Podcasts about Physics

Study of the fundamental properties of matter and energy

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Latest podcast episodes about Physics

Converging Dialogues
#139 - Accuracy in Climate Science: A Dialogue with Steven Koonin

Converging Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 63:56


In this episode, Xavier Bonilla has a dialogue with Steven Koonin about climate change and how to best engage with climate science. They discuss how people can trust the science on climate from institutions and published data. They mention the differences between weather and climate, radiative equilibrium, and greenhouse gases. They review the data on carbon, discuss various forms of energy such as fossil fuels, clean energy, and nuclear energy. They talk about rising temperatures, increased precipitation, and rising sea levels. They discuss how much responsibility humans have on the changing climate, balanced responses to tackle climate change, and many other topics.  Steven Koonin is a theoretical physicist and Professor of Information, Operations, & Management Sciences and Director for Urban Science and Progress at Stern School of Business at New York University. From 2009-2011, he was the Undersecretary for science, Department of Energy during the Obama administration. Formerly, he was BP's Chief Scientist and Provost and Vice President of California Institute of Technology. He has his Bachelors in Physics from California Institute of Technology and PhD in theoretical physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the member of numerous academies such as the American Physical Society, the American Association of the Advancement of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of the most recent book, Unsettled: What Climate Science Tells Us, What it Doesn't, and Why it Matters. You can find his work here. 

Science Friction - ABC RN
The second kind of impossible: Part 2 — the wild adventure (REPEAT)

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 25:46


American Conservative University
The Surprising Relevance of Engineering in Biology.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 40:26


The Surprising Relevance of Engineering in Biology. https://youtu.be/M9i2vFEa6rE May 17, 2022 Discovery Science 160K subscribers Scientist Brian Miller explains the intriguing story of how biology is beginning to adopt more design-based models in its research. Although it's true that many biologists still offer lip service to unguided evolution, engineers and biologists are actually working together to change the way we view how life developed. Dr. Miller is Research Coordinator at Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. He holds a Ph.D. in Physics from Duke University. More about him and the articles he has written can be found here: https://www.discovery.org/p/miller/ This talk was presented at the 2022 Dallas Conference on Science and Faith in January 2022. ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter: Twitter: https://twitter.com/discoverycsc/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe...  

Night Dreams Talk Radio
ENDTIMES OR? With Dr.Richard Alan Miller

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 63:11


Dr. Richard Alan Miller reveals a depth of knowledge and experience in alternative agriculture, physics, and metaphysics. Miller began working in the secret world of Navy Intel (Seal Corp. and then MRU) in the late 60s, and now has amazing experiences and conclusions to share. Before many leading edge concepts became trendy topics, Miller was (and is) in the international front lines of research, experimentation and documentation. Today, Miller writes for Nexus magazine and is a preferred guest on internet radio. In the 21st century Miller is re-emerging at a critical time in humanities evolution where metaphysics and practical survival converge

Between the Lines with Barry Kibrick
Rules for a Flat World with Dr. Gillian Hadfield

Between the Lines with Barry Kibrick

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 25:55


No one denies we live in a new era filled with issues that are reshaping our lives. Dr. Gillian Hadfield, a professor of law and economics, wants to be sure we gain back our power during these turbulent times. Our conversation about her book, “Rules for a Flat World,” gives us the tools we'll need to gain back our confidence and make the necessary changes to better ourselves and our world.Support the show

Physics World Weekly Podcast
Black-hole physics and that iconic ‘shadow' image, balloons and rockets probe the atmosphere's acoustic duct

Physics World Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:14


We speak to a geophysicist and an astrophysicist in this week's podcast

New Books in Science
Jim Al-Khalili, "The Joy of Science" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 50:13


Today's world is unpredictable and full of contradictions, and navigating its complexities while trying to make the best decisions is far from easy. The Joy of Science (Princeton UP, 2022) presents 8 short lessons on how to unlock the clarity, empowerment, and joy of thinking and living a little more scientifically. In this brief guide to leading a more rational life, acclaimed physicist Jim Al-Khalili invites readers to engage with the world as scientists have been trained to do. The scientific method has served humankind well in its quest to see things as they really are, and underpinning the scientific method are core principles that can help us all navigate modern life more confidently. Discussing the nature of truth and uncertainty, the role of doubt, the pros and cons of simplification, the value of guarding against bias, the importance of evidence-based thinking, and more, Al-Khalili shows how the powerful ideas at the heart of the scientific method are deeply relevant to the complicated times we live in and the difficult choices we make. Read this book and discover the joy of science. It will empower you to think more objectively, see through the fog of your own preexisting beliefs, and lead a more fulfilling life. Jim Al-Khalili is Distinguished Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Surrey and one of Britain's best-known science communicators. He has written numerous books, including The World According to Physics (Princeton); Quantum: A Guide for the Perplexed; and Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and lives in Southsea, England. Twitter @jimalkhalili Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Jim Al-Khalili, "The Joy of Science" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 50:13


Today's world is unpredictable and full of contradictions, and navigating its complexities while trying to make the best decisions is far from easy. The Joy of Science (Princeton UP, 2022) presents 8 short lessons on how to unlock the clarity, empowerment, and joy of thinking and living a little more scientifically. In this brief guide to leading a more rational life, acclaimed physicist Jim Al-Khalili invites readers to engage with the world as scientists have been trained to do. The scientific method has served humankind well in its quest to see things as they really are, and underpinning the scientific method are core principles that can help us all navigate modern life more confidently. Discussing the nature of truth and uncertainty, the role of doubt, the pros and cons of simplification, the value of guarding against bias, the importance of evidence-based thinking, and more, Al-Khalili shows how the powerful ideas at the heart of the scientific method are deeply relevant to the complicated times we live in and the difficult choices we make. Read this book and discover the joy of science. It will empower you to think more objectively, see through the fog of your own preexisting beliefs, and lead a more fulfilling life. Jim Al-Khalili is Distinguished Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Surrey and one of Britain's best-known science communicators. He has written numerous books, including The World According to Physics (Princeton); Quantum: A Guide for the Perplexed; and Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and lives in Southsea, England. Twitter @jimalkhalili Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Jim Al-Khalili, "The Joy of Science" (Princeton UP, 2022)

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 50:13


Today's world is unpredictable and full of contradictions, and navigating its complexities while trying to make the best decisions is far from easy. The Joy of Science (Princeton UP, 2022) presents 8 short lessons on how to unlock the clarity, empowerment, and joy of thinking and living a little more scientifically. In this brief guide to leading a more rational life, acclaimed physicist Jim Al-Khalili invites readers to engage with the world as scientists have been trained to do. The scientific method has served humankind well in its quest to see things as they really are, and underpinning the scientific method are core principles that can help us all navigate modern life more confidently. Discussing the nature of truth and uncertainty, the role of doubt, the pros and cons of simplification, the value of guarding against bias, the importance of evidence-based thinking, and more, Al-Khalili shows how the powerful ideas at the heart of the scientific method are deeply relevant to the complicated times we live in and the difficult choices we make. Read this book and discover the joy of science. It will empower you to think more objectively, see through the fog of your own preexisting beliefs, and lead a more fulfilling life. Jim Al-Khalili is Distinguished Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Surrey and one of Britain's best-known science communicators. He has written numerous books, including The World According to Physics (Princeton); Quantum: A Guide for the Perplexed; and Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and lives in Southsea, England. Twitter @jimalkhalili Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter.

Stanford Radio
E180 | The physics of gel-like substances

Stanford Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 27:34


The Future of Everything with Russ Altman: E180 | The physics of gel-like substances The vast majority of substances are neither liquid, solid, nor gas – but an alternative form that shares characteristics of liquids and gases. Among them are gels, glasses, and colloidal suspensions, and they're an essential part of everyday products like toothpaste, paint, hair products, and even windows. Stanford chemical engineer Roseanna Zia is an expert on the gel-like substance known as colloids. In this episode of Stanford Engineering's The Future of Everything, Zia joins host Russ Altman to talk about the physics of these substances, and how a greater understanding of colloids can improve our understanding of cells, biological processes, and human health and disease.

PartsVu Xchange Talks Boating
Crash Course in Boat Propeller Physics

PartsVu Xchange Talks Boating

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:21


Phil Stephanuik, Product Engineering Manager at Turning Point Propellers, and Charlie Haimes, a partner with the Haimes Coleman Group, joined PartsVu Xchange Talks Boating to share their boat propeller expertise. Based in Jacksonville, FL, Turning Point Propellers' mission is to engineer and produce the best performing propeller in every category. Additionally, they are driven to help every boater become a prop expert and provide the tools to help them find the ideal propeller for their boat.The Haimes Coleman Group is a sales organization made up of highly experienced and knowledgeable marine industry professionals. They represent 20 of the leading brands in the industry, including Turning Point Propellers, and have a fascinating bird's eye view of the market.Our discussion included:Boat propellers' contribution to a boat's performance on the water  Propellers' fundamental physics -  characteristics like cup, rake, pitch, number of blades, etc  Advanced prop characteristics  How can boaters best select the propeller that is right for them?What should boaters do to best maintain their propellers?Shop for Turning Point Propellers at PartsVu.comTurning Point Propeller ResourcesTurning Point Propeller websiteTurning Point Prop Wizard - prop selection toolTurning Point Propeller YouTube ChannelVisit the Haimes Coleman Group websiteSpecial Discount from PartsVu for Listeners of This EpisodeFinally, PartsVu is here to support all of your boating cleaning, polishing, and waxing needs.Use coupon code PVTALKSSHINE for free shipping for your next www.partsvu.com order.Follow PartsVu on Facebook and Instagram (@partsvu4u)

Exploring Astrophysics
Dr Olivier Hervet, Assistant project scientist at UC Santa Cruz

Exploring Astrophysics

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 20:48


Active galactic nuclei are found in the centers of galaxies and emit extremely high levels of radiation, which Dr Hervet tries to model computationally. Dr Hervet is also part of the VERITAS collaboration which is a ground based observatory with an array of 4 telescopes, each with a 12 meter wide diameter! 

Charlotte Mason Show
S6 E3 | How to Identify a Living Book (Jeannie Fulbright)

Charlotte Mason Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:14


Living books are a vital and necessary part of a living education. They are full of ideas and personality that sparks the imagination, imparting interest in the subject, and building a love for learning. But how do you know if a book is a living book? How do you tell a living from a dead book? Jeannie Fulbright shares the way you can tell almost immediately if a book is a living book. She gives examples from living books and twaddle. By implementing the method Jeannie describes, you can easily identify a living book.  Host biography Jeannie Fulbright, a 24-year veteran homeschooler, is the author of the #1 best-selling, multi award-winning Apologia Young Explorer science series: Exploring Creation with Astronomy, Chemistry and Physics, Botany, Zoology, and Anatomy & Physiology. She is also the author of the action-packed historical time travel book series Rumble Tumbles Through Time, as well as preschool science books and activity kits, the Charlotte Mason Heirloom Planner, and many high-quality Charlotte Mason based products. Jeannie and her husband Jeff became empty nesters in 2019. All four of their children all went to the University of Georgia on scholarship (homeschooling works!). For more than 20 years Jeannie has traveled around the country speaking to homeschoolers at conventions, covering a plethora of topics from Charlotte Mason to marriage and prayer.  Connect Jeannie Fulbright | Instagram | Facebook | Facebook Group | Pinterest | Website Homeschooling.mom | Instagram | Website Thank you to our sponsors! Medi-Share: an affordable Christian alternative to traditional health insurance Have you joined us at one of the Great Homeschool Conventions?  We hope to see you there! For more encouragement on your homeschooling journey, visit the Homeschooling.mom site, and tune in to our sister podcast The Homeschool Solutions Show. View full show notes on the blog.

Jacobs: If/When
STEAM Education: Future-Proofing Our Youth

Jacobs: If/When

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 42:26


Kara Connon has experience developing and delivering inspirational and interactive educational STEAM programs for pupils of all ages, to raise young people's aspiration and knowledge of future STEAM careers and develop the skills of the future workforce. Kara has successfully engaged with Boards of Directors and Executive Leadership teams to gain their confidence in the development of a strategy that will support them in achieving ambitious KPIs for global STEAM engagement. In November 2020, Kara was appointed Jacobs STEAM Lead for Europe, coordinating over 800 STEAM Ambassadors in the UK alone, with a remit of developing and delivering Jacobs' global STEAM launch and an ambitious STEAM strategy, to maximize the social value and impact Jacobs will have on pupil and community STEAM education throughout the world.As a communicator, Lainie Harber is passionate about storytelling and building relationships. In her nearly 10 years in communications – starting in public relations, social media and crisis communications eventually transitioning to executive communications and strategy work – she's had the pleasure of helping people and companies reach their communications and marketing goals. Currently, she serves as a Communication Project Manger at Jacobs where she oversees large company projects that support and drive the company strategy forward. Lainie is a Kansas girl and earned her Masters of Journalism and Strategic Communication from the University of Kansas. In her spare time, Lainie likes to travel, cook and have adventures with her husband, Scott, her son, Max and their Australian Shepherd, Marlow.Samuel Stanford is a 24-year-old Physicist and Structural Engineer for the Jacobs Electronics Team, as well as the host of his own STEAM education podcast called Everything STEAM. He is also a STEAM Ambassador for Jacobs and spends his free time educating individuals through social media platforms such as Instagram, TikTok and the Wisdom app. Just recently with the help of a local business partnership, Sam has launched a sustainable clothing line called Ecolite. He writes ecological research blogs such as saving the bees, commercial fishing and much more. These research blogs are directly linked to Ecolite clothing via a QR code. With the drive for a circular fashion approach and the incorporation of green clothing alternatives, he has been able to combine fashion, sustainability and learning, all in one purchase. Throughout his college years, he had developed his teaching abilities through tutoring people in advanced Physics and Mathematical concepts. He was also given the opportunity to conduct material science research while running a fully functional 3D Printing laboratory, and he conducted research into Organic Electrochemical Transistor nanofabrication for a healthcare company. In the future, Sam has aspirations to continue his college career by pursuing a Master's program consisting of Structural Engineering and Mechanics of Materials. 

Den of Rich
Vladimir Porus | Владимир Порус

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 125:12


Vladimir Porus is a Soviet and Russian philosopher, specialist in the theory of knowledge, philosophy and methodology of science. Doctor of Philosophical Sciences, Professor at HSE University. Vladimir was born on September 19, 1943 in the city of Osh, Kirghiz SSR. He graduated from high school in Lugansk. After serving in the Soviet army, he entered Moscow State University. In 1970 he graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy of Lomonosov Moscow State University with a degree in Philosophy. In 1974, he completed postgraduate studies at the Institute of Philosophy of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and defended his dissertation for the degree of candidate of philosophical sciences on the topic "Gnoseological problems of many-valued logic". From 1974 to 2007 he worked at the Institute of Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Junior, Senior and Leading Researcher). In 1997 he was awarded the academic title of Associate Professor. Since 1999 - Head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of the Russian Academy of Education. In 2002 he defended his dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy on the topic "Scientific Rationality as a Topic of Epistemology". Since 2003 - Professor and Head of the Department of Ontology, Logic and Theory of Knowledge of the School of Philosophy, Faculty of Humanities, National Research University Higher School of Economics. Since 2004, he has been a member of the editorial board of the journal Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. Since 2017, he has been the editor-in-chief of Philosophy. Journal of the HSE School of Philosophy and Cultural Studies. Author of more than 450 scientific publications, including monographs “Rationality. The science. Culture” (2002), “At the Edge of Culture” (2008), “At the Crossroads of Method” (2014), etc. FIND VLADIMIR ON SOCIAL MEDIA LinkedIn | Facebook ================================ SUPPORT & CONNECT: Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrich Twitter: https://twitter.com/denofrich Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/denofrich Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/den_of_rich/ Hashtag: #denofrich © Copyright 2022 Den of Rich. All rights reserved.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. KATIE MACK - Theoretical Astrophysicist ExaminesThe End of Everything

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 60:01


Dr. Katie Mack is a theoretical astrophysicist exploring a range of questions in cosmology, the study of the universe from beginning to end. She currently holds the position of Assistant Professor of Physics at North Carolina State University, where she is also a member of the Leadership in Public Science Cluster. Throughout her career she has studied dark matter, the early universe, galaxy formation, black holes, cosmic strings, and the ultimate fate of the cosmos. Alongside her academic research, she is an internationally recognized writer and communicator. She has been published in a number of popular outlets such as Scientific American, Slate, Sky & Telescope, and Cosmos Magazine, where she is a columnist, and she has recently been named a TED2020 Fellow. You can find her on Twitter as @AstroKatie.******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. JOHN BRANDENBURG - Life and Death on Mars, and The New Mars Synthesis

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 41:28


John Brandenburg was born in Rochester Minnesota and grew up in Medford Oregon. He obtained his bachelor's degree in physics at Southern Oregon University, and his MS in Applied Science at University of California at Davis, and also hie PhD in plasma Physics at UC Davis extension at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories studying controlled fusion using magnetic fields to confine plasma. John .E. Brandenburg is a Senior Propulsion Scientist at Orbital Technologies Inc. after being a researcher at Florida Space Institute having come there from The Aerospace Corporation, where one of his duties was as principle investigator of the MET (Microwave Electro-Thermal) propulsion project. He also performed an architecture study for a Human Mars Mission using solar electric propulsion. He also performed research on Fusion Propulsion and Kaluza-Klein theory of Field Unification for purposes of space propulsion. Before coming to Aerospace corporation Dr. Brandenburg was a researcher at Research Support Instruments (RSI) where he specialized in making controlled plasmas for uses ranging from Fusion Energy research to the MET thruster. He also worked as an independent consultant on Space Missile Defense, Directed Energy Weapons, and space rocket plume phenomenology, and also at Mission Research Corporation and Sandia National Laboratories on plasmas for controlled fusion and similar topics. He has written 4 books : Dead Mars Dying Earth on Global Warming and Energy problems with Monica Rix Paxton, which won the 2000 silver Ben Franlikn award for best environmental or science book. Two sci-fi novels : "Asteroid 2012 Sepulveda" and its sequel "Morningstar Pass the Collapse of the UFO Cover Up" under the pen name "Victor Norgarde" and most recently the Mars science book: Life and Death on Mars: The New Mars Synthesis" which describes a new concept of mars geochemical and biological history. - www.adventuresunlimitedpress.comlisten to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Sonic Gravity
UFO and UAP Secrecy Part 2: The Phenomenon is Real

Sonic Gravity

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 72:53


Orbit in Sonic Gravity and see the universe through the eyes of a madman.  You will see the connection between our discussion in Part 1:  The Physics of Leadership, where we discussed how we know the phenomenon is real and how the players act predictably in their own self interest.  In Part 2, we discuss who the players are and, how we know they are who they are--and what they're hiding, and the how, and why, the transition of UAP Secrecy must evolve from deception to misdirection.  We discuss why the imminent congressional hearings between congress and the Department of Defense will yield no fruit, and how this ultimately leads to Part 3:  The Secret Evolution.  **Correction:  I refer to isotopes saying that different isotopes have different numbers of "protons"--I meant to say "neutrons."

Disruptors for GOOD
XPRIZE Carbon Removal Milestone Award Winner on the Future of Renewable Energy - Hans De Neve // Founder and CEO of Carbyon

Disruptors for GOOD

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:17


Agency of One - Take the stress out of hiring a freelancer or full-time employee. Learn moreAgency of One - Podcast Pilot - The Easiest Way to Launch a Podcast for Your Startup. Learn more---> Check out the Causeartist Partners here.---> Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.In episode 142 of the Disruptors for GOOD podcast, I speak with Hans De Neve, Founder and CEO of Carbyon, on winning the XPRIZE Carbon Removal Milestone Award and the future of renewable energy through direct air capture.After finishing his PhD at IMEC, Hans became a researcher within the Alcatel Research & Innovation division – currently part of the Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs organization. Subsequently he's worked for several product units of Alcatel-Lucent where he continued to look for product differentiators and product innovation – facing the challenge to turn innovative ideas into commercial successes.Hans has Master degree's from KU Leuven and Ghent University in Physics of Microelectronics, Materials Science, Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics. He also has PhD from Ghent University  in Micro-electronics, solid state lighting, and III-V semiconductors.After Alcatel-Lucent, Hans started to specialize in the field of renewable energy, first at VITO in Belgium, later at ECN and TNO in The Netherlands. Following the great experience, he founded Carbyon, a start-up to develop machines that can capture CO2 from air.Carbyon is developing equipment to filter CO2 from the air and store it underground. Recently, the Dutch start-up was named a Milestone Award winner of the XPRIZE for Carbon Removal. This $1 million incentive prize, funded by Elon Musk and the Musk Foundation, is part of the four-year global XPRIZE competition.The organization invited innovators and teams worldwide to create a solution that can extract CO2 directly from the atmosphere or oceans and store it in an environmentally friendly way for good."For us, winning this award means being recognized. XPRIZE is like the world championship within our field. The fact that the jury ranks our concept among the fifteen best in the world means a lot to us. It is fantastic that three years after the start of our company we are already playing at this level." Hans de Neve, CEO at Carbyon.Carbyon is a start-up company with the purpose of turning direct air capture into an affordable and scalable technology that can be used to turn the corner on climate change. Carbyon is located at the High Tech Campus in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. This is one of the world's leading technology research and innovation centers.Carbyon is a team of scientists and engineers working closely together on one common goal: scale up this technology cost-effectively and provide the world with a powerful tool in the fight against climate change.Their technology is aimed at saving our planet from climate change. The company strives to maximize impact towards this purpose. Profit serves as a means to achieve this and is not an end in itself.Agency of One - Take the stress out of hiring a freelancer or full-time employee. Learn moreAgency of One - Podcast Pilot - The Easiest Way to Launch a Podcast for Your Startup. Learn more---> Check out the Causeartist Partners here.---> Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.Listen to more Causeartist podcast shows hereFollow Grant on Twitter and LinkedInFollow Causeartist on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram

Exploring Astrophysics
Dr Xinnan Du, Outreach and Engagement manager at KIPAC Stanford

Exploring Astrophysics

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 21:38


This episode Dr Du spoke about some of her work looking at the physical properties of the interstellar medium in distant galaxies. She also spoke about her interest in asgtronomy outreach and the kind of work she does as outreach manager at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology. Listen to the end of the podcast to hear her advice on learning more about astronomy at a young age!

Total Information AM Weekend
clear view of the lunar eclipse

Total Information AM Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 5:18


KMOX's Stuart McMillian went to the Jefferson College Observatory to talk with Maryanne Angliongto, Associate Dean of Math, Physics, and Technology at the college and Don Ficken with the St. Louis Astronomical Society about how to get a clear of the lunar eclipse tonight in Hillsboro.  

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea
What Happened Before The Big Bang?

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:06


If you ask most people how the universe began, they might say “the Big Bang” - but it's hard to be satisfied with that answer and to resist the temptation to ask “but what happened before that?” Well, that is precisely the question that Will Kinney, Professor in the Department of Physics at the University at Buffalo, strives to answer in his new book - 'An Infinity of Worlds: Cosmic Inflation and the Beginning of the Universe'. He joined Jonathan to discuss. Dr.Ruth Freeman from SFI & Dr. Lara Dungan also joined Jonathan to run through some of the week's biggest science stories for Newsround. Listen and subscribe to Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.    Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

Science Friction - ABC RN
The second kind of impossible: Part 1 — a maverick mind (REPEAT)

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 25:46


Kidacity
Ep 76- Questions That Can Wait & A Book About Mr. Ratan Tata

Kidacity

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 9:00


How often have you wanted to ask a question even before someone had finished talking? It could your parents or teacher. I am guilty of doing this. But, over the last few weeks, I realised that if I wait for a few seconds or minutes, a few of my questions may be answered. In our 5 deep breaths segment, we will discuss questions that can wait.All of us know about Mr. Ratan Tata, the ex Chairman of the Tata Group that makes salt to steel and everything in between. In our bookworm segment, I will review the book I Came Upon A Lighthouse by Shantanu Naidu.You can write to me at hello@kidacity.club and follow me on Instagram/Twitter @hellokidacity.

MacroFab Engineering Podcast
MEP EP#328: Berry Based Physics with Collin Anderson

MacroFab Engineering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 70:48


MEP EP#328: Berry Based Physics with Collin Anderson Collin Anderson Computer scientist turned electrical engineer Has worked on things as varied as: Quantum key distribution at Los Alamos National Laboratory A tool to help decipher glyphs of the classical Mayan civilization FPGA firmware at the Ice Cube Neutrino Observatory Currently an engineer and co-founder of Orthogonal Systems An engineering and software development firm specializing in: Custom test & measurement hardware Databases Data analysis What are Particles Really? Thinking of sub atomic objects as particles muddies the water Starting with an understanding of wave theory Knowing particles are waves, the weirdness is less weird Electron Standing Waves Current flow is more like a sound pressure wave Each electron is kinda doing its own thing

Talking Real Money
Financial Physics 101

Talking Real Money

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 21:55


Don heads out to Seattle for Retiremeet and his new edition of "Financial Fysics" is hot off the press. So, Don whips out his traveling mic and Tom interviews him about the book.

Physics Alive
We're Going on a Planet Hunt with Sara Seager

Physics Alive

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:33


Sara Seager is Professor of Planetary Science and Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on discovering new exoplanets and characterizing their atmospheres. She hopes to find and identify another Earth and searches for signs of life. In this episode, Sara describes how we find planets around other stars and how we can possibly know how their atmospheres are composed.   Check out the full show notes at: www.physicsalive.com/exoplanets   Learn more about Sara and her work: https://www.saraseager.com/ Sara's MIT faculty page   Here are some of the great resources that Sara Seager suggested! Discover some of the great exoplanets we've found at: NASA exoplanets Eyes on Exoplanets For instance, you can check out the travel posters for some new worlds you might like to visit.   The NASA website is full of great information. You can also learn more about Sara's Venus work: Venuscloudlife.com   For some great images, a tutorial on light curves, and the data from my transit classroom experiment, go to the full show notes at: www.physicsalive.com/exoplanets    

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Syzygy
99: Black Holes & Big News

Syzygy

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:59


Not wanting to overshadow this week's exciting supermassive black hole image release or anything, but Emily has news of her own. A short episode, in which Chris delves into the new Sag A* image a bit, before dropping the news bomb you've all *really* been waiting for ...Syzygy Merch! Get it at the store.Help us make Syzygy even better! Tell your friends and give us a review, or show your support on Patreon: patreon.com/syzygypodSyzygy is produced by Chris Stewart and co-hosted by Dr Emily Brunsden from the Department of Physics at the University of York.On the web: syzygy.fm | Twitter: @syzygypodThings we talk about in this episode:· Article about the SagA* image — and that'll do, you can find the rest from there

StarTalk Radio
All Pain, No Gain with Charles Liu

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 42:56


How fast does cheese roll down a hill? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly walk us through the physics behind the weirdest sports: cheese rolling, belly flopping, face slapping and more with astrophysicist Charles Liu. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Scott Schekk (shek), Kristine May, Jacob godman, Chelsea Dolloff, Daniel Lopez,Dustin G, Michael McManus, Genesis Martinez, Kinetik Plastik, and Pavel Bains for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Coyau / Wikimedia Commons

The Lynda Steele Show
The Full Show: B.C.'s we spring leads to concerns for those communities hit hard by last years floods, The Jas Johal Show Political Forum and an update on Site C!

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 63:45


BC's cold and wet spring leading to flooding concerns for several communities Henry Braun, Mayor of Abbotsford discusses the challenges the wet Spring weather may bring for the community of Abbotsford.  Spencer Coyne, Mayor of Princeton discusses how the rebuild process is coming along after last years floods. Plus, what the community is expecting throughout the wet Spring weather.  Astronomers share 1st photo of ‘gargantuan black hole' at the centre of our galaxy! Dr. Douglas Scott, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia discusses the first ever photo of a black hole at the centre of our galaxy  The Jas Johal Show Political Forum: Density in Vancouver and the Broadway Corridor Plan & B.C. Nurses make their voice heard at the legislature On the Political Forum this week  Sandy Garossino - Former Crown Prosecutor and Columnist with the National Observer Stephen Smart - Western Canada General Manager for Hill and Knowlton Strategies, Former Legislative Bureau Chief for CBC & Former Press Secretary to the Premier of B.C.  Premier Horgan says Site C is in “the best interest of British Columbia” after recent visit to controversial project Keith Baldrey, Global BC's Legislative Bureau Chief and Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun discuss Premier John Horgan's surprise visit to the Site C Dam Langley City Council issue a motion of censure and sanction against Mayor Val van den Broek Val van den Broek, Mayor of the City of Langley responds as Langley City Council issue a motion of censure and sanction against the Mayor  Happy Birthday Jas Johal! It's Jas' birthday and Jawn Jang & Ryan Lehal thought we should celebrate!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Lynda Steele Show
Astronomers share 1st photo of ‘gargantuan black hole' at the centre of our galaxy!

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:56


Dr. Douglas Scott, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia discusses the first ever photo of a black hole at the centre of our galaxy  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Welcome to the May 2022 Ask Me Anything episode of Mindscape! These monthly excursions are funded by Patreon supporters (who are also the ones asking the questions). I take the large number of questions asked by Patreons, whittle them down to a more manageable size — based primarily on whether I have anything interesting to say about them, not whether the questions themselves are good — and sometimes group them together if they are about a similar topic. Enjoy!Support Mindscape on Patreon.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Family Thrive with Audra & Justin
Yes On-the-Go: 10 Laws of Emotional Physics

The Family Thrive with Audra & Justin

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 9:58


Welcome to Yes On-the-Go, where we bring Yes Collective members the audio version of a Yes Collective expert team content. This is for all of us parents who are too busy or — let's face it — too worn out at the end of the day to read. But we still want the mental and emotional wellness tools the Yes Collective expert team serves up.  This episode of On-the-Go is an audio version of our 10 Laws of Emotional Physics. In this article, we learn about what emotions are and how they work in our bodies, hearts, and minds. This and tons of other amazing mental and emotional wellness content is available in the Yes Collective app. Link to original article: https://home.yescollective.app/posts/ten-laws-of-emotional-physics (https://home.yescollective.app/posts/ten-laws-of-emotional-physics)

The Great Simplification with Nate Hagens
Thomas Murphy: “Physics and Planetary Ambitions”

The Great Simplification with Nate Hagens

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 69:04


On this episode, we meet with Professor of Physics at UCSD and the Associate Director of CASS, the Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Tom Murphy. Murphy shows us how continued growth and energy use is an impossibility if continued at our current trajectory. How does physics constrain our planetary ambitions? Murphy helps us do the math. To help us align with a post-growth trajectory, Murphy offers suggestions for how humans can begin to treat nature as well as we treat ourselves — and why we must care about the future in order to create a brighter one. About Thomas Murphy Thomas Murphy is a Professor in the Physics Department at UCSD, the Associate Director of CASS, the Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, and is the author of Energy and Human Ambitions on a Finite Planet. From 2003–2020, Murphy led the APOLLO project as an ultra-precise test of General Relativity using the technique of lunar laser ranging. Professor Murphy's interests are transitioning to quantitative assessment of the challenges associated with long-term human success on a finite planet.

This Academic Life
Ep.32 – Social Media in Academia

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:46


In this episode we discuss how social media sites and academics go hand in hand. Whether it's promoting your work, making connections, or helping get your students names out there every platform has its benefits and drawbacks. Reference list: Wired Academia: Why Social Science Scholars Are Using Social Media LINK Social Media in Academia LINK Social media for professional development and networking opportunities in academia LINK Academia goes social media, MOOC, SPOC, SMOC and SSOC LINK The social media in academia and education LINK Social media for scientists LINK Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Awakening Code Radio
Physics and Philosophy (Part 2) with Robert Grant

Awakening Code Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 84:24


In part 2 of our conversation with Robert Grant, we dive deep into the meaning of what it means to be an awakened participant in this experience we call life on Planet Earth. Cracking mysterious codes and solving physics equations is great, but it's the application of what we are learning that matters most, and Robert drops into a very deep place to share his views on humanity's purpose and future. At the end of the show, Robert shares a mind-blowing audio clip of a recording he recently made inside the Great Pyramid of Giza.

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!
9/11: Inside Out - "Crime Scene Proximity Investigations" with 9/11 Researcher Jeremy Rys

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 129:51


What's the evidence at the crime scene that suggests a crime - other than the “Act of War” that the official narrative has presented?What arms industry contractors were deeply involved in the writing of the NIST report?Who was really in control of security at the World Trade Center?What was the role of Kroll Associates and Jerome Hauer in the 9/11 event?What really happened to John O'Neil - and why?What are the deeper connections of Mayor Giuliani that might shed light on 9/11?Who was really in control of security at the airports of the origin of the hijacked flights?Where did the investigation of the “9/11 insider trading” lead?What is the connection between the 9/11 event and the laundered drug money by the big banks?Why were the only fireproofing upgrades at the Twin Towers at and near the floors by the airplanes.What was the secret role of J. Paul Bremer at Marsh & McLennan, and in Iraq following 9/11? And what very interesting product development was he involved with?What are the implications of the elevator modernization by Ace Elevator at the Twin Towers the nine months prior to 9/11?Jeremy Rys is my guest on RichardGage911:UNLEASHED! He has a Bachelor's of Science Degree in Physics from Bridgewater State University. He has been investigating 9/11 and related events since 2004. He has also been a major contributor to the scientific debunking literature and videos including his work with Engineer Jonathan Cole on the “9/11 Experiments” series. He is also appreciated in the foreword of Kevin Ryan's book Another Nineteen: Investigating Legitimate 9/11 Suspects.Visit the RichardGage911 website

The Data Scientist Show
Using AI to detect online abuse, from physics PhD to staff ML engineer@Linkedin, persuasion at work with James Verbus - the data scientist show #035

The Data Scientist Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 95:55


(Timestamps below) James Verbus is Staff Machine Learning Engineer at LinkedIn. He has a PhD in Physics from Brown university. He is the tech lead of the Anti-Scraping and Automation AI Team, working on protecting LinkedIn's Members from bots and abusive scripted behavior, pioneering the use of deep learning to detect abusive automated sequences of user activity (blog post). (00:01:14) from physic to data science (00:16:37) background of online abuse detection (00:24:40) Isolation Forest Algorithm (00:42:59) his day-to-day as a staff ML Engineer (00:52:57) how to persuade stakeholders (00:58:17) how to build influence at work (01:00:22) how he grew to staff engineer (01:13:48) what he learned from his mentor Follow Daliana on Twitter @DalianaLiu for more on data science and this podcast. Subscribe to the channel and leave a 5-star review if you like this episode :)

The Homeschool Solutions Show
326 | Dads Can Homeschool, Too! (Jeannie Fulbright with Sean Sherrod)

The Homeschool Solutions Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 26:37


Jeannie Fulbright interviews a dad who homeschools, Sean Sherrod. Jeannie and Sean discuss the issues that are unique to fathers who are the primary educator, as well as how having a father involved in the child's education benefits children. This podcast also encourages fathers, even those that work, to get involved in their children's education, because dads really can homeschool, too. Guest biography Sean Sherrod lives with his wife Melissa near Richmond Virginia. He is the primary educator of his two young children. Host biography Jeannie Fulbright, a 24-year veteran homeschooler, is the author of the #1 best-selling, multi award-winning Apologia Young Explorer science series: Exploring Creation with Astronomy, Chemistry and Physics, Botany, Zoology, and Anatomy & Physiology. She is also the author of the action-packed historical time travel book series Rumble Tumbles Through Time, as well as preschool science books and activity kits, the Charlotte Mason Heirloom Planner, and many high-quality Charlotte Mason based products. Jeannie and her husband Jeff became empty nesters in 2019. All four of their children all went to the University of Georgia on scholarship (homeschooling works!). For more than 20 years Jeannie has traveled around the country speaking to homeschoolers at conventions, covering a plethora of topics from Charlotte Mason to marriage and prayer.  Connect Sean Sherrod | Instagram | Facebook Jeannie Fulbright | Instagram | Facebook | Facebook Group | Pinterest | Website Homeschooling.mom | Instagram | Website Thank you to our sponsors! Medi-Share: an affordable Christian alternative to traditional health insurance Have you joined us at one of the Great Homeschool Conventions?  We hope to see you there! For more encouragement on your homeschooling journey, visit the Homeschooling.mom site, and tune in to our sister podcast The Charlotte Mason Show. View full show notes on the blog.

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – Multiverses & Wormholes with Brian Cox

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:19


What properties are fundamental to the universe? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice take a deep dive into multiverses, inflation theory, wormholes, and quantum entanglement with particle physicist Brian Cox.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Tony Thompson, Kevin the Sommelier, Verne Thomas Inman, PhD, Claudio Carletti, James Weldon, Satoshi Watanabe, Keegan Matthews, Sandy Moir, Jim Flatt, and Mason Grogan for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Pablo Carlos Budassi, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Travels Through Time
Dr Suzie Sheehy: The Matter of Everything (1932)

Travels Through Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 65:25


In this episode, we are donning our lab coats and gaining access to the secrets of particle physics. We visit 1932, an astonishing year in the history of science across the world, from Carl Anderson's rooftop cloud chamber in California, to Marietta Blau's mountaintop experiments in Austria, via the Cavendish Lab at the University of Cambridge. Our guest is Dr Suzie Sheehy. Dr Sheehy is unusual for Travels Through Time – she is a scientist rather than a historian – but she is also quite unusual within her own field of accelerator physics. Firstly, because she is a woman, and secondly because she is a brilliant communicator, able to beautifully articulate the wonder and complexity of Physics. In her new book, The Matter of Everything, Twelve Experiments that Changed Our World she tells the major discovery stories of the past century: the cathode ray tube that brought us television, splitting the atom, finding new particles and, of course, the Large Hadron Collider and Higgs Boson. Behind each of these breakthroughs are the brilliant scientists whose curiosity and persistence made them possible.  This episode is sponsored by ACE Cultural Tours, the oldest and most experienced provider of study tours and cultural travel in the United Kingdom. Find out more via their website at www.aceculturaltours.co.uk or speak to their friendly team on 01223 841055. Show Notes Scene One: 2nd August 1932. The discovery of the positron, Carl Anderson, at Caltech in America. Scene Two: 14th April 1932. Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, the splitting of the atom Ernest Rutherford (at almost the same time James Chadwick discovers the neutron in the same lab!). Scene Three: 1932. Hafelekar observatory, Marietta Blau and her assistant Hertha Wambacher place 'emulsion plates' 7,500 feet above sea level, near Innsbruck, Austria. They would go on to have a huge impact scientifically, but as women their work was undervalued and overlooked at the time. Momento: Marietta Blau's diaries so Dr Sheehy could write about her and fully reveal her genius and achievements to the world. People/Social Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Dr Suzie Sheehy Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Or on Facebook See where 1932 fits on our Timeline   

School for Good Living Podcasts
174. David J Helfand – A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age: Scientific Habits of Mind

School for Good Living Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 95:24


David J Helfand is the chairman of the American Institute of Physics, past President of the American Astronomical Society, and has been a faculty member at Columbia University for 45 years. He's authored nearly 200 scientific publications and mentored 22 Ph.D. students. But most of his teaching has involved teaching science to non-science majors. David … Continue reading "174. David J Helfand – A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age: Scientific Habits of Mind" The post 174. David J Helfand – A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age: Scientific Habits of Mind first appeared on School for Good Living Podcasts.

Why This Universe?
13 - Does Quantum Mechanics Imply a Multiverse? (Rebroadcast)

Why This Universe?

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 34:25


Today we explore different interpretations of quantum mechanics, from Copenhagen to the many-worlds hypothesis, in an attempt to uncover what quantum reality really is. This episode is a rebroadcast of one of our early favorites.