Podcasts about southern utah

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Best podcasts about southern utah

Latest podcast episodes about southern utah

Wild Utah
Reimagining Recreation

Wild Utah

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:48


Human-powered recreation is exploding on public lands throughout the west, with Southern Utah as the poster child for unsustainable growth and associated impacts to resources and user experiences. These problems are compounded by under-staffed and under-resourced federal land management agencies like the Bureau of Land Management. Join Professor of Recreation Resources Management Dr.Christopher Monz and SUWA Wildlands Director Neal Clark to learn about the impacts of human-powered recreation in Southern Utah, and how implementing more proactive land management strategies from the Bureau of Land Management will protect public lands, wildlife and wild places-- all while providing a spectrum of high-quality, meaningful experiences for a diverse recreating public.

The Solarpreneur
The #1 Principle You're Probably Forgetting (Even If You're Experienced)

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 16:15


Visit Solciety.co now!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:42):What's going on Solarpreneurs Taylor Armstrong here with another episode. And as usual, we're here to make you a sell more solar, close, more deals and get more referrals and more leads. So I kind of butchered that in show, but I'm just getting back from a little hunting trip more about that later. So apologize if I'm a little out of it here, got back late last night, trying to get back into the grain of things here and excited to get back into it. Get closing some deals before we jump into the episode today. And of course, I'll tell you more about my, uh, hunting trip for my hunters out there. If you don't care about hunting, then you can skip pass maybe the first minute or two after this. But before we jump into that, I want to invite you to a special live stream I'm doing with my friend, Solar Joe.Speaker 2 (01:36):He was on the podcast, I think about a month ago. So he's a master of objections. He has what I would say. The number one Facebook group for solar pros, um, Solarpreneur, Facebook group. Isn't quite there yet, but, um, someday his group is called solar objections and he does some awesome live streams in there, which he graciously invited me to take part in one. So that's happening tomorrow. Um, at the time, you know, you hear this episode will be tomorrow. Um, but when I say tomorrow, I mean Wednesday, October 20th, 2021, of course. So if you listened to this episode after the fact, I apologize, you're late to the party. So listen to the episode, right? When they come out and come on, turn your notifications on and get this content. You can be fresh on the announcements, but if you want to join that, it's going to be at 4:00 PM Pacific standard time.Speaker 2 (02:34):And I would love to see you on there. Hit me with some questions. I'm going to try to brush up on my objections a little bit. So hopefully I don't look like a complete idiot up there. I know I'm probably not the world's greatest at overcoming objections, but I think I can drop some knowledge in there. Hopefully help some people out. So go join in. If you want to check that out and of course join the Facebook group if you haven't already. So without further ado, jump into the topic for today. Okay. And what I want to talk about is why we need to keep solar super simple and a couple different meanings with simple. When I say simple, Hey, actually my hunting trip that I just got back from kind of ties into this. And I got thinking about it. I got asked an interesting question.Speaker 2 (03:24):Um, couple of days back, I, I always love, you know, interacting with my Solarpreneurs, with my homeys, with, uh, all our listeners here. So definitely feel free to shoot me a message. I try to respond to all of them on a Facebook and Instagram, but I got a question, um, from my friend Carston, he asked if you were to go back and start from the beginning, which skill would you put your focus in to get back to where you are now, the fastest? What would you say are the most important skills that one can develop when just starting out to maximize or maximize their effectiveness? So I thought that was an interesting question. And I want to talk about that a little bit more on the podcast. And the short answer is I would focus on keeping things as simple as possible. Hey, in simple, in the fact that people complicate their presentations too much people combo complicate the process.Speaker 2 (04:24):People come complicate just solar in general, in many different aspects. So I want to talk about some ways that we, as Solarpreneurs, solar professionals, we can simplify things and just focus on the things that matter the most. And so here's how this hunting trip kind of ties into this. This is my second, uh, hunting trail. I took I'm from Utah. So I went back down to Southern Utah, met up with a buddy, went on this little hunting trip, just, you know, the general rifle hunt, um, bought my first gun actually, um, last year. So I'm not a big time hunter. This is my second time ever. And I needed to have my buddy coming with me because I don't know what I'm doing out there. So I meet up with him and my first hunting trip, I was able to get a deer probably in like, I dunno, second morning, where out there didn't spend much time.Speaker 2 (05:20):Um, just sort of drove around and found a deer on the side of the road, shot it and was done. But this trip was a lot different. What happened was we went out it's a Thursday morning. We went out, drive around, drive around, didn't see anything, Thursday night drive around, drive around hike, hike, drive, drive, rinse, and repeat finally saw one dough. But of course, you know, you got to shoot the buck. So we didn't even see any bucks, just one dough. All right, man, what's going on? So next day, morning, drive around, drive around nothing. Absolutely nothing afternoon of Friday, um, slash evening drive around, drive around. Finally we start seeing herds of dos. So a lot more deer we see, but no box. So at this point we're just pretty frustrated because not only have we driven around, we're going to side by side at truck.Speaker 2 (06:21):Um, we're driving a lot, going all over these mountain trails, but we also hiked probably seven or eight miles up to this point. And it's like, you know, up mountains and Hills and stuff like that. So it's not easy hiking. So I'm thinking, man, why is this taking so long to, you know, see a buck? Like I usually at least see something by then. And this is me. I mean, I'm impatient. I'm not a patient guy. Like I said, this my second time hunting ever. So those that are actual hunters, they're probably hearing this and thinking, this is stupid. Cause I know guys will go out and scout and you know, search for deer for months and you know, pass on box and stuff like that. But me being a beginner hunter, not really know what I'm doing. I'm getting frustrated. I'm like, man, I thought you just go out there, see tons of bucks and you can get yourself a monster, one be done with it.Speaker 2 (07:17):But no, that's not how it was. And then the other thing is there's lots of hunters up here. So we're seeing tons of people. You might as well call it Disneyland up there in the mountains. There's a ton of people just walking around. I felt like there's crowds of hunters. So got pretty frustrating. And then finally, Saturday morning, well, we didn't see anything again on Saturday morning, but at this point I'm about ready to just call it quits, give up, okay. This is day three. I'm like, man, okay. I'm not getting the data this year. And we decided, okay, let's go out one more time. I took my car up to the base of the mountain. We didn't camp that night just because we're getting sick of camping in the freezing cold. We went back into, uh, Cedar city where Stan, um, and find the Friday afternoon slash evening though.Speaker 2 (08:11):We finally see a couple of bucks and it's a little, two point, nothing big. If you follow me on Instagram, you saw me post it, but get it, shoot it from the side of the road. And I'm stoked to finally, I get my buck, taking it to the butcher, get some meat out of it. Uh, Mike, about freaking time. So how does this tie in with solar? Well, it's not that much different. Yeah. I was not patient out there. We're going to different areas. We're knocking on doors. So to speak. We're trying to get our opportunities, but we're not getting anything we're searching around. We're a trick or treating for dear, I guess you could say, but there's no sign of anything. So sometimes that's how it is in solar. How many times are we going to neighborhoods? Maybe we're used to getting a deal closed the first day.Speaker 2 (09:05):Maybe we were, we were used to booking lots of appointments after, you know, an hour, whatever, but sometimes that's not how it's going to be. This is how it was on my hunting trip. The first time I went out, got a deer pretty much right off the bat. This time it took driving around for tons of miles that took hiking, probably like close to 10 miles when it's all said and done, and it took a ton of work to get the same result. So that's how it is in solar. Some weeks are going to be that way some weeks it's going to take twice the amount of effort to get a deal as other weeks. So that's why you need to keep things simple. You need to keep things consistent and you need to not give up. You need to take your mind off of the results and focus in the input.Speaker 2 (09:57):What are you inputting to get the results? If you focus, if you take yourself out of the results and focus more on the output you're putting in the time you're putting in, that's what you can control, right? You can't necessarily control how many people are going to sign up that week, but what can you control? You can control the doors. You knock, you can control to some degree. The people you talk to, you can control the hours you put in. Okay? There's things you can do to control your attitude. So focus on those things you can control and that's how you're going to get way more consistent results. Okay? So this is part of what I told Carson. Um, when he was messaging me, what would you focus on? And that's what I would focus on. I would focus on those things. You can control and track it like a mad man, the most successful people I know in this industry, that's what they're doing.Speaker 2 (10:49):They're keeping everything super simplified. They're tracking their numbers and whether they close 10 deals that week or whether they close one deal, they're working basically the same day they're putting in that same output as they, as the week that they closed 10 deals, whether it's one deal or 10 deal, 10 deals. So it's easy to forget. I did this couple of weeks ago. Matter of fact, where I closed a couple of deals early in the week, and it's a trap we can all fall into pretty easily. If you don't watch yourself because I got two deals closed early in the week, I started getting lazy like, okay, well, you know what? I'm not going to go knock. Um, you know, I'm just going to follow up and I'm going to see if I can get some, uh, installs, hopping a little bit quicker, but I'm gonna, I'm gonna not start knocking until a little bit later today.Speaker 2 (11:45):And what could have turned into many more deals that week? I only closed the two because I, I took down my effort. I took down my production and I got lazy because I closed the two deals. And then guess what happened after that? Both those deals ended up canceling. So now instead of having the two deals close on the week, I was at zero that's kicking myself. I'm like, man, why didn't I keep my production the same? I could have had two deals that stuck two more deals that stuck, but I got lazy and didn't do it. So at that'd be a lesson to you, focus on keeping things simple, keep, keep things, um, focused on what you can control and then track it like crazy. I've talked about this before, but keep spreadsheets of, um, you know, the hours you're putting in the doors, you're knocking the appointments.Speaker 2 (12:41):You're sitting down with homeowners, the closing opportunities. You're getting have those key metrics, make sure you're tracking them like a madman, cause that's how you're going to make improvement. And then there's an app you should all be using. If you're on the doors or however you're tracking stuff. I just have an app that my friend Earl told me about. It's called counter. You can go download it app store and you can customize it to the things you want to track. So for me, I'm checking my close deals on the week. I'm checking my appointments kept track of my appointments booked. I'm tracking my conversations on the doors. Okay? How many qualified prospects my talking to? So I would suggest tracking those things, go download that app. And on next episode, we're going to hear from one of my friends that is having some insane results, not just right now, but the past pretty much, I would say six weeks or sorry, six months minimum.Speaker 2 (13:37):I've been seeing this guy close, super consistent deals. And I think he's hit 15 deals on the month for going on. I think like six, seven months now consistently. So these are things that he actually talks about in the podcast. We did his name's Christian Maroney. So you're not going to want to miss out. That's going to be next episode. And he's going to talk about a lot of these topics. We're going to dive deeper into it. And you're going to see the things he's doing to be super consistent and get results and be the top rep at his company. So tune into that episode, I hope this helped you send it to someone that wants to simplify more. And we'll talk more about how you can simplify other things, but for now just simplify the process, focus on the things you can control. And it's not that complicated.Speaker 2 (14:24):Sometimes we make it difficult. Oh, why, why aren't they closing deals? Go back to the beginning, focus on those things that matter. And that's how you're going to get massive results. Hope that helped. And you we'll see you on the next episode with Christian Maroney, send this to someone who needs it. And don't forget to tune into the live stream tomorrow. You can make it in the solar objections, Facebook group peace.Speaker: (15:26):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co and join. We'll see you on the inside. 

Outside Oddities
Ep. 1: Waterglyphs and Sacrificial Stones of Southern Utah

Outside Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:08


In this episode we explore a series of sacrificial stone in southern Utah, or maybe they're water markers, or maybe aliens did it. Lets speculate wildly about them. These petroglyphs from 2,000 years ago cover the Arizona Strip; an area south of Zion National Park, north of the Grand Canyon.Also, Mark gets his mole attacked by the Lake Witch of Lake Powell.We want to hear from you about the odd stories or places near you. Email us and let us hear your latest adventures or oddities we should investigate: outsideoddities@gmail.comFollow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/outsideodditiesFollow us on Instagram: @outsideodditiesFollow Keith: @wildpackfamFollow Mark: @marekvreekenFor more adventures and to help support the show visit our website: wildpacksports.com.

Boundless Body Radio
The Joyful Carnivore Battista Locatelli! 175

Boundless Body Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:03


Battista Locatelli was born and raised in Las Vegas, where his grandparents owned the oldest Italian restaurant in town. He grew up in the kitchen, was very heavy as a child. He experienced food addiction, childhood trauma, molestation, domestic violence and parental drug use. After numerous issues with drug use, multiple stints in jail, weight gain and loss, and homelessness, he maxed out at 342 pounds. That's when he tried a ketogenic diet, and started walking on a local outdoor track. Slowly the weight came back down! He was on the ketogenic diet for nearly 4 years, before transitioning onto a carnivore diet! He has been clean and sober from drugs and alcohol for over 1700 days! He is the operations manager for seven sober living homes in Southern Utah! He is also currently getting his Master's Degree in social work to become a licensed clinical therapist, and is interning at the exact same place that he went to rehab on three separate times! Find Battista at- IG- joyfulcarnivore!Special love to-KETO BRICKS! My favorite bar!

Eyres on the Road
Advice-Giving and Sunday Sessions

Eyres on the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 28:30


The Eyre's are in St. George Utah for today's episode--Richard is there competing in the World Senior Games, and he and Linda begin the show musing about their tradition of going to the Red Rock country of Southern Utah every October. They then share some of the current goings-on with their own family and discuss "best practices" for giving advice to adult children and holding a "Sunday Session" each week to review goals and priorities.

The Basketball Podcast
Episode 184: Todd Simon, Scoring Offense, Triggers, and a Relationship-Based Program

The Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 55:11


Guest: Todd Simon, Southern Utah Head Coach In this week's coaching conversation, Southern Utah head coach Todd Simon joins the Basketball Podcast to discuss the scoring offense, triggers, and a relationship-based program. At the start of the 2021-22 season, Todd Simon will be in his sixth year at the helm of the Southern Utah University men's basketball team after being named the head coach on March 24, 2016. Simon led the Thunderbirds to their first-ever Big Sky Championship during the 2020-21 season, as they were named Big Sky Conference Regular Season Champions after finishing conference play with a record of 12-2. Simon was named interim head coach of the UNLV men's basketball program in January 2016 and immediately led them to three consecutive victories. During Simon's 17 games, the Runnin' Rebels ranked as the number one team in the nation in adjusted tempo, scoring more than 100 points in four games. UNLV finished with a 9-8 record, despite playing with as few as five scholarship players. Prior to being named interim head coach, Simon was in his third year as associate head coach with UNLV and had a critical role in assembling UNLV's roster, which Rivals.com ranked its 2014 recruiting class No. 5 in the nation, while the 2015 class was ranked No. 11. Prior to his tenure as a Runnin' Rebel, Simon served Findlay Prep for seven years in both head and assistant coaching roles. As head coach at Findlay Prep in 2012-2013, he led the team to a 35-1 record, including eight wins over top-25 ranked teams. Breakdown1:00 - Tempo and Scoring Offense4:00 - Painted Rim7:00 - Cutting10:00 - Practice Stats13:00 - Putting Pressure on the Floor17:00 - Attacking the Weak Side21:00 - Having Counters25:00 - Working with Elite Players28:00 - Managing Expectations32:00 - Psychological Adaptation35:30 - Actual Game Situations39:30 - Repetitions42:00 - Caring for Mental Health44:00 - Retaining Players in the Program47:00 - Middle Drive49:30 - Non-Negotiables on 5-on-551:00 - ConclusionTodd Simon's Bio:Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Todd_Simon_(basketball)Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoachTsimon Basketball ImmersionWebsite: http://basketballimmersion.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/bballimmersion?lang=enYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/basketballimmersionFacebook: https://facebook.com/basketballimmersionBetOnline Website:Website: www.betonline.agBest in the West Video SeriesBest in the West Website: http://bestinthewestclinic.com/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Nigel Burton, Bruce Barnum

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 136:59


John Canzano talks with the Pac-12 Network's Nigel Burton about what's going on in Pac-12 football. Then Portland State football coach Bruce Barnum joins the show to discuss his team's win over Southern Utah. We also play the Big Splash, the 2@2 and more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Bruce Barnum

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 21:00


John Canzano talks with Portland State Vikings head coach, Bruce Barnum following their win against Southern Utah and looking ahead to a big match-up with Idaho. Canzano asks Barnum what went right for his team in the win against Southern Utah, what did the team do during their pitstop in Las Vegas on the road, who is Seth Vernon the punter and how good is he to be ranked top-3 in all of FCS currently, what is he seeing on film when looking at Idaho, how disruptive is it to lose your play-caller on offense or defense, and much more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

The Inside Line Podcast - Vital MTB
Tyler McCaul - The Inside Line Podcast

The Inside Line Podcast - Vital MTB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 76:03


Welcome Mountain Bikers, thanks for tuning into Vital MTB's The Inside Line podcast. Our guest today is Tyler McCaul. We catch up with him at home in Southern Utah as he prepares for Red Bull Rampage coming up soon. TMAC shares details of his near career-ending injury, the challenging recovery process and how it's changed his outlook on the capabilities of the human body. We talk all things freeride, his chops as a contest commentator and dabble in some old good times, too. Tyler, thank you for being our guest today.The Inside Line is brought to you by Jenson USA.com. Use coupon code insideline (all one word) at check out and receive 10% off qualifying items. Maxxis tires hook us up on the trail and for the show. Speed, grip and durability are what make Maxxis mountain bike tires the best.Santa Cruz Bicycles has pledged $1,000,000 to trail-building projects and advocacy groups over three years. Their Paydirt Fund is helping get new trails built all over. Hit up santacruzbicycles.com/paydirt to see how your trail project can apply.Enjoy the show!Photo provided by Red Bull Content Pool

Beliefcast
Dave Lindsay

Beliefcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 51:32


Dave Lindsay is one of the most genuine people you will ever meet and I am honored to call him my friend.  Dave is a film producer and director and has most recently directed the award-winning true-crime documentary, Dog Valley. This important LGBTQ-themed film is about the 1988 kidnapping, torture, rape, and murder of gay college student, Gordon Church. Set in a rural Mormon community in Southern Utah, Dog Valley examines one of the most brutal hate crimes in the United States. It explores the life of the victim and his legacy and delves into the minds of the killers, Michael Archuleta and Lance Wood. It also shows the crimes' impact on the community and modern-day hate crimes legislation. Dog Valley is currently being distributed by Gravitas Ventures and was released on October 1, 2021.   Dave is a graduate of the University of Utah and is the President of Avalanche Studios, a film and video production company based in Salt Lake City, Utah.  He has produced and directed hundreds of local, regional and national television commercials and business-related media projects.  He has also produced several documentaries and television projects including The New SLC (2020), Front Man: The Alex Boyé Story (2010), Mario's Conviction (2008), and Los Mormon Boys (2007).   He is a past winner of Utah Business Magazine's Top 40 Under 40 and has been honored by the Salt Lake Chamber as a Chamber Champion. Dave and his wife, Heidi, are the proud parents of two girls and two boys and live in Sandy, Utah.  Tune in and listen to how Dave lives his amazing life!     ... #dogvalley #friend #faith #courage #loveothers #confident #strong #LGBTQ #inspiration #mindset #mentalhealth #love #light #believe #beliefcast #tsinspires  .... You can connect with Dave here: dogvalleymovie.com @dlindz67 https://avalanche-studios.com/ .......... Special thanks to our sponsors: Siegfried & Jensen @siegfriedandjensen Wasatch Recovery @wasatchrecovery Veracity Networks  iHeal Institute @rebeccadeaz

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Bruce Barnum

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 19:18


John Canzano talks with Portland State Vikings head coach, Bruce Barnum ahead of their match-up with Southern Utah. Canzano asks Barnum what he's seeing on film from Southern Utah, how to handle a situation like the one between Mario Cristobal and Kris Hutson, are coaches telling the truth when they say it's a "1-0" mentality each week, where are his biggest worries on the team right now, how is he feeling about his quarterback's impact on the offense so far, and much more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

Mikey And The Mrs.
Your Wedding Disasters

Mikey And The Mrs.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 8:54


Southern Utah has seen their share of ruined weddings. Here are a few of your stories. #wedding #weddings

PHNX Sun Devils Podcast
Juan Roque's journey at ASU and our thoughts on the Southern Utah game

PHNX Sun Devils Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 57:13


Brittany Bowyer and Shane Dieffenbach talk to ex-ASU stud lineman Juan Roque and look back at ASU's win at home against Southern Utah.

Speak of the Devils
Episode 289 - ASU vs. UNLV Preview

Speak of the Devils

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 84:52


ASU got off to a good, but imperfect, start to the 2021 season. After a look at the news, we dive into the Sun Devils' 41-14 win over Southern Utah, focusing on the highs, lows, and questions raised. Then we look ahead to Saturday's battle against UNLV. After going behind Rebel lines with Sam Gordon of the Las Vegas Review-Journal, we outline the keys to the game and give our predictions.

Devil's Junkie Podcast
Season opening win provides some concerns, pleasant surprises

Devil's Junkie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 30:26


Week one overreaction is bound to happen when a team doesn't take the lid of the season in an impressive manner, and words such as "sloppy" and "embarrassing" were used to describe ASU following a 41-14 win over Southern Utah. But was Thursday's night more of an expected display of a bag of mixed goods? Here's our examination of that contest.   Episode rundown (30 minutes)   (1:02) My thoughts on the ASU offense which was sloppy and not able to achieve the desired balance between the pass and the run. What went wrong on the season opener and is this a trend and that can change later in the season? (14:04) The Sun Devils in comparison was a model of stability. We discuss what stood out on that side of the ball versus the Thunderbirds. (18:09) Special teams seem to draw the most ire from the collective fanbase, but is the picture of that unit as adverse as it seems? (24:58) Final thoughts about week one and a look ahead at ASU's next opponent, UNLV.

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast
Review of ASU's 41-14 win over Southern Utah in season opener

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 35:13


On this latest episode of The Sun Devil Source Report Podcast, host Ethan Ryter is joined by site publisher Chris Karpman and reporters Jacob Rudner and Carson Breber as they discuss Arizona State's opening game victory over Southern Utah. Covered on this episode: -- The sloppiness of ASU's play and it leading to a lot of penalties -- Injury updates, particularly freshman running back DeaMonte Trayanum -- The play of the running backs in junior Rachaad White, Trayanum, and freshman Daniyel Ngata -- The positive play from the offensive line in both pass protection and run blocking -- How the game was not used as a game to get sophomore quarterback Jayden Daniels more in tune with a young wide receiver group -- Why it was a disappointing performance from a veteran defensive group -- The struggles in kicking from senior kicker Logan Tyler -- The impressive punting debut from freshman punter Edward Czaplicki

Burns & Gambo Podcasts
Jordan Simone, ASU sideline reporter

Burns & Gambo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 9:56


Jordan Simone breaks down ASU's season opening win over Southern Utah.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 9/1/21: Oregon Ducks still have some undecided position battles, Utah reporter Josh Newman, Arizona State reporter Michelle Gardner, LSU reporter Brody Miller, UCLA reporter James H. Williams, Ohio State reporter Marcus Hartman

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 95:15


On Wednesday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene, James discusses the Oregon Ducks still having some undecided position battles, Utah beat reporter Josh Newman of the Salt Lake Tribune previews Thursday's game against Weber State, Arizona State beat reporter Michelle Gardner of the Arizona Republic previews Thursday's game against Southern Utah, LSU beat reporter Brody Miller of The Athletic previews Saturday's game at UCLA, UCLA beat reporter James H. Williams of the Orange County Register recaps the win over Hawaii and previews the matchup with LSU and Ohio State beat reporter Marcus Hartman of the Dayton Daily News previews Thursday's game at Minnesota

James Crepea Show
9/1/21: Arizona State beat reporter Michelle Gardner

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 16:30


Arizona State beat reporter Michelle Gardner of the Arizona Republic returns to preview the Sun Devils' season opener against Southern Utah

Shine
Water Stewardship: Create Necessary Alliances in Leadership and Business with Greg Koch

Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 114:55


How we take care of water is a necessity. Water is a finite resource- we only have the amount that we have. Water is life. We are 70% water. Water is spiritual, it's healing, it's cooling. It's beautiful. And in this interview, I speak with my friend and colleague, and water protector and sustainability expert Greg Koch, about the nexus between food, water energy, and our consumption habits and limits on our resources. For example, how many greenhouse gases can we put in the atmosphere? How much debt can we tax our economy? How many limits can our planet take regarding tin, aluminum, Tesla batteries before it's too much? We speak to our current environmental crisis of climate change. We bring attention to the topic of water stewardship and how we can all be more environmentally responsible as individuals and businesses. In this episode, you will learn that all water problems are knowable, solvable and affordable. We actually have enough technology and data to be able to solve for the water problems, but it requires that we set up a conscious and inclusive environment for water. Greg Koch is a globally recognized leader and technical director at Environmental resource management (ERM? with over 100 countries in water resource management, community and stakeholder engagement in conflict resolution. Greg also excels in sustainability strategy, sustainable development, adaptation and resilience and related policy and finance. SHINE Links: Leading from Wholeness Executive Coaching Leading from Wholeness Learning and Development Resources Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World by Carley Hauck Contact Carley Hauck     Resources mentioned in this episode: NY Times Article - “A Hotter future is certain: How hot is up to us” NY Times Article - “How much hotter is your hometown than when you were born?” Creating 21st Century Abundance through Public Policy Innovation: Moving Beyond Business as Usual by Greg Koch and William Sarni Greg Koch on LinkedIn     The Imperfect Shownotes   Carley Hauck 00:01   Hi, this is Carley Hauck. Welcome to another episode of the SHINE podcast. This podcast is all about the intersection of three things, conscious, inclusive leadership, the recipe for high performing teams and awareness practices. I am offering three episodes a month. Before I tell you about our topic today, can you go over to Apple podcasts and hit the subscribe button. That way you don't miss any of our incredible interviews. And if you love this episode, which I imagine you will, please write a positive review, or share it with friends and colleagues on your favorite social media channel. It really helps. Thank you.   Our topic for today is water stewardship: create necessary alliances with leaders and business with Greg Koch.   One of the reasons I began this podcast in May of 2019 was due to all the research I was conducting for my new book, Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World. The podcast came about due to my desire to bring education, awareness, and then to inspire calls of action to be the change as individuals and business so that we together could solve some of our greatest challenges. The biggest challenge that has been a large motivator for me personally and the reason why I wrote my book was climate change.   I had been following the science for many years, and as a result began teaching on the intersection of leadership and spirituality, and consciousness so that we could be more mindful of our consumption. And I brought that into so many of the work that I've been doing with different leaders and businesses.   So this episode is about water stewardship. As our world becomes warmer, July was the hottest month in recorded history. Glaciers are melting, our oceans are becoming hotter. And all the marine life is struggling to flourish.   How we take care of water is a necessity. Water is a finite resource we have the amount that we have. Water is life. We are 70% water. Water, spiritual, it's healing, it's cooling. It's beautiful. And in this interview, I speak with my friend and colleague, also water protector. I'll call him Greg Koch, about the nexus between food, water energy, and our consumption habits and limits on our resources. For example, how many greenhouse gases can we put in the atmosphere? How much debt can we tax our economy? How many limits can our planet take regarding tin, aluminum, Tesla batteries before it's too much? We speak to our current environmental crisis of climate change. And the most recent IPCC climate report, which is the sixth report. We bring attention to the topic of water stewardship, and how we can all be more responsible and how we consume how to take responsibility as individuals and businesses. In this episode, you will learn that all water problems are knowable, solvable and affordable.   We actually have enough technology and data to be able to solve for the water problems, but it requires that we set up a conscious and inclusive environment for water. Greg Koch is a globally recognized leader with over 100 countries in water resource management, community and stakeholder engagement in conflict resolution. Greg also excels in sustainability strategy, sustainable development, adaptation and resilience and related policy and finance. He is a lead consultant at ERM. We all have the responsibility and opportunity to be the change. Listen to one of my favorite SHINE podcast episodes ever.   Carley Hauck 05:10   Hi, everyone. Thank you for joining the SHINE podcast. I feel delighted to be here today with my new friend and colleague, Greg Koch, thank you so much for joining.   Thank you. Thanks for having me.   Well, I know that we have a lot of really wonderful things to speak about. And one of the first questions I'd like to ask you is, how would you define conscious and inclusive leadership?   Greg Koch 05:39   I first say that it has become paramount to my work. And I feel a hallmark of the success that I've had, and that success has always been collective with communities and inclusivity. But first a bit of history. I'm originally from Germany, an educated and trained engineer. And so for the first 10 years of my professional life, things were very direct, very quantitative, very objective, I had the opportunity to leverage those skills, and to begin to have a better understanding of water issues around the world, and water being so local, and so emotional, and I don't mean emotional in a pejorative sense, emotional baggage, not that there's anything wrong with even that. But what I mean is we people are tied across all cultures to water in ways that are fundamentally different from lots of other sustainability issues.   We're tied to it spiritually, even religiously. Everyone needs it, everyone has a stake in it. And you could see where I'm leading is that when you step into a watershed, a community, for whatever reason, you're motivated to work on water solutions. You realize, at some point, hopefully, early on, that all that water is being shared by everyone, and that everyone needs to be a part of understanding the challenges and being a part of the solution. And so inclusive, is a fundamental prerequisite, of trying to address serious water challenges. And so I have grown.   That was a beautiful answer.   Thank you. So where does consciousness come in? And I'd say obvious, well, not perhaps not obviously. But they go hand in hand, in that, when water is stressed, we could say this for a lot of stressful or challenging situations. In addition to including everyone, because you need to solve the problem, and this was the hardest thing for me to do. And that is to be conscious of their perspective. And their perspective, their demands, and have to be accepted. Because no one's using water for the sake of using water, you use water because of how fundamental it is to your life. So whether you're a mother, or a corporation, or the environment, you have to put your mind in, in a way that appreciates the perspective everyone has. And accepted at face, you don't have to agree with it. But if you're not consciously trying to understand those different perspectives, and help people understand yours, then you don't have the first step towards inclusion.   Inclusion isn't just bringing everyone together in the same room or the same field, particularly around a challenging topic, and then maybe more so for water. You have to understand the different perspectives and accept every one of them at face value before you can take that inclusive environment and try to work towards a solution.   Carley Hauck 09:40   Thank you. Well, and Greg, one of the reasons that I was so excited to have you on the podcast to share your experience and your passion and your expertise around water is because as you're saying, you know we all need it, to survive. It's fundamental. I mean, we're 70% water, right. And it is a way that we are all gathering, so to speak, to use the same resource. And when we're looking at the greater picture, which is people and planet, and that's our motivation for how we're leading for how businesses, hopefully solving for some of these larger problems that are impacting people and planet in a more negative way.   That's, that's really leading with more consciousness. And I know that you're based in Atlanta. And just to kind of bring this to some of the things you were speaking to in 2019, I went through Al Gore's Climate Reality leadership training, which happened to be in Atlanta. And what was so wonderful about that training, and the trainings that he does is that he really focuses on the region or the area of where that training is.   So at the time, I was living in the Bay Area of California, but I came to Atlanta, and there were 1200 of us from all over the world from all over, you know, different parts of the country. But the speakers, and the focus was on that area of Georgia, of Florida, a little bit of North Carolina, and what was going to be impacted in those areas by climate change, because it's different all around the country. Like right now, I have relocated to North Carolina, where there's a lot of water right now, you know, we've had different storms come through.   And I'm actually temporarily in Oregon, in Bend, Oregon. And it has been so incredibly dry. And it was in the high 90s to 100 degrees for the first few weeks that I was out here. And just recognizing how people are adapting and struggling with the difficulty of that.   And so that kind of brings us, you know, back to sustainability and your passion for this topic and why you've actually chosen to hone in on water. And so I feel curious, where did that start? How did that begin?   Greg Koch 12:27   Well, it started with my engineering background. And at the time, I had moved from engineering, consulting to work for the Coca Cola company. And initially, my work was, you know, inside the four walls of the business. So water efficiency, water use, storm water, wastewater management. But over time, myself and Coca Cola began to have a greater appreciation of the challenges that the business was facing, but also the communities that they were a part of were facing. And that led to 15 years of maturity on my part where I transformed myself into someone who not not just focused on water, but focused on solutions. And what drew me to that is two things.   You led the Global Water stewardship program? Correct?   I did, while I was there, for a period of time until I left their great company and they still have a wonderful water stewardship program and many other things. I am really proud of what I did there, and happy to work with other clients now in my consulting role. But back to why water. two fundamental reasons.   The first is water, there's a danger in thinking of water in the binary litany of sustainability topics. So you take major sustainability crises around the world, including the United States, you have safety issues, you have disease, you have poor education, you have social inequity, you have air pollution, you have excess carbon emissions, you have waste and litter. Right. And so you're marching down this litany of big challenges. And what they all share in common is that the desired outcome is less or none of those things. Right. So they're all bad disease, child labor, forced labor, pollution, and the desired place is well, we need to reduce or eliminate that.   And the danger when you get to water is to keep that binary thinking that's not true with water, water. Yes, there are places it's being wasted. And we can talk about that. But in a sense, you really can't waste water, not at least at the global scale, water is a finite resource. It's infinitely renewable, we have the amount we have.   And the other thing is that, beyond that non binary nature of it, it's largely, most people look at water, and they have a positive opinion and a positive experience. You bathe your child, you, you bathe yourself, you go swimming, you go sailing, you know, most people have this daily visceral connection with water, that's a positive one, most people's first memory of water, learning how to swim, you know, at Grandma's lake house, or whatever the case may be.   And so at its heart, water is a positive, right. And you could extend that thinking at a higher level to say, well, Water is life. Alright, we're 70% water, you don't want to reduce your water footprint, you'll get thirsty, then you'll dehydrate, and then bad things will happen. And when we look for life, there's a lot of things that life can use. But we always look for water, whether we're in Mars, around the moon, or wherever, because we know how fundamental it is. And that's a positive thing. So that's one reason that makes me so passionate about water.   16:45   The other is that while there are lots of different forms of water stress around the world, all of those are solvable. First of all, they're knowable, they're solvable, and they're affordable. And you cannot say that for any other sustainability challenge that you have enough data and enough technology today that is affordable, and can be implemented.   Carley Hauck 17:18   I love that. They're knowable, they're solvable, and they're affordable, affordable. Well, I'm gonna ask you some more difficult questions. Yeah, sure. Yeah, go ahead.   Greg Koch 17:30   No, I mean, that, that that says at all, so when, so but so what's the crux? What's the crux that the Kruk is the crux is first, to set up that inclusive conscious environment that respects everyone's need for water that's inalienable and understands their perspective on why they need or want the water they want? And what condition and at what time to then be able to introduce solutions, whether they're technological based or process and policy based.   If you have that enabling environment from the beginning, then you're never going to lack for Well, let's pull this technology and let's make this regulatory change. Right. There's still challenges around getting agreement and getting agreement on the timing. But one thing I like to say about water solutions is the soft stuff is the heart stuff. Right? So hard stuff, meaning infrastructure, pumps, pipes, technologies, hard stuff, meaning reservoirs and collection systems and even data, right?   That stuff's easy. I mean, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, I mean, humankind has been capturing water, storing it, moving it and even treating it for 1000s of years. And yes, we have better ways of doing that today. And there's still room for innovation. But there's enough technology and data out there. So that's not the hard stuff.   The soft stuff is the hard stuff, the soft stuff being How do you build an inclusive, conscious, enabling environment that respects everyone's need for water, and seeks an equitable outcome, and then allocates the funding, which is completely affordable, compared to a lot of the other challenges that the world faces, whether you call them sustainability or not.   Carley Hauck 19:40   Great, great. Well, I'm gonna bring it back to water. But I want to bring it to another conversation that you and I had talked about a few weeks ago where we were talking about climate change. And I was naming it as probably one of the largest complexities that we as humanity face and you challenged me and said, You believed that climate, one of the biggest problems related to climate change was population growth, economic development. And we could even think of resource scarcity as part of that. And I'd love just to hear a little bit more from you on that topic.   Greg Koch 20:23   Yeah. Well, I'll go a step further and say that while climate change is real, is serious and needs attention at a much accelerated pace than the world has done today. It is not the biggest issue facing the world. Let me explain.   First of all, in summary, there are many challenges that exist today that have existed throughout most of human history are getting worse, and will continue to get worse in the future, independent of a changing climate. Climate change is a force multiplier.   And you can say, yes, it's the biggest issue facing us today because of the urgency in solving it. But it doesn't make it the biggest issue short of existential, existentially meaning, if we all went extinct because of climate change. Well, then, of course, but when you look back, and really take climate change out of the equation and say, What is the challenge the world is facing? Yes, it's being driven by population growth and economic development, more people with better lifestyles, less poverty, less infant mortality, those are actually all good things.   But what has happened today, and what I think the biggest challenge is, it's called the Nexus, the nexus between food, water and energy. And it all is underpinned by this concept of limitations, right? So the world is bumping up against a lot of limits. One of those limits is how much greenhouse gases we can put into the environment and not cause global warming. Okay, so that's climate change. That is certainly one of the limits that we're facing. But we're facing limits in terms of how much air pollution beyond greenhouse gases, how much water pollution, how much arable farmable land there is, how much government debt and personal debt, those are also limits. Right?   There's limits on other resources, such as phosphate, tin, lithium for all of our cell phones and Tesla batteries and things like that. Those limits are being approached or even exceeded, and they have been getting there independent of climate change, they're getting worse, even as climate change is happening. And solving for climate change isn't going to solve those limitations. You can design it such but why is that such a big challenge?   You could say, well, I have solutions to water pollution or food security or what have you. But because we're approaching those limits, the solution for one of those can cause problems for the other two. Right? I'll give you an example.   If you're in the United States, and you have a car that uses gasoline, you can see it right on the pump up to 10% ethanol. That's a government mandated and government subsidized program. And it all centers around corn production to make industrial grade ethanol. 15 years ago, there was hardly any corn for ethanol in the fuel supply in the United States. Now it's close to 60% of corn that's grown, goes into ethanol production. Okay, that's a renewable fuel, decreases our dependence on foreign oil is cleaner. So you say, Oh, that's a good thing. Well, you've solved a single variant. you've provided as a single variant solution in a multivariate problem, meaning let's grow more corn and make ethanol for all the good reasons that that that can be considered. But what has led to it's led to a historic rise in the price of corn. You don't see it and I don't see it because I can't if I ever bought a bushel of corn, you know, you buy a couple years of corn or things with corn.   Corn derivatives in it. But that price is really high. And, and then you've also created water stress in places that you would think are water abundant, like Canada, a lot more acreage now being put under the plow to grow corn to meet this ethanol demand. And now you partly solved an energy problem, while causing previously non existent food and water problems. And so that nexus of those three, in a world where we're facing those limits, to me is the biggest challenge.   Carley Hauck 25:41   Thank you. I wanted to actually ask you about another problem as well, I was recently reading about how Lake Mead is drying up, and it's over allocated. And Lake Mead and the Colorado River apparently, well, they're created for melted snows that pour and flow from the Lipitor pass in the Rocky Mountains. And then seven western states really utilize that water for their, you know, for their water needs. And so those states are California, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada and Arizona. And then there's also 29 tribes and Mexico that are also depending on that water. And apparently there have been some successive treaties that have been signed on how much they're going to receive an S us from the river and the dams. But those agreements are expiring in 2025. And when we have such low water, like, how are they going to renegotiate that? Who's going to get what, and then we know that California is in a huge drought as well. And so it's just it's such a complexity, how we're going to solve for that.   Greg Koch 27:03   It is. And there's two things to recognize, from a historical standpoint, and from a reality standpoint, that make a solution on how to allocate what little water there may be even more difficult. The first is the allocation scheme, both international treaties and individual and multi state agreements about how much water each person can get, or each state can get from the Colorado River were negotiated, let me check my dates 1930s 1940, somewhere around the time where the Hoover Dam was built that created Lake Mead. I'm not getting the dates exactly right. But that was based on historical snowpack measurements that assumed that that would be status quo going forward. Well, the droughts we're seeing today, again, let's Park climate change over here, but I will bring it back in.   There's a lot of scientific research. But early indications are that what we're seeing today, what we saw in California, back in 2014, what we're seeing today throughout the West, that that's actually normal conditions. And what we based all of our planning on was a period of time that we had records for, that just happened to be abnormally wet, and snowy and colder. The reality is, if you take all that away, and you think northern Mexico, Arizona, Southern Utah, Southern California and Nevada, those are deserts. Those are extremely arid areas, yet we have millions of people living, we've got tons of agriculture, we have Las Vegas, right? We have all these things that only can be there, because we've captured and allocated over allocated and are diverting all that water. If it wasn't for that manmade intervention, those places would remain scarcely populated, not being farmed, and they would be very dry.   So it's artificially enabled because of what we did, in terms of moving water around and allocating it. And now we're seeing that that allocation and those beliefs were probably based on a historically wet period, and what we're seeing today might be the norm. And so where does that lead you?   Carley Hauck 29:51   I wanted to make just one extra comment because I think it's interesting. I read this other article in the LA Times that was speaking to the drought of California and apparently because there's been such little rainfall, normally Northern California would have I think enough water coming from the Sierras. But right now Southern California actually is doing better with the allocation of water, because it's coming from a different source as you were talking about the storing of it. But historically, you know, Southern California has less water, because as you said, it's more of a desert climate.   Greg Koch 30:31   And so it's interesting that California, of all those states, you've mentioned, actually has priority rights, you know, when the government has to start, and they already have, and they will continue to limit the allocation for the other states. California's agreement doesn't expire, I think, until the late 2030s. So other places will not get enough water, maybe no water, and California will get water. So those communities will see that water flowing by knowing that it's headed to California, only because of the way the contracts and agreements were repent years ago.   Carley Hauck 31:08   And I also just feel curious, not that you should be the end all know all of water, but I'm in Oregon right now. And what's interesting is that it is incredibly dry here. I mean, I went to the Oregon coast, just for the weekend, because I just needed moisture. And the Deschutes river is this incredible river and there's lakes all around, bend where I am, but it is so dry. It feels like such an interesting juxtaposition. And I know that it's lower, the water is lower here than it has been in a very long time. But it feels so interesting that they can both be like the climate can be so dry. And yet there's a lot of water here visibly, because it's coming from glaciers. And I feel curious, you know, half the state is very wet, or again, and then where I am right now it's a desert. And so I guess I feel curious, like what do you think about Oregon as far as how they're going to fare with water?   Greg Koch 32:14   Well, I think Oregon and the states below it, and above it, that whole western United States corridor, the conditions you're seeing today might be what over a long period of time are normal and everything that we've experienced in the couple 100 years that we've basically been the United States before native peoples was that was abnormal. Right? And so where does that lead you?   I started going down that line earlier. If you were in the middle of the Sahara Desert, you would never say, hey, there's a drought. Now, it's just always like that. So you could see, I could see a point where you have to stop calling the conditions that you're facing in Oregon and California and all those a drought. Maybe that's just the way it is. That's the climate that you have, and you're not in a drought. You just happen to live in a very arid part of the world that used to have this brief period of a few 100 years where it was wet.   How does climate change come in? in a major way, okay. You're wet in Oregon and a lot of that to glacier melt. They can only melt to a point where they don't exist. And that's happened around the world. But when you look at the models, particularly for those Western Rockies, right the Cascades, the Uinta mountains down into Utah, this year, Nevada's climate change models all call for there to be more precipitation.   Now I use the word precipitation, which you know means snow, ice or rain. But that precipitation because of warmer temperatures is going to come in the form of rain versus snow. Right? So glaciers, the Sierra Nevada snowpack, think of those as Lake Mead. Those are huge reservoirs that build up through the winter and then slowly melt and release that water over the spring and summer and into the fall. But if even more precipitation falls in the winter, but it comes in the form of rain, there's no storage for it, it's just going to run off and ultimately end up in the Pacific.   So that's a big problem. That's a big problem. You could have wetter winters, but still have greater water scarcity because you don't have that natural reservoir of the snowpack, the snow and ice pack. slowly melting   Carley Hauck 35:00   So we're talking a little bit about water scarcity on the West. But then what do you see happening on the East? With the, you know, with more hurricanes and tropical storms where there's a lot more water, but then how do we store it? Right?   Greg Koch 35:17   Yeah, I'd say the biggest problem in the East and and it also exists out West. So it just compounds the problems that you have is infrastructure, water infrastructure. So think of water pipes, bringing your drinking water, sewage pipes, stormwater drains, 99% of that is out of sight, to underground and out of sight means out of mind. It's not sexy, it's not, you don't want to see it. Right? You just assume 3am. I can walk into my bathroom, turn the tap and get clean drinking water. I'll flush the toilet and it's all taken care of?   Well, the average age of infrastructure in the US is about 75 years old. It's underfunded, it's under maintained. It's underpriced in terms of the tariffs that are collected. And there's a lot of reasons why it's under priced that way. But that is leading to a problem. Can we maintain the level of service that we've experienced and been able to grow our economies and populations with this crumbling infrastructure?   Carley Hauck 36:34   And I'm wondering if you know, part of what you talk about in your your book that you authored, creating 21st century abundance through public policy innovation, moving beyond business as usual, does that pipe some of the responsibility on changing the system and structures so that we are able to actually innovate around how we're storing water and how we're implementing all of this?   Greg Koch 37:06   It does. And it provides some real examples of how you can even improve, not just maintain, but improve the level of water, infrastructure and service and be able to afford it. There's several different approaches that me and my coauthor William Sarni detail in the book, but staying on the theme of infrastructure, let me give you an example that I think shows you the type of thinking. So you recall earlier I mentioned waters underpriced in most places in the United States, you pay a very small amount for water. And there's a lot of pushback if water rates come into being or go up.   So why is that? Well, back to the beginning of this discussion, you know, water is emotional, it's spiritual, it's, it's to human right? It's inalienable. And when you bring that thinking into a municipal water system, and there's parallels in water in nature, water and agriculture, but let's stick in urban areas. You run into danger. It's like if water is a human right, how can you charge me anything for it, let alone more for it, it falls from the sky. You can't lease the rain, you can you know, it's, Hey, come on. It's water, human rights should be free?   Well, I'd say it's up to governments to decide how much they want to charge customers, particularly the underprivileged, that, and I think they should solve for that. And there's a great example of how that's done in South Africa that we can talk about, but here's the problem that they're facing, they're confusing. And therefore people are confused. Government is confusing water, the substance from water services.   So when you buy electricity, when you buy your gigabytes for your Wi Fi in your smartphone, when you buy gasoline for your car or diesel, right, you are buying a substance. You're buying electrons, you're buying radio waves, you're buying gallons of gas. You can't see them, you don't think about them. You don't want to see them in terms of gas might be a safety issue. You never think about, I'm buying a substance yet look at your bill, you are being paid for an amount of electrons called kilowatt hours, gigabytes of data, those are radio waves effectively electrons, you are paying for a substance. And of course you're paying for however many gallons or liters of gas that you buy.   But you don't think of them in that way. You think of those as services. I'm buying more lighting, security, convenience, I'm buying entertainment. I'm buying connectivity. I'm buying mobility, right? That's how you think of those substances you buy, you think of the services that they enable.   And one of the things that we talk about in the book is that mind shift needs to happen for water. Water- the substance- at your tap is free. But who's going to collect it, move it, treat it, pipe it chlorinated, chlorinated, and get it to your tap, and then do the opposite with your stormwater and wastewater. All that infrastructure, costs, money, takes labor, chemicals, energy, those are all services. And if you add up the true cost of all those services, your water bill should be about what your electricity bill is, yet it's a 10th a 20th. of that. And that's led to these infrastructure issues being underfunded, because of the confusion of the substance versus the service.   So the latest UN, IPCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report came out, and it's dire. Some people are calling it the final warning to humans. It shows that a lot of the early predictions are being manifest. And that time is running out if it hasn't already, on some drastic level of climate change, global warming and the implications that that has.   42:12   I experienced what they're forecasting firsthand a few weeks ago at a family reunion. And most of us live in the southeast United States, I'm in Atlanta, it's hot and humid. Others are in Sarasota, or Charlotte. And so we purposely chose a place in the mountains out west, east of Seattle, thinking we'll be on a river, it'll be nice and cool. Maybe sleep with the windows open at night. The lowest daytime temperature in the eight days we were there was 94. The highest was 105. And everyone says Oh, but it's a dry heat, which it was. But that didn't make 105 degrees any less comfortable.   Add to that for about three days, during the middle of that vacation. There was smoke in the valley that we were in from wildfires that were nearby. And that made it almost impossible to go outside. You know, we had, we'd started saying, okay, when it's really hot, we'll just try to do everything before noon and then just relax or float in the river or what have you. But then when you add wildfires and the smoke around that, then the air quality is such that you really you're just inside and it's no big bummer. Right?   And so you know if that's climate change, and that's going to happen more often. And for longer durations in places you wouldn't expect. And we did not expect that they're certainly the 105 degree heat, then that's a cause for alarm.   So what to do. And and it's a segue into how I help clients in this regard. So when you look at the UN report, it's based on a lot of complicated models, and it takes a global view. And yes, that view can be disaggregated at the local level. But that's still just a zoom in on a global model. What's more useful to people, to communities, to companies in the different places that they operate, is saying, Okay, alright, I get global warming, but I don't live all over the globe. I live and work or manufacture in a certain place. What do the models say is going to happen in that place?   And that's a level of analysis that you can start with the global models, but you have to do a lot of sophisticated calculations and modeling to try to determine what the boundary of the local area that you're looking at is, how it's being influenced by these global changes, to try to come up with a forecast of what is this valley? or What is this community? or What is this region, at a local level going to face? That's much more useful to people, you know, if you were planning for water supplies, or droughts or increased heat, then knowing that, you know, the world might warm 1.5 to 4.5, or greater degrees centigrade, really doesn't help you particularly if you think in Fahrenheit most Americans do.   But so that's the global average, what does it mean for me, in Asheville, or Atlanta, or Seattle. And so that's part of what we do that we find is very helpful to clients because it gives them that local view. And then they can share that information with others, which we encourage, to say, look, we're all going to face this situation, what can we do collectively?   Carley Hauck 46:19   Now, I also appreciate you sharing that I don't recall if I shared this with you. But it might have been one of our previous conversations in March of 2019. I went through Al Gore's Climate Reality leadership training, and he does a few of them a year all over the world. And he picks regional, you know, in geographic areas, and my training happened to be in Atlanta. So he was very much focused on bringing in speakers that could speak to what was happening in this, you know, southeast area, and how flooding is going to happen here. And this is going to happen here based on all of the science and even though at the time, I lived in California, I was still part of that cohort of 1200 folks, and because I grew up in Florida and have family in Florida, it was helpful. And it was helpful regardless.   But I think, to your point, you know, how does this affect me, right? Because most people are very self motivated, versus some of us that are more altruistically motivated, but at the same time, you can hold both. And so I feel curious, in your work, how are you supporting clients? And what's a typical client that you might serve? Because I know your area is water stewardship?   Greg Koch 47:47   Well, it's water and climate. Yeah. And so one of the ways we help clients is translating those global models and projected impacts of climate change to the local level. My clients are typically larger, multinational companies, a lot of them are in the consumer goods, business, or industry. So Procter and Gamble, Unilever, companies like that, but I also have clients in the oil and gas sector in the renewable energy sector. You know, really wide pharmaceuticals, really a wide area.   And so when it comes to climate change, the first place we can help them is having a granular understanding of what's going to happen, where they're located. And that's usually multiple locations in terms of their manufacturing plants. So okay, here's global climate change what's happening in these 20 or 30 places that leads to more meaningful responses on their part, to prepare themselves for the coming change.   Now, you say, Well, what are they doing to prevent the change? And there are a lot of clients, a lot of companies in general around the world are setting targets to reduce their emissions. That fuel they directly burn on site or in their vehicles for their say distribution fleet. They're trying to reduce emissions in the electricity and energy they purchase, trying to buy from renewable sources of energy versus fossil fuels-   Or to do carbon offsets or to really know how effective that is in the long term would be better if we weren't emitting emissions anyway, right?   Yeah, my feeling on carbon offsets if they are, quote unquote, gold standard, then yeah, carbon. The carbon footprint of the world is being reduced but that reduction might happen on the other side of the planet.   And I heard a quote, an analogy that I like, it's like buying a carbon offset credit is like, going for a run in Atlanta and having somebody in Iowa take a shower for you. Right? I think it can help, but it kind of excuses what you're doing.and puts it on somewhere else. At some point there aren't going to be any more carbon credits, and people are going to need to actually reduce their own emissions.   Carley Hauck 50:36   I love that. You just said that. Thank you. Greg Koch 50:46     Yeah. Now, company setting goals is expected, is welcome. I help clients do that. But I first asked them, 'What are they doing to advocate for government change?' Because, you know, the UN report for climate change, rightly belongs there, this is global warming, global climate change, and the scale of the globe's climate isn't going to be solved by any number of corporations making reductions in their emissions. That's good. That's welcome. That'll help. But you're going to need government, governments, global governments, the UN and individual governments at the state, federal, local, you name it level, to make some tough decisions about changing the way we produce and use energy.   And they can incentivize that which they have with subsidies for solar and wind power, they could tax it in terms of a carbon tax and a trading scheme, which exists in many parts of the world. Fossil fuels, and that's gonna be extinguished. But the point is, you know, be while you set, you know, I tell clients, while you set goals for your own business, how are you using your voice? Right, you know, that that's your footprint? What about your blueprint? Right, what are you doing, to advocate for the right policies?   And I find a lot of clients actually welcome that right now, there's a lot of uncertainty. You know, let's take the United States, for instance, is the Biden administration going to come up with a carbon tax? Or are they not? And if they do, which industries would be subject to it? And how much would that tax be? Is it enough to mitigate climate change, so on and so on, that's a lot of uncertainty, that you can sit around and wait to resolve itself.   You can advocate for that change, right? In fact, a lot of businesses say, look, I wish you just to remove the uncertainty and say we're going to tax carbon at $25 a ton, starting in 2025. And it'll be a level playing field, people can incorporate the change that's necessary and embedded into their business model. And yes, costs get passed on. But it removes the uncertainty because what you're left with now, is largely a altruistic fear, or investor driven push for companies to set these targets, you know, for a company to say, Look, I'm gonna get off the grid and produce all my energy by solar wind, some renewable form, fine, it can be done, and some have done it. But it's almost impossible to ever recover those costs.   So they're doing it because of fear of climate change, of reputation of investor pressure, maybe other stakeholder pressure. That's great. But that's right off their bottom line. And so, you know, I always ask them to have my clients and we thought about advocating, you know, whether you do it yourself or you do it through a trade association for your industry, or at some level to say, this is a problem, climate change, we want a solution. And us setting our own little goals will only get the world so far. So that's really how I advise clients on climate change.   Carley Hauck 54:42   Thank you. I don't know if you can speak you know, to this specifically, because I'm sure there's a confidentiality clause but you mentioned that one of your companies that you've supported as you knew every multinational company, and they're known as a company that really is more aligned with ESGs, you know, environmental, social governance and and creating more of those commitments and I'm seeing, and I'm grateful to see this shift is that companies that are making, you know, millions, billions of dollars like Salesforce, Amazon, they're giving a certain amount of their profits towards, for example, climate change I believe in.   I wrote this in my book, January 2020. Bezos at that time, this was right before the pandemic awarded $10 billion towards climate change now, how that is being distributed, how it's being regulated? Who knows, where's it going? You know, since then Amazon has done incredibly well, in the last year and a half. And so I haven't seen the targets, but I know that there are more checks being written. And so you said to advocate for government, but if government, you know, isn't cutting that money, or isn't making those changes, I do think that there is a responsibility and an opportunity for business to be a force for good, and to utilize their voice, their influence, because a lot of government officials, you know, tend to be elected through money that might, you know, lobbying that might be coming from businesses. And so I think it's kind of all combined. What do you think about that? Your perspective?   Greg Koch 56:38   You have to appreciate the scale of government versus the scale of business. Right? So a lot of people might say, well, businesses should just bite the bullet and donate half of their profits or 100% of their profits to some cause. Let's say that's climate change, since that's the most pressing crisis we're facing.   Now, when you look at the scale of business versus government, it is not apples and oranges. It's apples and hammers, the scale of government is in the trillions and 10s of trillions of dollars, the scale of business is in the billions of dollars. And there's a big difference between a billion and those three more zeros to get to a trillion. In the book I co authored, I took the top 1000 corporations in the world and their annual profits for the year that I analyzed, and said, Okay, how much is that profits? That was about $800 billion. So almost a trillion dollars. And so if the top 1000 corporations gave away all of their profits, 100% for 10 years, what do you have, and I equated it to the problem in the world around safe drinking water access.   And that amount of money. You know, there's a lot of people in the world who don't have affordable, reliable access to safe drinking water in their homes, all over the world, including in Georgia, and North Carolina, and, of course, many parts of the developing world. So that's a goal within the Sustainable Development Goals. There's a goal number six, which is all things related to water, and a sub goal within SDG. Six is safe drinking water, that amount of money over 10 years is enough to solve just that sub goal. Right. So that calls for the top 1000 corporations in the world to take 100% of their profits for 10 years, which is kind of unrealistic. But even if they did that, that only solves part of one of 17 SDG goals. So to say that companies ought to donate more. You can say that, but if they donated everything, it wouldn't be nearly enough because the scale of government is so much bigger.   I mean, just take the United States, for instance, Congress now is debating and probably will soon pass a five and a half trillion dollar budget, excess budget, to do all the things they want to do, including parts of the New Clean deal and things like that. That would be all of corporations for five years and all their profits just to come up with that but governments have that scale. And so it doesn't excuse philanthropy and direct corporate action. But it's sort of a red herring to say, well, business should do more.   There's only so much they can do. And if they gave away all their profits, and they all became charities, it's nowhere near enough money to solve the problem. So that's why I say, do what you can give what you can as a corporation, but also use your voice to advocate government to make the tough decisions that are needed.   Carley Hauck 1:00:30   That's really wonderful. It's a three fold action sequence, just to summarize what you said. So it's advising businesses to bring climate change into their operations? How can they lower their carbon emissions? How can they really reduce them, not just have offsets? How then do we also take some of our profits, and really align with social and environmental responsibility in giving to maybe help with some of the sub goals of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, because I think, again, more is better than none. But then to really advocate for the government, and to, you know, put some pressure on some to hold some accountability for the government to do the wise and good thing for all.   And not to get into politics very much at all. But you know, our last president denied climate change. So we are behind the mark on a bigger level. And, you know, we we have some, I think, very important shifts and changes that we need to make right now, you know, in the next couple years, there is urgency, because if we are to reduce our emissions by 50%, in 10 years, which is what they're forecasting, so that we have a chance for humanity to not have this horrible suffering, like you were experiencing just a small bit on the west coast.   When we had our first conversation, several weeks ago, I was in Bend, Oregon, I was there for six weeks. And the entire time that I was there, it was 93 to 108. And I have, I felt like I was baking from the inside out. Bend is a beautiful place. But I really couldn't enjoy it because I was so tired. And so exhausted every day. So it's, yeah, it's real.   And, and then I'm back here and, you know, and outside of Asheville, which is kind of a temperate rainforest, and it feels like a jungle. And they're just such different climates. And this is a bubble. Like I'm very aware most of our country does not look like where I am. But that's why I landed here. From the fires of the Bay Area 10 months ago. Yeah. So anyway, long, longer tangent there.   But let's talk a little bit more about water, if you're open to that. And also thank you for the book that you wrote. It sounds like a really wonderful contribution. I have not read it yet. But we will be sure to leave a link in the show notes for people that want to learn more about that. It sounds like such a huge undertaking to be able to analyze and understand what's really happening.   Greg Koch 1:03:38   Thank you. Thank you so much. Yeah, so water. As we've chatted already, water is under a lot of stress, and that stress is growing independent of climate change. Right? So you can argue about climate change all you want. Flint, Michigan, and those problems with lead and drinking water had nothing to do with climate change. Right? The lack of safe drinking water to almost 4 billion people around the world has nothing to do with climate change, right?   So there are water quality problems, lack of infrastructure, water scarcity, droughts, floods, storms, all of these things exist today. And climate change is making them more unpredictable, more intense, and and have greater duration. And so water, right you know, climate change is a shark has been often said than water is its teeth. So there's a lot of reasons for business. And therefore my work with my clients to look at water, in conjunction with or even independent of climate change, which is more of a sort of a future type planning but even today, there are problems.   Now, what I find is that most businesses in the clients I work with, but even in general, they do a really good job of managing water in the four walls of, say the factory, right. So they bring it in, they pay for that. They use it efficiently, they look for ways to reuse it. They treat their wastewater before they discharge it, and they manage stormwater that falls on their property, right? And that's table stakes, they should do that. And they need to always do that. independent of regulations. And by and large business does a good job with that.   Where I come in, is where we see that clients are exposed to more water stress in the watershed, and communities that they're a part of, we help them analyze that water stress and determine what impacts that could have on them. And that's a big aha, for a lot of clients, because it puts them in two mindsets, and that's always my goal. And when I achieve it with a client, I feel really good because I know some really good things are gonna happen in that community and watershed.   One, you have to get them to truly appreciate that water is a shared resource. They are sharing that water, with their neighbors, with nature, with other industries, even their competitors, of course, with people all around them wherever they're located. Right, it's not their water. It's not someone else's water independent habit, our government may or may not sort of manage it, but water is shared. And so when you recognize that water is shared, that means if it's under stress, you're going to have to work with those with whom you share that water, in partnership to address issues, right. So one leads to the other.   The other big aha, I aim for clients to achieve is to understand that water is transient, right? It's you know, get some water and put it in a bucket and put it in your room and say I own that five gallons of water. Well, good luck. If you do nothing, and you never tip it over and a dog doesn't come in and drink it, it'll eventually all evaporate, right?   Water is heavy, water likes to move, water is in a continuous cycle. And you know, that's a, that's a very easy but illustrative example to say, you don't really own water, it's transient, right? It's going to come into your home, your body, your factory, your ecosystem and move on somewhere else. And so what that leads to, along with this shared concept is the concept of stewardship.   Alright, so stewardship is defined as taking care of something for a period of time. So a shepherd stewards the flock of sheep, for instance, right? Shepherd may own the sheep or not, but they'll move on eventually into something wool or die of old age or, you know, other things. So it's a good analogy, because it says, Okay, I have to take care of this water. And it's water that I share. So you get these two concepts. I'm sharing this, and I have to steward it while it's in my control at some level.   And when you achieve those two mindset changes, I find that it's very powerful for companies to then say, Okay, well, I know what water stress issues I'm facing. And I know how to solve them at the end of the pipe and my four walls, but that's not going to solve the problem. I'll have to continue throwing money at it. The problem is still getting worse. It's impacting my employees and where they live in that community. It's impacting maybe my customers, maybe my suppliers. It's impacting my neighbors, people that share this water with me. So, yes, I ought to do things in my own control. But since I'm a steward who shares that water, I seek partnerships, the local government and local community, NGOs, peers, even competitors And that's the big aha. And it leads to some really exciting types of projects and partnerships.   Carley Hauck 1:10:09   Great. Let's bring it to the consumer and the individual. Because a lot of folks, you know, might be really looking at water like what's happening with the water in my community, how is it being treated? Are the rivers or the lakes if I have those nearby? Are they even safe to swim in? I don't know if you do any advising around that, but I'll just give a personal example.     So when I was living in Bend, there is a river called the Deschutes that goes through the river, or sorry, goes through the town. And everybody's in it. They're kayaking and stand up paddleboarding. It's a huge part of the culture there, even though it's very hot and dry people are in the water, especially in the summer, and the waters are clean. You know, it's coming from glaciers, it's cold. But then where I live now, outside of Asheville, the French Broad River is another river that goes through the town of Asheville, and everybody tells me don't swim in that river. You can fall in it, but then get out, don't swim in it, I think. Why is this river so polluted? Why is there not a responsibility to clean it up? And so me being a person that wants to be a good steward of the water for however long I'm here, I've been thinking, Okay, so how can I use my voice? How can I speak up about things that matter to me that will benefit the whole? And why is this not being cared for? I am wondering if you could just support me as an individual, and how that might translate to others because this is my, you know, geographic area, right, going back to the beginning of our conversation.   Greg Koch 1:12:00   So you've touched on one of the biggest problems not with water, not just in the United States, but around the world. But the United States is a great example. Because when you look at water quality, right, there's three things that are impacting it. And two of them have been largely solved. And the big challenge is that third one. Okay.   So starting with the Clean Water Act in 1972, created by the EPA. Before that, businesses weren't required to treat their wastewater and municipalities weren't required to treat their wastewater and you had things like Love Canal, your listeners can Google that. You had rivers catching on? Love Canal, yeah, Google Love Canal, okay. Google, Pittsburg Rivers on fire. I mean, basically, you had raw industrial effluent being discharged into the environment and raw sewage being discharged by cities.   The Clean Water Act came along, and over a period of a few decades. Now, there are strict regulations in place with very strict enforcement. Nothing's perfect. But businesses have to have an industrial wastewater discharge permit that is heavily regulated, they have to treat their water to a certain level before they discharge it to the sewer. And if they go directly into the environment, it's a whole different ball of wax with a lot more control.   So by and large, industrial, chemical, wastewater, is being treated. Similarly. Communities, from Chicago to Asheville to tiny communities around the world, now all have to fully treat their wastewater before it's discharged into the environment. So why do we still have polluted rivers? One is, neither of those are perfect. But it should still be swimmable if that's all that was going in there.   So it comes to the third. And the concept is called non Point Source runoff. A good example of non Point Source meaning a point would be here's the municipal sewage treatment, that's a point or here's a factory and there's their discharge. pipe. That's a point, a non point. A good example is a parking lot. Right, you got a parking lot in front of a grocery store and a lot of people's cars drip a little bit of oil or whatever it is, and then the rain comes and that rain picks up those contaminants and contaminates the water. So that is a source of contamination.   But the biggest one, which is also non-point, is farming. Farms do not need to treat water that leaves their site, whether it leaves a storm water, or it infiltrates into groundwater. Now, farming, agriculture uses 70-75% of the world's water. And they're applying fertilizers, they're applying pesticides and fungicides. And to the extent those aren't fully incorporated into the biomass of the plant, which most cases they're not, then you're going to have run off with those agro chemicals. And that causes a lot of problems in water quality.   Carley Hauck 1:15:58   And so that's one of the horrible parts of the animal agriculture system, which you and I were talking about before we hit record, but you know, that's a huge, Oh, what's the word I want to use? I mean, it's definitely adding to the warming of the planet just based on all of the practices and the carbon that's coming from the animals. And that would be a whole nother conversation.   Greg Koch 1:16:28   It would, but it's not just animals. I mean, it's it's row crops. It's corn, its wheat, its peas, its carrots, it's Yeah, you exacerbate that? Particularly when it gets concentrated? You know, you're part of mono cropping? Yeah, mono cropping. But in North Carolina, you know, there's a lot of concentrated livestock. So chicken farms, hog farms, right, that are, you know, I could argue their point sources right here, the 10 acre plot of land that has 5000 pigs on it, and it discharges its wastewater I mean, if that's not a point source, then then what is? The same with, you know, chicken, you know, chicken farms in the long rows of chicken houses, and, you know, they have waste coming out of those. And so, so yeah, you, you, you exacerbate the water pollution. And you have climate issues when you talk about livestock and meat in general. But agriculture at large is a huge source of water quality problems, and it's almost completely unregulated.   Carley Hauck 1:17:45   Wow. Thank you for sharing that. Yeah. So I want to pull it back to the climate report, and I'm tracking all of our conversations. So I'm gonna summarize it kind of in as skillful of a bundle as I can, so that listeners can actually really understand how they might want to take action with all this wonderful information you're giving.   When we look at this massive climate report, the sixth one, you know, as you said, it's really talking about what's happening globally. But there are maps that are being shown of how it's going to impact you know, the West Coast versus the East Coast. And most of my listeners of the podcast are in the United States, but they're also in other countries. But just for the purposes of the dominant listeners, what could you forecast regarding drought and water from the west coast to the east coast. In our last conversation, we were talking about how California is actually getting their water from other states. But we know that California is really running out of water, but they have such a massive population. So based on the geography of the climate maps right now. What do you think is going to be happening in the next few years from the west coast to the east coast? I mean, the East Coast is getting more water from these hurricanes and storms and the West Coast, at least from what I can tell, is having more drought and fires but I would love if you can break it down even more and where is a safe place? You know? Or maybe maybe not safe, climate resilient, right? Where is more climate resilient? And how do we support more climate resiliency, in the places that we are? Greg Koch 1:19:52   Well, let me say that, that second part, how do we support climate resilience, where we are is what we should all be focused on. I don't think the time now is. Where's that place in northern Canada? We can all go running because you're right that that's a bit alarmist and I'm not going to advocate for that.   But so yeah, call your congressperson, call your senator and say, I want action on climate change, I want it for myself, I want it for my grandchildren, etc, etc. Reduce your own carbon footprint in in ways that are meaningful. Encourage your friends and families to do that. But use your voice and use your vote. Some of the more powerful dollars, no shop with your products, right? Yep. right about that a lot on the podcast. So let's look, West Coast, East Coast, and what is forecasted? I'll just give one example from each coast, right?   Yes, you see droughts, you see wildfires, which have always happened and will continue to happen but are anticipated to to be more frequent and last longer and be more intense. But the big, forecasted change in the West Coast. That doesn't get a lot of press but it is. To me, one of the biggest problems is precipitation. Much of the west coast from the Rockies West, regardless of what state you're in, get their water from snow and ice that falls on the Sierra Nevada or the Cascades or the Rockies. It's all part of the Rockies, the Wasatch Mountains in Utah. What have you.   And so snow and ice fall and you've got a nice snowpack that's actually measured, and then it melts slowly over spring and summer. And feeds downstream communities from San Diego to Seattle. Okay. Large generalization but pretty accurate. So that snow and ice pack is a reservoir. Think of it as a lake, right? And the temperature is the dam. Right? Because it's still frozen. And then it slowly melts and on it comes like Deschutes river and bend oregon. That's snow and ice melt.   Right? It's snow melt.   So what if and this is what's forecasted? You actually get more precipitation in the winter. But because it's warmer, that precipitation comes as rain and not snow. Right?   Right. So what's gonna happen to the rain, it's not going to wait till summer, it's going to go downhill. And there's nowhere to store it. There's not enough places to store it. So it just ultimately will run off eventually, somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. And that's a huge problem. And in fact, if you read the UN Climate report that we talked about earlier, and this got picked up in the press, it rained for the first time in recorded history at the highest glacier in Greenland. Right? So Greenland's got this huge snow ice pack. Right. And so more and more snow. It rained up there.   Yeah, Right versus snow. And so think about that in the Sierra Nevada. I mean, forget about skiing and stuff. We're talking about as you're losing that reservoir, and all that water goes off. Now, even if you don't have a drought, there's just no water coming from the mountainside. And so even if the temperatures were cooler, it does, where's the water? It was supposed to be fed to us over the spring and summer. Right.   On the east coast. I think one of the biggest near term sort of 10 year problems is storms and storm surges. And probably the best place to see that in action today, as we speak, is Miami Beach. Right. But you could extend that to Galveston, Texas to New Orleans to Biloxi you know, really the whole Gulf Coast and up the e

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast
ASU football season predictions

Sun Devil Source Report: An ASU Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 59:55


On this latest edition of the Sun Devil Report Podcast, host Ethan Ryter is joined by site publisher Chris Karpman as well as reporters Jacob Rudner, and Carson Breber. They discuss the health of the team heading into the Southern Utah game and give in-depth predictions for ASU football's season. Covered in this episode: -- Sophomore offensive linemen Ralph Frias and redshirt freshman Triston Miller being out for extended time and what it means for the offensive line -- The absences of junior defensive back Timarcus Davis and freshman wide receiver Elijhah Badger in practice and what it might mean -- In-depth predictions on how the offense will perform now that they're in their second year of offensive coordinator Zak Hill's system -- In-depth predictions on how the defense will perform under defensive coordinator Antonio Pierce -- In-depth predictions on Shawn Slocum's special teams unit and what they can accomplish this season -- Predictions on ASU's record and whether or not it will win the Pac-12 South -- Predictions of games around the Pac-12 in "Pick the Pac"

Mountain West Wire
Week 0 Recap; Early Week 1 Preview

Mountain West Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 88:01


Jeremy and Matt are back to recap Week 0 which featured three games in the Mountain West, plus we get into the early Week 1 games that are Thursday and Friday. In the openers, we go over what we liked in Fresno State's 45-0 victory over UConn as it showed the defense and offensive line are doing well, even if against a bad team. Hawaii looked lackluster and had the same problems as last year in its 44-10 loss to UCLA, then San Jose State seemingly found every receiver open in its easy win over Southern Utah. Week 1 of the early game is mostly FCS matchups but the big one is Boise State traveling to UCF in a much anticipated matchup of Group of 5 powers. Expect the game to feature a lot of points and really good quarterback play, but it might come down to what defense can make a stop. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Speak of the Devils
Episode 288 - ASU vs. Southern Utah Preview

Speak of the Devils

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 76:41


GAME WEEK IS HERE. We lead off with a look at the latest news, including some notable developments on the roster.  Then we look ahead to Thursday's opener. We go behind Thunderbird lines with SUU play-by-play announcer Chris Holmes for the latest on ASU's opponent. We then preview the game, outline the keys to a win, and give our score prediction.

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta
8-30-21 Bickley + Marotta discuss the cancelation of the Cardinals preseason game

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 40:57


In hour No. 1, Dan Bickley and Vince Marotta react to the Cardinals preseason game scheduled for Saturday being canceled due to Hurricane Ida. They also talk college football ahead of ASU's game against Southern Utah on Thursday and the 49ers quarterback situation.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta
8-30-21 Bickley + Marotta discuss the cancelation of the Cardinals preseason game

Podcasts Bickley & Marotta

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 40:57


In hour No. 1, Dan Bickley and Vince Marotta react to the Cardinals preseason game scheduled for Saturday being canceled due to Hurricane Ida. They also talk college football ahead of ASU's game against Southern Utah on Thursday and the 49ers quarterback situation.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion
Coach Harvey Hyde scouting USC opponents San Jose State and UCLA from their week 0 games

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 47:30


In this edition of the Peristyle Podcast Coach Harvey Hyde and Ryan Abraham are back together talking actual college football and getting ready for the Trojans home opener against San Jose State. Two of USC's opponents were in action on week 0, including the Spartans so Coach and Ryan breakdown what they saw from San Jose State vs. Southern Utah and UCLA vs. Hawaii. Please review, rate and subscribe to the Peristyle Podcast on Apple Podcasts! The best 5-star review each week will get a $50 Trader Joe's gift card! Make sure you check out USCFootball.com for complete coverage of this USC Trojan football team.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The College Football Experience
College Football DFS Picks Week Zero (Ep. 816)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 53:30


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network reveals their Week zero DFS lineups. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) break down their Draft Kings lineups for this weekends college football games. Will Adrian Martinez light it up against the Illini defense? Will Dorian Thompson-Robinson make his case for a Heisman trophy right out the gate? Will Samori Toure be the secret weapon for Nebraska? Will UTEP and Deion Hankins run heavy on a unproven New Mexico State defense? Will Nick Starkel and Nick Nashboth get reps against Southern Utah? Is their value in grabbing San Jose State tight end Derrick Deese Jr. ? We talk it all on this DFS edition of The College Football Experience. Make sure you subscribe to The College Basketball Experience at sg.pn/tcbe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Check out all of the SGPN 2021 NFL & College Football Preview in the SGPN app - Download it today https://sgpn.app and leave us a rating/review Support for this episode - WynnBet | PropSwap.com code “SGP” | Pickswise.com | UnderdogFantasy code “SGPN” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Cover 3 College Football Podcast
College football betting picks: Week 0 Locks (08/26)

Cover 3 College Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 44:37


The Cover 3 crew locks up their favorite plays for Week 0. First, two Lock Fights highlight the breakdown for Nebraska-Illinois with opposite bets on both the side and the total (4:15). Then, what to expect from a UConn team that didn't play in 2020 as it travels to Fresno State (12:17), what Chip Kelly's non-conference record against the spread should tell us about UCLA-Hawaii (21:26) and whether a rivalry trend will continue along I-10 between UTEP and New Mexico State (27:00). Plus, Locks for San Jose State and Southern Utah in the night cap and Moneyline Sprinkles for Week 0 (33:00).  Cover 3 is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Watch Cover 3 on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/cover3 Follow our hosts on Twitter: @Chip_Patterson, @TomFornelli, @DannyKanell, @BudElliott3 For more college football coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/college-football/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mountain West Wire
Week 0 Mountain West Football Preview

Mountain West Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 88:49


Jeremy and Matt are here to FINALLY preview the opening weekend of college football that features three Mountain West games with Fresno State hosting UConn, Hawaii at UCLA, and then San Jose State bringing in Southern Utah. The two also go over some last minute fall camp news from across the league, and also how the Alliance between the ACC, Big Ten and Pac-12 could impact the Mountain West. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

High Motor
Best Bets of College Football Week 0

High Motor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 31:50


Andrew Doughty and Chase Kiddy break down betting odds for each Week 0 game and give their favorite bets for the first weekend of college football, among them: Illinois +7 (vs. Nebraska), Fresno State -27.5 (vs. UConn), and San Jose State -22.5 (vs. Southern Utah).Mailbag Questions: @HighMotorPodBetMGM Odds: College Football Odds

Big Bets On Campus
Week Zero College Football Betting Preview

Big Bets On Campus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 82:00


Alright gamblers, it's time to break the huddle and hustle up to the line! Action Network college football experts Stuckey and Collin Wilson are back for their much-anticipated Week Zero betting preview, as they go deep on every game on this appetizer slate. Together they discuss their favorite picks from a Illinois total to a Southern Utah second half backdoor, plus quarterbacks they love and everything in between. But first they are joined by Action Network college football reporter Brett McMurphy, who lays out the latest news from the college football universe, including Scott Frost drama at Nebraska. And finally, Stuckey and Collin provide a robust recap of all their preseason win totals and futures plays, which they've laid out in great detail in previous episodes.  MCMURPHY (4 MIN) NEB/ILL (16 MIN) UCONN FRESNO (29 MIN) HAWAII UCLA (38 MIN) UTEP NMSU (49 MIN) FCS or NO (56 MIN) FAVORITES BETS (1 HR)  And to take advantage of our WynnBET offer, please follow this link:  https://www.actionnetwork.com/online-sports-betting/reviews/wynnbet And we'll see you next week for Week One's main course slate!

Bleav in FCS Football with Joe DeLeone and Sean Anderson
FCS Football Week 0 Preview why the FCS Football Twitter account stinks

Bleav in FCS Football with Joe DeLeone and Sean Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 37:02


Joe DeLeone and Sean Anderson preview Week 0 of the FCS Football season, featuring Eastern Illinois vs Indiana State, NC Central vs Alcorn State, and Southern Utah vs San Jose State. They also harass the FCS Football Twitter account.

The College Football Experience
Southern Utah Thunderbirds @ San Jose State Spartans Game Preview (Ep. 814)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 19:11


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews Saturday's week zero matchup between the Southern Utah Thunderbirds and the San Jose State Spartans. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) recaps both teams previous seasons and keys in on their rosters and what we should expect from this early season matchup. Will Nick Starkel get the downfield passing attack going? Will Tyler Nevens and the Spartans experienced offensive line be too much for Southern Utah? Could Justin Miller and the Thunderbirds pull the big road upset? Will Landom Measom make his name known on the national scale after this week? Will Southern Utah be able to get anything going on the ground? Could the Thunderbirds front 7 keep San Jose State in check? We talk it all on this special edition episode of The College Football Experience.  Make sure you subscribe to The College Basketball Experience at sg.pn/tcbe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Check out all of the SGPN 2021 NFL & College Football Preview in the SGPN app - Download it today https://sgpn.app and leave us a rating/review Support for this episode - WynnBet | PropSwap.com code “SGP” | Pickswise.com | UnderdogFantasy code “SGPN” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Hans & Scotty G.
Southern Utah head coach Demario Warren and the Thunderbirds are ready for their season opener against San Jose State

Hans & Scotty G.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 14:23


SUU head coach Demario Warren joined the show to preview the Thunderbirds season and season opener against San Jose State

Murph & Mac Podcast
8-18 Brent Brennan joins the Murph & Mac Show to talk about his expectations for 2021 season as the Spartans prepare for their season opener against Southern Utah!

Murph & Mac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 17:50


San Jose State's Head Coach Brent Brennan joins the Murph & Mac Show to talk about his expectations for 2021 season as the Spartans prepare for their season opener against Southern Utah! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
8-18 Brent Brennan joins the Murph & Mac Show to talk about his expectations for 2021 season as the Spartans prepare for their season opener against Southern Utah!

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 17:50


San Jose State's Head Coach Brent Brennan joins the Murph & Mac Show to talk about his expectations for 2021 season as the Spartans prepare for their season opener against Southern Utah! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wilderness Therapy & Residential Treatment Center Journey
Season 3/Episode 8: Wingate Wilderness Therapy with Shayne Gallagher

Wilderness Therapy & Residential Treatment Center Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 34:51


In this episode, we speak with the Founder and Executive Director of a unique program based in Southern Utah. Shayne Gallagher shares with us the following: · Background · Wingate Therapy origins and focus · AWE/Actual Wilderness Experience · Good candidates for the program · Typical day · Trends in the industry · Recommendations for parents who are struggling with their child right now · Contact information You can find out more at https://www.wingatewildernesstherapy.com/

Culture Bytes
FMASU and Bringing Film to Southern Utah

Culture Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 21:41


This week we spoke with John Pugh, the Co-Founder and Vice President for the Film and Media Alliance of Southern Utah (FMASU). He discusses the significance of FMASU and what exactly differentiates the organization from other film-presenting entities. John also talks about the Guerilla Filmmaking Challenges that are put on by FMASU as well as the Desertscape International Film Festival and what it means to the southern Utah community. To hear more of our conversation, be sure to listen on our website or through your preferred podcast platform including Apple Podcastshttps://www.utahculturalalliance.org/podcast_culture_bytes#utculture #utaharts

Swan Dive
Bhakti Baxter - Into the Unknowing

Swan Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 46:52


Bhakti Baxter (born in Miami FL, 1979) lives and works in Topanga, CA. At 38, having never lived anywhere but his hometown, Bhakti outfitted an old Sprinter and made his way to the west coast, immersing himself in the deep solitudes of Southern Utah and other singular landscapes along the way. Exploring the relationship between science and spirituality, his work hinges heavily on geometry, the systemic manifestations of geometric principles in nature and the interpretive freedom of abstraction. Working in a variety of media within sculpture, painting and drawing, Baxter's practice is an ongoing investigation into existential queries through the creative process. His work has been exhibited at Nina Johnson Gallery, Miami, FL; Perez Art Museum Miami, FL; Bravin Lee Programs, New York, NY; Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, Paris, France; Manifesta 11, Zurich, Switzerland; among others.Share your Swan Dive at www.swandive.us

JUST A PODCAST
July 2nd Potatoes

JUST A PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 20:04


In this episode I rant about what my mom would think and discuss some aspects of the Southern Utah comedy scene

Dave and Dujanovic
Flash Flooding in Zion

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 20:19


It happened in an instant -- flash floods in ZNP sent visitors scrambling to safety -- destroyed a major road at the park -- and we will ask if the long holiday weekend will bring more flooding. Serious Rain in Southern Utah is unlike anything you've ever seen. Grant Weyman , KSL Meteorologist chimes in to give us the expected forecast and Kevin Kitchen with UDOT explains the latest on the road damage from the flood.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond the Box Score Podcast
Interview w/ Patrice Days (Assistant Coach at ETSU)

Beyond the Box Score Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 61:23


Coach Patrice Days shares his journey from growing up in Baltimore to moving multiple times, coaching at multiple schools at multiple levels. After cutting his teeth at New Orleans he moved to Charlotte where he was their Director of Player Development. Despite being at the NCAA DI level he decided to move to Florida and coach high school basketball. He coached at Arlington Country Day School and helped turn them into a national powerhouse before moving on to Vermont Academy. Coach Days would get his first Assistant Coach position at the NCAA level when Joe Golding hired at Abilene Christian, from there he moved onto Wright State, and then Southern Utah. Cliff Ellis hired him to his coaching staff at Coastal Carolina where they advanced to two postseason tournaments in four seasons. Coach Days talks about working for a legend, and what made him decide to become an Assistant Coach at East Tennessee State after they'd been getting bad press as of late.

Active Travel Adventures
Hike and Bike Southern Utah

Active Travel Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 52:35


Kit heads to magical southern Utah to explore not just its fantastic National Parks, but also some lesser known areas, as she continues her USA camper van road trip in "Sophie". Learn about cool destinations and what Kit has learned about road tripping - both good and bad - along with tips to make your next road trip more pleasant. LINKS MENTIONED ON TODAY'S EPISODE: Wildland Trekking [ Use Promo Code ATA75] Active Adventures [Email Kit for Promo Code] Red Cliffs Lodge Moab UT Rim Tours [ Mountain biking guided tours Moab] Utah's Mighty 5 National Parks ATA episode #90 Teton National Park ATA episode #52 Olympic National Park ATA episode #26 Hike Sedona   ATA episode #88 Boondocking Adventure Travel Show Podcast #34   Get FREE Travel Planners for ATA adventures (and each month you will get an email from Kit with links to all future Travel Planners (no spam promise!).  Get the monthly newsletter here.   Resources  Promo Codes and Recommended Tour Companies Amazon Kit's Picks CONTACT KIT SUBSCRIBE to the Adventure Travel Show (the “How to's of adventure travel) SUBSCRIBE to Active Travel Adventures (fantastic adventure destinations) Join the Active Travel Adventures Facebook Group Follow ATA on Twitter Follow ATA on Instagram Follow ATA on Pinterest

94 Feet With Coach J.T. Podcast
94 Feet With Coach JT, Former California,Texas Tech Superstar and now Published Author Dr Casey Morris joins me.

94 Feet With Coach J.T. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 33:16


Dr Casey, Published author, A 2008 graduate of Division 4 Piedmont High School ... As a freshman: Helped Piedmont High School claim the state title ... named to the Cal-Hi Sports All-Freshman team ... named third team all-state ... As a sophomore: Named all-metro and all-league ... picked to the End of the Oregon Trail all-tournament team ... As a junior: Averaged 24 points that season and had scored 1,358 points after just three seasons ... named the co-MVP of the End of the Oregon Trail tournament ... selected a Street & Smith's honorable mention All-American ... participated in the 2007 USA Youth Development Festival ... As a senior: Ranked 35th nationally by Blue Star Reports and No. 53 by HoopGurlz.com and the No. 10-rated point guard according to HoopGurlz ... named co-MVP of the Bay Shore Athletic League ... was second team all-metro by the San Francisco Chronicle ... help Piedmont High to a 21-6 record and scored a game-high 19 points in the North Coast Section quarterfinals ... also played softball in high school ... high school basketball coach was Brian Gardere. AAU Played in 32 games with 31 starts ... Scored 20 points or more twice ... scored in double figures 21 times ... second on the team in scoring (378 points) ... second on team in scoring average (11.8 points per game) ... second on team in field goals made (124) ... led team in 3-point field goals made (66) ... led team with 81 percent free-throw percentage (64 of 79) ... second on team in steals (60) ... led team in minutes played (1,144 - 35.8 average) ... scored 15 points at Arizona State ... scored 18 points vs Southern Utah ... scored 19 points with seven steals and was 7 of 10 from field vs Nicholls ... scored 16 points vs New Orleans ... scored 18 points vs Northern Colorado ... scored 20 points at Texas ... scored 16 points vs Kansas ... scored 20 points vs West Virginia ... scored 18 points at TCU ... scored 19 points at Kansas. Finished career with 1,056 points at Texas Tech in just three seasons ... 6th all-time in Texas Tech history with 177 career 3-point field goals made ... 7th all-time in Texas Tech history with 81.6 career free-throw percentage (177 of 217) ... started 99 of 100 games played at Texas Tech. Enjoy the walk through her journey.

The Dental Clinical Companion
133 Dr. Shea Bess: Composite Curing Lights: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

The Dental Clinical Companion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 40:16


Dr. Shea Bess discusses the physics and chemistry of curing lights, bonding technology, and optimal clinical esthetic technique from a materials perspective. Dr. Shea Bess graduated from the University of Utah with a BS in Medical Biology. He obtained his DDS from Loma Linda University in 2002. He started his practice from scratch in February of 2003 and has maintained a full time practice ever since. He was a part time employee for Ultradent Products Inc. for 17 years and worked in the Research and Development department. Dr. Bess lectures on various topics on restorative dentistry at dental schools and regional CE courses throughout the United States. He has provided dentistry in Fiji and Guatemala, and serves locally at Give Kids A Smile annually to help underprivileged children with their dental needs. He worked part-time for a few years, with the Navajo Nation to provide dental care to Native Americans in Southern Utah. The Dental Clinical Companion Podcast (DCCP) is provided for general informational purposes only. The DCCP, MounceEndo, LLC, Dr. Joel Fransen, Richmond Endodontics CA, and Dr. Richard Mounce personally have no liability for any clinical, management, or financial decisions or actions taken or made by you based on the information provided in this program. The DCCP is not intended to offer dental, medical, legal, management, investment, surgical, tax, clinical, or any other professional advice. Reliance on the information in the DCCP is done entirely at the listeners own risk.  No guarantees, representations, or warrantees are made with regard to the completeness, accuracy, and/or quality of the DCCP.  The DCCP takes no responsibility for, does not endorse, and does not imply a relationship/affiliation to any websites, products, services, devices, individuals, organizations which are hyperlinked to any DCCP component or mentioned in the DCCP. Third party materials, hyperlinks, and/or DCCP content does not reflect the opinions, standards, and policies of MounceEndo, LLC (owner of the DCCP, Dr. Richard Mounce, the guest, or show sponsors). The DCCP makes no warranty that the Podcast and its server are free of computer viruses or other destructive or contaminating code elements. The Dental Clinical Companion Podcast expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special consequential or other damages arising out of any individuals use of, reference to, reliance on, or inability to use, this podcast or the information presented in this podcast. Support the show (http://mounceendo.com/)

Kylee Mentors Moms on All Things Business
51. From Burnout to CEO with Amanda Clark

Kylee Mentors Moms on All Things Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 34:40


Amanda is owner of a product-based AND service-based business! She owns Amanda Clark Photography in Southern Utah and Cold Strike, an brand new outdoor apparel business. We've always been friends but in January she became one of my coaching girls! I LOVE coaching because it is more like guiding — not directing. When we first started coaching sessions, she was burnt out and even felt like it was time to quit photography. I was able to watch Amanda dive into what was causing her burn-out and help her completely pivot her business. Amanda discovered that she didn't love photography as much as she loves the people. So now that we know what she is passionate about, we can shift her business to be more about the people. At the beginning of coaching, Amanda had a six-year old photography business. Now she has a six-year old photography business, a podcast, an associate photographer, a virtual assistant, an outdoor apparel business and three more instagrams. She has completely stepped into that CEO role (flawlessly, might I add) and does what she really loves every day, the managing and the executing and the negotiating. The people-side of things. Amanda wouldn't have gotten to the bottom of her burn-out and found what she really loves to do without pushing past her limiting beliefs. She HAD to let go of these big fears. That's why I love coaching. We were able to discover and work through limiting beliefs that she didn't even know were there! Get all the juicy details in today's episode - going from burn out to CEO! FIND AMANDA HERE: instagram.com/amandaclarkphoto instagram.com/coldstrikegear Hi, I'm Kylee and I'm a business coach for women! I specialize in helping women make money while still balancing their families. Learn more about my courses and coaching options at kyleeann.com/education FIND US HERE: kyleeannphotography.com/podcast instagam.com/kyleeannstudios facebook.com/groups/ourphotogblog Get the show notes to your inbox: bit.ly/KMMpodcast

Singletracks Mountain Bike News
Ride Like a Local: St. George, Utah

Singletracks Mountain Bike News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 42:02


Cimarron Chacon is the president and race director at GRO Promotions, which offers mountain bike event and trail development services in and around St. George, Utah. She also founded the Dixie Mountain Bike Trails Association which is now known as the Trail Alliance of Southern Utah. We ask Cimarron: What makes St. George stand out among mountain bike destinations? For someone visiting for the first time, what are 2 or 3 must ride trails or trail systems? Which trails are family-friendly, and which ones are the most challenging? What are some lesser-known trails where riders can get away from the crowds? Who builds and maintains the trails in the area? Where do people hang out after the ride? Are there any bars or breweries that tend to attract mountain bikers? What are some of the mountain bike races or events visitors can plan to attend (or avoid)? Are there plans to expand or improve trails in the area? Learn more about mountain biking in St. George at tasutah.org and gropromotions.com. This episode is sponsored by Explore Brevard. Picture yourself in the middle of 100,000 acres of public lands and over 300 shredable miles of single track. A place often referred to as one of the top mountain biking towns in the country. Brevard, North Carolina has countless epic adventures for every kind of rider on tap. Whether you love rocky, rooty technical lines in Pisgah, or flowy lines in Dupont State Recreational Forest, or something in-between – Brevard has it all…in spades. Come discover the place often referred to as the Cycling Capital of the South. Start planning your trip at ExploreBrevard.com --Keep up with the latest in mountain biking at Singletracks.com and on Instagram @singletracks --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/singletracks/support

#SoccerChat
Southern Utah Women's Soccer Staff

#SoccerChat

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 82:09


They've turned the West Coast soccer scene upside down.  Hear the struggles and successes of this staff taking over a program and making it rise like a phoenix in year 1.  The things said about their program, injuries to players, and overcoming all odds with limited players...the Birdgang tells endless tales of each of their experiences in year 1.And we talk about the celebration-gate.Join the discussion on twitter every Wednesday night at 9:30PM EST following twitter.com/ChatSoccr with the hashtag #SoccerChat and on facebook at facebook.com/ChatSoccr!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~HOSTS:Nick Rizzo, St. Mary's Minnesota Women's Head CoachShaun Soderling, Brescia University Women's Head CoachGUESTS:Kai Edwards, Head CoachMario Felix-Suarez, Assistant Coach Maggie Sherman, Assistant CoachAlexander Zermeno, Volunteer CoachSteven Lindquist, Volunteer Coach~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~#SoccerChat is a duKTig brand FC member! Use the promo code "SOCCERCHAT" to get yourself a sweet discount at checkout!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Leading Saints Podcast
How Connection Can Improve Your Ward’s Mental Health | An Interview with Geoff Steurer

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2021 68:21


Geoff Steurer is a licensed marriage and family therapist in private practice in St. George, Utah, with over 20 years of experience. He is the co-author of Love You, Hate the Porn: Healing a Relationship Damaged by Virtual Infidelity and the host of the weekly podcast, "From Crisis to Connection". He has produced workbooks, audio programs, and online courses helping couples and individuals heal from the impact of sexual betrayal, unwanted pornography use, partner betrayal trauma, and rebuilding broken trust. He received a bachelors in communications studies from Brigham Young University and a masters in marriage and family therapy from Auburn University, and maintains a private counseling practice in beautiful Southern Utah. Geoff has served as a bishop, on the high council, a young men's president, and currently serves as the gospel doctrine teacher in his ward. He's been married for 25 years to Jody Young Steurer and they are the parents of four children. Highlights 6:00 Why Geoff chose to talk about healthy attachment for the virtual summit because connection and attachment are within our realm of control 8:20 Making space for attachment Recognizing that attachment matters 10:15 Connection and individuality are not either/or; they both matter for our psychological well-being The messages of individuality as the source of happiness have pushed our culture in that direction, but the research says the web of relationships is vital 14:45 Adam & Eve: from the beginning we have known it is not good to be alone 18:25 The tendency to send away people who are lonely: people just need to be witnessed 20:40 It's the relationship that matters. 75-80% of what affects change in therapy is the relationship between the therapist and client 23:00 A leader or therapist cannot always be there. There are always people who care and can be part of their life if we get creative. The Church has a built-in system to create healthy relationships and attachments that can help people feel included; it's part of our baptismal commitment 27:45 There are opportunities beyond the ministering program for us to connect with others; the surface relationships can go deeper and we are all looking for that 34:30 A summary of attachment science 41:25 Marriage isn't the solution to loneliness for single adults 42:20 Exercises for calling on attachments and creating connection even when alone; our system is designed to store those bonding moments 48:00 Reaching out to an old friend 49:45 How to leverage attachment As individuals: take the risk to connect to others 55:55 In our families: children are a mix of dependency and a need to be independent; parents need to support both 58:40 Children will thrive even in the messiness: just show up and support people 1:00:30 In the Church: we have opportunities to connect with people who we would not otherwise be part of our lives Don't overcomplicate with organization: See people as people and connect with them 1:05:25 Start by recognizing your own comfort level with connection Links GeoffSteurer.com Trust Building Academy

The Herd with Colin Cowherd
All Ball - Southern Utah Head Coach Todd Simon Talks Learning From Westphal and Kruger, Recruiting, Rebuilding

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 71:03


In this episode, Doug is joined by Southern Utah Head Coach Todd Simon to talk about his path from growing up a "Bad Boys" Pistons fan, to learning under Paul Westphal and Lon Kruger as an assistant, to talking over UNLV on an interim basis and finally getting a full time gig at Southern Utah, rebuilding the program from a perennial loser into Big Sky champs. Make sure you download, rate and subscribe here to get the latest All Ball Podcasts! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com