Turk was spotted by Charles Saatchi and was included in several YBA exhibitions. Turk's work has since been collected and exhibited by many major museums and galleries throughout the world. Kensington + Chelsea Art Week (KCAW) is delighted to present its fifth annual Public Art Trail. West London will be brought to life with vibrant and immersive public art, free for all to enjoy for the duration of the summer.Opening on 18 June, the Public Art Trail will feature world-class sculpture, installations and exhibits throughout the borough. For more information on the Kensington + Chelsea Art Week go tohttps:// www.kcaw.co.uk | @kcawlondon To Support this podcast from as little as £3 per month: www.patreon/ministryofarts For full line up of confirmed artists go to https://www.ministryofarts.orgEmail: ministryofartsorg@gmail.comSocial Media: @ministryofartsorg See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Monocle 24: The Curator
Highlights from Monocle 24

Monocle 24: The Curator

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 60:00


A big week for diplomacy as the Nato summit takes place in Madrid. We visit the new Royal College of Art building, meet the duo behind Suri toothbrushes, flick through the history of festivals and cities, and look back at the life and legacy of Italian businessman Leonardo del Vecchio.

ScreenHeatMiami
0067 Stewart Mackinnon-Producer-part two

ScreenHeatMiami

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 106:55


Creator and Independent Producer of numerous award winning movies and long form drama series including: The Man In The High Castle a 40 hour long Amazon series which has become the cornerstone of the streaming network's line-up, winner of two Primetime Emmy's and many other awards. Quartet Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut and Golden Globe nominee, starring Maggie Smith, The Invisible Woman Oscar nominated, starring and directed by Ralph Fiennes, the Emmy Award winning Peter and Wendy starring Stanley Tucci. The Miners winner of the Grierson Award, This Little Life BAFTA nominated and winner of the Dennis Potter, BANFF and RTS awards and Saboteurs the Prix Italia winning series. Stewart studied at the Edinburgh College of Art and Royal College of Art in London and after graduating regularly contributed illustrations for The Times, Sunday Times, Oz, Nova, Time Out, , Spare Rib, Ambit and Management Today amongst many others. He also produced the artwork for the British TV movie The War Game and designs for the Royal Shakespeare Company. His work was featured in the Radical Illustrators magazine published by the Association of Illustrators in which co-editor George Snow singled out Mackinnon as “perhaps the greatest single influence on today's Radical Illustrators.” After being awarded a DAAD scholarship for his film Border Crossing he spent a year in Berlin before returning to the UK where he founded Trade Films which produced films and television such as The Miners' Campaign, Woodbine Place and Grierson Award winner, When the Dog Bites. He was closely involved in devising the Workshop Declaration in partnership with Channel 4. The Workshops worked with their local communities, women's organisations and ethnic minority communities. So began a decade of experiment with progressive and aesthetically avant-garde documentaries and dramas screened on British television, which continued until 1990. Stewart set up the Northern Film and Television Archive in the late 1990s and some years later co-founded the Northern Screen Commission with Sir Peter Carr, and Media Training Centre which provided courses for deaf students which was the first of its kind in the world. In 2005 he founded Headline Pictures with the Head of BBC drama Mark Shivas and after delivering the fourth and final season of Man in the High Castle in 2020 founded Circle Pictures with US based Jere Sulivan with the aim of producing world class drama which explores the pressing issues of our times.

Last Word
Dame Deborah James (pictured), Yves Coppens, Revel Guest OBE, Samuel Bhima

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 27:59


Matthew Bannister on Dame Deborah James who raised millions of pounds for cancer research by talking openly about living with - and dying from - bowel cancer. Yves Coppens, the charismatic French palaeontologist who led the team that discovered hominid remains estimated to be 3.2 million years old. Revel Guest OBE, the documentary film producer who became chair of the Hay Literary Festival. Samuel Bhima, the first Malawian to become a Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Producer: Neil George Interviewed guest: Jude Rogers Interviewed guest: Zeresenay Alemseged Interviewed guest: Corisande Albert Interviewed guest: Maliza Bhima Archive clips used: BBC Radio 5 Online, Raising a Glass to Deborah James 28/06/2022; BBC Two, The Making of Mankind - One Small Step 11/05/1981; FRANCE 24 English, Yves Coppens dies at 87 23/06/2022; PBS (US), PBS Ident by Paul Alan Levi; Trans Atlantic Film, Placido 1983; Dreamworks Pictures/ Touchstone Pictures/ Reliance Entertainment, War Horse (2011) Trailer; YouTube/ memoriesofrhodesia, 1957 Royal Tour of Nyasaland 29/10/2015; Meliza Bhima Personal interview archive with Samuel Bhima; BBC Sound Archive, Dr Hastings Banda Interview 27/02/1959.

Woman's Hour
Aparna Sen, Midwives, Marged Sion

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 57:43


Aparna Sen joins us in the studio. She's one of India's best loved and most successful film directors. Her career has spanned 40 years and she's explored issues around mental health, sexual abuse and infidelity. Aparna is in England for the London Indian Film Festival. The number of NHS midwives in England has fallen by over 600 in a year, according to figures by the Royal College of Midwives. We talk to Birte Harlev-lam from the Royal College of Midwives, as well as a midwife in the West Midlands. What's the reason behind this drop? We talk about what it's like to be a plus-sized actor. A new Matilda film is coming out starring Emma Thompson who will play Miss Trunchbull. It means she'll wear a fat suit for the role. Two plus-size actors, Katie Greenall and Samia La Virgne, give their reaction to the casting, and share their experiences of being a bigger actor. Welsh singer and dancer Marged Siôn is with us. She's in the band, Self Esteem and appears in a new Welsh-language short film called Hunan Hyder which means self-confidence). She talks to us about trauma, healing and appearing on stage with Adele! And we catch up with Gina Harris who at 82 has cycled from Lands End to John O'Groats. It took a month and she faced rainy days and tired legs!

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast
Quantum 205 - Glastonbury and the Supreme Court

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 33:53


This week we hear the 80 year old Paul McCartney and Peat and Diesel at Glastonbury; Lily Rodrigo; The Supreme Court - Abortion and Prayer; Nancy Pelosi; Justin Trudeau;  Islamist Terrorism in Norway; The Who - Concert for New York; Ukraine and a Failed Strategy; Boris, Putin and Toxic Masculinity; Dutch Coal; Racist Puppets;  SSM in Japan; Trans Skateboarder;  NZ Uni Indoctrination;  BBC, the Halifax and the Royal College of Midwives promote Trans ideology; Noisy Edinburgh Church;  Christianity in Australia; Florence and the Machine

RNZ: Checkpoint
Wellington urgent care doctor on overwhelmed health sector

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 6:30


Emergency medical clinics in Wellington are being swamped with patients due to a surge in winter ills, meaning some are waiting hours to be seen. Checkpoint has been reporting on a health system under pressure with many GPs so under the pump they are not taking on new patients, forcing some patients to travel long distances or wait to see a doctor. Some hospital emergency departments have been offering vouchers or paying emergency clinics to stay open longer and take their overflow patients. Dr Kelvin Ward is the medical director of the Wellington Accident and Urgent Medical Centre and is also the chair of the Royal College of Urgent Care. He talks to Lisa Owen.

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft
From The Wheel To The Lathe | Nicholas Lees | Episode 846

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 60:38


Nicholas Lees has a string of degrees from University of Kent (BA), University of the West of England (BA), University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (MA), and the Royal College of Art (MPhil). Nicholas has work exhibited in the UK and overseas and in public collections, including York City Art Gallery, Westerwald Keramikmuseum in Germany, and Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Italy. His awards include the Cersaie Prize, Faenza and Nicholas was a Senior Lecturer at Bath Spa University between 2000 and 2010 and is now a Visiting Lecturer at RCA and UCA Farnham. http://ThePottersCast.com/846

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Yassmin Abdel-Magied and Robin Lustig discuss the opening day of the G7 summit as Russian missiles hit Kyiv. Also: Jens Stoltenberg's plan for a major Nato overhaul, the fallout from the overturning of Roe vs Wade and Seville launches a new system for naming heatwaves. Plus: the Royal College of Art in London unveils its new premises.

Talking Flutes!
A flute sound of claret with a hint of Prosecco! - E: 220 with Philippa Davies

Talking Flutes!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:26


"I want flute playing to be expansive and to communicate a story! This week on Talking Flutes, Clare speaks with the wonderful London flute player, and Professor at the Guildhall College of Music in London  Philippa Davis about how she started and always being very busy!! Philippa Davies has established an international reputation as one of the finest flautists currently performing. Originally Principal Flute of the National Youth Orchestra of GB, Philippa went on to train at the Royal College of Music with Douglas Whittaker and later William Bennett. She won many awards including the Tagore Gold Medal Prize, the National Federation of Music Societies award, the Mozart Memorial Prize and was a Park Lane Group Young Artist. She was a member of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies's ensemble Fires of London, and of the ensembles Capricorn and Albion; currently she is part of the Nash Ensemble and London Winds directed by Michael Collins and plays in duo with Jan Willem Nelleke, piano, and with Maggie Cole, harpsichord. She was principal flute with the London Mozart Players, and continues to be a regular guest principal flute with all the main London orchestras. As a soloist, she has taken part in many international festivals since her debut at the BBC proms in 1988. She gives masterclasses, recitals and broadcasts, and performs concertos throughout the world with many orchestras. Philippa's numerous recordings include Mozart's entire original concertos and quartets, Bach's Flute Sonatas, Romance of the Flute and Harp, Poulenc's Flute Sonata, Giles Swayne's Winter Solstice Carol with the King's College Choir and all William Alwyn's flute music. She is a Professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and has a summer International Flute Course in Cubertou, France. 'Talking Flutes' and 'Talking Flutes Extra' are podcast recordings by the TJ flute company.  For more information visit www.trevorjamesflutes.com 

RCSLT - Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists
IJLCD - Phonological Delay versus Phonological disorder

RCSLT - Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 24:25


In this podcast we chat with Rebecca Waring, one of the authors of a paper looking at the differences between phonological delay and phonological disorder and how the disorder is linked to executive function.The paper is:Differentiating phonological delay from phonological disorder: executive function performance in preschoolersRebecca Waring,Susan Rickard Liow,Barbara Dodd,Patricia EadieFirst published:  21 January 2022Access the paper here:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1460-6984.12694 Useful resources:CLAESSEN, M., LEITÃO, S., and FRASER, C-J., 2017, Intervention for a young child with atypical phonology. In B. Dodd and A. Morgan (Eds.). Intervention Case Studies of Child Speech Impairment (pp. 275–291). Surrey, England: J&R Press.CROSBIE, S., HOLM, A., and DODD, B., 2009, Cognitive flexibility in children with and without speech Disorder. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 25 (2), 250-270.DODD, B., 2011, Differentiating speech delay from speech disorder: Does it matter? Topics in Language Disorders, 31, 96-111. JACQUES, S. and ZELAZO, P.D., 2001, The flexible item selection task (FIST): A measure of executive function in pre-schoolers. Developmental Neuropsychology, 20(3), 573-591.NOTES:For RCSLT members, access this paper by navigating to the IJLCD website from our A-Z journals list here.  Also, if you would like further information on the research terms used in the podcast, or many other aspects of research design, please navigate to the ‘Sage Research Methods' collection from the Research Methods page of the RCSLT website'.The interview is conducted by Jacques Strauss, freelance producer, on behalf of The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Break Out Culture With Ed Vaizey by Country and Town House
81. The Royal College of Art: A Petri Dish of Future Solutions

Break Out Culture With Ed Vaizey by Country and Town House

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 29:23


With the RCA's Vice Chancellor Dr. Paul Thompson and Chair of the Governing Body Sir Peter Bazalgette This week we're talking about the RCA's brand new £135 million Battersea campus. In a fascinating conversation with Dr. Paul Thompson and Sir Peter Bazalgette, they tell us how the new facilities can give future creative leaders the tools to learn to solve some of the most pressing global issues, from climate crisis and ageing populations to mobility, urbanism, inclusivity and ensuring AI remains a force for good. As Paul Thompson says, ‘We're trying to introduce some core fundamentals of science into the RCA art petri dish.' The new development comprises a large scale hangar, robotics centre and an intelligent mobility design centre as well as sculpture and contemporary art practice studios. RCA alumni include some of the world's most innovative designers from Jony Ive to James Dyson and Thomas Heatherwick, alongside artists including David Hockney, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Bridget Riley and Tracey Emin. Listen in to hear how the RCA is in a better position than ever on the global stage to produce the creative leaders our world needs.

Monocle 24: Monocle on Saturday
Monocle on Saturday: 25 June 2022

Monocle 24: Monocle on Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


Emma Nelson and the weekend's biggest discussion topics. Justin Quirk reviews the day's papers and we visit the Royal College of Art's new premises in London.

Casenotes: A History of Medicine Podcast
Ep.1 - Past & Present - Diabetes

Casenotes: A History of Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 35:17


Casenotes Past & Present is a Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh podcast. In this episode we uncover the history of diabetes and its treatment, starting with Ancient Egypt and Greece and some very dubious therapeutics, including opium, alcohol and animal dung! Then we talk to Professor Mark Strachan, a consultant physician in endocrinology and diabetes, about his clinical and research work. Website: https://www.rcpe.ac.uk/heritage Twitter: https://twitter.com/RCPEHeritage

Casenotes
Ep.1 - Past & Present - Diabetes

Casenotes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 35:17


Casenotes Past & Present is a Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh podcast. In this episode we uncover the history of diabetes and its treatment, starting with Ancient Egypt and Greece and some very dubious therapeutics, including opium, alcohol and animal dung! Then we talk to Professor Mark Strachan, a consultant physician in endocrinology and diabetes, about his clinical and research work. Website: https://www.rcpe.ac.uk/heritage Twitter: https://twitter.com/RCPEHeritage

Home of Medicine with Dr Amie Burbridge
In Conversation with Professor Andrew Elder; Is bedside teaching still relevant?

Home of Medicine with Dr Amie Burbridge

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 38:35


In this episode I am joined by Professor Andrew Elder, the current President of the Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh, UK.   Professor Elder has extensive experience in bedside teaching and was the Medical Director of the MRCP (UK) exams. In this enlightening episode, we discuss bedside medicine and how it has been affected by the pandemic.   What can we do to recover bedside education, or has it been changed forever.  Does good bedside education play an important role  in preventing medical errors?Coming soon Season 2...............

A is for Architecture
Alastair Parvin: Open systems and democratic built environments.

A is for Architecture

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 65:25


In Episode 30 of A is for Architecture, I speak with Alastair Parvin, CEO of Open Systems Lab, co-founder of WikiHouse, writer and architect. Open Systems Lab 'believe that if we want to build a successful, sustainable, fair and inclusive digital economy and to navigate the massive changes of the next half-century, we need to design, invest-in and deploy new open systems for everyone'. We discuss the impact of these things and the implications and possibilities they suggest, particularly for the production and management of the built environment - towns and cities, house and homes (and the gaps in between). Alastair and I talk about all this with reference to three pieces he has written: A New Land Contract, Planning for the Future and We need new operating systems. Whose job is that?, all linked here but available on Alastair's Medium page. I met Alastair At Sheffield School of Architecture, where we both studied. His work, which incorporates stints at RSH+P and Architecture 00, is a wonderful example of the possibilities afforded by engaging with socio-spatial and process thinking. Follow the links above to Al's articles, and watch him TED the roof off here: Architecture for the people by the people. He also gave a talk entitled The Future of Regulations at the Radical Practice Conference 2020, Royal College of Art & Dark Matter Laboratories, which is worth a sticky. Enjoy! + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + Music credits: Bruno Gillick. + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + aisforarchitecture.org Apple: podcasts.apple.com Spotify: open.spotify.com Google: podcasts.google.com

Woman's Hour
Kate Bush, Lynn Fitch, Cost of living, Electroconvulsive therapy

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 56:59


In a world exclusive, today Kate Bush gives Emma Barnett her reaction to being discovered by a new generation and making it to number 1 in the UK singles charts 44 years after her first chart-topper Wuthering Heights. Running Up That Hill was first released in 1985 and its use in the Netflix hit series Stranger Things has made Kate Bush a social media and streaming sensation. We also speak to Caitlin Moran about how rare it is to hear from Kate and why she is inspired by her songs. A report out today has found that the number of abortions has increased over the course of the pandemic. The cost of living has been cited as a key factor for this rise at an uncertain time in the economy and with job insecurity. Mary-Ann Stephenson is co-director of the Women's Budget Group, an independent body which analyses the impact of government policy on women. A decision is also expected any day from the US Supreme Court on whether to overturn Roe v Wade – the historic 1973 ruling which has guaranteed women access to abortion nationwide. At the centre of this legal challenge, is a woman who is being hailed by some as the lawyer who could end Roe v Wade. She is the Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch…and the BBC's Holly Honderich joins Emma to explain more. Twice as many women than men are receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) according to researchers at the University of East London. ECT is used to treat a range of mental health issues including severe depression, long-lasting mania, and catatonia. But an FOI request to twenty NHS Trusts has also revealed that older women are also more likely to be receiving treatment. They are concerned it causes memory loss and that patients are not given sufficient information to make informed decisions before they give consent to treatment. Emma is joined by one of the lead researchers, clinical psychologist Dr Chris Harrop and by Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar of the Royal College of Psychiatry. Emma speaks to the writer, DJ and broadcaster, Annie Mac on what has been a big week for music. They discuss Beyonce's new single, Break My Soul, which marks a change of musical genre for her as it's a House track. They talk about the history of house music and it's cultural shifts and about Kate Bush and Glastonbury 2022.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
The Huddle: Trans swimmers, Indian couple deported, Tauranga by-election

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 9:39


Swimming's world governing body has banned trans women from competing in female competitions.FINA has said they are only allowed to compete if they started transitioning before 12-years-old, and will instead create an open category for trans women.An Indian couple is getting deported over breaking Covid lockdown rules.The man had smuggled his partner out of Auckland, only to be caught when asking around for employment for her.Although the judge discharged them without conviction, recognising the financial and mental stress imposed on the couple, Immigration NZ has decided to deport them.Middlemore Hospital in Auckland is paying GPs to help out in their emergency department.Local GPs are being funded up to $1400 an hour to take on patients for free over the weekend, but Royal College of GPs Medical Director Bryan Betty says it's not sustainable long-term.Tauranga locals have cast their vote in the weekend's by-election.National's Sam Uffindel beat Labour's Jan Tinetti convincingly by 6000 votes to maintain the party's stronghold in the area.Tim Beveridge and Ali Jones joined Heather du Plessis-Allan on The Huddle

The Physician Associate Podcast
Find out more about the Royal College of Physicians

The Physician Associate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 25:34


In this episode, I'm joined by the president of the Royal College of Physicians Dr Andrew Goddard. We find out a bit more about what the Royal College of Physicians and Faculty of Physician Associates is all about, how it came into being, the work it is currently doing, and where it is looking to go into the future to support PAs.You can get in touch with the FPARCP through the website - www.fparcp.co.ukYou can connect with the Physician Associate PodcastTwitter - @PApodcastUKFacebook - @PApodcastUKInstagram - @PApodcastUK

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Dr Bryan Betty: Royal College of GPs medical director says paying GPs up to $1400 an hour is not sustainable long-term

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 2:25


A medical expert says paying GPs to take on hospital patients is just a band-aid for a deeper staffing issue.Auckland's Middlemore Hospital is paying GPs to take patients off its hands as pressure grows in Emergency Departments.It's funding local GPs up to $1400 an hour to take on patients for free over the weekend.College of GPs medical director Bryan Betty told Heather du Plessis Allan it's not sustainable long-term.“We need a long-term strategic workforce plan. That's what has to come into play and if Health New Zealand's gonna do anything, it needs to start to sort out this issue.”LISTEN ABOVE

Table Talk
281: Saliha Mahmood-Ahmed - from MasterChef winner to NHS campaigner

Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 35:35


Dr Saliha Mahmood-Ahmed's career has taken her in all sorts of different directions. She is a junior doctor working in the NHS, an author, and of course she won MasterChef in 2017. But her passion for good food doesn't stop there, Saliha co-founded the No Hungry NHS Staff campaign. It's about making sure NHS staff have access to hot, affordable, nutritious food - whatever time of the day or night they are working. In this episode of the Food Matters Live Podcast, Saliha says she sees the impact bad diet has on people's health every day in her NHS work. That's mainly in patients (she specialises in digestive disorders), but also the short-term impact of staff going hungry or being forced to eat poorly. She's also keen that, when it comes to diet-related health outcomes, prevention should be given more prominence. Saliha believes as much attention should be paid to what people eat in the years before they become ill, as the medicine they are given once a problem emerges. Listen to the full episode to hear her views on nutrition as medicine, why she's celebrating what she calls a "new age of curry", and how winning MasterCher in 2017 changed her life - it involves pyjamas and slippers! Dr Saliha Mahmood Ahmed, chef, author, campaigner Saliha is a junior doctor working in the NHS. She graduated from Kings College London in 2012. Starting her career at St Mary's Hospital, she has subsequently worked in Hillingdon Hospital and Watford General Hospital. She is training to specialise in Gastroenterology, focussing her energies on the treatment of Digestive disorders. She is a member of the Royal College of Physicians, having completed her postgraduate exams.  Saliha won MasterChef in 2017, facing off competition from 63 other determined contestants, through seven gruelling weeks of culinary challenges and an exhilarating final cook-off. Saliha has published two books. Khazana: An Indo-Persian cookbook with recipes inspired by the Mughals and Foodology: A food-lover's guide to digestive health and happiness.

Material Matters with Grant Gibson
Carl Clerkin on mending and narrative.

Material Matters with Grant Gibson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 51:29


In my opinion, Carl Clerkin is one of the most original – and certainly one of the wittiest – designers currently practicing. He graduated from the now-defunct furniture course of the Royal College of Art in the late '90s, a time when many of his contemporaries were dreaming of fame and fortune with a glamorous Italian manufacturer. However, he steered a very different – more local – course. His work, which ranges from industrial to fine art pieces, is always imbued with a sense of narrative and not a little charm. Clerkin is also a teacher at Kingston University and has curated exhibitions such as The Learned Society of Extra Ordinary Objects at London's Somerset House. He returns to the London venue this month with The Beasley Brothers' Repair Shop, as part of the gallery's new show Eternally Yours – an exhibition about repair, care and healing.In this episode we talk about: his new installation at Somerset House and the importance of mending; the role narrative and humour plays in his work; feeling uncomfortable in the art world and becoming a designer by default; growing up in London's Eastend; the influence of Michael Marriott; his love of teaching… and his fascination with buckets. Support the show

ScreenHeatMiami
0066 Stewart Mackinnon-Producer

ScreenHeatMiami

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 91:53


Creator and Independent Producer of numerous award winning movies and long form drama series including: The Man In The High Castle a 40 hour long Amazon series which has become the cornerstone of the streaming network's line-up, winner of two Primetime Emmy's and many other awards. Quartet Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut and Golden Globe nominee, starring Maggie Smith, The Invisible Woman Oscar nominated, starring and directed by Ralph Fiennes, the Emmy Award winning Peter and Wendy starring Stanley Tucci. The Miners winner of the Grierson Award, This Little Life BAFTA nominated and winner of the Dennis Potter, BANFF and RTS awards and Saboteurs the Prix Italia winning series. Stewart studied at the Edinburgh College of Art and Royal College of Art in London and after graduating regularly contributed illustrations for The Times, Sunday Times, Oz, Nova, Time Out, , Spare Rib, Ambit and Management Today amongst many others. He also produced the artwork for the British TV movie The War Game and designs for the Royal Shakespeare Company. His work was featured in the Radical Illustrators magazine published by the Association of Illustrators in which co-editor George Snow singled out Mackinnon as “perhaps the greatest single influence on today's Radical Illustrators.” After being awarded a DAAD scholarship for his film Border Crossing he spent a year in Berlin before returning to the UK where he founded Trade Films which produced films and television such as The Miners' Campaign, Woodbine Place and Grierson Award winner, When the Dog Bites. He was closely involved in devising the Workshop Declaration in partnership with Channel 4. The Workshops worked with their local communities, women's organisations and ethnic minority communities. So began a decade of experiment with progressive and aesthetically avant-garde documentaries and dramas screened on British television, which continued until 1990. Stewart set up the Northern Film and Television Archive in the late 1990s and some years later co-founded the Northern Screen Commission with Sir Peter Carr, and Media Training Centre which provided courses for deaf students which was the first of its kind in the world. In 2005 he founded Headline Pictures with the Head of BBC drama Mark Shivas and after delivering the fourth and final season of Man in the High Castle in 2020 founded Circle Pictures with US based Jere Sulivan with the aim of producing world class drama which explores the pressing issues of our times.

RCSLT - Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists
RCSLT news June 2022: Health and Care strategy; Integrated Care Systems; Messenger Rewview; SEND survey and so much more

RCSLT - Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 13:26


In the May 2022 news update, we cover:- The Health and Care Strategy implementation- Integrated Care System updates- Messenger review- SEND survey- UN conference- Children's listening event- RCSLT in the news- and so, so much more!This interview is conducted by Victoria Harris, Head of Learning at The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists and features Derek Munn, Director of Policy and Public Affairs at the RCSLT.

BAST Training podcast
Ep.64 What Singing Teachers Need to Know About the British Voice Association With President Louise Gibbs

BAST Training podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 40:37


Today Alexa is joined by the President of the British Voice Association, who is also a jazz singer, composer, and educator teaching at Chester, Leeds, and York Universities, Louise Gibbs. Join in the chat from all things from gardening to jazz to improvisation and all you need to know about the British Voice Association.    KEY TAKEAWAYS Louise has always had the instinct as a musician to create rather than reproduce. After she had her first piano lesson, Louise went home and created her own compositions, then when she played them for her teacher in the second lesson she was told never to do it again and to follow the sheet music. That's when she knew that classical might not be for her.  We need to remember that most music just existed in people's imagination and in the oral tradition before it was ever written down.  A jazz singer is someone who treats a piece of music as a form which they improvise with, it's a more compositional approach. Whereas a jazz stylist will take the features of that music and reproduce them, with that you often get the same result every time.  Every time you alter something, you're adding some form of improvisation.  The British Voice Association (BVA) is the 'voice for voice' in the UK, an association of multi-disciplinary professionals who work to promote the field of voice in its broadest sense. Their remit is the encouragement of a healthy voice, vocal skills and communication in such areas as the performing arts, business and industry, medicine and education.   BEST MOMENTS   ‘I was always taken by the rhythm'  ‘Jazz is the ability to make something new every time and be creative with that' ‘The idea of not knowing what you're going all the time can put a lot of fear into people'  ‘You have to be able to embody rhythm and if you're not familiar with it, it's very tricky to do'   EPISODE RESOURCES  BAST Training    Guest Website: louisegibbs.co.uk britishvoiceassociation.org.uk   Relevant Links & Mentions:  Jazz Artists Mentioned: Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, Miles Davis iSing Magazine - Vocal Style: A beginners guide to singing jazz by Louise Gibbs: https://www.isingmag.com/vocal-style-a-beginners-guide-to-singing-jazz/ BVA Event: Breakthroughs & Boundaries Forum (Sunday 17th July 2022)  Louise Gibbs' Email: louise@jazzmine.co.uk ABOUT THE GUEST  Louise Gibbs is a jazz singer, composer and educator, and graduate in both music and education from Columbia University, New York. She is Visiting Professor at the University of Chester, and teaches jazz and popular voice and musicianship for the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield, and York. She has held academic and teaching positions at Leeds College of Music (Course Leader for the Postgraduate Programme and the Jazz Programmes), Goldsmiths, University of London, Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and Royal College of Music, and given workshops for major conservatoires and international institutions in the US and New Zealand. She maintains active research and writing interests in voice, improvisation, education and musical aesthetics. Louise is currently President of the multidisciplinary British Voice Association.  Louise continues to perform her own music, and the jazz repertory. Described in Jazzwise as “meeting all musical challenges with creativity and charisma” she has recorded with top UK and US artists and has five acclaimed albums as leader. Her performance of self-penned song suite, Seven Deadly Sings for voice and septet earned a 4-star review: “Both in its conception and execution, …is an unqualified triumph”.  Louise is a keen gardener, allotment-holder, and sourdough bread baker.    ABOUT THE PODCAST BAST Training is here to help singers gain the knowledge, skills and understanding required to be a great singing teacher. We can help you whether you are getting started or just have some knowledge gaps to fill through our courses and educational events. Website: basttraining.com Get updates to your inbox: Click here for updates from BAST Training Link to presenter's bios: basttraining.com/singing-teachers-talk-podcast-bios See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Plus podcast – Maths on the Move
The maths and magic of shuffling

Plus podcast – Maths on the Move

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 29:30


We all have our favoured methods of shuffling cards, but most of us don't think any more about it once we've started playing a game. But there's so much more to be discovered! In this podcast mathematician Cheryl Praeger and magician Will Houstoun reveal the maths and magic behind shuffling cards. And as this podcast, first published in March 2021, was the first podcast we produced in collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute, Dan Aspel also tells us all about the INI! You can watch Cheryl Praeger talk about the mathematics of shuffling in her Kirk Lecture at the INI in 2020. You can be astounded by Will Houstoun's magic, including the amazing trick we mentioned in the podcast, and find out more about his work as magician in residence at the Imperial College London and Royal College of Music Centre for Performance Science, at his website. And you can read all the details behind the maths and magic of shuffling in their Plus articles: The magic of shuffling and The mathematics of shuffling. This podcast was inspired by a talk given by Cheryl Praeger as part of the Groups, representations and applications programme at the Isaac Newton Institute. You can find out more about the maths behind this programme here.

Story in the Public Square
Leveraging the Power of Scent for Communication with Saskia Wilson-Brown

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 28:21


Noses—and their ability to detect smell—may not be as celebrated in words and songs as our other human senses—but Saskia Wilson-Brown says scents tell stories, too.  Wilson-Brown began her career in music video and production design, going on to serve as festival co-director for Los Angeles' seminal Silver Lake Film Festival, launching the festival's visionary media arm, MP4Fest, in 2005.  She went on to work as an independent producer and a film distribution strategist, producing events including the Open Video Alliance Filmmaker Summit, several of Lance Weiler's DIY Days events, and the TEDActive Innovation Lab.  Wilson-Brown founded The Institute for Art and Olfaction in 2012.  A 501(c)3 non-profit arts organization, the institute is devoted to experimentation and cross-media projects with a focus on scent.  In 2013, she created and launched one of the institute's flagship programs, The Art and Olfaction Awards, an international, blindly judged awards mechanism for independent and artisan perfumers, and experimental practitioners with scent.  In 2020, she launched the institute's online division, allowing it to continue its mission to facilitate access to the tools and information of perfumery, while reaching an even wider audience through online education.  In 2019 and 2020, Wilson-Brown was a visiting lecturer at the Royal College of Art in London, teaching about scent-making as a creative practice in the MA Fashion program.  She is currently producing a documentary about ownership and historic reconstruction in the field of perfumery, while pursuing a Ph.D. about the relationship between perfume, access and power.  She earned her BA from the University of California, Berkeley and her MFA at Central Saint Martin's College in London. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Habitual Excellence
Dr. Susan Moffatt-Bruce on the Science and Culture of Continuous Improvement

Habitual Excellence

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 36:54


Episode page with video, transcript, and more Welcome to Episode #69 of Habitual Excellence, presented by Value Capture. Joining us today as our guest is Susan Moffatt-Bruce, M.D., Ph.D. M.B.A., FRCSC. She is a thoracic surgeon and she is the Chief Executive Officer at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. She was previously executive director of The Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center University Hospital. Prior to that, she was the OSU Wexner Medical Center's first chief quality and patient safety officer. She and her team were celebrated for their success in reducing patient safety events and hospital re-admissions. Dr. Moffatt-Bruce completed medical school and residency in General Surgery at Dalhousie University. She undertook a PhD in Transplant Immunology at the University of Cambridge, England, and completed her Cardiothoracic Surgery fellowship at Stanford University, California. She also trained at Intermountain Healthcare, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Moffatt-Bruce has a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certification. She earned her Masters of Business Operational Excellence and her Executive Masters of Business Administration at the Fisher College of Business at the Ohio State University. In today's episode, Susan talks with host Mark Graban, about topics and questions including: How did you get interested in the practice of continuous improvement? “Science of continuous improvement” Engaging surgeons in continuous improvement? From singular improvements to a System level — How would you describe a “Culture of Continuous Improvement” in healthcare? Successes — examples and impact? Reducing patient safety events Reducing hospital re-admissions Challenges and lessons learned - things you would have done differently? MBOE program — any other surgeons in that program? What did you learn about C.I. through that? Aravind Chandrasekaran - Episode 25, academic director How would you suggest others get started in their organization? Click to visit the main Habitual Excellence podcast page.

Interviews by Brainard Carey
Vivienne Griffin

Interviews by Brainard Carey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 21:41


Vivienne Griffin (they/them) is an multi-disciplinary artist who uses sound, sculpture, drawing and text in various forms. Griffin works with the voice through digital post-processing and in a workshop format called Synthetic Voices. They work with sound alongside sculptures and installations. More recently they have used generative sound in videos of virtual worlds. Their current work looks at the opaque boundaries of human-computer relations; where does the mind end and the machine begin? Born in Dublin, Ireland and living in London, Griffin studied fine art at Hunter City University New York supported by a Fulbright Scholarship. They completed one year DPhil in visual art at the Royal College of Art, where they are now a visiting lecturer. They moved their research to the Sonic Arts Research Center, Queen's University, Belfast to pursue a PhD in Music with a focus on sound in an art context, noise, and the voice. Recent shows include Manchester International Festival, 2021, the AGM in Somerset House, 2021, for Montez Press Radio in NYC, Condo in London. They are represented by Bureau, in NYC. They won an Oram Award in 2021, they are a resident at Somerset House Studios, London. Still from Mercy, 2022, Digital video, sound. Still from Mercy, 2022, Digital video, sound. Mercy from Vivienne Griffin on Vimeo.

Dr. Chapa’s Clinical Pearls.
Monkeypox 101: Effect in Pregnancy and Beyond.

Dr. Chapa’s Clinical Pearls.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 20:56


This is your crash course into all things “Monkeypox”. Data for this podcast comes from the CDC, WHO, and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Information is moving fast and we're here to keep you evidence-based. How does Monkeypox affect pregnancy? When is a C-Section indicated? What are the treatments available? And what about the 2 vaccines available in the USA… Why is one more problematic than the other? Listen in and find out.

Project IMG
11. Dr. Tara Jamieson, Pediatrics

Project IMG

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 34:07


Dr. Tara Jamieson is an incoming PGY-1 resident at the Boston Combined Residency Program. She shares her journey from being a student in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland to matching into Pediatrics in the United States. Tune in to listen more about her journey!

Skip the Queue
Why retail space is pivotal for today's visitor attractions

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 43:49


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.lumsdendesign.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/callum-lumsden-b8473a3/https://www.instagram.com/lumsdendesign/https://www.linkedin.com/company/lumsden/ Callum Lumsden is a leading design expert for cultural and visitor attractions. He is the co-founder of Lumsden, a specialist design studio delivering bespoke retail and leisure environments for the world's most renowned museums, galleries and visitor attractions including V&A Dundee, MoMA (NYC), Warner Bros. Studio Tour – The Making of Harry Potter London, and M+ Museum, Hong Kong.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with Callum Lumsden, Co-Founder and Creative Director of Lumsden Design. Callum shares his journey to founding Lumsden, an interior design agency that creates iconic retail spaces for museums and attractions all over the world. Listen along to hear why retail space is pivotal for today's visitor attractions. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the user channels by searching to Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Callum, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast today. It's a pleasure to have you with me.Callum Lumsden: Thank you. Thanks for inviting me. I'm looking forward to this.Kelly Molson: I'm glad that you're looking forward to this but we are going to start with our icebreaker questions. Yeah, it might be a think, you never know. So at the start of every podcast, I always ask a few icebreaker questions to our guests. Mostly they're really stupid and just a chance for us to find out a little bit about you. So I would like to know, when you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?Callum Lumsden: Oh, that's a good one. What did I want to be? A rock star.Kelly Molson: Oh really?Callum Lumsden: Oh yeah. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Okay. And did you ever come close?Callum Lumsden: I managed to get a flute from school and I was big into a band called Jethro Tull at the time. So Ian, I can't remember his last name. He used to stand on one leg and play a flute. That's as far as I got.Kelly Molson: Oh, right. Okay. Can you do the one-legged flute playing?Callum Lumsden: Maybe I can do the one leg, but not the flute.Kelly Molson: It doesn't sound very rockstar-ish, does it? Flute player.Callum Lumsden: No, no, no, it doesn't, but Jethro Tull were pretty good. But I was also roadie for some mates of mine. They had a proper band and that was in Edinburgh. So I got to get a little bit of taste of that, but I've always been massively interested in rock music or music of any kind, really.Kelly Molson: Oh well this is really handy then, because my next question for you is, what is your karaoke song?Callum Lumsden: It's got to be Sweet Caroline.Kelly Molson: Yeah. It's a classic, isn't it?Callum Lumsden: Yeah. That's the one. Because you can get everybody joining in on that. Because nobody knows the words, but they get the bah bah bah so that always works.Kelly Molson: That's the key to a good karaoke song choice, isn't it? Pick something that everybody else knows. So you're not the only one singing it.Callum Lumsden: Oh, things they know. Yes.Kelly Molson: Great. Okay. Last one. If you could switch lives with anyone for a day, who would it be?Callum Lumsden: Somebody who's just starting to go to art college?Kelly Molson: Well, that's a good choice. Is that because you would be full of the wisdom that you have now or you would want to go in a different direction?Callum Lumsden: Yeah, it might take me in a different direction of what I originally wanted to do, which was to be an artist.Kelly Molson: Hmm. Interesting. Okay. Maybe we'll talk a little bit more about that. All right, firstly though, I want to know what your unpopular opinion is.Callum Lumsden: Here's one. I think musical theatre is the most unattractive part of the creative industries. I absolutely hate musicals.Kelly Molson: Oh no.Callum Lumsden: Come on. Bring it on.Kelly Molson: I love it. Oh no, really? What is it that really upsets you about it?Callum Lumsden: I just think it's so pretentious and naff and horrible. And then-Kelly Molson: Isn't it the naffness that makes it great though?Callum Lumsden: Yeah. And I just love ... I'm surrounded by people who love musical theatre so I really like winding them up about it.Kelly Molson: Do you get dragged along though?Callum Lumsden: No.Kelly Molson: Yeah but you point blank refuse.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Oh yeah. Yeah. I wouldn't even think about ... People don't even think about asking me because I'll just sit there and be embarrassing.Kelly Molson: So not even a little Mamma Mia trip would inspire you.Callum Lumsden: Nope.Kelly Molson: Oh no. I had really high hopes for this interview. I thought we were going to get on so well.Callum Lumsden: Sorry. Is that the end of it?Kelly Molson: We're done. You can leave. Get out of my podcast booth.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Yeah. And let's not get onto ABBA either.Kelly Molson: Oh God. Can we not? Because yeah, that'll go right off. There's a lot of people listening to this that love ABBA and I bet Eurovision as well so-Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Yeah. Sorry everybody.Kelly Molson: All right. Well let's just, we'll park that then. Callum you tell me about your background and how you have come to found Lumsden Design.Callum Lumsden: Well, it started it by me going to art college. At art college, I ended up studying furniture design. Then I went to Royal College of Art to do what was then called interior architecture. And that opened me up to all manner of different people and processes, et cetera. And then when I graduated I knew most of the people in the fashion department and they went off to work for various retailers and their bosses started saying that there's any of your mates, any good interior design, we've got a shop to design. And lots of them said, "Oh I know this guy called Callum. Give him a shout." So that got me into that. So I've been designing shops ever since then.Kelly Molson: Wow.Callum Lumsden: So that's how it started.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And so how long has Lumsden Design been around?Callum Lumsden: Well, it's been in a few different variations because when I left the RCA, I worked for myself and then I went to work for various retailers in house, such as Jaeger for instance. But I was also freelancing myself and then I eventually joined various big design companies. And then I formed London Design Partnership, it was called, oh 20, 30, 35 years ago. Something like that.Kelly Molson: It's the longest job you've ever had.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah it's gone through various different for formations. I did merge with another design company for a couple of years and then I started what it is now, which is Lumsden Design. Although we're getting rid of the design, just calling it Lumsden now.Kelly Molson: I like that. That's quite rockstar, isn't it? You just got the one name now.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah, it's keeping the Lumsden name, it's had its advantages, but there's also disadvantages. Because how long can ... Lumsden isn't just me. I have a team of people, a great team of people and everybody has to be part of all of that. And clients need to understand that I can't be there on every single one and all of those kind of things. So this one, this variation, which will stay the same, probably goes back to 2010. Yeah. So 12 years in the way that we're doing it now. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yeah. And so it's really interesting the way that you've ... Because this podcast is obviously for people that work in and for the attraction sector. And you have kind of evolved a little bit over the years, haven't you, in terms of working in that sector. So it that wasn't what you set out doing. Was it?Callum Lumsden: Yeah, there's a bit of happen chance that has gone on. The route to where we are now started probably in the year 1998, when we pitched for the retail for Tate Modern. And I'd always done retail, but I was asked to pitch for Tate Modern. I presume that you've been there or people that are listening to this know it. And we won it and I had no idea about the importance of retail to the cultural sector. And that opened in year 2000, 22 years ago, believe it or not. And then that got me into this sector. So I started, Tate Modern kicked it off. And then it was people like the V&A, the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum.Callum Lumsden: So I started spinning into this and then that went into loads of different places. And I'd always worked in retail, but retail, if you take mainstream retail, from a design perspective, you come up with a concept, you build it and if it's successful, then it gets repeated again and again, and again. The Americans call it cookie cutter. If you think of Gap, whichever Gap you see, it looks exactly the same. With this sector, every single client is different. And then eventually took the decision that we would just concentrate on that sector. And the route to visitor attractions was winning the Warner Brothers project in Leavesden, just outside of London, doing the retail for the Harry Potter-Kelly Molson: The name that everyone always gets wrong.Callum Lumsden: Studio tour. Yeah. It's the Harry Potter Studio Tour. No, no. It's the Warner Brothers Studio Tour, the making of Harry Potter. There we go.Kelly Molson: We had Jeff Spooner on-Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Sorry Jeff.Kelly Molson: Sorry, Jeff. But he said, everybody gets it wrong. They either call it the Harry Potter tour or the Warner Brothers tour. It's always a different, a different name every time.Callum Lumsden: And it's interesting connection with the route to get to them because the reason that I got contacted about pitching for that project was a couple of the directors from Warner Brothers in LA went to the British Museum and we'd done all the retail for the British Museum. And one of the library rooms in the British Museum is called the Greenville room. When you walk into the British Museum, you turn right, and it's where all the high end products are sold. Everything from statues to jewelry to watches to da da. And it's got loads of books. And Harry Potter is that. And they said to the guy who's in charge of British Museum commercial side, who did this? And that was me. Well, me and my team. And we pitched for it and we won it. And that started us into this amazing journey with Warner Brothers and various other places.Kelly Molson: Oh, I love that. It's a really ... I wanted to ask you how you became specialists. And I love that you've said it's like a catalyst process, because that's what happened to us as well. We won a big project for an existing client, for Pernod Ricard. So we worked on a project for the Plymouth Gin Visitor Centre. We created their ticket booking system and their website and it was such a brilliant experience going through that, to understand about the experience economy and visitor experience and how you take somebody on a journey through that. That was the catalyst for us. That was a really exciting project. And it was a world that we just thought we want to be more and more involved in. And it's really lovely to hear that was kind of a similar effect to you. It's brought you into this incredible world of ... It's fun, isn't it? All of these things that we work on, they're really fun.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. And that's what's interesting about all the clients that we work with, they're all entirely different and the we've got a who's who of clients. Abbey Road, everybody in the world knows Abbey Road. You can talk to somebody from China and they'll know what Abbey Road is all about. And that's as much about visitor experiences as the studio tour in Leavesden.Kelly Molson: So I've got quite a few questions for you today, but I just want to touch on what you said earlier, because you were talking about Gap and the cookie cutter experience of their stores. So with that, I guess people work out what works and they just replicate it. Yours is so different because every store that you're working on is completely different. Everything has a different brand story, has different values. How do you even start to approach a project when it's so different each time you do it?Callum Lumsden: Well, it's a very overused word, but immerse ourself in that brand, as much as we can. We sit down or walk around and just talk to people, observe, find out who the visitors are, the fans, are they school kids? And that's the difference in this sector. Because if you go to, say a high street brand, again, you probably got every retailer saying, well, our core customer is ... For the people that we work for, there is a bit of a core customer, but actually it can be anybody from two years old to 82 years old. The Warner Brothers Studio Tour, it's international, it can be grannies and grandpas to a whole trip of school kids to teenagers or moms who were reading the Harry Potter books when they were six, who are now reading that to their own kids.Callum Lumsden: And if you go to, we worked for MoMA in New York, you've got absolute fans of MoMA products. The New York dinner set will go and buy their china and their cutlery at the New York design store, the MoMA design store. Go across the roads to the museum itself and you'll get a tourist, who's come from Austria because ... So actually defining who the ... So understanding that is completely different every single time. The National Theatre that we did in the South Bank, the shop there, the book shop that you went to find a particular book on a particular play, we changed that around to actually make it about stories about the productions that were going on in the theatre, the theatre itself. And they have three or four one time because there's lots of different theatres and that help the retail team there design the products that will fit that store, but still have the bookshop at the back because they weren't making any money out that, but they are making money out of the products.Kelly Molson: Right.Callum Lumsden: And understanding how ... Because it's not just about making the spaces look great or seamless, which is another part of what needs to be done, but they've got to make money. They have to increase revenue. That's why they're there in the first bit, apart from everybody expects to go into, I hate the term gift shop, but 96% of people will go into the shop and buy something-Kelly Molson: Exit through the gift shop. Yeah.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. And they will buy something. So make the most of it.Kelly Molson: It's a fascinating process, isn't it? I think you touched on it there in terms of the commercial, but why is retail space so important to the sector? It is about commercials, right?Callum Lumsden: Yes it is. But it does have benefits as well. Visitor attraction are slightly different to the cultural sector because the cultural sector, the money that's generated goes to the curators to help them buy the objects that they want in their collections. And it also helps in the education part of what they do and the events and everything else. If you take MoMA, their retail turnover is $52 million per year. That's a lot of money.Kelly Molson: That is a lot of money.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. I'm not able to tell you what Warner Brothers is, but let's say it's really quite successful, but that goes back into them to be able to develop the next part because a studio tour can't stand still, everybody has to look at, all right, what are we going to do in the next year, the next two years. Because they want repeat visits. So to be able to do that and to be fair to Warner Brothers, they also put a lot back into the local community education as well, developing their staff, all of those kind of things. So there's a whole load of other aspects to it. So the money that's generated is really important to everybody.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yeah. Completely. How does it help to sustain their visitor engagement? So what part does retail play in making that visitor maybe come back or be more engaged with the brand?Callum Lumsden: Well, again, the retail offer is done to the merchandise. The merchandise has to be looked at as creatively as possible in terms of, okay, what else can we do that will grab people's attention? So there's an introduction of hampers at Warner Brothers for Harry Potter. So you could actually take a whole Harry Potter based hamper with loads of product in it so you've got a whole set of something. That was introduced and that's been really important. That's been a really successful one. Personalisation, doing lots of different things to actually make a wand that's just for you or all of those kind of things and personalisation is becoming really ... Well it's there. It's become really important also in the cultural sector as well where you can get your own name on it. You can get things custom made according to ... Because people like Adidas and Nike, they're doing that. You can get your trainers personalised, all of that needs to seep into the sector that I work in as well. And that's becoming really successful.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And I guess some of the retail spaces that you've owned, most of the retail spaces that you've designed, they almost become experiences in themselves. Don't they? Like a mini attraction within an attraction.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah. Well, a lot of ... Yeah. There's quite a lot of stores that we've done that people go to but they don't go into the museum. The Tate Modern is one example. MoMA is another example. But that's not the point. The point is that what is being sold and how you actually design that store needs to reflect the brand of the institution that it is part of. And it should be, in our view, a seamless thing. So you shouldn't feel, all right, well, I'm now going into the shop. You should feel that it's part of the Harry Potter experience or the museum or the theatre experience in terms of look and feel. So that means that the space could be inspired by, well, for Harry Potter, it's about the props that are in there, referring to Diagon Alley in terms of the look and feel of the place.Callum Lumsden: Or, if you take the British museum, it reflects the architecture, because it is a completely ... That's big tourist ... That people want British Museum because it's a fantastic building. It's got an amazing collection. Everything that's in the shop is telling stories about what they've just seen as they've walked around the museum. And that's what they want to take a piece of. They want to take that memory away either for themselves or to buy for somebody. And that's where the click happens between retail and the actual experience of walking around the rest of the building, et cetera.Kelly Molson: I would love to know the process that you go on when you start to work with the visitor attraction. You touched on it earlier about immersing yourself into who their clientele is, who their customers are, who's going to be visiting. Can you share the process that you take? You take the cultural institution on, or the attraction on. So things that they need to think about or research that they need to carry out if they're going to go through this process with you?Callum Lumsden: Well, most of the institutions that we work with or the companies or the brands, they have their research anyway. So the demographic for instance will be well and truly looked at by ... Without exception actually. There's usually something. Except when it's a brand new, we haven't done this before that. That's usually very interesting. We just did the stores for amazing new museum that's been built in Hong Kong called M+, that's M with a plus sign, which has the largest collection of contemporary visual culture in Asia. It's an amazing building. It's taken something like 20 years to finally come to fruition. We've been working with them for five years. It opened last November. Sadly Hong Kong is closed because of COVID, et cetera. So I haven't actually been able to visit what we just sweated tears over.Kelly Molson: Oh gosh, that must be really hard, to not be able to see it.Callum Lumsden: Yeah, it's really difficult. Yeah. But they are anticipating that people from Hong Kong, but also most of, when they're allowed to, people from China, but also Asia, but they're also expecting other international tourists. So deciding who was going to be the demographic for there was a little bit-Kelly Molson: Yeah. Very tricky.Callum Lumsden: Hit and miss. Abbey Road was the same. They knew that everybody, so many people, tourist buses, et cetera, were rocking up to walk across the zebra crossing and really upset London taxi drivers the whole time. But they had no idea people would actually walk into the building to buy anything, but that's been an enormous success. So you have to make assumptions is a long way around of saying that. But most of the time, the details of the demographics, who'll be there, talking to the curators, talking to the management, talking to the retail teams, as well, is our way of doing it.Callum Lumsden: And an awful lot of the time we're working in, such as the M+ in Hong Kong example, working with a brand new building, you've got super important architects who are being commissioned to design these amazing buildings. So being allied with them in terms of their vision for the building is another part of what we like to understand. In terms of the materials they're using, the space they are going to give us, where it's actually going to go, because the location of a shop, it's not always exit through the gift shop. All of those ... Are there other opportunities? So we look at all of that with the client teams that we work with. And then that starts to, for us, that's the kickoff point.Callum Lumsden: Understanding what the merchandise is, a lot of the time that's been developed at the same time as we're ... Because it actually takes longer to get merchandise together than it does to build a shop.Kelly Molson: Oh really?Callum Lumsden: Oh yeah. Sometimes it can be two years. In museums, if you say somewhere like the National Gallery, their most popular product is the sunflower painting by Van Gogh, which they've got on everything from beer maps to fridge magnets, et cetera. Working to get permission to do that from artists can take ages. Andy Warhol, working at Abbey Road, trying to get The Beatles, the guys who are looking after The Beatles or Pink Floyd or Rolling Stones, they are super sensitive about, no, you can't do that. Or you can do that. For Abbey Road to really get the products, they've done it, but it's taken a long time.Kelly Molson: Yeah. I wonder what they' vetoed. No, you can't put my face on a tea towel.Callum Lumsden: Well, I had an idea about Mean Mr. Mustard socks and that didn't happen.Kelly Molson: Disappointing.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. I would've worn them.Kelly Molson: Me too. That's brilliant. Thank you for that insight into the process. I guess then, the brands that you work with are phenomenally well known or they have such rich history or such good stories like Harry Potter, or I know you mentioned the National Gallery there, the designing of the stores and what they're going to look like, interior. That must be the easy part. You've got so much to work with.Callum Lumsden: No, it's never easy because there's lots of layers of people that you need to go through. And navigating that it can be quite interesting, shall we say. Because every everybody's got an opinion.Kelly Molson: And there are quite a lot of boards involved in cultural organisations as well. Aren't there? So there's a lot of layers of people to come through.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah. And if you're working with a museum, you are working with academics and they don't have conversations, they have debates. And inevitably that debate will mean there'll be 25 people in the room who all have to say something and you come away with, was there a decision there? And then you've got the architects. The architects can be very easy to work with or very opinionated and have one direction. So actually navigating that can be quite entertaining sometimes. We did the V&A Dundee, which is an amazing building, that was designed by a Japanese architect called Kiakumi. And they were fantastic. They were just so ... Yes, this is ... We'd like this, da da. Everything fitted. It was good. But there's other examples that I won't go on air to talk about-Kelly Molson: I was going to ask you, I was going to ask you-Callum Lumsden: Nose to nose.Kelly Molson: Without naming any names, can you tell us about an experience where you couldn't get what you wanted.Callum Lumsden: I usually get what I want.Kelly Molson: Oh, right.Callum Lumsden: Or there's-Kelly Molson: You're very persuasive.Callum Lumsden: Or there's a bit of a compromise. Yeah. There was one example where it just got so stupid that the head of the museum walked into one of the meetings that I was having alongside the retail team and the architects. And he came in and said, I've had enough of this, the architects ... You're no longer involved in this, get out.Kelly Molson: Wow.Callum Lumsden: And let Callum do what he wants to do. So there you go.Kelly Molson: Oh right, I love it.Callum Lumsden: No name, no name was mentioned.Kelly Molson: No names mentioned the power that you have Callum, as well, I love that.Callum Lumsden: I have since worked with those architects on another project and everything was fine.Kelly Molson: We all have our little friction moments.Callum Lumsden: But that was 15 years later and they'd calmed down.Kelly Molson: It took them that amount of time to mellow.Callum Lumsden: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I'm glad there was a happy ending. What about retail spaces that aren't at the actual attraction itself? So we talk about Harry Potter, they have retail stores all over the place. So King's Cross is the one for me because obviously that is very pertinent to the film. So I will be queuing up to get ... Waiting for my train to be announced and I'll see hoards of people queuing up to have their photo taken with their trolley wedged into the wall there and the shop there. Do you get involved in that element as well? So retail-Callum Lumsden: Yes we do. Yeah. We designed that shop and that was a moment of genius by somebody ... A guy called Jonathan-Kelly Molson: Very clever.Callum Lumsden: Johnathan Sands. He saw the opportunity and he opened that up and he eventually joined up with Warner Brothers. He's since moved on. But with those ones, we did that shop. We also did the airport shops, but because of COVID that didn't work out. Then there was Cursed Child, we did all the retail and the theaters for that. And that went world wide, New York, Hamburg Sydney. I can't remember all the cities that that went to. And then we didn't get involved in it, but Warner Brothers opened up the store in New York, a full blown store right next to the Flat Iron building, that's been enormously successful. We didn't get involved in that one, but there's the shops that Warner Brothers have done, but there's also the shops that lots of other people have done copies of. And if you go to Edinburgh, you've got six versions of Harry Potter shops, nothing to do with us.Kelly Molson: No claim on those. Someone once described a retail experience as a bit like a theatrical experience. Not a musical theatrical experience, because we know how you feel about those, but ultimately you are taking the visitor on a journey, aren't you, around the store and you are making that a real experienced for them. Can I ask you, and this might be like what's your favourite child, but what has been your favourite store to design from that perspective?Callum Lumsden: Definitely the Warner Brothers Leavesden store, because that's gone through the number of iterations as well. They've expanded it. We've moved it around. We've done different things. We've developed the restaurants and the cafes. That's been great fun too. Every project, I'm thinking ... Because it's recently opened, the M+ in Hong Kong has been a great experience. And that's an interesting one about where it's going in the sector because within that, it wasn't just about a whole lot of shelves with products on it. A number of what we've called pavilions that were inspired by Hong Kong. And, for instance, the central pavilion in the show is a combination of a place where artists can do master classes and talk about what they're doing. And the retail guys developed products based around the artist or the artist has designed some of those products.Callum Lumsden: And then there's another space where artists are given the market stalls in Hong Kong, which I don't know if you've been to Hong Kong, but the markets are amazing. And the stalls are called pai dongs. We based one of our fixtures on pai dongs, and the idea. And that's what's happening, is that one of the pai dongs could be taken over by an artist to do anything that they want on it.Kelly Molson: Lovely.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. So sculptural or lighting or sounds because they've got sound artists and all of those kind of things. Or it can be handed over almost on a concession basis. So it could be, I don't know, a sports retailer, if they take it over. All of those things, or personalisation again, where you could actually get, if you're buying a wallet, you can get your own initial put on it, all of that kind of stuff. And then another part of it was for gift wrapping where we were commissioning Chinese calligraphers who will actually sign it.Kelly Molson: Oh, wow.Callum Lumsden: Or showing origami, how you can actually use origami to make your gift wrapping look even more different.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's incredible. That's really theatrical, isn't it? That's a real experience.Callum Lumsden: So you've really got activity going on and that's what happens with Harry Potter. When you're buying a wand, you've got somebody showing you how everything works and how to wave it and what to say and all of those kind of things. And that just gives people something. They'll remember that, they'll love that. And hopefully they'll also buy something, but it's adding something extra into that visitor experience. That's the way it's going for mainstream retail as well. That whole thing.Kelly Molson: Yeah.Callum Lumsden: Experiential.Kelly Molson: So I guess it's like the Hamley's thing, isn't it? Because I can remember as kid going around Hamley's and you watch the people, they show you how to use the toys and they show you how they work and to play with them.Callum Lumsden: Yeah, absolutely.Kelly Molson: There's a guy ... Do you know what? I hope I don't misquote this because I think it was Geoff Ramm that told me this story where ... Geoff Ramm is a public speaker and he told me this story about how he just got mugged off but he spent so much money in Hamley's because of somebody who was there demonstrating the product. It was some like paint blocks and they were painting these pictures and then talking them through and his kid was watching them paint and she asked the child what her name was. And then she drew this picture with her initials and blah, blah, blah, and then gave it to her. And he was like, well, that's it. I have to buy that product now, don't I? I've got this picture that I'm taking home with me, but I've also got to buy those things because my kid wants the magic. She's just seen the magic happen.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Well, if you think about it, you go down to a food market and you've got the guys, come and get your apples and pears and all of that kind of thing. It's actually, it's not you, it's the way that people have always been persuaded to buy things or the butcher show that will remember your name when you walk in and say, did you enjoy that steak last week, we've got a nice piece of roast beef here. It's interaction. It's not just about how great the shop is, it's to do with the staff, the product, the atmosphere, the layout, there's so many different aspects that we've got to work together.Kelly Molson: Yeah. All the facets coming together. I think you've described that perfectly there, Callum, thank you. We're at the end of our interview, which I'm quite sad about, if I'm honest, I've really enjoyed this.Callum Lumsden: Nice of you to say.Kelly Molson: I always ask our guests a final question, which is about a book they love, but actually I've got one more question for you. I would love to know. Your list of clients is incredibly prestigious. Is there anyone that you would love to work with that you've not got your hands on yet?Callum Lumsden: That's a good one, Hamley's.Kelly Molson: Hamley's. Oh okay. Yeah. There's some work that could be done there.Callum Lumsden: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I think if you put stuff out in the universe, you never know what's going to come back, do you?Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Yeah, no, I think there's ... Well, if I ever get to speak to them, I'll tell them-Kelly Molson: You'll tell them.Callum Lumsden: I think what Hamley's used to be and what it is now is in need of a little bit of TLC.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, universe, let's see what you can bring to Callum. Thank you for sharing that. All right. What about a book that you love or something that you love, something that's helped you in your career? What would you recommend to our listeners?Callum Lumsden: Well, there's a beautiful book by a fantastic illustrator called Charlie Mackesy. I think that's how you pronounce his name. It's called The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse. And it's all illustrations, but with lovely little writing from him, and it's all about being gentle and kind to people. And that sounds a bit naff, but the illustrations are absolutely fantastic. I follow him on Instagram and it's just a lovely, beautiful book. I came across it as somebody else had it. And then somebody bought it for my birthday and I've actually used it a couple of times when I've done talks, et cetera, to illustrate different things. I highly recommend it. Charlie Mackesy, The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Hare.Kelly Molson: Ah, it is a wonderful book.Callum Lumsden: Oh, you know it?Kelly Molson: I do. I also follow him on Instagram and I have the book and it is a beautiful book and a number of people have recommended that book because I think it touched a lot of people at a really challenging time.Callum Lumsden: Yeah.Kelly Molson: As well. I think a lot of people were drawn to that book during the pandemic. And it's become a bit of a staple in, especially in nurseries as well, to be honest. A little bit of love and a little bit of hope that we all needed at that time.Callum Lumsden: Sorry. Lots of other people have recommended it as well. I thought I might have come up with something that would nobody else-Kelly Molson: No, it's a good thing. I always think it's a good thing if people have recommended it, because it's testament to that book, isn't it?Callum Lumsden: Oh yeah.Kelly Molson: It's a-Callum Lumsden: No it is good.Kelly Molson: Yeah. So as ever listeners, if you want to win a copy of that book, if you head over to our Twitter account and you retweet this podcast announcement with the words I would like Callum's book, then you could be in with the chance of winning it.Callum Lumsden: Oh that's nice.Kelly Molson: Callum. Thank you. Yeah. Isn't that lovely, people can win your book choice. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast. Been lovely to chat.Callum Lumsden: My pleasure.Kelly Molson: We will put all of Callum's details in the show notes, we will put links to some of the case studies so you can see some of the incredible work. I'm sure most of you listening have visited many of the places that Callum has designed. So you will see firsthand what they look like, but we'll put links in the show notes and you can go and check that out. And if anyone has a connection at Hamley's that they would like to put Callum's way, pass it on to me and I will make sure he gets that. Thanks Callum.Callum Lumsden: Thank you, Kelly. Nice to see you.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

ZEITGEIST19 Curated Podcast
Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg. Cross-Pollination: Art, Nature, Technology

ZEITGEIST19 Curated Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 35:09


Episode Summary:In today's episode we are diving into the inspiring world of Dr. Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg. Named "One to Watch" by the Financial Times and voted a Future 50 by Icon Magazine, this Cambridge University and Royal College of Art graduate makes artworks that explore our fraught relationships with nature and technology. Through artworks, writing, and curatorial projects, Ginsberg's work explores subjects as diverse as artificial intelligence, synthetic biology, conservation, and evolution, as she investigates the human impulse to “better” the world. In this candid conversation we ask Daisy about her ongoing one of a kind interspecies artwork entitled Pollinator Pathmaker that transforms how we see gardens and who we make them for. This conscious art project will come into full bloom for the first time this May at the Eden Project, Cornwall. Further public Pollinator Pathmaker gardens will be planted this year in other locations globally including the Serpentine in London. Meanwhile, anyone in Northern Europe will be able to plant their own garden at home, as well as globally by creating a garden plan at pollinator.art, supported by the Google Arts and Culture Lab.The Speaker:Dr. Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg is an artist examining our fraught relationships with nature and technology. Through artworks, writing, and curatorial projects, Ginsberg's work explores subjects as diverse as artificial intelligence, synthetic biology, conservation, and evolution, as she investigates the human impulse to “better” the world. Ginsberg spent over ten years experimentally engaging with the field of synthetic biology, developing new roles for artists and designers. She is lead author of Synthetic Aesthetics: Investigating Synthetic Biology's Designs on Nature (MIT Press, 2014), and in 2017 completed Better, her PhD by practice, at London's Royal College of Art (RCA), interrogating how powerful dreams of “better” futures shape the things that get designed. Ginsberg won the World Technology Award for design in 2011, the London Design Medal for Emerging Talent in 2012, and the Dezeen Changemaker Award 2019. Her work has twice been nominated for Designs of the Year (2011, 2015), with Designing for the Sixth Extinction described as “romantic, dangerous... and everything else that inspires us to change and question the world”. Ginsberg exhibits internationally, including at MoMA New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, the National Museum of China, the Centre Pompidou, and the Royal Academy, and her work is held in museum and private collections. Talks include TEDGlobal, PopTech, Design Indaba, and the New Yorker TechFest. Daisy is a resident at Somerset House Studios, London.Follow Alexandra's journey on InstagramHosts: Elizabeth Zhivkova & Farah Piriye, ZEITGEIST19 FoundationSign up for ZEITGEIST19's newsletter at https://www.zeitgeist19.comFor sponsorship enquiries, comments, ideas and collaborations, email us at info@zeitgeist19.com Follow us on Instagram and TwitterHelp us to continue our mission and to develop our podcast: Donate

Digital HR Leaders with David Green
Live Special from People Analytics World 2022: Linking People Analytics to Business Impact

Digital HR Leaders with David Green

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 40:41


It's a Digital HR Leaders Podcast first this week, with a live episode recorded in April at People Analytics World 2022. David's joined by two illuminating guests – Jordan Pettman and Tertia Wiedenhof – for a special discussion recorded onstage at the Royal College of Physicians in London. Jordan is Head of Organisation Analytics and Insight at London Stock Exchange Group, and Tertia is Head of People Analytics and Insights at Rabobank. In this episode, you'll hear their thoughts about the impact of the pandemic on the field of people analytics, the changing role of the chief people officer, the evolution and future considerations of hybrid working, the increased appetite for data-driven analytics, the best way for people analytics teams and HR to successfully work together, and a whole lot more. Support from this podcast comes from Visier. You can learn more by visiting https://www.visier.com/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cold Steel: Canadian Journal of Surgery Podcast
E124 Paul Engels on Trauma Training in Canada

Cold Steel: Canadian Journal of Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 47:58


This week on the podcast we spoke with Dr. Paul Engels, a trauma surgeon from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. We got into some pretty detailed discussions around trauma training specifically, but more broadly about how we define what a resident should be able to perform at the end of training. Links: 1. The current state of resident trauma training: Are we losing a generation? https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29806811/ 2. Canadian Collaborative on Urgent Care Surgery (CANUCS): https://canucs.ca/ 3. Cause for concern: Resident experience in operative trauma during general surgery residency at a Canadian centre. https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/cmej/article/view/69323/54233 4. Toward an all-inclusive trauma system in Central South Ontario: development of the Trauma-System Performance Improvement and Knowledge Exchange (T-SPIKE) project. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33720676/ 5. ASSET course: https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/trauma/education/asset/ 6. Treatment of Ongoing Hemorrhage: The Art and Craft of Stopping Severe Bleeding. https://www.amazon.ca/Treatment-Ongoing-Hemorrhage-Stopping-Bleeding/dp/3319634941. 7. Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T) course: https://caep.ca/cpd-courses/simulated-trauma-and-resuscitation-team-training-s-t-a-r-t-t/ 8. Definitive Surgical Trauma Care (DSTC™) Courses. https://iatsic.org/DSTC/ 9. Advanced Trauma Operative Management (ATOM) course. https://atomcourse.com/#:~:text=The%20Advanced%20Trauma%20Operative%20Management,post%2Dcourse%20exams%20and%20evaluations. 10. BEST - Basic Endovascular Skills for Trauma. https://medschool.ucsd.edu/som/surgery/divisions/trauma-burn/training/courses/Pages/REBOA-Course.aspx. Bio: Paul Engels is a Trauma/General Surgeon and Intensivist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He completed his residency in General Surgery and fellowship in Critical Care at the University of Alberta. He completed a fellowship in Trauma & Acute Care Surgery at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada and the American College of Surgeons, as well as a member of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma and the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

The Health Design Podcast
Alastair Santhouse, Neuropsychiatrist and Author of 'Head First'

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 33:07


Alastair Santhouse is a Consultant Neuropsychiatrist at The Maudsley Hospital in London. He began his career working in internal medicine, retraining in 1996 as a psychiatrist. He worked as a consultant psychiatrist for 18 years in Guy's Hospital, London, at the interface between medicine and psychiatry, before moving into neuropsychiatry. He is a fellow of both The Royal College of Physicians and The Royal College of Psychiatrists, and is a former President of the Psychiatry Council at the Royal Society of Medicine. Alastair is an enthusiastic teacher and communicator, and has taught medical students and junior doctors over many years. His book, Head First, was published in 2021 and is available to buy at https://atlantic-books.co.uk/book/head-first/ as well as all good bookstores.

DocPreneur Leadership Podcast
451. Concierge Medicine Across the Pond

DocPreneur Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 30:57


"Medicine is personal, there is no one-size fits all. Hence, it is no surprise many leaders choose concierge doctors to look after themselves and their families" ~Priyanka Chaturvedi, Managing Director, HealthClic, London, England UK LEARN MORE, https://healthclic.co.uk Dr Anuj Chaturvedi Medical Director & Family Doctor Dr Anuj Chaturvedi has been a doctor for over 30 years, and is our Medical Director. Highly popular with his patients, he is focused on personalised medicine, and is also a Specialist GP Advisor to the Care Quality Commission.   Dr Chaturvedi personally interviews each GP who joins HealthClic and strives for a team of HealthClic Doctors who are fit for “global standard”. He also carefully approves preventative health protocols for our members. Furthermore, he is a current GP Trainer and Appraiser, and is involved in the recruitment process for GPs with The London Deanery. Dr Chaturvedi has spent many years working in the NHS at Partner Level, holding Membership with the Royal College of General Practitioners. Case Management and leading a team of specialists to treat and care for his patients is one of his major strengths. Through his extensive experience, Dr Chaturvedi advocates care suited to individuals' genetics, family and lifestyle factors. His main specialties cover radiology, general surgery (with background in renal transplant) and preventive medicine along with bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. The HealthClic Ethos One of the biggest challenges when managing health is knowing what to prevent; and which are your biggest risks. As a leader upon whom many rely on, the consequences of a health crisis could be catastrophic for family, an organisation or even an industry. This is where our area of expertise delivers, as we simply cannot afford to be reactive when it comes to the care of our patients. While our focus is preventative medicine, we also take on some of the most complex cases in the country, often requiring intervention by global experts. LEARN MORE, https://healthclic.co.uk DISCLAIMER AND USE: In no event is this information considered medical, legal, tax, financial, accounting or other professional advice (Please see full disclaimer below). This Podcast Is Subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use (https://conciergemedicinetoday.org/tcpp/) and is recorded/hosted by Concierge Medicine Today, LLC. Concierge Medicine Today, LLC., our representatives, agents or employees accept no responsibility or liability for direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential damages or financial costs or claims made by the Physician(s) interviewed or our guests. OTHER RESOURCES FOR PHYSICIANS https://members.fordoctorsforum.org/ www.ConciergeMedicineFORUM.com www.ConciergeMedicineToday.org www.ConciergeMedicineToday.net

Afternoons with Helen Farmer
Having A Baby in Dubai?

Afternoons with Helen Farmer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 74:33


02 June 2022: In the studio is Dr. Samina M Dornan, the first female specialist in Maternal Fetal Medicine from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of London to come to Dubai. Uzma Akser is helping parents who need support bringing up children of determination  Aventura Park have created activities and play areas based on research for child development Yummie4kids is a platform to educate kids on exercise and healthy eating And Helen chats to children's author Hilda Youssef. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Discovery Institute Podcasts: Distinguished Glasgow Surgeon David Galloway Dissects Darwinism

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022


Today's ID the Future brings onto the show Scottish physician David Galloway, author of the recent book Design Dissected and former president of Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Source

Intelligent Design the Future
Distinguished Glasgow Surgeon David Galloway Dissects Darwinism

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 16:47


Today's ID the Future brings onto the show Scottish physician David Galloway, author of the recent book Design Dissected and former president of Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. In his conversation with guest host and fellow physician/author Geoffrey Simmons, Galloway describes how he found himself in the evolution/design controversy and eventually presented his doubts about Darwin to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. In this first half of a two-part conversation, Galloway and Simmons briefly summarize the content of Design Dissected, and Galloway homes in on one section in particular where he tells the tragic story of Ignaz Semmelweis, a nineteenth-century Hungarian physician who pioneered life-saving antiseptic procedures in hospitals, but whose ideas were Read More › Source

Creative Boom
Marina Willer on 10 years at Pentagram and the joy of looking back and realising work can still surprise you

Creative Boom

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 64:34


Our guest this week is Marina Willer, an award-winning graphic designer and filmmaker and one of Pentagram's many respected partners. Before joining the global agency, she was head creative director for Wolff Olins in London. With an MA in Graphic Design from the Royal College of Art, Marina has enjoyed an incredible career so far. She's led the design of major identities, including Rolls Royce, Oxfam, Nesta and Amnesty International. She recently rebranded Battersea and Sight and Sound Magazine. And as a multi-faceted designer, she has even designed major exhibitions for the Design Museum, including Ferrari: Under the Skin and Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition. Both were the most-visited shows in the museum's history. Elsewhere, Marina's first feature film, Red Trees, premiered at the 2017 Canne Film Festival and was released worldwide by Netflix in 2018 to much critical acclaim. She talks about it fondly in this episode and shares many other fascinating insights into her amazing creative journey. We talk about her process and inspirations. We learn more about Pentagram and how she feels about the world right now. We discuss the idea of "home" and how it feels to be in London post-pandemic. And she shares the joy of realising that work continues to surprise her, even after it's been 20 years since she famously rebranded Tate. Season Four of The Creative Boom Podcast is kindly sponsored by Astropad Studio.

Farming Today
21/05/22 - Farming Today This Week: The vet shortage, dead shellfish, biodiversity and county shows.

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 25:03


There is a shortage of vets in the UK - a situation exacerbated by COVID, Brexit, and the increased workload caused by new paperwork and a surge in pet ownership. The UK's veterinary workforce is currently heavily reliant on vets from the EU - but data from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons show the annual number of registrants from the EU coming to work in the UK fell by 68% from over a thousand in 2019... to just 364 in 2021. Fishing boats have led a protest off England's NE coast saying not enough is being done to help them – it's the latest in the long running dispute over thousands of unexplained shellfish deaths in the area. As we reported - after crabs and lobsters began washing up along the Yorkshire coast last Autumn, Defra and the Environment Agency investigated and blamed an algal bloom. Fishermen disagree saying that the dumping of contaminated sediment is a more likely cause. And it's very rare that a foreign species is introduced into the UK to fight off another which has taken hold. But after a decade of research, the Government's decided it's safe to release South American Weevils to chomp through the serious invasion of the floating pennywort plant, which is clogging up some of Britain's waterways. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio Wales and West of England by Heather Simons If you've been affected by any of the issues mentioned in this programme, there are details of organisations that offer advice and support at BBC Action Line: Emotional Distress / Suicide https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4WLs5NlwrySXJR2n8Snszdg/emotional-distress-information-and-support Mental Health in the Farming Community https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/489tVhcXfvd98RmcH5CBmdj/information-and-support-mental-health-in-the-farming-community Mental Health https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/1NGvFrTqWChr03LrYlw2Hkk/information-and-support-mental-health-self-harm

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast
Quantum 199 - Football, Faith and Fantasy

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:07


This week we look at Rangers in Seville; Jack Daniels; Idrissa Gueye; the Obcession with Sexuality; US womens football; Quantative Easing and Inflation; Runrig - Loch Lomond; Turkey blocks Sweden and Finland joining NATO;  Mariupol 'evacuation'; Nutbush and the Australian Election; Michelle Obama and Womxn; Justin Truedeau and 'Two Spirit'; Dr Who goes Trans; The Royal College of Nursing goes Drag; Undeceptions on Transgender; When is Bullying at School OK? Church of Scotland General Assembly; Syrian Rap with Ream Brazi; Amazing Grace with Jelle Bosfeld.