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City in California, United States

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  • Dec 5, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about long beach

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Latest podcast episodes about long beach

Good Beer Hunting
EP-323 Melissa Hidalgo, Dr. Beer Butch

Good Beer Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 55:05


Melissa Hidalgo might be the smartest beer person I know. She has a Ph.D in Literature from U.C. San Diego; is currently a professor of women's, gender, and ethnic studies at California State University, Long Beach; and, if she wasn't busy enough with her work in academia, she's also a longtime beer writer who often goes by the pseudonym Dr. Beer Butch. Melissa has been writing about beer for over 10 years, but it was a pint of Guinness that started her beer journey well before that. As a Los Angeles native, she was an early organizer of queer spaces in her local community, helping to form a beer education social club called Queers and Beers, as well as a blog called Butch's Brew, all with the intent of taking up space in what was then, and could still very well be considered, an extremely white, cis, male beer scene. As a freelance writer, Melissa mostly writes about beer for L.A. Taco, but her desire to tell stories about people, history, and culture transcend food and drink. In our conversation today, you'll hear her tell her own experience and journey into beer, the prejudices she's had to overcome in order to explore the industry she loves, what's changed over the years (as well as what hasn't), who inspires her, and the preciousness of human connections through a shared passion. 

GENERATION RIPE
The Seventieth One... and Derrick C. Brown

GENERATION RIPE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 44:34


Episode 70 and Wendi and Dfernando's guest interview is award winning novelist, comedian, poet, and storyteller Derrick C. Brown.Derrick first discovered poetry as a young man enlisted in the United States Army. He often found himself spending hours in foxholes needing to pass the time. He began rewriting psalms from his military-issue Bible in a more relatable language and, after serving in the 82nd Airborne, continued to explore poetry. He became involved with the Long Beach and Orange County Poetry Slam community, competing at his first National Poetry Slam in 1998, where he placed second in the individual championship. He began touring with his poetry shortly thereafter. Early in his career, Brown often toured solo. However, he has since become known for touring and collaborating with other artists. To date, Brown has written four children's books, a musical, and eight books of poetry, including the 2013 Texas Book of the Year, STRANGE LIGHT.In October 2006, Brown teamed up with poet, TV and film actress, and activist Amber Tamblyn for several poetry performances in California called THE LAZERS OF SEXCELLANCE.  Brown also collaborated with painter Blaine Fontana for a live reading and gallery opening of new paintings based on Brown's work. In 2007, Brown toured Europe opening for the band Cold War Kids, chronicled in the documentary film about him, YOU BELONG EVERYWHERE.  That same year, Brown performed as a poet on THE TONIGHT SHOW with Jay Leno. In 2011, Brown was commissioned to write a 40-minute-long poem for the prestigious Noord Nederlands Dans Collective. The work, titled INSTRUMENTAL, received rave reviews in the Netherlands and Canada.In 2014, he was commissioned to write poems about soldiers for the Los Angeles Craft and Folk Art Museum. These poems were later performed by Oscar-nominated actor Jake Gyllenhaal.  The following year, Brown was again commissioned, this time by the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, to create a new work for the J.M.W. Turner Exhibit.In 2016, Brown toured as the opening act for Greg Dulli of The Afghan Whigs. On his most recent tour in 2017, Brown toured the United States and Europe, opening for rock band Rival Sons. He also often tours and performs with comedians, including David Cross, Kristen Schaal, Jon Glaser, H. Jon Benjamin and Eugene Mirman.In 2017, Brown wrote, directed, and produced his original musical 300 BONES. Later that year, he performed an original piece called “If You Were God...” in Israel, reading alongside the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company members, Martin and Shani who choreographed their dance program based on Brown's poetry. Brown is known for being an innovator in curating unique and creative poetry adventures like the DOUBLE DECKER POETRY BUS PARTY and poetry shows at sea for POETRY CRUISE, which he started in Long Beach, CA. He is also the creator of THE LIGHTBULB MOUTH RADIO HOUR, a literary variety show. PARTY WITH HONOR is his latest literary variety show in Los Angeles, CA.Perhaps his biggest accomplishment to date is his creation of Write Bloody Publishing in 2004, which FORBES and FILTER Magazine call “…one of the best independent poetry pressed in the country.”   The press is known for utilizing a rock & roll, indie record label model, uncommon for a poetry press.At the center of Write Bloody is the philosophy that to create a lasting career and engage with your audience, you can't simply publish a book and hope for the best. Every author on the press is required to tour and perform their works to build a lasting fan base. This has proved incredibly successful for the press. To date, Write Bloody Publishing has released 134 volumes of poetry, including books by Sarah Kay, Clint Smith, Andrea Gibson, Anis Mojgani, Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz and Taylor Mali. Also on Episode 70, Wendi and Dfernando discuss his newly trimmed white beard and her manicurist's assessment of her dressed-down, casual appearance.  On THE RIPE REPORT, Dfernando shares his love for Magnolia Bakery's Banana Pudding and Apple Crisp Pudding, and Wendi shares 23andMe genetic testing, which helped reunite her and her family with a cousin.  Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their TEAM GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram:Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE... and our guest Derrick C. Brown, and for just about everything else: Click Here!Remember to subscribe, rate & leave a review for GENERATION RIPEVisit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

What Up, Long Beach?!
Long Beach Poly Football Win Championship, Prepares For CIF State

What Up, Long Beach?!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 43:25


This week we're talking about Long Beach Poly football winning a CIF championship and taking on Serra in the CIF State game on Saturday. 03:00 Long Beach Poly wins CIF championship 32:00 Mater Dei Hazing Controversy

Bait and Switch Podcast
I'm Waiting For a Call ( S3 E4 ) 3 min. Highlights

Bait and Switch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 3:00


November's Highlight package arrives just a few days late due to Supply Chain issues. It was just off-loaded from a container ship in Long Beach. This episode features a guest who was a little distracted. A message to future guests - Leave your phone at home!

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How Judy Baca's murals help recover history through 'public memory'

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 6:00


A new exhibit at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach, California, looks at the monumental scale and achievement of an artist capturing the untold stories of Los Angeles. Jeffrey Brown took a look at the work of Judy Baca for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Ferment Podcast - Conversations About Worship And Transformation
Ryan Albrecht - Healed People Heal People: A Redemption Story

The Ferment Podcast - Conversations About Worship And Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 65:21


Ryan Albrecht is a psychotherapist, husband, father and musician from Long Beach, New York. He has been serving at the Experience Vineyard Church in Rockville Centre for nearly a decade where he volunteers as a worship leader with his wife and worship director Elisha. It is there where his life transformed and he continues to experience life giving community, family, and encounters with God. Professionally Ryan is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker where he works with various mental, emotional, behavioral and spiritual health issues. Inspired by his own life experiences he is called to work with others to help heal from their trauma to realize lives that are full and unique to themselves. Ryan is also passionate about de-stigmatizing mental health in the church through sharing his story and professional insight to educate, equip, and train leadership. In this episode of The Ferment, Ryan shares his story of leading a life of youthful rebellion after a series of traumatic events changed his course, and the way those decisions escalated into addiction, multiple overdoses and criminal activity. He also shares about the steady pursuit of the Lord, being drawn into community at a church and slowly turning his life over to the service of people. Ryan and Adam then chat about the need to mature emotionally as we are growing spiritually, and tending to the inner life. This is a powerful testimony of redemption and the goodness of God.    Socials:  Instagram @thefermentpodcast Twitter @fermentcast TikTok @vineyardworship

If Plants Could Talk
#45 - Reganrocksyoursuccs

If Plants Could Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 71:35


A conversation with Forney, Texas based artist and succulent collector, Regan - of @reganrocksyoursuccs. Regan is another creative mind utilizing multiple mediums from painting to ceramics. She has been growing her eclectic collection of succulents and cacti since 2016. A link to her social media is pasted below. Regan (@reganrocksyoursuccs) • Instagram photos and videos This podcast is brought to you by Mezcala Nursery located at 6901 Orange Ave. Long Beach, CA 90805. Family owned, family ran, since 2007. Mezcala carries everything from landscape plants, to house plants, to cactus and succulents. They also offer a wide variety of rare collector specimens. @mezcalanursery • Instagram photos and videos Did you know there are tons of health benefits to supplementing mushrooms? No, not that kind, although those are great too. I'm talking about Chaga, Reishi, Turkey Tail, Lions Mane, Shiitake, the list goes on. There is truly ancient wisdom to this. Mushrooms have been used in Chinese herbal medicine for thousands of years. The uses range from immunological and digestive issues, to nootropic or in other words - brain health. There are many studies that can be found showing the evidence and potential of these functional fungi. Want to learn more? Consider referring to Episode #38 featuring author and Ethnomycologist, Jeff Chilton - where he discusses this topic at length. A list of educational resources is pasted below. How do Mushrooms Support the Immune System? - Real Mushrooms 7 Medicinal Mushrooms and Their Health Benefits Real Mushrooms Ready to try Real Mushrooms? Head to https://shop.realmushrooms.com/discount/Ifplantscouldtalk and sign up for the first-time buyer code for 25% off your first order. Use code: Ifplantscouldtalk for 10% off all future orders. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ifplantscouldtalk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ifplantscouldtalk/support

GARDEN CHURCH Podcast
Advent : Hope - Audio

GARDEN CHURCH Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 30:33


"in Long Beach as it is in Heaven." For more information visit: garden.church

GENERATION RIPE
The Sixty-Ninth One... and another with Shelley McLendon

GENERATION RIPE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:13


Episode 69 and GENERATION RIPE's interview is a revisit with Episode 30 guest: actress, writer, director, producer, and licensed therapist Shelley McLendon. Originally from Long Beach, California, Shelley McLendon has lived in the northwest for over 25 years.  She is known for writing sketch comedy as well as adapting cult movies into staged parodies that are performed to sold-out audiences. Discouraged by the auditions she was being called for, Shelley decided her best bet was to write her own material that would highlight her comedic chops. It was her staged adaptation of the 1989 Patrick Swayze film ROAD HOUSE which she co-wrote with fellow writer Courtenay Hameister back in 2010 that was the catalyst for her production company Bad Reputation Productions. With Bad Reputation Productions, she's become a driving force in Portland's comedy scene. Also a talented comedic actor, she's successfully made the jump into producing and directing other artists. With the opening of The Siren Theater in 2015, she's added a venue to her growing empire.Along with her performing art career, Shelley holds a Master's of Arts in Counseling and is a Licensed Professional Counselor with the State of Oregon.  In addition to private counseling, Shelley has worked with individuals and groups in alcohol/drug recovery, in college counseling centers and in community mental health agencies, and has taught courses in counseling and psychology as an adjunct university instructor.Also on Episode 69 Wendi and Dfernando catch up on things, like Wendi's booster Pfizer vaccine and binging on FX's AMERICAN HORROR STORY: COVEN and the second part of Netflix's TIGER KING documentary series.  On THE RIPE REPORT there's sourdough bread turkey and Christmas time in New York City.  Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their TEAM GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram: Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE... and our guest Shelley McLendon, The Siren Theater & her TwitterRemember to subscribe, rate & leave a review for GENERATION RIPEVisit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

The Rest Is History
125. The CIA

The Rest Is History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 51:23


The USA's Central Intelligence Agency is a mysterious organisation which has used covert methods to assassinate enemies, influence governments and tip whole countries into revolution - or so countless films, TV series and books would have us believe. How much of it is true? Hugh Wilford, professor of history at California State University, Long Beach, and author of four books, including 'The Mighty Wurlitzer: How the CIA Played America', joins Tom and Dominic to discuss. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Checc'n In w/ BIG U
Checc‘n In - Episode 5: OT GENASIS

Checc'n In w/ BIG U

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 55:57


BIG U x WSHH Presents: CHECC'N-IN (Exclusive Worldstar Podcast) Episode 5:  O.T. GENASIS Growing up in  Long Beach, Going to jail at early age, signing to 50 cent and Busta Rhymes, Keisha Cole beef starting over son having Autism, beating Mike Tyson in a street fight and more.   Big U breaks down the true meaning of what it is to CHECC'N-IN touching on topics never discussed before. Quando Rondo joins Big U on the premiere episode and discusses becoming a crip, his label issues with NBA YoungBoy, and King Von. Executive Produced by Eugene “Big U '' Henley @bigu1, Doe Henderson @dynastydoe, Danny @Dany2times Cotton, Kyle "KP" Reilly @KPdatpiff.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H3 – Nov 23 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:51


Kyle Rittenhouse blasts his former attorneys, including Lin Wood, in Tucker Carlson Interview. The teen said he was “taken advantage” of and is now battling with his former representation for $2 million in funds raised to post his bond. Have MSNBC's executives reached their breaking point? Are Clay and Buck on Joy Reid's hate list yet? They hope so! Record number of container ships outside Long Beach harbor. Will Cain, co-host of Fox & Friends Weekend, joins the show to talk with C&B about the media's appalling coverage of Rittenhouse and the WTA standing up to China. Clay raves: The new Ghostbusters film is fantastic! Buck is going to see it. Great family film for the Thanksgiving weekend. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

What Up, Long Beach?!
Long Beach High School Football Championship Preview Interviews

What Up, Long Beach?!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:52


This week we're interviewing players and coaches from the four Long Beach football teams who are playing a CIF Southern Section championship game this weekend. 13:30 Long Beach Poly head coach Stephen Barbee 18:10 Long Beach Poly senior Donovan Poe 19:00 Long Beach Poly senior Jalen Johnson 20:45 Jordan head coach Tim Wedlow 23:00 Jordan senior Jeremie McGurn 25:30 Jordan Principal Keisha Irving 27:00 Compton head coach Calvin Bryant 30:30 Compton senior Aava Lilmaiava 32:30 St. Anthony head coach Raul Lara

On the Evidence
Removing Barriers to Child Care for Parents in Education and Training Programs | Episode 66

On the Evidence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:40


In the United States, education and training programs are available to help adults with low incomes secure better jobs and earn higher wages. But, of an estimated 21 million parents with low incomes nationwide, only about 1 in 10 participated in such programs. One reason the participation rate isn't higher? Inadequate supply of affordable and convenient child care options. The lack of child is a major barrier for parents with low incomes who want to engage in training, acquire new skills, increase their earnings, and advance their careers. In 2016 the U.S. Department of Labor launched a five-year federal grant program called the Strengthening Working Families Initiative (SWFI) to remove barriers to child care for parents with low incomes who wanted to participate in education and training programs. SWFI provided 13 grantees in 12 states with up to $4 million each. The grantees were a mix of nonprofits, local workforce development boards, institutions of higher learning, and municipalities. As part of the initiative, Mathematica provided technical assistance to SWFI grantees to assist them with identifying areas for improvement, co-creating solutions, and assessing progress. The latest episode of On the Evidence explores lessons from SWFI that can inform federal policies and programs, as well as cross-sector community partnerships at the local level that help parents participate in education and training by removing barriers to child care. This episode features the following guests: • Robin Fernkas, the deputy administrator for the Office of Workforce Investment at the U.S. Department of Labor • Shalonda Jackson, a working mom in Mississippi who completed a pre-apprenticeship training program and found a job in the shipbuilding industry afterward • Carol Burnett, the executive director of Moore Community House, a SWFI grantee in Mississippi that provides workforce training to women as well as early childhood education • Ruth Mazara, a program manager at Moore Community House • Nick Schultz, the executive director of the Pacific Gateway Workforce Innovation Network, a public agency in Long Beach, California, that received a SWFI grant • Sandra Dafiaghor, who directs OAI Chicago Southland, a workforce development agency that received a SWFI grant • David Moore, who directed the SwiftStart program for Total Action for Progress, a workforce development agency in Virginia that received a SWFI grant • Nickie Fung, a researcher at Mathematica who provided technical assistance to SWFI grantees Find a full transcript of the episode here: https://www.mathematica.org/blogs/removing-barriers-to-child-care-for-parents-in-education-and-training-programs Learn more about Mathematica's work on SWFI here: mathematica.org/projects/strengthening-working-families-initiatives

KQED's The California Report
Congressman Seeks to Restore Land to Karuk Tribe

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 18:15


1,000 acres of sacred land could be restored to the Karuk tribe living along the Klamath River in Humboldt and Siskiyou counties. That's if legislation introduced in Congress is passed. Reporter: Danielle Venton, KQED  Diablo Canyon in San Luis Obispo County is the state's last commercial nuclear power plant and is set to close in the coming years. But the planned closure is not without controversy. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report The DMV is expanding its capacity to administer commercial driving tests, by extending weekend hours and shifting examiners from other parts of the state to Southern California. The hope is that it can clear some of the backlog at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Reporter: Keith Mizuguchi, The California Report Universal preschool is coming to California in 2025. Yet not everyone is celebrating. In fact, some believe universal preschool could have disastrous consequences for child care centers and families seeking early care, with the impact falling hardest on communities of color.  Reporter: Deepa Fernandes, early childhood reporting fellow at Pacific Oaks College, which is funded in part by First 5 LA

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP280 - Anker Innovations Head of Global Communications Eric Villines

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:01


EP280 - Anker Innovations Head of Global Communications Eric Villines Eric Villines is the Global Head of Communications for Anker Innovations. Anker is one of the most successful brands to be started on the Amazon platform. In this broad ranging interview, we discuss the origin story of Anker, their evolution from early Amazon FBA seller to Global Omni-channel brand. Eric covers their incubator, Anker Innovation, and their Amazon FBA consulting service OceanWing. We also discuss his recent book, Get Funded!: The Startup Entrepreneur's Guide to Seriously Successful Fundraising. Episode 280 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Wednesday. November 17th, 2021. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:00] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 280 being recorded on Wednesday November 17th 2021 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:15] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners Jason is a fellow Gadget addict one of our favorite brands that we love from consumer perspective is Anchor and then we also spend a lot of time here on the show talking about anchor because it's a very interesting brand that is one of the few that we call kind of digitally native Amazon born so today on the show we are very excited to welcome Eric villines he is the head of Global Communications at anchor and is based out of Sunny Seattle Eric welcome to the show. Eric: [0:50] Thanks for having me we've also been having about two months of rain so we're living up to our our cliche. Jason: [0:59] That for the last two months that might have sounded bad but being here in Chicago I have a feeling that rain is about to start looking pretty good to me. Eric: [1:07] Yeah means known cold and wind. Jason: [1:09] Exactly all of the above although it's been pretty mild so far. Eric before we jump into all the anchor discussions we always like to get sort of a brief background about our guests and maybe you could tell us what your role is an anchor. Eric: [1:25] Sure so I run Global Communications at anchor Innovations which is essentially a fancy way of saying public relations. Which in time it's sort of corporate Communications you could be crisis Corporate social responsibility and then obviously the most exciting part of what I do which would be product PR dealing with the media on reviews and, I'm getting the word out of on the cool gadgets we. Jason: [1:51] That's awesome so does that mean you have one of everything. Eric: [1:55] I have two of everything. It's a funny story I've worked in consumer electronics for a long time and I remember Steven Yang who hired me personally for the role, I remember I was in China and I said I want to make sure that I've got budget to give everyone on my team, you know one of the products and he giggled and I'm absolutely serious, we all have to you know live it and breathe it and love it and know the good and the bad aspects of all of our products because we're talking with the media all the time so I kind of. I'm kind of insistent that everyone on my team has the products and then the other part is we all we can never run out of battery that's like that's like a major faux pas here, if I ever hear the words even coming out of my own mouth that my phone is almost out of juice that's super bad as a charging company. Jason: [2:45] That does seem off brand I am I have a little bit of a fetish for your products and the thing I've noticed is every time I have a family gathering I get completely cleaned out. Eric: [2:57] Oh yeah there is. Jason: [2:58] So I yeah I didn't realize you were in such a replenishment category but it's ended up being one for me. Eric: [3:04] It's funny because I started out an entertainment before I came into consumer electronics and one of the first things I did here because I'm just using my own family Dynamics as I have three children. And my wife of course is involved in this as well and we steal each other's cables constantly and then we lie to each other, about you know and it's gotten so bad that people take you know colored Sharpies and all sorts of things but we had done a survey, on you know what are some of the most irritating things that happen in the family and this came in like is a top four. People stealing each other's charging components and then lying about it so it's a national issue that we just haven't spent enough time talking about. Jason: [3:48] Yeah we'll have to dedicate a whole nother show to solving that problem one last product related question do you have a favorite anchor products. Eric: [3:57] Well gosh I so we have these new cables that you said fetish I don't want to take it too far but it's. It's the material that's made out of is reminds me of certain things and that Dominion but it's a super soft latex like, cable that seems to never because of the material it seems to never not up. And that's one of my favorite things and they come in all these super cool colors and that's really new for us we've always offered two colors a beautiful white and the Beautiful Black Version, and so this year we started getting into more colors and that's been really exciting because that's a really easy way to distinguish your product from say your son's because you can have different colors but the material it's really nice I keep them in my bag I've got him for all my products. Those are really cool we launched a new line of Mag go products which we have a desk version which allows you to, put your phone against and it'll you know magnetically charged it but the battery is removable so you can actually bring it with you, so it serves two purposes and I keep that like in the kitchen so when I'm cooking and I have my recipes but then I can grab it and go. So those are really cool but I mean man we launch new products every day so you ask me next week I'm going to tell you something completely different. Scot: [5:23] Yeah this is an unsolicited but my favorite is there's a little Hub you guys have for the Macbook so I can just plug in one USB C and I've got this thing I'm looking at it now it looks like a mutated octopus with with 800 things, poking out of it that I no longer have to plug into my MacBook so you're you're saving me a lot of ports which I really appreciate. Eric: [5:40] Yeah as they move to usb-c only but you still had a myriad of other things you needed to connect to it. Scot: [5:47] Yeah well now the magsafe is a now they're back yeah they decided they're giving you guys too much Martin said so now they now they have like they're like oh man when you need to add more stuff you know. Eric: [5:57] Well I've talked to a lot of pro users and they're really excited to see the HDMI cable come back it's just a you know it's a strong connection that cables is still different. And sometimes it's a huge hassle putting a hub attached to the computer and then attaching your HDMI cable and everything else to it. Scot: [6:16] Yeah absolutely especially when you're traveling and you're popping into someone else's conference room you'd never have that one little cable, so we obviously we talked a lot about anchor on the show and we can just kind of stopped fan blowing on the on the user side would love to hear kind of your view of the founding story of anchor, you know we kind of classify it as you heard is this kind of like Amazon born would love to know how you guys tell that story. Eric: [6:43] Yeah I mean it's you know I had relatives that move during the Dust Bowl and move to Pasadena and built. You know a chain of gas stations and it's this true Americana story but he what's interesting is I think Steven Yang story is very similar it is that that's story of an idea and perseverance and building and Global brand that. People have in their purses and backpacks even if they don't know it's anchor there's a strong probability that it is and that's that's one is exciting the others a branding dilemma. But Stephen was a senior engineer in California at Google and he had he was trying to find a new battery for his Toshiba laptop. [7:32] And as he was looking online including Amazon and the Toshiba websites he realized he had sort of two choices you either going to buy the one from Toshiba that was super expensive, for take a chance, on all of these other versions white-label versions and unknown brands on Amazon and and purchase one from their sort of buyer beware. And he kind of had a light bulb moment and thought you know this is this is ridiculous like who are the people that are putting these online how they've been tested how can I know that, what I'm buying is going to work with my laptop and you know give me a year of battery life. Long story short he moved back to China with his wife who was then his fiance he took a small loan from his mom. And he started anchor and in the beginning what Stephen did was go around to different factories and and Developers, and with his engineers and they went and tested all these batteries so in the beginning it was a white label play was him finding and filtering through. [8:38] I'll just say it a lot of garbage and trying to find the absolute best, alternatives to all of these laptop batteries and they started selling those through Amazon and that was the first point was the easiest place for them and selling specifically and exclusively to the United States. A year later it was a massive success beyond anything that he had ever imagined, and the next logical step was to take that concept and move it into mobility and start looking at mobile phones and chargers and portable batteries and all these things that were at the time, really starting to come out but the big difference when he went into Mobility is the idea was we need to get as fast out of, the white labeling as we can because we have some ideas that even these these smaller factories and people that were producing, can are doing that we can find ways to make it better, so that sort of unearth the world of you know contract manufacturing where they're Engineers were developing and designing, you know the specifics and then Contracting manufacturers to develop those products and the rest as they say is history. Ironically today we are celebrating our 10-year anniversary actually last month. [9:58] And that's a pretty big deal so we went from a guy and his wife. And a little mama money from his mom to a you know a multibillion-dollar company. With multiple Brands and over 3,000 employees all around the world. So in addition to charging which is still a huge huge part of our, DNA we've developed a number of Brands subsequently over the last three to four years everything from robotic vacuums and future robotic products, to home security high-end true wireless headsets. Smart Home Entertainment pet products baby socks I mean like you know smart baby socks I mean just like the whole gamut. [10:45] And the sort of the common line through all of this is that Steven and his team are constantly looking for areas within an emerging or establish consumer electronics area where they can bring value. And you know usually we might come in and the play might be okay we're going to come up with a really great product that's going to be, a little lower cost and that gets our foothold and then the the long-term strategy is then to LeapFrog over the competitors with something truly innovative. And this is kind of a phenomenon that's worked really really well. For Stephen and his engineers and the marketing teams and all of our sales people around the world. Scot: [11:28] Did he have an industrial design background hurry just had the pain and kind of cheeses and created the company from there. Eric: [11:37] Well he's a Hitman he's a True Blood engineer so I mean he's he's right at that right at the hardware level and into coding and all of that so the industrial design. Was not his core competency so bringing in people that that could fill in, those areas and ultimately well they say 10 years later we brought color right but of course then we had great devices that worked really well but we're but when we look at industrial design, I would say that you know that's what's going to propel us over the next 10 years with with the Thinker charging. Scot: [12:14] Yeah it's been the you know I really like kind of the functional but still kind of modern kind of vibe you guys have with your products it's really nice is he still with the company is you still still involved. Eric: [12:27] Yeah yeah I mean I talked to him regularly he is very approachable. It's interesting because he shares his office with two other people at the company and it's kind of this kitchen table set up he doesn't have a private office, because there's so much collaboration and you look around the company we're all like that even though I'm in Seattle, and in my office I do the same thing with my team we just take some long tables and we connect them up and everyone just sits on them because it's like jazz we're just constantly. You know coming up with ideas and talking and it's just more efficient. Jason: [13:06] I do want a Lobby by the way I feel like you have some cool colors now you have like a like a lavender and a mint but what you really need is like a retailgeek blue I think would be. Eric: [13:18] Retailgeek blue yeah. Jason: [13:20] Yeah I could send you the PMS colors at that. Eric: [13:22] Okay yeah send me the Pantone colors yeah the, yeah I mean we I would think the colors are sort of muted so they're they're a joke they don't offend anyone so they're not they're not super striking their kind of muted across the color spectrum but so far they've been. They've been received really really well there's there's an old joke and consumer electronics that people are always screaming for color. And then when you look at the sales and you find it's the white and black that sell the most. So it's like you need to have the color but in the end most people end up choosing the the kind of safer black and white. Jason: [14:05] Yeah now I actually I'll be honest the style of the colors fine and actually think they are attractive kind of pastel colors but the it's just nice to have a diversity because I actually have a system like I have one color for my USBC cables. Eric: [14:19] Mmm. Jason: [14:20] One color for my lightning cables so that I can you know quickly distinguish them in my back. Eric: [14:24] You're not messing around man. Jason: [14:27] I have a little I have a problem. So I it's funny in the early days of these kind of digitally native direct to Consumer Brands there used to be this religious battle there were companies that were like. And the path to the customer through Amazon we're going to sell this stuff on Amazon and I would characterize anchor as the poster child for the most successful brand that was born. By primarily making themselves available on Amazon and selling through Amazon's traffic. But for every company like that there was another company that's like that's crazy Amazon is going to steal your customer and knock you off and they're all these you know potential, downfalls to Amazon and you know we should own the customer ourselves and we should have our own website and so increasingly that became the Shopify contingency and so it used to be, you know a company was either an Amazon company or a Shopify company. And more recently I feel like the increasingly the answer is not or it's and that. You know the consumers on Amazon so you need to be on Amazon but you also do have consumers that want to buy direct and you should have your own website and. My proof point for that is I want to say in the last year or so anchor has launched its own Shopify site so I now can shop anchor on Amazon but also on your own direct website is that like. [15:54] Like you got did you guys have debates and conversations about that and was that a very overt decision or is it just something where you just swept up a Shopify side at some point and you really still think of yourself as an Amazon only company. Eric: [16:07] Well there's a lot to unpack I'm going to I'm going to try to I'm going to try to find the question in that statement, the first of all we started definitely start on Amazon and one of the things I would argue about Amazon is that it is direct, so whether you're selling on your website you know or you're selling on Amazon you're ultimately. [16:29] Selling direct through the Amazon platform and you're engaging with your customers and your you know you're dealing with customer service and all the things you would normally do so I think Amazon has been a great partner and it is it continues to be definitely a big part of our DNA. But as we evolved into different regions around the world you know that there are different channels, that in our sort of different stages of development but the omni-channel approach meaning, you know in our case Amazon which is always a big part of us our own website which is great for Branding and direct connection and through our Retail Partners because in the United States were sold everywhere we're sold at you know Best Buy Walmart Target, Etc you can go to medium art overseas, so we don't see ourselves as just a single Channel we definitely are see ourselves is an omni-channel but I think you know Amazon is provide us an incredible platform to launch on, the ability the ability I think for a person that has a great product looking to sell something and any part of the world where Amazon is is so convenient and so easy. [17:41] And you know the financial Commitment if you're just starting out and you're Distributing your products the platform has evolved its improved. And it's ultimately pretty easy to get going on the platform without you know a tremendous amount of financial backing. Jason: [18:02] Yep and it is interesting because you have you know been a heavy practitioner on the platform from the early days in it does feel like it's evolved a lot. From your guys's perspective do you still feel like there's a. Competitive advantage in knowing the platform better than other sellers like it feels like there's a lot of levers to pull now and I mean you know different companies with different levels of sophistication in their Amazon presents. Why does everybody learning all the best practices now and they're sort of parody or do you feel like you guys can still kind of win more than your fair share of eyeballs on Amazon. Eric: [18:38] I mean we we've been doing this for you know for 10 years now and so they're the they're the tools and there's the Instinct and then there's the the lessons learned from the billions of mistakes that we've made, along the way and I don't know those things are those things are harder to I think grass for people that are just coming into the space so I think we absolutely have an advantage, but you know I mean I think it's not magic it takes a lot of work and a lot of patience, and a lot of observation, you know if you're putting a listing on Amazon and you're putting that listing in Italy or France or the UK or whatever, you know simply Translating that listing into the local language is just the bare minimum I mean you're dealing with customer service and being able to communicate. With customers being able to deliver products on time being able to answer their questions be able to take returns and then that's you know even before you've really thought about marketing because there are. [19:44] Something like nine million sellers on Amazon right now and that is a huge ocean, just filled and filled with Fish And you are you're battling against the the those eyeballs every day. Organic search or even direct search you're going to you know if you go up and look for toothpaste I mean you know, in the search engine you're going to see a myriad of players in there including you know ones that are common Brands to others that seem interesting and what's going to draw the eyeball away from the common brand that everyone knows too, the new brand what's going to make the consumer just try and reach out a discover you and take that extra effort so everyone going on to any platform, that may deal with a bunch of Brands is dealing with you know millions of competitors and it stopped. [20:39] I think getting set up on the platform and getting started is easy but that's that's you know that's step one, but then you got to get people seeing your listings and you got to get people reading your listings and you got to get people putting stuff in their shopping cart and clicking the shopping cart and, fulfilling and then you know being there at the end of that process to give them great customer service in every language, where you're selling that product because if you can't do that and that last part is critical, you're going to get bad reviews and people don't buy products with two and sometimes even three star ratings when you're dealing with you know consumer electronics they're looking for four and five. So you could have the greatest product in the world but you could have a lot of mad consumers out there where you haven't done right by them and they're not going to give you some great star ratings and you can pretty much. You know kiss your Prosperity goodbye. Jason: [21:33] Yeah I sometimes describe it as a. A darwinian meritocracy that like you know if you think about old school if you sell a product to Walmart and they give you shelf space and you screw up and run out of stock, you lose all the sales while you're out of stock but the day you restock your back on the Shelf your kind of entitled to that that shelf position. The duration of a program but you have to earn that visibility in the front of the Amazon shelf what every minute through a wide variety of best practices and if you screw up, you fall off that shelf and when you get back in stock you don't get your spot back you got to climb back up the hill. Eric: [22:10] Yeah yeah I mean especially now in today's climate there's a lot of. Material shortages and other things and that's been you know super painful for four people across every, line of business not just consumer electronics and that very same thing you know you're working hard to develop customer base and then, you don't have the materials to produce the products or the factories that you're working with and then you can't fulfill you been all this great marketing you brought everyone to your front door and then, grab we don't have any products, and that's it's painful to see for especially you know entrepreneurs and people new to the game because they have brilliant ideas and great products and. You know they've done an amazing job building word-of-mouth and it's super sad to see that fail at that last step. Jason: [23:03] For sure that actually is a great segue we're recording this in mid-november double 11 day just happened Black Friday is next week. As we sit here I think there's something like ninety one container ships off the coast of Long Beach either a bunch of cool new anchor products like trapped in those boats what's holiday looking like for you are you guys well well stocked and well positioned. Eric: [23:30] I think we are with some things and we could be better and other things I mean again we have the advantage of having a lot of skus so we I would say it's easier for us, to adapt, then than others and you know I can say from my perspective if I go out on a media to and September and I show a lot of really cool gadgets. And then we reach the end of October and I'm like well crap so that isn't coming we're going to we're going to delay that because of something it is what it is what we're used to it. But we have so many skus that you know we were Prime day or Black Friday or Cyber Monday or just basic Christmas shopping or Hanukkah shopping we've got something, so we can adapt it will get past it. Jason: [24:23] Yeah speaking of which I given that you're in the consumer at Rackspace is CES ordinarily a big part of your marketing mix. Eric: [24:32] I would say it is I think in the new world order it isn't as important for us. But we you know we've done Big Boost and we've done stuff and you know our sales teams of gone out there I think it's wait and see. This January we've done some some interviews with with media and I think we found that maybe forty percent of those that normally attend are coming, the rest are waiting and seeing we didn't do a booth this year I've also heard from our sales team that their counterparts at some of the retailers may not be coming in January as well. So I don't know is it going to be like a bad prom or nobody dances. I think we're going to have to wait and see I think maybe for many it's going to be a real last minute decision. Jason: [25:25] Yeah it's interesting I've attended like 28 CES has and I'm not going and, talking which I used to catch a flu at CES every single year so it's the I'm not care. I think Tom Clancy wrote a book where like the terrorist likes bedspread the biological Weapon by disseminating it at CES just for. Eric: [25:47] Perfect yeah I think it's you know I think people I think you have to have a vaccination card this time around to get in I think that's what I've heard but yeah I mean from point A to Z you know your. There's a lot of airplanes. Jason: [26:02] I'm kind of curious I think less people are going to but then the magic question is. Does that kind of will they discover that the world didn't end when they didn't go and put your point like does that accelerate the changing World Order and CES becomes less important or you know is this just going to be a down year and next year they'll be back to normal I think, that's going to be interesting to watch. Eric: [26:22] Yeah I mean there's CS is just the beginning you've got Mobile World Congress you've got aoife you've got you know as we move into next year and all of them are going to have to be making those tough decisions. And then I think that the repercussions of companies that didn't go in the world didn't sink either going to be wondering you know what are these what's the value of these trade shows. To us as a business you know I think for us they're valuable you know on the one end of the communication Spectrum it's super beneficial to scale our pitching by having an enormous number of people from all around the world in ones. But it's also very noisy so you know you're competing with a lot of large names. And we've always been very Scrappy so we tend to do a lot of are moving and communication before CES. And after CES or even entirely outside of the you know the wake of any of these trade shows. So and that's that's generally how we've been successful. Scot: [27:27] Brickell any other interesting holiday Trends or anything you guys noticed as we've kind of gone through covid and or kind of hopefully coming out the back side. Eric: [27:37] Yeah I mean I you know not to sound boring but charging is always a big thing during the holidays people bought their new iPhones people are buying new MacBooks people are buying peripherals. And you know around that time usually you know a couple of weeks later when they lost their cables already or you know they realize they won't one for travel and they wanted to stay home and they want one in their home office and they want one in the kitchen, so it's always a good time for us in that category, so charging definitely the other big part of our business right now is audio so our sound Core Audio brand, we develop a super popular line of true wireless headphones the Liberty series, and one of the things that makes it unique is we work with a bunch of grammy award-winning Engineers to help us tune them, so they would come out of the box sounding like the mix that the engineers originally in planned versus over based or over traveled, that's been really really popular for us all around the world I mean as far as India hugely popular in the United States the UK Germany, Emerging Markets that's a big thing and then I'd say home security that's been a big a big Boon for us we launched our home security brand yuffie about three years ago. [28:59] And you know we're developing a lot of unique products in that space that separate us from the rest for one we don't we don't use the cloud when you buy the product at your. [29:12] All of the footage is captured on a secure SD card that's integrated either into the base station or the independent products that you put outside the house. Which is really cool and we have millions of users around the world right now, using that product because they see it not only is protecting your security but also their privacy. [29:32] You'll see a lot of people do personal gifts to themselves during the holiday so a lot of those those big, tend to be you know people in a house saying hey how about we get this for ourselves for Christmas, and and we recently launched a super-smart robotic vacuum called the X8 it's are you fee robotic vacuum. That's super smart so instead of bumping into walls and trying to figure things out at uses both Visual and Laser mapping. And will actually draw up a map of your house that you can look at on your phone, and see it's how it's found the most ingenious way of cleaning around chairs and couches and other things and making sure that it can do everything and then you can create zones, I didn't say well I just want to let stay away from the baby room because the baby's sleeping but you can clean this Zone and that zone and this Zone. That's been really popular and we had been doing kind of lower in robotic vacuums until that point. Entry level and this was one of our first push and super-premium summarize forleo some but that LeapFrog, so in the beginning we might find Our Place coming in as as a lower-cost alternative that still is super quality, and then with the X8 we're doing the LeapFrog moment and trying to jump past the competition with the technology. Scot: [30:59] Frankel, so one of the things we want to do is Pivot you guys have some other innovations that are not gadgets or charging or anything like that, you guys launched a new division that both Jason and I were excited to learn more about called ocean wing. My guess was it was drones but I think that's wrong tell you tell us more about what ocean when you. Eric: [31:24] Yeah so I say first with the title but when I first started working with anchor Innovations in the United States over four years now, I was actually working for ocean Lee that was our that was how we presented our Corporation, and the the story is that it was ocean Wing to essentially take our technology and fly across the Pacific or Atlantic Ocean and bring it to the United States. So when the idea came up of developing a Consulting business, under anchor Innovations the ocean Wing name came up again and simple it's actually makes a hell of a lot more sense for this than it may have Hazard LLC in the United States when we were bringing anchored to the United States. [32:14] But long story short we established in 2019 so we've been around awhile we have about 200 employees around the world. And the long and the short of it is that we're trying to take the the decade of experience that we've developed. Again with all those mistakes along the way to become you know the 7 billion dollar, consumer electronics company and give people an option to improve their business lines, so that's from the beginning to the end of the process and what we're looking for is companies that have already gone in and let's just say made their first 10 million, and they've hit a wall. [32:55] Because they haven't been able to expand the business or scale either through supply chain issues through fulfillment customer service maybe the advertising has become, complicated and convoluted because they've developed so many skus there's just so many problems that when someone reaches a certain point and they want to get to that next 10 or 20 million dollars when they're doing business, it's a different skill set, you know what they've done is worked it to a certain point and they is try as they might they can't get past that threshold and that's where we come in, so we're developing essential overall Amazon selling and operations processes that could be digital marketing marketing insights, advertising management helping them develop their Brand store and their product pages to customer service and relationship management which I mentioned earlier is. Reticle to get those star ratings in a good place through good authentic communication with your customers in a great experience with the products. [33:59] Obviously e-commerce and all the financial systems, and then what we're dealing with a lot these days is supply chain and Logistics management so you get yourself to a certain point and there's a lot of people that are coming to us and that is the area, where they're really hurting the most and they need help they need help developing new contacts new supply chain partners, for how do I deal with the issue if you're dealing with something that might spoil like we're dealing with a company that, deals in collagen and when something spits on one of those tankers out in the middle of the ocean for too long when it arrives in the warehouse, it's past its fresh state so you've just lost all that inventory so each client is unique, but with this kind of broad scope of things that we can help them with and we can help audit the business and hopefully help them transcend whatever's keeping them from moving to that next 10 and 20 and 30 million dollars. Jason: [34:59] Very interesting so going back to our earlier conversation this is sort of a way for other young young Brands to leverage all the expertise and skills you guys have have built-in staying on top of this ecosystem. Eric: [35:14] Exactly it's an opportunity for us to take what we've learned and apply it to that young brand I couldn't have said it better myself. Jason: [35:22] Yeah and it at this point is ocean Wing primarily focused with Amazon distribution or would they also leverage all the other distribution channels that you guys have expanded into. Eric: [35:36] Yeah I mean I think I think our sweet spot is definitely FBA so specifically Amazon. That is not to say that we can't help them with other things like supply chain and Logistics but for us, it's a recipe and you know where we've had our success with the clients have come in or people that have been focused on Amazon and then we can kind of look at what they're doing and we can evolve the recipe a little bit, and and get it all the ingredients in place and help them be successful because they all work together, so but I would say Amazon is definitely our primary focus right now at least dealing with businesses that are on Amazon that isn't to say that these businesses are you solely focused Amazon because they're not but Amazon is a key Channel especially if they're going globally and that's where we come in. Jason: [36:31] Got it and obviously over the last year there's kind of been a lot of Buzz around these I'll call them FB a roll ups where you know these, these companies have raised a bunch of money and they go out and acquire Brands and aggregate them and try to help them with their Amazon presents and we you know we've followed thrash Co and perch and, and all of those is, is this kind of your version of that do you see your value prop being different than those other companies or is it just that you have. Sort of more experience and and product scale than some of these companies. Eric: [37:05] How to say this without sounding like it like it's not a jerk but the again we this is what we do, this is how we built our business so we can take. The lessons learned the hard ones too and we can apply it to our clients and I think that alone is super unique that we're a company that's already done this and you know in spades, and now we can apply those learnings to irregular company the other part of it is that most consultancies are focused on Consulting, and but we're a consultant that actually you know rolls up our sleeves and gets into the nitty-gritty of the business and helps and and and that's really depending on the level of the contract or the engagement but you're not only dealing company that can come in and, say some pretty words and show you a powerpoint of what you should be doing, but you know we've already done it and we can roll up our sleeves and get deep in there with you and help you do it or do it. And then that last part in terms of supply chain and and Logistics and you know dealing with manufacturers around the world or suppliers and stuff I think that's a definitely a secret sauce because of our relationships. In China and around the world that we can bring to bear that others can't. Scot: [38:23] So I'd be remiss as the entrepreneur on the show if I noticed in your bio on LinkedIn you have written a book and it's very much in my wheelhouse it's called get funded the startup entrepreneurs guide to seriously successful fundraising I wish I'd had this 20 years ago but I'm glad it exists now tell us tell us about this book and how it came to be. Eric: [38:46] Well my writing partner John Biggs is a little bit of a media icon we've known each other for I think I took them on a media tour maybe 12 13 years ago and. [38:58] We just became very good friends and our families have subsequently traveled the world with each other and we just kind of dig each other and we both have the same kind of sense of humor and sensibilities. [39:10] A couple of years ago he reached out to me that he had been approached by McGraw-Hill to write this book, and thought that I could help provide sort of the second part of the book so the book is broken out into two parts one is is about financing but written in such a way that whether you're trying to develop a taco truck, or you know a retail store or something else what are the different options out there from let's say SBA Loans to even using cryptocurrency, 22 you know set up fundraising all the way down to the meetings and how you value the company how do you pitch people, how do you put presentations together, so very very very this is not this is for the person that was really starting out with very limited knowledge, on the fundraising process and how do you present yourself at the end of the day so John really focus more on the fundraising side and I focus more on the presentation skills, how to pitch how to talk how to prepare how to answer questions the technical aspects of doing a presentation when everything goes wrong. Obviously if I could if I could rewrite a whole section on this now since the book was published last year in September I probably be a whole section on how to pitch during covid because that was. [40:35] That was definitely not it was not a reality when we were writing the book but it was definitely a reality by the time the book was published and I hope and we've heard, the people the industry has adapted that investors and seed funders and people are hard at work and investing but, for the person that might not have the background in this I still think the book for evaluating your company, getting all your ducks in a row building your presentations and how to pitch is still very valuable. Scot: [41:12] Very cool yet this kind of books I think they're kind of Evergreen and it's kind of a little snowball kind of effort so be patient it'll it'll catch up. Jason: [41:22] I am curious it does feel like there's a little bit of a disruption in the fundraising World why you know there for a long time there's this kind of traditional VC path, and obviously there's still a lot of money that flows through that path but I feel like the the role of Angel Investors and sort of other untraditional fundraising. Is becoming more common than it used to be like you guys try to cover that those kind of approaches in the book as well or is it mostly focused on on moving through Sandhill Road. Eric: [41:52] Well it's we wanted it in some ways to be the antithesis of Silicon Valley so for those people that are going down that road you know inevitably they're going to partner up. Let's say at the app generation. They're going to partner up and kind of go down that road our book really tries to focus everything from the pros and cons of using your own credit card friends and family, crowdfunding as I said SBA Loans if you're a minority or women owned business looking at options they're looking at. Prices and options like through FedEx has a great program for entrepreneurs and trying to cover the whole gamut, so we could make fundraising more reasonable and open to the entrepreneur is opposed to. Yeah the tech bro going to Silicon Valley and looking for for someone's bill. Scot: [42:45] Awesome I had one follow-up on Ocean we just took kind of clarify it for listeners you guys are your kind of more in the agency side of things you're not going out there and finding, new brands that are also born on Amazon and acquiring of in kind of rolling them up like the thrashes of the world is do I have that right. Eric: [43:04] We're talking about anchor Innovations right. Scot: [43:07] Yeah the ocean Wing synchronization set. Eric: [43:12] Well on the ocean on the ocean Wing side it's definitely consultative but I mean those things are going to evolve as the business comes in and I don't know if you mean like Financial stakes and the business and stuff but. I mean who knows right if if something came along that looked amazing and a great partnership I'm sure we would consider that. On the anchor Innovation side I think you'll be seeing and you know in the future probably incubator initiatives and things like that, it would be to me it would be a personally exciting to get involved in as seeking out and finding you know exciting. Developers all around the world we tend to be very myopic here and look at the United States as being, where everything's happening and I'd say you know maybe from apps and things like that might be true but when you're looking at Innovation and medicine or innovation and Robotics or innovation and Farm Technology or whatever, you really have to look outside and around the world and you're going to find that Innovation and really unique an unassuming places. So is is if we do get into more ink you know becoming more of a global incubator, I would imagine in our direction would be all over the place and looking in places like India and Africa and you know wherever cool things are being developed. Scot: [44:34] Cool so no almost boundless growth opportunities for you guys it sounds like an exciting time. Jason: [44:44] Well this is certainly going to be a exciting and different holiday season and this is going to be a great place to leave this conversation because it is happen again we've Perfectly Used up our allotted time, But Eric we really appreciate your time and enjoyed hearing about anchoring some of the exciting new initiatives there. Eric: [45:05] Thanks God and thanks Jason. Scot: [45:07] Yeah if anyone wanted to follow you or you are you big on Tick-Tock or I said it's usually or Twitter or LinkedIn or you publish their and then where should they go for some good the latest Anchor Information. Eric: [45:22] Someone can connect with me on LinkedIn my focus to be quite Frank with you as I'm So Married to my work as I tend to focus my communication through work as opposed to myself. I think it's one of those things when you work in Communications you got to be careful about what use you say. So mostly I'm just talking about my company in the things that we do. Jason: [45:49] Awesome well we will put a link to your LinkedIn profile in there and certainly some links to Anchor and until next time happy commercing!

Best Book Ever
076 Lya Badgley on "Hunters in the Dark" by Lawrence Osborne

Best Book Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:48


Lya Badgley has led a fascinating life, and talking to her about the role books have played in her life was a fantastic conversation. She introduced me to the atmospheric thrillers of Lawrence Osborne, who we'll be hearing a lot more from in the near future – all of his books have been optioned for movies. Lya and I also discussed writers who communicate an immersive sense of place, her life as a rock star, and how she hung on to her humanity while documenting some of the worst atrocities humans have ever committed. Support the Best Book Ever Podcast on Patreon   Follow the Best Book Ever Podcast on Instagram or on the Best Book Ever Website   Host: Julie Strauss Website/Instagram     Guest: Lya Badgely Website/Instagram/Facebook   Do you have a book you want to tell me about? Go HERE to apply to be a guest on the Best Book Ever Podcast.   Discussed in this episode: Hunters in the Dark by Lawrence Osborne The Foreigner's Confession by Lya Badgely (releases Feb 1, 2022; available for pre-order now) From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg (Has anyone else noticed how often my guests refer to this book? It's one of my all-time favorites, too!) The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith The Wet and the Dry: A Drinker's Journey by Lawrence Osborne In the Shadow of the Banyan: A Novel by Vaddey Ratner The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris   Discussed in the Patreon Exclusive Clip Cambodian Amok The Cambodian Community in Long Beach, California (Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links, meaning I get a few bucks off your purchase at no extra expense to you. Anytime you shop for books, you can use my affiliate link on Bookshop, which also supports Indie Bookstores around the country. If you're shopping for everything else – clothes, office supplies, gluten-free pasta, couches – you can use my affiliate link for Amazon. Thank you for helping to keep the Best Book Ever Podcast in business!)

The Jason Cavness Experience
Sasha Horne Award Winning Storyteller, Communications Strategist and Creative Entrepreneur

The Jason Cavness Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 62:16


On this episode of the Jason Cavness Experience I talk to Sasha Horne - An award-winning multiplatform storyteller, communications strategist, and creative entrepreneur We talk about the following Her Gullah heritage How she uses tech for good Perks of Ambition Sasha Talks Tech Sasha's Bio Empowering Millennials and Gen-Zers of diverse backgrounds to make their voices heard is the passion of Sasha Horne. An award-winning multiplatform storyteller, communications strategist, and creative entrepreneur Sasha is known for her work in front of the camera as a reporter, host, and creator of Sasha Talks Tech. She's now a leading subject matter expert in digital media strategy and an advocate for promoting digital equity and using tech for good. Sasha's tenure in broadcast journalism started more than a decade ago as a graduate fellow at CNN world headquarters in Atlanta. From there she went on to cover a variety of topics from politics and entertainment to technology and health. Some of her most memorable assignments include covering the 2012 Tea Party movement across the southern United States, the 2016 DNC and legalization of cannabis in more than a dozen states and the shooting death of Michael Brown by police in Ferguson, Missouri. Her work appeared on-air and online for dozens of mainstream and niche media outlets including NPR, Forbes, ABC News, CBS, Fox, and most recently BET Digital. A Beaufort, South Carolina native of Gullah heritage, Sasha earned her Bachelor's degree in Communications from the College of Charleston and her Master's degree in Journalism from Georgetown University. After appearing as “The Journalist” on ABC's cult classic “Whodunnit? (2013) Sasha relocated from the East coast to Los Angeles where she launched Sasha Talks Tech, an online resource for gadget, product, and app reviews. What started as a blog quickly expanded to include television segments, podcasts and speaking engagements across the globe covering red carpet interviews with global founders of diverse backgrounds at Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal, as a startup panel judge at the Dublin Tech Summit in Ireland, and as moderator at Wonder Women Tech in Long Beach and Keynote speaker at the Tennessee Technology Student Association State Conference. She is also a sought after speaker and host and has hosted live and virtual events across the globe from the Sydney Opera House with Inspectah Deck and his Wu-Tang brothers to major launches from XBox and PlayStation at E3 in Los Angeles. An Air Force veteran, Sasha identifies as a servant leader and has altruism at the top of her list of values when it comes to taking on projects and partnerships. It was her desire to create opportunities for other creatives and techies that led her to found Perks of Ambition, a collective of community thought leaders using the digital space to amplify multicultural voices and perspectives. In 2021, Sasha self-funded and curated a 10-week virtual course for a cohort of driven, Gen-Z creative entrepreneurs. The summer program included workshops illustrating the ways creative entrepreneurs can streamline their business, use the digital space to gain exposure, increase their revenue and build generational wealth. Each of the four students received a $1000 stipend for their participation in the project. Read more here on Medium. She also launched STT News - an online news platform for multicultural millennials. Thesite will soft launch with a free newsletter in November. Sign up here to be a Beta tester. Sasha's Social Media https://www.sashatalkstech.com/ Sasha's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sasha-horne/ Sasha's Twitter: https://twitter.com/sashatalkstech https://www.digitaldash.info/ http://www.perksofambition.com/ Sasha's Gift Just in time for the holidays, we are working on curating a black and brown digital ebook that will allow you to shop from your phone or from your computer or forward it to someone who you'd like to share that with. If you head over to our site, https://www.digitaldash.info/ you can subscribe. I think it's going to be a really great gift. We're teaming up with all the creators who we've met through the clubhouse ecosystem, as well as through our variety of Facebook groups. This is going to be a living document that is going to be continuously updated. So w can provide this resource at no cost to the community. Sasha's Advice II would say with Final Thoughts is don't forgot to start where you are, you may not necessarily have it all figured out. But if you're able to set that goal, and just try to do something to just move the needle just a little bit each day. Maybe it's doing research, maybe it's watching some videos on YouTube, maybe it's listening to some podcasts like this one. But just as long as you can stay inspired, you can make it happen and that's what storytelling to me.

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast
Episode 7 - COVID-19 Front Line Perspective with Norma

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 49:11


Joe sat down live with Norma Bostarr in Long Beach for the seventh episode of BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast. The team speaks to Norma Bostarr on Healthcare and Crisis Management, Norma is the Senior Manager of Social Impact Operations and Implementation at Carbon Health. Throughout her career, Norma has had stops as a clinical researcher, venture capital and at a Health Tech Startup. She discusses how her experience in research, her personal life and experience at Carbon Health enhanced her focus on the need for change in healthcare and the importance of centering on the patient. Norma shares the harsh realities of working on the COVID-19 response in San Francisco and Los Angeles counties for testing and vaccination campaigns. She provides a great perspective on what early careerists should think of when they are looking to pursue a new opportunity and how to work to scale their impact. Norma Bostarr – Carbon Health Norma envisions a world where healthcare is a tool to heal communities. After leaving the VC and recruiting space in 2019, Nora wanted to give herself some space to find a pathway for working in healthcare. When COVID-19 arrived, she felt called to action. She is tremendously grateful for the opportunity to lead Carbon's clinical teams and direct their public partner operations. Her teams delivered 1.5M vaccines and 1M tests throughout the pandemic. Norma practices self-care through movement, playtime in nature, and reading. She is an advocate for caregiving and Alzheimer's. She loves engaging in conversations around end-of-life care. The crew asked Norma the following questions: Tell us a bit about yourself and your healthcare background? Can you talk about how your clinical research experience launched your career? You currently serve as Senior Manager of Social Impact Operations and Implementation at Carbon Health. What does your work entail? Can you speak to the great work that Carbon does and who they are? How did you and Carbon get involved in the COVID-19 pandemic? Happy Thanksgiving – Good tidings to you! The group talks about what they are doing for Thanksgiving and what they are thankful for in this Thanksgiving season.. This has been a trying year for all of us, especially those providers and administrators who have been on the front lines of the pandemic. We are incredibly thankful for all of your efforts. We hope all of you have a Happy Thanksgiving and we'd be interested to know from our listeners how they envision the next year of the pandemic response will look like? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/byob-health/message

Did I Ever Tell You The One About... MF DOOM
S2: MF DOOM, Part 6 - Apartment 6G

Did I Ever Tell You The One About... MF DOOM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:55


As ZEV LOVE X deals with the loss of his brother DJ Subroc and the loss of his recording contract with Elektra, ZEV LOVE X begins his migration from Long Beach to Harlem.  He begins to make a new family (The CM Fam) led by Kurious Jorge, Kadi, and the men who held him down creatively and emotionally in Apartment 6G.   The importance of the artistry and camaraderie of those men and woman helped formulate his next move.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

GARDEN CHURCH Podcast
Jesus’ Strategy Enabling One Anothering - Audio

GARDEN CHURCH Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 35:42


"in Long Beach as it is in Heaven." For more information visit: garden.church

Iglesia Bautista Bíblica de Long Beach
Avivamiento - Luis Parada

Iglesia Bautista Bíblica de Long Beach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 60:32


Avivamiento - Luis Parada by Iglesia Bautista Bíblica de Long Beach

Up First
Planet Money: Of Boats And Boxes

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 23:47


More than a third of the goods that the United States imports comes through the Ports of LA and Long Beach. So what happens when shipping backlogs mean that ships have to idle just outside those ports? And what can be done to solve the problem? Planet Money takes a trip to three ports around the U.S. to investigate what broke the global supply chain and how the ports are working to clear the bottlenecks.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Supply Chain Backlog: The Cargo Ship Pile-Up at Ports

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 4:27


Supply chain problems continue as container ships pile up at U.S. ports. The number of ships waiting to offload off the Southern California coast just hit a new record. That's despite a new 24/7 schedule to get ships unloaded. There's also a new ‘pop-up container yard' on the other side of the country to help get things moving.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.A record 111 container ships were sitting outside the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach on November 10th. According to an Insider blog, that tops a previous record set on October 21st for 108 ships. (1)Not Enough Dock WorkersConsumer demand has been surging and there's been an effort to speed things up but there aren't enough dock workers and truck drivers to unload and deliver all the goods. Insider says the size of the backlog is unprecedented.Prior to the pandemic, there may have been as many as 17 ships waiting to unload. And now, it's typical to see more than 100 ships bobbing around offshore, and huge stacks of containers on the docks waiting to be picked up by truckers.Supply Chain Disruptions Task ForceThe White House launched a Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force last June to address the challenges at ports. Task force members met with local government leaders and companies to determine the cause of the bottlenecks and come up with solutions. The Port of Long Beach began the new 24/7 schedule in September. Los Angeles followed in October. According to the White House announcement, it's possible to move goods at the Port of L.A. 25% faster at night. (2)Various companies and unions also agreed to expanded work hours. Some of those companies include Target, Walmart, UPS, FedEx, Samsung, and Home Depot. The commitment from those six companies will make it possible to move an additional 3,500 containers per week, through the end of this year.Shipping Companies Face Big FinesThat hasn't solved the problem however, and shipping firms now face fines if they don't get those containers moving more quickly. Insider reports that the two Southern California ports will begin fining companies $100 a day for each container that's left on the docks for too long. They have three days to move the containers if they are being shipped by rail and nine days to move them if they are going by truck. Those fines are expected to start hitting companies on November 15th.A global logistics company told Insider: “These containers would move if they could, but it's a combination of warehouse space, trucking and labor issues.” American Shipper says, at the beginning of November, there were about 60,000 containers at these two ports for more than nine days, and they could all be eligible for fines.Ports Running Out of RoomThe government is also working on another potential solution with the announcement of a “pop-up container yard” at the Port of Savannah on the East Coast. The port will be able to redirect federal funds from a budget surplus to build the port. It will be a couple hundred miles inland from the coast along a rail line. That will give the Georgia Port Authority more space for containers that are waiting to be picked up. (3)The worst back-ups are in Southern California however. About 40% of the nation's imports reportedly go through those two ports. But smaller ports, like the one in Georgia, are also dealing with ships that are unloading cargo faster than truckers can take it away.The newly approved bipartisan infrastructure bill includes several measures to improve port operations. Among those measures are new grants and new grant flexibility, along with the Port Infrastructure Development Program to modernize ports and shipping routes. The supply chain issues we've been facing have impacted all parts of the economy. As you know, the housing industry has been heavily impacted by a shortage of building materials. That's caused construction delays and higher prices for new homes, as well as material shortages for do-it-yourself homeowners renovating their properties.You'll find more info by following links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com.You can also find out more about real estate investing at our website by joining RealWealth for free. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources. That includes experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://www.businessinsider.com/supply-chain-crisis-record-number-of-container-ships-ca-ports-2021-112 - https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/supply-chain-crisis-holiday-shortages-plan-b1954506.html3 - https://sports.yahoo.com/white-house-announces-pop-container-170539918.html

The Nine Club With Chris Roberts
Boo Johnson - Stop And Chat

The Nine Club With Chris Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 127:08


Boo Johnson Stops by and Chats with us about his YouTube channel, getting signed by IMG, acting in a new movie with Machine Gun Kelly, skating for Straye Footwear, skating the Cherry Park gap, the new generation on DGK, how he does hardflip back smith grinds, trying a Paqui Chip, his Pharmacy skate shop in Long Beach, reviewing some of his skate clips and much more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Lusk Perspectives
2021 Casden Multifamily Forecast Report

Lusk Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:14


Richard K. Green (Director, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate) highlights data and analysis from the 201 Casden Multifamily Forecast Report. Before Green dives into forecasted rent, vacancies, and deliveries for Los Angeles, Inland Empire, Orange County, San Diego and Ventura submarkets, he offers an economic context for where Southern California stands. In the context discussion, Green delivers insights into what's happening with the supply chain in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, why cap rates are so low, and how unemployment and total employment impact the delivery of goods, including multifamily construction. More: https://lusk.usc.edu/perspectives

If Plants Could Talk
#44 - Variegated Troy

If Plants Could Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 96:09


A conversation with LA based cactus collector and ceramics artist, Variegated Troy. Links to social media and Etsy shop are pasted below. Troy (@variegatedtroy) • Instagram photos and videos TroysCeramics on Etsy This podcast is brought to you by Mezcala Nursery located at 6901 Orange Ave. Long Beach, CA 90805. Family owned, family ran, since 2007. Mezcala carries everything from landscape plants, to house plants, to cactus and succulents. They also offer a wide variety of rare collector specimens. @mezcalanursery • Instagram photos and videos Did you know there are tons of health benefits to supplementing mushrooms? No, not that kind, although those are great too. I'm talking about Chaga, Reishi, Turkey Tail, Lions Mane, Shiitake, the list goes on. There is truly ancient wisdom to this. Mushrooms have been used in Chinese herbal medicine for thousands of years. The uses range from immunological and digestive issues, to nootropic or in other words - brain health. There are many studies that can be found showing the evidence and potential of these functional fungi. Want to learn more? Consider referring to Episode #38 featuring author and Ethnomycologist, Jeff Chilton - where he discusses this topic at length. A list of educational resources is pasted below. How do Mushrooms Support the Immune System? - Real Mushrooms 7 Medicinal Mushrooms and Their Health Benefits Real Mushrooms Ready to try Real Mushrooms? Head to https://shop.realmushrooms.com/discount/Ifplantscouldtalk and sign up for the first-time buyer code for 25% off your first order. Use code: Ifplantscouldtalk for 10% off all future orders. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ifplantscouldtalk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ifplantscouldtalk/support

Fruitbox
72 · Orlando Wong, Able Freight

Fruitbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 16:36


The importance of air cargo services to the global fresh produce business has certainly taken off in the past 18 months as the Covid-19 pandemic has landed ocean container shipping networks with a major circulation problem. As Orlando Wong explains in the latest episode of Fruitnet's conversation series Fruitbox, a sharp increase in demand for consumer goods in the world's major markets has led to logjams in ports that where the traffic previously flowed freely. “The last I checked there were about 64 vessels waiting to come into dock at [the Port of] Long Beach,” he reveals. “The situation has really not improved. The container yard is quadruple stacked, [whereas] normally it's only double stacked. Essentially, Long Beach is now like a storage dock. There is no room to work around, and the infrastructure needs to be expanded in a big way.” Wong is CEO of perishable produce logistics specialist Able Freight, and from his headquarters in Los Angeles he can see firsthand the pandemic's impact on both sea and airfreight. And despite a simultaneous decline in the number of passenger flights circumventing the earth, he says it's also apparent that airlines are working to free up new space for cargo to take to the skies. “It's been a very challenging 18 months. Obviously it started with 95 per cent of all international passenger flights suspended. So we had to look elsewhere, mostly at charter airlines, for cargo capacity,” he recalls. In effect, the new normal for airfreight may well involve a larger volume of temperature- and time-sensitive cargo capacity being in the sky. “We were very fortunate that the airlines started to put their thinking caps on, and started converting passenger planes to cargo planes. So that really helped a big deal.” During his 15-minute chat with Fruitnet's Chris White, Wong also considers the ongoing effect of fuel price inflation, the potential for new models of electrified transportation, and the importance of making supply chain temperature control even more visible. Hosted by Chris White, Fruitbox attracts a big audience across the global fruit and vegetable business that tunes in every week to hear exclusive interviews and expert analysis. Produced by Fruitnet Media International, the show is essential listening for everyone in the fresh produce industry. To find out how you can tell your story on Fruitbox, email chris@fruitnet.com. To learn about sponsorship and advertising opportunities, email advertising@fruitnet.com. Read the latest fresh produce industry news at www.fruitnet.com

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 1 | Jane Yamamoto joins KFI @ConwayShow @janenews

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:12


Blake Troli – Alec Baldwin and Production being sued // Jane Yamamoto joins the KFI team // Jason Nathanson – Licorice Pizza // Pastathon / Port of LB Fines

People We Love
119. Aaron Monte Loves Comedian, Richard Pryor

People We Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 68:31


Comedian Aaron Monte grew up in a large family in LA, and everyone in it has a sense of humor and loved to joke around. Whether it was family members farting on his head, or his dad's deadpan humor, imaginative young Aaron seemed to always have comedy around. But long before he started incorporating music into his standup, a young adolescent Aaron recalls the very first time he watched the legend, Richard Pryor, Live in Concert special in Long Beach, CA, on Comedy Central. https://www.instagram.com/therealaaronmon, http://instagram.com/peoplewelovepodcast, http://instagram.com/adamchoit, http://twitter.com/adamchoit, http://peoplewelovepodcast.com  

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 77: Tango Alpha LIma: Air Force Gaming with Sgt. Erin Rich

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:37


Air Force Gaming Community Esports Operations Manager Erin Rich joins the podcast to talk about the gaming community initiative that brings Airmen and Guardians of all ages, ranks and backgrounds together for camaraderie and competition. Erin shares a little bit about the background of the community, how it works, and how the Air Force intends to grow the scope of the program. She also schools Jeff just a little bit about the nerd factor. Special Guest: Erin Rich.

Things I Learned Last Night
Lawn Chair Larry - Larry Walter's Sketchy Balloon Chair Flight

Things I Learned Last Night

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:27


Lawn Chair Larry, also known as Larry Walters, had always dreamed of flying. As a kid, he planned on becoming a pilot in the airforce. Unfortunately, he was turned by air force recruiters away due to his poor eyesight. In the wake of the death of his dream, Larry became a truck driver. However, his vision of flying never left him, even though the airforce was no longer an option. One day this dream drove him to do something crazy. Larry strapped 45 balloons to his lawn chair and took flight over Long Beach, CA. The event made headlines. From that day forward, Larry Walters became known as Lawn Chair Larry.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 1 | Steve Gregory - Long Beach Ports @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:31


Steve Gregory –SWAT guarding LA/ LB ports as cargo ships are unloaded//guarding ports//WHIP: President last time Detroit won Superbowl//3LG wireless going away//Superbowl Jobs//

BLANK with Jim Daly & Giles Paley-Phillips
144: Wendi McClendon-Covey

BLANK with Jim Daly & Giles Paley-Phillips

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 84:39


Wendi McClendon-Covey is an actress, writer, comedian and podcaster. Best known for her leading role as Beverly Goldberg in The Goldbergs, Wendi has appeared in many films including Bridesmaids, Blended and Army of One and TV shows Reno 911, The Office, and American Dad. Wendi told us about her early life living in Long Beach and her always wanting to be a performer. We discussed having a regular job alongside creative work and Wendi's love of Father Ted. PLUS we have extra chat with Wendi just for our Patreons at patreon.com/blankpodcast Massive thanks to our Patrons: Mary Catherine Byrnes, Victoria Nielsen, Manya Kay, Alex Williams, Joel Piveteau, Richard Astill, Samantha Beaton, Claudia McKelvey, John Holland, Katherine Keen, Lynn Robinson, It's Coming Home 2022, Alice Chrystall, Maddie Lightfoot, Alex Collis, Martin Grimm, Liam Deacy. @blankpod @eliistender @jimdalycomedy @wendimclendonco theblankpodcast2018@gmail.com

Have You Herd? AABP PodCasts
2022 AABP Vice President Candidates

Have You Herd? AABP PodCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 19:50


In this episode, AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich has a conversation with the candidates for the 2022 AABP Vice President election. The candidates are Dr. Dave Sjeklocha and Dr. Fred Muller. We ask the candidates to introduce themselves, tell us what being an AABP member has meant to them, ask their ideas about how AABP can support our members and improve recruitment and retention of cattle veterinarians,  and what initiative they would support as a leader in the organization. We thank both Dr. Sjeklocha and Dr. Muller for their past service to AABP and for accepting the nomination for AABP Vice President. The candidate receiving the most votes will be seated after the annual business meeting in Long Beach, Calif. on September 24, 2022. The online ballot is now open at this link. You can view candidate bios, read the question-and-answer document published in the November newsletter, and watch their videos from the candidate's introductions from the Salt Lake City conference. Voting will close on December 30, 2021 at 5 pm Eastern time.  

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals
Mastering Apartment Complex Due Diligence with Omar Ruiz

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 46:12


Omar Ruiz is co-founder of LeRu Investments LLC, a private for-profit real estate Investment Company and LeRu Management Services, the property management division of LeRu Investments LLC. LeRu Investments LLC currently manages 92 individual units located from Orange, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties, California, and Harris County, Texas. LeRu Investments LLC is a member of the AOA (Apartment Owners Association). Omar can occasionally be found in front of local audiences sharing his knowledge and expertise on topics such as apartment analysis, due diligence, market cycles, section-8, and effective property management practices.   Mr. Ruiz has been in private practice for more than 10 years and is a real estate investor, property/asset manager. A majority of business activities have been in the city of San Bernardino, where he has advised, guided, and created partnerships and provided property management services to other investors. Mr. Ruiz has a background in business marketing consulting and is a quality control engineer. He's worked as an AS9100 quality manager in the aerospace industry working directly with companies such as Boeing, Gulfstream, and Airbus, ULA, and SpaceX. He holds his bachelor's degree from the California State University of Long Beach in business with an emphasis on marketing. He is also a member of the American Marketing Association the “Downtown Merchants Association” in his home city of Placentia as well as a founding member of “Citizens for a Better Placentia'' and co-organizer of the Real Estate Investors Network in Long Beach, California.   [00:01 - 05:00] Opening Segment Get to know Omar Ruiz What do Omar and LeRu Investments do? A Business that Keeps Your Curiosity Engaged   [05:01 - 13:45] Creating a Real Estate Empire A Great Time to be Involved Why and how Omar started with property management in the great recession How Omar and his team started to manage a lot of stuff in the Inland Empire A No Brainer Deal and Doubling-Up How to Foster Good Relationships with Brokers   [13:46 - 36:06]  Mastering Apartment Complex Due Diligence Performing the due diligence on properties from a distance How Inconsistencies Can be Your Advantage and Disadvantage How to Build Proper Due Diligence Three Levels of Due Diligence Omar shares a story on one of their properties The Power of Stubbornness: Due Diligence with a 1031 Pre-COVID What are COVID Reserves? “We're not selling.”  Did it work out for the better?   [36:07 - 46:13] Closing Segment Quick break for our sponsorsGroundfloor offers short-term, high-yield real estate debt investments to the general public. Check www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ to get started. What is the best investment you've ever made other than your education?Good mentors Omar's worst investment13-Unit Commercial Deal What is the most important lesson that you've learned in business and investing?“... To be calm, and to just be a focused leader.” Connect with my guest. See the links below.   Resources Mentioned: Patton on Leadership   Tweetable Quotes: “And that's something that's really important to do in this type of business, is to really foster good relationships with brokers.” - Omar Ruiz “You have to be persistent and maybe, maybe stubborn.” - Omar Ruiz ------------ Connect with Omar Ruiz through Facebook and LinkedIn.  Visit their website https://leruinvestments.com/.    Invest passively in multiple commercial real estate assets such as apartments, self storage, medical facilities, hotels and more through https://www.passivewealthstrategy.com/crowdstreet/ Participate directly in real estate investment loans on a fractional basis. Go to www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ and get ready to invest on your own terms.  LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes         

GARDEN CHURCH Podcast
Old Testament Origins of Othering - Audio

GARDEN CHURCH Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:52


"in Long Beach as it is in Heaven." For more information visit: garden.church

AfterGlow!
PINS! Feat. Ms. Cookie from The Cray Project

AfterGlow!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 67:35


The girls got to sit down with Cookie creative director of The Cray Project in Long Beach to discuss an annual black and brown burlesque show called PINS. PINS incorporates a theme, this year its Freaknik, and celebrates that theme through sensual dance, It also aims to educate folks on some of unspoken issues of FreakNik. Tune in and listen and be on the look out for PINS tickets! As always thanks for Glowing with us and don't forget to subscribe and download and follow us on social media!Instagram @AfterglowpodcastFacebook @Afterglowpodcast Twitter @Afterglowpodcas

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

los angeles japanese russian bay university long beach chinese california american project mexico natural surfing north world war ii state utah congress money nasa energy california department professor pacific dc meaning democratic alaska federal washington presidential gulf oil act birds places gas school southern california san francisco bay new mexico carlsbad fish deepwater horizon police journal beach businesses miami wyoming donations interior airbnb safety americas san diego fishing us open patch american history currents cambria eis orange county commission crude wall street journal north dakota apache amplify joe biden investigations beta holley bureau tom fowler hogan importantly heal cunningham coast guard santa barbara dolphin midway hwy barrels san clemente infrastructure tot protecting maintain san diego county california state senate summerland deep water rio grande emeritus music alley treaty sarahs oceanside regulations marine science busan alessi offshore refugio aro surfboards fisheries subcommittee michael h encinitas colorado river huntington beach newport beach laguna beach pacific ocean queen mary david l maryland center vhf wahoo aros santa barbara channel captain dave del mar seal beach cosco keystone pipeline ocean health executive orders ocs gao oversight veterinary medicine decommissioning elkind cancellations mileage offshore oil bsee dana point endangered species act oil drilling wing lam congressional dish international energy agency mineral resources boem ocean energy management offshore drilling government accountability office kern county business alliance newport harbor noble energy government oversight cover art design biological diversity heritage site best technology david ippolito crestview
SoCal Restaurant Show
Show 451, November 13, 2021: CANstruction Long Beach 2021 with Producer Terri Henry

SoCal Restaurant Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:51


“One of the most visually stunning demonstrations of talent and creativity within the architectural and engineering communities returned for year through November 14, 2021. The annual CANstruction Long Beach event provides a much-needed source of unperishable food for Food Finders … Continue reading → The post Show 451, November 13, 2021: CANstruction Long Beach 2021 with Producer Terri Henry appeared first on SoCal Restaurant Show.

Where Am I To Go
Podcast #66-S2 - World Kite Museum & Hall-Fame - Oct 12 2021

Where Am I To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 34:03


History of the World Kite Museum The World Kite Museum and Hall of Fame has its roots in the local community. In the mid 1980's a group of kite enthusiasts began to discuss the idea of forming a museum dedicated to kites and kite flyers. The group met informally and developed a plan of action. They researched building opportunities, nonprofit status requirements, storage facilities, and other basic details that were needed to establish a museum. The group was eager to create a place where people could go to learn about kite history and see kiting displays. kite-museum history Several auspicious things happened during this period of development: 1989 was the Washington State's 100th birthday and with this celebration came an initiative focused on developing museums and history preserving organizations. There were many workshops offered by the state to encourage upgrading and fostering museums. Our developing museum board picked areas that interested them and attended. We learned about how to run a gift shop, accession artifacts, write a mission statement, goals, and objectives, recommended storage techniques, 501 c 3 status – all these topics of importance to an new museum organization. Also in 1989 the David Checkley's widow donated his collection of 700 Japanese, Chinese and Malaysian kites to the World Kite Museum. The 300 Japanese kites in the collection are considered the most complete collection of Japanese kites outside of Japan. Our first exhibit, “The History of Kites in Washington State”, was a week long affair in the Long Beach City Council rooms during the 1989 Washington State International Kite Festival. This same year a famous Japanese kite maker Eiji Ohashi also brought kite-making materials to Long Beach. With the help of World Kite Museum volunteers every child at Long Beach Elementary made a flyable Japanese kite. The Museum had begun with an exhibit, a unique kite display on the beach, and a school kite making class. Due to the success of these exhibits and activities the museum believed a freestanding building was necessary to house the collection. Jim Buesing went to the City of Long Beach with a proposal for the use of the Coulter home in the southwest corner of the one half block of beach cottage vacation rental property the city had acquired. Through the assistance of the City of Long Beach this building became the Museum home from 1990-2004. By August 1990, led by Buesing, the inside of the home plus the two rental rooms attached became a four-room exhibit space. The kitchen morphed into an admission desk and gift shop. The bathroom, tub and sink removed were computer room and print, picture, video and book storage. The laundry room stored kites not on exhibit. One of the exhibit rooms was designated as the Long Beach room. It was a nostalgic place for festival participants. Admission included the ability to make a kite to fly, from materials provided by the museum, a tradition which the current museum still promises. During the 14 years the World Kite Museum was in this location the museum grew their community partnerships – using the Long Beach Elementary gymnasium for adult workshops and bringing cultural experiences to their students. We also worked closely with Long Beach Peninsula Merchant Associations, providing programs for local clubs and libraries. We developed in house programs and activities like membership drives, quarterly newsletters, demonstrations, and traveling exhibits. Little did we know that running into each other in our crowded building cause us to make so many new and wonderful friends. As the museum grew we began to search for a larger space to accommodate the needs of the collection and the visitors. A 10,360 square foot, two-story building was available on Sid Snyder Drive in late 2004. By November 2005, the Board of Directors was able to purchase this building that provides over 6,000 square feet of exhibit space, room for storing research artifacts, both photos a --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/loren-alberts/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loren-alberts/support

Ricochet Podcast
E570. Ship Happens

Ricochet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 81:23


When elected leaders decide to look the other way from… ya know… the matters that actually matter to us, we find out about the kinds of people America has in its reserve stock. Yes, the supply chain is a mess; but we’ve got all three hosts to chat with Ryan Peterson, CEO of Flexport, who hopes to fix it. (Take a look at what is likely the first-ever viral tweetstorm on shipping logistics, as well as his children’s book to educate youngsters about the machines that power the world they inhabit!) The gang ask Ryan about his boat tour of the Long Beach port complex to see for himself what’s got us so backed up. He gets us into the nooks and crannies of his industry; how the pandemic has showed its weak points, his ideas for innovating it; and, naturally, the regulatory burdens that slow it all down. Also, the guys spar about the importance of the Rittenhouse trial; they talk gas prices and inflation; plus, Rob gives us a view from France. Music from this week’s podcast: Ship of Fools by World Party

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, November 12, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 22:30


Good Friday to you. This is Pastor Toby Sumpter. Today is Friday, November 12, 2021. This is the CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief. Find all our shows at Crosspolitic.com and download the Fight Laugh Feast App at your favorite app store so you don't miss anything. We are currently suspended by youtube for saying naughty COVID words, and we don't plan to abide by their rules, so even if we are back up on youtube soon, we will probably get sent back to the corner with a dunce cap shortly, so download the APP now and you can get notifications every time new content drops and never miss a show. Supply Chain Woes Continue https://www.dailywire.com/news/supply-chain-crisis-worsens-number-of-ships-off-california-coast-hits-new-record?%3Futm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=dwtwitter There are now 111 container ships waiting to unload in California's ports. For the past several months, shipping vessels delivering consumer goods from Asian markets have idled in the Pacific Ocean as the United States faces labor shortages, creating bottlenecks in key California ports. As a result, retailers and suppliers across the United States are short on inventory to meet consumer demand. Even after action from the Biden administration, more consumer goods than ever remain stranded. As Business Insider reported on Wednesday: According to data from the Marine Exchange, a total of 111 container ships are bobbing at sea around the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, waiting to dock and unload. That breaks the previous record of 108 vessels reported on October 21. The two ports remain clogged despite efforts to speed up the processing of containers amid a surge in consumer demand for goods. The White House announced a shift to an around-the-clock schedule in October and a new looming threat of fines for leaving containers on the docks for several days. Analysts expect that the crisis will endure for the foreseeable future. In a recent Wall Street Journal poll of economists, roughly half cited supply chain bottlenecks as “the biggest threat to economic growth in the next twelve to eighteen months” — with 45% estimating that bottlenecks will not recede until the second half of 2022. Indictment for Russia Collusion https://www.foxnews.com/politics/democrats-probed-russian-interference-steele-dossier-silent Igor Danchenko, a Russian national who lives in Virginia, was charged with five counts of making false statements to the FBI last week. Danchenko is said to be the sub-source for Christopher Steele, a former British intelligence officer, who compiled the dossier that served as the basis for Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act [FISA] warrants against Trump campaign aide Carter Page. [All of this was the basis for claiming that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to win the 2016 presidential election.] While a number of fair minded people were asking lots of questions about the accusations of collusion with Russia, almost every Democrat on the Intelligence Committee in 2017 and 2018, when the committee probed Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 elections, strongly defended the dossier. For example, Adam Schiff, now the Intelligence committee's chair, was one of the most vocal voices in Congress in pumping the dossier. While the Republican majority issued subpoenas to get testimony under oath regarding the claims of the dossier, Schiff tweeted: "Unilateral subpoenas issued by House Intel Majority appear to be part of effort to discredit Steele, rather than determine truth of dossier," Schiff tweeted in 2017. Schiff also had this exchange with Rachel Maddow in 2017 on CNBC: https://twitter.com/RepAdamSchiff/status/905468532061700096?s=20 Play Audio: 1:13-2:43 Rachel Maddow: The existence of the dossier is the scandal -- the original sin -- therefore the FBI is participating in some Russian plot. Actually… yes, that's about right, Ms. Maddow. And Hillary Clinton's campaign paid for it. According to the Danchenko indictment, in March, May, June, October and November of 2017, the Russian national made false statements regarding the sources of specific information he provided to a U.K. investigative firm that, in turn, were included in reports prepared by the firm and subsequently passed to the FBI. Speaking of corruption, Kyle Rittenhouse Took the Stand Wednesday and Became Emotional Play audio: 0:00-1:32 While we should be careful to note that mere emotions prove nothing, a great deal of the testimony and evidence would at least seem to indicate that it is not at all obvious that Kyle Rittenhouse is a mass murderer, like an article from the Gospel Coalition claimed. But that didn't stop Lebron James who responded to Rittenhouse getting emotional with this tweet: “What tears????? I didn't see one. Man knock it off! That boy ate some lemon heads before walking into court.” Apparently, Lebron feels the same about the Uyghars in China as well as the people of Hong Kong. Fake tears everybody. Apparently Social Media Agrees with Lebron https://freebeacon.com/media/social-media-companies-suppressed-claims-of-kyle-rittenhouses-innocence/ Social media platforms rendered a verdict on Kyle Rittenhouse long before he went to trial, suppressing claims that he was innocent and blocking users from searching for details of the case. Immediately after the anti-police riots that thrust Rittenhouse into the national spotlight, social media companies began to block users who expressed support for the Illinois teen. Twitter suspended the accounts of users who called Rittenhouse innocent, including the defendant's own lawyer. Facebook said it "designated this shooting as a mass murder and … removed the shooter's accounts from Facebook and Instagram." The platform also blocked searches for "Kyle Rittenhouse." Social media platforms often intervene to suppress posts expressing a particular stance on controversial issues. Both platforms censored news stories about Hunter Biden's laptop in the month before the 2020 election. Facebook blocked a Gold Star mother's criticism of President Joe Biden and suppressed a song that criticized the president. Twitter and Facebook also suspended users who oppose vaccine mandates. The fundraising platform GoFundMe also removed a page set up to support Rittenhouse, which the company said violated its ban on fundraisers involving "the legal defense of alleged crimes associated with hate, violence, harassment, bullying, discrimination, terrorism, or intolerance." GoFundMe supported fundraising for the family of one of Rittenhouse's assailants, Anthony Huber. The site regularly hosts fundraisers for individuals associated with Black Lives Matter. ​ When smaller platforms began raising funds for Rittenhouse, hackers breached the donation lists. News outlets doxxed paramedics and police officers who gave small donations to Rittenhouse's defense. Twitter is still banning or suspending users for supporting Rittenhouse, even as the trial proceeds. Facebook searches for Rittenhouse's name turn up no results. Neither platform responded to requests for comment. Rittenhouse faces six charges, including two counts of homicide, after shooting three men who attacked him during last August's anti-police riots in Kenosha, Wis. His murder trial began on Nov. 1. His defense hopes that videos that show rioters assaulting Rittenhouse will bolster his self-defense claim. Let's just point out that to the extent that the Gospel Coalition represents something of conservative Christianity, Facebook and Twitter are just following their lead. We are supposed to be salt and light, but instead supposedly Bible-believing outlets are publishing hit pieces before the facts are in, joining the lynch mob. But this is not justice, and it is certainly not biblical justice. A Man Who died of Gunshot Wounds is Listed as a COVID Death in New Zealand Play Audio And that's the world we live in. Psalm of the Day: Psalm 30 “O where is the advantage if my blood should be shed? Will dust declare you faithful, can praise come from the dead? O Lord, to me be gracious, and hear me as I've prayed. To you, O Lord, I cry out, O be my help, my aid.” You turned my grief to dancing, from sackcloth set me free. You wrapped me up in gladness; I shall not silent be. Indeed, my soul, my glory, will praise you and adore; O Lord, my God, I'll thank you both now and evermore. Play: 1:21-3:28 Amen! Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: if you see news stories and links that you think we should cover on the daily news brief, please send them to news @ crosspolitic.com and don't forget to check deft wire dot com where we are constantly posting all our stories. Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. You always get a free Fight Laugh Feast t-shirt with a membership and remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conferences, club members have access to all the talks from Douglas Wilson, Joe Boot, Jeff Durbin, Glenn Sunshine, Nate Wilson, David Bahnsen, Voddie Baucham, Ben Merkle, and many more. Join today and have a great day.

Tour Stories
The Check-In with Rob Crow

Tour Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 28:36


Rob Crow is a singer, guitarist and founding member of  San Diego luminaries Pinback, Physics, Heavy Vegetable and Goblin Cock to name a few.  His newest effort,  PLOSIVS,  includes John Reis (Drive Like Jehu, Hot Snakes, Rocket From the Crypt),  Atom Willard (Against Me!, The Offspring)  and Jordan Clark (Mrs Magician).  In this episode Joe and Rob talk west coast hardcore, the process of making the new PLOSIVS record and why taking his kids on tour is so important to him. Also Rob also tells us the tale of the Jersey Devil and we hear some tunes from both his newest solo record and the new PLOSIVS single Hit The Breaks (out on Swami Records soon). All this and.....surprise! Rob gives us a couple bonus tour stories!   Music by PLOSIVS, Rob Crow,  Hew Time and Joe Plummerhttps://swami-records.myshopify.com/https://robcrow.bandcamp.com/http://www.tgrec.com/bands/band.php?id=17Use Code Fret10 for a free month of Music Production Suite Pro and a 10% discount on all other software. Visit Izotope.com

Shoot Your Shot
Daylight Savings is a Scam (Is Ben Franklin a Fraud?)

Shoot Your Shot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:22


It's dark at 2 pm and we LOVE it. Is Daylight Savings a scam? (:45-19:50). John recaps his trip to New Mexico and we rank it as a state (2:02-10:18). We break news about our basketball coaching career (10:18-19:50). Los Coyotes Diagonal is getting traffic signal improvements (19:50-31:43). New tenants at 2nd and PCH (31:43-46:55). Who are your least favorite Long Beach athletes? (46:55-51:00). 908 Athlete of the Week: DePaul Basketball Director of Basketball Operations Patrick Scully (51:00-1:00:13).

Dark Art Society Podcast
Jeremy Schott/ Dark Art Emporium- Ep. 222

Dark Art Society Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 111:40


This week I interview creator and owner of The Dark Art Emporium, Jeremy Schott! We learn about Jeremy's background in film, music and starting his Long Beach dark art gallery. Another great and fun interview! Also- an art life update Jeremy's Dark Art Emporium Links: www.darkartemporium.com https://www.the4thhorsemanlbc.com www.carsexlbc.com The Dark Art Society Podcast is produced by Chet Zar. Become an Official Member of the Dark Art Society: www.patreon.com/DarkArtSociety Chet's Patreon: www.patreon.com/ChetZar The Dark Art Society Instagram: instagram.com/darkartsociety Official Dark Art Society Website: www.darkartsociety.com The Dark Art Society Podcast is now available in a variety of places, including the following platforms: SoundCloud: @darkartsociety iTunes: apple.co/2gMNUfM Stitcher: www.stitcher.com/s?fid=134626&refid=stpr Podbay: podbay.fm/show/1215146981 YouTube: bit.ly/2nNYPre DarkArtSociety.com Copyright Chet Zar LLC 2021

Trackside Podcast
Kevin and Curt welcome Alexander Rossi in-studio

Trackside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 82:46


This week on Trackside, 2016 Indianapolis 500 winner Alexander Rossi joins Kevin and Curt in-studio for the first part of the show. The guys preview the upcoming Petit Le Mans at Road Atlanta this weekend. Rossi gives his thoughts on the Andretti to Formula 1 rumors and what it could have meant for the Andretti Autosport IndyCar team. We also ask Alex about Colton Herta's potential move to F1 and the pros and cons of racing in F1. They discuss the changes to the Andretti IndyCar lineup, with Romain Grosjean and Devlin DeFrancesco joining the team. They relive the viral moment between Helio Castroneves and Rossi at the season finale at Long Beach and if he would welcome a “Drive to Survive” type documentary series about IndyCar. Rossi gives his thoughts on bumping in IndyCar races outside of the Indy 500 and if full-time entrants should have a protected qualifying spot in May.    Later in the show, Kevin and Curt discuss the Racer.com report that Kyle Kirkwood will race for A.J. Foyt Racing in 2022 and the potential long-term future for the 2021 Indy Lights champion. They discuss the star-studded rookie class for next year's Indy 500, including Jimmie Johnson and the possibility of NASCAR Cup Series champion Kyle Larson giving the 500 a try. Dr. Nasser Hanna from the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center joins us in-studio for an exciting sponsorship announcement with Jackson Lee. To close out the show, Kevin and Curt take listener questions.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 517: Editing for Directors with Gael Chandler

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 55:15


Television editor and author Gael Chandler is on the hot mic today. Most of you may know by now that I started out in post as an editor. Anytime I have another editor on it's like sailors recalling old battle stories, which are always very entertaining. It is a whole other world when a director says, ‘CUT!' to the final scene and the elves of film production, EDITORS, get to work. While I am curious to hear Geal's stories from behind the scenes, I would like to focus first on her new book, Editing for Directors: A Guide for Creative Collaboration which was released in August of 2021. This is her fifth publication which shares tools and lessons from her expert experience in film production/editing. Gael has been nominated twice for the Cable Emmy award for comedy editing and has taught editing practices and history at Loyola Marymount University and California State Universities at Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Northridge.Editing for Directors: A Guide for Creative Collaboration focuses on how directors should be working with editors. It guides directors through postproduction, starting with planning for editing during the shoot and ending with the completion of their film. This thorough, well-illustrated book:Describes the artistic, organizational, and technical skills editors bring to the party; with tools on what directors should look for when hiring an editor and the best ways to work with an editor; It further explains how and why directors should plan for editing before they shoot a frame. An entire chapter is devoted to relating the history of editing and cutting tools and how they have affected the language of cinema and present-day editing while defining and discussing cutting-room terms, practices, and workflows.Gael filmography credits her editing on wonderful 90s television shows like Max Headroom, Deep Dark Secrets, A Mom for Christmas, Family Matters, and The Very Retail Christmas. Some of her other books include Film Editing: Great Cuts Every Filmmaker and Movie Lover Must Know and Cut by Cut: Editing Your Film or Video.It's always fun to hear unique stories from seasoned technicians and the huge technological revolution or evolution their line of work has had to face as well as their adaptation processes.

On Point
What's behind the supply chain breakdown at the Port of Long Beach

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 47:21


What is going on at the Port of Long Beach? Truckers, longshoremen and port managers tell us why the supply chain is breaking down. Matt Schrap and Mario Cordero join Meghna Chakrabarti.

Sofa King Podcast
Episode 614: Snoop Dogg: For Shizzle my Nizzle!

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 107:15


On this episode of the Sofa King Podcast, we talk about the one and only Snoop Dogg. This is a true rags to riches story. He was born as Calvin Broadus to a poor single mom in Long Beach. Through an amazing talent as a freestyle rapper and a lifelong career, he has grown to be a media mogul worth over $150 Million. However, his life as a rapper almost ended as soon as it started since he was arrested for a gang murder just after recording his first album with Dr. Dre. He was acquitted and went to create some of the all-time greatest lyrics in all of rap. With a smooth and unique voice and style, Snoop Dogg ended up befriending Martha Stewart, hosting the Olympics, creating a line of weed, and turning Colonel Sanders Vegan. His story is as unique as his rap style, and by the end of this you'll know what's his mutha fu*king name!   Visit Our Sources: https://www.biography.com/musician/snoop-dogg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snoop_Dogg https://wealthygorilla.com/snoop-dogg-net-worth/ https://www.phactual.com/15-bizarre-facts-about-snoop-dogg/ https://www.factinate.com/people/30-facts-about-snoop-dogg/ https://thebeet.com/snoop-dogg-beyond-meat-tailgate/ https://plantbasednews.org/lifestyle/snoop-doggs-raves-vegan-kfc/ https://www.huffpost.com/entry/snoop-dogg-weed-line_n_56433db1e4b06037734701bf