Podcasts about gmat

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Latest podcast episodes about gmat

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 273—Strong profile, GMAT worry. Targeting Johnson and Stern. Wharton versus Yale and money

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 34:14


In this episode of WireTaps, Alex and Graham discuss the flurry of interview invites popping up on MBA LiveWire. Many programs are starting to release their Round 2 invites - and some appear to be earlier than last season. Graham highlighted the renewal of Dartmouth Tuck's Dean's tenure, as well as the s school's decision to waive the GMAT for recently laid-off tech workers; your hosts discussed the implications of that latter decision, which is a tactic that several programs are adopting. Graham also commented on a recently published piece that looks at trends in tech recruiting (we are clearly seeing the down slope of what might have been a bubble). Your hosts then discussed a recently published piece on the cost of European MBA programs, where there is quite a broad range in price. Graham then reminded listeners about the two deferred enrolment events that Clear Admit is hosting this Wednesday and then on February 8. Signups are here: https://bit.ly/defer23 For this episode's candidate reviews, Alex selected two ApplyWire entries and one DecisionWire entry: The first candidate reviewed is targeting next season. She has a very interesting profile, with a strong focus on data analytics. Her academic record also looks very strong. Her big concern is the GMAT test, which she hasn't taken, but is nervous about as she claims to be a poor standardized test taker. Alex and Graham discussed the implications of this, and how things might be if she had a GMAT score of 650 vs. 700+.  This week's second candidate looks to have a decent career in financial services and is awaiting word from Cornell / Johnson and NYU / Stern on R2 applications. Alex and Graham worry about the combination of a 700 GMAT score and 3.2 GPA (an international degree). Despite these concerns, your hosts are keeping their fingers crossed for interview invites. This week's final candidate is taken from a DecisionWire entry.  The lucky applicant is debating between offers from UPenn / Wharton and Yale (with a large scholarship). They are focused on entrepreneurship and there are potentially good reasons to choose either option... This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced in 'always sunny' Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The Dominate Test Prep Podcast
64. The Secret to Growing Past a Prep Plateau

The Dominate Test Prep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 42:51


It's common to hit a plateau as you're preparing for your standardized test. Your momentum stalls, your practice test scores stop going up, and no matter how much you keep studying, you don't seem to be making any progress. The key to getting un-stuck so that you can get off your prep plateau and continue growing toward your goals lies in the "Growth Formula" as laid out by Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness in Peak Performance. In this episode we dissect their formula and reveal what may just be the secret ingredient for you to achieve the breakthrough you're looking for. Incidentally, the components of the Growth Formula will help you achieve excellence in all areas of your life to which you apply them. Even if you haven't [yet] hit a plateau as you're studying for your exam, the concepts and studies discussed here will help you optimize your preparation so that you can experience peak performance on test day.RESOURCES / LINKSPeak Performance, by Brad Stulberg and Steve MagnessComprehensive prep courses for the GMAT, GRE, Executive Assessment, and LSATSIMILAR EPISODESIf you enjoyed this episode, we encourage you to check out these other similar episodes of The Dominate Test Prep Podcast:Episode 17: Nutrition Hacks for Improved Focus, Memory, and Mental Clarity, with Dr. Barrett DeubertEpisode 33: How to Get Started Again if Something Derails Your PrepEpisode 40: Proven Principles of Perfect Practice, with Mike BerginA DOSE OF MOTIVATION“The process of setting a goal on the outer boundaries of what we think is possible, and then systematically pursuing it, is one of the most fulfilling parts about being human.” — Brad StulbergConnect with Us Get more free content on the DTP YouTube Channel Register for a comprehensive prep course (GMAT, GRE, EA, LSAT) Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts Questions? Comments? Email us at support@dominatetestprep.com.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 272—Cybersecurity candidate, needs to ace GMAT. Online gaming interest, 760 GMAT. Wharton vs Columbia, for tech in NYC

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 34:52


WireTaps kicks off this week with a timely discussion about the importance of interview preparation for those candidates entering that phase of the MBA admissions cycle (this included a conversation about Clear Admit's free Interview Archive: https://www.clearadmit.com/category/interview-reports/).  Graham then highlighted the employment reports recently published for Stanford and Cornell / Johnson. Both programs are offering impressive numbers from last season. The challenge to business schools this season will be how to replicate these strong numbers in the less favorable economy that we are now experiencing. Graham also highlighted a recent Clear Admit article that focuses on the decline in the tech sector for MBA job seekers; this led to some discussion about whether or not this news portends a more challenging time across the board for the Class of 2023. Before getting into this week's candidate reviews, Graham mentioned the two deferred enrolment events that Clear Admit is hosting on February 1 and February 8. Signups are here: https://bit.ly/defer23 This week's featured candidates were sourced from two ApplyWire entries and one DecisionWire entry: First up, an early-bird candidate who appears to have a very interesting military background with a focus on cyber security. They worry about their undergraduate record (3.04 in Electrical and Computer Engineering) and are taking steps to mitigate that. As part of that, they need to target a very strong GMAT score. That said, Alex and Graham love the overall profile, and think there might be options at the very best programs when this candidate applies next season. This week's second candidate has a super GMAT of 760. They have an accounting degree with a 3.23 GPA (slight concern) and a CPA. They also have a passion for online gaming, which may shape their long term goal, and Alex and Graham think this might be an interesting aspect of their profile to set them apart. Along those lines, your hosts did wonder why USC / Marshall is not a target program. Finally, this week's final candidate review comes from a DecisionWire post where a lucky applicant is debating between offers at UPenn / Wharton, Columbia and MIT / Sloan. They want a large network, which favors Wharton and Columbia, and they want to be in New York City, post MBA, in tech or early stage VC. Comments on the site leaned towards Wharton, but the applicant may need to wait to see if Columbia will offer them scholarship... This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in Philadelphia by the incredibly hard-working, always reliable Dennis Crowley (shout-out to Dennis's dad, who Dennis credits with instilling in him these traits). Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The GMat Podcast
Goodbye | #230

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 128:34


Feat. GMat, Aidan, Ben J, Beppa & Sienna. Goodbye everybody. It's been a wild ride. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

GRE Snacks
You don't need to answer every question on the GRE for a great score

GRE Snacks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 20:16


Most of us are used to tests in school, where to get an A, you have to answer every question correctly. But on the GRE, you don't! In fact, you can get a 160+ score without answering every question, let alone correctly. Testcrackers founders Yuri Gottesman and Seth Capron have tutored thousands of both GRE and GMAT students. In this episode, Yuri and Seth explain what they've found taking hundreds of GRE exams in their career and how the way GRE scoring works should factor into your test taking strategy. Achievable is a modern test prep platform for the GRE exam - visit https://achievable.me TestCrackers is a renowned GRE & GMAT prep firm based in San Francisco - visit https://www.testcrackers.org/ 

The Business Casual
Susan Christoffersen | Dean of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto

The Business Casual

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 36:00


Hey Trailblazers! In this episode I am so excited to be joined by Susan Christoffersen, Dean of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. Susan is the first female Dean at the University of Toronto and I am so excited to be interviewing her as I'm beginning my final semester. From 2015 to 2020, Professor Christoffersen served as the Vice-Dean, Undergraduate and Specialized programs. Her research focuses on mutual funds and the role of financial institutions in capital markets. She has published in top finance journals and cited inThe New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Bloomberg News Service, and The Wall Street Journal.  Susan talks about her background, her journey to becoming a Dean, when she thinks it is worth it for students to pursue an MBA, what it means to her to be the first female Dean at Rotman, the best advice she has ever been given, and so much more. Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review! Follow The Business Casual on Instagram Connect with Susan on LinkedIn Offers: Athletic Greens | Get a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/BUSINESSCASUAL. Target Test Prep | Start your 5-day, full-access trial of the TTP GMAT Quant and Verbal Course today for just $1, and see for yourself why TTP has been a game-changer for so many GMAT test-takers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Admissions Straight Talk
What Does 2022 Mean for Applicants in 2023

Admissions Straight Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 17:34


Reflecting on trends that impacted graduate admissions in 2022, Linda Abraham shares her predictions for 2023 and offers an action plan for those planning to apply in the new year. [Show Summary] Thanks for joining me for today's solo show. I'm going to review a few trends from 2022 and also attempt to inspire you for the upcoming year. You can email me at ast@accepted.com when my predictions prove wrong in the course of the year. Predictions: More law schools will withdraw from U.S. News rankings [1:16] I predict that more law schools will withdraw from U.S. News rankings.  Will the rankings influence end with the withdrawal of these schools? I actually don't think so.  U.S. News will use publicly available data and still rank programs. Its rankings will continue to influence admissions, recruiting, and applicant decisions. But are they going to hold as much sway as they have in the past? I don't know. That's hard to say. I don't think the U.S. News is going to just stop ranking schools. I don't think applicants are going to stop looking at rankings, and I don't really think schools are going to stop being influenced by rankings. Perhaps a little less so in the past, but I think you're going to see changes on the margins in that segment.  What about other segments of the higher education market? I don't think medical schools are going to stop ranking or participating in the U.S. News ranking. I also think that the rankings are a little bit less influential in the med school arena than they are in law schools or business schools.  It'll be really interesting to see if business schools withdraw from the rankings. Certainly, the admissions directors there have no greater love of rankings than the law school admissions directors and deans. I think if you see the M7 schools withdraw, you might see a trend very similar to what you've seen in the law school market, where it's the elite programs that have largely withdrawn, and the lower-down ones are not withdrawing yet. There are some that have but not that many. We'll link to posts that Accepted has on the withdrawal of specific schools from the U.S. News rankings. Prediction: More experimentation with test options and waivers [3:05] What about test optionality? That has been a trend that's been growing and increasing over the last several years. It really took off with COVID. I don't think you're going to see much change in the law school space this year. I think you will see it if, as anticipated, the ABA approves making tests optional for its accredited programs. I think you're going to see more experimentation in the grad and MBA market with test optionality. And you may also see, throughout the graduate and undergraduate arenas, acceptance for a larger variety of tests. Many law schools are accepting the GRE in addition to the LSAT. In the business school world, you're seeing widespread acceptance of the GRE or the GMAT to the extent that the test is required. You're seeing more waivers. You're also seeing greater acceptance of the Executive Assessment, which was originally designed for Executive MBA programs. And at some schools, you're seeing them basically saying, whatever has an alphabet soup in it is fine. I think you're going to see more and more experimentation. You'll see more waiver options and there's been a lot of experimentation with that in the B school market. I'm not sure you're going to see wholesale test optionality at the elite programs.  I think med schools will stick with the MCAT. It has some correlation to performance on the USMLE, which is obviously the test that doctors have to take at the end of medical school. And medical schools very legitimately want to know that the people they admit are going to perform in medical schools. Grad schools are all over the map outside the professional designations that I've just discussed. Some are going to require a GRE or another test; some won't. Again,

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 271—Private Equity to Asset Management. Entrepreneurial ambitions with a Search fund. Fuqua versus Haas and Kenan Flagler, for Investment Banking.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 33:47


This week's episode kicks off with a quick discussion around the last of the Round 2 application deadlines for top programs (MIT / Sloan have a deadline this Wednesday). Graham and Alex also touched upon the fact LiveWire is starting to see one or two programs release early interview invites for Round 2, CMU / Tepper seems to be leading the way in this regard. It is also worth noting that Duke / Fuqua has added an extra deadline for this season, while UVA Darden have made their final round 'rolling'; is this a sign of deflated application volumes? Alex also noted that Goldman Sachs has announced a round of lay-offs; they join several leading tech forms that have also announced lay-offs in recent months. Your hosts then discussed the potential implications of a less steady job market in terms of the ROI of the MBA. Graham highlighted the return of the Real Numbers series from Clear Admit, kicking off with looking at tuition costs at the top programs. Graham then reminded listeners about two deferred enrollment events that Clear Admit is hosting on February 1 and February 8. Signups are here: https://bit.ly/defer23 For this week's candidate profile reviews, Alex chose two ApplyWire entries and one DecisionWire entry: First up, Graham introduces a very solid candidate for top programs: he has a 730 GMAT, 3.67 GPA and solid banking and private equity experience. He is looking to transition from PE to Asset Management, and Alex and Graham like the switch, but hope there's enough to differentiate his profile from some other very good, but similar, candidates. This week's second candidate has an ambitious goal of establishing a Search Fund straight after the MBA. We discussed some of the implications of that goal, and while we believe they have great work experience to date, we worry their numbers (320/3.2) in combination may hold them back, for now - even if they have completed MBA Math. This week's final candidate is debating admissions offers from Berkeley / Haas, Duke / Fuqua and UNC / Kenan Flagler (all with scholarships of varying amounts). They are looking to do investment banking, and are an international student. We think it boils down to the geographic preferences and IB placements, and lean towards Fuqua in this case. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered by the amazingly talented Dennis Crowley in West Philadelphia. Please remember to rate and review this show wherever you listen. Best of luck to everyone applying!

The GMat Podcast
Our First Conversation | #229

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 75:57


Feat. GMat & Ben J Come down memory lane with us. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 270—Unorthodox pathway. GRE of 318. Ross beats other options.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 36:38


This week's show kicks off with a quick run-down of the remaining Round 2 application deadlines; on Monday and Tuesday there are a handful of schools with apps due. Graham then highlighted an important admissions tip that Clear Admit recently published, regarding whether the optional essay should be used. He then presented the Columbia Business School 2022 employment report, which led with financial services, followed by consulting; the graduating class have a huge average starting salary of $175,000. Graham then highlighted the two deferred enrolment events that Clear Admit is hosting on February 1 and February 8 with ten leading business schools. Signups are here: https://bit.ly/defer23 For candidate reviews, Graham and Alex tackle two ApplyWire entries and one DecisionWire entry: First up, Alex choses a candidate who dropped out of high school, but 13 years later is completing their undergraduate after stints in the private sector and in the army. They still need to complete the GRE or GMAT exam, but we think there is a lot to like, in terms of how they've appeared to successfully manage their unorthodox career to date. This week's second candidate also looks very promising, with one weak spot; a GRE of 318. Alex and Graham think that with the programs they are targeting, they should hear some positive news (assuming well-executed applications). Finally Alex and Graham discuss a candidate who ran the table with their R1 applications and has selected Michigan / Ross, despite having several other MBA options to consider. Some of those other options might appear to be more promising, but the nuances regarding each individual's decision making can lead to a variety of outcomes. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered by Dennis Crowley in West Philadelphia. Thanks for listening, and for telling any fellow-MBA applicants about the show. Stay safe everybody!

The GMat Podcast
The Podcast is Actually Over | #228

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 52:42


Feat. GMat & Ben J For once, this isn't clickbait. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 269—640 GMAT, is it too low? Very low GPA. Kellogg PT versus top 16 FT

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 39:14


Happy New Year to all of our podcast listeners!  Alex, Graham, and the entire Clear Admit team wish you all the best for 2023!  This episode begins with some discussion of this week's blitz of Round 2 application deadlines; on Wednesday and Thursday there are at least 15 deadlines for the programs Clear Admit covers! Graham then highlighted the recently published Real Humans from Northwestern / Kellogg. Your hosts then moved into a discussion of the employment reports from CMU / Tepper and USC / Marshall. Being in the same tier, their average starting salaries are very similar. What is interesting is how the two programs differ from a geographic placements perspective; Tepper sends students to all areas of the United States, whereas Marshall has a very high concentration of graduates staying on the West Coast. In terms of upcoming events, Graham highlighted the two deferred enrollment webinars that Clear Admit is hosting for current college students on February 1 and February 8. Signups are here: https://bit.ly/defer23 As always, this episode features reviews of three current MBA candidates - in this case, two ApplyWire entries and one DecisionWire entry. First up, Alex picks a candidate who has completed an electrical engineering degree in Canada, and has worked for four years, two in consulting, and two as a product manager in tech. They are of Indian heritage (despite having never lived in India) and the one real weakness is their lower GMAT of 640. Unfortunately, as things stand, Alex and Graham think this will be a problem for their target programs, despite the fact that they have taken the test four times. This week's second candidate is from India, and has a very low GPA due to health issues at the time of their education. Applying in Round 2 makes things more challenging, and while their GMAT is decent (710), it's not outstanding in terms of overcoming the lower GPA. They are being more realistic about their target programs, but the GPA may still be a significant challenge. The final candidate for this episode, taken from DecisionWire, is debating between attending Kellogg as a part-time student, or NYU / Stern, UVA / Darden, Cornell / Johnson or Michigan / Ross as a full-time student with significant scholarships. Alex and Graham discussed the merits of going full-time versus part-time as well as which of the full-time offers may make more sense. This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in West Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'! Here's to a happy and healthy 2023 for all!

B-Schooled
Advice from a former adcom, part 2 of 2: B-Schooled episode 140

B-Schooled

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 20:13


A unique aspect of our admissions-consulting process at Stacy Blackman Consulting is our Flight Test, which replicates an actual admissions committee review of your entire application process. We have a team of former admission officers from the top MBA programs who serve as our Flight Testers, and this week we wrap up our two-episode conversation with one of them: Caryn, a former Kellogg admissions committee member. In Part 2, Caryn reveals how MBA adcoms judge a candidate's essays, recommendation letters, extracurriculars and leadership.     

Double Take: Explorations of Sports and Pop Culture
Episode 40 - APBA Wish Lists and more...

Double Take: Explorations of Sports and Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 43:06


This episode discusses new APBA products, our APBA wish lists, the upcoming GMAT, LEG season three, and more. Please follow hosts Kirk and Kevin Weber on Twitter @doubletakecast, facebook.com/doubletakecast, Instagram, email them at doubletakefeedback@gmail.com, send a voice message at Anchor.fm, or read their writing on The APBA Blog. Links: APBA Products: 1984[R] Master Baseball Season, Metro Detroit Golf Course, Men's Golfers All-Time Greats 2022 Additions, Great Negro League Baseball Teams, College Football Great Teams Vol. 1, Big Ten College Football Great Teams 9th Annual Greater Michigan APBA Baseball Tournament- March 4, 2023 LEG BBW League --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/double-take-podcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/double-take-podcast/support

The GMat Podcast
Pop-Tarts at Christmas | #227

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 48:54


Feat. GMat, Ben J & Beppa.   Merry Christmas you dirty dawgs. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat  Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

B-Schooled
Advice from a former adcom, part 1 of 2: B-Schooled episode 139

B-Schooled

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 20:56


At Stacy Blackman Consulting, we have a team of former admission committee members from the top MBA programs who serve as our "Flight Testers." Our Flight Test mimics an actual application review, just like the adcom will do it in real life. Except that you'll be getting personalized feedback on what you can improve BEFORE you hit submit. In the first of this two-part episode series, we talk with Caryn, a former member of the Kellogg admissions committee and member of the SBC team, who shares what MBA adcoms really think about -- and are looking for in -- applicants' transcripts, test scores, resumes and data forms.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 266—Improved GMAT, Round 2 strategy? Interesting profile, aim high. Turnaround story, tough circumstances.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 34:44


This week's show begins with a rundown of all the activity on MBA LiveWire for the last week, which included MBA admissions decisions from Berkeley / Haas, Northwestern / Kellogg, UCLA / Anderson, and UPenn / Wharton. This upcoming week will be a little quieter with Washington / Foster and Indiana / Kelley scheduled to release their Round 1 decisions, but hopefully all of those tuning into the show who are awaiting word will receive some good news before the holidays!  After the opening segment, Graham highlighted the Real Humans pieces from Dartmouth / Tuck and Minnesota / Carlson, while also running down the latest employment report for Chicago / Booth. The average starting salary of $175,000 is very impressive (up over $20K from last year!). Like many peers, Booth also experienced a slight downturn in tech sector hirings, with a small upswing in placement for financial services. As usual, this WireTaps episode tackles profile reviews for three MBA applicants who shared their details on ApplyWire: First up is a candidate who is on the Dartmouth / Tuck waitlist from Round 1, and is also waiting for their decision from Northwestern / Kellogg (they will know this decision when the podcast airs). They have improved their GMAT score from 710 to 730 since they originally applied in Round 1, and Alex and Graham think this improvement will make a difference. They are preparing their Round 2 strategy and had questions about how to proceed in light of the new score and waitlist situation. This week's second candidate has an interesting background in retail and food. They are targeting next season, and we think they should be aiming high, especially in the first round. Their numbers (740/3.65) are pretty fantastic, as is a potential narrative that weaves together their background on a farm, experience to date, and professional aspirations. This week's final candidate has been through a life experience that's almost unimaginable. Since then, they have spent several years in the US Army, and appear to have done very well. That said, Alex and Graham worry about their numbers (312/2.7) and provide some guidance in terms of what they need to do to optimize for Round 2, or even think about Round 1 next season. This episode was recorded in Cornwall and London, England. It was produced and engineered by Dennis Crowley in West Philadelphia, PA, USA. Thanks for tuning in, and please remember to spread the word about the Clear Admit MBA Admissions podcast, or at least buy a t-shirt!

The GMat Podcast
Male Moaning Edging and Whimpering ASMR | #226

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 61:20


Feat. GMat & Ben J Things get jazzy in this podcast, we take on the weird side of Spotify AGAIN, and we ask ourselves why anyone would go to an improv show willingly? Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 265—Army officer for 10 years. Super profile, aim higher. Communications, retaking GRE

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 35:57


As is customary for this time of year, this week's podcast kicks off with a rundown of the recent and forthcoming activity on MBA LiveWire; we are in the middle of decision weeks for Round 1, so lots of Round 1 decisions are being released and reported!  Graham highlighted the Real Humans pieces from Washington / Foster and Texas / McCombs; this led to a discussion on the impact of the downturn in the tech sector. Graham also highlighted the employment report for Yale SOM. Yale appears to be following a trend we are exploring, higher portions of their class going into consulting, as the tech sector drops a little. As usual, this episode features in depth candidate profile reviews, taken from three recent ApplyWire entries: First up, Alex and Graham look at an army officer who is applying for next season, with 10 years of service experience. He still needs to complete the GRE, and is considering doing an internship to enable the transition to the MBA. While there is generally a lot to like with this profile, your hosts did discuss the impact of the longer-than-average experience. Our second candidate this week appears to have an outstanding profile in terms of work experience, additional activities, the GMAT, and more. In light of this, Alex and Graham are encouraging them to target the very best programs, some of which are missing from their target list. This week's final candidate has 10 years of experience in the area of communications and is seeking a transition into media and entertainment. While the nature of their work experience is really interesting, the one aspect Alex and Graham are concerned with is the quantitative score on their GRE, and the potential absence of quantitative skills more broadly. This candidate plans to retake the GRE in the coming days, ahead of the Round 2 deadlines... This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in West Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The GMat Podcast
Bill Cosby Uses an Air Fryer | #225

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 52:29


Feat. GMat, Aidan & Ben J Things get weird in this podcast, we battle the time, we battle our brains and we battle the world. Also we hates air fryers. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 264—Booth said no, now what? South African for next season. 720 GMAT, increased to 760

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 37:13


This week's show kicks off with a discussion of the fact that 12 leading MBA programs are releasing their Round 1 decisions in the coming days, including Harvard and Stanford on Thursday. Graham then highlighted the Real Humans piece for MIT / Sloan, and shared numbers from the recently published employment report for Dartmouth / Tuck. Alex underlined the huge median starting salary of $175k, which was likely nudged upwards by a disproportionate number of students going into consulting (47%).  Graham was recording this episode from sunny Barcelona, while attending the European GMAC conference on the campus of IESE. As usual, our show features three candidate profile reviews, selected from ApplyWire: The first candidate comes from India and has outstanding numbers, as well as what appears to be very strong work experience. They applied in Round 1 to Chicago / Booth, and were not invited to interview. This appears to be a puzzling decision, and it makes it difficult to develop an appropriate Round 2 strategy. Alex and Graham speculated on some of the reasons why Booth may not have invited them for the interview and offered suggestions for a path forward. This week's second candidate is from South Africa and is targeting next season. They also have good numbers, and what looks like decent work experience and outside activities. Alex and Graham like that they are planning ahead, and think they should be targeting M7 in Round 1 next season. This week's final profile review is for a Latin American real estate developer and architect that had a 720 GMAT and retook it and earned a 760. Alex and Graham thought the 720 would have been good enough, based on the rest of the file, so this new development means the candidate will land with very good options. This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Barcelona, Spain. It was produced and engineered in West Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The GMat Podcast
Mistakes

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 123:46


Feat. GMat & Ben J. In this episode, we take a look at a few things that have been on our minds, pretty soon after Ben made a mistake. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 263—Accounting entrepreneur. Online degree, enlisted candidate. MBB-sponsored, is GMAT good enough?

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 38:29


This week's episode kicks off with an update on admissions decisions and all the latest MBA LiveWire activity.  This includes Round 1 admits being released early for London Business School. Alex and Graham then moved into a quick conversation about top law schools leaving the U.S. News rankings, and whether that will happen with the MBA rankings; your hosts are not convinced. Graham highlighted the Real Humans pieces recently published for IESE and for Georgetown McDonough, and then ran down the latest employment reports for MIT / Sloan and McDonough. Alex points out that there were no real surprises in the numbers, with both schools reporting strong average salaries. As usual, Alex chose three candidates for profile reviews, taken from recent ApplyWire entries: First up, Alex selected an entrepreneur who set up and is running an online accounting business, which looks to be doing very well. Their numbers are solid, and they have a masters degree, but Alex and Graham are a little concerned as to whether or not their 10 years of experience raises fit issues with the programs they are targeting. With that said, your hosts move into a discussion as to how this candidate might mitigate some of those concerns. This week's second candidate is enlisted in the navy, and has completed an online undergraduate degree. Alex discussed the implications of that; their GPA is at 3.9, and it's been an interesting, less traditional pathway to the MBA for sure. The GRE of 324 is decent, and they are targeting next season - which is a good thing, since your hosts would like to hear more about this candidate's post MBA goals, specifically in the longer term. This week's final candidate works at an MBB consulting firm and is being sponsored for their MBA. They are from Canada, and it looks like the only real concern is the slightly lower GMAT of 690. They have taken the test three times, should they try for a fourth, or should they widen their target school list? This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in always sunny Philadelphia by the amazing Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The GMat Podcast
Quitting | #224

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 28:52


Feat. GMat. I catch everybody up on all of the craziness lately. Can't wait for 2023! Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 262—Female Asian attorney. Hispanic in Private Equity. Phoenix-bound

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 44:53


This week's episode of the podcast kicks off with Graham and Alex discussing the latest activity on MBA LiveWire which included interview invites from Berkeley / Haas and Stanford. Graham then highlighted his recent tour of leading MBA programs on the east coast, including Harvard, Dartmouth / Tuck, MIT / Sloan, Yale SOM, NYU / Stern, and Wharton; he noted the energy and diversity of the student bodies he observed on the campuses. Graham and Alex also reviewed the employment reports for Harvard and Duke / Fuqua. Both programs released strong numbers, including increases in average starting salaries. Your hosts then discussed the potential  impact from employment contraction in the tech sector. Graham also mentioned the Real Humans pieces recently published, for HEC / Paris and Washington / Olin. As usual, this episode features three profile reviews, taken from ApplyWire entries: First up, Alex selects a female attorney from Asia, who relocated to the United States for her undergraduate degree. She's just received a 720 on the GMAT and is exploring her options for Round 2. Likely she will be a decent candidate for top programs, Alex and Graham just worry a little about the late start in the application process. There might be an argument to target few top programs this season, for a second opportunity next season. This week's second candidate appears to have really strong work experience, having moved from investment banking into private equity. They are Hispanic, and also have a good GPA from an engineering discipline. They will need to ace the GMAT, but given that they are targeting next year, there's a lot of time and potential.  The final candidate for this week has a focus on living in Phoenix post-MBA. This led to a conversation about whether that makes Arizona State / Carey a better option than programs that are ranked higher, especially if this would mean greater access to scholarship. This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in 'always sunny' Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The GMat Podcast
The 20 Greatest Films of All Time | #223

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 84:08


Feat. GMat, Aidan, Ben J & Beppa. In this episode, we spend WAY too long talking about film ... And then a little bit about poetry. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Task, Time, Energy: The Purpose-Filled Productivity Podcast
Learning to Love the Struggle with Chris Ryan

Task, Time, Energy: The Purpose-Filled Productivity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 45:16


I've enjoyed the conversations that I've had with all of our podcast guests, but this one might qualify as the most fun so far. My guest for this episode is Chris Ryan, co-founder and CEO of Silverquicken.Chris has an infectious and inspiring fascination with knowledge and learning. It's led him to some impressive successes as a student and educator. He holds a degree in physics from Harvard and an MBA from Duke. He taught physics and chemistry to high school students. As a tutor and teacher with a top test prep company, he helped MBA candidates master the GMAT.His new venture, Silverquicken, provides unique enrichment programs for students in 3rd through 8th grade. They're taking resources that are usually reserved for students in gifted programs and making them available for anyone.In this episode, Chris and I discuss the value of struggle—why we tend to view struggle as a negative thing, and why and how that should change.Chris shares stories of his own struggles with procrastination and describes the systems that help him stay organized and productive.He shares stories about wanting to control the wind, biking across Ireland, and using a stapler to make an emergency repair on a Ralph Lauren suit.You'll hear all of this and more in this week's episode.To learn more about Silverquicken, visit https://www.silverquicken.com/ or email Chis at chris.ryan@silverquicken.com.Transform your relationship with time. Visit https://scottmillercoaching.com/.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 261—Nigerian M.D., next season. Indian, family business. Central Asian, in the U.S.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 33:31


This week's episode kicks off with the usual rundown of recent activity on MBA LiveWire, which included admits for Cornell / Johnson's Round 1 and interview invites for Berkeley / Haas.  In terms of upcoming dates of note, this week INSEAD has its Round 2 deadline. Graham highlighted the Real Humans pieces for INSEAD, Haas, and Boston College / Carroll as well as a recently published focus on two veterans at NYU / Stern and an interview with Georgetown / McDonough's Career Services Director. Alex and Graham then discussed the recently published employment report for Northwestern / Kellogg (impressive, including 40% heading to consulting and an average starting salary of $165,000); this led to a discussion on whether we are heading into a recession, and its implications for prospective MBA students. Graham also reminded listeners about Clear Admit's upcoming Deferred Enrolment event for this Wednesday; signups are here: https://bit.ly/defermba As usual, this episode of WireTaps features three candidate profile reviews, taken from ApplyWire entries on the site. First up, Alex selected a female candidate from Nigeria who is targeting Round 1 next season. She's an M.D., and has a strong focus on the business-side of healthcare. She hasn't taken the GMAT yet, but Alex and Graham are hoping for a high score so she can target the very best U.S.-based healthcare MBA programs. This week's second candidate works in a family business in India. She's targeting Round 2 this season, and Alex and Graham had a conversation about her overall strategy, and whether it's worth keeping in mind that she might be a stronger candidate in Round 1 for next season. The final candidate for this episode has some somewhat pedestrian numbers, but Alex and Graham really like what's under the surface. This applicant is originally from Central Asia, and plan to return there in the long run, to focus on the sustainable energy industry. This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

The GMat Podcast
Mistaking a Nerve for a Hair | #222

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 51:17


Feat. GMat, Aidan, Ben J & Beppa. In this episode, we are all totally normal. Nobody is out of place or doing anything weird. Everything is fine. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 260—Healthcare data scientist. 15 years of experience, low GPA. First generation, energy career

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 38:47


This week's podcast kicks off with a look at the latest activity on MBA LiveWire, which led to a disussion about the anxiety the interview invite process creates for candidates. Graham highlighted the recently published Real Humans pieces for Toronto / Rotman and SMU / Cox before calling listeners attention to  the congested application deadlines for Round 2; on January 4 and 5, there are 16 top MBA programs with Round 2 deadlines! Graham also highlighted this Tuesday's webinar with Georgia / Terry, focused on Experiential Learning, signups are here: https://bit.ly/experientialmba Graham also reminded listeners of Clear Admit's upcoming Deferred Enrolment event featuring Wharton, MIT Sloan, Chicago Booth and many other leading programs; signups are here: https://bit.ly/defermba As usual, this episode features candidate profile reviews for three real applicants, each selected from ApplyWire.  First up, Alex selects a data scientist in the healthcare domain, who has a 720 GMAT (decent) and a 3.3 engineering undergraduate degree. They have also completed a masters degree, with a 3.8. They are an over-represented minority (likely Asian American), and Alex and Graham discussed the programs they are targeting, and whether Wharton should be included, because of its strength in the healthcare domain. This week's second candidate has 15 years of experience, and unfortunately has a low undergraduate GPA, due to some mental health issues. They have subsequently completed a masters degree with a stronger result (but did not share the exact GPA). Beyond the potential academics problem, they will need to address issues related to fit because of their additional length of work experience. The final candidate this week is targeting next season, and is a first generation candidate who's pivoted from engineering into finance. Alex and Graham like that pivot, and had a long conversation about their goals, post MBA, and whether they should stick to an energy theme, which has formed the basis of their prior experiences. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered by the immensely talented Dennis Crowley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, home of the National League Champion Phillies. Thanks for joining us and for reading these descriptions! Please remember to share the Clear Admit podcast with friends, colleagues, and anyone who might benefit from tuning in. Stay safe everybody.

The GMat Podcast
Kanye Is a Butthole | #221

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 62:45


Feat. GMat & Aidan. In this episode, we catch up after many weeks of missing each other. We chat quickly about Kanye butthole mouth and fear the end of ours lives. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

5 Talents Podcast - Commercial Real Estate, REI, Financial Freedom
Nima Rezaei - Save On Taxes By Utilizing Tax Strategies

5 Talents Podcast - Commercial Real Estate, REI, Financial Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:49


After coming to America from abroad, Nima Rezaei started elementary school and quickly adopted the American culture. Although he came from a long line of engineers, he knew that was not his calling. He flirted with law school and even prepped for the LSAT. However, during his undergrad as a business major, he was forced to take accounting courses and quickly fell in love. The logic behind the debits and credits, coupled with a supportive teacher, inspired him to become a CPA. He completed the GMAT with a score of 710 and started Grad School at Sacramento State University. Nima completed his grad school and his CPA at the same time, either of which is a difficult feat alone. He passed every class and every CPA exam on the first attempt. Having been in public accounting for a number of years, Nima recently started his own practice in Roseville, a suburb of Sacramento, and has been in operation since. [00:01 - 05:07] Opening SegmentIntroducing Nima to the show!Nima shares his experience in real estate and tax planning[05:08- 12:52] Achieving Financial Independence Through Discipline And EducationFinding passion in accountingReal estate investment is considered passive incomeInvesting in multifamily syndicationsInvestors are looking for a double-digit income through real estate[12:53 - 24:59] Save On Taxes By Utilizing Tax StrategiesVarious ways to save on taxes using:Corporate structurePassive incomeDepreciationWhat is depreciation recapture?Inheriting real estate can result in a step up in the basis[25:00 - 32:50] Closing SegmentNima emphasizes the importance of education and generational wealth     See the links below to connect with Nima! Quotes:"Whether it's Law, CPA, Engineer, whatever it is, I just personally believe that if somebody chases their passion they're going to be successful at it.” - Nima Rezaei“Real estate investment is not just about me. This is generational stuff that we're talking about." - Nima Rezaei Connect with Nima through LinkedIn! Connect with me:www.5talents.capitalLinkedInInstagramWatch 5T CRE on YouTubeLeave us a review and receive your free ebookEmail us --> abel@5tcre.com5 TALENTS CAPITAL | ABEL PACHECOIf you are ready to start your investment journey with 5 Talents Capital, here are the next steps you should take:View our informational video and case study at https://5talents.capital/grow-your-wealth/After viewing the video follow the prompts which will lead you to a scheduling link to meet one on one with Abel Pacheco. Register for our investor portal here investor portal once registered you will be able to review some of our past deals and you will receive alerts for upcoming investment opportunities. I Help People Build Wealth And 10X THEIR MONEY By Establishing Multiple Income Streams Through Multi-Family Real Estate Investments.Our blueprint to financial freedom is streamlined so you can get going in multifamily commercial real estate investments fast. Support the show

The GMat Podcast
'Smile' Gave Us Nightmares | #220

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 73:04


Feat. GMat & Aidan. In this episode, we talk about the new film Smile and the absolute terror it put in us AND some others in the theatre. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 258—Columbia ED ding, what now? Sports management in London. Economics faculty in India.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 38:21


This week's episode of the Clear Admit MBA Admissions podcast kicks off with a review of the upcoming admissions deadlines, including R1 interview invites for UPenn / Wharton and Duke / Fuqua.  Your hosts also discuss the wave of Early Action decisions out of Darden and Fuqua. Graham then highlighted the Real Humans pieces for Vanderbilt / Owen and Ohio State / Fisher as well as a recent adcom Q&A with Fuqua' Shari Hubert, noting that half their incoming class receives some form of merit-based scholarship. Graham also presented NYU / Stern's recently released employment report, which includes huge average starting salaries; Alex suggested that the large number of finance placements and the school's New York City location must be at least partially responsible for these impressive figures. Graham highlighted an upcoming webinar on Wednesday, focused on whether or not to take a test (GMAT/GRE vs. waiver); signups are here: https://bit.ly/testornotest. Graham also highlighted Clear Admit's upcoming Deferred Enrolment event; signups are here: https://bit.ly/defermba As usual, this episode features three real candidate profile reviews; coming from both LiveWire and ApplyWire entries. First up, Alex selects a candidate who was denied admission at Columbia ED, following their alumni interview. They have a very strong GMAT, work in MBB consulting, and are from South Africa. Based on the limited information shared by this candidate, the decision appeared surprising, so Alex and Graham discussed some of the possible reasons. Your hosts also encouraged the candidate to not loose focus, and to continue applying to top programs in Round 2.  This week's second candidate has charted a path from Colorado to Philadelphia (UPenn undergrad) to London where she is working for a large sports team, in human resources. Alex and Graham really like her profile, and think with the less traditional career path, she may be an appealing candidate for top programs, despite her numbers not jumping off the page (they are certainly near the averages at leading MBA programs). She also has a great post-MBA plan. The final candidate for this episode is a faculty member of economics at a university in India. They now want to transition into the business world. Alex and Graham wonder if they might be better off applying next season, with a more concrete plan... This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered by the immensely talented Dennis Crowley in Philadelphia. Thanks so much for tuning in to the show. Please remember to rate, review, and share the Clear Admit MBA Admissions podcast! Best of luck to all who are currently applying to business school...

The GMat Podcast
Ruining a Child's Birthday | #219

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 58:19


Feat. GMat, Ben J & Beppa. In this episode, we talk about Bec's birthday and the absolute destruction that we caused to a bunch of teenagers lives. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin
Michael Brandt Recap: The New IQ

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 9:25


The New IQ with Michael Brandt  Everything Michael Brandt does is fast and intense. Aside from being the CEO and co-founder of  Health Via Modern Nutrition (HVMN), he cruises through marathons at a cool 6-minute mile pace. With the launch of Ketone-IQ, Michael and his team created an entirely new category of ketone shots, which have taken over elite sports and high-end workplaces. Michael has quickly scaled the business to multi-million dollars in revenue including a $6MM contract with the US Department of Defense. As CEO, Michael is focused on cultivating a world-class team and increasing education and access to metabolic health & performance. Michael majored in computer science and product design at Stanford. He scored 99th %ile on his GMAT but decided to skip business school and go straight into entrepreneurship. Prior to starting H.V.M.N. he was a professor of brand strategy at the Academy of Art in San Francisco.Michael and his cofounder were awarded Forbes 30 Under 30. Outside of work, Michael is an avid triathlete and holds a 2:42 personal record for the marathon. He lives with his wife and daughter in LA.What are ketones? Ketones are a super efficient source of fuel for your brain, that leave you feeling energized and clear-headed.Visit Ketone IQ here - https://hvmn.comPurchase your ketones here - https://hvmn.com/products/ketone-iq-shotsRead more about the science behind it here - https://hvmn.com/pages/ketone-science----Full Transcript, Quote Cards, and a Show Summary are available here:https://www.jjlaughlin.com/blog

Poets&Quants
Why You Were Rejected Without An Interview

Poets&Quants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 27:29


MBA applicants with exceptional GMAT and GRE scores are routinely turned away by to business schools. Here's why

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 257—13 Applications in one round? Pivoting to investment banking. Start-up experience to tech PM

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 35:57


This edition of the Clear Admit MBA Admissions podcast kicks off with a quick review of the upcoming MBA admissions deadlines for this week, including final decisions from both Duke / Fuqua and UVA / Darden for their Early Action rounds. Alex and Graham then discussed the considerable activity last week on Live Wire in terms of interview invites for several top MBA programs. Graham highlighted three Real Humans pieces for Cambridge / Judge, CMU / Tepper and Rice / Jones and also noted the new adcom Q&As for INSEAD and CMU / Tepper. Your hosts then weighed in on the Class of 2024 profile for Michigan / Ross, which further highlighted the downturn in applications across the board for last season. Beyond the news and notes, Graham shared an email he and Alex received from a candidate who appears to be strong in all areas, but has a lower GMAT of 680. Alex offered some guidance with that predicament, some of which included aiming a little higher!   Before moving into the candidate profile reviews for this week, Graham reminded listeners Clear Admit's upcoming Deferred Enrolment event; signups are here: https://bit.ly/defermba As always, this episode features in-depth reviews of three ApplyWire entries: First up, Alex selects a candidate from India who has already applied to 13 programs in Round 1! Your hosts discuss the merits and risks of such a strategy, and wonder if they would have been better served with a more targeted approach. Their GRE is decent (326) but their converted GPA might also raise some concerns. They are a civil engineer, with tech consulting experience, and are also involved in three NGOs. This week's second candidate appears to have a strong profile in health care, and is looking to pivot to investment banking in the short run. Alex and Graham think this pivot makes sense based on the applicants long-term plans in healthcare private equity. This profile also prompted your hosts to get into a protracted discussion on the merits of having work experience from a brand-name firm. This week's final candidate appears to have had interesting start-up experience, and is looking to switch into tech product management, post MBA (they do have an engineering degree). This led to a discussion on the value of working in an entrepreneurial, start-up-type environment, in terms of being able to showcase impact. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered in the City of Brotherly Love by Dennis Crowley. Thanks for listening and please remember to spread the word about this podcast, and to rate and review wherever you may listen.

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin
The New IQ with Michael Brandt

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 60:44 Transcription Available


 The New IQ with Michael Brandt  Everything Michael Brandt does is fast and intense. Aside from being the CEO and co-founder of  Health Via Modern Nutrition (HVMN), he cruises through marathons at a cool 6-minute mile pace. With the launch of Ketone-IQ, Michael and his team created an entirely new category of ketone shots, which have taken over elite sports and high-end workplaces. Michael has quickly scaled the business to multi-million dollars in revenue including a $6MM contract with the US Department of Defense. As CEO, Michael is focused on cultivating a world-class team and increasing education and access to metabolic health & performance. Michael majored in computer science and product design at Stanford. He scored 99th %ile on his GMAT but decided to skip business school and go straight into entrepreneurship. Prior to starting H.V.M.N. he was a professor of brand strategy at the Academy of Art in San Francisco.Michael and his cofounder were awarded Forbes 30 Under 30. Outside of work, Michael is an avid triathlete and holds a 2:42 personal record for the marathon. He lives with his wife and daughter in LA.What are ketones? Ketones are a super efficient source of fuel for your brain, that leave you feeling energized and clear-headed.Visit Ketone IQ here - https://hvmn.comPurchase your ketones here - https://hvmn.com/products/ketone-iq-shotsRead more about the science behind it here - https://hvmn.com/pages/ketone-science----Full Transcript, Quote Cards, and a Show Summary are available here:https://www.jjlaughlin.com/blog

The GMat Podcast
Meth Heads Love Snakes | #218

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 62:46


Feat. GMat & Ben J. In this episode, we talk about growing up poor. We ask ourselves "sub dog?" and we have a good ol' chuckle. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

The Come Up
Zach Blume — President of Portal A on 2006 Web Videos, the Wheelhouse Investment, and Building with Your Best Friends

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 65:18


This interview features Zach Blume, Co-Founder and President of Portal A.  We discuss how he built a 360 monetization strategy for an early Internet video series, launching one of the first branded content studios with his childhood friends, creating one of the most well-known and longest-running digital formats in YouTube Rewind, how Portal A ended up selling a minority stake to Brett Montgomery's Wheelhouse, why feeling like outsiders is central to their identity, and what's up next for the Portal A team.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.comInterview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:Hi, I'm Chris Erwin. Welcome to the Come Up, a podcast that interviews entrepreneurs and leaders.Zach Blume:We built a business model around it that included merchandise, ad revenue share, ticketed events, and sponsorships. And so we actually ran that show at a profit, even though it was early internet video web series. And the idea was to build an entertainment property on the web that could become multi-season, could eventually travel to TV, which it did. It later became a TV series called White Collar Brawlers. It was super experimental, and I would say, looking back on a fairly innovative for three guys who had really no idea what we were doing and had no training in any of this, we built an entertainment property on the internet that was profitable.Chris Erwin:This week's episode featured Zach Blume, Co-Founder and President of Portal A. So Zach grew up in Berkeley and had a self-described normal suburban life of sports and friends. Zach then went to University of Oregon to study political science and pursued an early career running local political campaigns in California. But an opportune moment reunited Zach, with his two childhood friends to create one of the internet's earliest digital series White Collar Brawlers.After some unexpected success, the friend trio then became the founding team for Portal A, an award-winning digital and branded content company. Some highlights of our chat include his 360 monetization strategy for one of the earliest internet video brands, what it takes to co-found a successful company with your friends, how they landed a strategic investment from Wheelhouse, why feeling like an outsider is central to their identity, and how they're building towards the next massive creator opportunity. All right, let's get to it. Zach, thanks for being on the Come Up podcast.Zach Blume:It's a pleasure to be here.Chris Erwin:From our conversation yesterday, amazingly, I believe this is your first podcast interview ever. Is that right?Zach Blume:It's true. A lot of interviews over the years. Some predating the podcast era, some during the podcast era, but I'm honored to be invited onto yours. I've listened to a bunch of episodes, and we'll see how it goes.Chris Erwin:Awesome. All right, so as is typical, let's rewind a bit before we get into the whole Portal A story, although it actually starts pretty early on. So why don't you tell us about where you grew up and what your childhood was like?Zach Blume:Yeah, I grew up in Berkeley, California, the son of two die-hard New Yorkers who had moved out to California. My dad was born in the Bronx. My mom was from Manhattan. They were part of the New York exodus to California, and I was the first kid in my family who grew up in California and, of all places, Berkeley, childhood filled with lots of sports and playing in the street and all that good stuff. And the really interesting tie to the Portal A story, obviously, is that I met my two co-founders when we were somewhere between four and five years old. The stories differ, but we met in kindergarten, and we're close friends basically since we were little kids and played a lot of basketball together growing up. And the court that we played basketball in was called Portal A, which eventually became the name of our company 25 years later. The founder story of Portal A is very tied up in the childhood story of all for all three of us. I live in Oakland now, so I didn't stray too far from home.Chris Erwin:Got it. I remember in doing a little bit of research for this episode, I was trying to look up Portal A parks around the US, and I kept finding some in Orange County, so I thought you were an NorC kid, but No, you're a NorCal kid.Zach Blume:I mean, I think if there's an opposite of Orange County, it would probably be Berkeley.Chris Erwin:That's probably right.Zach Blume:But the court was actually an El Cerrito, which is an adjacent town to Berkeley, and it still exists. It's still around, and we should probably go play some hoops over there, but we haven't for years.Chris Erwin:Yeah, that'd be fun. So I have to ask, what did your parents do?Zach Blume:My dad has a business background. He runs and, up until actually six months ago, ran an investment advisory firm helping individuals manage their investments. It was a small company, five to six employees, just a great business, really community based, all about relationships and helping people manage their life and their money. And yeah, it's taught me a lot about business growing up, for sure.My mom was a therapist. She's retired now. She was a private practice in Berkeley. They've known each other since they were 20. They actually both went to the Wright Institute, which was a psychology graduate school in Berkeley. My dad was a psychologist briefly for about six months before he went back into business. And my mom was a therapist for 25 years. It was an interesting mix of business and psychology growing up, for sure.Chris Erwin:Got it. And were there any siblings?Zach Blume:No siblings? I'm the only one and-Chris Erwin:Oh, only child. Okay.Zach Blume:Yeah, interestingly, five of my closest friends, all groomsmen at my wedding, were from that same kindergarten class where I met Nate and Kai, my two co-founders. So there's definitely been a brotherly nature of those relationships. And at this point, I kind of consider Nate and Kai almost like brothers. We've known each other for 35 years, and we've been in business together for over 12 years, so it's pretty deep. Those relationships run pretty deep.Chris Erwin:Was there a part of you early on where you thought you might go into business and finance or become an investment manager like your father?Zach Blume:So there was also a lot of political kind of conversation and learning in my house. I remember from a very early age, my dad, when I was like eight, he would try to sit me down and read the Sunday Weekend Review in the New York Times. And it was like torture for me. But I think it got in there somewhere.In college, I actually studied political science and, for years, worked in the political world after I graduated from school. And I really thought that was my path, and it was for many years. I worked on campaigns. I started managing campaigns. I worked for political communication shop in San Francisco for years. I kind of burned out on the world of politics. I've since been re-engaged in a lot of different ways. But when I burned out on politics, that's when I thought I was going to go into business.I left the political world, was studying to go to business school, doing all the GMAT prep, and that's when Nate and Kai came to me and said, "We should make a web series together." Because I had a three-month gap, and it sounded so fun. We had made some stuff together just for fun earlier on. And so, while I was studying for the GMAT, I joined Nate and Kai to make this web series in the early days of internet video. And that's kind of the origin story of where we are today is that that web series, it was called White Collar Brawler. It was totally weird and crazy and awesome, and it started us on our journey to where we are today.Chris Erwin:Got it. So going back even a bit further, I'm just curious because you met your co-founders, Nate and Kai, back when you were in kindergarten, as you said, four to five years old, when you were in middle school, or when you in high school, were you guys part of the theater club? Were you creating any types of videos for your classes? There's something about meeting people early in your childhood, particularly in digital media, that I think blossoms into different relationships. So was there any kind of through line early on where you were interested in media entertainment before getting into PoliSci, which as part of your early career?Zach Blume:Yeah, I think there definitely was for Nate and Kai. There was less so for me. So Nate and Kai started making, maybe not in high school, but in their college years, they both went to school on the East Coast. This is like 2003, 2004, 2005. They started making internet, video, and web series when they were in college. And Kai was a film major, so he had some training, and they started just playing a lot of comedic stuff earliest day pre-YouTube, so quick time player-type stuff.So yeah, high school, I'm not so sure college for sure for them, at least it started building. And then, right after college, the three of us, plus another friend, grabbed a flight to Hanoi, bought motorcycles in Vietnam, and traveled across the country, and we made a web series called Huge In Asia.So it was like a 30-episode comedy travel web series, kind of just chronicling our journey across Vietnam. And then, they went on, I had to come back to the States for some work, but they went on to Mongolia, China, Laos, all sorts of different countries across Asia. That's where it really started for us the idea that you could not be in the formal, either entertainment industry or advertising industry. You could buy a pretty shitty camera, have an idea, start producing content and build an audience. And that was 2006. So the interest in internet video as a medium really started there.Then we all went our separate ways, and all did kind of normal early career professional stuff, but that Huge in Asia as an idea and an adventure was really the starting point for us. So yeah, so I would say the interest in video and film and just the distribution of it online started college years, and then the year after, we went to Asia.Chris Erwin:Got it. So just to add some context here, because I think YouTube was founded around 2004, and then it was bought by Google around '05, '06 pretty shortly after founding. So when you're coming out of college, I think this is around a 2006 timeframe, as you noted, when you guys decided to go to Asia and to do this motorcycle tour, was there a goal of, "Hey, there's an explosion in internet video, we have a chance to build an audience and make money off of this?" Or was it just, "Hey, this seems like a really fun thing to do. We're just coming out of college, we're kind of this in this exploratory phase, we like spending time with one another, let's go do this and see what happens." When you were thinking from the beginning, what was the end goal of that project?Zach Blume:Much more the latter. I mean, it was purely experimental. It was all about the adventure. I think there was a sense that we were at the dawn of something new, and I think that YouTube, Vimeo, I mean all the other platforms in the investment of history at this point, but there was an explosion of internet video technology that was enabling people like us to start making stuff. So I think there was like a sense that something was happening. It definitely was not a money-making endeavor. In fact, it was the opposite. And it was really just to experiment and play and see where it took us.Looking back on it, 15 years later, 18 years later, whatever it is, I think it's 100% served its purpose. We got our feet wet. We started experimenting. We started learning what worked, what didn't work, what audiences responded to, what made us happy. It kind of gelled our relationship as young adults versus as kids. And we never would've known at the time, but it did 100% lead to Portal A, and that's to where we are now.Chris Erwin:Okay, yeah, I hear you. I think, looking back in retrospect, it was definitely a catalyst to the forming of Portal A and where you got to where you are today, but it wasn't because when you came back from that trip, it wasn't like, "Oh, let's found Portal A and let's get going." You actually entered into the political realm for two to three years before founding Portal A, right?Zach Blume:Yep. That was always my plan, and that was the career I was going to pursue for sure.Chris Erwin:So, but the seed had been planted, but yeah, in '06, for the next two years, you become a political campaign manager. What campaigns were you working on?Zach Blume:First campaign was a Congressional campaign in Southern California. That was actually my first job out of college. We got trounced by 22 points in a very heavily Republican district by Mary Bono, who was Sonny Bono's widow. We had a candidate that we really liked, and it was the 2006 election, so it was kind of the midway point or the later stages of, I guess, Bush's first term. And there was a ground swell of just whenever there's a presidential election, two years later, the other party is the one that's like kind of getting their grassroots organizing on.So it was definitely an exciting time. It was an exciting election year. I happened to work on a campaign that was in a... It was Palm Springs. It was like that area, heavily Republican area, but I learned so much, and I was running a third of the district, and I loved it. I loved organizing. I felt like I was on the right side of history and doing the right thing.That then led to this fellowship that I did called The Coro Fellowship. I met one of my best friends on the campaign who had done the Coro Fellowship, and it was a year-long fellowship in political and public affairs. Everybody listening to this podcast will never have heard of Coro, but in the political and policy world, it's well-known and well-regarded, and that was a great experience. I got exposure across a bunch of different sectors, including government, labor unions, business, nonprofits, et cetera.Out of that, I started managing a campaign for the California State Assembly in Richmond, California, with a candidate, Tony Thurmond, who is now the Superintendent of Public Education in California. So he's gone on to do pretty big things. He's an amazing guy.And that led me to work at Storefront Political Media, which was a political media and communication shop in San Francisco that, at the time, ran all of Gavin Newsom's campaigns. He was then the mayor of San Francisco, obviously, is now the governor of California.I ran the mayor's race in Houston, of all places, elected Annise Parker, who was the first lesbian mayor of a major American city. And she was a fantastic executive out in Houston and then had a bunch of different clients, including firefighters unions, individual candidates. Ultimately, I was working for a client that was leading initiatives that didn't necessarily align with my own political values. And that was part of what led me to say I was ready to move on from the world of politics. So it was a fantastic experience, I learned so much, but that's what kind of prompted me to want to go to business school, which is what I was going to do until Nate and Kai came along and said, "Let's make a web series."Chris Erwin:Yeah. When you were working on these political campaigns and also working with Storefront Political Media, which is a national communication media and PR firm, were you bringing some of your grassroots internet video tactics to help build community, to help build influence and sway some of these elections? Was that part of kind of some of the unique flavor that you brought to these teams?Zach Blume:For sure, I was definitely the internet guy at that shop. I mean, there were a couple of us, there was a couple of coworkers who were of my generation. This was just when kind of Facebook was becoming a powerful tool for communications pre-Instagram, pre all those other platforms we're familiar with now. I definitely brought my expertise in video and the distribution of content online to that work. It was an interesting time politically. It was just at the advent of the internet as a powerful communications tool for campaigns.Chris Erwin:So then you're considering going to business school, you take the GMAT.Zach Blume:I got halfway through the class, and White Collar Brawler, that series, came calling. It was all-consuming. It was so fun. And we produced the hell out of that show, and it got a lot of notoriety. We got a big write-up in the New York Times, like big-Chris Erwin:Give us the context for White Collar Brawler again. What exactly was that project, and what were you supporting?Zach Blume:The log line was basically what happens when you take office workers whose muscles have become dilapidated by sitting in front of a computer all day long and train them to become amateur boxers. It just so happened that the two White Collar workers that were the stars of the show were Nate and Kai. So it was very, kind of like meta, we were the creators, and Nate and Kai were also the stars.The experimental part of it was shooting and producing the series in real-time. So there was an experiential element to the show, meaning as Nate and Kai were training to become boxers, fans of the show could actually come out and train with them, run on the beach in San Francisco or go to a training session with a boxing coach. We had events happening throughout the course of the show. It eventually culminated in an actual fight, a licensed fight in Berkeley between Nate and Kai for the Crown. And we had, I think, 1500 people showed up to that site and paid tickets-Chris Erwin:Was it boxing, mixed martial arts? What was the actual thoughts?Zach Blume:No, just old-school boxing.Chris Erwin:Okay.Zach Blume:It was the real deal. And-Chris Erwin:I may have missed this in the beginning. Who funded this? What was the purpose of it?Zach Blume:It was partially self-funded. It was partially funded by a friend of ours who had sold, in the early internet days, had sold his tech company to Google in one of the early Google acquisitions. So he just privately financed, I mean, we're not talking about big dollars here, and we built a business model around it that included merchandise, ad revenue share, events, ticketed events, and sponsorships, which I was in charge of in addition to other things.And so we actually ran that show at a profit, even though it was just an early internet video web series. It was actually a profitable property, and the idea was to build an entertainment property on the web that could become multi-season, could eventually travel to TV, which it did. It later became a TV series called White Collar Brawlers. And so it was actually super experimental, and I would say, looking back on it, fairly innovative in terms of for three guys who had really no idea what we were doing and had no training in any of this, we built an entertainment property on the internet that was profitable.Back to the question, I mean, that's what distracted me from going to business school because I felt like, first of all, I was learning so much, I was having so much fun creating content with two friends, and you just had a feeling that we were onto something and we didn't know what that thing was. We thought we were going to be an original entertainment company that would just make shows like White Collar Brawler, but we knew there was something. We knew there was a lot of activity and interest in this space. And so that took up all my attention and then took up my attention for the next 12 years.Chris Erwin:I will say from personal experience it saved you a couple of hundred thousand dollars and a lot of agony of actually taking that test.Zach Blume:Right, exactly.Chris Erwin:And being two years out of the workforce, speaking from personal experience.Zach Blume:Right. I know, I know.Chris Erwin:So, okay. And look, this is interesting to think about how you guys, as a founding team, were gelling and coming together. When you guys started talking, "Let's do this White Collar Brawler show as a team," what was your specific role, Zach? What was it like? What are you going to focus on?Zach Blume:Yeah, I mean, it actually reflects the role that I now play and ended up playing when we turned White Collar Brawler into a business. So Nate and Kai are more on the creative side, the creative and production side, both had experience. They had both actually before me had left their kind of "normal jobs," moved to LA, and started making internet video with a vision for again, "We don't know what it is, but there's something going on here, and we want to be a part of it."They had background as almost as creators themselves and also some training, actually with the physical act of production. So Nate and Kai were always much more on the creative side and the production side. And then my role was kind of capital B business. I was responsible for sponsorships. I was responsible for the operations of the show. I was responsible for where we were going to have office space, all that type of stuff. Basically the business side of creativity, and that's the same today. I mean, it's kind of like, it was just a foreshadow of the roles that we ended up playing as we were growing Portal A. And we've always had a super clear and complementary division of labor.I would say when looking for business partners, I think that might be, I mean, your rapport and your ability to communicate is lots of things are really important, but making sure that each person, each principal has a clear role and that they actually like that role and can succeed in that role is I think one of the keys to business success. So we've always had very clear roles. We've always liked our roles and felt like we belonged where we were. That's how it started with White Collar Brawler.Chris Erwin:That's awesome. Yeah, I have to give you some real kudos because you take very early on in your career, and in the digital entertainment ecosystem, you take an IP concept, and you create a diversified, sustainable business model around it where you have revenue coming in from advertising, sponsorships, merch, ticket sales, that's what many different IP properties want to figure out today. And many struggle to do that.Zach Blume:The only we could've described it back then as well as you described it now, but yes, that's basically what it was.Chris Erwin:Yeah, you look around at one another, you have this culmination in a ticketed event where there's over 1500 people pay to see the fight between Nate and Kai. And so you guys look around at one another and say, "Hey, we got something here." Is the next step? Let's found a business, call it Portal A and start doing this at scale. Or did it kind of just naturally happen, saying, "All right, let's find the next project and see where it goes from there."Zach Blume:It was much more, again, the latter. I mean, we did know that there was something brewing; I gave ourselves, at the very least credit for that. Did not have a business model. We did not have a plan. We had a kind of a concept and an idea and a good partnership. And I think that was really important too, is just how well we worked together.When we came out of White Collar Brawler, we had this idea credit to Kai. I believe we really wanted to do a show about whiskey, that that was going to be our next piece of IP that we wanted to develop and the concept behind the show, again because we didn't want, we were just going to be doing original series built for internet video was basically a distillery tour type show, but with a twist where there would be a membership model involved. And for anybody who was in a... 99% of viewers would just watch the show for the entertainment value, any type of good travel show that built that type of audience. But 1% of viewers would subscribe to the show and get a drum of whiskey. For each distillery that we were visiting as part of the show, they would actually get samples in the mail, and it would be kind of a whiskey of the month model married to an entertainment property.And we were coming out of White Collar Brawlers, we were visiting distilleries, getting drunk, trying to figure out this model. And we were super hyped on it. We thought it was a really interesting way to monetize internet video through subscriptions. And we even got into the logistics of shipping, and we were really going down that path, and in the meantime, we were broke, we were like 25 years old and-Chris Erwin:That was my next question. How are you funding all of this?Zach Blume:Well, we paid ourselves an extremely nominal salary. I would call it a stipend when we were making White Collar Brawler enough to survive. And then, coming out of that, we were trying to do our whiskey show, but that stipend went away. So we were without income, really. I mean, I remember going to Bank of America at some point, and there was so little... This is one of our funny stories that we tell each other. I remember this parking lot moment where the three of us had gone to Bank of America, where we had this White Collar Brawler account, or maybe it's a Portal A account. I'm not sure. And there was, I think, less than $1000 in there, and it was one of those like, oh, shit-type moments, and I remember going out to the parking lot and being like to Nate and Kai because I was always kind of the rah-rah guy of the three of us. And just, I remember basically having to give a motivational speech about that we were going to be okay, that this is going to be okay, despite the fact that we had absolutely zero money in the bank.That was where we were at that point. We were trying to figure out this whiskey idea, and then all of a sudden, because of the popularity of White Collar Brawler and some big YouTube videos we had made to promote the series, we started getting some inbound interest from brands. And that was never in the plan. We would think about sponsorships on our original series from brands, but never creative service worked directly to brands, and our first phone call was-Chris Erwin:Explain that difference for the listeners. I think that's a good nuance.Zach Blume:Yeah, I mean, if there was a business model, the business model we were considering was building properties like White Collar Brawler that could be sponsored by, in the best-case scenario, Nike or by Everlast, the boxing company, or by Gatorade or that's who we were pursuing for what-Chris Erwin:So think of title cards and brought to you by et cetera.Zach Blume:Exactly. Or like sponsoring events or merchandise or all that type of stuff. And we had some success, not from the big brands, but we had some success on White Collar Brawler with sponsorships from more regional brands, or like there were some beer companies and some smaller merchandising startups that were part of the sponsorship mix.I will say that we sent out about 500 to 1000 sponsorship emails and got about five sponsors. So we worked hard at it. And so that was the model we were going to pursue even for something like the whiskey show. We were going to look for sponsors and brand sponsors in that way. We never thought we were going to build a creative services company, meaning brands, an advertising company effectively, like brands hiring us as a service provider to create content. That was never, ever something we thought about.We started getting these phone calls. I remember being in a car one time, and I got this random call from a number I did not know, and it turned out to be a marketing manager at the Gap. Her name was Sue Kwon. Shout out, Sue Kwon, if you're out there. She was our first real client after White Collar Brawler. And we started making videos for the Gap, as kind of like a little agency production company.Then we got some more calls. There was a Tequila company that wanted us to make a web series called Tres Agaves Tequila. They wanted us to make a web series shot in Mexico about the origins of Tequila. Then we got a call from Jawbone, which was a hot Bluetooth speaker company at the time-based in the Bay Area. They wanted us to make a music video featuring a bunch of early YouTube influencers or creators.So we started getting these, we called them gigs at the time because literally all we were trying to do is pay our rent and so we could make the whiskey shows. We were just trying to get a little bit of income coming in so we could actually go out and make our dream whiskey show. And there were fun projects, and we weren't making advertising. We were making content, and that was a big difference for us. We weren't making pre-roll ads or 30-second ads. We were making web series for brands and music videos for brands and all that type of stuff. And without knowing it, we kind of stumbled across an area that was in high demand, which was brands trying to figure out what to do on platforms like YouTube and social media with video. We had established ourselves as understanding that world.So that's the origin of our branded content business which became the core of our business for many, many years was just one-off phone calls, unexpected phone calls, taking projects as gigs to pay the bills, and just kind of doing our best and seeing where it led.Chris Erwin:Hey listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of the Come Up. I have a quick ask for you if you dig what we're putting down. If you like the show, if you like our guests, it would really mean a lot if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show, it helps other people discover our work, and it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it, everybody. Let's get back to the interview.What was the moment where you felt it evolved from, "Hey, it's the three of us rotating between gigs, hiring freelancers as need be, to what became a business, which is called a systematized and efficient way to deliver consistent quality around a good or service."Zach Blume:I think the first year was the gig model. It was just a patchwork of projects in order to generate some form of income. The second year it started to feel real. There started to be a fairly steady flow of inbound interests, and then a kind of something we be started to become known for a type of content. It was kind of humorous, entertaining, felt like it was native to the internet and to YouTube.I think in that second year was when it started to feel like a business, and then some light clicked for me that we actually needed to do some business planning and thinking, and I had no idea what I was doing. I mean zero, negative. Negative idea what I was doing. But I had grown up where my dad was a small business owner, so I had some exposure, but I just remember being it was just like a vast sea of unknown principles and requirements that I had to navigate.Chris Erwin:How did you figure that out? Did you put together an advisory board? Did you call your dad? Were you calling some other friends in business?Zach Blume:One of our earliest advisors was not a business advisor. He was our sensei in some forms in the earliest days. And this is another shout-out to Steve Wolf, who you may know, who was on the executive team of Blip, which was one of those many early internet video platforms. He really helped us understand the space.We did not have a formal advisory board. We did not have a board. And it was truly trial and error. That's the best way I can describe it. It was just using our brains and figuring things out through mistakes and successes. It is a total blur looking back on it, but I think we were a good partnership. We had our heads screwed on straight, and we kind of learned how to operate.Chris Erwin:Another important part, too, is, like you said, when you all looked at your bank account, and everyone's face went white, but you were the rah-rah guy, which is like, "Hey, guys, we're going to figure this out. Where there's a will, there's a way." And I think that's a very important role. Shout to Steve Wolf. He was one of the execs that oversaw the AwesomenessTV network when I was there in 2014, 2015 timeframe. Super sharp guy, OG in the digital space. So not surprised to hear that he was a valuable advisor to you.All right, so then I think there's another pretty big moment where your business takes an even bigger step up. And I think this has to do with becoming the official partner for the YouTube Rewind project. The moment where you felt, "Okay, we're really onto something here."Zach Blume:Yeah, it was coincidental. We were introduced to somebody at YouTube in 2011 as a three-person team that was making internet video content and mostly on YouTube. And Rewind was just a twinkle of an idea. I mean, it was like there was a minor budget. It was basically a countdown of the top videos of the year. The budget was, I think, $20,000 in the first year to make Rewind. And we shot it in a small studio location. It was one of our earliest projects, and it was before Rewind became Rewind, the big thing that many of us are familiar with. It was a major validator for us to start working with YouTube directly as a client. And Rewind eventually became a project that defined our growth for many, many years to come. But it started very, very small.Chris Erwin:From that project. You've been around for now for 12 years, being founded around 2010. What did the growth in scaling part of your business looks like? With YouTube Rewind and other marquee projects, you're starting to get a sense of what are we actually building towards. Was there a point of view there or like, "Hey, we have inbound interests, we're working with brands and advertisers," all of a sudden we're working with publishers, and were you just kind of being more reactive or was it a mix of being reactive and proactive?Zach Blume:The best analogy I can draw is to kind of riding a wave. This may resonate with you, but I don't think we knew what was around the next corner or what the next thing was going to look like. We were just building momentum in those early years and taking each project as it came. We knew we had something. We knew we had a good partnership. We knew we were starting to bring some really interesting, smart people to the team, clients that were really willing to push some boundaries. And I was learning as I went along how to run a business, and Kai was learning, and Nate was learning how to create amazing content, and there was not a lot of foresight. It was mostly about riding a wave and seeing where the wave took us. Then doing a really good job. That was really important because every project, the success or not success for the project kind of dictated what the next chapter was going to look like.So we just focused on trying to build some good fundamentals for the business, trying to make sure we were profitable because we had to be and just making work that we were proud of. That's the extent of our planning, I think, was just what did the next three months look like and how do we keep riding this wave?Chris Erwin:Yeah, and that's something I think worth emphasizing for the listeners where it's, so often people will say you have to be super strategic in planning every single move and where is their white space and how are you going to beat out your competitors to get it? But I think when you are building a small business, and this is something that I reeducate myself on consistently with RockWater, it's really about the basics, which is know your core service offering and nail it and delight clients, from there, that's really the core foundation from where you grow and where other things can emerge. And I think that's a testament to really what you guys have done for well over a decade is you know your lane, and you operate so effectively within it that is now, over the past few years, created some other really exciting opportunities for you, your success in your lane led to the investment by Wheelhouse a couple of years back. So how did that come to be? Because I think that's a pretty big moment for the company.Zach Blume:That fast-forward a bit over years of misery and happiness and everything in between. We threw ourselves entirely into growing Portal A for the bulk of our 20s. It was all-encompassing, tons of sacrifices that were made to other parts of our lives, which I'm okay with looking back. I do think that 20s are a good time to throw yourself and just be completely focused and passionate about something like this. And we built that branded business. We diversified the type of clients we were working with. Projects got bigger and bigger, Rewind got bigger, and all the rest of our projects got bigger.Starting around 2016, we wanted very badly to return to the original thesis of Portal A, which was creating an original entertainment properties for the web. That's where it all started. And we had spent so many years working with brands, and it was fantastic, and it was a good business, and we got to make really cool stuff. But we had this hunger to return to the kind of to our entertainment roots in some ways. And we're not talking at that point about TV shows on broadcast, but about entertainment that was built for internet consumption.So we started taking steps back in that direction. As we were continuing to grow the branded business and expand in that area, we were committing ourselves to the original entertainment dream and started making shows horribly oversimplified what it took to actually start doing that again. But we started making shows again. We kept the branded business running and growing. And-Chris Erwin:When you started making shows, were you deficit-financing these yourself? So you were developing them internally and then taking them out as a slate to pitch and sell? Or were these being funded by other digital and streaming platforms that were going to put this content on their channels?Zach Blume:We were developing them internally, as a kind of a traditional development arm, and then taking them out to streaming and digital buyers. We were not doing the White Collar Brawler model, where we were building properties completely independently. So we did kind of slot in a little bit more into back into the entertainment ecosystem versus building our own properties, which that could be a whole separate conversation about the drawbacks and the benefits of that.So we were finding our way to making original series, again, we hired ahead of originals a guy named Evan Bregman, who's now at Rooster Teeth who's a good friend. And we started kind of trying to build that business again, and eventually, we started to feel like the branded business was running really well and growing year over year. We felt in order to take the next step forward on the entertainment side of our business. We needed a partner.So we had been a completely independent entire course of our trajectory. We were running a really good business at the time. It was very profitable, and the growth trajectory was really attractive, I think to outsiders. And so we started taking meetings with potential partners with the idea of strategically aligning ourselves to somebody who could level us up. We weren't looking for a sale. We were looking for truly a strategic partner.Chris Erwin:Were you running a formal process here where there was a mandate of, "We seek a strategic partner, we're going to take meetings over the next two months?" Or was it, "Hey, these relationships that we create in the industry, we got some inbounds, let's take these meetings with perhaps a little bit more intent than we would've a couple of years ago."Zach Blume:It was not a formal process in the sense that we had a banker or some advisor who was guiding us through it. But it was a process in that it was fairly intentional. Remember sitting down with Nate and Kai and listing out the players in the original entertainment world, whether that was individuals or production companies, mostly who we think would be good partners for us, and starting to navigate through our network to see who would be interested in talking. And the thing that I've found, especially in that period, which was 2017, '18 was when we were starting to have those conversations, it was a pretty hot period for digital media. I think there was a lot of consolidation going on. Our experience was once we started having a couple of those conversations, and people started to see our numbers and see the fact that we were running an actually profitable business that was growing year over year.It just like word got out, and it was a little bit of a domino. And so I just remember over the course of 2017, 2018, we took like 15 or 20 strategic meetings with potential strategic partners. Again, not running it through a banker or anything like that, but just kind of word of mouth. And it was a really interesting experience, and learned a lot about ourselves and about the space. And we just really clicked with Brent Montgomery and Ed Simpson, who were, at the time they, had sold their TV production company to ITV and they were working at ITV at the time but starting to think about what their post-ITV move was going to be, which would eventually become Wheelhouse and just to immediate connection with both of them on a personal and kind of business level.To them, we looked like a really smart partner. They felt like a really smart partner to us. And that's how that started. And there were other conversations going on at the time, but Brent and Ed and eventually Wheelhouse always felt like the right fit for us.Chris Erwin:From that first meeting with Wheelhouse, did they indicate in the room, "Hey, we want to do a deal, we're going to make an offer," or did it take a while to get there?Zach Blume:Well, this story I always tell about Ed, who everybody should know, Ed Simpson, he's an amazing guy, is that within five minutes of our first meeting he asked us, "Are you Butellas?" And I was floored. I was like-Chris Erwin:Gets right to the point.Zach Blume:I was like, we just shook hands. We were just getting to know each other, but I think honestly it's a testament to directness, and I think that actually really helped was kind of just getting our cards on the table from early days. And I think from the beginning. It was clear that Ed and Brent were looking for their first partners. Brent is also like no BS. He knows what he wants, he goes out and gets it, and the intent for an investment, a partnership of some sort, was clear from the very beginning. The eventual process took very long.Chris Erwin:How long was that process?Zach Blume:I think the timeframe from offer letter or LOI to signed paperwork was about a year. But I think there was a six-month or eight-month, even maybe even a full-year courtship before that. So the whole process from first meeting with Ed, where he asked us what our EBITDA was after shaking his hand, to signing paperwork and then collapsing on the floor because we were so exhausted was maybe year and a half, two years.Chris Erwin:Yeah. It always takes longer than people expect.Zach Blume:Yeah. It's incredible. And there were multiple points where that deal almost fell completely apart. In fact, I was sure it was done. It was toast. And what I've learned from other founders that I've talked to that have done deals, whether it's a sale or a minority investment or some sort of strategic partnership like this, is every time there's a deal, it almost fails twice or three times or more.It's just in the nature of things when there's two negotiators that there's going to be some moments of staring into the abyss. And I actually haven't heard of a deal that hasn't had that. So I learned that, in retrospect, at the time, they were hugely existential moments because we had put so much time and energy, and money into making this happen and having the deal almost fell apart multiple times was, it was really intense.Chris Erwin:Yeah. After having been a part of many M&A and capital raising processes throughout my career before RockWater when I was a banker, and then also at Big Frame, where I hired my old investment bank to represent us in a sale to Awesomeness backed by DreamWorks. And then at RockWater now, there's so many variables. You have different business models, you have different team cultures, you have leadership, you have investors, and to align on, are we working towards the same mission? Do we want the same thing in the future? Do we want the same thing now when we integrate? Where are we complementary? Will we actually succeed combined, or there alternative ways to do this? And I think it really is a special thing. We read a lot of deal headlines in the trade, so everyone thinks like, "Oh, deals get done all the time, it's easy."For all those headlines of the success, there's many, many more instances where deals have fallen apart that we don't hear about. I think the best thing that you guys had, Zach, was your BATNA, your Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement, but also your leverage. You had a profitable independent business. It was you, Zach, and Kai as the founders. You were growing, and you were profitable, and you could sustain with a partner or without a partner. And essentially, that led to a great deal for you guys. So it's awesome to say.Zach Blume:Yeah, it's true. I mean, we were not trying to parachute at our business in any stretch. We weren't trying to sell to then do an arm out to then leave. We were trying to level up, and I agree it was our ability to walk was good leverage for us, but we really wanted to do it because we really had committed ourselves to making this type of strategic move. I think it's very different when you're trying to capitalize on a moment in exit versus when you're trying to make an actual partnership to take the next step up in a business. And we just weren't ready to, and we still aren't ready to sunset Portal A.This is becoming our life's work. We are committed. We are always kind of doubling down on our commitment. Sometimes I can't believe I've been doing this for 12 years. It's unbelievable. And I hope that we do it for many, many, many, many, many more years.Chris Erwin:You found your magnum opus in the first company that you founded pretty rare and pretty incredible, right?Zach Blume:Yeah. I mean it's amazing, but it also puts a lot of pressure on that to fulfill a lot of parts of your being and or your professional desires. When you're focused on one thing for so long, as opposed to a lot of entrepreneurs who kind of jump or leapfrog from one thing to the next. We've had to come to grips with the fact that this is our baby, and it's continuing to be our baby. And it's a long play. It's a long run.Chris Erwin:This is actually a good segue to think about how this business is fulfilling to you, kind of over the past couple of years, some key changes that you've made of, how you're rewarding some of your most prominent team members, elevating them to partner and then thinking about what you want to grow into. So let's get into that. I look at your business. In your 20s, it was kind of the freshman segment of Portal A really starting to become into a real business. Then in your 30s, it's kind of like the sophomore years where you're starting to scale up and start to realize some pretty incredible success. And now you've got this incredible foundation.So not to aid you in front of everyone, but I think you and the founding team are entering your 40s over the next year or two years or so, entering the junior and senior years of your business. And for you guys to continue to be excited and fulfilled, tell us about some of the recent moves that you've made at the company and then where you want to go. What does that look like?Zach Blume:It's a great question. I wonder what happens after the junior and senior year sets. We're definitely at a different life stage, just on a personal level, then we were when we were on the treadmill moving 100 miles per hour in our 20s and in the kind of like the first half of Portal A and the deal with Wheelhouse was definitely like a marker, or maybe it was the dividing line between the freshman and sophomore era as you put it.First of all, I mean the last couple of years have been crazy, the pandemic, the election in 2020, there's been a lot of volatility in the world over the last few years, but what we're trying to do in the face of that volatility and kind of coming out of the Wheelhouse partnership, which again marked a new chapter for us is, create A on the business side sustainability and kind of consistency. And we've been able to do that. I mean, we've been profitable, consistent from a numbers perspective for many years, but it definitely felt for many years, we were running on a treadmill trying to keep up.And over the last several years, we've been trying to do as we enter into new periods of our lives personally, as we bring other people into the business as partners is create a business that doesn't feel like you're about to gasp for air and collapse at the end of every year, but actually create something that's sustainable and supports other parts of our lives that are really important to us. Family, having kids, all that type of stuff.I think on the business side, it's like, and I think we've done this over the last several years, but how do we move from sprinting to running at a good pace and building something that feels sustainable over the course of the next chapter of our lives as our lives change. And that's been really important, and you mentioned this, but bringing, we brought four new partners into the business. Our head of production, our head of business operations, our managing director, and our head of talent partnerships all had been with us for five to seven years each. And we made them partners a couple of years ago.We've invested in our team in a way that we always try to take care of people, but we truly doubled down on that over the last several years so that people feel like they're working at a place that they can work at for many years and feel very taken care of and part of a community, et cetera.Chris Erwin:Quick question on partnership front. So when you elevate these individuals to partners, does that mean there's a compensation bump but is also a bigger voice at the table for bigger strategic decisions for the company? What is the value exchange for that?Zach Blume:They went from kind of executives to partners. I mean, they're always executives, and I think what a partnership means is they participate in the profitability of the company. They participate in an exit. If there is a future, another deal on the horizon, they would have a stake in that. And then they have visibility into all aspects of the business and a seat at the table for really important business decisions around the type of work we take on, the type of things we invest in, the vision that we lay out for the company, the priorities for the year or for the next few years, et cetera.So it's been incredible, and I think it was a big moment. It was always Nate, Kai, and I sitting in a room, staring at each other's faces and trying to figure things out. And to bring in Robyn, Emma, Elyse, and Brittani, they're all so incredibly smart and powerful in their own ways, and it's just made our decision-making much more thoughtful, multifaceted, strategic, and I think intelligent, that group of three became a group of seven. That's been a major milestone and moment for us.So that was a big part of things. And investing in our team and doubling down on the team's wellness and creating a pace of work that was sustainable, not working over Thanksgiving, all that type, taking long breaks, giving days, all sorts of steps we've taken over the last several years to make Portal A sustainable business entity over many years.So that's number one in terms of what this chapter looks like. And I think number two is we just want to make good shit. At the end of the day, when we put ourselves in the future and try to look back on what will feel most valuable about this whole experience, what we make because we are a creative company is at the top of the list. So investing in the quality of the work that we do, investing in projects that may not be the most profitable or they may even not be profitable at all, but that are important to us creatively experimenting in new content formats, longer form, feature-length type stuff, short film, all sorts of getting back to kind of our roots in some ways as experimental content producers and investing in the quality of the work that we're making either on the original side of the business or on the brand side of the business that has become kind of central to our whole vision and identity is just this relentless commitment to quality.Chris Erwin:I want to touch on that because when we were preparing for this interview, something that we spoke about was, yeah, your commitment to creative quality and craft. Sometimes that is undervalued, sometimes that feels like it's going against the grain, and like you said, Zach, maybe there's a near-term impact where these new IP concepts, they're not profitable immediately, but there's actually long-term value to it where adherence to that mission keeps the leadership and founding team galvanized and fulfilled. It also keeps your business exciting for new team members that you want to recruit, building towards future opportunity where there can be much more meaningful revenues to generate in the future.So that's hard to do when you face kind of the near-term headwinds of those decisions, but you got to be steadfast in that it's clearly worked for you guys for over 12 years, and I think that that's just an important reminder that this is a founding value of our company and that's what's going to continue to drive long term success for the next 10, 20 plus years.Zach Blume:Everything you just said, I would like you to come speak to our company, and we can all talk about it together. I mean, that's exactly where we are at. What we'll define the next five, 10, however many years of this adventure will be the quality of the work that we're making. I don't want to speak too soon, and I'm going to knock on wood, but I feel like we've cracked the code on how to run this business well and how to find good people, take care of our people, take care of ourselves, find our lane and operate really well in our lane. And what's going to define the next chapter is how good is the stuff we're making. Is it something we're proud of? And that's both from a kind of, almost like, a spiritual or existential level, but it does layer back to business because we believe what will differentiate us is the quality of the work that we're creating. And so it will lead to new opportunity and new horizons when we're making really good stuff.Chris Erwin:Last one or two questions before we get into rapid fire and we close out here is, are there any current projects that you're working on or things that you're thinking about that maybe are good signals to the listeners of the type of things that you're going to be doing more of going forward?Zach Blume:One really interesting one is completely different from a lot of the work that people may know us for, but my partner Nate is developing a feature documentary. We've done one feature-length documentary, we did it with YouTube original called State of Pride, all about the origins and the genesis of Pride festivals across the country. And it's a beautiful film called State of Pride. It's on YouTube. Nate did a really cool, together with Portal A, did a really cool 30-minute documentary in 2020 about the response from the Trump administration to the first year of COVID.So we've definitely played with longer-form documentary projects. This project is called Fault Lines, and it is a longer-formed feature documentary about housing in America and about the shortage of housing in America, which is driving up housing costs for everybody. Kind of like the deep backstory on where that all comes from.No brands associated with that project. It's going to be financed by foundations and private funders, but we're really excited about it, and it's that kind of getting back to telling interesting stories, experimenting with new formats. It's not going to be the core of our business for the next several years, but we are going to be investing in those types of projects where we can kind of make a name for ourselves in new spaces.And then, of course, we're doing all sorts of cool stuff with our brand partners like big, splashy campaigns that are coming out later this year that I shouldn't talk about yet, but doing a lot of work with Target and Google and we have long-standing partners at Lenovo, the computer maker and all sorts of cool branded stuff. We have original shows in the pipeline.So I think the business mix for us is branded content. Again, nothing that we make should ever feel like a commercial, and if it does, we've failed ourselves and our partners. So content that is made in partnership with brands feels like something you'd actually want to watch. That's one pillar. The second pillar is original series. We just released Level Up, which is a show on Snapchat starting Stephen Curry mentoring a new generation of athletes. So there's all sorts of series like that that we're working on.Then this new area, which is short films, documentary feature films that we're investing in as a loss leader, like truly a loss leader, but as a way to diversify the type of content we're making and invest in quality like I was just talking about.Chris Erwin:That's great. You guys are doing a lot. Last quick question before rapid fire, how would you succinctly describe how your leadership philosophy has evolved now, being, call it 12 years into the Portal A business?Zach Blume:When you're building something, especially for us, we started from zero. We didn't come from the space. We didn't have any relationships. It was completely homegrown and organic. When you're building something, it's like you're captaining a tiny little ship in very rocky waters, and it is survival in some ways. I mean, it's both like I'm just picturing someone on the deck of a little dinghy in the middle of the ocean, just like yelling and surviving and getting thrown all over the place, and you're just trying to survive and make it through the first few years. And I think that was in many ways what leadership, just getting through the choppy waters and trying to grow and survive, was what it looked like for many years in the early days of growing our company.I think now that we've made it through those choppy waters and kind of established ourselves and built something that has a foundation underneath it. I really focus on sustainability and vision. And so that means creating an environment where people can be fulfilled creatively in terms of the people that they work with in terms of the pace of the work, both for the team that works with us and also for us, for ourselves. So creating that kind of a rhythm that feels not like you're like a tiny boat in a gigantic ocean and just trying to survive, but that feels steady and sustainable and solid. So creating that kind of consistency and strength, and that's one side of it. And then, for many years, it was just eat what you killed. And that was so many years of growing the company.Now it's like, "Okay, who do we want to be and who are we and who do we want to be?" And I think I spend so much time thinking about that and then communicating that back to the team and then repeating it over and over and over and over again and giving people something that they can understand and hold onto and feel like they're working toward a common cause has become so much more important now than it was when we were just basically in survival mode. So I think, yeah, sustainability and vision have become the most important pieces.Chris Erwin:I love that. Very well said, Zach. All right, so last segment from me giving you a bit of kudos at the end of this interview. Look, a lot of the people that I interview on the show, I've known for years, if not decades or more. I've actually interviewed people that I've known for over 30 years on this show. I've really only gotten to know you over the past. I think like two to three months through a handful of conversations. But I will say some of the kudos is it feels like I've known you a lot longer than that. I think we have a really shared sensibility, and I think that that's a testament to in this space.What I really like about being at the intersection of digital and entertainment is that there's just some really good people in it. And I think that's not the same from a lot of other industries that I've worked in. And I think you really embody that spirit. I think you really care about your people. I think you really care about your clients and your team and your partners, and that's really valuable. And I can even sense that in what the audience isn't hearing in between these segments is I really just love that note, how you are like the rah-rah spirit for your team. You've even been that for me, talking me up about me as a podcast host and supporting our content work where I'm going through a bit of my own existential crisis with RockWater on, I can feel that very positive energy from you, and I think that makes you a very, very, very compelling leader.Lastly, just to reiterate one of the points I made earlier, you have this extreme focus on your core service and product and on your team and doing right by your client partners. And I think that is actually shows incredible strategic focus and vision versus some really complex framework for how Portal A is going to take over the entire digital entertainment ecosystem with 10 different business models. You guys have nailed your core, and it's given you so much opportunity for what I define as the very exciting junior and senior years that are going to come for you. So massive kudos to you and the team for what you've built exemplary, and I look forward to many more conversations in the future.Zach Blume:Thank you. It feels like you understand us, and I really appreciate that. So thank you for that.Chris Erwin:For sure. Easy to do. All right, so to the rapid-fire, I'm going to ask six questions and the rules or as follows, you'll provide short answers. Maybe just one sentence, maybe just one to two words. Do you understand the rules, Zach?Zach Blume:Yes, I do.Chris Erwin:Okay, cool. All right, first one, proudest life moment.Zach Blume:Birth of my daughter.Chris Erwin:What do you want to do less of in 2022?Zach Blume:Worrying about the state of our union?Chris Erwin:Okay, what do you want to do more of?Zach Blume:Making work that we are proud of and stands the test of time.Chris Erwin:One to two things drive your success?Zach Blume:Focus and commitment, and loyalty.Chris Erwin:Okay, last three here. Advice for media execs going into the second half of this year and 2023.Zach Blume:Brace yourselves. I mean, I don't want to fear monger or create an atmosphere of angst or anxiety, but I definitely can see that there are headwinds ahead and many of us have been through these periods before, and we can make it through, but it's definitely a time to focus on fundamentals and be aware of your costs and brace yourselves for what could be a choppy period.Chris Erwin:Yeah, well said. Any future startup ambitions?Zach Blume:Not beyond what we're doing. I mean, if there's ever sunset to Portal A, I would love to get involved again in the political world. And we've done a lot of political work over the years through Portal A but at the moment, continuing to double down on what we're building.Chris Erwin:Got it. The easy final one for you. How can people get in contact with you?Zach Blume:I don't know, old school email, I mean, really old school, I guess, would be a landline, but email Zach, Z-A-C-H@portal-a.com, or you can find me on LinkedIn, but that sounds really lame, so just send me an email.Chris Erwin:Okay. I think LinkedIn is great.Zach Blume:No, I love Linkedin, but I just don't want to be the guy hawking his LinkedIn profile.Chris Erwin:Got it. All right, Zach, that's it. Thanks for being on the Come Up podcast.Zach Blume:It's been a pleasure, Chris. It's a great service to the digital media, community and world and really appreciated being here.Chris Erwin:All right, quick heads up that our company has a new service offering. We just introduced RockWater Plus, which is for companies who want an ongoing consulting partner at a low monthly retainer, yet also need a partner who can flex up for bigger projects when they arise. So who is this for? Well, three main stakeholders. One, operators who seek growth and better run operations. Two, investors who need help with custom industry research and diligence. And three, leadership who wants a bolt-on strategy team and thought partner.So what is included with RockWater Plus? We do weekly calls to review KPIs or any ad hoc operational needs. We create KPI dashboards to do monthly performanc

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Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 256—London-based finance guy. Tech applicant seeking entrepreneurship. Indian lawyer, next season.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 42:00


This week's action-packed episode runs the gamut from admissions gossip to HBS interview invites, and from Fortune's MBA ranking to candidate profile reviews...  Alex and Graham kick things off by reviewing the upcoming MBA admissions deadlines, including UNC / Kenan Flagler, Texas / McCombs and USC / Marshall.  They also discuss the activity on MBA LiveWire as Harvard released its Round 1 interview invites. This led to a segment on the forthcoming departure of Chad Losee from Harvard, who joins admissions directors from Stanford, Columbia, Michigan, Tepper, and more as part of an admissions exodus. Graham then highlighted the Real Humans pieces from Emory / Goizueta, ESADE, London Business School and Rochester / Simon as well as the recently published class profiles for Stanford, Chicago / Booth and UVA / Darden. And finally, before tackling three ApplyWire entries, Graham asked Alex to weigh in on the recent MBA ranking from Fortune. As to the this week's profile reviews: first up, Alex picks a finance candidate from London. They have very good numbers (750, 4.0) and have targeted all the usual suspects in terms of top programs in the Northeast of the U.S. While they are active at work, with respect to additional activities, Alex and Graham are curious what they do outside of work. There was also some discussion regarding their heritage, and its potential impact on their candidacy. This week's second candidate also has an outstanding GMAT (750), but their GPA is slightly lower. They are a reapplicant, and have made some improvements over the additional year. Their goal is entrepreneurship, and Alex and Graham encouraged them to also consider UPenn / Wharton (they do not want to be on the West Coast, which rules out some additional options). Finally, Alex selects an Indian lawyer, who is targeting next season. There is a lot to like about their experience, and the numbers are very good, too. Because they already have 8 years of experience, Graham and Alex would have preferred if they were targeting this season, but next season, in the first rounds, may well be fine, as long as they have a good focus on their “fit”. Fit because they are a lawyer, and also because they are on the longer end of the work experience spectrum. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered in West Philadelphia by the Steve Albini of podcasts, Dennis Crowley. Thanks for tuning into the show and please remember to subscribe, rate, and review this show wherever you may be listening!

The GMat Podcast

Feat. GMat & Ben J In this episode, we take the time to look over the recent sketch we made and tell stories, analyze and come to the conclusion that we're all morons. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

The GMat Podcast
Who Really Assassinated Kennedy? | #217

The GMat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 81:26


Feat. GMat, Aidan, Ben J, Beppa & Sienna. In this episode, we are LIVE!! We get into a big Q&A at the end of the episode and it goes off the rails. Check out: VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/c/thegmatpodcast PATREON: www.patreon.com/thegmatpodcast FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/therealgmat/ TWITCH: www.twitch.tv/therealgmat INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/therealgmat Buy some GMat threads at https://teespring.com/stores/therealgmat Animation and graphics by Ben Mansur https://www.instagram.com/benjaminmansurart/ More GMat Content over at Send Noobs | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfmRvAAh3T10D1fdMZyrb9Q Contact us at contact@therealgmat.tv

The Dominate Test Prep Podcast
63. How Many Prep Resources are Too Many Prep Resources? [Mailbag]

The Dominate Test Prep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 15:43


It's easy to feel like more is better when it comes to preparing for your standardized test. More instructional videos. More practice problems. Another book. Another course. But the reality is that more is not always better on high-stakes exams, as it can lead to uncertainty -- and therefore wrong answers -- during the time pressure of test day. Instead, we explain in this episode why it's important to have "one voice" as you're learning the underlying content and test-taking strategies in preparation for your exam. We also tell you how to find that voice and make recommendations for resources you can trust.Questions? Comments? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Reach out to us at support@dominatetestprep.com. We'd love to hear from you!SIMILAR EPISODESIf you enjoyed this episode, we encourage you to check out these other similar episodes of The Dominate Test Prep Podcast:Episode 5: The Success Triad + Time Management TipsEpisode 61: Priorities if You're Short on Study TimeEpisode 56: How to Use Practice Tests (and What to Avoid), with Vinay NarangA DOSE OF MOTIVATION“Too many cooks spoil the broth.” - English Proverb