Podcasts about Dynamo

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  • 712PODCASTS
  • 1,912EPISODES
  • 1h 5mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
Dynamo

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Best podcasts about Dynamo

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Latest podcast episodes about Dynamo

City of Soccer
S3:E2 - Steve Clark & Haley Hanson

City of Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:23


Dash right back Haley Hanson talks about her growth into a professional, favorite Dash Dog and an appearance from Finn and new Dynamo keeper Steve Clark is welcomed to Houston and shares stories from Norway, the playground and why he likes going to the movies alone.

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/12/2022 Aberdeen FC & Former Dynamo ST Christian Ramirez joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 17:25


Aberdeen FC & Former Dynamo ST Christian Ramirez joined Glenn to talk about how he's adjusting to life over in Scotland and the Scottish Premier League, how his move away from the Dynamo came about, why the SPL is becoming a good stepping stone for American players, and much more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/12/2022 Duke Men's Soccer Head Coach John Kerr Jr. joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 11:00


Duke Men's Soccer Head Coach John Kerr Jr. joined Glenn to to give Dynamo fans some great insight into what they can expect from their SuperDraft 1st Round selection, striker Thor Ulfasrsson.

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/12/2022 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 48:38


To begin the opening half of the show, Glenn discusses the latest with the world's game digging into some results from AFCON and both the Italian and Spanish Super Cups.  After the opening segment he is joined by USMNT and Nashville SC CB Walker Zimmerman to get an update on this USMNT camp and talk about Walker's excellent career thus far.  To close the first half of the program, he is joined by Duke Men's Soccer Head Coach John Kerr Jr. to give Dynamo fans a unique and up-close look at their newest player, Thor Ulfarsson. 

Let's Start A Cult
The Church of Scientology Part 2: The Indoctrination Process

Let's Start A Cult

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 44:03


For many, Tom Cruise is a good-looking actor who rose to fame after starring in blockbusters like “Top Gun,” “Mission Impossible,” and “Risky Business.” But for Scientologists, Tom Cruise is a demigod who has become “Operating Thetan VII.” According to them, this status has allowed him to gain a wide range of superpowers, such as telekinesis, leaving his body at will, and controlling the behaviour of other living things – including humans. In fact, former Scientologist and actress Leah Remini once said, quote, “Being critical of Tom Cruise is being critical of Scientology itself. You are a person who is anti– the aims and goals of Scientology. You are evil.” End quote. It's crazy to think that a belief system created in the 1950s managed to become so powerful that it was able to turn an ordinary human being into a deity worshipped by members. Get Ad-Free episodes and episodes A Week Early on our https://www.patreon.com/cultiv8podcastnetwork (Cultiv8 Podcast Network Patreon) Follow us on the socials: https://twitter.com/lets_cult (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/letsstartacultpod (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/lets_cult/?hl=en (Instagram) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChcl9qrvKAsXJTaBfVgKILQ (YouTube) https://www.letsstartacultpodcast.com/ (Website) Weird Distraction Podcast: https://twitter.com/WeirdDistracti1 (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/WeirdDistractionsPod/ (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/weirddistractionspod/?hl=en (Instagram) https://linktr.ee/WeirdDistractionsPod (Website) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Dynamo - https://www.voxnest.com/dynamo/privacy-policies Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

HSV, wir müssen reden
Toni Leistner: „Abgehakt habe ich die Geschichte nie“

HSV, wir müssen reden

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 64:44


Der gebürtige Dresdner und ehemalige HSV-Verteidiger spricht im Abendblatt-Podcast über den Tribüneneklat bei Dynamo im September 2020, den Abgang aus Hamburg und seine aktuellen Aufstiegsfavoriten.

Earshot - ABC RN
A newspaper is born

Earshot - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 28:36


Locals were devastated when their newspaper was axed, so they set up their own. Dynamo editor cum journalist Susanna Freymark tells the stories that really matter to The Richmond River community.

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/05/2022 Soccer Matters Game on for 90

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 3:04


In this week's edition of game on for 90, Glenn passionately explains why as a city, Houston must keep up the "healthy pressure" as positivity returns to both the Dynamo and the Houston soccer community with the recent moves that have been made. 

City of Soccer
S3:E1 - Paulo Nagamura & Maria Sanchez

City of Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 44:51


The newest member of the Dynamo, head coach Paulo Nagamura and the newest player for the Dash, Maria Sanchez, join the pod to kick off season 3 of the City of Soccer.

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/05/2022 Dynamo General Manager Pat Onstad joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 33:43


Dynamo GM Pat Onstad joins Glenn to talk all about the hire of new head coach Paulo Nagamura, how they'll work together to take the club where they want to go, his thoughts on the current roster, spots they might need to improve, transfer rumors, and so much more. 

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/05/2022 Dynamo Technical Director Asher Mendelsohn joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 28:07


The first ever technical director in Dynamo history, Asher Mendelsohn, joins Glenn to discuss his relationship with GM Pat Onstad that led to him ending up in this position, his vision and future expectations for the team, his role in the organization, and more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/05/2022 Dynamo Head Coach Paulo Nagamura joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 20:07


Newly named Dynamo HC Paulo Nagamura joins Glenn to talk about the path that has led him to this position, how he sees the game of soccer, his vision for the team, and much, much more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
01/05/2022 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 52:22


To kick off a huge Wednesday edition of the show, Glenn sets the stage for a wall-to-wall Dynamo edition in which he'll dive into a bunch of exclusive interviews.  After the opening segment, he is joined by newly named Dynamo HC Paulo Nagamura to talk all about his journey to this point, his vision for the team, and more.  To wrap the opening half, he interviews Dynamo Technical Director Asher Mendelsohn to discuss his role within the club, his expectations, and more.

Let's Start A Cult
The Church of Scientology Part 1: The Story of L. Ron Hubbard

Let's Start A Cult

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 51:48


Super excited to kick off 2022 with this much-anticipated cult! The Church of Scientology may be controversial; however, its devotees have nothing but praise for its teachings. For instance, actor Tom Cruise once called it “a beautiful religion,” while fellow actor John Travolta publicly stated that it was only being criticized because it “really works well.” For many, though, the Church of Scientology is nothing but a dangerous cult that brainwashes people, charges them exorbitantly for their membership, and never lets them leave. Get access to Part 2 right now on our https://www.patreon.com/cultiv8podcastnetwork (Cultiv8 Podcast Network Patreon) Follow us on the socials: https://twitter.com/lets_cult (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/letsstartacultpod (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/lets_cult/?hl=en (Instagram) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChcl9qrvKAsXJTaBfVgKILQ (YouTube) https://www.letsstartacultpodcast.com/ (Website) Weird Distraction Podcast: https://twitter.com/WeirdDistracti1 (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/WeirdDistractionsPod/ (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/weirddistractionspod/?hl=en (Instagram) https://linktr.ee/WeirdDistractionsPod (Website) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Dynamo - https://www.voxnest.com/dynamo/privacy-policies Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The TextLocate Story with Ryan Rogers

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 54:49


The TextLocate Story with Ryan Rogers Ryan Rogers and Joe Lynch discuss the TextLocate story. Ryan is the Founder and CEO of TextLocate which provides a freight location tracking and communication solution for brokers and partner carriers. About Ryan Rogers Ryan Rogers is the Founder and CEO of logistics tech startup TextLocate. TextLocate bridges the gap between truck drivers and logistics professionals by creating a simple way to locate freight through a proprietary text message platform that has taken the logistics industry by storm. Prior to founding TextLocate, Ryan's extensive experience dates back over 20+ years and includes stints with Amazon as well as both Covenant Logistics and U.S. Xpress--two top trucking firms headquartered in Chattanooga. At Covenant, Ryan had direct responsibility for technology, continuous improvement, mergers and acquisitions, innovation and strategic planning across the Covenant enterprise. His experience at U.S. Xpress included time spent as corporate treasurer and Chief Operating Officer at the company's logistics division during a time of extensive growth in revenue. He also served as a transportation executive at Amazon.com, leading procurement and carrier development at a time when e-commerce – led by companies like Amazon -- turned heads around the transportation and logistics industry with increasing sales and demand for capacity. He currently serves as a mentor at Chattanooga-based transportation and logistics incubator Dynamo and is a member of the Chattanooga Technology Council. Ryan holds an MBA and undergraduate degree from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where he and his wife, Nicole, have chosen to make their home in the ‘gig city' with their children, Kate and Jack. About TextLocate  TextLocate is headquartered in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and was founded in 2021 by logistics technology executive Ryan Rogers as the solution to freight location tracking and communication for brokers and partner carriers. Rogers, a Chattanooga native, has formerly held executive positions with Amazon.com and Chattanooga transportation companies U.S. Xpress and Covenant Logistics. Key Takeaways: The TextLocate Story Ryan Rogers is the Founder and CEO of freight tech firm, TextLocate which provides a freight location tracking and communication solution for brokers and partner carriers. In the podcast interview, Ryan describes his successful career in the logistics business and his entrepreneurial journey. TextLocate is a simple method for check call updates with partner carriers. TextLocate simplifies the process using TextLocate's custom one-time location update from your partner carrier's driver with one simple text message. Ryan's vision for TextLocate is to complement existing visibility platforms using a one-time text message that is more agreeable to some drivers who resist using apps and other visibility systems. TextLocate's automation makes it very easy for users to make check calls to drivers. Drivers love it because there is no app to download and they are not constantly tracked. With TextLocate, users request a one-time location update as a text message sent to the driver. The message includes company name and unique load ID. All the driver has to do is click the hyperlink within the text and approve the one-time location update. The response updates TextLocate dashboard with the driver's current city, state and zip code. The process is convenient for the operations team to request and simple for the driver to respond without a phone call interruption. TextLocate offers an easy to implement, simple to use process for communicating with drivers. The process is safe, convenient, cost effective, and uses texting technology so there is no training and no learning curve. TextLocate has a free option so users can get started by signing up for a free account. Learn More About The TextLocate Story Ryan Rogers LinkedIn TextLocate LinkedIn TextLocate Why Chattanooga is the Silicon Valley of Trucking with Craig Fuller The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Outliers
#42 Mar Asset: a gestora novata que quer ser a "Dynamo dos Multimercados"

Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 65:50


O episódio #42 do Outliers recebeu Bruno Coutinho e Philippe Perdigão, sócios fundadores da Mar Asset. A gestora foi criada em 2019, quando Bruno e Philippe se uniram ao sócio investidor Luis Moura que, após fundar a 3G Capital em Nova York e ter trabalhado no BTG Pactual e Citibank, montou uma estrutura para alocar, inicialmente, o seu próprio capital. O dinheiro dos sócios, portanto, é investido na mesma condição dos outros cotistas, na estratégia única da casa.O nome da gestora vem de uma paixão em comum entre os três: o surfe. “O mar é um ambiente de variáveis incontroláveis: vento, maré, tamanho da ondulação. O que controlamos é a nossa reação. É isso que pensamos no mercado também”, disse Bruno Coutinho.E o objetivo de longo prazo da gestora não é nada módico: ser para os fundos Multimercados o que a gestora Dynamo é para os fundos de ações - uma referência. Vão ter bastante trabalho duro pela frente e algumas décadas...boa sorte!Ouça o episódio completo e entenda mais sobre a Mar Asset!O Outliers reúne conversas com os gestores mais renomados do mercado e é apresentado por Samuel Ponsoni (@samuel.ponsoni), gestor de fundos da família Selection na XP, acompanhado por Carol Oliveira, coordenadora de análise de fundos da XP.

Come and Take It Pod
5 - Transfer rumors upon rumors, Mati doubles his salary and Paulo Nagamura as the new Dynamo head coach?

Come and Take It Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 22:31


Welcome to the Official Dynamo Theory Podcast! We hope everyone had a fantastic holiday weekend! We touch on some of the transfer rumors of players that are being linked to the Dynamo. We learned more information about Matias Vera new contract terms. And finally, we get some news regarding the head coach position, but who is Paulo Nagamura & what will he bring to the club? Our hosts Rudy and Cristian are here to bring you all the Houston Dynamo FC latest information and of course their own opinions and views of different topics. Don't forget to check us out: @DynamoTheory on IG & Twitter Hit us up using our hashtag #HoustonDT Hosts: @RudySegura10 on IG, @RudySegura3 on Twitter @CrisPutallaz on IG and Twitter @RodrigoSegura01 on Twitter DynamoTheory.com for everything. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/28/2021 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 49:28


To kick off a Tuesday edition of the show Glenn discusses all the angles of the Dynamo's new head coaching hire, Paulo Nagamura.  He continues that conversation throughout the first couple segments of the show, discussing both what it signals for the team and why there is still much work to be done to get soccer back to where it belongs in this city, before being joined by new Dynamo GK Steve Clark to talk all about his move to Houston and his excitement for the season ahead. 

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Physical Fitness is the Key to Recharging Your Body’s Dynamo

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 57:24


Certified Personal Trainer Greg Jasnikowski says anyone can optimize their health and increase the enjoyment of life through physical fitness. Greg is one of America's most knowledgeable and effective personal trainers who has assembled online video fitness courses that people can access anytime, anywhere at a reasonable price...

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/23/2021 Soccer Matters Bonus Interview with Dynamo GK Steve Clark

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 15:06


Newly acquired Dynamo GK Steve Clark joins Glenn to talk all about his career, his move to Houston, and more.

Come and Take It Pod
4 - Off-season News, Players In/Out, Darwin Quintero's numbers, who is Jaime Lozano and more!

Come and Take It Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 57:02


Welcome to the Official Dynamo Theory Podcast! Feeling the holiday spirit the boys unwrap all the small presents that Pat Onstad has provided so far. We go into trading Lassiter, re-signing Darwin Quintero and touch on his playing style and rating numbers and the acquisition of goalkeeper Steve Clark. Jaime Lozano continues to be mentioned as the next possible coach for the Dynamo, so who is he? We answer questions summited by fans and even find out what we want underneath our Christmas tree! Our hosts Rudy and Cristian are here to bring you all the Houston Dynamo FC latest information and of course their own opinions and views of different topics. On this episode we break down the freshly of the press Contract Options. The good, the bad and the ugly.   Don't forget to check us out: @DynamoTheory on IG & Twitter   Hit us up using our hashtag #HoustonDT   Hosts: @RudySegura10 on IG, @RudySegura3 on Twitter @CrisPutallaz on IG and Twitter @RodrigoSegura01 on Twitter   DynamoTheory.com for everything. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/22/2021 Dynamo President John Walker joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 17:03


Dynamo President John Walker joins Glenn to discuss the latest with the offseason moves the Dynamo still need to make, things that are being done to improve the fan experience, and more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/22/2021 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 46:34


To kick off a Wednesday edition of the show Glenn dives into some Dynamo discussion, taking a look at some of the business the Dynamo have done thus far and what they still need to do to build a better Houston soccer culture.  After the opening segment, he is joined by Dynamo President John Walker for and interview in which they discuss the latest with the offseason moves the Dynamo still need to make, things that are being done to improve the fan experience, and more.  To close the opening half of the show, Glenn takes a quick look at the results in the Carabao Cup before returning to the Dynamo and what they still need to do this offseason.

BIMThoughts
E2144 – Konrad Sobon

BIMThoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


In this episode, we chat with Konrad Sobon of bimbeats & Bad Monkeys fame about Dynamo, Programing, The Revit API, Teaching, his coding origin story, favourite language and more. Show Notes Episode Hashtag: #DadJokes Here is where you can find Konrad on the World Wide Web: Website: bimbeats Website: Bad Monkeys Blog: archi+lab LinkedIn:Konrad K … Read More →

The Field Guide to Particle Physics
The Alpha Particle : Part 5 : The Solar Wind

The Field Guide to Particle Physics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 10:03


The Field Guide to Particle Physics https://pasayten.org/the-field-guide-to-particle-physics©2021 The Pasayten Institute cc by-sa-4.0The definitive resource for all data in particle physics is the Particle Data Group: https://pdg.lbl.gov.The Pasayten Institute is on a mission to build and share physics knowledge, without barriers! Get in touch.A few References and Resources for you.Isotopes of Helium:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopes_of_heliumHelium Fact Sheet from NIST:https://webbook.nist.gov/cgi/inchi/InChI%3D1S/HeCDC Fact sheet on Uranium-238:https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/radiation/emergencies/isotopes/uranium.htmBerkeley National Lab Essay on Earth's Heathttps://newscenter.lbl.gov/2011/07/17/kamland-geoneutrinos/Space Weather Prediction Center and the Solar Windhttps://www.swpc.noaa.gov/phenomena/solar-windA couple of articles on the Dynamo Effecthttps://news.mit.edu/2010/explained-dynamo-0325https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamo_theoryhttps://courses.seas.harvard.edu/climate/eli/Courses/EPS281r/Sources/Earth-dynamo/1-Wikipedia-Dynamo-theory.pdfThe Alpha ParticlePart 5 : The Solar WindIntroductionIn the past few weeks, we've learned that helium - that useful, noble gas, is created deep underground by the radioactive decay of heavy elements like Uranium and Thorium. Those decays generate quite a bit of heat - about half the heat inside the Earth is credited to these decays.As we've seen, that heat has tectonic consequences! The churning of molten rock not only drives volcanic eruptions, but also is responsible for all the moving and shaking of the continents on earth. Most of this movement is slow and imperceptible to us, but when we can sense major movement. It's usually as a violent earthquake.The collective impact of all those humble alpha particles literally shapes the world around us.We say humble in part because, alpha radiation is mostly harmless. Human skin is pretty good at stopping alpha particles emitted from a decaying nucleus. You wouldn't want to ingest any uranium, that's for sure, but having a tiny bit in room with you isn't necessarily a problem. This is NOT true for all radioactive materials, some of which can be extremely hazardous. This is because alpha particles come out with a characteristic velocity that - frankly - isn't very high. Remember, alpha particles are just little fragments of a nucleus that just kind of escaped. Other forms of nuclear radiation include beta and gamma rays, which are essentially electrons and photons. These decays are driven directly by the subnuclear forces and because they have less electric charge and far less mass, can penetrate much deeper into living tissue.And that's what makes them hazardous. They can mess with your insides.Nuclear decays are NOT the only radiation we are exposed to. They is plenty raining down on us from the sky. You see, the enormous nuclear furnace known as the sun does more than light up our skies. It is constantly streaming a LOT other particles, like electrons, protons, alpha particles, a bunch of other ionized stuff. Not the kind of stuff you want to be directly exposed regularly.As we'll see, the collective effects of the humble alpha particle inside the Earth protects us from a lot this “solar wind” of electrically charged particles.GeomagnteismThe Earth, like some of the other planets in our solar system, generates it's own magnetic field. It's a weak magnetic field  - it takes the WHOLE EARTH to move your tiny compass needle just a little bit - but it's still big in size. It reaches out into space, well past our own atmosphere.As we discussed in part two of this series, magnetic fields are created by the motion of electric charges. Big magnetic fields require a bunch of electric charges working together, moving coherently. For the electromagnets used in MRI machines, many many electrons - otherwise known as the electrical current - are pushed through many, many loops of wire. To generate the Earth's magnetic field, something even bigger must be happening. Our best working type of model - one that best fits the data - is known as a magnetic dynamo. I'll sketch the idea for you here.For a plant like Earth to generate a magnetic field via the dynamo model, we need three things: 1. A conducting liquid inside the planet. 2. A large amount of coherent motion 3. And heat. Lots of heat.As to the conducting liquid:The outer core of the Earth is believed to be made of iron. Liquid iron. Heavy things - like iron - sink, remember? So there's a lot of it deep within the earth. The earth is so big and so hot inside that that there's a whole inner layer of that metal in liquid form, churning. As to the large collective motion:The earth itself is spinning - which we see as day and night. The rotational motion of the Earth itself stirs up that liquid iron coherently - like the loops of wire in an electromagnet. For the experts out there, it's the Coriolis Force - as sort of three-dimensional version of the centripetal acceleration you feel in the car when taking a turn too sharply. It's the same effective force that drives hurricanes to spin counter clockwise in the northern hemisphere, and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.And finally, As to the heat:Well. We discussed that in part four. About half of the Earth's radiant heat comes from the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium. In other words, from the production of helium.All that collective motion of a hot, conducting fluid is what builds the coherent magnetic field - the dipole field - that surrounds the Earth. And it's a good thing that we have one. We're probably alive today because of it.The Solar WindBack to that issue of the solar wind. The atmosphere of the sun is hot. REALLY hot. Millions of degrees hot. Way hotter than the inside of the Earth. When matter is that hot, atoms can't exist in their familiar state. The nuclei and electrons separate into a PLASMA. The tongues of light emitted by a bonfire - or a bolt of lightning from the sky - are both examples of a plasma. They're hot, and because the electrons and nuclei are separated into a sort of electrically active gas, they cause a lot of electromagnetic disturbance. For us that mostly means they generate a lot of light.Given that, it might not surprise you to learn that the atmosphere of the sun is a plasma.But there is more to a plasma than just light. Each tiny particle - each electron or charge nucleus - carries with it an electromagnetic field. When they are bound together, the positive charges in the nucleus neutralize the negative charges of the electrons. That tight binding keeps the surrounding electromagnetic field pretty tame.When things get hot enough to separate the atoms in something as BIG as a planet or the solar atmosphere, all those tiny electromagnetic fields merge to form large, collective magnetic fields.Kind of like a SUPERCHARGED version of the magnetic dynamo we just discussed. Some of the charged particles in the upper atmosphere of the sun - the corona - escape into space. It's a constant stream. The further they get from the sun, the less of its gravitational pull they experience, and so the faster they travel. But it's not just the intense heat of the sun that drives them away. The collective magnetic field of all those churning, charged particles in the solar   further accelerates those particles away from the the sun and… unfortunately… towards us.The Magnetosphere and the IonosphereThe magnetic field that surrounds the Earth is our shield from this solar wind. That shield extends way out into space, its a bit over five times as big as the Earth. At that distance, much of that incoming solar plasma get deflected back out into space. What isn't is caught up by the magnetic field and driven to the poles, where they eventually get focused into a donut shaped belt around the Earth. Occasionally, when that so-called space weather is REALLY bad, it literally lights up our skies as the Aurora.By keeping those charged particles away from the surface, the Earth's magnetic field protects us from direct exposure to that radiation. But the protection afforded by the dynamo magnetic field goes far beyond that.Neither Venus nor Mars generates its own magnetic field.  Exposed to the  solar wind, their atmospheres are literally being blown away by the impact of those charged particles. Venus still has a lot of its atmosphere left to give, but poor little mars has all but lost its protective atmosphere.That protective magnetic field - driven in part by the same radioactive, alpha decays that create helium - protects both us and our atmosphere. 

Whatever This Is
WTI | Episode 64: Russian Football (No, Really)

Whatever This Is

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 65:50


The winter break is here, and we somehow stay on topic for an entire episode. Wrapping up the year, we talk about only Russian football and discuss Spartak, Zenit vs Dynamo, Russia's Nations League draw, and many other topics!TIMESTAMPS:00:00 Introduction02:30 Krylia beat Rubin; Slutsky out?11:38 Rostov are wild15:45 Zenit 1-1 Dynamo: Do Dynamo have a better squad than Zenit?30:15 Spartak lose to Sochi; Vitoria out, Vanoli in42:07 Zenit draw Betis, Russia draw Israel, Albania and Iceland in their UNL group47:14 Transfer rumours, looking at expiring contracts in the RPLTwitter handles:Hanu- @H4nuuArtem- @AMakarevitchPodcast- @PodcastWTI

Shoot the Defence
Dynamo Abroad Podcast: Winter Is Here

Shoot the Defence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 65:05


On this episode, Alex, Dima, and Erik are joined by Richard. They go over the latest news, review the latest game vs Zorya, and go over some Football Manager tips. If you would like to contact the Dynamo Abroad Podcast, you can follow us on twitter @dynamoabroad or send us an email to dynamoabroadpodcast@gmail.com.

Screaming in the Cloud
“Liqui”fying the Database Bottleneck with Robert Reeves

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:45


About RobertR2 advocates for Liquibase customers and provides technical architecture leadership. Prior to co-founding Datical (now Liquibase), Robert was a Director at the Austin Technology Incubator. Robert co-founded Phurnace Software in 2005. He invented and created the flagship product, Phurnace Deliver, which provides middleware infrastructure management to multiple Fortune 500 companies.Links: Liquibase: https://www.liquibase.com Liquibase Community: https://www.liquibase.org Liquibase AWS Marketplace: https://aws.amazon.com/marketplace/seller-profile?id=7e70900d-dcb2-4ef6-adab-f64590f4a967 Github: https://github.com/liquibase Twitter: https://twitter.com/liquibase TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: You know how Git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else.Corey: That's all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best ways I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's Git-based workflows mean you don't have to play slap-and-tickle with integrating arcane nonsense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as Git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for Pets startup, to global Fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them—because you don't have to; they get why self-service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y dot com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This is a promoted episode. What does that mean in practice? Well, it means the company who provides the guest has paid to turn this into a discussion that's much more aligned with the company than it is the individual.Sometimes it works, Sometimes it doesn't, but the key part of that story is I get paid. Why am I bringing this up? Because today's guest is someone I met in person at Monktoberfest, which is the RedMonk conference in Portland, Maine, one of the only reasons to go to Maine, speaking as someone who grew up there. And I spoke there, I met my guest today, and eventually it turned into this, proving that I am the envy of developer advocates everywhere because now I can directly tie me attending one conference to making a fixed sum of money, and right now they're all screaming and tearing off their headphones and closing this episode. But for those of you who are sticking around, thank you. My guest today is the CTO and co-founder of Liquibase. Please welcome Robert Reeves. Robert, thank you for joining me, and suffering the slings and arrows I'm about to hurled directly into your arse, as a warning shot.Robert: [laugh]. Man. Thanks for having me. Corey, I've been looking forward to this for a while. I love hanging out with you.Corey: One of the things I love about the Monktoberfest conference, and frankly, anything that RedMonk gets up to is, forget what's on stage, which is uniformly excellent; forget the people at RedMonk who are wonderful and I aspire to do more work with them in different ways; they're great, but the people that they attract are invariably interesting, they are invariably incredibly diverse in terms of not just demographics, but interests and proclivities. It's just a wonderful group of people, and every time I get the opportunity to spend time with those folks I do, and I've never once regretted it because I get to meet people like you. Snark and cynicism about sponsoring this nonsense aside—for which I do thank you—you've been a fascinating person to talk to you because you're better at a lot of the database-facing things than I am, so I shortcut to instead of forming my own opinions, I just skate off of yours in some cases. You're going to get letters now.Robert: Well, look, it's an occupational hazard, right? Releasing software, it's hard so you have to learn these platforms, and part of it includes the database. But I tell you, you're spot on about Monktoberfest. I left that conference so motivated. Really opened my eyes, certainly injecting empathy into what I do on a day-to-day basis, but it spurred me to action.And there's a lot of programs that we've started at Liquibase that the germination for that seed came from Monktoberfest. And certainly, you know, we were bummed out that it's been canceled two years in a row, but we can't wait to get back and sponsor it. No end of love and affection for that team. They're also really smart and right about a hundred percent of the time.Corey: That's the most amazing part is that they have opinions that generally tend to mirror my own—which, you know—Robert: [laugh].Corey: —confirmation bias is awesome, but they almost never get it wrong. And that is one of the impressive things is when I do it, I'm shooting from the hip and I already have an apology half-written and ready to go, whereas when dealing with them, they do research on this and they don't have the ‘I'm a loud, abrasive shitpostter on Twitter' defense to fall back on to defend opinions. And if they do, I've never seen them do it. They're right, and the fact that I am as aligned with them as I am, you'd think that one of us was cribbing from the other. I assure you that's not the case.But every time Steve O'Grady or Rachel Stephens, or Kelly—I forget her last name; my apologies is all Twitter, but she studied medieval history, I remember that—or James Governor writes something, I'm uniformly looking at this and I feel a sense of dismay, been, “Dammit. I should have written this. It's so well written and it makes such a salient point.” I really envy their ability to be so consistently on point.Robert: Well, they're the only analysts we pay money to. So, we vote with our dollars with that one. [laugh].Corey: Yeah. I'm only an analyst when people have analyst budget. Other than that, I'm whatever the hell you describe me. So, let's talk about that thing you're here to show. You know, that little side project thing you found and are the CTO of.I wasn't super familiar with what Liquibase does until I looked into it and then had this—I got to say, it really pissed me off because I'm looking at it, and it's how did I not know that this existed back when the exact problems that you solve are the things I was careening headlong into? I was actively annoyed. You're also an open-source project, which means that you're effectively making all of your money by giving things away and hoping for gratitude to come back on you in the fullness of time, right?Robert: Well, yeah. There's two things there. They're open-source component, but also, where was this when I was struggling with this problem? So, for the folks that don't know, what Liquibase does is automate database schema change. So, if you need to update a database—I don't care what it is—as part of your application deployment, we can help.Instead of writing a ticket or manually executing a SQL script, or generating a bunch of docs in a NoSQL database, you can have Liquibase help you out with that. And so I was at a conference years ago, at the booth, doing my booth thing, and a managing director of a very large bank came to me, like, “Hey, what do you do?” And saw what we did and got angry, started yelling at me. “Where were you three years ago when I was struggling with this problem?” Like, spitting mad. [laugh]. And I was like, “Dude, we just started”—this was a while ago—it was like, “We just started the company two years ago. We got here as soon as we could.”But I struggled with this problem when I was a release manager. And so I've been doing this for years and years and years—I don't even want to talk about how long—getting bits from dev to test to production, and the database was always, always, always the bottleneck, whether it was things didn't run the same in test as they did, eventually in production, environments weren't in sync. It's just really hard. And we've automated so much stuff, we've automated application deployment, lowercase a compiled bits; we're building things with containers, so everything's in that container. It's not a J2EE app anymore—yay—but we haven't done a damn thing for the database.And what this means is that we have a whole part of our industry, all of our database professionals, that are frankly struggling. I always say we don't sell software Liquibase. We sell piano recitals, date nights, happy hours, all the stuff you want to do but you can't because you're stuck dealing with the database. And that's what we do at Liquibase.Corey: Well, you're talking about database people. That's not how I even do it. I would never call myself that, for very good reason because you know, Route 53 remains the only database I use. But the problem I always had was that, “Great. I'm doing a deployment. Oh, I'm going to put out some changes to some web servers. Okay, what's my rollback?” “Well, we have this other commit we can use.” “Oh, we're going to be making a database schema change. What's your rollback strategy,” “Oh, I've updated my resume and made sure that any personal files I had on my work laptop been backed up somewhere else when I immediately leave the company when we can't roll back.” Because there's not really going to be a company anymore at that point.It's one of those everyone sort of holds their breath and winces when it comes to anything that resembles a schema change—or an ALTER TABLE as we used to call it—because that is the mistakes will show territory and you can hope and plan for things in pre-prod environments, but it's always scary. It's always terrifying because production is not like other things. That's why I always call my staging environment ‘theory' because things work in theory but not in production. So, it's how do you avoid the mess of winding up just creating disasters when you're dealing with the reality of your production environments? So, let's back up here. How do you do it? Because it sounds like something people would love to sell me but doesn't exist.Robert: [laugh]. Well, it's real simple. We have a file, we call it the change log. And this is a ledger. So, databases need to be evolved. You can't drop everything and recreate it from scratch, so you have to apply changes sequentially.And so what Liquibase will do is it connects to the database, and it says, “Hey, what version are you?” It looks at the change log, and we'll see, ehh, “There's ten change sets”—that's what components of a change log, we call them change sets—“There's ten change sets in there and the database is telling me that only five had been executed.” “Oh, great. Well, I'll execute these other five.” Or it asks the database, “Hey, how many have been executed?” And it says, “Ten.”And we've got a couple of meta tables that we have in the database, real simple, ANSI SQL compliant, that store the changes that happen to the database. So, if it's a net new database, say you're running a Docker container with the database in it on your local machine, it's empty, you would run Liquibase, and it says, “Oh, hey. It's got that, you know, new database smell. I can run everything.”And so the interesting thing happens when you start pointing it at an environment that you haven't updated in a while. So, dev and test typically are going to have a lot of releases. And so there's going to be little tiny incremental changes, but when it's time to go to production, Liquibase will catch it up. And so we speak SQL to the database, if it's a NoSQL database, we'll speak their API and make the changes requested. And that's it. It's very simple in how it works.The real complex stuff is when we go a couple of inches deeper, when we start doing things like, well, reverse engineering of your database. How can I get a change log of an existing database? Because nobody starts out using Liquibase for a project. You always do it later.Corey: No, no. It's one of those things where when you're doing a project to see if it works, it's one of those, “Great, I'll run a database in some local Docker container or something just to prove that it works.” And, “Todo: fix this later.” And yeah, that todo becomes load-bearing.Robert: [laugh]. That's scary. And so, you know, we can help, like, reverse engineering an entire database schema, no problem. We also have things called quality checks. So sure, you can test your Liquibase change against an empty database and it will tell you if it's syntactically correct—you'll get an error if you need to fix something—but it doesn't enforce things like corporate standards. “Tables start with T underscore.” “Do not create a foreign key unless those columns have an ID already applied.” And that's what our quality checks does. We used to call it rules, but nobody likes rules, so we call it quality checks now.Corey: How do you avoid the trap of enumerating all the bad things you've seen happen because at some point, it feels like that's what leads to process ossification at large companies where, “Oh, we had this bad thing happen once, like, a disk filled up, so now we have a check that makes sure that all the disks are at least 20, empty.” Et cetera. Great. But you keep stacking those you have thousands and thousands and thousands of those, and even a one-line code change then has to pass through so many different tests to validate that this isn't going to cause the failure mode that happened that one time in a unicorn circumstance. How do you avoid the bloat and the creep of stuff like that?Robert: Well, let's look at what we've learned from automated testing. We certainly want more and more tests. Look, DevOp's algorithm is, “All right, we had a problem here.” [laugh]. Or SRE algorithm, I should say. “We had a problem here. What happened? What are we going to change in the future to make sure this doesn't happen?” Typically, that involves a new standard.Now, ossification occurs when a person has to enforce that standard. And what we should do is seek to have automation, have the machine do it for us. Have the humans come up and identify the problem, find a creative way to look for the issue, and then let the machine enforce it. Ossification happens in large organizations when it's people that are responsible, not the machine. The machines are great at running these things over and over again, and they're never hung over, day after Super Bowl Sunday, their kid doesn't get sick, they don't get sick. But we want humans to look at the things that we need that creative energy, that brain power on. And then the rote drudgery, hand that off to the machine.Corey: Drudgery seems like sort of a job description for a lot of us who spend time doing operation stuff.Robert: [laugh].Corey: It's drudgery and it's boring, punctuated by moments of sheer terror. On some level, you're more or less taking some of the adrenaline high of this job away from people. And you know, when it comes to databases, I'm kind of okay with that as it turns out.Robert: Yeah. Oh, yeah, we want no surprises in database-land. And that is why over the past several decades—can I say several decades since 1979?Corey: Oh, you can s—it's many decades, I'm sorry to burst your bubble on that.Robert: [laugh]. Thank you, Corey. Thank you.Corey: Five, if we're being honest. Go ahead.Robert: So, it has evolved over these many decades where change is the enemy of stability. And so we don't want change, and we want to lock these things down. And our database professionals have become changed from sentinels of data into traffic cops and TSA. And as we all know, some things slip through those. Sometimes we speed, sometimes things get snuck through TSA.And so what we need to do is create a system where it's not the people that are in charge of that; that we can set these policies and have our database professionals do more valuable things, instead of that adrenaline rush of, “Oh, my God,” how about we get the rush of solving a problem and saving the company millions of dollars? How about that rush? How about the rush of taking our old, busted on-prem databases and figure out a way to scale these up in the cloud, and also provide quick dev and test environments for our developer and test friends? These are exciting things. These are more fun, I would argue.Corey: You have a list of reference customers on your website that are awesome. In fact, we share a reference customer in the form of Ticketmaster. And I don't think that they will get too upset if I mention that based upon my work with them, at no point was I left with the impression that they played fast and loose with databases. This was something that they take very seriously because for any company that, you know, sells tickets to things you kind of need an authoritative record of who's bought what, or suddenly you don't really have a ticket-selling business anymore. You also reference customers in the form of UPS, which is important; banks in a variety of different places.Yeah, this is stuff that matters. And you support—from the looks of it—every database people can name except for Route 53. You've got RDS, you've got Redshift, you've got Postgres-squeal, you've got Oracle, Snowflake, Google's Cloud Spanner—lest people think that it winds up being just something from a legacy perspective—Cassandra, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, CockroachDB. I could go on because you have multiple pages of these things, SAP HANA—whatever the hell that's supposed to be—Yugabyte, and so on, and so forth. And it's like, some of these, like, ‘now you're just making up animals' territory.Robert: Well, that goes back to open-source, you know, you were talking about that earlier. There is no way in hell we could have brought out support for all these database platforms without us being open-source. That is where the community aligns their goals and works to a common end. So, I'll give you an example. So, case in point, recently, let me see Yugabyte, CockroachDB, AWS Redshift, and Google Cloud Spanner.So, these are four folks that reached out to us and said, either A) “Hey, we want Liquibase to support our database,” or B) “We want you to improve the support that's already there.” And so we have what we call—which is a super creative name—the Liquibase test harness, which is just genius because it's an automated way of running a whole suite of tests against an arbitrary database. And that helped us partner with these database vendors very quickly and to identify gaps. And so there's certain things that AWS Redshift—certain objects—that AWS Redshift doesn't support, for all the right reasons. Because it's data warehouse.Okay, great. And so we didn't have to run those tests. But there were other tests that we had to run, so we create a new test for them. They actually wrote some of those tests. Our friends at Yugabyte, CockroachDB, Cloud Spanner, they wrote these extensions and they came to us and partnered with us.The only way this works is with open-source, by being open, by being transparent, and aligning what we want out of life. And so what our friends—our database friends—wanted was they wanted more tooling for their platform. We wanted to support their platform. So, by teaming up, we help the most important person, [laugh] the most important person, and that's the customer. That's it. It was not about, “Oh, money,” and all this other stuff. It was, “This makes our customers' lives easier. So, let's do it. Oop, no brainer.”Corey: There's something to be said for making people's lives easier. I do want to talk about that open-source versus commercial divide. If I Google Liquibase—which, you know, I don't know how typing addresses in browsers works anymore because search engines are so fast—I just type in Liquibase. And the first thing it spits me out to is liquibase.org, which is the Community open-source version. And there's a link there to the Pro paid version and whatnot. And I was just scrolling idly through the comparison chart to see, “Oh, so ‘Community' is just code for shitty and you're holding back advanced features.” But it really doesn't look that way. What's the deal here?Robert: Oh, no. So, Liquibase open-source project started in 2006 and Liquibase the company, the commercial entity, started after that, 2012; 2014, first deal. And so, for—Nathan Voxland started this, and Nathan was struggling. He was working at a company, and he had to have his application—of course—you know, early 2000s, J2EE—support SQL Server and Oracle and he was struggling with it. And so he open-sourced it and added more and more databases.Certainly, as open-source databases grew, obviously he added those: MySQL, Postgres. But we're never going to undo that stuff. There's rollback for free in Liquibase, we're not going to be [laugh] we're not going to be jerks and either A) pull features out or, B) even worse, make Stephen O'Grady's life awful by changing the license [laugh] so he has to write about it. He loves writing about open-source license changes. We're Apache 2.0 and so you can do whatever you want with it.And we believe that the things that make sense for a paying customer, which is database-specific objects, that makes sense. But Liquibase Community, the open-source stuff, that is built so you can go to any database. So, if you have a change log that runs against Oracle, it should be able to run against SQL Server, or MySQL, or Postgres, as long as you don't use platform-specific data types and those sorts of things. And so that's what Community is about. Community is about being able to support any database with the same change log. Pro is about helping you get to that next level of DevOps Nirvana, of reaching those four metrics that Dr. Forsgren tells us are really important.Corey: Oh, yes. You can argue with Nicole Forsgren, but then you're wrong. So, why would you ever do that?Robert: Yeah. Yeah. [laugh]. It's just—it's a sucker's bet. Don't do it. There's a reason why she's got a PhD in CS.Corey: She has been a recurring guest on this show, and I only wish she would come back more often. You and I are fun to talk to, don't get me wrong. We want unbridled intellect that is couched in just a scintillating wit, and someone is great to talk to. Sorry, we're both outclassed.Robert: Yeah, you get entertained with us; you learn with her.Corey: Exactly. And you're still entertained while doing it is the best part.Robert: [laugh]. That's the difference between Community and Pro. Look, at the end of the day, if you're an individual developer just trying to solve a problem and get done and away from the computer and go spend time with your friends and family, yeah, go use Liquibase Community. If it's something that you think can improve the rest of the organization by teaming up and taking advantage of the collaboration features? Yes, sure, let us know. We're happy to help.Corey: Now, if people wanted to become an attorney, but law school was too expensive, out of reach, too much time, et cetera, but they did have a Twitter account, very often, they'll find that they can scratch that itch by arguing online about open-source licenses. So, I want to be very clear—because those people are odious when they email me—that you are licensed under the Apache License. That is a bonafide OSI approved open-source license. It is not everyone except big cloud companies, or service providers, which basically are people dancing around—they mean Amazon. So, let's be clear. One, are you worried about Amazon launching a competitive service with a dumb name? And/or have you really been validated as a product if AWS hasn't attempted and failed to launch a competitor?Robert: [laugh]. Well, I mean, we do have a very large corporation that has embedded Liquibase into one of their flagship products, and that is Oracle. They have embedded Liquibase in SQLcl. We're tickled pink because that means that, one, yes, it does validate Liquibase is the right way to do it, but it also means more people are getting help. Now, for Oracle users, if you're just an Oracle shop, great, have fun. We think it's a great solution. But there's not a lot of those.And so we believe that if you have Liquibase, whether it's open-source or the Pro version, then you're going to be able to support all the databases, and I think that's more important than being tied to a single cloud. Also—this is just my opinion and take it for what it's worth—but if Amazon wanted to do this, well, they're not the only game in town. So, somebody else is going to want to do it, too. And, you know, I would argue even with Amazon's backing that Liquibase is a little stronger brand than anything they would come out with.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: So, I want to call out though, that on some level, they have already competed with you because one of database that you do not support is DynamoDB. Let's ignore the Route 53 stuff because, okay. But the reason behind that, having worked with it myself, is that, “Oh, how do you do a schema change in DynamoDB?” The answer is that you don't because it doesn't do schemas for one—it is schemaless, which is kind of the point of it—as well as oh, you want to change the primary, or the partition, or the sort key index? Great. You need a new table because those things are immutable.So, they've solved this Gordian Knot just like Alexander the Great did by cutting through it. Like, “Oh, how do you wind up doing this?” “You don't do this. The end.” And that is certainly an approach, but there are scenarios where those were first, NoSQL is not a acceptable answer for some workloads.I know Rick [Horahan 00:26:16] is going to yell at me for that as soon as he hears me, but okay. But there are some for which a relational database is kind of a thing, and you need that. So, Dynamo isn't fit for everything. But there are other workloads where, okay, I'm going to just switch over. I'm going to basically dump all the data and add it to a new table. I can't necessarily afford to do that with anything less than maybe, you know, 20 milliseconds of downtime between table one and table two. And they're obnoxious and difficult ways to do it, but for everything else, you do kind of need to make ALTER TABLE changes from time to time as you go through the build and release process.Robert: Yeah. Well, we certainly have plans for DynamoDB support. We are working our way through all the NoSQLs. Started with Mongo, and—Corey: Well, back that out a second then for me because there's something I'm clearly not grasping because it's my understanding, DynamoDB is schemaless. You can put whatever you want into various arbitrary fields. How would Liquibase work with something like that?Robert: Well, that's something I struggled with. I had the same question. Like, “Dude, really, we're a schema change tool. Why would we work with a schemaless database?” And so what happened was a soon-to-be friend of ours in Europe had reached out to me and said, “I built an extension for MongoDB in Liquibase. Can we open-source this, and can y'all take care of the care and feeding of this?” And I said, “Absolutely. What does it do?” [laugh].And so I looked at it and it turns out that it focuses on collections and generating data for test. So, you're right about schemaless because these are just documents and we're not going to go through every single document and change the structure, we're just going to have the application create a new doc and the new format. Maybe there's a conversion log logic built into the app, who knows. But it's the database professionals that have to apply these collections—you know, indices; that's what they call them in Mongo-land: collections. And so being able to apply these across all environments—dev, test, production—and have consistency, that's important.Now, what was really interesting is that this came from MasterCard. So, this engineer had a consulting business and worked for MasterCard. And they had a problem, and they said, “Hey, can you fix this with Liquibase?” And he said, “Sure, no problem.” And he built it.So, that's why if you go to the MongoDB—the liquibase-mongodb repository in our Liquibase org, you'll see that MasterCard has the copyright on all that code. Still Apache 2.0. But for me, that was the validation we needed to start expanding to other things: Dynamo, Couch. And same—Corey: Oh, yeah. For a lot of contributors, there's a contributor license process you can go through, assign copyright. For everything else, there's MasterCard.Robert: Yeah. Well, we don't do that. Look, you know, we certainly have a code of conduct with our community, but we don't have a signing copyright and that kind of stuff. Because that's baked into Apache 2.0. So, why would I want to take somebody's ability to get credit and magical internet points and increase the rep by taking that away? That's just rude.Corey: The problem I keep smacking myself into is just looking at how the entire database space across the board goes, it feels like it's built on lock-in, it's built on it is super finicky to work with, and it generally feels like, okay, great. You take something like Postgres-squeal or whatever it is you want to run your database on, yeah, you could theoretically move it a bunch of other places, but moving databases is really hard. Back when I was at my last, “Real job,” quote-unquote, years ago, we were late to the game; we migrated the entire site from EC2 Classic into a VPC, and the biggest pain in the ass with all of that was the RDS instance. Because we had to quiesce the database so it would stop taking writes; we would then do snapshot it, shut it down, and then restore a new database from that RDS snapshot.How long does it take, at least in those days? That is left as an experiment for the reader. So, we booked a four hour maintenance window under the fear that would not be enough. It completed in 45 minutes. So okay, there's that. Sparked the thing up and everything else was tested and good to go. And yay. Okay.It took a tremendous amount of planning, a tremendous amount of work, and that wasn't moving it very far. It is the only time I've done a late-night deploy, where not a single thing went wrong. Until I was on the way home and the Uber driver sideswiped a city vehicle. So, there we go—Robert: [laugh].Corey: —that's the one. But everything else was flawless on this because we planned these things out. But imagine moving to a different provider. Oh, forget it. Or imagine moving to a different database engine? That's good. Tell another one.Robert: Well, those are the problems that we want our database professionals to solve. We do not want them to be like janitors at an elementary school, cleaning up developer throw-up with sawdust. The issue that you're describing, that's a one time event. This is something that doesn't happen very often. You need hands on the keyboard, you want people there to look for problems.If you can take these database releases away from those folks and automate them safely—you can have safety and speed—then that frees up their time to do these other herculean tasks, these other feats of strength that they're far better at. There is no silver bullet panacea for database issues. All we're trying to do is take about 70% of DBAs time and free it up to do the fun stuff that you described. There are people that really enjoy that, and we want to free up their time so they can do that. Moving to another platform, going from the data center to the cloud, these sorts of things, this is what we want a human on; we don't want them updating a column three times in a row because dev couldn't get it right. Let's just give them the keys and make sure they stay in their lane.Corey: There's something glorious about being able to do that. I wish that there were more commonly appreciated ways of addressing those pains, rather than, “Oh, we're going to sell you something big and enterprise-y and it's going to add a bunch of process and not work out super well for you.” You integrate with existing CI/CD systems reasonably well, as best I can tell because the nice thing about CI/CD—and by nice I mean awful—is that there is no consensus. Every pipeline you see, in a release engineering process inherently becomes this beautiful bespoke unicorn.Robert: Mm-hm. Yeah. And we have to. We have to integrate with whatever CI/CD they have in place. And we do not want customers to just run Liquibase by itself. We want them to integrate it with whatever is driving that application deployment.We're Switzerland when it comes to databases, and CI/CD. And I certainly have my favorite of those, and it's primarily based on who bought me drinks at the last conference, but we cannot go into somebody's house and start rearranging the furniture. That's just rude. If they're deploying the app a certain way, what we tell that customer is, “Hey, we're just going to have that CI/CD tool call Liquibase to update the database. This should be an atomic unit of deployment.” And it should be hidden from the person that pushes that shiny button or the automation that does it.Corey: I wish that one day that you could automate all of the button pushing, but the thing that always annoyed me in release engineering was the, “Oh, and here's where we stop to have a human press the button.” And I get it. That stuff's scary for some folks, but at the same time, this is the nature of reality. So, you're not going to be able to technology your way around people. At least not successfully and not for very long.Robert: It's about trust. You have to earn that database professional's trust because if something goes wrong, blaming Liquibase doesn't go very far. In that company, they're going to want a person [laugh] who has a badge to—with a throat to choke. And so I've seen this pattern over and over again.And this happened at our first customer. Major, major, big, big, big bank, and this was on the consumer side. They were doing their first production push, and they wanted us ready. Not on the call, but ready if there was an issue they needed to escalate and get us to help them out. And so my VP of Engineering and me, we took it. Great. Got VP of engineering and CTO. Right on.And so Kevin and I, we stayed home, stayed sober [laugh], you know—a lot of places to party in Austin; we fought that temptation—and so we stayed and I'm texting with Kevin, back and forth. “Did you get a call?” “No, I didn't get a call.” It was Friday night. Saturday rolls around. Sunday. “Did you get a—what's going on?” [laugh].Monday, we're like, “Hey. Everything, okay? Did you push to the next weekend?” They're like, “Oh, no. We did. It went great. We forgot to tell you.” [laugh]. But here's what happened. The DBAs push the Liquibase ‘make it go' button, and then they said, “Uh-Oh.” And we're like, “What do you mean, uh-oh?” They said, “Well, something went wrong.” “Well, what went wrong?” “Well, it was too fast.” [laugh]. Something—no way. And so they went through the whole thing—Corey: That was my downtime when I supposed to be compiling.Robert: Yeah. So, they went through the whole thing to verify every single change set. Okay, so that was weekend one. And then they go to weekend two, they do it the same thing. All right, all right. Building trust.By week four, they called a meeting with the release team. And they said, “Hey, process change. We're no longer going to be on these calls. You are going to push the Liquibase button. Now, if you want to integrate it with your CI/CD, go right ahead, but that's not my problem.” Dev—or, the release team is tier one; dev is tier two; we—DBAs—are tier three support, but we'll call you because we'll know something went wrong. And to this day, it's all automated.And so you have to earn trust to get people to give that up. Once they have trust and you really—it's based on empathy. You have to understand how terrible [laugh] they are sometimes treated, and to actively take care of them, realize the problems they're struggling with, and when you earn that trust, then and only then will they allow automation. But it's hard, but it's something you got to do.Corey: You mentioned something a minute ago that I want to focus on a little bit more closely, specifically that you're in Austin. Seems like that's a popular choice lately. You've got companies that are relocating their headquarters there, presumably for tax purposes. Oracle's there, Tesla's there. Great. I mean, from my perspective, terrific because it gets a number of notably annoying CEOs out of my backyard. But what's going on? Why is Austin on this meteoric rise and how'd it get there?Robert: Well, a lot of folks—overnight success, 40 years in the making, I guess. But what a lot of people don't realize is that, one, we had a pretty vibrant tech hub prior to all this. It all started with MCC, Microcomputer Consortium, which in the '80s, we were afraid of the Japanese taking over and so we decided to get a bunch of companies together, and Admiral Bobby Inman who was director planted it in Austin. And that's where it started. You certainly have other folks that have a huge impact, obviously, Michael Dell, Austin Ventures, a whole host of folks that have really leaned in on tech in Austin, but it actually started before that.So, there was a time where Willie Nelson was in Nashville and was just fed up with RCA Records. They would not release his albums because he wanted to change his sound. And so he had some nice friends at Atlantic Records that said, “Willie, we got this. Go to New York, use our studio, cut an album, we'll fix it up.” And so he cut an album called Shotgun Willie, famous for having “Whiskey River” which is what he uses to open and close every show.But that album sucked as far as sales. It's a good album, I like it. But it didn't sell except for one place in America: in Austin, Texas. It sold more copies in Austin than anywhere else. And so Willie was like, “I need to go check this out.”And so he shows up in Austin and sees a bunch of rednecks and hippies hanging out together, really geeking out on music. It was a great vibe. And then he calls, you know, Kris, and Waylon, and Merle, and say, “Come on down.” And so what happened here was a bunch of people really wanted to geek out on this new type of country music, outlaw country. And it started a pattern where people just geek out on stuff they really like.So, same thing with Austin film. You got Robert Rodriguez, you got Richard Linklater, and Slackers, his first movie, that's why I moved to Austin. And I got a job at Les Amis—a coffee shop that's closed—because it had three scenes in that. There was a whole scene of people that just really wanted to make different types of films. And we see that with software, we see that with film, we see it with fashion.And it just seems that Austin is the place where if you're really into something, you're going to find somebody here that really wants to get into it with you, whether it's board gaming, D&D, noise punk, whatever. And that's really comforting. I think it's the community that's just welcoming. And I just hope that we can continue that creativity, that sense of community, and that we don't have large corporations that are coming in and just taking from the system. I hope they inject more.I think Oracle's done a really good job; their new headquarters is gorgeous, they've done some really good things with the city, doing a land swap, I think it was forty acres for nine acres. They coughed up forty for nine. And it was nine acres the city wasn't even using. Great. So, I think they're being good citizens. I think Tesla's been pretty cool with building that factory where it is. I hope more come. I hope they catch what is ever in the water and the breakfast tacos in Austin.Corey: [laugh]. I certainly look forward to this pandemic ending; I can come over and find out for myself. I'm looking forward to it. I always enjoyed my time there, I just wish I got to spend more of it.Robert: How many folks from Duckbill Group are in Austin now?Corey: One at the moment. Tim Banks. And the challenge, of course, is that if you look across the board, there really aren't that many places that have more than one employee. For example, our operations person, Megan, is here in San Francisco and so is Jesse DeRose, our manager of cloud economics. But my business partner is in Portland; we have people scattered all over the country.It's kind of fun having a fully-distributed company. We started this way, back when that was easy. And because all right, travel is easy; we'll just go and visit whenever we need to. But there's no central office, which I think is sort of the dangerous part of full remote because then you have this idea of second-class citizens hanging out in one part of the country and then they go out to lunch together and that's where the real decisions get made. And then you get caught up to speed. It definitely fosters a writing culture.Robert: Yeah. When we went to remote work, our lease was up. We just didn't renew. And now we have expanded hiring outside of Austin, we have folks in the Ukraine, Poland, Brazil, more and more coming. We even have folks that are moving out of Austin to places like Minnesota and Virginia, moving back home where their family is located.And that is wonderful. But we are getting together as a company in January. We're also going to, instead of having an office, we're calling it a ‘Liquibase Lounge.' So, there's a number of retail places that didn't survive, and so we're going to take one of those spots and just make a little hangout place so that people can come in. And we also want to open it up for the community as well.But it's very important—and we learned this from our friends at GitLab and their culture. We really studied how they do it, how they've been successful, and it is an awareness of those lunch meetings where the decisions are made. And it is saying, “Nope, this is great we've had this conversation. We need to have this conversation again. Let's bring other people in.” And that's how we're doing at Liquibase, and so far it seems to work.Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing what happens, once this whole pandemic ends, and how things continue to thrive. We're long past due for a startup center that isn't San Francisco. The whole thing is based on the idea of disruption. “Oh, we're disruptive.” “Yes, we're so disruptive, we've taken a job that can be done from literally anywhere with internet access and created a land crunch in eight square miles, located in an earthquake zone.” Genius, simply genius.Robert: It's a shame that we had to have such a tragedy to happen to fix that.Corey: Isn't that the truth?Robert: It really is. But the toothpaste is out of the tube. You ain't putting that back in. But my bet on the next Tech Hub: Kansas City. That town is cool, it has one hundred percent Google Fiber all throughout, great university. Kauffman Fellows, I believe, is based there, so VC folks are trained there. I believe so; I hope I'm not wrong with that. I know Kauffman Foundation is there. But look, there's something happening in that town. And so if you're a buy low, sell high kind of person, come check us out in Austin. I'm not trying to dissuade anybody from moving to Austin; I'm not one of those people. But if the housing prices [laugh] you don't like them, check out Kansas City, and get that two-gig fiber for peanuts. Well, $75 worth of peanuts.Corey: Robert, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so extensively about Liquibase, about how awesome RedMonk is, about Austin and so many other topics. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Robert: Well, I think the best place to find us right now is in AWS Marketplace. So—Corey: Now, hand on a second. When you say the best place for anything being the AWS Marketplace, I'm naturally a little suspicious. Tell me more.Robert: [laugh]. Well, best is, you know, it's—[laugh].Corey: It is a place that is there and people can find you through it. All right, then.Robert: I have a list. I have a list. But the first one I'm going to mention is AWS Marketplace. And so that's a really easy way, especially if you're taking advantage of the EDP, Enterprise Discount Program. That's helpful. Burn down those dollars, get a discount, et cetera, et cetera. Now, of course, you can go to liquibase.com, download a trial. Or you can find us on Github, github.com/liquibase. Of course, talking smack to us on Twitter is always appreciated.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:46:37]. Robert Reeves, CTO and co-founder of Liquibase. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment complaining about how Liquibase doesn't support your database engine of choice, which will quickly be rendered obsolete by the open-source community.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/15/2021 Dynamo CB Daniel Steres joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 15:31


The newest member of the Houston Dynamo, Daniel Steres, joins Glenn to discuss his move to Houston, what he will bring to the team, his expectations for next season and more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/15/2021 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 48:17


To kick off a Wednesday edition of the show, Glenn discusses the latest happenings in the world of soccer including the day in the Premier League, Atlas winning their first Liga MX title in 70 years, and NYCFC taking home the MLS Cup.  After the opening segment, he is joined by good friend Eileen Dowd to talk about her new book, "Leeny's Fight" and how you can help brighten the lives of those facing childhood cancer.  To close the hour, Glenn is joined by the Dynamo's newest signing Daniel Steres to talk about his move to Houston, what he can bring to the team, his expectations for next season, and more!  

Let's Start A Cult
The Hermes Far Eastern Shining Cult | Curing The World One Grift At A Time

Let's Start A Cult

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 43:43


When Ann Fitzgerald met a group of New Age devotees at a festival in London, she thought that she had found a set of like-minded and supportive friends. Never did she imagine that she would spend the next decade in their grip, working 16-hour shifts without being paid a single dollar. Ann, however, was far from the group's only victim. Follow us on the socials: https://twitter.com/lets_cult (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/letsstartacultpod (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/lets_cult/?hl=en (Instagram) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChcl9qrvKAsXJTaBfVgKILQ (YouTube) https://www.letsstartacultpodcast.com/ (Website) Canadian SPIRIT podcast: https://twitter.com/spirit_canadian (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/SPIRITGP (Facebook) https://anchor.fm/canadianspirit (Website) Sources for this episode include The Famous People, the World Religions and Spirituality Project, The Laughing Man Institute official website, the Hermes Far Eastern Shining official website, The Daily Telegraph, Cult Education, and The Apologetics Index. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Dynamo - https://www.voxnest.com/dynamo/privacy-policies Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

Let's Start A Cult
Let's Start A Cult Presents: Best & Worst Of 2021 | Capitol Riots, Musk, and More

Let's Start A Cult

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 92:19


Hey Wikimaniacs! It's my (Josh's) final episode of 2021! Crazy right? Still feels like 2020...Anyways, I thought it would be fun to do a recap of all the wild and crazy things that happened this year. We touch on some very real topics in this episode but it's incredibly fun and we have our good friend Lindsay from Ye Olde Crime and Pineapple Pizza Podcast! She has some excellent takes and it's always fun having her on. So go check out her podcasts after listening to this episode! Enjoy and I hope you all have a happy holiday and a wonderful New Year! 00:00 - Introductions, 08:36 - Capitol Hill Riots, 22:40 - Social Media, 37:26 - Elon Musk and Billionaires, 50:16 - Kim and Kanye, 53:01 - Residential Schools, 01:07:45 - Canada's Election, 01:10:58 - COVID, 01:20:48 - Our New Years Resolutions, 01:29:06 - Outro Lindsay's Podcasts: https://www.yeoldecrimepodcast.com/ (Ye Olde Crime) https://www.pineapplepizzapodcast.com/ (Pineapple Pizza Podcast) Become a Patreon for early episodes: https://www.patreon.com/redditonwiki (Patreon) Follow Us For Memes: https://twitter.com/redditonwiki (Twitter) https://www.instagram.com/redditonwiki/ (Instagram) https://www.tiktok.com/@redditonwikipod? (Tik Tok) https://www.redditonwiki.com/ (Website) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Dynamo - https://www.voxnest.com/dynamo/privacy-policies Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

Dynamo's Dozen
Dynamo's Dozen - History of Bash At The Beach

Dynamo's Dozen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 42:36


On today's episode of #DynamosDozen #IanDynamoKelly & #NiallHogan sit down and look back through the history of #WCW annual summer #PPV #BashAtTheBeach Many of the most significant moments in #ProWrestling happened at these uniquely visual show's, from formation of the #nWo to #JeffJarrett laying down. We cover it all today, and much much more!!! #DynamoPodcastNetwork Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dynamosdozen Twiiter: https://twitter.com/iankelly800 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ian_dynamok/ Email: Dynamosdozen@gmail.com DPN Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DynamoPodcasts --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ian-kelly3/message

Screaming in the Cloud
Building Distributed Cognition into Your Business with Sam Ramji

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 39:56


About SamA 25-year veteran of the Silicon Valley and Seattle technology scenes, Sam Ramji led Kubernetes and DevOps product management for Google Cloud, founded the Cloud Foundry foundation, has helped build two multi-billion dollar markets (API Management at Apigee and Enterprise Service Bus at BEA Systems) and redefined Microsoft's open source and Linux strategy from “extinguish” to “embrace”.He is nerdy about open source, platform economics, middleware, and cloud computing with emphasis on developer experience and enterprise software. He is an advisor to multiple companies including Dell Technologies, Accenture, Observable, Fletch, Orbit, OSS Capital, and the Linux Foundation.Sam received his B.S. in Cognitive Science from UC San Diego, the home of transdisciplinary innovation, in 1994 and is still excited about artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology.Links: DataStax: https://www.datastax.com Sam Ramji Twitter: https://twitter.com/sramji Open||Source||Data: https://www.datastax.com/resources/podcast/open-source-data Screaming in the Cloud Episode 243 with Craig McLuckie: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/innovating-in-the-cloud-with-craig-mcluckie/ Screaming in the Cloud Episode 261 with Jason Warner: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/what-github-can-give-to-microsoft-with-jason-warner/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access to anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers! Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor. List and see all SSH servers, kubernetes clusters or databases available to you. Get instant access to them all using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open source and a pleasure to use.Download Teleport at https://goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and recurring effort that this show goes to is to showcase people in their best light. Today's guest has done an awful lot: he led Kubernetes and DevOps Product Management for Google Cloud; he founded the Cloud Foundry Foundation; he set open-source strategy for Microsoft in the naughts; he advises companies including Dell, Accenture, the Linux Foundation; and tying all of that together, it's hard to present a lot of that in a great light because given my own proclivities, that sounds an awful lot like a personal attack. Sam Ramji is the Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax. Sam, thank you for joining me, and it's weird when your resume starts to read like, “Oh, I hate all of these things.”Sam: [laugh]. It's weird, but it's true. And it's the only life I could have lived apparently because here I am. Corey, it's a thrill to meet you. I've been an admirer of your public speaking, and public tweeting, and your writing for a long time.Corey: Well, thank you. The hard part is getting over the voice saying don't do it because it turns out that there's no real other side of public shutting up, which is something that I was never good at anyway, so I figured I'd lean into it. And again, I mean, that the sense of where you have been historically in terms of your career not, “Look what you've done,” which is a subtext that I could be accused of throwing in sometimes.Sam: I used to hear that a lot from my parents, actually.Corey: Oh, yeah. That was my name growing up. But you've done a lot of things, and you've transitioned from notable company making significant impact on the industry, to the next one, to the next one. And you've been in high-flying roles, doing lots of really interesting stuff. What's the common thread between all those things?Sam: I'm an intensely curious person, and the thing that I'm most curious about is distributed cognition. And that might not be obvious from what you see is kind of the… Lego blocks of my career, but I studied cognitive science in college when that was not really something that was super well known. So, I graduated from UC San Diego in '94 doing neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and psychology. And because I just couldn't stop thinking about thinking; I was just fascinated with how it worked.So, then I wanted to build software systems that would help people learn. And then I wanted to build distributed software systems. And then I wanted to learn how to work with people who were thinking about building the distributed software systems. So, you end up kind of going up this curve of, like, complexity about how do we think? How do we think alone? How do we learn to think? How do we think together?And that's the directed path through my software engineering career, into management, into middleware at BEA, into open-source at Microsoft because that's an amazing demonstration of distributed cognition, how, you know, at the time in 2007, I think, Sourceforge had 100,000 open-source projects, which was, like, mind boggling. Some of them even worked together, but all of them represented these groups of people, flung around the world, collaborating on something that was just fundamentally useful, that they were curious about. Kind of did the same thing into APIs because APIs are an even better way to reuse for some cases than having the source code—at Apigee. And kept growing up through that into, how are we building larger-scale thinking systems like Cloud Foundry, which took me into Google and Kubernetes, and then some applications of that in Autodesk and now DataStax. So, I love building companies. I love helping people build companies because I think business is distributed cognition. So, those businesses that build distributed systems, for me, are the most fascinating.Corey: You were basically handed a heck of a challenge as far as, “Well, help set open-source strategy,” back at Microsoft, in the days where that was a punchline. And credit where due, I have to look at Microsoft of today, and it's not a joke, you can have your arguments about them, but again in those days, a lot of us built our entire personality on hating Microsoft. Some folks never quite evolved beyond that, but it's a new ballgame and it's very clear that the Microsoft of yesteryear and the Microsoft of today are not completely congruent. What was it like at that point understanding that as you're working with open-source communities, you're doing that from a place of employment with a company that was widely reviled in the space.Sam: It was not lost on me. The irony, of course, was that—Corey: Well, thank God because otherwise the question where you would have been, “What do you mean they didn't like us?”Sam: [laugh].Corey: Which, on some levels, like, yeah, that's about the level of awareness I would have expected in that era, but contrary to popular opinion, execs at these companies are not generally oblivious.Sam: Yeah, well, if I'd been clever as a creative humorist, I would have given you that answer instead of my serious answer, but for some reason, my role in life is always to be the straight guy. I used to have Slashdot as my homepage, right? I love when I'd see some conspiracy theory about, you know, Bill Gates dressed up as the Borg, taking over the world. My first startup, actually in '97, was crushed by Microsoft. They copied our product, copied the marketing, and bundled it into Office, so I had lots of reasons to dislike Microsoft.But in 2004, I was recruited into their venture capital team, which I couldn't believe. It was really a place that they were like, “Hey, we could do better at helping startups succeed, so we're going to evangelize their success—if they're building with Microsoft technologies—to VCs, to enterprises, we'll help you get your first big enterprise deal.” I was like, “Man, if I had this a few years ago, I might not be working.” So, let's go try to pay it forward.I ended up in open-source by accident. I started going to these conferences on Software as a Service. This is back in 2005 when people were just starting to light up, like, Silicon Valley Forum with, you know, the CEO of Demandware would talk, right? We'd hear all these different ways of building a new business, and they all kept talking about their tech stack was Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. I went to one eight-hour conference, and Microsoft technologies were mentioned for about 12 seconds in two separate chunks. So, six seconds, he was like, “Oh, and also we really like Microsoft SQL Server for our data layer.”Corey: Oh, Microsoft SQL Server was fantastic. And I know that's a weird thing for people to hear me say, just because I've been renowned recently for using Route 53 as the primary data store for everything that I can. But there was nothing quite like that as far as having multiple write nodes, being able to handle sharding effectively. It was expensive, and you would take a bath on the price come audit time, but people were not rolling it out unaware of those things. This was a trade off that they were making.Oracle has a similar story with databases. It's yeah, people love to talk smack about Oracle and its business practices for a variety of excellent reasons, at least in the database space that hasn't quite made it to cloud yet—knock on wood—but people weren't deploying it because they thought Oracle was warm and cuddly as a vendor; they did it because they can tolerate the rest of it because their stuff works.Sam: That's so well said, and people don't give them the credit that's due. Like, when they built hypergrowth in their business, like… they had a great product; it really worked. They made it expensive, and they made a lot of money on it, and I think that was why you saw MySQL so successful and why, if you were looking for a spec that worked, that you could talk through through an open driver like ODBC or JDBC or whatever, you could swap to Microsoft SQL Server. But I walked out of that and came back to the VC team and said, “Microsoft has a huge problem. This is a massive market wave that's coming. We're not doing anything in it. They use a little bit of SQL Server, but there's nothing else in your tech stack that they want, or like, or can afford because they don't know if their businesses are going to succeed or not. And they're going to go out of business trying to figure out how much licensing costs they would pay to you in order to consider using your software. They can't even start there. They have to start with open-source. So, if you're going to deal with SaaS, you're going to have to have open-source, and get it right.”So, I worked with some folks in the industry, wrote a ten-page paper, sent it up to Bill Gates for Think Week. Didn't hear much back. Bought a new strategy to the head of developer platform evangelism, Sanjay Parthasarathy who suggested that the idea of discounting software to zero for startups, with the hope that they would end up doing really well with it in the future as a Software as a Service company; it was dead on arrival. Dumb idea; bring it back; that actually became BizSpark, the most popular program in Microsoft partner history.And then about three months later, I got a call from this guy, Bill Hilf. And he said, “Hey, this is Bill Hilf. I do open-source at Microsoft. I work with Bill Gates. He sent me your paper. I really like it. Would you consider coming up and having conversation with me because I want you to think about running open-source technology strategy for the company.” And at this time I'm, like, 33 or 34. And I'm like, “Who me? You've got to be joking.” And he goes, “Oh, and also, you'll be responsible for doing quarterly deep technical briefings with Bill… Gates.” I was like, “You must be kidding.” And so of course I had to check it out. One thing led to another and all of a sudden, with not a lot of history in the open-source community but coming in it with a strategist's eye and with a technologist's eye, saying, “This is a problem we got to solve. How do we get after this pragmatically?” And the rest is history, as they say.Corey: I have to say that you are the Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax, and I pull up your website quickly here and a lot of what I tell earlier stage companies is effectively more or less what you have already done. You haven't named yourself after the open-source project that underlies the bones of what you have built so you're not going to wind up in the same glorious challenges that, for example, Elastic or MongoDB have in some ways. You have a pricing page that speaks both to the reality of, “It's two in the morning. I'm trying to get something up and running and I want you the hell out of my way. Just give me something that I can work with a reasonable free tier and don't make me talk to a salesperson.” But also, your enterprise tier is, “Click here to talk to a human being,” which is speaking enterprise slash procurement slash, oh, there will be contract negotiation on these things.It's being able to serve different ends of your market depending upon who it is that encounters you without being off-putting to any of those. And it's deceptively challenging for companies to pull off or get right. So clearly, you've learned lessons by doing this. That was the big problem with Microsoft for the longest time. It's, if I want to use some Microsoft stuff, once you were able to download things from the internet, it changed slightly, but even then it was one of those, “What exactly am I committing to here as far as signing up for this? And am I giving them audit rights into my environment? Is the BSA about to come out of nowhere and hit me with a surprise audit and find out that various folks throughout the company have installed this somewhere and now I owe more than the company's worth?” That was always the haunting fear that companies had back then.These days, I like the approach that companies are taking with the SaaS offering: you pay for usage. On some level, I'd prefer it slightly differently in a pay-per-seat model because at least then you can predict the pricing, but no one is getting surprise submarined with this type of thing on an audit basis, and then they owe damages and payment in arrears and someone has them over a barrel. It's just, “Oh. The bill this month was higher than we expected.” I like that model I think the industry does, too.Sam: I think that's super well said. As I used to joke at BEA Systems, nothing says ‘I love you' to a customer like an audit, right? That's kind of a one-time use strategy. If you're going to go audit licenses to get your revenue in place, you might be inducing some churn there. It's a huge fix for the structural problem in pricing that I think package software had, right?When we looked at Microsoft software versus open-source software, and particularly Windows versus Linux, you would have a structure where sales reps were really compensated to sell as much as possible upfront so they could get the best possible commission on what might be used perpetually. But then if you think about it, like, the boxes in a curve, right, if you do that calculus approximation of a smooth curve, a perpetual software license is a huge box and there's an enormous amount of waste in there. And customers figured out so as soon as you can go to a pay-per-use or pay-as-you-go, you start to smooth that curve, and now what you get is what you deserve, right, as opposed to getting filled with way more cost than you expect. So, I think this model is really super well understood now. Kind of the long run the high point of open-source meets, cloud, meets Software as a Service, you look at what companies like MongoDB, and Confluent, and Elastic, and Databricks are doing. And they've really established a very good path through the jungle of how to succeed as a software company. So, it's still difficult to implement, but there are really world-class guides right now.Corey: Moving beyond where Microsoft was back in the naughts, you were then hired as a VP over at Google. And in that era, the fact that you were hired as a VP at Google is fascinating. They preferred to grow those internally, generally from engineering. So, first question, when you were being hired as a VP in the product org, did they make you solve algorithms on a whiteboard to get there?Sam: [laugh]. They did not. I did have somewhat of an advantage [because they 00:13:36] could see me working pretty closely as the CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation. I'd worked closely with Craig McLuckie who notably brought Kubernetes to the world along with Joe Beda, and with Eric Brewer, and a number of others.And he was my champion at Google. He was like, “Look, you know, we need him doing Kubernetes. Let's bring Sam in to do that.” So, that was helpful. I also wrote a [laugh] 2000-word strategy document, just to get some thoughts out of my head. And I said, “Hey, if you like this, great. If you don't throw it away.” So, the interviews were actually very much not solving problems in a whiteboard. There were super collaborative, really excellent conversations. It was slow—Corey: Let's be clear, Craig McLuckie's most notable achievement was being a guest on this podcast back in Episode 243. But I'll say that this is a close second.Sam: [laugh]. You're not wrong. And of course now with Heptio and their acquisition by VMware.Corey: Ehh, they're making money beyond the wildest dreams of avarice, that's all well and good, but an invite to this podcast, that's where it's at.Sam: Well, he should really come on again, he can double down and beat everybody. That can be his landmark achievement, a two-timer on Screaming in [the] Cloud.Corey: You were at Google; you were at Microsoft. These are the big titans of their era, in some respect—not to imply that there has beens; they're bigger than ever—but it's also a more crowded field in some ways. I guess completing the trifecta would be Amazon, but you've had the good judgment never to work there, directly of course. Now they're clearly in your market. You're at DataStax, which is among other things, built on Apache Cassandra, and they launched their own Cassandra service named Keyspaces because no one really knows why or how they name things.And of course, looking under the hood at the pricing model, it's pretty clear that it really is just DynamoDB wearing some Groucho Marx classes with a slight upcharge for API level compatibility. Great. So, I don't see it a lot in the real world and that's fine, but I'm curious as to your take on looking at all three of those companies at different eras. There was always the threat in the open-source world that they are going to come in and crush you. You said earlier that Microsoft crushed your first startup.Google is an interesting competitor in some respects; people don't really have that concern about them. And your job as a Chief Strategy Officer at Amazon is taken over by a Post-it Note that simply says ‘yes' on it because there's nothing they're not going to do, or try, and experiment with. So, from your perspective, if you look at the titans, who is it that you see as the largest competitive threat these days, if that's even a thing?Sam: If you think about Sun Tzu and the Art of War, right—a lot of strategy comes from what we've learned from military environments—fighting a symmetric war, right, using the same weapons and the same army against a symmetric opponent, but having 1/100th of the personnel and 1/100th of the money is not a good plan.Corey: “We're going to lose money, going to be outcompeted; we'll make it up in volume. Oh, by the way, we're also slower than they are.”Sam: [laugh]. So, you know, trying to come after AWS, or Microsoft, or Google as an independent software company, pound-for-pound, face-to-face, right, full-frontal assault is psychotic. What you have to do, I think, at this point is to understand that these are each companies that are much like we thought about Linux, and you know, Macintosh, and Windows as operating systems. They're now the operating systems of the planet. So, that creates some economies of scale, some efficiencies for them. And for us. Look at how cheap object storage is now, right? So, there's never been a better time in human history to create a database company because we can take the storage out of the database and hand it over to Amazon, or Google, or Microsoft to handle it with 13 nines of durability on a constantly falling cost basis.So, that's super interesting. So, you have to prosecute the structure of the world as it is, based on where the giants are and where they'll be in the future. Then you have to turn around and say, like, “What can they never sell?”So, Amazon can never sell something that is standalone, right? They're a parts factory and if you buy into the Amazon-first strategy of cloud computing—which we did at Autodesk when I was VP of cloud platform there—everything is a primitive that works inside Amazon, but they're not going to build things that don't work outside of the Amazon primitives. So, your company has to be built on the idea that there's a set of people who value something that is purpose-built for a particular use case that you can start to broaden out, it's really helpful if they would like it to be something that can help them escape a really valuable asset away from the center of gravity that is a cloud. And that's why data is super interesting. Nobody wakes up in the morning and says, “Boy, I had such a great conversation with Oracle over the last 20 years beating me up on licensing. Let me go find a cloud vendor and dump all of my data in that so they can beat me up for the next 20 years.” Nobody says that.Corey: It's the idea of data portability that drives decision-making, which makes people, of course, feel better about not actually moving in anywhere. But the fact that they're not locked in strategically, in a way that requires a full software re-architecture and data model rewrite is compelling. I'm a big believer in convincing people to make decisions that look a lot like that.Sam: Right. And so that's the key, right? So, when I was at Autodesk, we went from our 100 million dollar, you know, committed spend with 19% discount on the big three services to, like—we started realize when we're going to burn through that, we were spending $60 million or so a year on 20% annual growth as the cloud part of the business grew. Thought, “Okay, let's renegotiate. Let's go and do a $250 million deal. I'm sure they'll give us a much better discount than 19%.” Short story is they came back and said, “You know, we're going to take you from an already generous 19% to an outstanding 22%.” We thought, “Wait a minute, we already talked to Intuit. They're getting a 40% discount on a $400 million spend.”So, you know, math is hard, but, like, 40% minus 22% is 18% times $250 million is a lot of money. So, we thought, “What is going on here?” And we realized we just had no credible threat of leaving, and Intuit did because they had built a cross-cloud capable architecture. And we had not. So, now stepping back into the kind of the world that we're living in 2021, if you're an independent software company, especially if you have the unreasonable advantage of being an open-source software company, you have got to be doing your customers good by giving them cross-cloud capability. It could be simply like the Amdahl coffee cup that Amdahl reps used to put as landmines for the IBM reps, later—I can tell you that story if you want—even if it's only a way to save money for your customer by using your software, when it gets up to tens and hundreds of million dollars, that's a really big deal.But they also know that data is super important, so the option value of being able to move if they have to, that they have to be able to pull that stick, instead of saying, “Nice doggy,” we have to be on their side, right? So, there's almost a detente that we have to create now, as cloud vendors, working in a world that's invented and operated by the giants.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: When we look across the, I guess, the ecosystem as it's currently unfolding, a recurring challenge that I have to the existing incumbent cloud providers is they're great at offering the bricks that you can use to build things, but if I'm starting a company today, I'm not going to look at building it myself out of, “Ooh, I'm going to take a bunch of EC2 instances, or Lambda functions, or popsicles and string and turn it into this thing.” I'm going to want to tie together things that are way higher level. In my own case, now I wind up paying for Retool, which is, effectively, yeah, it runs on some containers somewhere, presumably, I think in Azure, but don't quote me on that. And that's great. Could I build my own thing like that?Absolutely not. I would rather pay someone to tie it together. Same story. Instead of building my own CRM by running some open-source software on an EC2 instance, I wind up paying for Salesforce or Pipedrive or something in that space. And so on, and so forth.And a lot of these companies that I'm doing business with aren't themselves running on top of AWS. But for web hosting, for example; if I look at the reference architecture for a WordPress site, AWS's diagram looks like a punchline. It is incredibly overcomplicated. And I say this as someone who ran large WordPress installations at Media Temple many years ago. Now, I have the good sense to pay WP Engine. And on a monthly basis, I give them money and they make the website work.Sure, under the hood, it's running on top of GCP or AWS somewhere. But I don't have to think about it; I don't have to build this stuff together and think about the backups and the failover strategy and the rest. The website just works. And that is increasingly the direction that business is going; things commoditize over time. And AWS in particular has done a terrible job, in my experience, of differentiating what it is they're doing in the language that their customers speak.They're great at selling things to existing infrastructure engineers, but folks who are building something from scratch aren't usually in that cohort. It's a longer story with time and, “Well, we're great at being able to sell EC2 instances by the gallon.” Great. Are you capable of going to a small doctor's office somewhere in the American Midwest and offering them an end-to-end solution for managing patient data? Of course not. You can offer them a bunch of things they can tie together to something that will suffice if they all happen to be software engineers, but that's not the opportunity.So instead, other companies are building those solutions on top of AWS, capturing the margin. And if there's one thing guaranteed to keep Amazon execs awake at night, it's the idea of someone who isn't them making money somehow somewhere, so I know that's got to rankle them, but they do not speak that language. At all. Longer-term, I only see that as a more and more significant crutch. A long enough timeframe here, we're talking about them becoming the Centurylinks of the world, the tier one backbone provider that everyone uses, but no one really thinks about because they're not a household name.Sam: That is a really thoughtful perspective. I think the diseconomies of scale that you're pointing to start to creep in, right? Because when you have to sell compute units by the gallon, right, you can't care if it's a gallon of milk, [laugh] or a gallon of oil, or you know, a gallon of poison. You just have to keep moving it through. So, the shift that I think they're going to end up having to make pragmatically, and you start to see some signs of it, like, you know, they hired but could not retain Matt [Acey 00:23:48]. He did an amazing job of bringing them to some pragmatic realization that they need to partner with open-source, but more broadly, when I think about Microsoft in the 2000s as they were starting to learn their open-source lessons, we were also being able to pull on Microsoft's deep competency and partners. So, most people didn't do the math on this. I was part of the field governance council so I understood exactly how the Microsoft business worked to the level that I was capable. When they had $65 billion in revenue, they produced $24 billion in profit through an ecosystem that generated $450 billion in revenue. So, for every dollar Microsoft made, it was $8 to partners. It was a fundamentally platform-shaped business, and that was how they're able to get into doctors offices in the Midwest, and kind of fit the curve that you're describing of all of those longtail opportunities that require so much care and that are complex to prosecute. These solved for their diseconomies of scale by having 1.2 million partner companies. So, will Amazon figure that out and will they hire, right, enough people who've done this before from Microsoft to become world-class in partnering, that's kind of an exercise left to the [laugh] reader, right? Where will that go over time? But I don't see another better mathematical model for dealing with the diseconomies of scale you have when you're one of the very largest providers on the planet.Corey: The hardest problem as I look at this is, at some point, you hit a point of scale where smaller things look a lot less interesting. I get that all the time when people say, “Oh, you fix AWS bills, aren't you missing out by not targeting Google bills and Azure bills as well?” And it's, yeah. I'm not VC-backed. It turns out that if I limit the customer base that I can effectively service to only AWS customers, yeah turns out, I'm not going to starve anytime soon. Who knew? I don't need to conquer the world and that feels increasingly antiquated, at least going by the stories everyone loves to tell.Sam: Yeah, it's interesting to see how cloud makes strange bedfellows, right? We started seeing this in, like, 2014, 2015, weird partnerships that you're like, “There's no way this would happen.” But the cloud economics which go back to utilization, rather than what it used to be, which was software lock-in, just changed who people were willing to hang out with. And now you see companies like Databricks going, you know, we do an amazing amount of business, effectively competing with Amazon, selling Spark services on top of predominantly Amazon infrastructure, and everybody seems happy with it. So, there's some hint of a new sensibility of what the future of partnering will be. We used to call it coopetition a long time ago, which is kind of a terrible word, but at least it shows that there's some nuance in you can't compete with everybody because it's just too hard.Corey: I wish there were better ways of articulating these things because it seems from the all the outside world, you have companies like Amazon and Microsoft and Google who go and build out partner networks because they need that external accessibility into various customer profiles that they can't speak to super well themselves, but they're also coming out with things that wind up competing directly or indirectly, with all of those partners at the same time. And I don't get it. I wish that there were smarter ways to do it.Sam: It is hard to even talk about it, right? One of the things that I think we've learned from philosophy is if we don't have a word for it, we can't be intelligent about it. So, there's a missing semantics here for being able to describe the complexity of where are you partnering? Where are you competing? Where are you differentiating? In an ecosystem, which is moving and changing.I tend to look at the tools of game theory for this, which is to look at things as either, you know, nonzero-sum games or zero-sum games. And if it's a nonzero-sum game, which I think are the most interesting ones, can you make it a positive sum game? And who can you play positive-sum games with? An organization as big as Amazon, or as big as Microsoft, or even as big as Google isn't ever completely coherent with itself. So, thinking about this as an independent software company, it doesn't matter if part of one of these hyperscalers has a part of their business that competes with your entire business because your business probably drives utilization of a completely different resource in their company that you can partner within them against them, effectively. Right?For example, Cassandra is an amazingly powerful but demanding workload on Kubernetes. So, there's a lot of Cassandra on EKS. You grow a lot of workload, and EKS business does super well. Does that prevent us from working with Amazon because they have Dynamo or because they have Keyspaces? Absolutely not, right?So, this is when those companies get so big that they are almost their own forest, right, of complexity, you can kind of get in, hang out, do well, and pretty much never see the competitive product, unless you're explicitly looking for it, which I think is a huge danger for us as independent software companies. And I would say this to anybody doing strategy for an organization like this, which is, don't obsess over the tiny part of their business that competes with yours, and do not pay attention to any of the marketing that they put out that looks competitive with what you have. Because if you can't figure out how to make a better product and sell it better to your customers as a single purpose corporation, you have bigger problems.Corey: I want to change gears slightly to something that's probably a fair bit more insulting, but that's okay. We're going to roll with it. That seems to be the theme of this episode. You have been, in effect, a CIO a number of times at different companies. And if we take a look at the typical CIO tenure, industry-wide, it's not long; it approaches the territory from an executive perspective of, “Be sure not to buy green bananas. You might not be here by the time they ripen.” And I'm wondering what it is that drives that and how you make a mark in a relatively short time frame when you're providing inputs and deciding on strategy, and those decisions may not bear fruit for years.Sam: CIO used to—we used say it stood for ‘Career Is Over' because the tenure is so short. I think there's a couple of reasons why it's so short. And I think there's a way I believe you can have impact in a short amount of time. I think the reason that it's been short is because people aren't sure what they want the CIO role to be.Do they want it to be a glorified finance person who's got a lot of data processing experience, but now really has got, you know, maybe even an MBA in finance, but is not focusing on value creation? Do they want it to be somebody who's all-singing, all-dancing Chief Data Officer with a CTO background who did something amazing and solved a really hard problem? The definition of success is difficult. Often CIOs now also have security under them, which is literally a job I would never ever want to have. Do security for a public corporation? Good Lord, that's a way to lose most of your life. You're the only executive other than the CEO that the board wants to hear from. Every sing—Corey: You don't sleep; you wait, in those scenarios. And oh, yeah, people joke about ablative CSOs in those scenarios. Yeah, after SolarWinds, you try and get an ablative intern instead, but those don't work as well. It's a matter of waiting for an inevitability. One of the things I think is misunderstood about management broadly, is that you are delegating work, but not the responsibility. The responsibility rests with you.So, when companies have these statements blaming some third-party contractor, it's no, no, no. I'm dealing with you. You were the one that gave my data to some sketchy randos. It is your responsibility that data has now been compromised. And people don't want to hear that, but it's true.Sam: I think that's absolutely right. So, you have this high risk, medium reward, very fungible job definition, right? If you ask all of the CIO's peers what their job is, they'll probably all tell you something different that represents their wish list. The thing that I learned at Autodesk, I was only there for 15 months, but we established a fundamental transformation of the work of how cloud platform is done at the company that's still in place a couple years later.You have to realize that you're a change agent, right? You're actually being hired to bring in the bulk of all the different biases and experiences you have to solve a problem that is not working, right? So, when I got to Autodesk, they didn't even know what their uptime was. It took three months to teach the team how to measure the uptime. Turned out the uptime was 97.7% for the cloud, for the world's largest engineering software company.That is 200 hours a year of unplanned downtime, right? That is not good. So, a complete overhaul [laugh] was needed. Understanding that as a change agent, your half-life is 12 to 18 months, you have to measure success not on tenure, but on your ability to take good care of the patient, right? It's going to be a lot of pain, you're going to work super hard, you're going to have to build trust with everyone, and then people are still going to hate you at the end. That is something you just have to kind of take on.As a friend of mine, Jason Warner joined Redpoint Ventures recently, he said this when he was the CTO of GitHub: “No one is a villain in their own story.” So, you realize, going into a big organization, people are going to make you a villain, but you still have to do incredibly thoughtful, careful work, that's going to take care of them for a long time to come. And those are the kinds of CIOs that I can relate to very well.Corey: Jason is great. You're name-dropping all the guests we've had. My God, keep going. It's a hard thing to rationalize and wrap heads around. It's one of those areas where you will not be measured during your tenure in the role, in some respects. And, of course, that leads to the cynical perspective as well, where well, someone's not going to be here long and if they say, “Yeah, we're just going to keep being stewards of the change that's already underway,” well, that doesn't look great, so quick, time to do a cloud migration, or a cloud repatriation, or time to roll something else out. A bit of a different story.Sam: One of the biggest challenges is how do you get the hearts and the minds of the people who are in the organization when they are no fools, and their expectation is like, “Hey, this company's been around for decades, and we go through cloud leaders or CIOs, like Wendy's goes through hamburgers.” They could just cloud-wash, right, or change-wash all their language. They could use the new language to describe the old thing because all they have to do is get through the performance review and outwait you. So, there's always going to be a level of defection because it's hard to change; it's hard to think about new things.So, the most important thing is how do you get into people's hearts and minds and enable them to believe that the best thing they could do for their career is to come along with the change? And I think that was what we ended up getting right in the Autodesk cloud transformation. And that requires endless optimism, and there's no room for cynicism because the cynicism is going to creep in around the edges. So, what I found on the job is, you just have to get up every morning and believe everything is possible and transmit that belief to everybody.So, if it seems naive or ingenuous, I think that doesn't matter as long as you can move people's hearts in each conversation towards, like, “Oh, this person cares about me. They care about a good outcome from me. I should listen a little bit more and maybe make a 1% change in what I'm doing.” Because 1% compounded daily for a year, you can actually get something done in the lifetime of a CIO.Corey: And I think that's probably a great place to leave it. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you think about these things, how you view the world, where can they find you?Sam: You can find me on Twitter, I'm @sramji, S-R-A-M-J-I, and I have a podcast that I host called Open||Source||Datawhere I invite innovators, data nerds, computational networking nerds to hang out and explain to me, a software programmer, what is the big world of open-source data all about, what's happening with machine learning, and what would it be like if you could put data in a container, just like you could put code in a container, and how might the world change? So, that's Open||Source||Data podcast.Corey: And we'll of course include links to that in the [show notes 00:35:58]. Thanks so much for your time. I appreciate it.Sam: Corey, it's been a privilege. Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Likewise. Sam Ramji, Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me exactly which item in Sam's background that I made fun of is the place that you work at.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Crossing Soccer Borders
Episode #33 (12-8-2021) - CONCACAF Nations playing friendlies, Mexico and Costa Rica get a rebrand and Dynamo talk!

Crossing Soccer Borders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 22:45


Welcome to another episode of the Crossing Soccer Borders podcast show. With some leagues wrapping up their season this fall a few CONCACAF nations still trying to qualify for Qatar are having friendlies in December. El Salvador played Ecuador at PNC Stadium and will be playing Chile in Los Angeles. Mexico will be playing in Austin versus Chile on the 8th. Honduras will play Colombia on the 12th at Inter Miami stadium. Panama will play Cameroon on the 13th against Cameroon in San Jose. The USMNT will play Bosnia and Herezegovina on the 18th in Los Angeles... Hit on Mexico and Costa Rica had their logo/crest rebranded and Dynamo Theory newest show and more! Hosted by Rudy and Rodrigo Segura . Be sure to Like, Share and Subscribe! . Follow Crossing Soccer Borders: @BordersSoccer on Twitter @CrossingSoccerBorders on Instagram . Follow Hosts: Rudy - @RudySegura3 on Twitter Rodrigo - @RodrigoSegura01 on Twitter . Part of the DynamoTheory.com Podcast Network --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Mutual Audio Network
Dick Dynamo The Album Track #15- End of the Beginning(120821)

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:57


And sadly we've hit the final cut of Dick Dynamo- the 5th Dimensional Man album from Jon Baker! This week it's track #15- End of the Beginning! Thanks for the ride! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Shoot the Defence
Dynamo Abroad Podcast: Season Defining Week

Shoot the Defence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 42:44


On this episode, Alex, Dima, and Erik review the game against Mynai and preview the upcoming games against Veres and Benfica. If you would like to contact the Dynamo Abroad Podcast, you can follow us on twitter @dynamoabroad or send us an email to dynamoabroadpodcast@gmail.com. Hosts: @lyszyk7, @lebovich, & @1927dima

Shooting the Sports Ish
Walk-On College Football Podcast: Championship Weekend!

Shooting the Sports Ish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 101:30


JB and Cam are joined by Jay(Roll Tide fan) to talk about: The coaching carousel, who left the worst? Who ends up filling the vacant slots? Props to Kentucky for holding on to Stoops. They discuss the Championship games this weekend And to end the show JB and Jay give their case as to why their team will win the SEC Championship! This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Dynamo - https://www.voxnest.com/dynamo/privacy-policies Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Support this podcast

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/01/2021 Dynamo GM Pat Onstad joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 18:31


Dynamo GM Pat Onstad joined Glenn to discuss the team's early offseason activity, give an update on the latest with their coaching search, and more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/01/2021 Dynamo Defender Zarek Valentin joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 18:33


Dynamo Defender Zarek Valentin joined Glenn to discuss some of went wrong with the team's disappointing season, what goes into his offseason, and more!

Glenn Davis Soccer
12/01/2021 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 50:37


To kick off a Wednesday edition of Soccer Matters, Glenn sets the scene for the show before diving into yesterday's MLS playoff action as well as this afternoon's Merseyside Derby.  After the break he is joined by Dynamo defender Zarek Valentin to get his thoughts on the Dynamo's disappointing season and look ahead at what's to come for both him and the organization.  To wrap the 1st half of the show, Glenn is joined by Jordi Sunyer from TV3 in Barcelona to get all the latest on FC Barcelona as they continue adjusting to their new life with club legend Xavi as their manager.

The Mutual Audio Network
Dick Dynamo The Album Track #14- Space Desire(120121)

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:57


We're back with the incredibly original Dick Dynamo- the 5th Dimensional Man album from Jon Baker! This week it's track #14- Space Desire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Glenn Davis Soccer
11/29/2021 Former Dynamo Defender Eddie Robinson joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 14:35


Former Dynamo Defender and current TV Color Analyst Eddie Robinson joins Glenn to talk more about the Dynamo coaching search and where they might be looking.

Glenn Davis Soccer
11/29/2021 The Striker's Victor Araiza joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 15:34


The Striker's Victor Araiza joins Glenn to talk all about the Dynamo's head coaching search and some of the potential candidates the team could/should be looking at.

Glenn Davis Soccer
11/29/2021 Soccer Matters Hour 1

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 51:07


To kick off a special Monday edition of the show Glenn discusses all the major results from the weekend in the Premier League and Barcelona as well.  After the opening segment, he is joined by The Striker's Victor Araiza to discuss the Dynamo's search for a new head coach.  To close out the 1st half of the show, former Dynamo Defender and current TV Color Analyst Eddie Robinson joins to continue the head coach conversation. 

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2149: Electric Words

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 3:47


Episode: 2149 Electrical words and a vision of the future.  Today, a new language for a new technology.

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans
Bavarian Podcast Works: Preview Show — Bayern Munich vs Arminia Bielefeld (Hinrunde)

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 11:51


Bayern Munich welcomes Arminia Bielefeld to Munich in the Bundesliga. Their encounter in the previous season in Munich was very entertaining and ended in a 3-3 draw. Julian Nagelsmann will be hoping for better results after a hard-fought victory over Dynamo Kyiv in midweek in the UEFA Champions League. In this preview, we looked at the following: Bielefeld's recent turnaround in form after a poor start to the season Bayern's injury headaches and more Covid-19 headaches! Bayern's remaining fixture list ahead of the winter break Some thoughts on Borussia Dortmund's mindset after their exit from the Champions League in the hands of Sporting Lisbon Some thoughts on Bayern's performances against Dynamo and Augsburg As always, thanks for your support and let us know what you think! Be sure to stay tuned to Bavarian Podcast Works for all of your up to date coverage on Bayern Munich and Germany. Follow us on Twitter @BavarianFBWorks, @jeffersonfenner, @TheBarrelBlog, @tommyadams71, @bfwinnn, and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Mutual Audio Network
Dick Dynamo The Album Track #13- Rainbows, Sunshine, Clowns(112421)

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:16


We're back with the incredibly original Dick Dynamo- the 5th Dimensional Man album from Jon Baker! This week it's track #13- Rainbows, Sunshine, Clowns Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BIMThoughts
E2140 – Dalton Goodwin

BIMThoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


In this episode, We chat with Dalton Goodwin of The BIM Coordinator YouTube channel fame. We talk about his love for all things AEC and Data related like, Dynamo, Revit, Python, Knime, Postman, Codewars, Bimbeats and more! Show Notes Episode Hashtag: Here is where you can find Dalton on the World Wide Web: Website: The … Read More →

Wild Business Growth Podcast
#169: Addie Gundry – Diaper-Changing Dynamo, Founder of Pluie

Wild Business Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 35:55


Addie Gundry, the Founder and CEO of Pluie, joins the show to share her journey from starring on the Food Network and working with Martha Stewart to creating the world's first and only self-sanitizing diaper changing table for public restrooms. Hear the insights that led to Pluie's design, how to find the right technology for your product, your ideal customer, what it's like cooking on TV, and what Martha Stewart's like in person. Connect with Addie on Instagram at @Hello_Pluie and LinkedIn