Podcasts about Undecided

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  • 354PODCASTS
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  • Oct 8, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Undecided

Latest podcast episodes about Undecided

The Ben Joravsky Show
Oh, What a Week: "Foxxfoot & Undecided for the Win.

The Ben Joravsky Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 74:50


Ben & Dr. D riff on a week's worth of news, including a fight between billionaires--Kenny G v. Governor Pritzker. Ben explains what Ken Griffin is really up to. Also, Mayor Lightfoot scapegoats Kim Foxx, again. DB comes in second to undecided in the latest Republican poll. And a word or two about the Bears, trying to soak taxpayers.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Drew Berquist Live
China Takeover? Lights Back On At Bagram | Fauci Undecided If We Can Celebrate Christmas | Ep 263

Drew Berquist Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 46:34


The lights turned back on at Bagram this weekend in Afghanistan, and there is a lot of discussion that China may be at the former U.S. military installation. Plus, China is ramping up efforts against Taiwan. Plus, Dr. Fauci is not sure if he thinks Americans will be able to celebrate Christmas this year, showing he is failing to forget that we do not care what he thinks, and the F**k Joe Biden chant got its most airtime yet this weekend at Talladega live on-air. Help Drew's Translator Shafi Get Assimilated in America! https://givesendgo.com/shafi LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos every day. **Donate directly to Drew and the show and be mentioned as a producer**: https://www.drewberquist.com/support/ Partner Links: Visit our friends at https://www.thinbluelinetv.com/ to get great news commentary and content on our nation's law enforcement community. Show Sponsors and Fan Discounts: My Pillow - Get the best night's sleep of your life and save! Use Promo Code DREW to save up to 66% off your purchase at https://MyPillow.com Mammoth Nation Become a member and save at https://mammothnation.com/ UFM Underwear Visit https://ufmunderwear.com/ and Use Promo Code DREW to receive $6 off! Red Beach Nation Whether you live at the beach, are traveling to one or just want to imagine yourself there…Red Beach's comfy patriotic apparel is sure to lift your spirits. Use promo code DREW and save 10% at https://RedBeachNation.com

Creative Bliss in Life & Biz
Eps 171: Interview with Undecided Teen Coach Emma B Perez

Creative Bliss in Life & Biz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 36:50


There is a coach for every season of your mothering journey. And at some point, you get to pass on the coach getting baton over to your kids. And that's just how I discovered this week's podcast guest, Emma B Perez. She is a coach for teens who are feeling undecided as to what direction they want to take in their lives, and maybe schooling, to design a fulfilling and satisfying future. Listen in as Emma tells us more on exactly she helps teens and young adults craft who they want to be and how they will impact the world as well as what works for her to find her clients. Plus, her beautiful philosophy she holds her teen clients with can definitely be applied to your mom coaching biz. Can't wait for you to check this out. https://www.blissbeyondnaptime.com/emma

The Long View
Hal Hershfield: People Treat Their Future Self as if It's Another Person

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 44:35


Our guest on the podcast today is Professor Hal Hershfield. Dr. Hershfield is Professor of Marketing, Behavioral Decision Making, and Psychology at UCLA's Anderson School of Management. His research concentrates on the psychology of long-term decision-making and how people's perceptions of the passage of time affect the decisions that they make. He has consulted with numerous organizations including Prudential, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Merrill Lynch, and the Principal Financial Group. He received his B.A. at Tufts University and his Ph.D. at Stanford.BackgroundBioThe Pandemic“How Elvis Got Americans to Accept the Polio Vaccine,” by Hal Hershfield and Ilana Brody, scientificamerican.com, Jan. 18, 2021.“Should You Immerse Yourself in Bad News These Days or Ignore It Completely?” by Hal Hershfield, scientificamerican.com, May 5, 2020.“How to Craft the Vaccine Message for the Undecided,” by Bill Kisliuk, ucla.edu, May 4, 2021.“Your Messaging to Older Audiences Is Outdated,” by Hal Hershfield and Laura Carstensen, harvardbusinessreview.org, July 2, 2021.“Time Is Meaningless Now,” by Shayla Love, vice.com, April 10, 2020.Saving for the FutureDaniel Kahneman“Temporal Reframing and Participation in a Savings Program: A Field Experiment,” by Hal Hershfield, Stephen Shu, and Shlomo Benartzi, halhershfield.com, 2020.“Using Vividness Interventions to Improve Financial Decision Making,” by Hal E. Hershfield, Elicia M. John, and Joseph S. Reiff, halhershfield.com, 2018.“Increasing Saving Behavior Through Age-Progressed Renderings of the Future Self,” by Hal Hershfield, Daniel Goldstein, William Sharpe, Jesse Fox, Leo Yeykelis, Laura Carstensen, and Jeremy Bailenson, halhershfield.com, 2011. “The Future Self,” by Hal E. Hershfield and Daniel Bartels, uchicago.edu, 2018.“Beliefs About Whether Spending Implies Wealth,” by Heather Barry Kappes, Joe J. Gladstone, and Hal Hershfield, londonschoolofeconomics.com, 2020.“Seeking Lasting Enjoyment With Limited Money: Financial Constraints Increase Preference for Material Goods Over Experiences,” by Stephanie M. Tully, Hal E. Hershfield, and Tom Meyvis, halhershfield.com, 2015.“Do Images of Older Americans Reinforce Stereotypes?” by Colette Thayer and Laura Skufca, aarp.org, September 2019.Retirement and Older Adults“People Search for Meaning When They Approach a New Decade in Chronological Age,” by Adam Alter and Hal Hershfield, halhershfield.com, 2014.Mike North“You Owe It to Yourself: Boosting Retirement Saving With a Responsibility-Based Appeal,” by Christopher J. Bryan and Hal E. Hershfield, halhershfield.com, 2012.

Front Burner
Undecided voters grill leaders face to face

Front Burner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 24:14


The CBC's senior political correspondent Rosemary Barton on how the national federal party leaders did on tough questions from undecided Canadian voters.

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 9/1/21: Oregon Ducks still have some undecided position battles, Utah reporter Josh Newman, Arizona State reporter Michelle Gardner, LSU reporter Brody Miller, UCLA reporter James H. Williams, Ohio State reporter Marcus Hartman

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 95:15


On Wednesday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene, James discusses the Oregon Ducks still having some undecided position battles, Utah beat reporter Josh Newman of the Salt Lake Tribune previews Thursday's game against Weber State, Arizona State beat reporter Michelle Gardner of the Arizona Republic previews Thursday's game against Southern Utah, LSU beat reporter Brody Miller of The Athletic previews Saturday's game at UCLA, UCLA beat reporter James H. Williams of the Orange County Register recaps the win over Hawaii and previews the matchup with LSU and Ohio State beat reporter Marcus Hartman of the Dayton Daily News previews Thursday's game at Minnesota

The Ian Furness Show
Cam Cleeland on the Husky offense - How much of the depth chart is still undecided?

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 12:35


Former UW and NFL tight end Cam Cleeland drops in each Thursday to discuss all things Husky football. Cam's visits are brought to you by 13 Coins, a Seattle favorite for over 50 years. Check them out in Pioneer Square, Bellevue, and SeaTac. Find out more at 13Coins.com.

AP Audio Stories
Mexico undecided on reinstating "remain in Mexico" policy

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 1:40


Political Breakfast with Denis O’Hayer
Polling, Politics, And The Undecided

Political Breakfast with Denis O’Hayer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 41:25


Atlantans are soon to elect a new mayor BUT a recent poll shows many are still undecided. And Heisman Trophy winner Herschel Walker emerges as the possible GOP candidate to challenge Raphael Warnock's Senate seat, even though the former Georgia Bulldogs star hasn't declared a run or said a word. Plus, Georgia State Representative and candidate for Secretary of State Bee Nguyen joins as a special guest to weigh in on hate crimes, infrastructure, and gerrymandering.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

E1 - College Scoops
Episode 85: Undecided About Your College Major? Here's What You Should Do with Guest Leslie Tucker

E1 - College Scoops

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 35:47


Picking a college major can be stressful for students, especially if they enter college undecided. Dr. Leslie Tucker, owner of Virtual College Consulting, will provide the College Scoops community with tips and tricks on how to pick a college major. If you are a student struggling to pick a major, Leslie Tucker is here to help. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/college-scoops/support

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®
Planned Fasting and Maybe Redecorating. I'm Undecided.

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 19:32


Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: July 23, 2021

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 34:44


Today on the show, Marco Lowe, Professor at Seattle University's Institute for Public Service, joins Crystal to discuss recent polls that have come out about Seattle's mayoral, city council, and city attorney races, the importance of understanding poll methodology and margin of error, and the historic and tragic impact of Seattle's recent heatwave and our governments responsibility to act to protect people from the impacts of climate change.  Key takeaways: Seattle's population has changed so much in the past 10 years that incumbents can't run just on their past popularity - a lot of folks who live here now won't remember it. Polls are just a snapshot in time, and it's important to contextualize them.  Climate change is here, and there is no more neutral ground. All policy and legislation needs to be evaluated through the lens of helping or hurting the environment. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Marco Lowe, at @MarcoLowe. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Bruce Harrell, Lorena Gonzalez lead in 2021 Seattle mayoral race with many undecided” from the Northwest Progressive Institute: https://www.nwprogressive.org/weblog/2021/07/bruce-harrell-lorena-gonzalez-lead-in-2021-seattle-mayoral-race-with-many-undecided.html  Poll released by Echohawk campaign:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/pvy5wwbipq2ln4t/Seattle_Primary_Mood_Q1-9.pdf?dl=0&fbclid=IwAR2szALLpK5ndk6lUQfD4faPero_XajzTUU7g83EByX95iF_zLhwFBtXmmc  https://www.dropbox.com/s/abts97djtqhv08i/Seattle_Primary_Issues_Q11-17.pdf?dl=0&fbclid=IwAR1BG9eSNaZi0wvM2c-2o92fHHynGUd7HXbM28lcnWU8go55oLtAMJW48po  https://www.dropbox.com/s/t387o51ncqqr8ia/Seattle_Primary_Q18-22.pdf?dl=0&fbclid=IwAR2e-n1Jl6tnIp99yZWVZZF8_gwczGlMhimhLIVRblDB_jmSpQGqoSBHB44  “A three-way race for Seattle City Attorney: Pete Holmes barely ahead of two challengers” from the Northwest Progressive Institute: https://www.nwprogressive.org/weblog/2021/07/a-three-way-race-for-seattle-city-attorney-pete-holmes-barely-ahead-of-two-challengers.html  “Nikkita Oliver has a big lead over Sara Nelson for Seattle City Council Position #9” from the Northwest Progressive Institute: https://www.nwprogressive.org/weblog/2021/07/nikkita-oliver-has-a-big-early-lead-over-sara-nelson-for-seattle-city-council-position-9.html  Endorsements The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2021/07/14/59065522/the-strangers-endorsements-for-the-august-3-2021-primary-election  The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2021/06/28/the-urbanists-2021-primary-endorsements/  The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/who-supports-who-in-seattle-elections-endorsements-roll-in-for-mayoral-council-races/   350 Seattle: https://350seattleaction.org/2021-elections  Publicola:  Mayor: https://publicola.com/2021/07/19/publicola-picks-lorena-gonzalez-for-mayor/  City Council Position 9: https://publicola.com/2021/07/19/publicola-picks-brianna-thomas-for-seattle-city-council-position-9/  “2021 heat wave is now the deadliest weather-related event in Washington history” by John Ryan at KUOW: https://www.kuow.org/stories/heat-wave-death-toll-in-washington-state-jumps-to-112-people    Transcript:  Crystal Fincher: [00:00:00] Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows, where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program friend of the show and today's co-host: professor at Seattle University's Institute for Public Service, Marco Lowe. Marco Lowe: [00:00:52] Thank you for having me. Always love being here. Crystal Fincher: [00:00:54] Always love having you here. Always very insightful. I thought we would get started talking about polling that was released in the past week about Seattle races, including the Mayor's race, City Attorney's race, the City Council races - the Northwest Progressive Institute actually sponsored a whole slew of public polling - some of the only public polling that we've seen regarding these races this cycle. We've heard a lot about internal polls at various points from different campaigns, but this was really interesting. So, I guess, starting with the Mayor's race, what did you glean from these polls? Marco Lowe: [00:01:39] I think that they're reflecting what we've seen some of the campaigns release quietly, maybe through back channel communication. That it looks like, currently - and again, Not Sure is the winning candidate in most of these races - but Bruce Harrell seems to have coalesced a good group behind him that gives him a very good chance of getting into the general. And then Council President Lorena González is probably in that second spot behind him. But what I think we've been watching is the jockeying with Colleen Echohawk and Jessyn Farrell that are trying to jump into that second spot as the weigh-in days of the campaign commence. Crystal Fincher: [00:02:17] Yeah, absolutely. And so, just for the percentages that were in this poll that has a 4.3% margin of error and a 95% confidence interval. Not Sure, Undecided at 54% - more than half of the people there. So to your point, Undecided is the winner here and really how they break will be how this race breaks, it looks like. Bruce Harrell at 15%, Lorena González at 8%, Colleen Echohawk at 6%, Jessyn Farrell 4%, Andrew Grant Houston 3%, Arthur Langlie 3%, Casey Sixkiller 2%. Lance Randall 2%, and everyone else has not broken 1%. The rest are at 0%. So really what that says is even though, technically, Bruce Harrell is - looks to be leading in this poll for people who've made a choice - one, more than half of the people who are still Not Sure. And it really is still a race for second place, if not first. It's certainly still a race for second place, and by no means decided. Marco Lowe: [00:03:27] I agree. And just to say that sometimes there's a tactic that you think you're going to push all the Undecided into the current levels and that's not often true. If people aren't deeply engaged in a race - when they enter and get educated, it doesn't follow that pattern. They will find other candidates. So I would agree with you entirely. This is an open race. Crystal Fincher: [00:03:48] Yeah, absolutely an open race. And there usually are a percentage of Undecideds who, unfortunately, end up not voting. Also, sometimes they just do not end up feeling strongly about any candidate and don't wind up pulling the trigger at all. But certainly, even with that percentage accounted for, this race is still wide open. But I think a number of the candidates certainly view the two front runners in the poll as front runners. And you see a number of candidates taking aim at the leader in their lane. And we've talked about lanes on this before - who is the more progressive candidate in the race who are aiming for that lane. Who is - again, I always talk about conservative in Seattle does not equate to a conservative in other areas - but Seattle's version of a conservative or a moderate Democrat, certainly, Bruce Harrell in that lane and people looking at that. And so, you have people like Colleen Echohawk, really seeming to take the fight directly to Lorena González, which led to another quasi poll released that we saw this week, that came from Bill Broadhead and people affiliated, it appeared with the Colleen Echohawk camp. But who released a portion of a poll, which upfront means that we need to take it with a grain of salt, because we don't see the methodology. I mean, there are best practices around how to release polling, so other people can, basically, check your work and verify that this is a legitimate poll - polling is an actual science. And we didn't get all of the information from this poll that purportedly shows that Colleen Echohawk performs better head-to-head against Bruce Harrell than Lorena González. And they certainly were pressing that point very hard online, but, unfortunately, the actual poll information that they released was scant. How did you view that? Marco Lowe: [00:06:06] It was an interesting release, because they did not, as far as I can tell, formally release it from the campaign. I saw it on Facebook from Bill Broadhead. And I think the way that you normally see these laid out, it looks a little different. Not bizarre, but just it was a little more informal, might be the right word. And I don't know exactly what they were trying to do, but there is potentially this effort to show that she could possibly win in a head-to-head. And that, again, we're trying to see her move into second place. So, I think this may have been more an insider game to show to donors or larger groups, versus a wider - because you see campaigns release these with press releases and press conferences and framing for the race. And this seemed to be a much more subtle effort. Crystal Fincher: [00:06:53] Yeah. I agree with that. And certainly, this brings to mind conversations - I've had a number of these conversations in real life with people - but polls as marketing versus polls as actual research. And this certainly seemed to be on the side of a marketing effort. Now I say that, and I certainly would not be surprised at all, to see that Colleen Echohawk polled more favorably against Bruce Harrell than Lorena González. I actually don't think that's a wild and ridiculous outcome if it were to happen. That could be the case. It's just making that conclusion from the data that we've seen publicly seems to be a stretch. Especially given as I read it - the bios as they were constructed in this are not consistent with the bios that people have heard to date. Now this can certainly have been message testing and "Hey, this is how we will message him and paint him if we do get through the primary. And so we can create these conditions." Maybe that's part of the conversation. And to your point, maybe part of that insider conversation, but we just haven't seen this information publicly. So, and given just the platform that it appears that the poll was done on, based on the watermarking, is one for corporate market research, commercial market research, not necessarily public opinion polling. So there are challenges there. That doesn't mean that the result is wrong, but it does mean that it's hard to accept that conclusion based on the information that we see here. And clearly the campaign was comfortable just releasing this information. So, I mean, I assume it's accomplishing their objectives, especially with some of the coverage of it that I've seen is certainly advancing this narrative. But it'll be interesting to see how this continues to play out over the final weeks of the campaign. Marco Lowe: [00:09:02] And it's worth saying - even just putting this poll aside, head-to-heads are tough until you're really in a race. And if you're in the last month of a presidential race, where there's been so many TV stories and everything about it, that's one discussion. But I remember in the second round for Dino Rossi and Governor Gregoire, he was polling very well into the spring against her. And one of her campaign folks, when I called them asking about it, they said, "Let's get them both in the ring and then let's see what happens. This is all just subjective data at this point." And so, it does just always with every poll - put it in its place in time. Crystal Fincher: [00:09:35] Yeah, absolutely. And it is worth reiterating that polls are in fact, just a snapshot in time. These polls are a snapshot of what people thought when they were fielded - which for the NPI poll was week before last or going into early last week, and it finished in the field early last week. So that certainly is before a lot of voter communication has happened, it's before a lot of the messaging from campaigns that are happening in these final weeks and campaigns making their closing arguments for this primary have happened. And that's going to impact how a lot of people wind up making a decision for this, in addition to a lot of endorsements that have come out and people seeing organizations that they like or trust, or dislike or distrust - see who they wind up supporting. So, certainly not conclusive. It would not be a shock if the results don't wind up lining up with these polls, because there's a lot that can change. And again, it's worth noting that the more than half of the people, the biggest vote getter were people who were Undecided. So, anything can happen. We're still in a wide open situation. Speaking of wide open situations, though - one race that really caught my eye in this polling that I think has to be causing some consternation for the incumbent is the polling in the Seattle City Attorney race. That race is extremely close in this poll with - again, 53% of people not sure who they're going to vote for, but Pete Holmes coming with 16%, which as a three term incumbent, not the number that you are aiming for. I mean, either he has not made an impact, has not been notable, or people have not noticed the work that he's done, or they're just unhappy with it. Either way, a tenured incumbent is never going to be happy with a number like 16%. Marco Lowe: [00:11:46] As a creature of City Hall, I will defend City Attorney. If you stopped cars on Fourth Ave in downtown and rolled down the window and put a mic in and said, "Who's the Seattle City Attorney?" I think you'd be lucky to get 16% to name any - maybe going back to Mark Sidran in the 90s and early 2000s, you had somebody who was on the press a lot. But Tom Carr, in the middle, lost to Pete Holmes - I think by his second re-election in '09. And I do agree with these numbers. I don't think anybody on Mr. Holmes' teams are saying this is a good news, but it's a challenging place to be. But that knee-jerk reaction aside - yeah. I agree with you. Going into a primary with these numbers and having three people so close together - you made a great point that with three - we were talking prior to the show. They can pitch somebody out really easily and it raises the bar for what he needs to get to now to close. I think that may be the first race I look at it on election night when the numbers drop. Crystal Fincher: [00:12:44] Yeah, same here. And so Pete Holmes is at 16%, Nicole Thomas-Kennedy at 14%, and Ann Davison at 14% also. So a race within the margin of error. The interesting thing about Pete Holmes is he used to be well-known. When he first came onto the scene, it was with a lot of pomp and fanfare - and he had looked at doing what, at that time, were some progressive things. Certainly, working with the nightlife community - there were a number of issues that were important to people involved in nightlife - owners of bars and cultural establishments, arts establishments, who definitely preferred him over his incumbent. And being willing to decriminalize, at that point in time, pre-legalization of marijuana, that they were going to de-emphasize prosecuting marijuana crimes. And they were on the front end of doing that. So when he came in, it was with progressive fanfare. But I think that, one, what we've seen from him in the preceding years was a lot less vocal, a lot less upfront, and he has been in the background. And a lot of the conversations where previously he has been in the foreground with, he was also well known for having some disagreements with Mayor McGinn at the time when that came in. But also - yes, there's been a lot of population change since he first came in. So there are just a lot of people in the City who never experienced that Pete Holmes, and never experienced what he hung his hat on. And so he's just a name that's part of this unpopular administration. And so looking at these numbers for his opponents, and especially given that The Times has endorsed Ann Davison, his opponent to the right. And The Stranger has endorsed Nicole Thomas-Kennedy, his opponent to the left. So, I would not call his position comfortable. And he certainly has to campaign and deliver a message to the people in order to get through this primary. Marco Lowe: [00:15:03] No, absolutely. And it is a low turnout - those endorsements matter a heck of a lot more right now. And it's interesting - boy, that point on population growth - we've added 30,000 people since '14. That's an incredibly good point. And he may be - you could almost look at his campaign like he is a new entrant into the race and we have three first-timers. That's a really interesting way to look at it. Especially when you're in an office that just isn't watched. I mean, there hasn't been high profile cases, they work a lot behind closed doors as attorneys do. Boy, when I'm hitting refresh on Tuesday night, it's going to be looking at that race. Crystal Fincher: [00:15:43] That's going to be one of the first races that I'm looking at. And who knows how that's going to end up? One and two could be anyone in that race. It could include Pete Holmes, it could not include Pete Holmes. Just really interesting. And the polling shows that it's completely up in the air. So, that's interesting. The other race that we saw some notable polling in was in the City Council race, with Brianna Thomas, Nikkita Oliver, and Sara Nelson - where Nikkita seems to be in a comfortable position in the lead. I'm actually pulling up this polling to get the exact numbers as we speak. Marco Lowe: [00:16:33] 26% was- Crystal Fincher: [00:16:36] Yeah. And so look, especially comparing this with the numbers in the other races - I mean, we're looking at Pete Holmes at 14%, Bruce Harrell at 15%. Seeing Nikkita Oliver at 26% - that's a big number. It's a big number, especially compared to a number of the other numbers. Certainly helps that Nikkita had been on a citywide ballot before - with this has Sara Nelson at 11%, Brianna Thomas at 6%. Again, Undecided - still 50%. So, again, when you're looking at this, it certainly is a race for number two, it appears, that could go any way. And with 50% of people Undecided and looking at Seattle ballot return - Seattle was trending a few percentage points behind the full King County number, which in my opinion, Seattle usually - well, I guess the fact that Seattle usually ends up with higher turnout numbers, but I feel like they may be lagging behind a little bit, because there are some tough choices for Seattle residents to make that aren't as tough in other cities, and in terms of City Council and mayoral races. So it just may take people a little longer to decide, but I anticipate that we'll see a Seattle number probably higher than the overall King County number. But this is going to be another interesting race to watch. And seeing Brianna Thomas and Sara Nelson - seeing how they both make their final statements. Sara Nelson ended up with The Times endorsement, Nikkita Oliver got The Stranger endorsement. Just saw today, PubliCola endorsed Brianna Thomas in the race. So we will see how this finishes out. But again, another one of those races that is not sold and that has a big Undecided number. Marco Lowe: [00:18:36] And you're seeing it's an open seat - when Nikkita Oliver, when they ran last time - if somebody agreed with them or not, oh my gosh, they were amazing. That King 5 debate - they owned the stage on numerous answers. And so, we have that name ID for them. Sara Nelson did not get through the primary last time. This is Brianna Thomas's first race. 26%, I mean, that's- Crystal Fincher: [00:19:06] Second race actually. Marco Lowe: [00:19:07] Second race. Oh, I apologize - so second race. So yeah, they're in a real strong position. And then you get to the general and it kind of resets, but I agree with you. Compared to the Mayor's race, it'd be hard to see them not going to the general. City-wide race to city-wide race, this is how people get into elected office. Crystal Fincher: [00:19:30] Yeah. I would agree. It is - this more than any other situation, that's hard not to see Nikkita getting through to the general. This seems like it would be the least likely to wind up in a surprise for the person in the lead in this poll to not make it through. But I do think that it's - we're up in the air for number two. Certainly a Times endorsement - countywide, a Times endorsement is a big deal. This could be something that really helps, or actually hurts - in terms of a Seattle race. But I also think an interesting dynamic there, because the voters who that would probably hurt most with are probably leaning towards Nikkita. But there is a lot to be talked about just in terms of people's records, whether they've been honest and forthcoming about those records. And I think that there may be more to come about that in the race. We will see. Marco Lowe: [00:20:39] Agreed. And also, you see this if Seattle breaks into, I call it, the outer ring and the inner ring. And the outer ring, homes with a view, tend to be the more conservative Seattle Times voters. And the inner ring tends to be the more progressive candidates. And you see the progressive candidates win when they push out the ring and the conservative candidates win when they compress the ring. And that's where I think you're going to see if Sara Nelson can attract the outer ring voters or not. Crystal Fincher: [00:21:07] Absolutely. And we will put in the show notes a review or links to different organizations and the endorsements that they've made. I know, certainly, it helps me sometimes to read through how other organizations are making their decisions, if I'm undecided about something. And I certainly have spoken to a lot of Seattle voters who still don't know which way they're voting in a number of races. So, this is still a critical time for making the case and people are still trying to decide. There's still a lot of communication that campaigns have to do. And that's also still making a difference. So the race is still shaping up. Marco Lowe: [00:21:49] If I can throw in one quick thing too - for all the races in Seattle, I think these three candidates have done an excellent job of articulating what they want to see in the City. This is as issue-based race as I've seen in a long time and I appreciate it. There's a lot of, "Here's what I'd like to do." And I just really appreciate that. A lot of races tend to say, "Look over here, look over there, but not right at what I'm trying to do." That is not the case. All the mail has been very specific. Crystal Fincher: [00:22:21] Yeah. Which I appreciate and I think is actually necessary at this point in time - not just that someone has a vision, and we've heard lots about people's visions. Or even that they're supported by, "I've got a ton of endorsements." Lots of candidates can tout that, but what do you actually plan to do with your power and authority and your jurisdiction? What are your plans? Not what we can do regionally, not what we need partners to do, or what we can study and learn more about doing, but what are your actual plans? What action will you take? I really do hope voters take a look at what candidates have said on that. And to your point, in that City Council race, there certainly is a lot that have been talked about for what the candidates actually plan to do, the action that they plan to take. And I hope they look at the mayoral race through that lens to say, "Okay. It's one thing to say, 'Yes, I believe in equity and treating people well, and we can have a better Seattle tomorrow,' but what have they committed to doing? What are our concrete steps and concrete actions beyond 'A lot of people support me?'" Marco Lowe: [00:23:42] And I give a little bit of credit to Nikkita Oliver on that. Anytime they're on stage, they are ticking off boxes. And even on Twitter, they said with a retirement of Seattle police officers, this money should be going to these kind of community groups. And again, this is a constant statement of what they would do in office. So, just - you kind of set the example - and the other candidates, it's hard to be on stage if you're not doing that as well. Crystal Fincher: [00:24:13] Very hard to be on stage if you're not doing that. I mean, just drawing on - we had conversations with all three of those candidates on Hacks & Wonks, and I heard a lot of information in detail and frankly, leading by example, from Nikkita Oliver, Brianna Thomas. Heard a lot of" I don't know"s from Sara Nelson and "We'll have to study that and figure that out." it's also interesting to see how campaign candidate rhetoric evolves throughout the campaign. So, a little bit more polished, but I certainly think that it is more natural for some candidates to be more action and ownership focused than others. And I think that's really important, especially at a time like this, when so much needs to be done to get us on the right track. Marco Lowe: [00:25:09] Sometimes just where they are in the race too. They're kind of - I mean, where I've started with some candidates early on at positions and later they may get better, but I agree, that's going to be a really interesting race. Crystal Fincher: [00:25:23] Going to be a really interesting race. So, we've covered races. Another thing that I wanted to talk about this week is it's taken a little bit for the state to compile all the numbers on what the impact of the historic heat wave that happened as a result of climate change was, but 112 deaths is the current toll. Throughout the entire Northwest - hospitalizations up over 60x. Not 60%, but 60x higher than what they normally are. So, the toll that the heat took on our communities was huge and devastating. It was the most lethal weather event that Washington State has ever had. And by all accounts, more extreme heat is something that we have to be expecting, because of climate change over the coming years. So this is something that our state and local governments have to prepare for. And frankly, it seemed like a lot of them were caught flat footed with, "Oh, heat coming. Oh, it's just another heat wave." We have some of these occasionally, but especially with the amount of folks that we have who are unhoused, who are vulnerable with a low percentage of air conditioning in homes and apartments now. This - you could see it coming - was a major threat to people's health and wellbeing. And it just seemed like a lot of governments were viewing this as something that was happening, that they didn't have to prepare for, that they weren't responsible for. And I think that we have to have a massive shift in attitude that, "Hey, this is something that is predictable - the consequences, the deaths, and the casualties are preventable. And we actually have a responsibility to prevent it." How did you see that play out? Marco Lowe: [00:27:30] I agree. A lot of local governments looked very flat-footed and we saw this temperature coming over a week away. And that's just irresponsible to not have both cooling centers, and how you get people there. The humans that are most vulnerable to this heat, whose bodies can't cool themselves. And at 105°, nobody's cooling themselves. Crystal Fincher: [00:27:47] No one. Marco Lowe: [00:27:49] But the most vulnerable aren't often driving. We have a whole issue with seniors in America that are somewhat stranded. Whether they can't drive, they live in a non-walkable community, what have you. So it's not just that you open the centers, but you get people in the center. And you staff them and people may be sleeping in those centers, because the night did not get better. So we have this immediate tactical response that we need to have better going forward, because we're not done. 2021 has been a B-roll for a disaster film - Texas mold, China and New York rain, Northwest heat, the fires in Oregon, in Washington, California, and the smoke that's gone all the way to New York City. We are in climate change, people are dying, and we have to react now. The other thing I'll throw in is that we are watching a fight in Washington, D.C., over an infrastructure bill that has in it more money towards renewable energy, so we can decarbonize this world. And America has to be a leader on it, because we are most of the carbon. So, to have both this tactical response and strategic response is essential and immediate and there's not a this or that. It is all of the above. Crystal Fincher: [00:28:53] It is all of the above. And I forget who it was on Twitter, but someone very astutely tweeted like really there is no neutral action on climate change. Every piece of legislation that every City Council person advocates for, passes, mayor legislator, there is no neutrality on climate change, on pollution. We have to examine every piece of legislation and say, is it hurting or is it helping? And to that point, we have a transportation package coming up in our State Legislature, where this has been a big point of conversation and contention - in that, are we going to continue to push for highway expansion and building and road expansion, which is the number one source of pollution. Over 40% of greenhouse gas emissions and a lot of air pollution is directly attributable to the transportation sector. So, are we going to continue and move in that direction? Are we going to start to move in the other direction? And to your point, climate change is here. We are dealing with it. And we also talked about, before the show - a point you made, which is very true - a lot of people have been pushed out of the city, because of affordability, into suburbs. A lot of our most vulnerable people now live in suburbs. And what people always hear talk about the "inner city," which is really a relic of the past, especially here on the West Coast. And that extreme poverty and some of that hardship is now in suburbs, who do not have the human services infrastructure that was built and developed in cities. And so, access to transit, access to assistance and help, just the visibility and prioritization of human services and health, in a lot of these suburbs and rural areas just does not exist. And it's not something that they've even factored in before and thinking in conversation. So, we're so behind. And so, experiencing these lethal challenges with some governments who just up to now aren't up to the task, we just need a rapid redeployment of resources, a rapid getting electeds up to speed, and demand from people in every city that you're in, that this is an essential service of government. Fundamentally, they're there to protect their residents and to keep them from foreseeable harm. And this is a threat that we know exists. It's so interesting seeing how heat and climate related disasters are covered in comparison to a lot of other things. Because there's this tendency for media to just cover it as an extreme weather event, disconnected from anything else, and like, wow, that was wild. Who could have predicted that? Or that was a once in 100 year event. We've seen these once in 100 year events, several times a year, all over the place. This is what climate change is. We have a responsibility to prevent it from getting worse. And man, we're already in for it getting worse and more just trying to prevent Earth from being uninhabitable for a majority of its people and for mitigating those impacts. So, we have to take action. I've certainly been vocal about this and the responsibility that local governments have to their residents to protect them. And that deaths and injuries that result are really a matter of negligence at this point, because we know what these consequences are. And either we choose to act and protect people or ignore the risk, and people should be held to account for that. Marco Lowe: [00:32:53] And if U.S. and, frankly, human history teaches us anything, when a crisis hits the wealthy will be taken care of. I mean, I have to - in my head, Exxon has a Dr. Evil lair some place, where they know they're going to be okay. I know that sounds crazy, but they know the data better than we do. They've been looking at it for 40 years and continued on their path. So if they're comfortable, it's not that they don't see the change, it's that they don't worry that it's going to impact them. And that has to be part of it. I will also just really - you said something that's worth putting a light back on. Legislation all needs a lens - is this making it better or worse? There is no middle land. I just think that's a really, really great idea. Crystal Fincher: [00:33:35] Well, thank you so much - we are at this time - certainly, issues that we both feel very passionately about. But I just want to thank you, the listener, for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM, this Friday, July 23rd. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler. And our wonderful cohost today was Professor at Seattle University's Institute for Public Service, Marco Lowe. You can find Marco on Twitter @MarcoLowe, it's M-A-R-C-O-L-O-W-E. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar, be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live show and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. We'll talk to you next time.

Pajama Gramma Podcast
All About You 365 Day Challenge, Day 202. Haven't Yet Made Your Mind Up About...?

Pajama Gramma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 2:41


All About You 365 Day Challenge, Day 202. Haven't Yet Made Your Mind Up About...? Do One Thing Every Day That Centers You! Join in every day in 2021 for a quick challenge that is ALL ABOUT YOU. https://www.facebook.com/ThrivingSharon Ask your questions, share your wisdom! #365daychallenge #allaboutyou #makeupyourmind

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 1: Bruce Harrell, Lorena González lead in 2021 Seattle mayoral race with many undecided

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 31:59


3PM - Hanna Scott: Bruce Harrell, Lorena González lead in 2021 Seattle mayoral race with many undecided // America Needs to Break Up Its Biggest States // ‘Cleaning fairy' went to the wrong N.J. house. His TikTok rant explains hilarious mixup See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: July 16, 2021

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 52:04


Primary ballots are in mailboxes now! Today friend of the show, former mayor of Seattle, and Executive Director of America Walks Mike McGinn joins Crystal on the show to discuss the front runners in the mayor's race, how candidates need to be making the case to the public in these remaining weeks before the primary, and the psychology and emotion that drives Seattle's voting decisions. And Mike delivers a fundamental election rule: Message quality multiplied by message delivery equals impact. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @frinchfrii and find today's co-host, Mike McGinn, at @mayormcginn. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources: “No incumbent in Seattle mayoral race, but candidates still running against City Hall” by Daniel Beekman: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/no-incumbent-in-seattle-mayoral-race-but-candidates-still-running-against-city-hall/  “Poll shows many voters still undecided, Bruce Harrell leading race for Seattle mayor” by Daniel Beekman: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/poll-shows-many-voters-still-undecided-bruce-harrell-leading-race-for-seattle-mayor/  “For the first time in years, there are 2 serious candidates for the King County executive” by David Guttman: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/race-for-king-county-executive-pits-experienced-well-funded-candidates-against-each-other/  “Seattle's mayoral candidates have plans for homelessness, but they're staring at an uncertain future” by Scott Greenstone: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/seattles-mayoral-candidates-have-plans-for-homelessness-but-theyre-staring-at-an-uncertain-future/  “The C Is for Crank: Correcting the Record on Compassion Seattle” by Erica C. Barnett: https://publicola.com/2021/07/13/the-c-is-for-crank-correcting-the-record-on-compassion-seattle/  Publicola Elections Coverage: https://publicola.com/category/elections/ South Seattle Emerald Elections Coverage: https://southseattleemerald.com/tag/2021-elections/ We the People Power Voter Guide: https://www.wethepeoplepower.org/voter-guide-2021   Primary Elections Endorsements: The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2021/07/14/59065522/the-strangers-endorsements-for-the-august-3-2021-primary-election  The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/who-supports-who-in-seattle-elections-endorsements-roll-in-for-mayoral-council-races/  The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2021/06/28/the-urbanists-2021-primary-endorsements/  350 Seattle Action: https://350seattleaction.org/2021-elections    Transcript: Crystal Fincher: [00:00:00] Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a co-host. Welcome back to the program, friend of the show and today's co-host: activist, community leader, former mayor of Seattle, and Executive Director of America Walks - and a fire Twitter follow also, the excellent Mike McGinn. Mike McGinn: [00:00:59] Yeah, you can find me on Twitter @mayormcginn. I just can't let go of that handle - it's just too good. But I'm really many years past it now, so thanks for having me on the show, Crystal. Crystal Fincher: [00:01:11] No, absolutely. But you know what, you're always there to provide context and an informed opinion - and it's usually insightful, and useful, and often spicy. We get spicy McGinn a lot of times, and I like it. Mike McGinn: [00:01:25] I'm not running for anything anymore so I'm just pure truthteller mode. No, 95% pure truthteller mode. I pull some punches. I do pull some punches still, Crystal. Crystal Fincher: [00:01:35] Well, what I want to talk about is - ballots should be in your hands today, tomorrow. If you're listening to this, ballots are arriving in Washington State for primary elections. So it's a big deal. We've seen a wave of endorsements be released from major political organizations, media organizations - both The Times and The Stranger. So it is now time to vote - a lot that we've been talking about, all the candidates that we have been talking about - now the rubber is hitting the road and communication plans are in full effect. Mailers are hitting mailboxes, commercials are on TV, digital ads are all over the place, so how are you seeing this race standing right now, Mike? Mike McGinn: [00:02:23] Mayor's race - I think at this point we're really down to three viable candidates - is where I would start. You can look at - fundraising numbers is one way to look at it, major endorsements is another. And Bruce Harrell has the Seattle Times and in early polling, he was what, at 17% or 18% or something like that, which is when you think about it, kind of low for an incumbent, somebody that the City knows. He's not incumbent in the office, but for being known. Lorena González has The Stranger endorsement and lots of labor endorsements, got a big IEC from labor coming out. The theme of her campaign is her personal resume primarily is what she's running on. But she has the drag of being from the City Council. I don't know whether it's 29 or 39 City councilmembers that have run for mayor, and only Norm Rice actually pulled it off. And he had the tailwind of the Rainbow Coalition from Jesse Jackson running for president. And when he announced that coalition, that was the following year from the Jesse Jackson race, and he just vaulted in. And also a very skilled elected official. I mean, "Mayor Nice"? Who gets that nickname, "Mayor Nice"? Crystal Fincher: [00:03:44] You didn't get that nickname? Mike McGinn: [00:03:51] [Laughter]. And the other thing is - when you look at it is the right track, wrong track numbers in the City have been off the charts on all of the polls that have come out to date. And so if you're associated with what's been going on, that's going to give you a headwind. I think that the third candidate in the race and full disclosure, I've endorsed Colleen Echohawk in the race. She's talking about the issue that people say is the most important one - homelessness - that comes out on top of almost every poll. That's the focus of her campaign. She organically raised a lot of money through vouchers - got there first, didn't have to hire people to collect them as opposed to the other candidates, and is the outsider. The other candidates in the race are credible and have been treated as credible, but I think at this stage when you look at the fundraising numbers and the endorsements, I think it's going to be very hard for Andrew Grant Houston or Jessyn Farrell or Casey Sixkiller to come out of this primary with where they stand right now - the combination of institutional endorsers, dollars, message and political base that they're bringing into it. Crystal Fincher: [00:05:10] So based on the polling that's come out, a number of people are looking at this as, okay, on the - conservative and progressive are different when used in Seattle than when used in outside of Seattle- Mike McGinn: [00:05:24] Let's use right lane, left lane. Crystal Fincher: [00:05:26] Right lane candidate being - looks like it's going to be Bruce Harrell, by polling and indications there, it appears to be that he is leading the right lane. And the left lane as you just talked about, it looks to be Lorena González, with potential Colleen Echohawk on her heels. How are both making the case that they can run against a right lane candidate and when? Mike McGinn: [00:05:59] Well, and that's interesting. Part of the reason I think Bruce - well, the right lane always consolidates more than the left lane. It's like that Will Roger's joke about, "I don't belong to any organized party. I'm a Democrat." So the left is never powerfully organized and the right tends to consolidate. The other right lane candidates didn't really take off. And the left lane candidates all have a little more juice in them. And actually, given that Jessyn decided to endorse the Compassion Seattle Initiative, I'm not sure what lane she's in at this point, but both. Crystal Fincher: [00:06:32] Well, and I think that's been a problem for her. Mike McGinn: [00:06:34] Yeah, I think that's been a problem for her because this is a year that unlike prior years in which you had the Chamber of Commerce uniting with the King County Labor Council to decide on a candidate - that's what they did with Durkan, that's what they did with Murray. We're now back to - that's what they did with Mallahan, as I think about it. Right, and I got some union support but the Labor Council and a lot more of the unions went with Mallahan because labor was for the tunnel. Labor was for the tunnel and I actually heard from service worker unions that ended up endorsing him and they said, "We're taking a risk, all of our brothers and sisters are mad at us for supporting you because they really want the tunnel." Crystal Fincher: [00:07:15] That tunnel. Mike McGinn: [00:07:17] Yeah, that tunnel. So even though I was clearly the candidate for transit and working people against what I believed was a corporate bureaucrat who was running in the right lane, they still went with him. You still see that happening in politics today. The construction unions still have a lot of influence. So do the firefighters - they're quite conservative. And the Labor Council. In this case, we don't have that - where the Labor Council and the Chamber are ordaining a leader. So we're seeing a business backing Bruce - they're consolidating behind Bruce. You're seeing labor consolidating behind Lorena, but you're not seeing all of the progressive left consolidating behind Lorena. You see it breaking up into more pieces there. So the argument as to, against Bruce, is insider versus outsider. And I think that's going to be a huge challenge for Lorena in the general - right track, wrong track numbers. It's about the mayor but it's also about the Council. I ran in 2013 and I wanted the electorate to say, "Well, if you see conflict between the mayor and Council, look at what people are advocating and pick the person on the right side. By the way, that's me." That was my argument. But if you're close to City Hall, you might be able to do that - but people who are further away, they paint everybody with the same broad brush and it can be hard to distinguish yourself. And I just think that when you look at the polling to date and how low Lorena's numbers have been for somebody who's run city-wide multiple times, it really suggests she still has to go out and get a lot of votes. You probably got to get to 25% or so to get out of the electorate. So she's got to get from wherever she's starting - a long way. Everybody does, and Bruce has a shorter path to get there, but everybody's got to go a long way and the question becomes, does Lorena have a ceiling because of the negativity towards the City Council? Crystal Fincher: [00:09:34] That's a really interesting question. I guess the variable that I'm also looking at in this is looking at candidates independently. It's always a different scenario than looking at them head-to-head with another candidate. Bruce, also being an insider, does that neutralize that whole insider argument? Really, and to be real, Colleen is a former head of the Downtown Seattle Association-ider. So it's not like she's a radical outsider. Mike McGinn: [00:10:03] I don't think she was the head of the Downtown Seattle Association. Crystal Fincher: [00:10:05] Was previously. Mike McGinn: [00:10:07] I think she was just on the Board, but maybe I'm wrong. Crystal Fincher: [00:10:09] On the Board, on the Board. Mike McGinn: [00:10:10] She was on the Board, right. But just for the record, that's a spot that's given to the Chief Seattle Club. They are automatically on it because they are downtown and the DSA wanted a homeless provider on their Board. Crystal Fincher: [00:10:22] Which is the case for a lot of different organizations. They have different spots there but also not known as a left-leaning organization at the same time. So looking at their policies and being associated with that from a policy standpoint does not quite paint the picture of an outsider in the way that a lot of people think of outsiders in terms of politics. A lot of people would view that as a more establishment qualification on the resume, but neither here nor there. I think the bigger point I was making is that - does the fact that Bruce was formerly a Seattle City Council member, briefly mayor also - does that negate an insider argument if both people are former Councilmembers within Seattle-elected government, or does that more even the playing field and get to more of an issue-based stuff, or does the insider versus outsider argument still carry? Mike McGinn: [00:11:22] I think that Bruce carries that baggage too. He's helped by the fact that he's been off the Council a couple of years, but he does carry that baggage too. There's no question about that. I think if the question is how would Lorena - if Bruce has consolidated the right lane and people are fighting for the left lane, the question becomes how would Lorena do against Bruce in a head-to-head and how would Colleen Echohawk do in a head-to-head? And I'll bet you, that in those types of heads, Colleen would do a lot better than Lorena. I would bet you that. But of course, we're only going to get to run one of these. That's the way it works. But if there were polling done, I bet you what those head-to-heads would show as well. Crystal Fincher: [00:12:10] Always an interesting conversation on if there was polling done. And one of the things that we both have browsers refreshing right now is that the Northwest Progressive Institute, NPI, is actually going to be releasing public polling in the Seattle City Council, the mayoral races, several Seattle races. So that's going to be interesting to see actual public polling come out. They anticipated it being near the end of this week. Let's see if that actually comes out today. It wouldn't surprise me if it wound up being early next week, but we certainly are keeping our eyes on it. Mike McGinn: [00:12:47] I also think you have to take a look at the messaging of the candidates. Bruce's messaging is, "I'm a decisive leader. I know how to get things done." That's also Lorena's messaging - "I'm a decisive leader, I know how to bring people together to get things done. And look at my resume, I'm a progressive." Colleen's message is, "I've dedicated my life to helping homeless people in Seattle, and I'm an expert on homelessness which is the most important issue in the city." And I think that the headwind that both Lorena and Bruce face in the general is that they're saying that they know how to get things done, but the public says, "Yeah, but you had your shot." And that's the biggest headwind that both of them will face in the general election. Crystal Fincher: [00:13:35] Yeah. I'm also curious to see how much attention is paid to their donors and what their donors say. Because one, I think - continuing issue that we have in Seattle elections is ignoring that, and then being surprised that candidates vote pretty consistently in line with where many of their donors are at. That does not mean that their votes are necessarily bought. It just may mean that, "Hey, people see someone who has values that they feel are similar, that they feel is representing them." Not necessarily that they're buying it but that they see kinship there. And it really is telling where corporate interests see their candidate, and where labor and progressive interests see their candidate. And looking at the overlap between where major donors to Ed Murray, major donors to Jenny Durkan - and then look to see where those are at in the current races - a lot of them with Bruce Harrell. So is what we're signing up for really different if the traditional backers, if the coalition of donors looked similar to a profile of prior coalitions of donors? I wish we paid more attention to that in Seattle politics. Mike McGinn: [00:14:58] I agree. And clearly the kind of the business side donor class is consolidating behind Bruce and they're going to have an independent expenditure for him. Labor is consolidating behind Lorena and they're going to have a big independent expenditure campaign for her. And it's hard to cross your base. It's hard to tell your base they're wrong. That's like an axiom of politics and you're absolutely right. It's not that it's pre-negotiated or bought, but it becomes hard. And we saw that in play with Lorena when the police contract came up and the King County Labor Council urged a Yes vote on the contract, Lorena voted Yes on the contract because that's what labor wanted at the time, and the Community Police Commission wanted a No vote on that. We saw it very recently with the vehicle license fee. A stakeholder group came forward and said 75% of the $20 vehicle license fund, like $7 million a year - real money, but not big money in infrastructure. And the climate advocates and the alternative transportation advocates asked for, so the Council respect that. And labor said, "No, put it into bridges." The laborers, the carpenters and the King County Labor Council went down and said, "Nope, take the money from walking, biking and transit, put it into a bond for bridge repair." And that's basically what Lorena did on that one as well. So you get the situation where the base, the people that pay for your elections - it gets hard to cross them on tough issues, on high profile issues. Crystal Fincher: [00:16:47] I would just ask that as people are voting, consider that. Consider where their base is and what their history is of voting in line or not in line with those considerations. And certainly I know a number of people who agree with Lorena on a number of issues and that issue for a lot of people is the most challenging one. It's like, "Oh, but that police contract vote." is a sticking point for a number of - particularly further left-leaning progressives and where they're having a challenge in there. But there's issues with that with every single candidate almost - although I did - someone referred to Andrew Grant Houston as - what did they call him - the Elizabeth Warren of the race because he has a plan for everything, like well thought out and well organized. But I would say, aside from him, most - just anecdotally, a lot of people are like, "I love this candidate except for major issue where there was a problematic vote or a problematic issue." Jessyn, it's Compassion Seattle. With Lorena, it's that police vote. People got stuck with Colleen on the initial indication of support for Compassion Seattle, which she later said she's not going to be voting for and she does not support. But that gave people a lot of pause. So there's a number of those with candidates. Mike McGinn: [00:18:16] And I think over on the progressive side, that's absolutely right, and there's a little bit of - kind of arguing over who's in fact the most progressive. Although I think we can say that all of them have very strong progressive credentials. You don't represent homeless downtown, or come from Lorena's background and she's done great things in other areas. But clearly, your point about labor is good. By the way, Bruce Harrell voted for that contract too. And Colleen asked for them to vote No. It's an interesting thing getting elected as I did in '09 without a lot of institutional endorsements. It meant that I actually had a lot more freedom of movement. Everybody was trying to figure out where I would land. At the same time, I also didn't have a whole cadre of people behind me who were looking to back me up and stand up for me when I got in. Crystal Fincher: [00:19:14] That is the thing. Mike McGinn: [00:19:15] It's an interesting mix. But it really did - people were really wondering when I got in, in 2010, well, where is he going to land? Because in the primary- Crystal Fincher: [00:19:25] I was one of those wondering in 2010 where you were going to land. Mike McGinn: [00:19:25] On the other hand, it gave me - it meant that I didn't - this is going to sound a little trite, but honestly, my biggest concern was responding to the voters because I had gone around the institutional endorsers for the most part to get to win. The Stranger endorsement was big, and I picked up some service worker unions and other individual endorsements but nothing like anybody else in the race did. So that makes a difference in governance as well as you pointed out. Crystal Fincher: [00:20:01] Yeah, absolutely. And to be clear, the City of Seattle races are not the only races happening. We have a number of races. One, King County Executive race where certainly the two front runners are Dow Constantine, the incumbent who's been there and certainly in a strong position, versus Senator Joe Nguyen. What's you're read on where that stands right now? Mike McGinn: [00:20:23] It's hard to say. I think that Dow, after 12 years in office, is going to be facing the same time for a change sentiment. But I think Joe has to make the case for change. I think if you look at - and Joe Nguyen has got a great progressive record in the legislature and you can hear his values when he speaks. Dow has to explain the Youth Jail, he has to explain the Mariners Skyboxes, he has to explain the bailout of the Convention Center. He's got to defend his record and explain why he is the agent of making things happen now after 12 years based on where things stand. So I think that's going to be a big challenge for him. I think that is somewhat of a lower profile race. It doesn't necessarily deserve to be a lower profile race. It just is - the mayor's race is going to use up a lot more of the media coverage than the County Exec race will. So Joe has to make the case. He's got to aggressively pursue the change argument and what his values were. But it can happen. Look at Girmay vs Larry Gossett - it can happen. People can make a decision that it's time for a change even if they're not particularly angry at the incumbent, but they just think that the incumbent isn't delivering to their expectations of what they want to see at that time. Crystal Fincher: [00:21:59] Yeah. This is going to be an interesting race to see, especially at the primary point. I think looking at the point where Joe Nguyen got into this Executive's race - before he got in, Dow, obviously incumbent not challenged by major Democratic candidate before that, was running away with all of the endorsements. After Joe declared, they've really split most of the endorsements. It has not been strong one way or the other. They've really been splitting a lot or just blocking each other's endorsements. There isn't enough for a consensus in a lot of places. So I think the insider, more activist, more involved, and people who pay attention to those stuff all the time - which is a small percentage of people - are indicating that they view this certainly as a race. It's a whole different thing than communicating with voters who don't pay attention across an entire county. That's a heavy lift, a really heavy lift. And so for me, the question is can Joe Nguyen communicate that same kind of thing that makes the insider race competitive county-wide before the primary? Certainly, they have a lot more time for the general, assuming he makes it through which he should. But man, that's a lot of communication to people who don't pay attention. Mike McGinn: [00:23:29] Who will be low information voters, right - which is why that kind of background, that insider or outsider thing takes on a larger influence in races like this. It comes in and they already have a frame for deciding the race. And what you were just talking about is something I call the "perception primary". Some people might call it the "money primary". But it's not just money - it's a perception and it's spread by the insiders. And the thing about the perception primary is that people can be entirely wrong, in the perception primary. And that's, I think, one of the things you're highlighting here. Again, I'll go back to my own experience. In 2009, Greg Nickels had almost all the major endorsements and a lot of money. And the idea that he was vulnerable was actually the reason that I could get in the race. Nobody else would get in the race. He couldn't be beat. So the perception primary was keeping people out of the race. They said, "Well, we can't win the perception primary. We can't even get out of the perception primary." So I think that's always a challenge for a candidate is - can you survive the perception primary and I barely did. I barely did, let's be really clear about that. But I did survive it, but then once you got into the actual primary, I took first place. So I think there's a thing that happens where we all get sucked into the perception of the race. So clearly, Joe has political insiders or the politicos, whatever you want to call them. People are like, "Yeah, Joe has got a shot." But now, he's got to take his case to the voters. That's a very perceptive observation. And the same thing is true - I'll circle back to the mayor's race. There was a whole lot, I was doing a whole lot of - same thing happened in my '09 race. Remember when Jan Drago, a longtime City Councilmember got in the race, it was almost literally a headline of "Now it's a real race". Well, her highest polling numbers were the day she got in. And the two highest vote getters in the primary were two people who had never been in office before, me and Mallahan. So that was a case where the perception primary was just way off. And mayor's race, there's been a perception primary but this is a remarkably wide open race, more wide open than I think we've ever seen in my time watching. Crystal Fincher: [00:25:57] It's pretty wide open. One thing that we talked about in terms of, hey, who appears to be leading here based on polling - the leading vote getter in polling is Undecided, really at this point- Mike McGinn: [00:26:10] By a lot. We are engaging in some of that perception primary stuff too by saying message, dollars, institutional support should lead to votes based on what we know. But we could be wrong - because the nature - yeah. The biggest leader right now is Undecided. So, once the paid media lands and once the media decides how they're going to frame up the race in the last few weeks - will really decide which candidates can propel a little bit and get to that finish line. Maybe they're starting in a different place to get to the finish line. I think two weeks before the ballots drop, I was polling 7% in the mayor's race, ended up at 28%. And Greg Nickels was polling at 22% and he ended up at 25%. So, he spent a lot of money, it just didn't move his numbers because he was in a context where he just couldn't. And I was. And in 2017, I said, "I'm going to do this again," and the exact opposite happened. I started with a higher number and I went down because these people heard about the other candidates and they wanted someone new. So, it really drove home to me just how important the context of the race is, not what the early polls show. It all happens when the money drops and when the voters start paying attention - what movement do you start seeing then? That really happens. Crystal Fincher: [00:27:48] Yeah. Now is when the race for real regular people begins. A lot of people realize that the race is happening once they get their ballot in the mail. It's like, "Oh, this is a thing." And usually along with their ballots, they're getting four mailers a day from here on out most of the time. So, it's going to be real interesting to see how effectively people can get their message across. And that's not an easy thing to do. It takes - you have to penetrate people's consciousness at multiple points, multiple times - in order to make a real impression. And so that takes - certainly a significant budget and just good message execution. Mike McGinn: [00:28:40] Well, good message too. That was part of the point I was making about '09. But I really learned it in 2007 when I worked on the - Roads and Transit campaign. So, to refresh people's memory, the legislature decided to - that a regional Roads and Transit ballot would go in front of the public in 2007. And it included money for light rail but it also included money for highway expansion. And the Sierra Club - we decided to fight it because we believed it was bad for global warming. And I think we got the Cascade Bicycle Club with us and no other institutional endorsers. A few elected officials joined us late. But it was all the elected officials, business, labor, most of the environmental groups supported the Roads and Transit ballot measure. They said it's the only chance to get light rail. They had $5 million to spend and the polling had them at like 56%. They ended up, I think, at 44% on election night. And we spent about $50,000. We had no money, but we had a really good message. And they spent $5 million, they didn't have a good message. So, here you go. I now feel like I'm in Marco Lowe's Politics class. It's a mathematical equation, it's really simple. It's Message x Message Delivery = Impact. And if your message is - it's the only math you have to know in this. If you got an awesome message and zero delivery, no impact. And if you got a billion dollars of delivery and your message is a zero, zero times a billion dollars is still zero impact. It's both. You got to have a good message. You got to deliver it. And now, we're going to find out who's got the message in these races that actually moves voters. Crystal Fincher: [00:30:40] Yeah. And a lot to learn from it and that will certainly inform how the message is developed in a general election. Certainly, your race - a number of races - have been instructive just for me personally in terms of how effective a message can be. But in a singular rallying issue, certainly you and transit- Mike McGinn: [00:31:02] Kshama and 15 in her race- Crystal Fincher: [00:31:06] Yeah. And Kshama was the other one - 15 Now. Mike McGinn: [00:31:10] 15 Now, yeah. And I think that- Crystal Fincher: [00:31:12] That was huge. That was very instructional for me. Mike McGinn: [00:31:15] I think that Bernie Sanders got into that first race against Hillary Clinton, thinking he was just going to be a message candidate. I mean somebody to carry this message and use the race as a way to distribute a message. And he discovered his message about the power of Wall Street and the power of billionaires was really powerful. And all of a sudden, he was in a real race. The reporters say he didn't think that was going to happen and maybe if he'd realized that sooner, he might have won that one. Because you want to race differently when you're trying to deliver a message and when you're trying to win. But it's another example of how someone can have tremendous amount of institutional support, but somebody can come in with a better message and lap 'em, or at least give them a good run. Crystal Fincher: [00:32:04] Well, Obama versus Hillary was message versus establishment. Mike McGinn: [00:32:08] Great example of that. And so it's not necessarily about experience, or resume. It's about what the voters are looking for right then in a candidate. And you can run a race that - it's the context that's going to decide it, ultimately, more than the candidates. Crystal Fincher: [00:32:33] Voting is an emotional decision. Voting is not a logical decision. And to your point, it really is about how you can connect, how your message and the vision that you're painting connects with voters. And if you can tap into what they're feeling, both their frustrations and their aspirations, that is the key. Like - "We don't have to be here. We can be in a better place. I can bridge that gap and get us there." Make that connection to the voters - that sticks. And helping to have, I think, in your case and Kshama's case and certainly looking nationally in Obama's case, but on a local level with a number of people, to be able to paint a very clear image of where you can go. You were very clear on your vision. Kshama was very clear on her vision, to the point like other people have no problem repeating and defining where you stand. And I actually think that's kind of the crux of where people have challenges with candidates. It's like, "Okay, explain the candidate to me." And if they have a hard problem doing that, that's a problem for the candidate. They need to be able to say, "Oh, Kshama is 15 Now candidate. Mike is the transit candidate." Mike McGinn: [00:33:56] The fact that I rode a bike actually delivered a lot of message. I was an environmentalist who cared about transit and walking and biking and alternatives. Those things really mattered. And if your supporters can't explain why you're running, you have a problem because so many votes are actually gained by your supporters carrying the message on your behalf. So, it's got to be really simple - people complain about sound bites and I understand, because they feel like it oversimplifies the issues, but the reality of somebody running for office or running an advocacy campaign is they have to be able to boil their message down and express it in a way that actually has impact and conveys meaning to people. It's a lot harder than it looks to do that. It's a lot harder and I think people don't fully appreciate the role that a few words can play in delivering a message that moves voters, or moves people to action in an advocacy campaign. I think of "Defund the Police", everybody is picking on Defund the Police - that it hurts Democrats, and it may well hurt Democrats. But that wasn't a message invented by Democrats to a bunch of people in swing districts. That was a message invented by activists to call attention to the role of policing America. And by that measure, it seemed like a whole lot of people were repeating their message. And again- Crystal Fincher: [00:35:38] A whole lot of people repeating the message functionally. In several areas, including here in Seattle, more movement both in rhetoric and in policy than we have seen in the past 20 to 30 years in most instances. And a clear delineation between action that is inconsequential and what is just rhetoric - like a reform conversation - versus Defund is a clear bright line of if we aren't addressing the resources involved with this, if we're just tinkering around the edges of maybe some trading and stuff, that that actually is not getting us where we need to go. Mike McGinn: [00:36:17] And I think that is just completely on point, Crystal. It came from a constituency that's been yelling for decades, if not longer, at not being heard. And somebody is now hearing the message and having to confront it and respond to it - the criticism that, "Well, it's not a perfect message and it might hurt somebody else over there," that's kind of a secondary concern to the activist who's been ignored already. Crystal Fincher: [00:36:45] 100%. 100%. Mike McGinn: [00:36:47] Now having said that, I've noticed that that's not a prominent phrase in this year's City Council or mayoral elections. Crystal Fincher: [00:36:57] No - no it's not. Mike McGinn: [00:36:58] But it served its purpose in the moment and now people have to move and find a different way to try to move the debate. And actually, I think that is- Crystal Fincher: [00:37:05] But it actually set the stage for the debate that we're having now - and determine the lanes and set the parameters. So now, there are discussions about what percentage of funding, how're we going to divert. And so it's not an explicitly Defund conversation - but starts with where are the resources, what are we doing with the actual funds, what are the budget numbers and items. And so kind of like talking about the bridge, or the tunnel - the tunnel, the tunnel, the tunnel was an issue that stood for a whole set of policies. Mike McGinn: [00:37:43] It stood for climate. It stood for using tax dollars wisely. It stood for equity - that transit was a better investment than highways. All of that was in play there. Boy, it kind of takes me to another topic I hesitate to bring it up, but there's a little bit of a test. This year is a test. Two years ago was a test too of where is the electorate right now on a lot of these things. The Compassion Seattle Initiative is an example of that. Now, it's written in such a way that people can see things in it that aren't there or not see things in it that are there. The vote is happening. It's become a little bit of a litmus test for left to right, but not completely. I saw former City Attorney Mark Sidran speaking up - I saw an article he was speaking up at a Belltown forum - saying you can't support Compassion Seattle, it's too lenient on the homeless. So, I think this why I'm laughing because there's such a swirl around this issue. But I think that's kind of one of the issues out here - is homelessness is clearly the most important issue in the city right now. That's what's showing up on the polls, and that's what people care about. But then you have to dig a layer deeper, what does that mean? What kind of city are we? Do we go to, "Yeah, so we need to build more housing," or do we get to, "We need to kick them off the streets and parks"? And that's the other thing that's kind of really very much in play this year. And the fact that Compassion Seattle is on the ballot and who's backing it - now that we see who's backing it, now that its contours become a little more clear - you can see that in a way it's designed to try to boost voter turnout of those who might vote for the right lane candidate. Crystal Fincher: [00:39:50] Absolutely. Mike McGinn: [00:39:50] That's what it feels like to me. This is a political ploy more than a reasoned solution. And we declared an emergency on these six years ago, for crying out loud, but we haven't really treated it like an emergency in that six years. It was just - and there's only so many task forces or government structures and emergency resolutions you can pass before the public goes, "Well, what the hell are you going to do?" And that's really a big issue. Is it a progressive response to homelessness or not a progressive response to homelessness? That's going to be a task for the Seattle electorate in the City this year. I know which side I come out on, and I hope the City comes out on the right side of that too. Crystal Fincher: [00:40:34] Yeah. I mean it is in reality. And Erica Barnett, in PubliCola, actually did a great piece this week on - what do its advocates say versus what does the text actually say? They're very different things. It is clearly not a progressive policy. It is clearly being, trying to be - it's dressed up in progressive clothing - from the name on down and what they're saying. So, it will be very interesting to see, but that's one of those where the simple messaging on that - the easiest way to message, the simplest way to message is very deceptive and it makes it seem like, "Hey, this is finally going to do something and take care of something and people who don't just want to see people swept. But hey, there's money for this and they're going to help." You can message all of that in a way that a lot of media organizations are carrying without question, and the text doesn't jive with what their messaging is. Mike McGinn: [00:41:38] I have a sense that the confusion about what it really means will hurt it in the same way that it hurts many initiatives. That initiatives always often suffer from the public response if it's not well thought out, it's not well-thought through, that the legislative process enables things to be a more nuanced approach. And I think that that is going to be a drag for the proponents of this getting it through, which is good, from my perspective. But even so, its level of popularity overall even without those negatives of we're not quite - maybe it's not built right, maybe it's got some bad provisions in it, maybe it's not well-thought through. I still think the level of support is going to be so high, even if it fails, that it kind of shows how fed up people are with no action from government on this issue. Crystal Fincher: [00:42:37] I agree with that. The issue is that people are so tired of this problem not being taken care of. It's been declared a crisis in overlapping jurisdictions - that it's been the top priority - and people have seen the issue get worse, not better. So, it is something. It's doing something, and some people I think are just willing to say, "Well, it's time to do something, and we've seen politicians dither for years. And so we have to do something." That is the challenge, I think the biggest challenge. Mike McGinn: [00:43:10] I don't know whether it passes or fails. Even though I was kind of leaning on it, I think it might fail, but I also think it might pass. Back then, maybe here's a close. Maybe we've reached the end. I think that that we have to do something kind of feeds back to the County Exec race we talked about, feeds back to the mayor's race - how that will affect people that were more in the position to do something and those that weren't. And even how it affects the race between Nikkita, Sara Nelson, and Brianna Thomas. Granted, none of them are incumbents but one worked for a City Councilmember and one is clearly the right lane and one is clearly the left lane. Crystal Fincher: [00:43:52] Technically, two have worked for City Councilmembers, but Brianna currently- Mike McGinn: [00:43:56] Oh that's true - Sara did for many years. I shouldn't say that, but Brianna more recently. Actually true - Sara worked for City Councilmembers for quite a long time and was working for Councilmember Conlin when I was mayor and we interacted with her quite a bit. So, yeah, I think that this overarching sense is something that's going to be feeding into all of the races and what's the power of that - given the specific people in the race and their personalities and their platforms and their supporters and their messaging - remains to be determined in each one. But I think it's a powerful driver in all of the races. Crystal Fincher: [00:44:32] Yeah, I agree with that. I think people are fed up and impatient at the moment. For what is the question - they are unhappy with where things are at. Most people do feel like things are on the wrong track for one reason or another. And so what to do with that is the question. Mike McGinn: [00:44:53] Never seen wrong track numbers this high, never seen them this high in my years of following it. It's really astounding numbers on the wrong track. Well, let's Crystal, you and me, we're trying to get the City on the right track in our own ways. And maybe not everybody agrees with our ways, but I'm for all the people out there fighting to make it get it back on the right track. So, maybe we'll lead back with everybody. Crystal Fincher: [00:45:21] Yeah, I'm with you. Getting things on the right track, taking action. I do think people have to - I do think people owe an explanation, who have been in power - an accounting of what they have done with that power. And I think that we are seeing in a lot of different places - certainly, with - Republicans are not hesitant to use whatever power they have and wield it in whatever way they can. I think a lot of frustration with Democrats is that a lot of people say, "Hey, you have the power to enact so much change and not much is happening," and feeling frustration with that. Certainly, that's not universal. Republican inaction is notorious. But people have to account for the power that they have. And I think people are like, "Dude, I'm electing you to use your power to do something." And I think people who can make the case that they will do something with the power that they have will fare well if they can communicate that effectively. Mike McGinn: [00:46:23] And I'm not running for office, so I'll say this. I think the voters too, have to hold themselves accountable as well. There's a little bit of, it's not easy to cut through all the rhetoric and the misrepresentations and all the rest. But ultimately, get out and vote this time - like we get the elected leaders sometimes that they get past us or they get in. And it's up to the voters to really hold them accountable. So, take your time. You don't have to take my word for who the right candidate is, or Crystal's, or any endorsers. Take your time to dig in and definitely take your time to vote. It's a low turnout election year. Sorry for just being - but it's a low turnout year. And what we know is people are calibrating their arguments and their policy positions based on who they think is going to vote this year. So, you get out there and you vote and upset the applecart a little bit. Maybe you can get some people in there who are more progressive. Crystal Fincher: [00:47:26] Yeah. And I think I said it in another show - vote your conscience. For me, I am a strong believer that in primary elections, a lot of people are like, "Well, am I throwing away my vote if I vote for someone who I feel is not in the lead?" And that's a whole host of people because right now, there's lots of talk about who's in the lead - although to be clear, Undecided voters are the plurality of voters right now. But vote for the candidate who you feel most closely matches your values because whether or not that candidate makes it through, that is a statement of values and that's a statement that all other candidates pay attention to. If X candidate that stands for a range of values doesn't make it through, but they're 15% of voters, especially in a general election where more than likely no candidate is going to be approaching 50%, probably not 40%, probably closer to 30%. They're going to have to put together a cohesive platform that can consolidate the other voters. And if they see that, "Oh, man, I am not going to get out of this without addressing climate. I'm not going to get out of this without meaningfully making sure people feel safe, without meaningfully addressing the issue of unhoused people on our streets." Make sure that they take notice of where you actually stand in terms of your values. And you don't have to compromise in a primary election. The choice in the general will be between two people and that's where you have to kind of look at, "Okay, what's the better choice, neither of them probably are going to be ideal on everything but the best choice." But vote your values now, please. Mike McGinn: [00:49:11] Let me put it this way - 90% of the elections, I'm with you. And boy, would I love some ranked-choice voting in a race like this. I would love to see ranked-choice voting in - so order the ones you want. So, you won'thave to worry about the strategic vote. But I think there are sometimes some races you want to vote for the person who you think stands the best chance of winning the general too. And I think this might be one of those as we talked about earlier. I think sometimes you have to look at that one too. And that certainly I think was a factor in getting Biden through the election. I think one of the reasons that the Black voter supported Biden so much, in addition to having a relationship with him and knowing where he stood, was also knowing they didn't want to take a chance on Trump. And they thought Biden had the best shot. Crystal Fincher: [00:50:03] And mistrust of other voters that they would vote progressively and not betray the vote that people might take if they voted their conscience. Yes, yeah. Mike McGinn: [00:50:13] Yeah, and so it's a tricky one. I wish strategic voting weren't a thing. I think there are sometimes when it is. And so that may be where we are this time too, but you can't and you shouldn't vote for somebody if you don't feel good that they're going to advance the causes you believe in at the end of the day. That's the thing that matters. So, do your homework, folks. Crystal Fincher: [00:50:38] Do your homework. We'll certainly include a lot of links - lots of organizations have endorsed - we'll include links from a variety of organizations - Times, Stranger, Urbanist, PubliCola, Transit RIders Union. There are a number of organizations and you can read through their rationale about why they made the decisions that they made. I find that helpful in sometimes trying to wade between which candidates I'm debating on. But please do that. We thank you so much for taking the time to listen to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, July 16th, 2021. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. Our insightful co-host today was activist, former Seattle mayor, Mike McGinn. You can find Mike on Twitter @mayormcginn - that's M-C-G-I-N-N. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. And now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts. Just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar, be sure to subscribe to get the full versions of our Friday almost-live show and our mid-week show delivered to your podcast feed. You can also get the full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show today at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. We'll talk to you next time.

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WNC Original Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2021 42:47


Lots of fun talking with Rachael Hurwitz, Mandy Mears  and Pippa Hoover of Honey Magpie. We discuss music, obviously, songwriting, craigslist, murder, and I try to break up the band. Honey Magpie at Isis Music Hall on June 24 - https://isisasheville.com/event/lawn-concert-honey-magpie-6-24-2021/   Click here for easy streaming or download -   https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/nn54bn/Ep_124_Honey_Magpie8nk2s.mp3   Listen to and follow Honey Magpie at these places https://www.facebook.com/honeymagpieband/ https://www.instagram.com/honeymagpieband/ https://twitter.com/HoneyMagpie https://soundcloud.com/honeymagpieband https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsdL_25p7vv2GbZ-aQtr3nQ  http://honeymagpie.com/ https://honeymagpie.bandcamp.com/ https://open.spotify.com/artist/1opTfiIaSKLhG2v6BM5kUq?si=TaydXWUfRlGJqlm2TME1CA&dl_branch=1   Thanks to Nathan Storey for the closing song http://www.nathanstoreymusic.com/ https://www.facebook.com/NathanStoreyMusic/ https://www.instagram.com/tnathanstorey/ https://www.tiktok.com/tnathanstorey     Subscribe to the podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/wnc-original-music/id1378776313 https://www.iheart.com/podcast/wnc-original-music-31067964/ https://gopod.me/wncom   Follow on Social Media https://www.facebook.com/wncoriginalmusic https://www.wncoriginalmusic.com https://www.instagram.com/wnc_original_music/   All music used by permission   Known for vocal harmonies, classical string instruments, and nature-inspired lyrics, Honey Magpie is the collaboration of singer-songwriters Rachael Hurwitz (guitar, keys), Pippa Hoover (cello), and Mandy Mears (keys). Their sound invites comparisons to all-female folk groups like I'm With Her, but draws more influence from pop than bluegrass or old time.   The band formed in 2014, when all members were in their mid-to-late 20s. Despite what felt like a late start in music, Honey Magpie pursued performing and recording wholeheartedly. They gained early success in the Triangle when they won the band contest at the Shakori Hills Grassroots Festival in 2015. They released their debut album Honey Magpie in 2017, and have since been featured in the Oak City Sessions video series and on WUNC's The State of Things. Their single “Undecided” premiered on Pop Matters in January 2020.   Their second album Midnight Morning draws from a richer range of musical influences and boasts a higher production level than Honey Magpie. Listeners will recognize elements of 90s rock, 60s pop, country, and femme-fronted indie pop, supported by a full rhythm section of bass, drums, guitar, and keys. Anyone experiencing a “quarter-life crisis" will relate to the album's mix of joy, angst, and reflection on life, and fans of all ages will love the new depth in the band's sound.

Don't Point Fingers
MMA & undecided on whether you want kids or not. #52

Don't Point Fingers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 24:18


MMA fights & Whether you want kids or not.

Locked On Giants - Daily Podcast On The New York Giants
PFF's NY Giants Projected Starting Lineups: What's Still Undecided - 05/21/2021

Locked On Giants - Daily Podcast On The New York Giants

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 33:38


Pro Football Focus is out with its post free agency and post draft starting lineup projections for all 32 NFL teams. What did they get right and what did they get wrong when it comes to the New York Giants? LockedOn Giants host Patricia Traina takes a look at their projections and offers some insight. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle
Weekly roundup — Flourishing & the undecided

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 30:00


The more people who vaccinate, the quicker life goes back to normal. But is there a (proven) way to convince the "on the fence" crowd to go get jabbed? Also, once life does get back to normal, how do I get back to normal — and maybe even start growing again?

The Myla Sweet Podcast
Kids Going Back to School? Do THIS before you do! #homeschooling #backtoschool #parenting #processing2020in2021

The Myla Sweet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2021 15:09


Are sending your kids to school this fall or already have? Undecided on if you will continue to homeschool? Regardless of what you decide this explores how to process what's the best decision for you. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mylasweetpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mylasweetpodcast/support

Happy Hour Harmonica Podcast
Will Galison interview

Happy Hour Harmonica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2021 59:39


Will Galison joins me on episode 38. Will first picked up the chromatic harmonica when studying guitar at the Berklee College of Music.  He quickly realised he had an affinity with the instrument, and after spending a day with Toots Thielemans he knew the chromatic instrument was what he wanted to do. Will went on to record numerous albums under his own name, including a successful collaboration with Madeleine Peyroux. He has been an in-demand session player for numerous years, with credits performing with the likes of Barbara Streisand, Carly Simon, Donald Fagen and many others. On top of all this he has recorded a version of the Sesame Street theme tune used on the TV show. With interests ranging from jazz, to pop and classical, as well as playing some mean diatonic, Will really delivers a pocketful of soul.Links:Will's website: https://www.willgalison.net/Takin It Back With Barack:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJW67YfLWgsOdysseus Fantasy:https://www.willgalison.net/odysseus-concertoBeethoven Spring Sonata:https://www.willgalison.net/beethoven-spring-sonataWill's Soundcloud:https://soundcloud.com/will-galison/Cremona harmonica company:http://www.workshop-cremona.com/Catalog%20ALLE.PDF.pdfWills-make Harmonica company:https://www.facebook.com/groups/2479774272276646/?redirect=falseHal Leonard Jazz Standards tutorial:https://www.halleonard.com/product/1335/jazz-standardsHal Leonard Pop Songs tutorial:https://www.halleonard.com/product/1090/pop-classicsHarmonicaUK Virtual Chromatic Weekend:http://harmonica.uk/HUKBlog/chromatic-weekend/Videos:Odyssey:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPC-fh3jyswBeethoven Spring Sonata:https://www.willgalison.net/beethoven-spring-sonataToots Thielemans playing Undecided:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMTmKwosSi8Pocketful of Soul:https://www.willgalison.net/pocket-full-of-soulSkylark with Sean Harness:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KylY3vQv8Y4&t=105sAlso check out the Spotify Playlist, which contains some of the songs discussed in the podcast:https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5QC6RF2VTfs4iPuasJBqwT?si=M-j3IkiISeefhR7ybm9qIQ

Jerry Royce Live - Worldwide
POWER LIFT S01 EP 56 - STEWARD "JASON DAVIS"

Jerry Royce Live - Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 52:46


You might be wondering, “Who exactly is Jason Davis?” Allow me to elaborate. Nickname: “Jaynayday.” Born in Philadelphia, PA (80s baby). Raised in the suburbs of Atlanta, GA. Spent a short stint (3 years) in Broken Arrow, OK (Random right?). Oldest of 3 brothers. Hobbies: movies, sports, reading (non fiction mostly), comics (Marvel vs DC? Undecided). Duluth High School Grad (2005). Georgia Tech Grad (2009). First in family to graduate from college. Played NCAA Div I college football at Georgia Tech (2005-2009). Met the woman of my dreams in 2007 (she didn’t know it then!) and later on married her in March of 2016. Whew! Get it? Got it? Good!

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 1: One Day Away

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 45:17


We are a day away from the NFL Draft. Alan Hahn, Keyshawn Johnson and Jay Williams create a list around QBs we have seen since 2010 and place some memorable QB names in the "Good/Great, Bad, Undecided, and Too Early" categories. Also, what do the Bears need to do in the draft this year?

The Max Kellerman Show
Hour 1: One Day Away

The Max Kellerman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 45:17


We are a day away from the NFL Draft. Alan Hahn, Keyshawn Johnson and Jay Williams create a list around QBs we have seen since 2010 and place some memorable QB names in the "Good/Great, Bad, Undecided, and Too Early" categories. Also, what do the Bears need to do in the draft this year?

Golic and Wingo
Hour 1: One Day Away

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 45:17


We are a day away from the NFL Draft. Alan Hahn, Keyshawn Johnson and Jay Williams create a list around QBs we have seen since 2010 and place some memorable QB names in the "Good/Great, Bad, Undecided, and Too Early" categories. Also, what do the Bears need to do in the draft this year?

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis
Hour 1: One Day Away

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 45:17


We are a day away from the NFL Draft. Alan Hahn, Keyshawn Johnson and Jay Williams create a list around QBs we have seen since 2010 and place some memorable QB names in the "Good/Great, Bad, Undecided, and Too Early" categories. Also, what do the Bears need to do in the draft this year?

Keyshawn, JWill & Max
Hour 1: One Day Away

Keyshawn, JWill & Max

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 45:17


We are a day away from the NFL Draft. Alan Hahn, Keyshawn Johnson and Jay Williams create a list around QBs we have seen since 2010 and place some memorable QB names in the "Good/Great, Bad, Undecided, and Too Early" categories. Also, what do the Bears need to do in the draft this year?

The Doula Road Trip Podcast
15 Doula Major- Undecided

The Doula Road Trip Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 30:07


Get my free training on how to become a doula by texting 'doula' to 216-616-3269. In today's episode, I chat about what to do when you're not sure what kind of Doula work is right for you. Picking the kind of Doula work you want to get into can be hard and overwhelming! What if everything sounds interesting and you have a connection with various points of Pregnancy, Labor, Postpartum, Fertility, and Loss? What if you really can't decide right now what suits you best? If your Doula Major is Undecided then I can tell you as someone who once actually majored in Undecided you are in the right place! Here are 10 ways to be next to birth work without being a Doula.Plus I share some advice on marketing that I wish someone would have shared with me 5 years ago. Let me know what you think of this episode!  www.instagram.com/doularoadtrip

Man of the Match with Alex Donno
Is it wrong for Josh Allen to be undecided on getting the vaccine?

Man of the Match with Alex Donno

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 8:21


Donno gives his takes on Bills quarterback, Josh Allen, being unsure on whether or not to get the covid-19 vaccine. 

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie
Looking at the People | Palm Sunday Message with Jonathan Laurie

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 45:21


On the first Palm Sunday, Jesus entered Jerusalem and had a mixed response—some worshiped while others grew angry. In this Sunday morning episode, special guest Pastor Jonathan Laurie asks us to respond to Jesus’ claims anew. Will we recognize Him for who He is? Listen in for this Palm Sunday message from John 12. Notes Both physical death and leprosy are spiritual pictures of sin. “Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death” (James 1:15 ESV). Sin is an inward disease that shows outward symptoms.  Martha was worshipping Jesus through her service. The Traitor, the Killers, and the Undecided  “She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21 ESV). The Different Responses to Jesus: The Dead Man and the Leper Mary and Martha The Traitor: Judas The Killers: The Religious Leaders The Undecided: The Large Crowd  Who are you in this story? Scripture Referenced Matthew 21:6 Matthew 15:19 Matthew 23:27–28 --- Make plans to join us for an Easter Cinematic Experience on harvest.org! This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio
Looking at the People | Palm Sunday Message with Jonathan Laurie

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 45:21


On the first Palm Sunday, Jesus entered Jerusalem and had a mixed response—some worshiped while others grew angry. In this Sunday morning episode, special guest Pastor Jonathan Laurie asks us to respond to Jesus’ claims anew. Will we recognize Him for who He is? Listen in for this Palm Sunday message from John 12. Notes Both physical death and leprosy are spiritual pictures of sin. “Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death” (James 1:15 ESV). Sin is an inward disease that shows outward symptoms.  Martha was worshipping Jesus through her service. The Traitor, the Killers, and the Undecided  “She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21 ESV). The Different Responses to Jesus: The Dead Man and the Leper Mary and Martha The Traitor: Judas The Killers: The Religious Leaders The Undecided: The Large Crowd  Who are you in this story? Scripture Referenced Matthew 21:6 Matthew 15:19 Matthew 23:27–28 --- Make plans to join us for an Easter Cinematic Experience on harvest.org! This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Greg Laurie Podcast
Looking at the People | Palm Sunday Message with Jonathan Laurie

Greg Laurie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 45:21


On the first Palm Sunday, Jesus entered Jerusalem and had a mixed response—some worshiped while others grew angry. In this Sunday morning episode, special guest Pastor Jonathan Laurie asks us to respond to Jesus’ claims anew. Will we recognize Him for who He is? Listen in for this Palm Sunday message from John 12. Notes Both physical death and leprosy are spiritual pictures of sin. “Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death” (James 1:15 ESV). Sin is an inward disease that shows outward symptoms.  Martha was worshipping Jesus through her service. The Traitor, the Killers, and the Undecided  “She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21 ESV). The Different Responses to Jesus: The Dead Man and the Leper Mary and Martha The Traitor: Judas The Killers: The Religious Leaders The Undecided: The Large Crowd  Who are you in this story? Scripture Referenced Matthew 21:6 Matthew 15:19 Matthew 23:27–28 --- Make plans to join us for an Easter Cinematic Experience on harvest.org! This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE JACK CHURCH SHOW!  Love letters to Pam
Undecided about the Future

THE JACK CHURCH SHOW! Love letters to Pam

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 6:52


It was a rainy Saturday and with nobody to share my day with I had absolutely no idea what to do. As the day went along I started to realize that the problem of not knowing what to do went beyond just this Saturday. What about the next week, next month, next year? Will I ever get it figured out? Listen and here if I came up with the answer.. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jack-church/support

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: Critical Swing States Still Undecided

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 45:28


We are now two days past election day and we still do not know who the next president will be. Jesse Kelly investigates the protesting that is happening around the country, coming from both the democratic and republican parties over the issue of voter fraud. Jesse talks with Tom Del Beccaro about ballot harvesting in the state of Wisconsin.

Part Of The Problem
Election Undecided w/ Michael Malice

Part Of The Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2020 62:28


Dave Smith and Michael Malice bring you the latest in politics! On this episode of Part Of The Problem Dave and Michael discuss the contested election, what will need to happen moving forward, and if the divide in this country can be healed.Support Our Sponsorshttps://Heshisocks.com use promo code PROBLEM30 https://www.aneighborschoice.comPart Of The Problem Airs every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 6pm ET on the GaS Digital Network! The newest 15 episodes are always free, but if you want access to all the archives, watch live, chat live, access to the forums, and get the show five days before it comes out everywhere else - you can subscribe now at gasdigitalnetwork.com and use the code POTP to save 15% on the entire network. https://bit.ly/3hQQH2JFollow the show on social media:Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComicDaveSmithhttps://twitter.com/RobbieTheFirehttps://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/https://www.instagram.com/robbiethefire/https://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightSubscribe On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/DSmithcomicBuy Daves Album : Dave Smith Libertas - https://bit.ly/2Nq5seMDave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in Politics three times a week, with the promise of bonus episodes! Libertarian Philosophy mixed with a sense of humor, POTP is one of the leading voices in libertarianism.Dave Smith is a New York based stand-up comedian, radio personality, and political commentator. Dave can be seen regularly on “The Greg Gutfeld Show” and “Red Eye” on Fox News, as well as “Kennedy” on Fox Business Network. In 2013 Dave was featured as one of the New Faces at the prestigious Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. He was also a featured performer on the New York Comedy Festival’s “New York’s Funniest” showcase in 2014 and 2015. Dave's outlet for his social commentary is his podcast, “Part of the Problem,” which is available on iTunes. Dave is also co-host of “The Legion of Skanks” podcast, available on the GaS Digital Network.

Into America
The Undecided Election

Into America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2020 31:38


Americans were told for months that results from the 2020 presidential election could take days, even weeks, to be confirmed. But there was little clarity on how it would all play out. For the first time in seven months, host Trymaine Lee hit the road for North Carolina, to track the Black vote in this crucial swing state. He found enthusiasm on a college campus, wary determination outside of polling places, and democracy in action as election workers gathered results in the bowels of an old courtroom. But as Election Day came and went without a clear winner, North Carolinians were left in limbo, waiting to find out who their state voted for. And all of America was left wondering which way our country is headed. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Watching: NBC News Decision Desk Live Blog Black men drifted from Democrats toward Trump in record numbers, polls show North Carolina Election Results 2020

Unashamed with Phil Robertson
Ep 174 | The Undecided Election & Appeasement of Leftists | Guests: Ann McElhinney & Phelim McAleer

Unashamed with Phil Robertson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2020 53:55


Phil and Al are joined by election refugees Ann McElhinney and Phelim McAleer, the conservative filmmakers behind "Gosnell: The Trial of America's Biggest Serial Killer" and "Obamagate." They discuss journalism and the age-old struggle between good and evil, the Hollywood wasteland, how Ann and Phelim got burned out on leftism and "pro-choice" politics, and what it was like to meet murderous abortionist Kermit Gosnell in prison. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Christopher Titus Podcast
UNDECIDED? A tough choice.

Christopher Titus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 92:55


Are you STILL undecided? We here at the Titus Podcast definitely, most certainly, and bigly, understand your dilemma. It's a tough choice this time around... I mean we get it. Listen to Titus, Bombshell, The Hylinder, and a Scottish LuluLemon designer, discuss current events, weird news, and maybe, just maybe, together we can clear things up. Titus Podcast ...because the world is a clown show.

improv4humans with Matt Besser
The Undecided Voters

improv4humans with Matt Besser

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2020 66:12


On a special improv4humans, Matt Besser talks to panel of undecided voters Dan, Lance, and Jean. We’ll hear undecided takes on everything from voting by phone and the Supreme Court to Kanye West and fantasy football. Make sure to cast your ballot, humons!

Joey Saladino Show
Trump & Biden Supporter CONVINCE Undecided Voter who to Vote For

Joey Saladino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2020 56:23


This is NOT a Debate but a Conversation between a Trump Supporter and a Biden Supporter trying to convince an Undecided Voter on who to Vote for in 2020 Please Support me here https://www.patreon.com/join/JoeySalads Subscribe to my Clip Channel Here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzA1d3VZTuSUY--9xSylhig/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Argument
Packed Courts, Undecided Voters and 'WAP': You Asked, We Answered

The Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 44:39


For the podcast’s two-year anniversary, Michelle and Ross start with a rousing debate over why Joe Biden isn’t saying he’d pack the courts, should he beat President Trump in November. Ross asks Michelle if she’d concede that court packing would be a significant escalation in the “judicial wars,” and Michelle asks Ross what happens to the anti-choice movement if and when Roe is overturned.Then, the hosts listen to the show’s voice mails and dig into the inbox to answer some listener questions. They respond to your questions about the open Supreme Court seat, who the heck is still undecided, Republicanism’s evolution to Trumpism, and whether “WAP” is a feminist anthem. Finally, both hosts suggest you dive into the Nxivm cult’s backstory through HBO’s new documentary series, “The Vow.” For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

The Tom Woods Show
Ep. 1754 The 45 Minutes Your Undecided COVID Friends Need to Hear

The Tom Woods Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2020 49:04


This is the single best presentation I've made on COVID and the government response. I genuinely do not see how someone can hear this information and continue along in support of lockdowns and the destruction of society. Here are all the arguments in one place. Enjoy.

American Conservative University
Glenn Beck- These are the facts you MUST share with an undecided voter before the election and Why the Polls Don't Make ANY Sense

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2020 20:51


These are the facts you MUST share with an undecided voter before the election and Why the Polls Don't Make ANY Sense Here's Why the Polls Don't Make ANY Sense | Steve Deace Showhttps://youtu.be/Gm44z0TyROE BlazeTVThe Mainstream Media is at it again claiming that there is no way President Trump can win the election because of the polls. Anyone remember 2016? Steve Deace breaks down why these polls don't make ANY sense. WATCH more Steve Deace: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-RAJ... ► Subscribe to BlazeTV YouTube! https://bit.ly/2KJHuwu ► Join BlazeTV! https://get.blazetv.com/ ► Sign up for our NEWSLETTER: https://theblaze.com/newsletters Connect with us on Social Media: http://twitter.com/BlazeTV http://instagram.com/TheBlazeTV http://facebook.com/BlazeMedia 

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 637 | The Fly Heard Around the 2020 Election World

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2020 44:52


The vice presidential debate took place Wednesday night but the media decided to focus on a fly that landed on VP Mike Pence's head. MSNBC host Rachel Maddow decided to go a different route and criticized the Trump administration as the new normal for the Republican Party. Why is the media focusing on the things that Americans don’t care about? Undecided voters have spoken, and they said that Pence won the debate and Kamala was abrasive and condescending. The second presidential debate was scheduled next week, but the Commission on Presidential Debates decided to make it virtual. President Trump said he wasn't participating in a virtual debate. Are the debates done? How does COVID-19 not rank as one of the top 5 most important issues to voters? NBA Commissioner Adam Silver announced that when the league returns next season, Black Lives Matter messages will not likely be displayed. Is that a good thing? Sarah Iannarone, an Antifa supporter, has a 11-point lead over Mayor Ted Wheeler in Portland. Will this end the riots in Portland? Today’s Sponsors: Home Title Lock protects your home’s legal title. Your home is your most valuable asset, your safe haven. Home Title Lock puts a virtual barrier around your home’s title. The instant they detect tampering – they shut it down. First things first: Go to https://HomeTitleLock.com and register your address to see if you’re already a victim. Then use code RADIO for 30 free days of protection. Have you noticed your hair isn't looking as full as it used to? Why make unnecessary trips to the doctor and drugstore when you can do it all from home?​ ​Let me get you started with a special deal. Go to ​https://keeps.com/why for 50% off your first order of KEEPS hair loss treatments. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hot Takes With Matt Gaetz
Episode 105 - NBC BUSTED for Fake "Undecided" Voters. VP Debate Hot Takes. Troops Home for Christmas.

Hot Takes With Matt Gaetz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2020 25:34


Bringing our troops home would be the greatest Christmas gift anyone could possibly give. President Trump wants to make it happen. I give more details along with highlights from the Vice Presidential candidate debate, NBC getting busted for fake "undecided" voters, and more.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
The Rush Limbaugh Show Podcast - Oct 07 2020

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2020 115:26


PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 1: Todd Herman fills in for Rush. Rush was right, Trump was right: Declassified Brennan notes prove Obama knew Hillary Clinton invented the false Trump-Russia collusion narrative. The wall of lies around COVID. Mark Meadows mask photo. Left is desperate, trying to delay Barrett hearing, going back to Trump taxes, separating children at border. Pence will be calm in face of accusations of racism and bigotry. Gregg Jarrett of Fox News, author of "Witch Hunt" on declassification of documents in Russia hoax. McCabe refuses to testify because of COVID. Plexiglass at VP debate is useless, just a symbol of fear. Cuomo, de Blasio target Jewish community in NYC. What Pence should do at debate. Cuomo uses 14-year-old photo to smear Jews. PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 2: Plexiglass replaces the woke mask at VP debate. Pence must talk to independent voters not insane from fear. Even NYT admits, 90 percent of cases have barely any virus in the body. The only thing plexiglass shields do is help the economy. Undecided voters’ short memories are a concern. Avowed Antifa member leads Wheeler in mayoral race. Be righteously angry. China has a model and it’s not the U.S. model. The repugnant rage of Kamala Harris. Dr. Fauci’s love letters to Hillary Clinton. A vaccine is a path to herd immunity. PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 3: Todd Herman interviews Kimberly Fletcher of Moms for America about her role in the Brett Kavanaugh hearings. It’s crunch time for Mike Pence. Trump’s base matters more to him than anyone in politics. Pence must reveal the multiple versions of Kamala Harris tonight. What socialist country is an environmental haven? Joe Biden will not stand up to Chinese pollution. Trump is the environmental president. The rebuttal to Kamala Harris’ common retort. We know the stakes of the Pence-Harris VP debate. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com