Podcasts about RPI

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  • 279PODCASTS
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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about RPI

Latest podcast episodes about RPI

Hobart and William Smith Athletics Podcast
Hobart Football Podcast, Episode 5

Hobart and William Smith Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Head Football Coach Kevin DeWall is back in the studio with Ted Baker to breakdown Hobart's trip to nationally-ranked Ithaca and the upcoming home game against nationally-ranked RPI.

”In the (D3FB) Huddle” - Crunchtime, Fall 2021 Week 6 (S14E17)

"In the (D3FB) Huddle"

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 71:29


Frank & JC start this week's show -- yes, JC, not JB -- auditioning JC for co-hosting duties on "In the Huddle." You'll have to watch to find out what we mean... But then, Frank & JB do their weekly grind of reviewing the highlights of some of the best #d3fb games of the weekend from across the country. Pair that with JB's MVPs for Week 6 and a Region-by-Region review of the current situation in the D3 Playoffs picture, and you've got a packed 70 minutes of college football. In addition, Frank & JB discuss the CCC, especially Endicott, thanks to footage from Noontime Sports, discuss the Delaware Valley "outside the locker rooms" video that caught attention this weekend, and discuss RPI's potential NCAA Playoffs hosting conundrum being caused by their current fan policy. All this and more on this week's "Crunchtime" episode. Please remember to LIKE & SHARE this episode on your social media!

The Parting Schotts Podcast
Union College hockey goalie Nieto discusses long road back; weekend preview

The Parting Schotts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:14


On the latest edition of “The Parting Schotts Podcast,” Associate Sports Editor Ken Schott talks with Union College men's hockey goalie Garrett Nieto about seeing his first collegiate action last Saturday after overcoming two hip operations. Schott also has interviews with Dutchmen head coach Rick Bennett, and players Josh Kosack and Dylan Anhorn as the team prepares for Friday's season-opener at New Hampshire. Schott also speaks with Dutchwomen head coach Josh Sciba, and players Emily King and Maren Friday as they get set to host RPI on Friday. “The Parting Schotts Podcast” is available wherever you get your podcasts and at https://dailygazette.com/category/sports/parting-schotts.

The Roundtable
10/5/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 81:41


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Albany Chief City Auditor Dorcey Applyrs, investigative journalist and UAlbany Adjunct Professor Rosemary Armao, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

The Parting Schotts Podcast
Union, RPI face off in exhibition men's hockey

The Parting Schotts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 22:11


On the latest edition of “The Parting Schotts Podcast,” Associate Sports Editor Ken Schott previews Saturday's men's college hockey exhibition game between Union and RPI at Messa Rink. Schott speaks with Union seniors Josh Kosack and Brandon Estes. Schott also talks to RPI senior forward Ture Linden and Engineers head coach Dave Smith. “The Parting Schotts Podcast” is available wherever you get your podcasts and at https://dailygazette.com/category/sports/parting-schotts.

”In the (D3FB) Huddle” - Crunchtime, Fall 2021 Week 4 (S14E13)

"In the (D3FB) Huddle"

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 55:40


You want comebacks? You want video clips of great #d3fb action? You want to hear Frank & JB sing the praises of Kyle King of UMHB finally? Well, then, you've come to the right place!   This Week 4 "Crunchtime" episode shows highlights from the most exciting D3 games from Saturday, with Frank & James looking at every score from the entire Division. In addition, Frank discusses the "Illegal Kick" foul in the W&L/RMC game and its implications, and Frank & James give a broad commentary on the latest news out of RPI concerning their draconian athletics fan policy.   As always, we ask you to LIKE & SHARE this episode so more people can find us!

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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The Roundtable
9/14/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 77:10


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, UAlbany Adjunct and investigative journalist Rosemary Armao, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

The Roundtable
9/9/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 71:25


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman Ira Fusfeld, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and Vice President for Editorial Development at the New York Press Association Judy Patrick.

”In the (D3FB) Huddle” - Crunchtime Week 1, Fall 2021 (S14E6)

"In the (D3FB) Huddle"

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 50:15


It's back! After Frank brings you a special chili segment with the Barr family from Westminster College to open the show, Frank & James kick off Show #300 with their highly-regarded "Crunchtime" segment, in which they review the entire #d3fb scoreboard and they show highlights from 13 of the biggest games from across the D3 Nation. After Crunchtime, Frank takes you through the controversial RPI final touchdown against Montclair St., and the guys walk through all six regions to discuss the winners, losers, and unclear verdicts they saw all weekend. Remember to tune in Thursday morning for interviews from last weekend's games, and Friday morning for a Week 2 Preview and 9/11 Remembrance Show. Please also remember to LIKE and SHARE this show across your social mediaa to help us let new #d3fb followers know we're here producing the best video content each week!

Noontime Sports Podcast
Jimmy Robertson (FDU-Florham Football)

Noontime Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 27:47


Jimmy Robertson, who was named the head coach of the FDU-Florham football coach last year, joined Matt Noonan for a brand new Noontime Sports Podcast to discuss the Devils' first game of the 2021 season against the United States Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA), along with a few other topics, including hosting a podcast to learning from previous coaching roles over the years after quarterbacking the RPI football team as a student-athlete from 2005 to 2008. Stay connected with Noontime Sports on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, as well as on Instagram at @NoontimeNation --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/noontime-sports/support

The Roundtable
8/30/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 75:44


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, Counter-terrorism expert and bestselling author Malcolm Nance, and Political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

"In the (D3FB) Huddle" - Preseason Special #1, Inc. Top 25 (S14E1)

"In the (D3FB) Huddle"

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 78:11


After a 13th Season that we'll never forget, it's time to start up a more normal season -- Season 14 of ITH! Frank & James open the show with original co-host and co-founder of the show, Eric Ren, to discuss the show's history and his alma mater, RPI. Then, they focus on the health aspects of the new season, including a discussion with Trine Athletic Director Matt Land about where we've been and what's next.   Frank & James then show the new region system for #d3fb that takes effect this season before revealing their Preseason Top 25 for Fall 2021.   It's a jam-packed show, and it's just one of five preseason episodes premiering over the next week. So, make sure to spread the word that "In the Huddle" is back, and it's going to be more comprehensive for D3 football than ever!

The Roundtable
8/16/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 76:41


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, Counter-terrorism expert and bestselling author Malcolm Nance, and Political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

From The Ground Up Reptile Podcast - Where we talk everything cold-blooded (Snake Podcast)
Discussing the Reptile Preservation Institute, NidoVirus, and all things Vet Tech with Pia Bartolini

From The Ground Up Reptile Podcast - Where we talk everything cold-blooded (Snake Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 118:30


If you don't know Pia Bartolini yet, you're missing out. Besides being an incredible vet tech, a genius when it comes to all things nido virus, and a phenomenal friend, Pia is also one half of the amazing Reptile Preservation Institute. RPI is an organization focused on conservation, specifically of venomous species, to provide captive specimens to venom labs around the country. Interested in this incredible cause? Check out the RPI fundraiser, auction, and patreon below! RPI FUNDRAISER/AUCTION LIVE THROUGH THURSDAY, AUGUST 19, 2021: https://www.facebook.com/RPI.ReptilePreservationInstitute/posts/1235602286889212 RPI Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ReptilePreservationInstitute RPI Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/reptilepreservationinstitute/ RPI Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RPI.ReptilePreservationInstitute Support the podcast on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ModernMedusaPodcast And don't forget to... Follow the Pod: https://www.instagram.com/modernmedusapodcast/ Follow the Host: https://www.instagram.com/difalcoreptiles/

Lean Green Athlete
Market Based Approaches to Development - with Emily Karol and Chris Nicoletti

Lean Green Athlete

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 50:52


This episode was  recorded on 6 January 2020 at the Posner Center for International Development in Denver, Colorado.  Emily Karol is the Senior Manager of Fund Development with iDE.  Emily first joined iDE in the Digital Media Manager role curating iDE's presence online to engage supporters and reach new audiences. In 2019, she transitioned to the Fund Development team where she helped launch iDE's Corporate Partnerships program and "100 Farmers" Legacy Society.Chris Nicoletti is the Senior Director of Impact and Analytics with iDE.  Chris leads iDE's global measurement efforts, including rigorous impact evaluations, designing and implementing efficient management information systems, and effectively communicating data and results. He first began working with iDE as an economics graduate student, conducting an impact evaluation of iDE Zambia's RPI program for his Master's thesis in Agricultural and Resource Economics from Colorado State University.Learn more about iDE at their website.

Sacred Adventure Begin
Astrology with Luna Brooke of The Chakra Oracle

Sacred Adventure Begin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 79:00


Today we are talking all things astrology with Luna Brooke, founder of the Chakra Oracle. Luna Brooke is a professional astrologer and certified spiritual life coach. She is a member of the American Federation of Astrologers and holds a bachelor of science from RPI with dual majors in Design, Innovation, & Society and Mechanical Engineering.Luna hosts Sacred Sister Circles in Burlington, VT on each new and full moon. She also offers astrology readings, tarot readings, and spiritual life coaching programs online ~ with a 100% satisfaction and recommendation rate!www.thechakraoracle.cominstagram.com/thechakraoraclehttps://www.facebook.com/chakraoracleyoutube.com/thechakraoracleUse coupon code FREEHUGS to drop the price of a 1 hour Astrology Reading with Luna to $50.As always you can be in exchange with the Sacred Adventure Begin podcast over on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/GettinIntuit

The Broadway Hat Podcast
Ep. 35- Drew Melanson

The Broadway Hat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 83:15


The Rangers re-signed Igor Shesterkin to a 4 year extension and make a few other small moves. Will we ever escape the Jake Eichel rumors? We are joined this week by former New York Ranger Drew Melanson. Drew shared some great stories from his USHL career, his college career which started at RPI and ended at BU with him scoring the Hockey East Championship game-winning goal. We talk about him playing for the now former NY Rangers Head Coach David Quinn there and then we talk about his experience playing in the Rangers organization and playing overseas in Germany.

Two Feet In with Coach Heather Macy
The more we serve the more we get to operate in joy: Jody Adams Birch

Two Feet In with Coach Heather Macy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 24:54


Please contact Jody at the following email address jody.adams@siu.edu. Jody Adams-Birch enters her third season on Cindy Stein's staff at Southern Illinois, and her first as the associate head coach. In her second season on staff, the Salukis posted their sixth-straight winning record. Southern defeated a ranked opponent (Missouri State) for the first time since 1991 and the Salukis finished with a RPI of 105, its highest since 2007. SIU's four top-100 wins during the 2019-20 season were its most since at least 2002. The Salukis also repeated as Compass Challenge Champions and Nicole Martin and Makenzie Silvey were both selected to the All-MVC honorable mention team while Brittney Patrick earned her first career All-Defensive Team honor. A 1994 graduate of Tennessee, Adams-Birch played four seasons for the Lady Vols under legendary head coach Pat Summitt, and was the starting point guard for three Southeastern Conference Championship teams. The Lady Vols advanced to the NCAA Tournament in each of her four years and captured the NCAA's ultimate prize with a national championship in 1991. She began her coaching career as a student assistant with the Lady Vols in 1993.

The Roundtable
8/4/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 78:50


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration and Chair of ACM Technology Policy Council Jim Hendler, Vice President for Editorial Development at the New York Press Association Judy Patrick, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

The Roundtable
8/2/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 52:27


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration and Chair of ACM Technology Policy Council Jim Hendler, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

Trosky Ranch Complete Player Development
CPD #38 - Damon Lessler (cont)

Trosky Ranch Complete Player Development

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 40:08


Nate Trosky and Trent Mongero are joined by Damon Lessler for Part 2! Damon Lessler recently accepted the title of hitting coach at Charleston Southern University in the Big South Conference.   Most recently Lessler coached in the Pac-12 conference at the University of California where he served as the Golden Bears' infield, catching & base running coach while assisting with the program's hitters. He was the team's third base coach & also dealt with player recruitment. Lessler spent three seasons in Bear Territory during a tenure that was highlighted by steady player development and Cal's first trip to an NCAA Regional since 2015. The Bears punched their ticket as an at-large bid and the No. 2 seed at the Fayetteville (Ark.) Regional after finishing fourth in the Pac-12 and carrying a No. 31 RPI ranking at the conclusion of the regular season. Cal's 2019 success continued into the summer when seven Bears were selected in the MLB First-Year Player Draft, including first-round picks Andrew Vaughn (No. 3 overall, White Sox) and Korey Lee (No. 32 overall, Houston). Vaughn and Lee - both of which went undrafted out of high school - became the first duo in school history to be taken in the first round of the same draft. Vaughn, who was the program's highest-drafted player ever, was also named a finalist for the Golden Spikes Award for the second straight year. Lee became Cal's second catcher drafted in as many years, a credit to Lessler mentorship. Lessler additionally guided shortstop Cameron Eden, who batted .365 with a team-leading 73 hits, 20 stolen bases and eight home runs all while making a position change midseason to center field during his junior season. Eden went on to be a sixth round selection by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 2019 MLB Draft. In 2018, Lessler worked closely with Cal's catchers as the Bears went 32-22 overall and 16-14 in the Pac-12. Cal catcher Tyrus Greene earned All-Pac-12 honors thanks to a season in which he hit .320. Greene committed just three errors, allowed only four passed balls, and went on to be drafted by the Chicago White Sox. A Bay Area native who hails from nearby Castro Valley, Calif., Lessler spent time as an assistant coach at San Jose State. He served as the Spartans' recruiting coordinator while also working with infielders, hitters and coaching third base. Prior to joining the Spartans, Lessler spent the 2016 season as an assistant coach at Cal Poly and worked in the same role at Southern Mississippi in 2015. In 2013 and 2014, he served as assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Chico State and helped the Wildcats go a combined 80-33 in two seasons. Working again with infielders, he helped Chico State compile a .977 fielding percentage in 2014, a mark that ranked first in all of Division II baseball that year. Chico State reached the NCAA Division II West Region finals in 2013 and the Division II College World Series in 2014. A shortstop at Castro Valley High School, Lessler went on to play collegiately at Mesa (Ariz.) Community College, Sonoma State and Mississippi Valley State. He went on to play professionally in the Northern League, the American Association and the Frontier League in addition to playing in five different countries. He transitioned to coaching in 2011. A 2006 graduate of Mississippi Valley State, Lessler earned his bachelor's degree in mass communications while also earning valedictorian honors from the university. In 2007, he earned a master's degree in sports administration from Southern Mississippi, where he also served as a graduate assistant while finishing his playing career. www.troskyranch.com https://troskybaseball.com/ https://coachmongero.com/ Thanks to our sponsors at: https://soldiersports.us/ https://winreality.com Use Code Trosky for one month free https://www.jaegersports.com/ https://qualityatbats.com/

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear
Dr. Shirley Jackson: President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 36:26


Schools in Washington, DC, were still segregated when Shirley Jackson started her education. We revisit this conversation in which Dr. Jackson tells how she became the first African American woman to get a PhD from MIT, the chair of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and president of the renowned RPI. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Rink Live
The Rink Live podcast -- ep. 88

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 37:25


Ben Barr grew up in Duluth and playing youth hockey players that would end up at Duluth East. He ended up following his dad's footsteps and attended Shattuck-St. Mary's Prep School. He then went on to play college hockey for RPI. Since finishing college, he has been an assistant coach at RPI (2004-08), Union (2008-11), Providence (2011-14), Western Michigan (2014-16) and Massachusetts (2016-21). He helped the Minutemen win their first NCAA Division I men's title and then was named the Black Bears coach in May. He discusses his career and life with The Rink Live's Mick Hatten and Matt Wellens.  

Capital Region Business Podcast
038 - Michael Scaringe on Growing Skyview Landscapes

Capital Region Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 33:02


Michael Scaringe, owner of Skyview Landscapes Inc, joins the podcast to discuss growing his business in the Capital Region and what we can all learn from his experience. Don't miss this episode... Episode Highlights: Mike shares his background. (2:30) Mike mentions what Skyview Landscapes can offer to their customers. (4:02) Mike explains what RPI has taught him. (7:45) Mike shares how the business has changed in the last 10 years. (9:07) Mike mentions why a conference is a good indication of what they do. (10:18) What's something that Mike's seeing out there that could be the next big thing for the future? (17:06) Mike shares how many employees they have and what the other employees are working on. (20:43) Mike explains what field managers do at Skyview Landscapes. (22:51) Key Quotes: “Me, as the contractor, I know where everything's gonna go.I feel very comfortable knowing that at the end, once we put the first shovel in the ground, where the end is going to go because of design.” - Michael Scaringe “If you're going to invest the money, invest in some sort of designer or architect. Because they know the trends, they know what works best, and how it will fit perfectly for your backyard.” - Michael Scaringe “I wanted to be a business owner, I'm not the best guy to maybe go work in a financial firm or county firm and do that sort of thing. So, I always knew that I wanted to be a business owner, but, it just has to be landscape because I kind of had a passion for contracts.” - Michael Scaringe Resources Mentioned: Michael Scaringe LinkedIn Skyview Landscapes Reach out to Ryan Hanley Reach out to Michael Field

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Darkside of Physics "stellar conundrum" with Glenn Ciolek pt2

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 9:48


Glenn Ciolek, theoretical and computational astrophysicist at RPI, spoke with Nithilan Pugal about exploring the universe as we know it and how the interstellar medium is important for the birth and development of stars and planets.

The Herpetoculture Network
RPI updates & More with Cody Bartolini

The Herpetoculture Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 148:38


For episode 127, Cody Bartolini returns since our first episode with both he and his wife 2 years ago. We talk about what's new with the Reptile Preservation Institute, alligators, and more. Like this episode? Want more? SUBSCRIBE via Soundcloud, iTunes, Google Play, or Spotify! Follow the Reptile Preservation Institute - https://www.facebook.com/RPI.ReptilePreservationInstitute Follow us - https://bit.ly/2MRsNJ1 Follow Justin - https://bit.ly/2AnesKR Follow Phil - https://www.instagram.com/knobtails.ig/ Follow MP Cages & Exotics - https://bit.ly/2vym7Ha Follow Steve's Snaketuary - https://bit.ly/2KO9BIY Support the show, pick up a shirt! - https://bit.ly/31gO7ux Into track: RadioSlug by Anitek - https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Anitek/Luna/11_RadioSlug

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
TfL fares are going up by how much?

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 7:36


The Evening Standard's Jack Kessler tells the podcast why Transport for London fares are set to rise by around 5 percent from January, and what that could mean for efforts to bring people back to the city centre.Normally TfL fares are set each year by the Mayor. But the terms of its third bail-out, agreed by Sadiq Khan with Transport Secretary Grant Shapps in May, state: “TfL will continue with its existing plan to increase fares in line with their business planning assumption of an overall fares increase of RPI+ one per cent on fares under the Mayor's control in January 2022.”Jack says some experts believe it will put people off returning to the commute, a bill many haven't had to pay since the pandemic began last year – but there's little chance of a u-turn. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ham Radio Workbench Podcast
HRWB133-Field Day 2021 Debrief and EmComm Software

Ham Radio Workbench Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 187:55


Field Day Debrief and EmComm Software with Gaston Gonzalez KT1RUN. Our Website - http://www.hamradioworkbench.com/ Follow us on Twitter -  https://twitter.com/hamworkbench Contact us -  http://hamradioworkbench.com/contact Connect with us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/hamradioworkbench/ BrandMeister Talkgroup 31075 - https://hose.brandmeister.network/group/31075/ QSO TODAY Ham Radio Expo August 14th and 15th - https://www.qsotodayhamexpo.com/ HRWB will host a live event Friday the 13th night starting at 6 PM PDT George will present the trailer build project Mark will present on Measuring 1:1 Balun/Common Mode Choke Designs With A NanoVNA Vince will present on Disaster Communications and Leadership imperatives Mike will present a spin-off on “death of the RS-232 port” Anyone else? **Digilent  Coupon Code HamRadioWorkbench2021 **Available at digilent Ham Radio Workbench will participate in the QSO Today Virtual Ham Expo August 14th and 15th Booth + conference tables to meet and chat https://www.qsotodayhamexpo.com/ Segment 1 - What's on your workbench Gaston Raspberry Pi 3B+ CPU cooling: case evaluation and software/hardware optimization What: Looking for perfect RPi 3B+ field case for a software project Why: Sonoran Desert & field operations How: Added CPU temperature telemetry (app + cron job) + journal/graphs Baseline: CanaKit Raspberry Pi 3 B+ (B Plus) with Premium Clear Case and 2.5A Power Supply iUniker Raspberry Pi 3 B+ Case, Raspberry Pi Fan ABS Case with Cooling Fan Unistorm Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Aluminum Case with Dual Cooling Fan Metal Shell Black Enclosure Flirc Raspberry Pi 3B Case (not yet tested) Pi 4 testing TBD with Argon ONE V2 Raspberry Pi 4 Case with Cooling Fan  Cases: Findings: active vs passive cooling Mark Looking at M17 again. They've come a LONG way since I started the protocol spec doc a year or so ago.  Provided a couple minor updates in a pull-request, mostly around Crypto protocols.  I have a couple MD380s that I intend to use for M17 hacking. Haven't done anything yet though. Another Field Day, another single episode working on my Contest Station Audio Interface Thingamajig. Debating between two designs: Single unified device, one board with all cables going in and out, all mixer controls in a single place. Distributed devices, with an RJ-45 bus connecting them. Puts controls nearer to the operators/radios, but is more complex.  Allows for further expansion. Playing a bit with my shiny new toy: Flex6400. Book recommendation: The Cuckoo's Egg, Cliff Stoll, K7TA. Not ham radio related, but I suspect will be of interest to hams. (AWESOME BOOK - RH) Rod Partial Tear down of my Covid Office / Ham shack to install a new (to me)  50 inch LG Digital sign (Like you see at Malls)  to run the GeoCron and also as an information radiator. Got this on an online auction. Live feed of data. LG Model 49SM5KE-BJ Studio A: Two 31 inch curved monitors at eye level - plus Macbook in centre Radios to the right (controlled by PC plus VFO Audio podcast gear to the Left (Rodecaster, etc) Below Monitors Studio B: (Spin around - a U shaped desk) Work related Hardware / tools plus Video Editing Ergonomics - Credit to Foundations of Amateur Radio Podcast - Onno (VK6FLAB) ‎Foundations of Amateur Radio on Apple Podcasts For the Ergonomics discussion Still working on a talk on the  future of all this Zoom fun “After” Covid?  Covid forced content back into prominence - How do we keep “Content” as king? George Maiden voyage of the radio trailer Presentation at the QSO Today virtual ham radio expo Playing with the ESP32 WiFi LoRa Arduino module Shipped out a pile of PackTenna trekmount antennas … thanks to Gaston New RigExpert AA-650 analyzer Tram 2m/UHF yagi $99 not bad Michael Operating -- conditions on 6M for the last 10 days have been amazing for us in VE3 land.   I have a Morseduino to build Improving power control to the rotator controller and Steppir controller installed at the base of the Tower - I have LAN at the tower base so a KMTronic switch mounted there now AT100 tuner kit for the IC-705 Vince W8BH.net Morse Tutor Kits update Next round parts have been ordered, now we wait Send email to Vince - ve6lk [at] rac [dot] ca The original project source is http://w8bh.net  PA0RDT mini-whip waiting on parts McHF repair waiting on parts KD2C Panadapter tap will, one day, go into my go-kit FT-857D Prepping for QSO Today conference UHF packet station project started Every SMC job … https://twitter.com/VE6LK/status/1411515481907859459     Segment 2 - Field Day Debrief George Trailer was great ! Best features Screen doors ! External powerfilm solar panels and DC extension cords SOK battery - $570 for 100 Ah vs Battleborn $949 for 100 Ah https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxMIs0PXrBw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjpkI8quyzQ&t=534s Carbon fiber masts - Gigaparts Flex 6400 + Maestro   Vince Socially Distant FD a success! Visitors from all over North America via Zoom Local Deputy Mayor and Fire Chief in attendance Adult beverage delivery actually happened! Aim high when you ask club members to contribute! http://field-day.arrl.org/fdentriesrcvd.php to check on entries Gaston - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUoEuaQ_l2Q Location: Tonto National Forest - evening/overnight operation X-factor: heat Man portable: 58.5 lb pack including 8L of water (17.5 lbs) Conditions: 101- 85 degrees (F) Did not participate in FD activities Gear:  PackTenna Linked Dipole: 20m/40m (80m not used) PackTenna TrekMount with Comet BNC-24 antennas for 2m SSB FT-818 with ARMOLOQ TPA pack frame, 4.5Ah LiFePO4, 20 watt Powerfilm solar panels, Buddipole PowerMini EmComm Tools testing successful: APRS text msg (SMSGTE), 40m Winlink status email, call lookup Mark N6EOF 2A Santa Barbara. 631 QSOs: 351 SSB, 94 Digital (FT4 and FT8), 186 CW. 100W so 2x multiplier.  1822 Total QSO points, 350 Bonus points. Final score: 2172 points! (but it's totally not a contest.) Had a great turn out! About 12 people total, 7 active hams who played with the radios at least a bit. Ran entirely on solar power, only spun up the generator for a couple minutes to make sure it worked, and show another person how (it's mod'd for Propane.)  2 stations, 100W both, using nothing but solar. I'm really proud of that. SSB station: FT-920, on an EFHW, cut for 40m (so resonates on 40/20/15/10m), but added a loading coil and stub to add 80m. It worked really well, but required more tuning at the radio than I anticipated. The loading coil was 13 turns of antenna wire around an FT140-43 (which should have been about 110uH, except that it totally isn't, it's 150uH, I should have done 11 turns… Oops…)  All the designs I've seen show a linear coil of antenna wire around a form, not a toroid. I'm wondering if the capacitive coupling of the toroid was different enough from the linear coil to affect tuning on 40m and above.  (The wrong inductance should have only negatively affected 80m, which definitely was tuned too low.) Used the feedline as a counterpoise, put a current choke 1:1 balun about 12 feet from the feedpoint: 13 turns of RG-8X around an FT240-43. You think wrapping magnet wire around toroids is a pain? CW/Digital station: Club member brought his Packtenna clipped dipole. Used it with his Flex6600 and Maestro. Worked a charm. 20m SSB was CHEEK BY JOWEL... Rod VA3ON  Teamed up with my friend (and Elmer) Peter West VE3HG to create a small scale field day for us and our two Padawans, Iuliya VE3UHA  and Dante VA3DNF. (4 total) Both teenagers licenced as Basic with Honours during the pandemic shutdown, but had yet to operate HF. Used the Oakville club call VE3HB. At the scenic “West Estate” we got a few antennas up (Dipoles, horizontal Endfed and verticals) 5 Watts on two Elecraft KX2 Stations (Commonality of rigs, preserved learning): Station A: CW  Station B: Phone and FT8 on the other New HRWB Logger appliance (with N1MM) - Avita Magus II [WT9M10C44] 10 Inches Intel Celeron 4GB RAM 64GB Storage Touch 2-in-1 Windows 10 Tablet PC Black     - rocked Conditions Phone was horrific on Saturday FT- not much better - could hear lots but nothing worked well CW great (as usual) To make CW workable we used a CW reader and keyer with preloaded exchanges and a keyboard. An approach I've not used before with rookies to shortened the learning curve. Emphasis on learning and getting the tempo. We may be seeing a lot more of these two as CW contesters - they were aggressive! Segment 3 - EmComm Software Project by Gaston KT1RUN What is the purpose? API and web app for field expedient digital communications platform that runs on RPi Offgid, mobile-first and 1-click digital operations Headless: eliminate need for VNC and/or external display/keyboard/mouse Lightweight: small footprint memory, CPU and disk => conserve power What does it do? Allows headless operation of various ham radio tools (Pat, YAAC,direwolf, etc.) on a RPi (everything runs on the Pi; the web browser is the interface) Streamlines mode switching: Winlink ARDOP, Winlink packet and APRS Streamines messaging for both Winlink and APRS through templating engine Offline callsign lookup - includes approx. distance calc based on GPS Status information: time (local/UTC, hostname, IP, CPU temp, GPS, grid square) Remote shutdown What did you use to develop it?  App and API decoupled Backend: (API) Java JDK 11 Spring Boot: DI, uber jar, systemd, oh my Lucene: IR library (search background) Custom YAAC plugin: Light-weight HTTP API (REST-like)   Frontend: (not my area) Prototype: Bootstrap and jQuery Prod: React.js: What is the project status?  Do you want people to try it out? Status: Prototype, field experimentation Limited beta tentatively schedule for fall 2021 First round: Operators with FT-817/818 or FT-857D (maybe FT-991A) Second round: Any all band, all mode radio (HF + 2m) RPi 3B+ Build and giveaway on the channel Weekly project updates: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/thetechprepper     Wrapup / Outro If people want to get in touch with you, what is the best way? Gaston Email: info@thetechprepper.com  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheTechPrepper/videos EmComm Tools Project: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/thetechprepper Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thetechprepper/ Twitter: @thetechprepper1 Mark Twitter @smittyhalibut Rod Twitter @VA3ON YouTube https://www.youtube.com/Cycle25 www.cycle25.ca Vince Twitter @VE6LK  Web www.VE6LK.com George DMR TG 31075 From all of us at the Ham Radio Workbench, 73. NOTES Reminder to Jeremy, post notes for HRWB132 onto web

Trosky Ranch Complete Player Development
CPD #37 - Damon Lessler

Trosky Ranch Complete Player Development

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 39:53


Nate Trosky and Trent Mongero are joined by Damon Lessler for Part 2! Damon Lessler recently accepted the title of hitting coach at Charleston Southern University in the Big South Conference.   Most recently Lessler coached in the Pac-12 conference at the University of California where he served as the Golden Bears' infield, catching & base running coach while assisting with the program's hitters. He was the team's third base coach & also dealt with player recruitment. Lessler spent three seasons in Bear Territory during a tenure that was highlighted by steady player development and Cal's first trip to an NCAA Regional since 2015. The Bears punched their ticket as an at-large bid and the No. 2 seed at the Fayetteville (Ark.) Regional after finishing fourth in the Pac-12 and carrying a No. 31 RPI ranking at the conclusion of the regular season. Cal's 2019 success continued into the summer when seven Bears were selected in the MLB First-Year Player Draft, including first-round picks Andrew Vaughn (No. 3 overall, White Sox) and Korey Lee (No. 32 overall, Houston). Vaughn and Lee - both of which went undrafted out of high school - became the first duo in school history to be taken in the first round of the same draft. Vaughn, who was the program's highest-drafted player ever, was also named a finalist for the Golden Spikes Award for the second straight year. Lee became Cal's second catcher drafted in as many years, a credit to Lessler mentorship. Lessler additionally guided shortstop Cameron Eden, who batted .365 with a team-leading 73 hits, 20 stolen bases and eight home runs all while making a position change midseason to center field during his junior season. Eden went on to be a sixth round selection by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 2019 MLB Draft. In 2018, Lessler worked closely with Cal's catchers as the Bears went 32-22 overall and 16-14 in the Pac-12. Cal catcher Tyrus Greene earned All-Pac-12 honors thanks to a season in which he hit .320. Greene committed just three errors, allowed only four passed balls, and went on to be drafted by the Chicago White Sox. A Bay Area native who hails from nearby Castro Valley, Calif., Lessler spent time as an assistant coach at San Jose State. He served as the Spartans' recruiting coordinator while also working with infielders, hitters and coaching third base. Prior to joining the Spartans, Lessler spent the 2016 season as an assistant coach at Cal Poly and worked in the same role at Southern Mississippi in 2015. In 2013 and 2014, he served as assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Chico State and helped the Wildcats go a combined 80-33 in two seasons. Working again with infielders, he helped Chico State compile a .977 fielding percentage in 2014, a mark that ranked first in all of Division II baseball that year. Chico State reached the NCAA Division II West Region finals in 2013 and the Division II College World Series in 2014. A shortstop at Castro Valley High School, Lessler went on to play collegiately at Mesa (Ariz.) Community College, Sonoma State and Mississippi Valley State. He went on to play professionally in the Northern League, the American Association and the Frontier League in addition to playing in five different countries. He transitioned to coaching in 2011. A 2006 graduate of Mississippi Valley State, Lessler earned his bachelor's degree in mass communications while also earning valedictorian honors from the university. In 2007, he earned a master's degree in sports administration from Southern Mississippi, where he also served as a graduate assistant while finishing his playing career. www.troskyranch.com https://troskybaseball.com/ https://coachmongero.com/ Thanks to our sponsors at: https://soldiersports.us/ https://winreality.com Use Code Trosky for one month free https://www.jaegersports.com/ https://qualityatbats.com/

The Roundtable
7/12/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 76:01


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration and Chair of ACM Technology Policy Council Jim Hendler, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

The Roundtable
7/6/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 75:18


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

The Roundtable
7/1/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 75:03


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Albany Chief City Auditor Dorcey Applyrs, Edward Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at RPI and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Fran Berman, and Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman Ira Fusfeld.

Fire Protection Podcast
Episode 33 - Upcoming NFPA Vote with AFSA's John Denhardt and Kevin Hall

Fire Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 48:37


TIMELINE:Introductions (1:35)What is the American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA?) (3:09)Meet John Denhardt, P.E., FSFPE, VP of engineering and technical services for the American Fire Sprinkler Association (4:20)Between John and Kevin they are on 40 NFPA Committees (4:11)Why it is Important to be on Committees (4:40)Meet Kevin Hall, M.Eng., P.E., ET, CWBSP, PMSFPE (5:00)John & Kevin Bring Real World Sprinkler Contractor Knowledge With Them (6:39)Theory is Great! But, it Has to Work in the Real World  (6:49)ITM Training (7:30)What is Coming Up - the NFPA Tech Meeting (8:01)NITMAN on NFPA13 (9:37)Is John Testing Kevin? (9:52)The NITMAN becomes a CAM (10:26)Three Big CAMS (11:10)Biggest CAM to AFSA (12:00)The History of this Water Supply CAM (12:06)Requiring an Adjustment to the Water Supply (12:30)Should Not be the Contractor's Responsibility (14:00)Where Should the Liability Fall? (15:20)Location, Location, Location (16:33)If Accepted as is - Cost of installation Would Go Up (17:05)The Lawyers Would Have Fun (18:10)There Goes the Price and There Goes theTimeline (18:30)It Isn't Even a Safety Factor (18:48)Any NFPA Member can Vote on it (20:10)Strike the Language! Please Vote in Favor of the CAM! (20:40)Please Educate Yourself on these Issues (20:50)Voting Guide (21:08)Review the Issues and See How They Affect YOU (21:21)Another One the AFSA is Against - Sprinkler in Elevator Hoist Way (22:47)Elevator CAM Acception = Giant Black Hole (23:40)Remove Unintended Affects (24:17)One More CAM that Causes Confusion - 9 vs 12 Sprinklers (26:21)People Can Vote Virtually (29:09)Uncle Sam Needs YOU! (32:06)What is Coming Up in NFPA 25? (33:35)2023 Version Second Draft is Almost Ready for Presenting (34:04)Quick Response Round! (37:09)Want to Meet John's Little Friend? (37:18)Kevin Must Rank Fire Protection Schools! (38:40)Three Inspect Point Co-Founders Went To RPI (39:00)Sprinkler Head Testing Frequency in NFPA25? (39:16)50 Years is a Long Time! (43:10)Where Can We Find You Guys? (43:43)VOTE! (48:00)LIVE from Atlantic City! (48:15)Wrap Ups (57:28)

Ron Paul Liberty Report
US Judge To TX Hospital Workers: 'Get The Shot Or Get Fired!'

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 32:18


A US judge has ruled against 117 workers at Houston Methodist Hospital who sued their employer over a vaccine mandate. Even though the current status of the "vaccines" is experimental (not yet fully FDA approved), the judge nevertheless called the workers' concerns over safety absurd. What's next? Also today, new poll shows Democrats overwhelmingly favor forcing shots on the public. And the CDC announces "emergency meeting" after hundreds of cases of heart inflammation are reported among young people after Covid shot. BIG ANNOUNCEMENT: TWO (!!) RPI CONFERENCES THIS SUMMER! August 15th Houston; Sept. 4th Washington DC. Subscribe for free to RPI for updates and ticket information: http://ronpaulinstitute.org/subscribe/

The Roundtable
6/7/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 77:53


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Immigration attorney and associate with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

College Sports Now
College Sports Now 6-2-21

College Sports Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 76:19


The Field of 64 is set and it's time to preview the 2021 NCAA Baseball Tournament! Schass and Surbs run through who got in and who was left out, discussion on the RPI and whether it should have been followed more closely throughout the season, plus we run through each regional with our thoughts on who will survive and play in the Supers next week. Follow College Sports Now on Twitter @CSNowTweets!

Bleav in Softball
Heather Tarr - Mighty Are the Women

Bleav in Softball

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 45:15


Jenna is joined by Husky Softball Head Coach, winningest coach of any sport in Washington history, UW alum, and Team USA coach, Heather Tarr! They talk about postseason - from their Selection Show reaction, to fighting through the Seattle Regional, and prepping for Super Regionals - how the Pac-12 can increase exposure, the essence of Husky Softball, the growth of the game, looking ahead to the Tokyo Olympics with Team USA, and more.

The Parting Schotts Podcast
Talking Tri-City ValleyCats, Albany Empire and Ben Barr

The Parting Schotts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 51:51


On the latest edition of “The Parting Schotts Podcast,” host and Associate Sports Editor Ken Schott talks with Tri-City ValleyCats manager Pete Incaviglia as the team prepares to open its first season in the Frontier League on Thursday. “Things have gone better than expected, player-wise,” Incaviglia said during his appearance on the show. “I feel like we've got a team that will compete. It'll be good to see them play some real games against real opponents in our league.” Schott also talks to ValleyCats general manager Matt Callahan about how attendance will be as coronavirus restrictions are eased. Albany Empire quarterback Tommy Grady comes on to talk about the team as the Empire opens its National Arena League season Saturday. “Obviously,” Grady said, “we're all happy that the season is about to start and get on its way.” New Maine men's hockey coach Ben Barr, who played at RPI and was an assistant coach at Union, also joins the show to discuss his new job. “The Parting Schotts Podcast” is available wherever you get your podcasts and at https://dailygazette.com/category/sports/parting-schotts/.

cityCURRENT Radio Show
Nashville Radio Show: Take Back Control of Your Shipping Contracts with Reveel

cityCURRENT Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2021 15:10


Host Jeremy C. Park talks with Jordan Allen, Senior Vice President with Reveel, who shares her personal background and highlights her company's mission to increase their clients' profitability by empowering them with shipping intelligence and advocating for transparency within the industry. During the interview, Jordan talks about their model and how they are able to renegotiate their clients' small parcel carrier contracts leveraging their benchmarking software and audit invoices for incorrect charges. She offers a glimpse at their new SaaS software that will be coming out soon, talks about trends in the industry, and their charitable efforts to support nonprofits, as well.Our Mission: To increase our clients' profitability by empowering them with shipping intelligence and advocating for transparency within the industryWhat we do: Reveel provides Shipping Intelligence® to help companies level the playing field between FedEx, UPS, DHL and Amazon. We renegotiate our clients' small parcel carrier contracts leveraging our benchmarking software and audit invoices for incorrect charges. Our services have saved companies tens of millions of dollars at zero cost to them due to our contingency-based savings model. Our dedicated team of local experts will give you valuable industry and regional benchmarks to help you identify measurable savings and increase profitability.Corporate Citizenship: We're committed to helping the communities where we work and live. We donate a percentage of the savings we procure to the charity of our client's choice; Reveel matches the percentage our clients donate.Current initiative: We are almost finished developing our groundbreaking SaaS software. The platform is insights driven and uses machine learning to increase efficiency and drive cost savings. As of now, there is nothing like it in this space. It pairs the general insights with actionable suggestions that maximize savings. We have a very unique agreement management feature where you'll have the ability to compare FedEx and/or UPS agreements side by side and manage your FedEx/UPS agreements revenue bands and expirations ensuring you don't lose any discounts. Lastly, we have a feature that visually shows you how you compare to other businesses with similar shipping characteristics (RPI).Trends: Shipping volume and expenses have increased due to consumers ordering product to their homes because of COVIDLearn more:Website:                www.reveelgroup.comLinkedIn:               https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordan-allen-77555a5b/

Bleav in Softball

Postseason college softball is back! Jenna breaks down the 2021 NCAA tournament bracket revealed at the Selection Show, how it works, themes by conference, reactions around the softball world, positive takeaways, history making, surprises to watch for, and what we can look forward to on the road to the WCWS. Plus, softball news and the Foul Tip of the Week.

The Roundtable
5/20/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 72:58


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany Chief City Auditor Dorcey Applyrs, Edward Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at RPI and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Fran Berman, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Dr. Carolina Gonzalez - Assistant Dean in the College of Education and Human Services at Montclair State University.

Wake Up Warchant
(5/18/21): Third time not a charm on the pitch, RPI rips ACC hopes, John Pak interview

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 49:34


Women's soccer squanders late lead, hopes of 3rd nat'l title (8:00) Untouchable FSU players (13:00) RPI making a mess of FSU's postseason destiny (23:00) Corey goes 1-on-1 with top collegiate golfer, FSU's John Pak Music: Matt Skiba and the Sekrets - Lonely and Kold Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dave 'Softy' Mahler and Dick Fain
Softy and Dick H1 - Bob Baffert banned / Ian Furness on K.J. Wright / Danielle Lawrie on UW softball

Dave 'Softy' Mahler and Dick Fain

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 39:40


Bob Baffert banned from entering horses in races in New York with the Belmont Stakes upcoming, Huskies softball screwed, thoughts on Seahawks rookie camp’s start. Ian Furness joins us to report that Seahawks have not made a contract offer to K.J. Wright, why they haven’t, if they need to do something with him, the implications of not bringing him back. Former UW softball star Danielle Lawrie joins Softy and Dick to discuss how and why #5 Huskies Softball got a 16-seed in the NCAA Tournament, the overall disrespect to the Pac-12 and what it is based on, how this team compares to the 2009 National Champions, why RPI was followed so closely in seedings, the SEC bias in the selections.

The Roundtable
5/13/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 86:41


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Professor of Sociology at UAlbany Angie Y. Chung, Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman Ira Fusfeld, and Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler. For the final portion of the program Joe and Alan are joined by Dr. James Fagin, MD, an Immunology & Allergy Specialist in New Hyde Park, New York.

The Roundtable
5/11/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 78:32


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain.

The Roundtable
5/6/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 77:21


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, T etherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author Malcolm Nance.

The Roundtable
4/29/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 79:36


The Roundtable Panel : a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany Chief City Auditor Dorcey Applyrs, Edward Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at RPI and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Fran Berman, and Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler.

Professional Christian Coaching Today
On Purpose with Purpose #298

Professional Christian Coaching Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 34:41


In these uncertain times, now more than ever we need to know where we are headed and how to get there. In this interview, Executive Coach John Ramstead shares the critical component that most people overlook as they try to live their lives on purpose, with purpose.   We invite you to:   Step into a self-coaching experience that will help you rewrite your story and live into your true purpose.   Walk a path of personal and professional development that will increase your impact, engagement, and legacy.   Run a race at a pace set just for you and finish strong, so you really can get to where you want to go.     About John Ramstead   There are those rare moments when substance, subject matter, and a personal story coalesce and create inspiration. John Ramstead’s is one such story. A native Minnesotan, John attended St. Thomas Military Academy where he developed a love for military history (especially WWII) and became immersed in ROTC. Graduating at the top of his class in high school, a theme repeated many times in his academic and professional life, John was accepted into the Naval Academy but opted for Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. At RPI, John studied electrical engineering. Again, John made Dean’s List and graduated RPI at the top of his class.   It was clear through his college career and young-adult life that John wanted to serve his country. John was the 1 in 10,000 to apply to the US Navy Flight School that got in. Like several other important milestones, this changed John’s life. When he arrived at flight school surrounded by extraordinary competitive peers, his father made a suggestion. “Find the best, the ace of the base, and get to know him. Then ask him how he does it.” John followed his father’s advice and this approach helped John to go on to graduate #1 in his class and #1 in Naval Aviation Training Command allowing him to be the only graduate to get his choice of aircraft.   John went on to serve our country by flying combat sorties in the Persian Gulf during Desert Storm. Over the following few years, John became a flight instructor, teaching America’s “best + brightest” to fly as he did. Of 40 elite pilots, John was selected for one of two spots at TOPGUN, the most advanced, competitive, and elite fighter pilot training program the world over. He continued his aviation career until it was cut short by a softball accident where he sustained nerve damage to his eye.   Things happen for a reason: John would go onto a highly successful career as an entrepreneur in the tech space, spending time at Focus Technology, Synera Systems in the data mining field, and then EMC, focusing on their $1B and below client portfolio where he managed a $100 million P&L. Regular 70 to 80 hour a week work schedules were common. Long days away from family and other important things began to take their toll. John began to ask a lot of penetrating questions about what he was good at and re-evaluated how to accomplish those goals. Transitioning from tech into financial services and planning, John has held several senior positions at Bernstein Global Wealth Management and Financial Designs, where he was a respected colleague and major contributor to those firms’ success.   Then came the accident. In 2011, John was thrown several feet from a galloping horse, impacting a fence. His doctors have told him he is nothing less than a living miracle. Twenty surgeries, six titanium plates later, and the likelihood that he would not live, John is not only here, but he is also thriving. His thinking and analytical capacity are operating at the same advanced level as before, but the accident shifted something profound in John and his outlook.   A calling: John believes that his life has been spared so that he can pursue his life work – to give back to other leaders what has been given to him. Having been a successful, proven leader of men and women, whether as part of executive teams or as a combat veteran, John has a unique perspective on establishing a template for success that goes beyond achieving financial goals and the mission.   John’s perspective is unique in that it not only encompasses critical performance metrics, but also critical life aspects of balance, family, happiness, joy, and laughter. John was born to lead. He has proven his valor and ability on the battlefield and in the boardroom. His aim is to apply those skills to other leaders struggling to find clarity and happiness in the pursuit of their own success and enjoy those things that matter most.   Strategic thinking, leadership skills, development, and execution – these form the framework for John’s approach. But John’s coaching style and methods go well beyond how to write and execute a brilliant plan. His message is about living life fully, making a lasting contribution, and understanding not only the how, but the why we are driven to achieve. He helps uncover these truths for his client-leaders and helps them to establish their own priorities to achieve what William James called “the life worth living.”   John has worked with hundreds of leaders in nine countries. His clients range from CEOs of Fortune 500 companies to start-up entrepreneurs and leadership teams of non-profits.   John has been interviewed on leadership, creating high-performing teams, and corporate coaching strategies multiple times on radio, TV, summits, and podcasts. John is also a frequent speaker on these topics and was asked to speak at the Jim Collins, author of Good To Great, Finishing Great event this summer.   John’s new book, On Purpose, with Purpose, will be released on 4/27/21, and you can pre-order your copy now at https://www.beyondinfluence.com/book/

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Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 60:30


BMo is back in the host's chair and refuses to be the next Wally Pipp. The crew touches on a controversial play, the RPI, before giving a preview of what's to come in April. Then they hit the hot programs in the ACC, the uniqueness of the 4 Game Series, and talk about some of the women making waves in the MLB. Plus a mailbag, Shaggin' Stats, and the Player of the Week. Check us out @7InningsPodcast on Twitter and Instagram