Podcasts about state employees

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  • 56PODCASTS
  • 63EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 1, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about state employees

Latest podcast episodes about state employees

Todd Feinburg
Rant Hour (HR 1 - 10/1/21)

Todd Feinburg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 39:07


Todd opens the 2 PM hour with the rants, as on Friday we switch things up for “Order Up” at 5 PM. Todd then runs through the daily rants, as well as some of the live calls as he runs through the topics including Lamont, State Employees, Biden, and more. Todd then responds to a rant who claims Lamont has led the state of Connecticut during the COVID pandemic. Todd also proves that the Great Patriot is an actual caller, and not just a hoax for the show. Tune in weekdays 2-6 PM EST on WTIC Newstalk 1080 ;or on the new Audacy app! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KUOW Newsroom
Nearly 70% of Washington state employees have been vaccinated against Covid-19

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 1:09


KUOW Newsroom
Less than half of WA state employees' vaccination status has been verified

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 1:09


Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 15:00


This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Tuesday, September 14, 2021. COVID hospitalization Numbers May Not Mean What People Think They Mean https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/09/covid-hospitalization-numbers-can-be-misleading/620062/ David Zweig at the Atlantic writes about a new study just out examining COVID hospitalization numbers. For months, many have assumed that “hospitalization numbers provide a more stable and reliable gauge of the pandemic's true toll, in terms of severe disease. But a new, nationwide study of hospitalization records… suggests that the meaning of this gauge can easily be misinterpreted—and that it has been shifting over time. If you want to make sense of the number of COVID hospitalizations at any given time, you need to know how sick each patient actually is. Until now, that's been almost impossible to suss out. The federal government requires hospitals to report every patient who tests positive for COVID, yet the overall tallies of COVID hospitalizations, made available on various state and federal dashboards and widely reported on by the media, do not differentiate based on severity of illness. Some patients need extensive medical intervention, such as getting intubated. Others require supplemental oxygen or administration of the steroid dexamethasone. But there are many COVID patients in the hospital with fairly mild symptoms, too, who have been admitted for further observation on account of their comorbidities, or because they reported feeling short of breath. Another portion of the patients in this tally are in the hospital for something unrelated to COVID, and discovered that they were infected only because they were tested upon admission. How many patients fall into each category has been a topic of much speculation. In August, researchers from Harvard Medical School, Tufts Medical Center, and the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System decided to find out. Researchers have tried to get at similar questions before. For two separate studies published in May, doctors in California read through several hundred charts of pediatric patients, one by one, to figure out why, exactly, each COVID-positive child had been admitted to the hospital. Did they need treatment for COVID, or was there some other reason for admission, like cancer treatment or a psychiatric episode, and the COVID diagnosis was merely incidental? According to the researchers, 40 to 45 percent of the hospitalizations that they examined were for patients in the latter group. The authors of the paper out this week took a different tack to answer a similar question, this time for adults. Instead of meticulously looking at why a few hundred patients were admitted to a pair of hospitals, they analyzed the electronic records for nearly 50,000 COVID hospital admissions at the more than 100 VA hospitals across the country. Then they checked to see whether each patient required supplemental oxygen or had a blood oxygen level below 94 percent. (The latter criterion is based on the National Institutes of Health definition of “severe COVID.”) If either of these conditions was met, the authors classified that patient as having moderate to severe disease; otherwise, the case was considered mild or asymptomatic. The study found that from March 2020 through early January 2021—before vaccination was widespread, and before the Delta variant had arrived—the proportion of patients with mild or asymptomatic disease was 36 percent. From mid-January through the end of June 2021, however, that number rose to 48 percent. In other words, the study suggests that roughly half of all the hospitalized patients showing up on COVID-data dashboards in 2021 may have been admitted for another reason entirely, or had only a mild presentation of disease. This increase was even bigger for vaccinated hospital patients, of whom 57 percent had mild or asymptomatic disease. But unvaccinated patients have also been showing up with less severe symptoms, on average, than earlier in the pandemic: The study found that 45 percent of their cases were mild or asymptomatic since January 21… [The author suggests that the increase in mild case hospitalizations correlates with the widespread vaccination of the public…] … the study also demonstrates that hospitalization rates for COVID, as cited by journalists and policy makers, can be misleading, if not considered carefully. Clearly many patients right now are seriously ill. We also know that overcrowding of hospitals by COVID patients with even mild illness can have negative implications for patients in need of other care. At the same time, this study suggests that COVID hospitalization tallies can't be taken as a simple measure of the prevalence of severe or even moderate disease, because they might inflate the true numbers by a factor of two. “As we look to shift from cases to hospitalizations as a metric to drive policy and assess level of risk to a community or state or country,” Doron told me, referring to decisions about school closures, business restrictions, mask requirements, and so on, “we should refine the definition of hospitalization. Those patients who are there with rather than from COVID don't belong in the metric.” WA State Troopers & Other Workers Sue Over Vaxx Mandates https://www.khq.com/politics/wa-state-troopers-other-workers-sue-over-vaccine-mandate/article_f957901b-2ae4-507b-bdb5-380612564ac1.html#utm_campaign=blox&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social KHQ News: Washington state troopers, prison correctional officers, ferry workers and other public sector employees have filed a lawsuit to try to overturn Gov. Jay Inslee's COVID-19 vaccine mandate. The Northwest News Network reports the lawsuit filed by more than 90 workers on Friday in Walla Walla County says the mandate is unlawful and unconstitutional. The lawsuit says the penalty of being fired for not getting the vaccine is “arbitrary and capricious,” especially for employees who can work from home or have natural immunity from having previously contracted COVID-19. An Inslee spokesperson, Mike Faulk, said the office had not yet reviewed the lawsuit, but added: “We know these vaccine requirements are legal and essential for saving lives.” Inslee issued his vaccine mandate last month. It requires most state employees, on-site contractors and volunteers, as well as private health care and long-term care workers, to be fully vaccinated by Oct. 18. Inslee later expanded the mandate to include workers in educational settings from preschool through higher education. While Inslee did not offer a testing alternative in lieu of the vaccine, workers subject to the mandate can apply for religious or medical exemptions. Previously, the Washington Federation of State Employees sued to delay the implementation of the governor's order. However, the union later reached an agreement with the Inslee administration, which was ratified last week by the membership. FBI Fires Lead Agent in Gov. Whitmer Sting https://justthenews.com/government/courts-law/fbi-fires-lead-agent-gov-whitmer-kidnapping-case The FBI agent credited with thwarting the plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has been fired from the agency after domestic violence allegations were levied against him. According to The Detroit News, Special Agent Richard Trask was fired last week while awaiting trial on charges of assault with intent to do bodily harm and allegations that he beat his wife's head against a nightstand following an argument caused by a swingers party they attended. The firing of the law enforcement officer comes amid questions concerning potential misconduct by the FBI during the kidnapping investigation, and whether as many as 12 informants were driving the alleged conspiracy. Trask was dropped as a witness for the FBI following comments he made on social media calling former President Donald a “douchebag” and other things… The arrest and subsequent firing come as defense lawyers representing the accused attempted kidnappers began planning their legal strategy, which includes attacking the credibility of the FBI agents involved in the case. The defense team also plans on alleging the FBI informants, including Trask, entrapped the defendants. The trial will not be conducted until December at the earliest, and the defense team may still attempt to call Trask as a witness despite the FBI dismissing him for the prosecution. All Eyes on California Tuesday for the Recall Election… Psalm of the Day: He Will Rejoice Zeph. 3:17 Play: 0:00-1:09 The Lord You God is in your midst| The Mighty One will save He will rejoice over you with gladness He will quiet you with His song He will rejoice over you with singing He will rejoice over you with His song Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: if you see news stories and links that you think we should cover on the daily news brief, please send them to news @ crosspolitic.com and don't forget to check deft wire dot com where we are constantly posting all our stories. Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. You always get a free Fight Laugh Feast t-shirt with a membership and remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conferences, club members have access to all the talks and lots more. Join today and have a great day.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Washington state employees union sues

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 38:20


What's Trending: Washington state employees union suing over vaccine mandate, Arnie Duncan has the dumbest tweet of the day, an RV fire breaks out in Queen Anne, and the CDC gets even more woke. WSP Trooper Philip Berg has been on the job for just five years and has a pregnant wife who is a teacher. They both may be out of a job due to not supporting Inslee's vaccine mandate.  An Anti-Vaccine Mandate rally drew thousands to Olympia over the weekend. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beacon Hill in 5
Some Mass. State Employees Say They'll Refuse To Follow Baker's Vaccine Mandate

Beacon Hill in 5

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 5:43


Last week, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed an executive order mandating COVID-19 vaccination for some 42,000 state employees. The order says they must be vaccinated by mid-October or face consequences, which could include losing their job.

MPR News Update
On-site MN state employees face vaccine-or-test choice

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 5:40


Minnesota approximately 40,000 state employees will face a choice after Labor Day: They'll either have to prove they've been vaccinated for COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing to be back in the office. Officials with Gov. Tim Walz's administration informed union leaders of the new rule on Wednesday. This is an MPR News morning update for Thursday, August 12, 2021. Hosted by Cathy Wurzer. Our theme music is by Gary Meister.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 1: Gov. Jay Inslee announces COVID-19 vaccine mandate for Washington state employees

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 31:13


3PM - Hanna Scott: Gov. Jay Inslee announces COVID-19 vaccine mandate for Washington state employees, health-care workers // Canada begins allowing vaccinated U.S. citizens to visit again // What's the Hot Endorsement Deal for 3½ Tons of College Football Players? Barbecue. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Vaccine mandates for state employees

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 37:46


Guest Host Paul Gallant What's Trending: Inslee and Durkan announce COVID vaccine mandates for state and city workers, Washington schools double down on masking this upcoming fall, Seattle schools are going to scale back the plan to offer virtual learning, and landlords continue to get screwed by the moratorium.  Fights break out in Portland between the Proud Boys and ANTIFA over a controversial pastor, and a rock gets cancelled. Canadian border reopens for Americans, yet more establishments in the PNW are requiring vaccine passports. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

VPM Daily Newscast
08/06/21 - Vaccinations Required for State Employees

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 5:43


State employees in Virginia must get vaccinated against COVID-19 by September 1st under a new directive issued by Gov. Ralph Northam; The Virginia Department of Health announced yesterday the first death of a child in the eastern region of the state due to COVID-19 complications; Democrats will fill eight judicial vacancies on the Virginia Court of Appeals in the coming days; and other local news stories.

Charlottesville Quarantine Report
Governor Northam requires state employees to get vaccinated; Albemarle to require to county offices visitors wear masks

Charlottesville Quarantine Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 15:27


Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 5, 2021: Governor Northam requires state employees to get vaccinated; Albemarle to require to county offices visitors wear masks

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 15:25


Hello and welcome to Charlottesville Community Engagement. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs, and before we get started, I wanted to remind some of you and tell some of your for the first time that this program is an offshoot of a podcast I created in March 2020 to get information out about COVID-19. Doing the Charlottesville Quarantine Report made me want to get back to journalism, and here I am a year and a half later with the 228th installment of this show and what is the 57th installment of the Charlottesville Quarantine Report. Let’s get right to it. On today’s program:Amid rising COVID cases, Governor Northam requires vaccines or weekly COVID tests for state employeesAn infectious disease expert at the University of Virginia is concerned about this flu seasonThe Blue Ridge Health District takes questions on where we are at the moment in the pandemicIn today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out: Help support black-owned business in the Charlottesville area. Check out the Charlottesville Black Business Directory at cvilleblackbiz.com and choose between a variety of goods and services, ranging from beauty supplies, professional services, and e-commerce. Visit cvilleblackbiz.com as soon as you can to get started!You know there’s something serious going on with the public health response to the surge in COVID cases when there are press conferences at the local, University of Virginia, and state level all held on the same day. We’ll get through all of those in this episode of the program dedicated solely to COVID. Let’s start with the numbers today.There are another 1,760 new cases of COVID-19 reported today by the Virginia Department of Health and the seven-day rate for positive test results is 6.8 percent. That’s up from 4.8 percent a week ago. In the Blue Ridge Health District there are another 30 cases today and the percent positivity is at 4.7 percent. Dr. Denise Bonds is the director of the Blue Ridge Health District.“We had a lovely couple of months where as vaccinations increased, our case counts went down, and unfortunately in this country we have had now had an increase of what’s called the Delta variant,” Dr. Bonds said. Dr. Bonds said the Delta variant is changing guidance from national health officials on wearing masks indoors. Locally, restrictions are beginning to go back in place. For instance, Albemarle County will require all visitors to administration buildings to wear a mask, regardless of vaccination status, beginning on Monday. Part of the reason is that even people who are fully vaccinated could potentially still carry the Delta variant as the virus load is believed to be higher. So official guidance has changed. “If you are vaccinated and know you have an exposure to someone who had a diagnosed case of COVID, the recommendations are that you get tested three to five days after that exposure and that you wear a mask when you are out in public for 14 days or until you have that negative test,” Dr. Bonds said. “That’s because we know with the Delta variant that you can become infected, have very mild or no symptoms if you’re vaccinated, but still be capable of shedding that virus to other individuals.”Dr. Bonds said she has resumed wearing a mask when she goes to the grocery store and when she goes to a weekly exercise class. The total for fully-vaccinated Virginians, including children, is 54.3 percent, up from 53.8 percent a week ago. The seven-day daily rate for vaccinations has increased to 13,031 a day, up from 11,840 a week ago. Dr. Bonds comments came at a town hall this afternoon by the Blue Ridge Health District to provide information about how to get a vaccine, how to get tested, and the latest status on vaccinations. Jason Elliott is a communications officer with the Blue Ridge Health District. (watch the Town Hall)“The math on this works out to about 61.8 percent of the Blue Ridge Health District having at least one dose and we’re sitting now at 56.5 percent of our Blue Ridge Health District being fully vaccinated,” Elliott said. The Blue Ridge Health District is offering vaccinations four days a week at a smaller location at Fashion Square Mall in daytime and evening hours. They’re also offering shots at their headquarters one day a week. Their mobile vaccination clinic is also in use from time to time for something they’re calling Shot on the Spot.“Coming up you’ll see us at Westhaven Health Day this weekend,” Elliott said. “We’ll also be at Lake Anna this weekend.”The “Mobi” van will be on the Downtown Mall this Monday. There is still an active homebound campaign underway between the health district, UVA Health, and the Charlottesville Fire Department to provide vaccinations to people who cannot leave their home.  “The added bonus to this is that we take care of everything for your first and second dose, and you get that smoke detector set up or that battery replaced if you need that as well,” Elliott said. We’ll hear more from the Blue Ridge Health District later in the program. Just before the town hall, the University of Virginia Health System held their weekly press briefing. In the near future, booster shots for COVID may be on the horizon but are not currently recommended. Will that become an annual event? Dr. Patrick Jackson, an infectious disease expert, said it is too early to tell. “With a lot of humility, we’re only known about this virus for about 19 months,” Dr. Jackson said. “There’s a lot of things still to know. HIV was discovered the year before I was born and my day job is to work on HIV virology so there’s just a ton we don’t know yet.”Dr. Jackson said it is likely that COVID will likely remain present as a respiratory pathogen that continues to circulate similar to influenza.“I think vaccination will continue to be a major emphasis for COVID-19,” Dr. Jackson said. “In terms of how often that vaccination will need to be updated, I think that’s unknown right now. There are reasons to believe that COVID-19 will mutate more slowly than influenza does so it might not be a yearly vaccine but there might be periodic updates that are recommended.”Dr. Jackson said last year there was virtually no transmission of influenza because of social distancing and this may present a problem. “Every year when the flu season comes around, you kind of rely on people having been exposed the previous year and recovered to kind of tamp down on the amount of transmission that flu can run through in a population,” Dr. Jackson said. “So I do think that in this upcoming flu season that vaccination is going to be incredibly important and we’re going to have to ramp up our efforts to vaccinate people because I think having kind of missed the last flu season is that we are kind of set up for a worst season this time around.”Dr. Jackson was asked at the press conference what he wanted Governor Northam to do to take steps for public health. “We already have a lottery in Virginia,” Jackson said. “We might as well have a vaccination lottery. I think that there’s at least some data that that helps get some people off the fence. Things the Governor can do to encourage vaccination particularly among state and local governments would be very helpful, up to and including expanding some vaccination mandates for people who are in a public facing role I think would be positive.”Dr. Jackson said it is also important that people who are sick get time off from work. “Paid time off for staff who are not feeling well to go home, recover, get tested, is super important, and supporting students who are not feeling well to continue their education, whether that is remotely,” Jackson said. “In an ideal world, and this is outside of the hands school system probably is allowing parents to take time off from work to care for their kids when they are sick rather than sending them in.”You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and it’s time now for another reader-supported announcement. The nonprofit group Resilient Virginia works to inform decision makers and officials about how to prepare for a changing world. They’re holding their annual event virtually this year, and registration prices go up at the end of this week. The Resilient Recovery Conference will take place the mornings of August 25, August 26, and August 27. Take a look at the details of the event as well as pricing at resilientvirginia.org. It has been a few months since Governor Northam held a press briefing specifically to address COVID-19. The pediatrician took to the dais today, wearing a mask, in order to give updates.“When we last spoke in early May, things were looking very good,” Northam said. “And they still are overall. This summer our case counts have dropped to the lowest we have seen since October of 2020. And we have been seeing drops in hospitalizations, deaths, and in our percent positivity.” However, the number of cases and the percent positivity have begun to increase as the number of vaccinations began to stall. That’s given the Delta variant room to spread. “The arrival of the Delta variant combined with the number of people who are not vaccinated is driving our case counts back up,” Northam said. “A large majority of the people getting infected now are unvaccinated. They haven’t gotten their shot.”Northam stressed that Virginia is still reporting lower numbers each day than at the height of the winter surge. “And I am confident we will not go back to that point,” Northam said. Northam said since January, 99 percent of COVID cases have been in people not fully vaccinated.“Even though Delta is more contagious, vaccinated people are still strongly protected against getting so sick that they have to go into the hospital,” Northam said. “Nearly every single person who has died from COVID has been unvaccinated.”Northam announced mandatory vaccinations for the 120,000 people who work for the Commonwealth of Virginia by September 1. “Anyone who chooses not to be vaccinated will have to get a COVID test every week and show proof of a negative result,” Northam said. “And I really encourage local governments and private companies to do the same thing.”Northam urged those who are hesitant to get the shot now. “The time for waiting is over,” Northam said. “Millions of people around the world have been vaccinated and we are fine. Three hundred and fifty million doses have been distributed in the United States including nearly ten million right here in Virginia.” Children under the age of 12 are still not eligible to get a vaccine, though Northam said he is hopeful approval from the Food and Drug Administration will come within the next month. Under Virginia law adopted by the General Assembly this past winter, schools are required to offer in-person instruction five days a week and they are to follow guidance from the federal Centers for Disease Control. (read the bill)“The CDC guidance is that people in schools need to be wearing masks,” Northam said. Several districts have already taken votes stating mask-wearing will be optional. Northam urged these localities to consult with their legal counsel and to reconsider.“It’s the law of the land and we expect our school districts throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia to follow the law,” Northam said. Northam stopped well short of issuing a mandate for indoor masks. The state of emergency declared on March 12, 2020 has now expired. On August 5, 2021, Northam invoked some of the messaging used back in the early days of the pandemic. “One of the things I said when all this started is that we as Americans are fighting a biological war and our enemy is the COVID-19 virus and when I served in the United States Army, one of the things that was so reassuring to me as an American was that Americans were on board with our mission. They were behind everything that we were trying to do to win this war. I would just hope that Virginians and Americans would look at this as a war and want to win that war.”So for now, just like I was doing in March 2020, I’m remaining vigilant, watching the numbers, and changing my behavior again. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Loving Liberty Radio Network
7-29-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 109:37


Hour 1 * Guest: Curt Crosby – Discussion of All Things Liberty – LocalHoneyMan.com. * Thomas Patrick Connally Jr. has been arrested for allegedly sending emails threatening White House chief medical advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci and his family, according to a criminal complaint. * CNN anchor Don Lemon defended Fox News host Tucker Carlson after he was publicly confronted in a Montana fly fishing shop on Saturday. “Let me tell you this: I don't like it. I don't like it when people do that because I would not want it to happen to me,” Lemon said. * Google Announces Vaccine Mandate for Workers. * New York Offers $100 Incentive for Vaccinations. * Fraudulent PCR Tests EXPOSED! CDC Quietly Withdraws Emergency Use Authorization Due to Inability to Differentiate COVID-19 & Influenza. * The CDC will withdraw current PCR tests and recommends method that can *differentiate* between SARS-CoV-2 and influenza. This might make it even clearer as to how the flu just disappeared at precisely the same point that another respiratory virus emerged with a similar death rate. * CDC Director Suggests Vaccine Passports Could be the Way Forward for America. * NY Gov. Cuomo Announces COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for State Employees. * CDC: Studies Propelling Shift in Mask Guidance Not Available! * Alarm sounded: COVID-shot mandates pose risk to millions – ‘Serious side effects have been identified … and may cause death' – Bob Unruh, WND.com – The comments come from Dr. Paul Kempen, M.D., who leads the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. Hour 2 * Biden to demand that federal workers get vaxxed? * Mike Lindell is offering $5 million to anyone who can disprove his allegations of voter fraud — if they show up to his cyber symposium. * Cyber Ninjas says it has received $5.7 million in private donations to fund the Arizona ballot audit. * MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says Fox News is ignoring his ‘cyber symposium' – so he's planning to buy more ads on the network to promote it. * Mike Lindell promises his “cyber symposium” will be bigger than Elvis' 1973 Hawaii concert. * Mike Lindell predicts Biden, Harris may resign after he discloses new evidence of election tampering. * Mike Lindell Confirms He Has No Understanding Of US Constitution. * ‘My Pillow Guy' Mike Lindell teams up with Alex Jones' on ‘Infowars'. * Sidney Powell to Assist Jan. 6 Prisoners as Inmate Letter Sheds Light on Jail Conditions! * Lin Wood, pro-Trump lawyer, risks being disciplined for sharing court hearing video on Telegram – Lin Wood tells judge he can't be sanctioned because he never ‘broadcast' video against court rules – Detroit Free Press. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Liberty Roundtable Podcast
Radio Show Hour 1 – 07/29/2021

Liberty Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 54:49


* Guest: Curt Crosby - Discussion of All Things Liberty - LocalHoneyMan.com. * Thomas Patrick Connally Jr. has been arrested for allegedly sending emails threatening White House chief medical advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci and his family, according to a criminal complaint. * CNN anchor Don Lemon defended Fox News host Tucker Carlson after he was publicly confronted in a Montana fly fishing shop on Saturday. "Let me tell you this: I don't like it. I don't like it when people do that because I would not want it to happen to me," Lemon said. * Google Announces Vaccine Mandate for Workers. * New York Offers $100 Incentive for Vaccinations. * Fraudulent PCR Tests EXPOSED! CDC Quietly Withdraws Emergency Use Authorization Due to Inability to Differentiate COVID-19 & Influenza. * The CDC will withdraw current PCR tests and recommends method that can *differentiate* between SARS-CoV-2 and influenza. This might make it even clearer as to how the flu just disappeared at precisely the same point that another respiratory virus emerged with a similar death rate. * CDC Director Suggests Vaccine Passports Could be the Way Forward for America. * NY Gov. Cuomo Announces COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for State Employees. * CDC: Studies Propelling Shift in Mask Guidance Not Available! * Alarm sounded: COVID-shot mandates pose risk to millions - 'Serious side effects have been identified ... and may cause death' - Bob Unruh, WND.com - The comments come from Dr. Paul Kempen, M.D., who leads the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons.

880 Extras
Cuomo: NY will mandate that all state employees get vaccinated or tested regularly

880 Extras

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 1:45


Peter Haskell reports. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Governor Cuomo Mandates Vaccinations for All Patient-Facing State Employees; Crime Is Down; A Member of the Extended WINS Family Has Won Quite the Reward

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 6:58


The All Local, 7/28/21 4pm Update  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED's The California Report
California to Require State Employees, Health Care Workers to Show Proof of Vaccination

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 11:37


In an order from Governor Gavin Newsom, state and health care workers will no longer be able to self attest that they've been vaccinated. Those who do not show proof of vaccination will be tested regularly for COVID-19 and have to wear a mask in the workplace. Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED Five people are dead following a long standoff at a home in Wasco. Three people inside the home, believed to be the gunman's sons and their mom were killed along with a Kern County Sheriff's Deputy. Reporter: Soreath Hok, Valley Public Radio As wildfires rage across much of Northern California, it's a stark reminder that once they are contained, many families will have lost their homes. And the challenge to rebuild can take years, if thoe families stick it out. Reporter: Caleigh Wells, KCRW

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Illinois may require mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for all state employees

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 2:45


In the top news on WBBM Newsradio now, Chicago police are investigating a shooting and possible attempted robbery that happened late Monday night, the Chicago Board of Education is set to consider renewing Aramark's school cleaning contract despite a plan to get rid of the company; and more stories.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBBM Newsradio's 8:30AM News To Go
Illinois may require mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for all state employees

WBBM Newsradio's 8:30AM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 2:45


In the top news on WBBM Newsradio now, Chicago police are investigating a shooting and possible attempted robbery that happened late Monday night, the Chicago Board of Education is set to consider renewing Aramark's school cleaning contract despite a plan to get rid of the company; and more stories.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBBM All Local
Illinois may require mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for all state employees

WBBM All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 2:45


In the top news on WBBM Newsradio now, Chicago police are investigating a shooting and possible attempted robbery that happened late Monday night, the Chicago Board of Education is set to consider renewing Aramark's school cleaning contract despite a plan to get rid of the company; and more stories.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today in San Diego
New Rules for Health Care Workers, International Travel Ban, "Sexist" Uniforms

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 4:20


Governor Newsom Outlines New Rules for Health Care Workers and State Employees, Tracking New COVID-19 Cases Across San Diego, Sheena Says the Rain is Gone for Now, Protesting "Sexist" UniformsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The LA Report
The P.M. Edition: Newsome Blames Unvaccinated, Requires State Employees Vaccinated; Garcetti Says Get Vaccinated or Risk Dying; Hospitals Filling Up With The Unvaccinated; Monsoonal Rains Hit The Southland;

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 5:18


What's happening today: California, Kaiser, New York City and Veteran Administration Employees Be Vaccinated or Test Weekly; Garcetti Says Get Vaccinated or Risk Dying; Hospitals Filling Up With The Unvaccinated; Monsoonal Rains Hit The Southland; Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: California orders its state employees to get vaccinated or regularly tested for COVID -- More carrots or more sticks for vaccine holdouts? -- A snow leopard down with COVID -- What was that liquid falling from the LA sky today?

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 46:35


The tipping point seems to have arrived in this country when it comes to living with a large segment of the population that either has not yet been vaccinated against COVID-19 or is refusing to: the state of California has just ordered all state workers to either get vaccinated or submit to regular, routine COVID tests. This comes after 55 health associations have called for making COVID vaccines mandatory for every healthcare worker in the country. So we'll go In Depth on the growing vaccine mandates, with the likes of Congresswoman Maxine Waters and LA County Supervisor Holly Mitchell. The Delta variant isn't only running wild in human beings: there's news this weekend out of the San Diego Zoo that a snow leopard there has tested positive for COVID, we'll get more details on that. And add this to the growing list of pandemic-induced shortages: there's a jet fuel shortage at several airports in the Western United States, but it's not that there isn't enough fuel available--it's a lack of trucks and drivers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Lead with Jake Tapper
V.A. heath care workers, New York City & California state employees all now facing vaccine mandates; Trump ally Tom Barrack pleads not guilty to charges of illegal foreign lobbying and making false statements; Infrastructure deal on shaky ground as bl

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 36:42


Biden administration will mandate vaccines for all V.A. heath care workers; Trump ally Tom Barrack ordered to wear GPS tracking bracelet, travel restricted, can't transfer funds overseas; Hose committee prepares for first capitol riot hearing; One-on-one with Jan 6 committee member Rep. Schiff; Feud intensifies between McCarthy, Pelosi ahead of Jan 6 hearing; China warns U.S. to “stop playing with fire”; U.S. general warns of more airstrikes targeting the Taliban; Record civilian casualties in Afghanistan as U.S. withdraws; Typhoon looms off Japan, suffers totally cool with it; CNN gets rare access to U.S. surfing team as it makes history; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
7/14 3-1 Highest Paid State Employees

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 21:11


Coaches. It's mostly coaches.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Capitol Insider from KGOU
Capitol Insider: New Laws Benefit State Employees

Capitol Insider from KGOU

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 5:30


Among the bills going into effect July 1 are two intended to help state employees. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn discuss the new laws and how another law is affecting state schools, colleges and universities in Capitol Insider.

Convo with Friendz
$250 DATE!!!

Convo with Friendz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 82:56


Hey, Friendz Hey!!!! We have a very hilarious yet serious show for you today. We are talking about everything from Atlanta kid abused on Instagram Live for Being gay to Trick Daddy talked about Beyonce and Jay-Z. For The Letter this week, a Friendz asked Do you think they should break their vows (for not having sex) to God to keep this man? If you want your letter read on-air e-mail us: convowithfriendspodcast@gmail.com. WackASS of this week goes to Gov. Brian Kemp for not letting State Employees receive pay for Juneteenth even though it is now a national holiday. Friendz we know you will enjoy this week's episode. Especially, with all the sidebar conversations we were having. So as always make sure you have your headphones ready because we are talking about it all!!!!   Guest: Laron Majors   To Donate to the podcast: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=PHJ8ECDXWD4EA   Signup for our Weekly Newsletter: https://convowithfriendzpodcast.com/   The Business of the Week: OFBGS (ONLY FOR BIG GIRLS)   Website: https://www.ofbgs.com/

Retire With Ryan
2 Upcoming Changes For CT State Employees Pensions #50

Retire With Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 13:10


What is your plan for retirement? Are you relying on a pension plan? What about auxiliary investment accounts? How does Medicare and Medicaid factor into your plans for the next stage of life? Don't let these questions go unanswered for too long! Join me on this episode as we jump into some upcoming changes regarding the state of Connecticut and how their pensions work for state employees. You'll want to pay close attention if you or someone you love is impacted by the changes in Connecticut. This particular question came to me from one of our listeners - if you have questions that you'd like to hear answered, make sure to reach out and leave a comment!  You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Understanding upcoming changes for CT State Employees Pensions [1:00]  Setting your budget for retirement. [4:00] How your health insurance premiums are changing [8:00]  Are you eligible to retire? [10:00]  Closing thought [12:00]  Retire before CT Pension changes take effect?  What is going on with the changes to the state of Connecticut's pension plan for state employees? Should you retire ASAP or is it still beneficial to wait? To give you a little bit of context, here is the main issue.  An agreement made in 2017 with the State Employees Bargaining Agent Coalition (SEBAC) included many changes to state employee retirement benefits. Some of the changes specifically affect benefits for those who retire on or after July 1, 2022, and could encourage many to retire before then. The biggest change is eliminating the minimum annual cost of living adjustment (COLA) for pension benefits and delaying a retiree's first COLA until 30 months after retirement. The agreement also changed the health insurance premium share for retirees who are not covered by Medicare. According to the Office of the State Comptroller, as of November 19, 2020, there were 13,066 state employees (full- and part-time) who are eligible for normal or early retirement before July 1, 2022. In the past, similar changes to retirement benefits have led to a surge in  retirements before the changes became effective. If this pattern reoccurs at a similar rate, the state can expect over 20% of eligible employees to retire between July 2021 and July 2022. I know that this is a lot of information to think about and unpack - listen to this episode as I expand on this topic and so much more. Also - don't miss the helpful links in the resources section!  Resources Mentioned on This Episode Consumer Price Index (CPI-W) - Social Security Properly Estimating Retirement Cash Flow #36 A Retirement Income Planning Strategy That Works, Ep #2 www.osc.ct.gov/empret/ Connect With Morrissey Wealth Management  www.MorrisseyWealthManagement.com/contact

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 3: State employees have to take a racism poll

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 35:35


BIG LEAD at 2: Dori and Nicole couldn't be part of a firing squad, the military gets woke, WA state employees had to take a woker "equity" poll // MORE BIG LEAD: Gay cops not permitted at Cap Hill pride event, white people have to pay a reparations fee to get in to Seattle pride // GUEST: Trooper Rick Johnson breaks news on a new arrest See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hacks & Wonks
Meet Senator (and KC Exec Candidate) Joe Nguyen, Again

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 39:30


Today on the show Crystal is joined again by Senator Joe Nguyen, this time to talk about his decision to run for King County Executive. They discuss why he chose to take on one of the longest serving public officials in the area, combating climate change through a lense of equality and equity, why Senator Nguyen believes the people of King County are ready for change, and so much more. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's guest, Senator Joe Nguyen, at @meetjoenguyen. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Understanding the King County Budget” from King County: https://kingcounty.gov/council/budget/archive/2019_2020_budget/budget_basics.aspx “What would it cost to house and provide treatment for Seattle's homeless?” by Scott Greenstone: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/what-is-the-cost-to-house-and-provide-treatment-for-seattles-homeless/ “Supporting homeless individuals: How much do we spend?” by Manola Secaira: https://crosscut.com/2018/08/supporting-homeless-individuals-how-much-do-we-spend#:~:text=Seattle%20set%20aside%20%2454%20million,was%20more%20than%20%241%20billion. “Seattle taxes ranked most unfair in Washington – a state among the harshest on the poor nationwide” by Gene Balk: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/data/seattle-taxes-ranked-most-unfair-in-washington-a-state-among-the-harshest-on-the-poor-nationwide/ “County Exec Candidates Spar Over PACs, City Finally Funds Street Sinks” from Publicola: https://publicola.com/2021/05/25/county-exec-candidates-spar-over-pacs-city-finally-funds-street-sinks/ “A guide to political money: campaigns, PACs, and super PACs” by Philip Elliot: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/politics/a-guide-to-political-money-campaigns-pacs-super-pacs “Democracy vouchers: They worked, now here are five ways to make them better” by Joe Nguyen: https://southseattleemerald.com/2017/11/20/democracy-vouchers-they-worked-now-here-are-five-ways-to-make-them-better/ “Washington high court charts less punitive path on juvenile justice” by Claudia Rowe: https://crosscut.com/opinion/2021/04/washington-high-court-charts-less-punitive-path-juvenile-justice “In Seattle's polluted valley, pandemic and particulates are twin threats” by John Ryan: https://www.kuow.org/stories/duwamish-valley-faces-pollution-and-pandemic “The Case for Making Transit Free (and How to Pay for It)” by David Gordon: https://www.theurbanist.org/2018/12/27/the-case-for-making-transit-free-and-how-to-pay-for-it/   Transcript Crystal Fincher: [00:00:00] Welcome to Hacks and Wonks. I'm your host Crystal Fincher. On this show we talk to political hacks and policy wonks to gather insight in the local politics and policy through the lens of those doing the work, and provide behind the scenes perspectives on politics in our state. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're happy to welcome back someone who's been on the show before, but not in his current capacity as a candidate for King County Executive. Thank you for joining us today, Joe Nguyen. Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:01:02] Thank you so much for having me. I'm very glad to be back. Crystal Fincher: [00:01:06] Yes. So, we've had conversations with you as a senator during the legislative session. We've talked about a lot that you were working on and that you had accomplished in that capacity. But now, you're running against Dow Constantine who has been a King County Executive establishment, basically. He's been there 12 years? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:01:24] Yeah. Crystal Fincher: [00:01:24] It's been a long time and a lot of people have looked at him as, "Oh, he's just there. He's not going to be challenged. He's a Democrat. King County elects Democrats. So, here we go." Then, you walked in, they're like, "Not so fast." What made you decide to challenge Dow Constantine, especially as another Democrat? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:01:43] Yeah, I think really in this moment, when you're trying to get past the pandemic, not just of COVID but also racial inequities, we are seeing how much success we can have when you have legislators who have lived experience, who are fighting with the fierce urgency to get things done. Really, the success in the legislature this past year was part of that inspiration. Seeing so much can be accomplished, say for instance, on progressive revenue, on police accountability, on climate, basic needs programs, childcare. All these things were possible before yet they weren't getting done. A lot of it is because the community now is being uplifted and amplified. So, for me, all of the legislation that we're passing at the State then has to be implemented at the local level as well. It's nothing against the current incumbent. I just feel that in this moment we need change and we need somebody who reflects the values of this community in the future, what King County looks like. Of all the things that we care about, in our campaign, whether it's police accountability, climate, transit, those all happen at the county level. I think that we are at a very, very unique moment to get a lot of stuff done. Crystal Fincher: [00:02:49] All right. So, you say nothing against the current incumbent, but as you said, in your opinion, a lot needs to change. You've certainly not hesitated to be spicy on Twitter in clapping back to some things that he said. So, I guess, what do you think does need to change and where do you think that Dow has not met the mark? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:03:09] Well, systems of power tend to reflect the people who create them. That's just how it works. It's so much that it's baked into our system. When you go look for a job, what do people tell you? It's not what you know, it's who you know, right? That is baked into our system. It is very hard to get systemic change when the people who are in power benefit from that system. There are just some key differences in which I would behave versus say, for instance, the incumbent. One of the examples is that in White Center, they were going to site a COVID facility, which I supported and said it was fine. I did say, "Hey, you should probably give folks a heads up because if you don't, there's going to be a lot of distrust and it's going to become a contentious issue." They didn't, and there's a history of this type of behavior where you're not having enough conversations at the local level. So, for me, I think what community has always done in the past is fight to make sure that their issue was being heard. But I want to be able to flip that. I want to be able to have community members have their voices be uplifted and amplified instead. I think that's truly transformative. So, I think it's just a mindset of how we would lead. Mine would be much more community focused and rooted in the folks who were impacted by policy and less top-down. Crystal Fincher: [00:04:24] All right. Well, Dow Constantine has certainly talked a lot about addressing homelessness, about leading a regional effort to address that and has a task force, or I forget the exact word of it. Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:04:39] The Regional Authority. Crystal Fincher: [00:04:39] Yes, to address that and recently made a hire for someone to lead that. How do you think that's going? Do you think that he's on the right track or would you do things differently? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:04:51] I will say that we've declared an emergency on homelessness over six years ago. In fact, it had been an emergency for even longer. I remember when I was in college back in 2006 and we had kicked off the ten-year plan to end homelessness. So, in King County we've talked about ending homelessness for decades, literally decades, and things don't seemed to be getting better. So, to be honest he's had 12 years as an incumbent to solve the issue. I'm not sure if four years he's going to be able to change it if he couldn't do it in 12. I think we just need leadership that looks at it a little bit different. What I will say is that the reason why in the legislature I tackled anti-poverty efforts as one of the key focus has been because you have to solve the systemic issues as they relate to homelessness, in addition to the short-term as well. If you don't turn off the spigot of folks who are becoming homeless, it becomes very difficult to alleviate it on the ground level. So, it's a multi-jurisdictional approach and it's completely true that it should be a regional approach. I'm very excited about that model. I was able to meet Marc Dones at a housing conference years ago before I was even in the legislature and was so impressed by them. So, I think that leadership is going to be a fantastic one, but it's not just King County as well. It has to be the state and it has to be the federal government. So, the King County Executive is in charge of a $12 billion budget. King County itself is the 12th largest county in the United States. It is bigger than 14 states. So, that position is more than just a county executive. It can be a bully pulpit to actually help influence policies at the state and the federal level as well. I think we need to be doing more in terms of alleviating homelessness, because it's cheaper to keep somebody housed than it is to take them out of homelessness. That's a lot of what the work we've been doing at the legislature, that in conjunction with the regional plan, I think, is the right move. But we can't look at it from a very myopic way. I'm glad that we're buying hotels. That's not going to be sufficient to alleviate homelessness. We need to be doing more in basic needs investments as well. So, the fact that we spend 73% of the County General Fund, 73% of the County General Fund goes towards law enforcement and the court system, not antipoverty, not human services. We have to fundamentally shift how we address problems. Crystal Fincher: [00:07:04] So, you say addressing basic needs, you say that we need to certainly house people and that's cheaper than allowing them to languish unhoused and all of the problems at cascade because of that, what specifically is involved with basic needs, and when you say we need to house people, specifically how? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:07:23] Yeah. So, let's think long-term. So, we'll start longterm and we'll go more short term as well. So, my family, when we were growing up, we benefited from being on what's called TANF, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. Locally, I think folks call it welfare in a derogatory term. So, when I grew up, we relied on that service. I think it was about a few hundred dollars a month. That was the key that kept us in our homes. We also grew up in public housing, so social housing as well. So, in my mind there's a few things that we can be doing. We can be doing more for housing as it relates to those on the margins. We've moved away from that social housing. We moved more towards what's called affordable housing. Oftentimes the calculations for affordable isn't truly affordable for those who make very little, like my family did back in the day. So, we have a lot of civic land, surplus lands that we can then use to build, I think, more social housing for those who need it the most. We also need to improve our stock of affordable housing as well. That's going to require public-private partnerships, which we're seeing happen now with the private sector, providing lower cost loans and whatnot. We can help certainly with permitting. We can help certainly with planning as well. By the way, we could also use what's called cross-laminated timber in order for us to be more mindful of climate, in addition to having it be done near transit centers. So, we need more housing. We need more social housing to keep those on the margins most impacted by the housing insecurity as well. So, those are investments we've been making at the State. We've then also tried to tackle a regressive tax structure. I think the root cause to a lot of these issues is the inequities in our tax structure, which has been done on purpose, in my mind, to keep certain people out of our economic system. Because of that, it's exacerbated over time. So, the fact that we funded the Working Families Tax Credit for the first time after it was passed 12 years ago, and by the way includes ITIN filers as well. So, those who don't have Social Security numbers. I think that's all part of it, is that if you look at those types of investments over the longterm, that's how you keep people stable. That's how you keep people housed. Then, even for cap gains, that money goes towards more affordable childcare. That money goes towards a more equitable tax structure, and that money goes towards investments in infrastructure as well. So, we can do all of these things at the state level, but we require implementation at the county and local level. For a long time, it's been the missing middle -- candidly. I think Seattle gets a lot of attention. The legislature gets a lot of attention. Folks aren't quite sure what the county does. I think Girmay [Zahilay] really put the county on the map in recent years as well. So, I think people are now paying attention to how that impacts their daily lives. That's why we need leadership at that level who reflects the future of what we can be doing, not just what we've been doing in the past. Crystal Fincher: [00:10:17] So, you talk about reflecting what we can be doing, not just what we've been doing in the past. That's going to take strong leadership, certainly to move in a more progressive direction to do things differently than you've done before. You come from a legislative body, in the legislature and it's one person in the midst of several coming together to make decision. But the ultimate blame, if something goes wrong, usually doesn't land on one person. The ultimate credit usually doesn't go to one person because you're acting in concert. King County Executive is very different, similar to the mayor at the end of the day, people are looking to you to get things done. So, how do you think you're uniquely qualified, especially coming from a different kind of background in the legislature to take on the task of running everything at the county? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:11:03] Yeah. Thank you for that question. What's interesting is both people know me because of my work in the legislature, because we've been very active over the past few years. If you look at my body of work even beforehand -- so, I actually have a finance and economics background out of college. I used to manage a portfolio of about $150 million. I was a senior strategist for the CFO of Expedia. I've been in leadership positions at startup companies. I've managed hundreds of millions of dollars. I've managed teams that were in the hundreds as well. Then, now, I'm at Microsoft doing strategy and analytics. So, my whole background is actually more robust than most people who've run for executive office in the first place. So, if you look at most folks, it's lawyer, public office, and then ran for executive office. They've never actually had executive experience before they ran for office. So, the fact that I already have significant executive experience, I also have a tremendous amount of success in the public sector. Most importantly, the lived experience of people who've been impacted by bad policy, I think that makes me uniquely qualified to serve as King County Executive, is because we have that ability to look at things different. What's funny is that there's been news articles written about how we've managed our office in the legislature, of how it was different. I don't think people realize it, but the bar, apparently, the bar is not super high. One of the news articles that people wrote was the fact that I use an app to schedule my meetings. I don't know if you saw this, but in the legislature, when I first came in, I just looked at it and said, "Hey, this doesn't make any sense." So, I documented every single step to pass legislation, there's about 153. I noticed that a third of the times a bill dies. But then, I also noticed there was a tremendous amount of effort spent in the wrong places. So, the most important thing that you have in the legislature is your team, your staff. I want to make sure that we are able to free them up to do good work as much as possible, and that a lot of our staff members were, in fact, just spending time in emails and then scheduling meetings. By having an app, we were able to save about six hours a day per day. So, by doing that, it freed them up. That's how we're able to be more effective in terms of communicating with constituents, getting more in-depth with policy. It just blew people's minds. I had people coming to my office just to take a look at how we were doing things. It was just how you would normally do it if you were just running a small business. You have to be more efficient just because you have limited capacity, limited resources to try and be effective. So, it's interesting seeing that translate into the public sector, how successful that can be. I think we could do it more at the county as well, but also just in general is being able to bring 21st century techniques and tools to a body that is not necessarily known for being as agile as it can be. Crystal Fincher: [00:13:42] All right. So, we could expect to see different, newer, updated, "today" type things from Joe Nguyen. You talked about doing things differently. Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:13:50] Yeah. Crystal Fincher: [00:13:51] There was a conversation in a recent forum where you talked about doing things differently, including not taking money from PACs. You said that you're committing to not taking money from corporate PACs, that you've never taken money from corporate PACs. Dow Constantine said, "Now hold up. It looks like you have taken money from several PACs, from the Washington Beer and Wine Distributors Association, from Federation of State Employees. A number of them, from labor union PACs, to housing PACs, to you name it, building trades. So, one, there have been PACs and there are others, just different associations. You've taken money from them. You've taken money from the State Dental PAC. How is that different than saying that you're taking money from a corporate PAC? Is that really a fair bar, if there is little differentiation between what type of PAC, who is the PAC? It seems like it might be splitting hairs a little bit. How do you answer that? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:14:57] Well, no. Actually, I do think it's very different. So, corporate PACs serve a special interest for a particular organization in a particular company. If you look at the money in politics, that's oftentimes the problem, is that people are trying to buy their way into access. I will point out that all those things came in after I had won. So, I won before any of those things came in. So, I'll just be very clear. What's funny is that even when I saw some of those associations, I wasn't sure how that should be classified. I asked some of our more progressive congressional leaders and progressive members as well. That was a differentiation, where it is okay to get money from people, but not necessarily the corporations themselves or the PACs associated with it. So, first off, if there is a distinction between the two, which I think that there is, I'd be happy to have the incumbent just do the same thing that I'm doing. So, give back all the corporate PAC money, give back all the money from corporations and that's totally fine. But because -- the reason why they're different is because they serve different interests. The reason why I support labor communities and the reason why I'm okay with taking funding from labor communities is because they serve the people. So, as long as it's focused on the people in the community, it's fine. If it's more to be in self-service to themselves, that's a very different type of story as well. But the incumbent has been around for a long time. I noticed that he did give back money from oil and gas companies and pharmaceutical companies as well. So, obviously there is some sort of difference in terms of where money comes from. We've just never taken it in the past. Even in this race, we don't take any corporate PACs. We don't even take any money from associations. It's been 100% individuals as well. So, I don't know. If it seems like splitting hairs then that's fine. They can do the exact same thing we're doing, give back all the money you've ever received from corporations and their PACs and only do associations and labor unions. But I do think that they're very different. Crystal Fincher: [00:16:47] So, do you consider something like the Washington Beer and Wine Distributors Association? By the way, lots of people enjoy, love beer and wine distributors. I certainly partake, so no shade to the organization, just in this conversation. An organization like that, which is a business lobby, really, and they're acting on behalf of their business members. Do you consider that to be something like a corporate PAC, where it's not a union, it's not something else, or do you just put that in a different category? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:17:21] I think it's an association of people. So, as long as you're not taking from a specific business or a specific corporation, but I concede -- that is a very fair point. I've actually had some conversations with even one of our current and state-wide elected officials about their bar, because he probably has the most streak in terms of what type of money he gets. What I will say is that I have had people and their corporations try to give me stacks of checks before they realize that I didn't take corporate PAC money. They do that on purpose because they want to buy your influence. So, it's not as if it's an accident. So, I'm okay with associations. If folks want to raise the bar and take no money from any associations or any PACs, let's have that conversation because I do believe that money corrupts politics, and that's fundamentally one of the problems. In that point, I would actually support democracy vouchers for King County as well. I think we should have that -- Crystal Fincher: [00:18:13] that's not a bad idea. It's a pretty good idea. Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:18:15] It's a good idea. You know what's funny? Is when Seattle Democracy Voucher first came out, I was skeptical at first. Then, my background is in analytics. So, after the first election where the mayoral race didn't have access to Democracy Vouchers but the council races did, it was a perfect case study to see the impacts of Democracy Vouchers. I published an article in the South Seattle Emerald that showed that by having Democracy Vouchers you level the playing field, you have a more diverse candidate pool. You have a more diverse donation pool. You have younger people, people of color involved in politics that they had not been before. Then, by the way, you also included a lot of -- oftentimes you'll have outside influences on politics within Seattle. So, the percentage of money from outside Seattle versus inside was a lot less for Democracy Vouchers too. So, I think it's a great investment towards making our free and fair elections better, but no, that's a great conversation to have. I think we should have it. So, I don't take corporate money. I don't take money from corporations and their PACs. There is certainly a nuance in terms of what associations might count. But if we want to have that conversation, let's just not take any money from corporations or the PACs and let's have the discussion about associations and we can go from there. Crystal Fincher: [00:19:25] That makes sense. Now, talking about keeping the public safe, which includes policing, in today's conversation. Especially at the county, the issue of the youth jail has certainly been big and visible with people saying, "Why, if we're saying that we want to move in a direction, are we building a jail for kids?" A lot of strong opposition to that. Now, there's also a new opportunity with appointing a new sheriff, where we're moving away from electing the sheriff. King County very strongly said, "Hey, we want to do things differently." Actually, lots of people talk about this conversation about public safety and, "Hey, this is just a Seattle thing." But voters countywide said, "You know what? We know that we need to move in a different direction. This is where we want to go." They voted for some substantial change within the county. So, in terms of what a Nguyen administration would look like, how would that be different than what the Constantine administration has looked like? What are your specific plans in terms of the King County Sheriff, the department, and incarceration across the county? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:20:43] Yeah. No, I agree. Like I mentioned before, 73% of the County General Fund goes towards our legal system. So, instead of trying to solve for the root causes of crime, which is oftentimes poverty, we just went ahead and criminalized it. That fundamentally is the problem. So, there's a few different aspects that I would tackle. So, first off, as it relates to the youth jail. So, the church where I grew up happened to be next to the youth jail, the area where we lined up in the morning on Sundays, you can see the cells from where were lined up. I remember a lot of the youth pastors at that point said, "Hey, if you're bad, you're going to end up there." Such a gross feeling for me just because whenever I look into those cells I saw kids that looked like me, and I just never liked that spot in the first place. That's why I'm so viscerally against it. In fact, one of my first bills, literally my first bill that passed on the Senate floor was a bill that would allow for law enforcement to refer youth to community facilities instead of having to go to the legal system as a whole. So, we've been working on this for the past few years. The difference is I would have listened to community members. Community members said, there were better ways than youth incarceration, there were better ways in building a bigger jail. Smaller therapeutic community-based organizations can help mitigate and lower the rates of youth detention. They were right. They built the jail anyway. Now, after it was built, they say, "Oh, it turns out you were right. We shouldn't have built it in the first place and then shut it down." That blows my mind. Imagine if you were able to spend $240 million on diversion and youth programs versus a jail. Imagine what better spot we would be in right now. So, the difference from a high level is that I would have listened to community members. I would have listened to the science and looked at the results and then make a decision based off of that. That's the first one. There are statutory requirements to have some sort of facility in order to maintain a process, but it didn't have to be a big jail. It could've been smaller therapeutic center as well. So, I'll put that one out there. There are a whole host of things that we can do. Everything from risk-based assessments, because the first thing that people are going to say is, "Well, there are going to be kids who are really, really bad and you don't know what to do with them." Well, first off, the number of kids who are in that category is very small. So, if all you have is a hammer, everything is going to look like a nail. So, we have to get away from that mindset and be able to actually address the root causes of some of these things. You can have what's called respite centers, where you have behavioral and mental health services onsite to help calm things down. So, certainly you can be able to have a facility to handle the most dire needs because we already spend so much money on that legal system. But for the majority of people, it should be more therapeutic, more humane, more community-based, that'd be the first one. In fact, they are doing it now. Choose 180, Credible Messengers, there are programs that are out there doing it right now because they were doing it before, we knew that they existed before. So, you would double down on some of those efforts. In terms of the Sheriff's office specifically, I thought that was a great move to make it an appointed process. Especially as a person who is currently running for office, I do know that running for office, the people that we elect aren't always the best people. It's just the people that were able to get elected. So, I think it's better to have a more thoughtful approach to something that is that important. The mindset that somebody in that position should have is a guardian. We need to change the culture of how we handle policing in King County. That person has to be a guardian and not necessarily a warrior in this space. So, we will look for somebody and it'll be based off of community input as well. So, oftentimes when we see leadership, a leader makes a decision, tells the community, and then thinks that counts as community engagement. I see it all the time. You've probably seen it all the time. That's not how it should be. They should be part of the process. Being able to have the discussions as we go along. One of the things that I would look for is how forward-thinking they are in terms of what the role of law enforcement should be because there's a lot of things that law enforcement is in charge of right now that I don't think you need somebody with a gun to be able to handle. One of the last bills or the last bill that I dropped before the session was over related to what's called pre-textual stops. Things like broken tail lights, expire tabs, something dangling from your rear view mirror. These are the things that do not pose a risk to somebody, but oftentimes half of the incidences where there's violence with law enforcement are because of what's called pre-textual stops. I think that should be removed from a uniformed officer that has a weapon. They could cite the person simply with the license plate. You can have a completely different department. Same thing with behavioral and mental health responses and stuff like that, where we should rethink the rule of policing in King County, because it would make it safer for the community. It also makes it safer for law enforcement as well. We have examples of how this has done well in other jurisdictions, whether it's one of the [Scandinavian] countries that are out there, but we're not reinventing the wheel. There are other examples of ways to do it better. Crystal Fincher: [00:25:45] So, in terms of what people can see with King County Sheriffs and their communities throughout the county, those cities that have arrangements and agreements and contracts with the King County Sheriffs -- Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:25:59] Contracts, yeah. Crystal Fincher: [00:25:59] -- they hopefully, in your administration, you're saying, can expect to see less of the stops you just described. Are there other differences that you think they will be able to see after you take office? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:26:14] Yeah. You know what's funny, is I used to be in the Office of Law Enforcement Oversight. After a young man named Tommy Le was shot in Burien, I really wanted to get more involved to understand the systemic issues that caused that dynamic to happen. Instead of having a knee jerk reaction, met with his family, helped organize a forum, actually met with the Sheriff's office as well. My background is actually in strategy and analytics. So, I downloaded 10 years of data for law enforcement in King County, specifically for every single contract city as well, just to understand the trends of what was happening. So, this is a particular point of interest for me in terms of how they should be handled. Each contract is different depending on the jurisdictions that they're in, and that's how they actually fund the King County Sheriff's Office, is through these contracts. I would offer a variety of services that are different. So, what I will point out is the City of Sammamish, I'm not sure if they still do it or not, but part of their contracts, they have apparently a lot of snowbirds where law enforcement will come and just check in on their homes to make sure it's fine. So, it is possible to have other functions for these officers when they're out on patrol, and making sure that people are safe in a different way, but it would look a lot different. I think it would look a lot different than what we're currently doing now. It's going to be based more on programs that we know already work. So, a lot of the incidences where it's behavioral and mental health, you can have more of a Medic One type response, where you would send a professional, a mental health or behavioral health professional people to get some help. What's interesting is that Washington State, we used to be 50 out of 50 when it came to funding for behavioral and mental health. Over the past few years, based on the investments that we made, we're now 26 out of 50. Again, a lot of those things have to be implemented at the county level. So, layering on more services, removing things that aren't necessarily required for somebody that has a weapon, being able to have a variety of services that are layered on top of the basic needs programs that we have right now, it would be a lot different in that we can rethink the paradigm of what policing looks like in King County. Like I said, it's bigger than 14 states. It's the 12th largest county in the entire nation. I think we can be a beacon in terms of what the future policing could look like in Washington State and across the country as well. Crystal Fincher: [00:28:23] Absolutely. Looking at how we take care of our people and their health, air pollution is certainly a big issue that literally affects life expectancy, child health, hospitalizations, and disabilities. Looking at water pollution, certainly, addressing those issues, in addition to greenhouse gas emissions and the increasingly dire and impending consequences of not taking more action sooner, what will you do as King County Executive to address those issues? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:29:00] Yeah. I think climate change should be the lens in which we look at the issues facing our county as well. What's interesting is, so I grew up in Burien as well. So, born in White Center, grew up in Burien, it's nearby the airport. Sorry, I have a lot of stories, but everything you say triggers a memory when I was a kid. I had asthma growing up because I was next to the highway and I had no idea that that was a thing. That if you were lower income you oftentimes live in areas that were more polluted. I just didn't know. So, we grew up next to the highway. I had asthma. I didn't realize a lot of other kids had asthma as well, but one of the most visceral memories that I had growing up before my father was in his car accident was that he would take us down to the Duwamish and he would go fishing or go crabbing. I remember one day, one of the strangers was walking by and said, "Hey, you don't want to eat that stuff because the water is polluted." He's a fishermen from Vietnam, so that's how you get sustenance. So, being told that the water is so poisoned you can't eat the food from it, was a very memorable moment for me in the sense of like, "Oh, wow, this stuff is impacting us right now." I was like six at that time. So, I think it impacts our daily lives. We have to look at it from a lens of how does our behavior as human beings impact climate change. So, before we were talking about the need for more affordable housing, I think there was a stat that said we needed 196,000 more affordable housing units to actually alleviate the issues that we're having right now. Again, you can do a few different things. So, we've passed legislation as it relates to car emissions and building standards. Again, those have to be implemented at the county level. Our planning should be mindful of climate change as well. So, the county is in charge of the Growth Management Act. For those who don't know, that's how you plan for development and growth in Washington State. It's a big, big deal. You should be more focused in terms of how climate change can impact that, which oftentimes means you need to build more densely in urban areas and then leave rural areas untouched. Because when you talk about mitigating the impacts of climate change, it's also carbon sequestration. So, being able to use that land to sequester carbon. Then, also when you talk about affordable housing, you can use what's called cross-laminated timber and you have to build as it relates to transit in those spaces as well. One of the things that I've always said is that we should have Transit For All. I say it because it's more equitable, but also because it lowers vehicles' miles traveled. So, it makes us lower our greenhouse gas emissions. I've done the math. People think that it's a wild idea. Fares make up 15% of the Metro revenue, 15%, you're talking about $180 million. So, the fact that we spend 73% of the General Fund on our legal system and nobody says anything, but if I wanted to just spend 10% of that budget on fares, people go wild. It's like, we can just reinvest our money more strategically. Also, we have to have a Transit Benefit District anyways to pay for a lot of the plans that we have in place for King County Metro Connect. So, there are ways to actually pay for this in a progressive way. It just requires a new level of thinking. So, when it comes to climate change, it has to be through the lens by which we operate. I'm glad that we bought a few buses. I'm glad that we're investing a little bit more in electrification. That's not going to be enough. We have to change behaviors. That includes being able to build transit in areas that have historically been left out. So, where I grew up, it took me an hour and a half to get downtown on a bus. I think they're now putting in the H Line, which is great because it helped pay for some of that as well, in partnership with the county. That is going to make it a little bit faster, 30 years after I left. So, it's an interesting dynamic where you're just now seeing communities having investments being made in it even though it's been a problem for generations. But that's really what it's going to take, is investing in communities impacted by it, having it be done strategically, so that way our transit and our housing is all being done at the same time. It also allows for economic mobility as well, so people can have access to their jobs. So, I'm rambling, but this is an area that I'm very, very passionate about. I serve on the Transportation Committee for this reason and I serve on the Environment, Energy and Technology Committee for this reason as well. Crystal Fincher: [00:33:02] And to be clear, when you say you support Transit For All, and especially talking about how it's very achievable to recover the amount of money that is received from the fare box, you're talking about free transit for all and not charging for riding whatever mode of Metro Transit it would be? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:33:20] Yeah, exactly. Also, to protect the drivers themselves, to be honest. I think a lot of interactions where drivers have altercations is because of that system. Also by the way, law enforcement, fare enforcement is potentially problematic as well, or it is problematic. You just have to pass legislation to allow for alternative means of collecting fares. So, it's one of those things where it's good, that should exist in our society. What's funny, I know what the person, the incumbent is going to say, is that, "Well, 60% of the fare revenue comes from corporations paying for it for their employees." Absolutely right. What's interesting is you can do what's called a Transit Benefit District. Right now, it's usually an MVET, or a sales tax, or a property tax, very regressive. I would lobby the legislature to have something a bit more progressive. What's interesting is that when Joe Biden put out his infrastructure plan and said that we would need to have progressive business taxes in order to pay for it, one of the first people to speak out in favor was actually Jeff Bezos. So, there is appetite because they understand that their workforce needs to have this infrastructure to be successful as well. So, I think that we could potentially get new authority from the legislature to have a Transit Benefit District paid for by larger corporations based off of whatever metric they want to use, office spaces they've leased or size, or whatever they want to use, to help mitigate the cost of the fares. But also we need to pay for a Transit Benefit District anyways for the infrastructure for part of the Metro Connect plan. That's another thing too, is that we need to do a better job connecting state infrastructure, city infrastructure, and county infrastructure. The fact that we have to have multiple ways of paying for things makes it a little bit difficult. So, implementing that by having Transit For All just makes it easier, I think, as a whole. Crystal Fincher: [00:35:05] I think so. I agree with that, actually. So, as we get ready to close, certainly looking at someone who's been an incumbent for a long time with Dow Constantine and who has almost always had a litany of endorsements from labor unions, progressive organizations, other elected officials. This year is no different, frankly. His endorsement page is lengthy. When you look at that and you're making the case to the people, why in the face of all that, and a lot of people supporting Dow Constantine, a lot of organizations supporting Dow Constantine, why should they choose you? Why do you have a path to win and the ability to really deliver on the change you're talking about? Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:35:53] Yeah, what's interesting is that most of those endorsements came before anybody knew that I was even running for office. In fact, I think all but a handful came before I even jumped in the race. For folks who are paying attention, the fact that we are in the driver's seat when it comes to most of these endorsements now, whether it's legislative districts, whether it's in the KC Dems and otherwise, we're getting about 60% to 40% of the majority of these meetings. We have the sole endorsements from the 11th, 39th [Legislative District Democrats]. We have duals in the 37th, 36th. Most other ones, we're just at that threshold to get a sole endorsement, which is 66%. We're getting 62%, 64%, so one or two people. So, the fact that the incumbent has been there for 12 years and the fact that he's already spent $750,000, and we're the ones that are driving the conversation in terms of the endorsement after only being in for about two to three weeks, I think in itself is telling in terms of where the tides are turning. We have the sole endorsements from the King County Young Democrats. We have the endorsements from the ATU [Amalgamated Transit Union]. There's a couple of other ones that are pending as well, that we'll make public pretty soon. Then, we have significant amount of support from legislators and other elected officials across the state. So, I'm not too worried about the endorsement game just because, look at what came in before I jumped in, look what came in afterwards. It's pretty telling by itself. But what people really want more so than that is to see that their lives are getting better. I've had conversations with thousands of people at this point, not just as a senator but also on the campaign trail. What really people want right now is change. They know that we need to act urgently when it comes to tackling homelessness. They know that we need to act urgently when it comes to tackling climate change. They know that we need to act urgently when it comes to tackling racial inequities in our society. Especially when it comes to say, for instance, gun violence and otherwise as well. So, I think the pitch that I'll make to people, and it seems to be resonating, is that, "Look, in this moment in time, as we're moving out of this pandemic, we're trying to now address systemic issues that have been in place for generations, for generations, that have not been able to be moved in terms of the current leadership that we have in place right now. It's simply time for change." I think we'll have that message resonate just based off of what we're already seeing with some of these, not just endorsements, but community conversations as well. I think we'll have a strong shot winning South King County. I think we'll have a strong shot winning Seattle. I think we'll have a strong shot in East King County as well. So, I think people are hungry for change and I think we represent what that change could look like. Crystal Fincher: [00:38:29] Well, certainly we'll be keeping an eye on this race. It's one of the biggest ones happening in the State this year. Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:38:35] Yeah. Crystal Fincher: [00:38:36] I look forward to talking to you again. Thanks so much for joining us today. Senator Joe Nguyen: [00:38:40] Thank you. I appreciate the time. Crystal Fincher: [00:38:45] Thank you for listening to Hacks and Wonks. Our chief audio engineer at KVRU is Maurice Jones, Jr. The producer of Hacks and Wonks is Lisl Stadler. You can find me on Twitter @Finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I, and now you can follow Hacks and Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts. Just type in Hacks and Wonks into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our mid-week show delivered to your podcast feed. You can also get a full text transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced during the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the podcast episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. Talk to you next time.

Arkansas Democrat Gazette
6/2/21: Board recommends health insurance premium increase for state employees and retirees… and more news

Arkansas Democrat Gazette

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 3:34


Board recommends health insurance premium increase for state employees and retirees; State covid cases rise by 69; NLR plans to buy bus station; Paws in Prison comes to women's unit

Morning Shot
State employees are losing everything, we need to talk about this..

Morning Shot

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 10:48


SPONSOR: Flatpack furniture to DIY for: https://www.facebook.com/pikassocabinets Win your own Pikasso Combo: https://tinyurl.com/5eb86mwr Boksburg SPCA: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=3823973054395667&id=695457603913910 Stories: Denel employees are left in the lurch: https://tinyurl.com/4yxj2ese Security Agency ATM funding ANC factions: https://tinyurl.com/puc48bze Timestamps: Intro: 00:00 - 00:26 Denel employees killing themselves: 00:27 - 05:26 Sponsor: 05:27 - 06:07 State Security Agency: 06:08 - 09:50 A plea: 09:51 - 10:49

Radio Boston
AG Healey Says Mandating Vaccines For State Employees Is 'A Matter Of Common Sense'

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 26:16


We take listener calls and discuss Healey's thoughts regarding mandating vaccines for employees in the public sector.

The CU2.0 Podcast
CU 2.0 Podcast Episode 147 Luis Pastor Latino Community Credit Union

The CU2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 43:32


Latino Community Credit Union was founded in 2000 in Durham NC when the community was rocked by a wave of robberies - even murders - of Latino workers who were paid in cash and were believed to walk around with their pockets stuffed with cash because they were unbanked.Enter John Herrera - whom you know from CU 2.0 Podcast 142 - and a handful more helpers and visionaries who founded the credit union which now has about $600 million in assets.Among the early volunteers was Luis Pastor who was in the US from his native Spain because his wife was pursuing graduate school and he had time on his hands. But soon he was offered the job of CEO and he took the offer. It's a job he is still in 21 years later and, he says, the fulfillment the job brings is what keeps him in it. Like what? Pastor tells of borrowers who have been deported who are still paying their loans - that seems unthinkable but it is a reality in Durham because this is a credit union that engages in helping people who have been ignored by traditional financial institutions. Extend a helping hand to them and these are people who remember that and value the relationship.A proof is that in 2020 Latino Community had a lower delinquency rate on loans than it had had in 2019. Despite the pandemic. And despite the fact that few of its members got stimulus checks.Another pandemic fact about Latino Community Credit Union is that it did not close any branches. "Our community needed us," said Pastor. He adds that the credit union is planning an expansion into South Carolina, Georgia, and Virginia and it now has 15 branches but plans are afoot for adding three more.Pastor has a word of advice: "If credit unions are trying to steal members from Bank of America we are going to lose this battle."Focus instead on the people who really need the services you offer and aren't getting them elsewhere.Along the way, you will hear about some truly out of the box thinking. For instance: the credit union has sponsored vaccination days, where - working with Duke University - it has put shots in the arms of some 7000 members. You'd heard that Latinos are vaccine skeptics? True enough. But when people trust a place where their money, they also trust that institution to get them vaccinated. Listen up.Along the way, many mentions are made of Jim Blaine, the retired CEO of State Employees' Credit Union of North Carolina. Hear the Blaine podcast here. Read more of Blaine's thinking in this CUInsight blog.  Like what you are hearing? Find out how you can help sponsor this podcast here. Very affordable sponsorship packages are available. Email rjmcgarvey@gmail.com

The CU2.0 Podcast
CU 2.0 Podcast Episode 143 Stephanie Smith America's Credit Union Museum

The CU2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 33:33


 The building still stands at 420 Notre Dame Avenue in Manchester NH.  That's where the nation's first credit union - St. Mary's Bank - opened its doors in 1908, to serve founding French American mill workers (and, yes, much of the original paperwork was written in French).St. Mary's Bank outgrew that space, moved into other facilities, but some years later it recognized that it wanted to preserve its original history and an attempt to buy it from its then owner was made.It did not succeed.As for how therefore the building now houses the America's Credit Museum you want to listen to this podcast with Stephanie Smith, executive director of the museum.The museum now is deep into an effort to capture and preserve the memories of a generation of credit union leaders who are entering retirement.Words of advice: don't throw away your archives without first contacting the museum.  You may well have pieces that the museum will covet as it seeks to document the how of the rise of America's credit union movement. You'll hear more about this process in the podcast. You will also hear how and why you want to visit the museum - which is about an hour north of Boston. Of course the pandemic has impacted the museum - it is presently open only by appointment. But that will change and, even better, the pandemic has prompted the museum to step up its efforts to digitize its collections which will put them within reach of us wherever we are.Ultimately, said Smith, the mission of the museum is to capture the credit union difference - and that happens through the histories of the many in the movement who have shaped today's credit unions.Listen up.Along the way, many mentions are made of Jim Blaine, the retired CEO of State Employees' Credit Union of North Carolina. Hear the Blaine podcast here. Read more of Blaine's thinking in this CUInsight blog.  Also mentioned is Bucky Sebastian. His podcast is here. Like what you are hearing? Find out how you can help sponsor this podcast here. Very affordable sponsorship packages are available. Email rjmcgarvey@gmail.comAnd like this podcast on whatever service you use to stream it. That matters.Find out more about CU2.0 and the digital transformation of credit unions here. It's a journey every credit union needs to take. Pronto

Utah's Noon News
Mask mandate will stay in place for state employees

Utah's Noon News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 27:28


April 1, 2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Winner Take All
Winner Take All #149 | FAMGA Ranking, Regulatory Capture, Palantir CEO on Gov Tech, China Tesla Ban?

Winner Take All

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 34:45


Alex starts the show with a quick look at Poshmark, a fashion marketplace whose stock has sharply fallen since touching the $100+ mark on IPO day. After breaking down if $POSH is more fairly valued in the ~$40 range, a quick ranking of the tech giants in FAMGA (Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and Apple) is given before diving into the current regulatory environment for tech. Also covered, what regulatory capture is, the Chinese government restricting government workers from driving Tesla vehicles, and Palantir CEO Alex Karp's commentary on U.S. tech companies lack of willingness to work with the U.S. government. The show closes with a short breakdown of how take rates work in platform businesses. 00:00​ - Subscribe for Tech & Business News Daily 00:18​ - $POSH Stock Update 01:20​ - FAMGA Breakdown 05:33​ - Is Tech Regulation a Short-Mid Term Threat? 11:35​ - Regulatory Capture 15:26​ - Tech Companies + U.S. Gov Work 16:26​ - Comments From Palantir CEO 22:36​ - Former TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer CNBC Interview 31:58​ - China Restricts Teslas for State Employees 34:01​ - What is a Take Rate? Originally Aired: 03/26/21 #RegulatoryCapture #PalantirCEO #FAANG

The CU2.0 Podcast
CU 2.0 Podcast Episode 142 John Herrera The Immigrant Banking Journey

The CU2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 59:35


 Before logging into this call, I studied up on who John Herrera is.  He was born in Costa Rica, then came to the US to go to college at the University of Delaware and one thing led to another and instead of going back to Costa Rica to build a better society he stayed in the US and has worked on building a better society for all of us but with a special focus on Hispanic immigrants such as himself.My first question to him, off mike, is how did he get from there to here.  The podcast starts off with him telling that saga.  Today Herrera is a senior vice president at Self-Help in North Carolina, where his focus is on Hispanic relations and he has been busy building banking relationships with immigrant communities in North Carolina but also Illinois, Florida and California.Also on is resume is that he is a co-founder of the very successful Latino Community Credit Union in North Carolina.  That credit union got its start some 20 years ago when there was a wave of robberies and murders of immigrant workers who got paid in cash and often carried large sums.He is the founder of El Pueblo in North Carolina which focuses on civil rights for immigrants.He was named an immigrant innovator by President Barack Obama.  He was the first Hispanic immigrant elected to a North Carolina municipal office. He served as an alderman in Carrboro NC.He was named by Time Magazine as one of 31 people who are changing the South.In this podcast he offers rich and deep insights into how to serve immigrants - especially Hispanics - and he muses on how the United States is soon to become a minority majority nation (by 2045 according to many demographers).  This is smart, sensitive commentary.  Take notes. It's a primer in how to serve a crucial US demographic.Listen up.Along the way, many mentions are made of Jim Blaine, the retired CEO of State Employees' Credit Union of North Carolina. Hear the Blaine podcast here. Read more of Blaine's thinking in this CUInsight blog.  Like what you are hearing? Find out how you can help sponsor this podcast here. Very affordable sponsorship packages are available. Email rjmcgarvey@gmail.comAnd like this podcast on whatever service you use to stream it. That matters.Find out more about CU2.0 and the digital transformation of credit unions here. It's a journey every credit union needs to take. Pronto

State employees and their fight to keep their health benefits

"This Is Just A Thought"

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 38:13


It seems the state finds itself in a financial windfall with retirees and can't make good on a promise --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stephen-kornegay/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stephen-kornegay/support

State employees in their fight to keep

"This Is Just A Thought"

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 38:06


It appears the state finds itself once again and I financial windfall and are trying to take back a promise that attracted so many to work for state government --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stephen-kornegay/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stephen-kornegay/support

Montana Public Radio News
Governor Keeps State Employees Masked

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 1:43


Montana's state employees are still required to wear a mask when working with the public or coworkers. Gov. Greg Gianforte has continued the requirement for state workers following his repeal of the public-aimed statewide mask mandate last week.

Vermont Edition
Pension Cuts For Teachers And State Employees: A Conversation With State Treasurer Beth Pearce

Vermont Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 47:14


For years, people have been sounding the alarm about Vermont's unfunded pension liabilities. Now State Treasurer Beth Pearce is recommending a reduction in pension benefits for teachers and state employees. She says this is necessary to keep the state's pension fund solvent. This hour, Pearce explains her recommendations and we hear from the state employees and teachers unions.

This Day in Maine
Dec. 8, 2020: Fewer State Employees Commuting, Less CO2 Emitted

This Day in Maine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 15:31


acatalina@mpbn.net (Andrew Catalina)

Bankruptcy Lite
State Employees Credit Union

Bankruptcy Lite

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2020 33:37


All music and sound effect are either covered by the Creative Commons CC0 license or are in the public domain. Eternal gratitude to Musopen and Freesound

Podcast By George!
Podcast By George! #198 - CARES Used to Pay State Employees!

Podcast By George!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2020 20:45


Push "Play" to listen here - or watch the entire episode on YouTube:  https://youtu.be/5NcjC4JIQFM

Contra Costa Today
Bay Area Rapid Transit Director Debora Allen Talks Budget, Ridership and Other Issues

Contra Costa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2020 51:58


On this episode, I chat with Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Board of Director Debora Allen on a variety of topics from the budget, ridership, cleanliness, homeless, BART Police and enforcement of code of conduct, its new 15 Point Plan, to whether or not BART should get into the housing business. 01:25 – Intro 02:05 – Steps to make the trains safer and healthier during COVID-19. Question asked by Supervisor John Gioia. 04:37 – Rider health procedures during when ridership increases. 06:45 – BART Budget issues and impact it may have 08:15 – BART Police enforcing things such as masks, eating on platforms, sex on platforms (code of conduct issues) 09:37 – Recap the May 23 meeting on the budget and sustaining a 90% drop in ridership. Debora gets into how the budget was formulated. 13:42 – How do you save as many jobs as possible for BART? Current budget calls for no layoffs, no furloughs, and current budget calls for 2.75% raises. How does it work when State Employees are getting a 10% cut, but BART still receiving a COLA increase? 16:11: Elected officials are elected due to unions and special interest which prevent tough decisions to be made. The big picture is not being taken seriously as BART will have a 6% increase in operating costs with ridership being down 90%, 21:50 – we get into BART projects helping maintain and improve tracks as ridership is down to save money later with little impact on ridership. They can now work more than 3-4 hours of actual construction. 23:25 – BART issues a 15 Point Plan – we talk about it. 25:17 – We touch on fare evasion, community outreach and back to police enforcing people wearing masks. BART Police need 93 more officers in 2018. 31:30 – Debora explains her tweet about 20-unfilled BART Police positions will be replaced by civil ambassadors.   35:22 – Is there any plan to address the homeless using the train as a bathroom. Any plans to expand to East Bay (Question from The Happy Medic). We get into how BART is going to enforce masks and eating on trains, but not homeless sleeping on trains and using BART as a restroom. How BART directors were not happy with 15 Point Plan because BART is enforcing mask policy. To enforce the code of conduct or not? 41:20 – BART’s Disconnect between urban and suburban areas. Need to redistrict BART Trustee districts for more equity around the Bay Area. In Contra Costa County, we only have 2 BART Directors. 45:26 – is BART Board qualified to get into housing? (Question by Wolfgang Croskey). 47:22 – Does Allen believe the BART Board understands why people are not riding BART? 49:19 – closing

World Business Report
UPDATE: Sri Lankan government asks state employees to donate a salary

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2020 7:14


The Sri Lankan government has asked its employees to contribute their May monthly salary, to help bail it out in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. The country has been under lockdown since March 20th, closing all industries, transport and shops apart from some that deliver essential supplies such as food and medicine. Plus, we get an update on the movements on the US markets and the unemployment figures with Cary Leahy.

Better Left Podcast
The AFSCME Council 28/WFSE Frontline Heroes Fighting for Our Lives Against COVID-19

Better Left Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 105:11


We apologize for the quality of our audio. We're getting settled with our respective home studios during quarantine, and we are eternally thankful to Jay for his superlative editing skills and patience. We'll get better! Don't forget to give us some stars and subscribe! We hope you are all staying safe, sane, and healthy. Want to talk about it? Send a note to hello@betterleft.net! Follow The Better Left Cast on Twitter Follow the Better Left Cast on Facebook Follow the Better Left Cast on Instagram “We are aware that there are some inherent dangers in our work, but none of us signed up for a suicide mission,” said Yestramski. -Mike Yestramski Jr, RollCall.Com Mike is a psychiatric social worker at Western State Hospital, and President of AFSCME 28/WFSIE, the union representing approximately 45,000 state employees and public service workers across the state of Washington. That includes employees of state agencies, state colleges and universities, social services providers, state park employees, and correction officers, to name a few. While all of these public service jobs have been impacted by the unprecedented impact of this global pandemic, COVID-19 has created an untenable pressure on the frontline healthcare workers at facilities like Eastern and Western State hospitals, Harborview Medical Center, and the University of Washington Medical Center. In this episode, we check in with our friend Mike and unpack the reports we've heard from the frontline workers, the ever-present struggle with hospital administration to get the necessary PPE -protective gear used by hospital staff to reduce exposure and risk of infection for both patient and the people providing vital healthcare services. In the midst of this crisis, at the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak and in the United States, Mike speaks to what's going on and what the team at Washington State Federation of State Employees is doing to advocate on behalf of the incredible work on the frontlines, like #Courageous Duty Pay for front-line workers (SIGN THE PETITION!), and advocating for better screening and prioritized COVID-19 testing for front line staff. Mike at KUOW.ORG Mike at PublicNewsService.Org Michael Ferguson We also speak with our dear friend Michael Ferguson, an account manager for a company that provides lighting and technical services for large-venue public events. 200 employees were laid off as a result of the impact of COVID-19, and he speaks to the difficulty of the situation, and what he and other leaders from his field are doing to help- like raising $70,000 in support of Washington State Stage and Tech workers in an emergency fund. This Episode: Follow The Better Left Cast on Twitter Follow the Better Left Cast on Facebook Follow the Better Left Cast on Instagram Guests: Mike Yestramski Jr and Michael Ferguson Hosts: Troy Hewitt, Cassidy 'Corn' Butler Editing: Jay Smith Show Notes: Troy Hewitt Intro Artist: Hemijinks Title: Nice Ray License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Adaptation: Reduced length to fit intro, adjusted audio levels Promoted by: https://www.tribeofnoise.com/viewMusic.php?fileID=17690 Outro Artist: Ed Navarro Dee Title: Atacama License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ Adaptation: adjusted audio levels Promoted by:https://www.tribeofnoise.com/viewMusic.php?fileID=61477

KGFX Beyond the Mic Podcast
Gov. Noem extends school closure, remote work for state employees until May

KGFX Beyond the Mic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2020 20:34


On March 24, 2020, South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem signed an executive order extending remote work for state employees and closure of public schools into May. Gov. Noem and state Sec. of Health Kim Malsam-Rysdon also provided more information about the inmate at the State Women's Prison in Pierre who tested positive for COVID-19 and about the nine inmates in the same unit who walked away the evening of March 23. One inmate is back in custody.

Feminist Sleeper Cell
Episode 62: Shameless Plug

Feminist Sleeper Cell

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2020 56:19


This week in the cell Moji , Marie and Lizz breakdown the week in fuckery.  We always love when pop culture talks about abortion but man, even when they are trying to good, it doesn’t help when they don’t do research. (Looking at you Shameless) Plus Indiana shames you into thinking you are a bad person if you don’t want to have a funeral for your blood soaked maxi pad.  Also, great news that you already knew, research shows 95% of people who have abortions, DO NOT… SAY IT WITH ME... FEEL REGRET!  GATHERED IN THE SLEEPER CELL Lizz Winstead @lizzwinstead  Marie Khan @mjkhhn Moji Alawode-el @mojilocks Quick Hits -Showtime show Shameless Talked about Abortion Access last Week and it was...off Season 10, episode 9   “O Captain, My Captain”Directed by - Anthony Hardwick Writing credits: Created by Paul Abbot, Written by…. DUDES! UGH Philip Busier and Executive Story Editor Sherman Payne  -Texas Is Dictating Donation Options for State Employees  -Wisconsin Has Too Many Catholics (Hospitals) -Virginia Has Decided to Pass the ERA  Get involved to ratify the ERA!  Meaty Stories/Mentions -Indiana Wants Legislate Grief in Abortions SIX DEGRESS OF ABORTION  Meghan Markle and Harry leaving their current roles in the UK > Meghan has publically posted abour her pro-choice support > Lizz winssss            LINQS!!! WHERE HOLLYWOOD WRITERS CAN GET THE FACTS!  Us duh.ANSHRHollywood Health and Society ABORTION ON TV Experts! Gretchen Sisson @gesissionSteph Herold @stephHerold OG AWFUL  BISHOPS TESTIFYING ABOUT CONTRACEPTION  JOIN US IN DC JAN 22-24! COME TO OUR SHOW!!!! http://www.blackcatdc.com/shows/feminist-buzzkills.html TAKE TO THE STREETS! https://www.facebook.com/events/600082710804738/ ALL THE HOUSEKEEPING Write a review/ give us 5 starsFollow us on social @accessforce on Twitter/InstagramEmail us at podcast@aaforce.org! Edited by Brad Pearson, theme song by Cory Eischen, The Purple Xperience DONATE TO Abortion Access Force/Feminist Sleeper Cell pod!!!! MAY THE ABORTION ACCESS FORCE BE WITH YOU!

Feminist Sleeper Cell
Episode 62: Shameless Plug

Feminist Sleeper Cell

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2020 56:19


This week in the cell Moji , Marie and Lizz breakdown the week in fuckery.  We always love when pop culture talks about abortion but man, even when they are trying to good, it doesn’t help when they don’t do research. (Looking at you Shameless) Plus Indiana shames you into thinking you are a bad person if you don’t want to have a funeral for your blood soaked maxi pad.  Also, great news that you already knew, research shows 95% of people who have abortions, DO NOT… SAY IT WITH ME... FEEL REGRET!  GATHERED IN THE SLEEPER CELL Lizz Winstead @lizzwinstead  Marie Khan @mjkhhn Moji Alawode-el @mojilocks Quick Hits -Showtime show Shameless Talked about Abortion Access last Week and it was...off Season 10, episode 9   “O Captain, My Captain”Directed by - Anthony Hardwick Writing credits: Created by Paul Abbot, Written by…. DUDES! UGH Philip Busier and Executive Story Editor Sherman Payne  -Texas Is Dictating Donation Options for State Employees  -Wisconsin Has Too Many Catholics (Hospitals) -Virginia Has Decided to Pass the ERA  Get involved to ratify the ERA!  Meaty Stories/Mentions -Indiana Wants Legislate Grief in Abortions SIX DEGRESS OF ABORTION  Meghan Markle and Harry leaving their current roles in the UK > Meghan has publically posted abour her pro-choice support > Lizz winssss            LINQS!!! WHERE HOLLYWOOD WRITERS CAN GET THE FACTS!  Us duh.ANSHRHollywood Health and Society ABORTION ON TV Experts! Gretchen Sisson @gesissionSteph Herold @stephHerold OG AWFUL  BISHOPS TESTIFYING ABOUT CONTRACEPTION  JOIN US IN DC JAN 22-24! COME TO OUR SHOW!!!! http://www.blackcatdc.com/shows/feminist-buzzkills.html TAKE TO THE STREETS! https://www.facebook.com/events/600082710804738/ ALL THE HOUSEKEEPING Write a review/ give us 5 starsFollow us on social @accessforce on Twitter/InstagramEmail us at podcast@aaforce.org! Edited by Brad Pearson, theme song by Cory Eischen, The Purple Xperience DONATE TO Abortion Access Force/Feminist Sleeper Cell pod!!!! MAY THE ABORTION ACCESS FORCE BE WITH YOU!

Maryland Transit Times
Maryland Transit Times: Maryland Charity Campaign

Maryland Transit Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2019 3:21


The Maryland Charity Campaign (MCC) ends on December 17th and MDOT MTA is encouraging State Employees to sign up before the deadline ends. MCC provides State Employees and MDOT MTA employees a platform where they can contribute to charitable organizations in an orderly and uniform process through one annual campaign. And this year MCC has made it easier than ever by creating a new platform to donate through automatic payroll deductions. For more details, click on the following link https://mcc.maryland.gov. This year’s goal of $2.8 million will provide over 1000 pre-screened charities with the funds needs to make a difference in their communities. #MDOTcares

Wright State University Newsroom
Wright State employees distribute food, collect donations as part of We Serve U Day

Wright State University Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2019 2:13


https://www.youtube.com/user/WrightStateU They just kept coming. Car after truck rolled into the warehouse of the Dayton Foodbank to pick up meat, eggs, vegetables, fruit and juice. And 15 Wright State University employees swarmed each vehicle, loading it up for the needy and grateful residents. It was all part of a July 19 university wide, service day opportunity for employees, who took a half day off work to help the community without having to use leave time. All 75 volunteer slots for the first We Serve U Day were filled. “The importance of service to the community is part of our university's mission and is ingrained in our culture,” President Cheryl B. Schrader said in an email announcing We Serve U Day. “Time and again, you have stepped up to help your neighbors and those in need.” More at https://webapp2.wright.edu/web1/newsroom/2019/07/22/wright-state-employees-distribute-food-collect-donations-as-part-of-we-serve-u-day/

The CU2.0 Podcast
CU2.0 Podcast Episode 40 the Jim Blaine Marathon

The CU2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2019 57:32


At 30 he took over as CEO of State Employees' Credit Union in North Carolina.  That was 1979.  Come 2016 and he retired. SECU had grown to $33 billion - and it had 256 branches and 5800 employees.That's the Jim Blaine story and here he sits for a marathon interview, the longest in this podcast's history.It's worth the hour. Make time.Blaine starts out by questioning the wave of mergers that is now rocking the world of credit unions. Why not just liquidate the institution and give every member $1000?Keep listening and you realize he's not exactly for doing that. In fact he denounces the loss of a few hundred credit union charters yearly. What he is actually doing is highlighting a reality that, typically, those mergers accomplish just about nothing. The resulting institution, a bit bigger, is in fact no more competitive.Blaine also worries about the loss of local institutions, where nowadays in many credit unions all decisions - including the trivial - get made at corporate HQ.Is there in fact a future for credit unions?Maybe. Maybe not.  Blaine highlights a strategy for keeping credit unions relevant. But he frets that many may not heed the message.Are you listening?Related podcasts mention in this interview include Bill Bynum, Maine Harvest. Teresa Freeborn, and Cliff Rosenthal. Like what you are hearing? Find out how you can help sponsor this podcast here. Very affordable sponsorship packages are available.Find out more about CU2.0 and the digital transformation of credit unions here. It's a journey every credit union needs to take. Pronto

Rod Arquette Show
Rod Arquette Show: Should Utah Provide State Employees With Paid Parental Leave?

Rod Arquette Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2019 77:41


Rod Arquette Show Daily Rundown - Tuesday, June 18, 20194:20 pm: Jeff Hunt, V.P. of Public Policy at Colorado Christian University, joins Rod for a conversation about a new study that shows teen use of marijuana is high in states where it has been legalized5:05 pm: Representative Elizabeth Weight joins Rod to discuss her push for Utah employers to provide paid parental leave for new parents

The CU2.0 Podcast
CU2.0 Podcast Episode 37 Cliff Rosenthal on CDFIs

The CU2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2019 38:31


You want to know about community development financial institutions? Cliff Rosenthal is the man you want to talk to.  He literally wrote the book on CDFIs and also the longstanding credit union initiative to serve the unbanked: Democratizing Finance: Origins of the Community Development Financial Institutions Movement.Have CDFIs lived up to their potential?Have credit unions changed the shape of financial services in America?Rosenthal has opinions and he shares them in this podcast.Along the way he talks about his stint at the CFPB - and the ingrained credit union executive distrust of that institution. Which may not be entirely warranted.Rosenthal pulls no punches. He said, "It dismays me that 100 years after the birth of credit unions we still have a significant problem of the underbanked and unbanked." And, note, about 25% of households falls into the category. Rosenthal also said that in 1990 there were around 13,500 banks and thrifts and a like number of credit unions.  There now are about 5500 of each.  "The number of credit unions falls by 200 to 300 each year.  Ten years from now there will be 3000, 3500 credit unions."That math is flawless. And it has to scare you.In this podcast, you'll hear a discussion of the successes of a Mississippi credit union executive Bill Bynum.  He told his own story in this podcast.You'll also hear about Jim Blaine, the charismatic, longtime CEO of State Employees' Credit Union in North Carolina, one of the country's biggest.And you'll also hear Rosental insist that many credit unions that focus on serving the underserved do better financially than those that focus on fighting with banks for more affluent consumers.If you enjoy this podcast, listen in to the podcast with Cathie Mahon, CEO of Inclusive, a trade group for institutions that focus on community development.Like what you are hearing? Find out how you can help sponsor this podcast here. Very affordable sponsorship packages are available.Find out more about CU2.0 and the digital transformation of credit unions 

Personal & Foul
State Employees

Personal & Foul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2018 104:47


Miles has Miles to go. State employee management structure is. a. DEAL. Purdue is better than Nate thinks, but not as good as Mike and Shawn think. This is the path to 5-7 and a rematch with Malzahn for Frost.

Penn State COMMversations
(Ep. 15): From Penn State Students to Penn State Employees

Penn State COMMversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2018 41:22


Kevin Flintosh talks with Matt Eichelberger (development), Tara Wyckoff (teaching) and PJ Mullen (athletics) about how they transitioned from Penn State students to Penn State employees working in different areas of the university.

Susan Monday
One dad with 4 kids says "No way!" to paid parental leave for state employees.

Susan Monday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2018 1:36


Delaware representatives voted "yes" to paid parental leave for all state employees. Guess who's paying for it?

Liberty On The Air
44: On The State's Dime

Liberty On The Air

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2018 76:43


This week we bring you another edition of Liberty On The Air with host Dan Fishman. We discuss the evolving situation with both Iran and North Korea, Trump's latest nominee fight, and Dan investigates how some Massachusetts Elected Officials are using State Employees on the clock to conduct campaign activities.

Rants & Rage
Unchecked Bureaucracy - Why the State Can Continue to Be Ineffective

Rants & Rage

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2018 24:58


At nearly 2.25% of our entire population, our state bureaucracy is our largest employer. But they are also inefficient and ineffective. If a private business ran this way, it would be bankrupt within no time. My guess is that when there is a steady stream of income regardless of performance, there is no accountability or drive to perform better. It's disgusting and something needs to change. It's time we put performance quotas on State Employees.

Legislative Week In Review 2016 | UNC-TV
Thursday, May 20, 2016 | Legislative Week in Review

Legislative Week In Review 2016 | UNC-TV

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2016 26:46


This week's show covers the House's passage of a $22.225 billion dollar budget bill. Rep. Grier Martin (D-Wake) discusses legislation calling on judges to consider a veteran's PTSD diagnosis when the veteran faces court sentencing. Rep. Chris Sgro (D-Guilford) discusses issue advocacy as advocates and grassroots groups descend on Raleigh, sometimes with hostility.

Organized Family
004: Home: Meal Planning

Organized Family

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2015 23:17


Meal Planning: Organized Families Eat Healthier Guest Speaker: Amy Roskelley Has a Bachelors degree in Health Education Worked for 10 years with the State of Utah counseling State Employees on how to incorporate healthy habits Currently the owner of Super Healthy Kids, an online resource that helps kids eat healthier. Site offers recipes, meal plans … Continue reading 004: Home: Meal Planning The post 004: Home: Meal Planning appeared first on Organized Family.