Ahead Of The Curve with Jonathan Gelnar

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Host Jonathan Gelnar and an array of guests from differing backgrounds discuss how to develop the complete baseball player. This will be your source for the most up to date coaching strategies for baseball player and coach development.

Jonathan Gelnar


    • May 20, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 53m AVG DURATION
    • 252 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from Ahead Of The Curve with Jonathan Gelnar

    Eric Borba on championship standards and individual player development.

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 75:18

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Today we have on Eric Borba, head baseball coach at Orange Lutheran High School.  Eric is in his 13th year there after leaving a very successful program at De LaSalle High School where he was the head coach from 2004-08.  Over 13 years, Borba has proven himself to be one of the elite coaches and programs in high school baseball. He has also been a frequent coach for several teams for team USA. On the show we discuss the standards that it takes to be a player and a coach at Orange Lutheran, and we dig heavily into player development. Resources - FCA Coaches Bible - Leading with the heart- Coach K   Contact https://twitter.com/coachborbs23 eric.borba@lhsoc.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Derek Sullivan on a year of individualized player development

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 81:08

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.      Bio Derek Sullivan begins his eighth season as the Head Coach of the Panthers, his 16th year as a member of the coaching staff, and his 19th involved in the City College program. In addition to his coaching duties, he also teaches full-time in the Kinesiology, Health, and Athletics Division. In his seven years as the head coach, Coach Sullivan has had 90 players transfer to four-year universities. Having a commitment to prepare for the next level, both on the field and off, is a huge part of becoming a “Sac City Guy”. While at City, Coach Sullivan has amassed an overall record of 191-108 (.639 winning %). The Panthers have qualified for the postseason in six of his seven years, won three Super Regionals two Sectionals and finished 3rd in California in 2019 and as the State Runner-Up in 2018!  “Sully” returned to the coach for the Panthers in 2005 after playing for ABCA Hall of Fame coach, Ed Blankmeyer, at St. John’s University in 2003 and 2004. On the show, Derek fills us in on what a "sac city guy" is and we spend a bulk of our time on going through a year of individual player development. This episode is so good with Derek Sullivan!     Time Stamps 1:00- Sac City History 6:20- First 100 days/Vision of the program 12:30- "Sac City Guy" Standards 20:00- "Whats a big leaguer look like?" 28:20:- Team Building activities 35:00- Outline of Player Development 43:00- Offseason-Pre Season 48:30- In season-Post Season 1:00:00- Self Reflection after the season 1:05:00- Last Things    Resources Sleep Research and studies Mans Search for meaning- Victor Frankl Heads Up Baseball 2.0 Old School vs New School- Eugene Bleecker   Contact https://twitter.com/dsullivanscc sullivd@scc.losrios.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Mitch Thompson on culture, practice design and making the big time where you are.

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 57:42

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Among the most highly respected coaches and recruiters in college baseball, Mitch Thompson is beginning his 8th year as head coach at McLennan Community College. Thompson was named McLennan head coach before the 2014 season and immediately began rebuilding the program to prominence, National Runner Up in 2015. 5th place in 2017. Had the top JUCOMLB Draft pick in two of the last three years.  They are also one of only 7 Division 1 JC’s to have 40 or more wins in each of the last 5 years.   Before being named McLennan head coach, Thompson spent one season as the South Texas area scouting supervisor for the Kansas City Royals organization after spending nearly two decades on staff at Baylor University (1995-2012) where he was the Bears’ hitting instructor and primary recruiter.  Mitch also began his coaching career as a graduate assistant for legendary coach Ron Polk at Mississippi State. on the show we discuss building the culture at a JUCO, we talk practice development/design, and how to make the big time where you are.   Time stamps 3:00- Vision of the program 5:00- Big time is where you are 10- Rules and s 13:30- Building the culture at McLennan 23:37- Offseason Calendar 30:00- Developing a team offense. 34:05- Pre Season- In season Practices 46:00- Last Things   Resources Ron Polks Baseball Handbook ABCA Conventions The Travelers Gift- Andy Andrews   Contact 254-299-8148 mthompson@mclennan.edu

    Mitch Thompson on culture, practice design and making the big time where you are.

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 57:42

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Among the most highly respected coaches and recruiters in college baseball, Mitch Thompson is beginning his 8th year as head coach at McLennan Community College. Thompson was named McLennan head coach before the 2014 season and immediately began rebuilding the program to prominence, National Runner Up in 2015. 5th place in 2017. Had the top JUCOMLB Draft pick in two of the last three years. They are also one of only 7 Division 1 JC’s to have 40 or more wins in each of the last 5 years.   Before being named McLennan head coach, Thompson spent one season as the South Texas area scouting supervisor for the Kansas City Royals organization after spending nearly two decades on staff at Baylor University (1995-2012) where he was the Bears’ hitting instructor and primary recruiter.  Mitch also began his coaching career as a graduate assistant for legendary coach Ron Polk at Mississippi State. on the show we discuss building the culture at a JUCO, we talk practice development/design, and how to make the big time where you are.   Time stamps 3:00- Vision of the program 5:00- Big time is where you are 10- Rules and s 13:30- Building the culture at McLennan 23:37- Offseason Calendar 30:00- Developing a team offense. 34:05- Pre Season- In season Practices 46:00- Last Things   Resources Ron Polks Baseball Handbook ABCA Conventions The Travelers Gift- Andy Andrews   Contact 254-299-8148 mthompson@mclennan.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Larry Vucan on holistic championship program building.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 67:38

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Larry Vucan- Head Baseball Coach, Southlake Carroll (TX)Larry took over in 2017 as the head coach at Carroll since he took over, they reached the final four 3 times in his first 4 years and won back to back Texas High School 6A State Baseball Championships in 2018 and 2019 He was Named Dallas/Ft. Worth High School Coach of the Year 2017 and 2019 A little background on Larry He is a native of El Paso. Played Collegiately at New Mexico Highlands University. and Played professionally in the Italian Baseball League in Trieste, Italy and then Coached and Managed there. On the show we discuss how to communicate throughout a large program (they have 5 total HS teams) Larry goes in depth over his player evaluation system and we discuss how to get teams ready for post season play Here is Larry Vucan   Timestamps 0:30- Playing in Italy 2:30- Vision of the program 26:35- Developing a player evaluation system 37:34- Pre-Season 42:03- In-Season Advice 55:00- Last Things   Resources Lincoln on Leadership BF Skinner- Operant Conditioning John Wooden Augie Garrido   Contact Twitter  

    Larry Vucan on holistic championship program building.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 67:38

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Larry Vucan- Head Baseball Coach, Southlake Carroll (TX) Larry took over in 2017 as the head coach at Carroll since he took over, they reached the final four 3 times in his first 4 years and won back to back Texas High School 6A State Baseball Championships in 2018 and 2019 He was Named Dallas/Ft. Worth High School Coach of the Year 2017 and 2019 A little background on Larry  He is a native of El Paso. Played Collegiately at New Mexico Highlands University. and Played professionally in the Italian Baseball League in Trieste, Italy and then Coached and Managed there. On the show we discuss how to communicate throughout a large program (they have 5 total HS teams) Larry goes in depth over his player evaluation system and we discuss how to get teams ready for post season play Here is Larry Vucan   Timestamps 0:30- Playing in Italy 2:30- Vision of the program 26:35- Developing a player evaluation system 37:34- Pre-Season 42:03- In-Season Advice 55:00- Last Things   Resources Lincoln on Leadership BF Skinner- Operant Conditioning John Wooden Augie Garrido   Contact Twitter   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Wes Carroll on building a culture of family, relationship building, and crucial conversations.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 75:44

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Wes Carroll heads into his 14th season as head baseball coach at the University of Evansville as the Aces usher in a new era of Evansville Baseball and has taken the program to new heights. Carroll learned the “the Purple Aces’ way” growing up just a few minutes from campus in nearby Newburgh, Indiana. He watched his older brother and former Major League infielder, Jamey Carroll, excel at shortstop, and later got to experience the success the program is capable of first-hand as a four-year starter for the Purple Aces and a member of UE’s 2000 NCAA Tournament team.   Following his college career at Evansville, Carroll was drafted in the 37th round of the Major League Baseball first-year player draft by the Philadelphia Phillies. Carroll spent the next five years playing Minor League Baseball for the Phillies, and later, for the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals organization. As a part of the now-Nationals organization, Carroll played parts of two seasons at the AAA level.  He retired from the professional ranks in the spring of 2006, but not before he was able to play alongside his older brother, Jamey, in two spring training games for the Washington Nationals. Carroll then returned to his alma mater in the summer of 2006 as an assistant coach with the Purple Aces’ program and was named the 12th head coach in UE baseball history on July 2, 2008.  On the show we discuss how to create a family culture, a year of player development, and change he made from when he started as a 28 year old head coach. Time stamps 1:00- Sports Family/Growing up and coming back to Evansville 9:00- Changes he has made in his career 22:00- Our culture is family 28:30- Fall Development 37:00- Pre Season 51:00- In Season  1:00:00- Resources Resources Mental Game of Baseball- HA Dorfmann Anything Jon Gordon Contact wc2@evansville.edu Twitter  

    Wes Carroll on building a culture of family, relationship building, and crucial conversations.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 75:44

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Wes Carroll heads into his 14th season as head baseball coach at the University of Evansville as the Aces usher in a new era of Evansville Baseball and has taken the program to new heights. Carroll learned the “the Purple Aces’ way” growing up just a few minutes from campus in nearby Newburgh, Indiana. He watched his older brother and former Major League infielder, Jamey Carroll, excel at shortstop, and later got to experience the success the program is capable of first-hand as a four-year starter for the Purple Aces and a member of UE’s 2000 NCAA Tournament team.   Following his college career at Evansville, Carroll was drafted in the 37th round of the Major League Baseball first-year player draft by the Philadelphia Phillies. Carroll spent the next five years playing Minor League Baseball for the Phillies, and later, for the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals organization. As a part of the now-Nationals organization, Carroll played parts of two seasons at the AAA level. He retired from the professional ranks in the spring of 2006, but not before he was able to play alongside his older brother, Jamey, in two spring training games for the Washington Nationals. Carroll then returned to his alma mater in the summer of 2006 as an assistant coach with the Purple Aces’ program and was named the 12th head coach in UE baseball history on July 2, 2008.  On the show we discuss how to create a family culture, a year of player development, and change he made from when he started as a 28 year old head coach. Time stamps 1:00- Sports Family/Growing up and coming back to Evansville 9:00- Changes he has made in his career 22:00- Our culture is family 28:30- Fall Development 37:00- Pre Season 51:00- In Season  1:00:00- Resources Resources Mental Game of Baseball- HA Dorfmann Anything Jon Gordon Contact wc2@evansville.edu Twitter   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Matt Parker on how to implement championship culture and standards.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 68:48

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. 20% off AND free shipping.  Bio Matt Parker started in 2018 as head coach of Eastern baseball. Year one they were 25-23, last years COVID year was 19-4, nationally ranked and leading league when shutdown and this year they are 26-3, nationally ranked, and were leading the league at the time. Before Eastern, Matt over and took the Oklahoma Wesleyan baseball program to new heights, breaking program records and turned the Eagles into an NAIA regional power and national contender. They won four conference championships and two NAIA World Series appearances. He was a three-time conference Coach of the Year and two-time ABCA Region Coach of the Year. Prior to Oklahoma Wesleyan, Parker spent three seasons as an assistant at California Baptist University, two seasons as an assistant coach at Garden City (Kan.) Community College, and he also spent the 2005-06 season as an assistant coach at Henderson State University. On the show we talk about how he implemented a championship vision to 2 programs on 2 different levels which includes standards on and off the field, consistent self reflection, and building players not only on the field, but off the field and in the classroom. Time stamps 1:30- Vision when you started (at both OKWU and Eastern) 10:20- Developing Arms 25:00- Standards  30:00- Offseason Calendar  53:00- In season Changes 102:00- Last things   Resources Rapsodo Synergy  Core Velo Belts Driveline/J-Bands Clean Fuego Balls Mind Gym- Gary Mack   Contact https://twitter.com/MattParker37 mparker@eosc.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Freddy Hilliard on defining and teaching core values and having a "no rules" rule.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 64:15

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.  Bio Freddy Hilliard is in his 11th season as Head Baseball Coach at Malvern Preparatory School in Malvern, Pennsylvania.   In his time at Malvern Prep, he has amassed a school record for wins with a 282-71 record and has led the Friars to 7 league championships and 6 State titles including the previous 3 in a row to go along with 8 straight seasons of making the state final. Coach Hilliard has been named Coach of the Year 3 separate times during his tenure, and his teams have been nationally recognized both with preseason and postseason national rankings in several publications 7 times.   Coach Hilliard has helped mentor over 65 players onto the collegiate baseball ranks including 40 that have gone on to play at the division one level. He has also had a player of his selected by MLB in 3 of the previous 4 drafts.  On the show we discuss the meaning behind Malvern having "no rules", defining and teaching core values, and practice organization. Time Stamps 1:00- Vision of the program 7:00- Making the switch from assistant to head coach 10:20- "Our rule is we have no rules" 13:50- Core Values 20:00- Offseason Calendar 30:00- Practice Design 50:00- Lightning Section   Contact @coachhilliard16 fhilliard@malvernprep.org   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Matt Hobbs on recruiting, assessments, and a deep dive into pitching development

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 80:15

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Matt Hobbs is in his third season as the Arkansas pitching coach in 2020, joining the Razorbacks in November 2018. Matt helped craft the Razorback pitching staff into one of the top groups in the country in his first year on the Hill in 2019. and In a shortened season, the Hogs put together a 3.68 ERA and an 11-5 record with three saves and one shutout. Arkansas racked up 143 strikeouts in 142.0 innings Hobbs has coached eight players that have been drafted in the top-10 rounds, including 2018 first-round pick Griffin Roberts, and has helped develop a total of seven big leaguers. Before Arkansas, Hobbs was the Pitching coach at Wake Forest and in each of his first three years in Winston-Salem, the Demon Deacons improved in ERA, strikeouts , walks per nine and opponent batting average  Hobbs pitched at Missouri from 1999-2002, where he won 13 games and struck out 125 batters. Hobbs was drafted twice, first by the San Diego Padres in 2001 and then by the Kansas City Royals in 2002. On the show we talk all things pitching development, including who they like to recruit, what pitching assessments they use, and how they use tech for offseason development and measuring in season progress. Time Stamps 5:00- Things he has changed from 2020 14:00- How has player development changed? 21:30- Recruiting talk 27- Assessments  30:30- Readiness Scores 36:00- Recovery  42:00- In season development 58:00- Using tech for development 1:07:00- Last Things   Contact Twitter mh099@uark.edu  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Tanner Reklaitis on the systems approach, power laws and the what, why and how of coaching

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 60:56

    On today's show we have on Tanner Reklaitis Tanner works as the Director of Operations at Tread Athletics. He also writes a weekly email newsletter for coaches called Monday Morning Edge which will have you thinking every Monday morning. His work is focused on helping coaches succeed in the 21st century. Previously, he worked at Driveline Baseball and was a Minor League Pitching Coach for the Los Angeles Angels.    On the show we discuss the systems approach, power laws and the what, why and how of coaching.    Time Stamps :30- Journey to Tread 2:00- Systems approach 1940- The Power Law 29:00- What, why and how of coaching 35:20- Studying coaches in other sports  40:20- The Importance of communication 43:50- Getting players to own their career 55:- Last things   Resources https://tanners.blog/mme/ Jurgen Klopp Biography Conscious Coaching- Brett Bartholomew Alchemy- Rory Sutherland Zero to One- Peter Thiel Contact https://twitter.com/treklaitis https://tanners.blog/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Spencer Allen on high challenge, high support environments and deliberate practice

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 55:28

    Bio Spencer Allen is the 26th head baseball coach of the Northwestern program and was named to the position on June 14, 2015.    Allen came to Northwestern after serving as an assistant coach at Illinois in 2015. He helped the Fighting Illini set the school record with 50 wins and win the first NCAA Regional in program history. the Illini ranked near the top of the Big Ten in numerous offensive categories, leading the league in hits, runs, RBIs, total bases, home runs and slugging percentage. Prior to his stint with Illinois, Allen served a two-year stretch as the associate head coach and recruiting coordinator at Creighton. Reaching the college world series. From 2010-12, Allen worked as an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Washington State University. Allen was the recruiting coordinator for the Boilermakers during the 2008-09 seasons. He also worked as a scout in the Detroit Tigers organization, and as a volunteer coach at Iowa (2004). Allen's coaching career began at Edmonds Community College in 2002, where he was an assistant coach.   He played three seasons at Iowa State from 1999-2001. He was a team captain during his final season and a 2001 All-Big XII Academic selection.   On the show, we discuss the pillars that Northwestern is built upon which includes a high challenge, high support environment and Deliberate practices   This episode is so good with Spencer Allen!   Time Stamps 1:20- Vision of the program 5:00- The Underdog Story 8:00- Compared to what? 13:00- High Challenge, High Support 16:45- Consistent Habits and Routines 20:45- "Everything that happens to you is your fault" 30:00- Deliberate Practice  40:00- Drills for developing infielders 47:00- Last Things   Resources Eat smarter- Shawn Stevenson Golfs Sacred Journey- David Cook The Gift of Failure- Jessica Lahey Contact https://twitter.com/CoachAllen_37 spencer.allen@northwestern.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    John Carter On Culture, Competition And Core Values

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 44:45

    Bio Today we have on John Carter, Head Baseball coach at Round Rock High School. John is a graduate of Round Rock High School and attended Round Rock schools growing up. Upon graduation from high school, Coach Carter attended Texas Tech, where he played both football and baseball. After his playing days ended, he remained at Tech as a graduate assistant from 1992 – 1994. He returned to Round Rock in 1995, coaching multiple sports including softball, soccer, football, and baseball. John became the head coach in (when). John also was the Texas HS baseball coach of the year in 2017 a year after graduating 7 D1 players.    On the show we talk culture, competition and core values so much more! Here is John Carter!   Time Stamps 3:00- Vision of the program when he started 6:20 - Core Values 16:00 - Culture building 21:20 - Competitions 227:00 - Parent Involvement 31:30 - Transition periods from offseason to in season 36:13- Baserunning 38:00- Quick Hitters Resource Culture Code- Daniel Coyle Lead for Gods Sake- Todd G. Gongwer Contact Twitter- https://twitter.com/Rockhardball Email- john_carter@roundrockisd.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Nate Thompson on player evaluation and training competitiveness

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 55:42

    Bio Nate Thompson, Hitting coach and recruiting coordinator for Arkansas Following the completion of his own collegiate playing career at Dallas Baptist in 2006, Thompson aided a Dallas Baptist coaching staff working with the DBU outfielders while assisting with hitting instruction and the implementation of the club’s strength and conditioning program. Nate then spent three seasons at Nebraska as the Cornhuskers’ volunteer assistant, then served as Hutchinson CC’s primary hitting coach from 2011- 2014 season. Nate next took a job as the hitting coach at Missouri State and they went on to hit .270 or better in each of his three seasons and averaged just under seven runs per game. And since 2017 Nate has been in his current role as the hitting coach and recruiting coordinator for the Arkansas Razorbacks From 2018-20, Arkansas leads the conference in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, weighted on-base average, OPS, runs, homeruns, extra-base hits, runs batted in, total bases and sacrifice flies.   So on the show we talk…..   Time Stamps 3:00- Recruit Evaluation 9:00- Player Evaluation 19:00- Using upperclassmen as leaders. 20:20- Training adjustability 29:30- Balancing tech with player development 35:30- Training Competitiveness 48:00- In Dugout talks 50:00- Last things Resources Bible 7 habits of highly successful people Andy Andrews (author) Contact https://twitter.com/CoachT_RZRBacks natethompson@uark.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Matt Parker on how to implement championship culture and standards.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 68:48

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. 20% off AND free shipping.  Bio Matt Parker started in 2018 as head coach of Eastern baseball. Year one they were 25-23, last years COVID year was 19-4, nationally ranked and leading league when shutdown and this year they are 26-3, nationally ranked, and were leading the league at the time. Before Eastern, Matt over and took the Oklahoma Wesleyan baseball program to new heights, breaking program records and turned the Eagles into an NAIA regional power and national contender. They won four conference championships and two NAIA World Series appearances. He was a three-time conference Coach of the Year and two-time ABCA Region Coach of the Year. Prior to Oklahoma Wesleyan, Parker spent three seasons as an assistant at California Baptist University, two seasons as an assistant coach at Garden City (Kan.) Community College, and he also spent the 2005-06 season as an assistant coach at Henderson State University. On the show we talk about how he implemented a championship vision to 2 programs on 2 different levels which includes standards on and off the field, consistent self reflection, and building players not only on the field, but off the field and in the classroom. Time stamps 1:30- Vision when you started (at both OKWU and Eastern) 10:20- Developing Arms 25:00- Standards  30:00- Offseason Calendar  53:00- In season Changes 102:00- Last things   Resources Rapsodo Synergy  Core Velo Belts Driveline/J-Bands Clean Fuego Balls Mind Gym- Gary Mack   Contact https://twitter.com/MattParker37 mparker@eosc.edu

    Freddy Hilliard on defining and teaching core values and having a "no rules" rule.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2021 64:15

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.  Bio Freddy Hilliard is in his 11th season as Head Baseball Coach at Malvern Preparatory School in Malvern, Pennsylvania.   In his time at Malvern Prep, he has amassed a school record for wins with a 282-71 record and has led the Friars to 7 league championships  and 6 State titles including the previous 3 in a row to go along with 8 straight seasons of making the state final.  Coach Hilliard has been named Coach of the Year 3 separate times during his tenure, and his teams have been nationally recognized both with preseason and postseason national rankings in several publications 7 times.   Coach Hilliard has helped mentor over 65 players onto the collegiate baseball ranks including 40 that have gone on to play at the division one level.  He has also had a player of his selected by MLB in 3 of the previous 4 drafts.  On the show we discuss the meaning behind Malvern having "no rules",  defining and teaching core values, and practice organization. Time Stamps 1:00- Vision of the program 7:00- Making the switch from assistant to head coach 10:20- "Our rule is we have no rules" 13:50- Core Values 20:00- Offseason Calendar 30:00- Practice Design 50:00- Lightning Section   Contact @coachhilliard16 fhilliard@malvernprep.org  

    Matt Hobbs on recruiting, assessments, and a deep dive into pitching development

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 80:15

    Go to WhatAboutBaseball.com/curve to get your special offer. Thats 20% off AND free shipping.    Bio Matt Hobbs is in his third season as the Arkansas pitching coach in 2020, joining the Razorbacks in November 2018. Matt helped craft the Razorback pitching staff into one of the top groups in the country in his first year on the Hill in 2019. and In a shortened season, the Hogs put together a 3.68 ERA and an 11-5 record with three saves and one shutout. Arkansas racked up 143 strikeouts in 142.0 innings Hobbs has coached eight players that have been drafted in the top-10 rounds, including 2018 first-round pick Griffin Roberts, and has helped develop a total of seven big leaguers. Before Arkansas, Hobbs was the Pitching coach at Wake Forest and in each of his first three years in Winston-Salem, the Demon Deacons improved in ERA, strikeouts , walks per nine and opponent batting average  Hobbs pitched at Missouri from 1999-2002, where he won 13 games and struck out 125 batters. Hobbs was drafted twice, first by the San Diego Padres in 2001 and then by the Kansas City Royals in 2002. On the show we talk all things pitching development, including who they like to recruit, what pitching assessments they use, and how they use tech for offseason development and measuring in season progress. Time Stamps 5:00- Things he has changed from 2020 14:00- How has player development changed? 21:30- Recruiting talk 27- Assessments  30:30- Readiness Scores 36:00- Recovery  42:00- In season development 58:00- Using tech for development 1:07:00- Last Things   Contact Twitter mh099@uark.edu 

    Tanner Reklaitis on the systems approach, power laws and the what, why and how of coaching

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 60:56

    On today show we have on Tanner Reklaitis Tanner works as the Director of Operations at Tread Athletics. He also writes a weekly email newsletter for coaches called Monday Morning Edge which will have you thinking every Monday morning. His work is focused on helping coaches succeed in the 21st century. Previously, he worked at Driveline Baseball and was a Minor League Pitching Coach for the Los Angeles Angels.    On the show we discuss the systems approach, power laws and the what, why and how of coaching.    Time Stamps :30- Journey to Tread 2:00- Systems approach 1940- The Power Law 29:00- What, why and how of coaching 35:20- Studying coaches in other sports  40:20- The Importance of communication 43:50- Getting players to own their career 55:- Last things   Resources https://tanners.blog/mme/ Jurgen Klopp Biography Conscious Coaching- Brett Bartholomew Alchemy- Rory Sutherland Zero to One- Peter Thiel Contact https://twitter.com/treklaitis https://tanners.blog/

    Spencer Allen on high challenge, high support environments and deliberate practice

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 55:28

    Bio Spencer Allen is the 26th head baseball coach of the Northwestern program and was named to the position on June 14, 2015.    Allen came to Northwestern after serving as an assistant coach at Illinois in 2015. He helped the Fighting Illini set the school record with 50 wins and win the first NCAA Regional in program history. the Illini ranked near the top of the Big Ten in numerous offensive categories, leading the league in hits, runs, RBIs, total bases, home runs and slugging percentage.Prior to his stint with Illinois, Allen served a two-year stretch as the associate head coach and recruiting coordinator at Creighton. Reaching the college world series. From 2010-12, Allen worked as an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Washington State University.  Allen was the recruiting coordinator for the Boilermakers during the 2008-09 seasons. He also worked as a scout in the Detroit Tigers organization, and as a volunteer coach at Iowa (2004). Allen's coaching career began at Edmonds Community College in 2002, where he was an assistant coach.   He played three seasons at Iowa State from 1999-2001. He was a team captain during his final season and a 2001 All-Big XII Academic selection.   On the show, we discuss the pillars that Northwestern is built upon which includes a high challenge, high support environment and Deliberate practices   This episode is so good with Spencer Allen!  Time Stamps 1:20- Vision of the program 5:00- The Underdog Story 8:00- Compared to what? 13:00- High Challenge, High Support 16:45- Consistent Habits and Routines 20:45- "Everything that happens to you is your fault" 30:00- Deliberate Practice  40:00- Drills for developing infielders 47:00- Last Things   Resources Eat smarter- Shawn Stevenson Golfs Sacred Journey- David Cook The Gift of Failure- Jessica Lahey Contact https://twitter.com/CoachAllen_37 spencer.allen@northwestern.edu

    John Carter On Culture, Competition And Core Values

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 44:45

    Bio Today we have on John Carter, Head Baseball coach at Round Rock High School. John is a graduate of Round Rock High School and attended Round Rock schools growing up. Upon graduation from high school, Coach Carter attended Texas Tech, where he played both football and baseball. After his playing days ended, he remained at Tech as a graduate assistant from 1992 – 1994. He returned to Round Rock in 1995, coaching multiple sports including softball, soccer, football, and baseball. John became the head coach in (when). John also was the texas HS baseball coach of the year in 2017 a year after graduating 7 D1 players.    On the show we talk culture, competition and core values so much more! Here is John Carter!   Time Stamps 3:00- Vision of the program when he started 6:20 - Core Values 16:00 - Culture building 21:20 - Competitions 227:00 - Parent Involvement 31:30 - Transition periods from offseason to in season 36:13- Baserunning 38:00- Quick Hitters Resource Culture Code- Daniel Coyle Lead for Gods Sake- Todd G. Gongwer Contact Twitter- https://twitter.com/Rockhardball Email- john_carter@roundrockisd.org

    Nate Thompson on player evaluation and training competitiveness

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 55:42

    Bio Nate Thompson, Hitting coach and recruiting coordinator for Arkansas Following the completion of his own collegiate playing career at Dallas Baptist in 2006, Thompson aided a Dallas Baptist coaching staff working with the DBU outfielders while assisting with hitting instruction and the implementation of the club’s strength and conditioning program. Nate then spent three seasons at Nebraska as the Cornhuskers’ volunteer assistant, then served as Hutchinson CC’s primary hitting coach from 2011- 2014 season. Nate next took a job as the hitting coach at Missouri State and they went on to hit .270 or better in each of his three seasons and averaged just under seven runs per game. And since 2017 Nate has been in his current role as the hitting coach and recruiting coordinator for the Arkansas Razorbacks From 2018-20, Arkansas leads the conference in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, weighted on-base average, OPS, runs, homeruns, extra-base hits, runs batted in, total bases and sacrifice flies.   So on the show we talk…..   Time Stamps 3:00- Recruit Evaluation 9:00- Player Evaluation 19:00- Using upperclassmen as leaders. 20:20- Training adjustability 29:30- Balancing tech with player development 35:30- Training Competitiveness 48:00- In Dugout talks 50:00- Last things Resources Bible 7 habits of highly successful people Andy Andrews (author) Contact https://twitter.com/CoachT_RZRBacks natethompson@uark.edu

    Jamey Carroll on blending the art and science of coaching

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 66:18

    This podcast is powered by Stick & Ball TV THE  baseball and softball streaming platform. If you haven’t check it out, there are hundreds videos and so much great content waiting for you. And the cool part? It’s all updated weekly. Check it out at StickandBall.TV, or on the Stick & Ball TV mobile app   Today we have on Jamey Carroll from the Pittsburgh Pirates. Jamey Grew up in Evansville Indiana, graduated from the University of Evansville, and after earning all-american honors at SS, he was drafted in the 14th round by the Montreal Expos. Jamey made his Major League Debut in 2002 and in 2004, scored the Expos final run in their history before moving to Washington DC. Besides playing with the Expos/Nationals franchise, Jamey also played for the Rockies, Indians, Dodgers, Twins and Royals franchises. Jamey retired and got into coaching in 2015 as a Pirates front office assistant.   On the show we discuss what his role with being a Defensive Coordinator entails, we go over how coaching has changed since  he played and what he has implemented, and he gives us us a ton of drills we can take to practice tomorrow.   Here is Jamey Carroll!   Time Stamps 2:10- What does a Defensive Coordinator do? 6:02- Discussion on Shifts 11:32- How to scout infielders. 16:00- Unique skills per position 21:40- Unique skills that are innate and we can teach. 27:15- What can amateur players get better at? 32:56- Teaching the game within the game 44:40- Practical ways to use sports psychology 48:40- Tao Training 51:40 Blending Science and Art of coaching 56:20- Pushback with trying new things 58:05- Last things Resources Keep Chopping Wood- Kevin DeSchazo

    Minisode Monday: Leadership Lessons from Ernest Shackleton

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 11:36

    What can we learn from a ship captain that got his ship stranded in the ice 80 miles the coast of Antarctica? Find out next.

    Alan Jaeger- Mastering the Mental Game

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2021 66:32

    This podcast is powered by Stick & Ball TV THE  baseball and softball streaming platform. If you haven’t check it out, there are hundreds videos and so much great content waiting for you. And the cool part? It’s all updated weekly. Check it out at StickandBall.TV, or on the Stick & Ball TV mobile app   Today we have on Alan Jaeger- founder of Jaeger sports. Alan founded Jaeger Sports on the principle that athletes need to develop both their physical and mental skills in order to be successful in game situations.   Since 1991 Alan Jaeger, as a personal trainer and consultant, has worked with over 200 professional players, including 2002 Cy Young Award Winner Barry Zito, and All-Stars Dan Haren and Andrew Bailey. Alan, has also consulted with many schools and professional organizations.   Alan’s intention is to help athletes merge the “mechanics” of the Western athlete with the “insight” of the Far Eastern mind, to position athletes to best realize their potential on and off the playing field.   On the show we extensively cover all things mental game.  Including meditation, visualization, routines, self talk, and awareness. Not only do we go over the methodology behind it, Alan puts it all on the table for us with countless practical drills and scenarios that you can take to practice tomorrow. Heres Alan Jaeger!   Time Stamps 2:00- Defining the mental game 11:20- What separates the good team from great teams? 16:40- Where do we start? 26:40- Getting players to buy in 36:40- Practical Strategies to use 42:40- Routines and process oriented 50:30- Failure Recovery 52:10- Mindfulness Plans and Breathing 1:03:10- Last things Resources https://www.jaegersports.com/mental-practice-plans/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h4er5U38SU&ab_channel=AlanJaeger Contact https://www.jaegersports.com/ @jaegersports

    Minisode Monday: Make Data Relevant

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 12:45

    How do we make data relevant? By giving in the story or experience. In order to gain attention from players using data. We have to show that we can connect with them in meaningful and useful always. And we use data to positively influence an outcome, one way or another.

    Ryan Harrison on how to improve sports vision

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2021 75:37

    Bio Ryan has a degree in Exercise Physiology from University of California at Davis and he has worked on improving athlete’s visual performance on the field since 1999.  Through the years he has worked hundreds of baseball stars. He has also worked with the 2010, 2012 and 2014 World Champion San Francisco Giants, the Toronto Blue Jays, the Philadelphia Phillies 2009-2012 as well as 9 other Professional Baseball Organizations. Collegiately he has worked with the 2016 NCAA Champion Coastal Carolina, the 2012 NCAA Champion Arizona Wildcats,  the 2013 NCAA Champions UCLA Bruins, as well as Oregon State, Wichita State, Kentucky, and Long Beach State.  Ryan has worked with many Collegiate Softball programs   On the show we go over several drills you can take and implement in practice tomorrow. We talk balance, depth perception, and one of my favorite discussions was over when, where and how to look   Here is Ryan Harrison!   Time Stamps 3:00- Where do we start? 6:30- Cognition tests 15:50 When, where and how to look 23:50- Setup to see 29:10- Depth Perception 33:00- Balance and its effect on vision 36:60-  "mechanics are a result of proper vision" 40:30- In game discussions 47:30- Reaction time vs predictive vision 55:50- Perception/Action Coupling 58:30- The Barry Bonds drill 1:01:30- Drills 1:13:00- Last Things   Contact https://www.slowthegamedown.com/ ryan@slowthegamedown.com https://ndvperformance.com/

    Minisode Monday: Developing players while developing the team

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 11:10

    Most of us are transitioning from offseason to in season this time of year. So I wanted to put some thoughts together from things I've learned and some thoughts on what I would do different.

    Patrick Murphy- Building a Championship Program

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2021 65:54

    Today we have on Patrick Murphy, Head Softball Coach, University of Alabama Murph is in his 25th year at Alabama; 23rd year as head coach. In his tenure, he is the winningest coach of all-time in any sport at Bama. They have been to the NCAA tournament 22 straight years and all 15 Super Regional rounds that have been played. They have been a 12-time WCWS participant. He is a 6-time SEC champion, they have been the national attendance leader 14 years running and they have had the most academic All-Americans of any softball program the past 10 years.   On the show, we discuss all things program building which includes leadership dinners, involving parents, creating a culture of affirmations and gratitude and so much more.   You're gonna love this episode with Patrick Murphy!   Time Stamps 4:00- Vision when Patrick got the job 8:11- First Steps 12:30- Combating the anxious generation 15:30- "its all about the relationships" 17:15- Leadership Dinners 23:15- "Dont hold grudges" 27:20- Involving Parents 35:00 The power of affirmations 41:30- Holding teammates accountable 46:40- Classroom Sessions 49:40- Practice Planning Advice 56:30- Quick Hitters Resources Leadership from a dancing man The Choice- Edith Eger   Contact Coach Murphy pmurphy@ia.ua.edu

    Start with Clarity

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2021 7:51

    This week, we're talking why we should start with and continually focus on clarity.

    Justin Toole on peak performance, simplifying analytics and facilitating learning environments

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 68:43

    Intro Entering his 13th year in the Cleveland Indians Organization, and his second year on the Major League Staff. Justin spend the first 7 years as a minor league player reaching AAA, and the past 6 years as a coach. He was a hitting coach from 2016-'19 and Spent 2020 in his current role as the Major League hitting analyst. Justin Attended/played collegiately at the University of Iowa. Spent a week in the American Association before he was fortunate enough to sign with the Indians as a non drafted FA. He just finished a masters program in Performance Psychology this past March.   On the show dive into the art of coaching, facilitating a learning environment, blending intuition and science, simplifying analytics, and of course, psychology.   Time Stamps 2:00- What does a hitting analyst do? 6:00- Filtering Information 9:45- Advanced Reports 16:50- Evaluating new players 20:00- Communication 23:32- Teaching and its role in coaching 30:40- Blending the art of coaching with science/data 37- Facilitating learning environments 43- Mastery vs Performance goals 47:20- Giving Better Feedback 50- Focal Points, Routines and breathing 56:00- Quick Hitters   Resources The Coaches Guide to teaching- Doug Lemov Greenlights- Matthew McConaughey Daniel Coyle Books Legacy- James Kerr Relentless- Tim Grover Mind Gym- Gary mack Range- David Epstein Contact https://twitter.com/Tooleyj24

    Creating a system for retaining information

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 10:47

    This episode is powered by stick and ball. If you'd like a free month? go to stickandball.tv and enter the code AOTC2021 for a free 30 day trial, it WILL be worth it.   I'm going to do some shorter podcasts on some topics i'm passionate about, periodically and in addition to the weekly podcast. Todays topic is about creating a system for retaining information.    

    Robin Lund on player assessments, developing motor learning plans, and blending the art and science of coaching.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 63:09

    Bio Born in Northern Alberta, Canada in an area where there is very little baseball, his parents let him move to Lewiston, ID when he was in the 9th grade and live with a host family and play high school baseball. He then played at Spokane Falls Community College and  Whitworth University After playing he coached at Spokane Falls CC for 4 years working with hitters and outfielders and  also serving as the S&C coach. During that time, he got His Master’s degree in Exercise Science from Eastern Washington University. Robin then got out of coaching and pursued a PhD and While working on it, he was Ed Cheff’s S&C coach at Lewis Clark State College. Robin completed his degree in 2002 and landed a tenure-track faculty position in the Department of Kinesiology in cedar falls Iowa. After 18 years, he got back into coaching and became the volunteer assistant for the University of Northern Iowa softball team in the Fall of 2018 and then in January of 2019 he took a job at the university of Iowa,  where he started as the hitting coach and then became the pitching coach in the Fall of 2020.   On the show, we go over player assessments, developing motor learning plans, and blending the art and science of coaching.   Time stamps 3:50 - Player Assessments 16:00- Blending art and science of coaching 18:30- Motor Learning Plans for pitchers 25:27- Motor learning plans for hitters 33:30- Using in game data for pitchers 37:00- Using in game data for hitters 43:30- Gameplanning 45:00- Pre-pitch routines 46:45- Post Game reports 50:30- Simplifying data 55:30- Quick Hitters   Resources Motus Sleeve Trent Otis Google sheets/Pivot tables Functional Movement Screen Frans Bosch   Contact @Lunderton robin-lund@iowabaseball.com

    Lance Zawadzki on the lower half function in the swing, training adjustability and using technology efficiently

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 57:53

    Today we have on Lance Zawadski, Minor League hitting coach for the Boston Red Sox. Lance played at San Diego State University and Lee University. He also played for 6 different organization and indy ball before getting into coaching.   On the show we talk about the lower half function in the swing,  training adjustability in the swing and using technology efficiently   Time Stamps 2:30- Player Evaluation. 10:48- Exploring the lower half. 13:00- Environment/Adjustability. 19:50- Training vs preparation 28:00- Lower half adjustability 35:00- Bill Belichick on technology and Technology best practices 46:30 Gameplanning 51:30- Resources   Resources https://www.synapse-ccr.com/ Anticipation and Decision Making in Sport 1st Edition, Kindle Edition by A. Mark William   Contact IG- @Lancezawadzki Twitter -@Lancezawadzki  

    Keith Law on scouting, developing talent, and preventing cognitive bias

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2021 57:21

    On todays show Keith is currently a senior baseball writer for the Athletic. He previously wrote for ESPN.com and ESPN Scouts, Inc. and for Baseball Prospectus. Keith also worked in the front office for the Toronto Blue Jays from 2002-2006.   On the show, we discuss scouting and its role in player development which includes a discussion on what traits can be taught, and what cant. Then we take a deep dive into analytics and what Keith thinks could be the most impactful information for the next decade.   Time Stamps 2:30- How Keith started in baseball 8:30- Analytics 11:30- Future Trends 25:30- Scouting 34:30 cognitive Biases 40:00 Traits that we can develop and traits that are innate 47:35- Acquiring players with traits you can develop 53:00- Resources 55:30- Last Things   Contact The Athletic Paste Twitter Blog   Resources Thinking Fast and Slow- Tversky and Kahneman Inside Game- Keith Law Smart Baseball- Keith Law Whistling Vivaldi- Steele Biased- Eberhardt

    Geoff Rottmayer and Darrell Coulter on individualized player development plans and in-game strategy

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2020 64:22

    Today we have on the Athletic Mission Baseball Academy staff Geoff Rottmayer and Darrell Coulter. AMBA is located in Tulsa Oklahoma and specializes in helping two way baseball players develop a strategic advantage mindset so they can deliver on game day.   Geoff is the owner of AMBA, was Drafted by the Florida Marlins out of High School 2003 but went on to sign at Seminole State College 2003 and later Florida Gulf Coast University 2004. He has 15+ years of coaching and mentoring hundred of player through the college recruiting and pre-draft and draft process and is the Creator of “The Command Hitting System”   Darrell signed with the Philadelphia Phillies out of High School in 1986 and played 4 years in Phillies Minor League System. Darrell has more than 15 years of College Recruiting Consulting and Advising for Parents & Players. he has Consulted with over 100+ College and Professional Pitchers. and he is the Owner of S.T.A.R.T.T. Pitching and theCreator of “The Strategic Pitcher Program”   They both also Co-Host of The Strategic Baseball Podcast.   On the show we go dive into what player development consists of, how to create strategic in game advantages, we talk game-planning, assessments and much, much more.     Contact http://www.athletic-mission.com/staff https://www.strategicbaseballpodcast.com/  

    Trevor Burmeister on technology, challenging training environments and constraints training

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2020 64:38

    Today we have on Trevor Burmeister, MiLB hitting coach for the Colorado rockies. Trevor started his coaching career at UW-La Crosse in 2014 as Outfield and Assistant Hitting Coach. In his second year at the school the team went on to take second place in the NCAA World Series.   The following season, Burmeister started pursuing his Master’s Degree at the University of Minnesota-Duluth and in his first season there, they also had the third best batting average and second best home run totals in NCAA DII.   Before getting hired by the Rockies, Trevor was an assistant coach at Madison College. And In 2019 he was named the NJCAA Division II Assistant Coach of the Year by the ABCA and Baseball America   on the show, we discussed how to best use technology, how to create a challenging training environment,  and Trevor goes in depth with implements and constraints training.   Resources Old School vs New School https://108pa.com/book   Contact https://twitter.com/T_Burm

    Kyle Stark on coaching and feedback, culture and why conversations need to start with clarity, connectedness and consistency

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2020 66:51

    On todays show we have on Kyle Stark who is a leadership and coaching consultant. Kyles went to ball state, got his law degree from Toledo but he always knew he wants to be in baseball, so much so that in grad school he also serves as the pitching coach for St. Bonaventure, where he got his masters in business administration. He started as an intern with the Cleveland Indians and then he was hired by the pirates and worked his way up to be the assistant GM until 2019. On the show we discuss coaching and feedback, we take a deep dive into culture and we discuss why conversations need to start with clarity, connectedness and consistency.   Resources The Bible Contact tkstark8@gmail.com

    Bhrett McCabe- Clinical and Sports Psychologist

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 54:38

    Today we have on Bhrett McCabe Clinical and Sports Psychologist. Bhrett has worked with professional athletes including 12+ PGA and LPGA Tour players whose rankings have reached #1 in the world. He has been a consultant and Sports Psychologist for The University of Alabama Athletic Department, working with all teams and coaching staffs and he has been a featured speaker to numerous Fortune 500 companies and organizations.   On the show dive deep into his experiences at LSU playing for Skip Bertman, we go over practical mental game strategies, and we discuss "how to win awareness" which includes classroom sessions and how we can coach in game strategy to players.      Contact https://www.bhrettmccabe.com/ https://twitter.com/DrBhrettMcCabe    

    Jim Maciejewski- Athletic Director/Head Baseball Coach at Mauldin HS (SC)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 69:10

    Today we have on the Jim Maciejewski, Athletic Director/Head Baseball Coach at Mauldin HS in South Carolina.   Maj has been the head baseball coach at Mauldin since 2009, so we go over what building the culture over the last decade has looked like, we discuss how we can leverage social media as a celebration tool but also how to use it to keep alumni connected and we dive deep into what he has done differently because of the COVID pandemic.   Resources Joe Torre's Ground Rules for Winners   Contact https://twitter.com/Maciejewski24 jmaciejewski@greenville.k12.sc.us    

    Dr. Andy Bass- Coordinator of Mental Conditioning, Pittsburgh Pirates

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2020 60:16

    Today we have on Andy Bass Coordinator of Mental Conditioning for the Pittsburgh Pirates.   Andy has an awesome story, with playing professional baseball and developing the yips, then deciding he wanted to focus his attention onto helping players with the mental side by getting his advanced degrees in psychology and then motor learning.   On the show, we discuss how to integrate mindfulness into our practice sessions, we go over how to allow some autonomy players, we dive deep into game-like practices and feedback loops     Resources Blackbox thinking- by Matthew Syed Beartown- by Fredrick Backman   Contact Andy.bass@pirates.com

    Jeremy Sheetinger- Head Baseball Coach, Georgia Gwinnett College

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2020 76:55

    Today we have on Jeremy Sheetinger, head baseball coach at Georgia Gwinnett College. Sheets is by far one of the most popular baseball coaches in the world. After working for the American Baseball Coaches Association and running the podcast, he took the job at GGC last year. On the show we discuss what he has learned during the 4 years he stepped away from the field, and how he has implemented so much information into what they do at GGC. We go all in on competitions, classroom sessions, and how to teach the mental game. If you're looking for a copy/paste episode, sheets delivered. This episode is so good, and here is Jeremy Sheetinger!   Resource Baseball Playbook- Ron Polk Help the Helper- by Kevin Pritchard, John Eliot Contact @CoachSheets3 Sheets@ggc.edu

    Rich Benjamin- Head Baseball Coach, Indiana Weslyan University

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2020 59:19

    Rich Benjamin begins his 6th year at the helm of the Indiana Wesleyan University   In Benjamin's first year at Indiana Wesleyan the Wildcats had one of the most successful seasons in program history as they advanced to the NAIA National Championship Opening Round for the first time.The Wildcats topped their 2016 success two years later going 37-20 in the 2018 season, winning the Crossroads League and reaching the NAIA Opening Round for the second time in program history. Coach Benjamin was named the Crossroads League Coach of the Year for his leadership during the 2018 season. Prior to Indiana Wesleyan, Benjamin was the head baseball coach at Judson (Ill.) for eight seasons where he accumulated the most wins in program history with 304.  On the show we go over how being a pitching coach early on helped him to develop a well rounded approach as a hitting coach and now head coach, we discuss why we need to simplify things in a world of constant noise, and we dive deep into what Rich calls “training zone focus vs performance zone focus”   Resources Romans- The Bible   Contact rich.benjamin@indwes.edu  

    Kyle Wagner- Author of Green Light Hitting and How the Rivercats Won, Teacher and Coach

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2020 60:30

    Subscribe here! Description Kyle is a former standout high school baseball player who went on to play Division 1 baseball at Wake Forrest and a year professionally in the Angels organization.  Kyle was also a part of the historic 2015 Red Land Little League team that wen on to win the United States Championship. He is the author of two books- Green light hitting and How the Rivercats won.  Kyle is one of my favorite twitter follows because he always helps me to think deeper on different subjects like practice design and player development.   Resources How The RiverCats Won: Lessons on Relationships and Competition Green Light Hitting from the backyards to the big leagues   Contact  https://twitter.com/GowagsKyle    

    David Jeans- Head Baseball Coach, De La Salle HS (CA)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 56:20

    Subscribe here! Description Today we have on David Jeans, head baseball coach for De La Salle HS. David is an industrial engineer by trade and after pursing that for several years, started coaching a 6th grade basketball team. This led him to coaching football at De La Salle during the Bob Ladouceur era, which is one of the most successful dynasties in HS football history. He worked his way up the ranks and became the head baseball coach in 2012. And Since 2012- De La Salle Baseball has reached title game every year, won in 12,14,16,17,18,19.   So on the show we discuss how being a football coach has helped Under coach Lad helped him to establish a “development first” program. We discuss how being an engineer has helped with with practice plan design in limited space. And we dive deep into what being Spartan looks like on a daily basis.   Resources Ideal Team Player   Contact https://twitter.com/jeans_david Email   Show notes courtesy of Zach Casto David Jeans: Head Baseball Coach De La Salle HS Being a teacher is helpful with coaching. It helps you with observing your players and finding out how they learn best. Being a teacher helps you have a format on helping your players to solve problems that baseball brings. In high school sports it’s all about development. It’s about developing the person, student, and player. Focus on developing every single player in your program. When coaching and teaching focus on building the person while teaching them. Relationships are crucial for development of the player. Have mixed practice. The varsity comes on and stretches, catch play, individual defense, team defense, and then the JV comes and has BP. When the JV takes BP, the Varsity takes game speed defense. The goal is to not have a lot of standing around. Work on getting quality reps. Having a whole team practice allows for the JV players to understand the expectations of the Varsity team. This also creates competition within the team. Tell your players they you are preparing your athletes to be a college player. Tell all of your players this. Have practices that will be next level speed and a lot like a college practice. Point out expectations of college programs to prepare the players. More often than not the mental piece is what is lacking in underclassmen. The playing piece is there but it’s the mental game that holds them back. It often takes 2-3 years for the underclassmen player to be mentally prepared for the Varsity team. As you’re preparing your players as coaches you are giving players tools for their toolkit to solve problems that baseball gives them. Example: working on push bunts. The philosophy of the team stays the same but the skill set can be changing every single year depending on the makeup of your team. Tell the players on the importance of their decisions. Their decisions should be a good reflection upon the team in order to be successful on and off the field. The weight room is where successful team habits start to be taught and occur. Teach your underclassmen the importance of lifting, how to lift, how to play baseball, and how to take care of what they have. When the players are upperclassmen then they will already be doing those habits they were taught. You want your players to be empathetic, good listeners, look you in the eye, and are reliable. Expect to win, play hard, and do things the right way. Remind your players about how to represent the school program the right way all the time. Even if you’re playing in a different program. “It’s always a learning experience in sports.” “The ultimate goal is to have good husbands, fathers, and family members.” Have commitment cards with your players. Weekly students will stand up and commit to their teammates about what they plan on doing this week. Example: I’m going to run hard out of the box. The hard part is being held accountable by the team. The following week you’ll have to stand up and say if you did it or not. This teaches accountability. You need to expect your players to be able to consistently do a skill in order to have success. “They are on the pursuit of mastery.” You want your players to narrow down their focus in order to have success. You want your players to be able to adapt within different situations in the game. You need to be able to beat high velocity and good offspeed, low velocity and spin, etc. Work on defeating multiple kinds of pitchers and teams. It is the saying of adapt or die. When you decide to adapt, it has to be a well informed decision. Have competition days in practice. Saturday’s are competition days. Have an intersquad scrimmage on Saturday so that everyone gets their game like reps in. On opponents go and scout them. “Having information is huge.” Having advanced knowledge on opponents gives you a better chance to win. Example: 52% opportunity to win can go up to 62% due to quality preparation. Face the probable pitcher on the pitching machine so that the hitters will adapt to the pitch. Try to take away the pitchers number one pitch. You want your players to be their own best coach and understand what they need to do to be adaptable for success. You want the players to be accountable, learn from their failures, and to be adaptable. Teach things as simple as possible and then allow the players to see and experience what was taught so that they can be adaptable. Take away what the opponent does best. If you do that then you have an advantage. Do the little things over and over so that the players are confident with their fundamentals. Winning is the outcome of preparation. Develop skill sets that cause successful results. Example: move up on a dirt ball read. List out all of the things they players need to know in the program. Start when they are freshmen. “It’s a continuous four year journey.” Experience comes in your career. It takes doing things over and over to get better. Experience also allows you to pull from the past to help the present. You want your players to talk to each other and communicate to learn from each other. Three ideal team players are humble, hungry, and smart. Have your players self assess and and their teammates assess their teammate. We need to understand the importance of coaching on our players. We could change their lives within four years.

    Curt Nelson, Professional Hitting Consultant and NW Bandits Head Coach (WA).

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2020 89:05

    Subscribe here!   Description Today we have on Curt Nelson, Professional Hitting Consultant. and NW bandits head coach (WA). Curt works with players from the big leagues to little league. So on the show we discuss what his evaluation process looks from when a person walks in the door for the first time, to fine tuning professional hitters mechanics. We dive deep into hitting mechanics, game planning, timing and much more. This episode is so good and here is Curt Nelson!  resources  Curt’s YouTube page  Contact Info https://twitter.com/Nelson_Hitting Show notes courtesy of Zach Casto The goal of a coach is to take each player and take them to the next level. When pre assessing a player, you need to understand the level of play of the player. Professional players you need to look up video to get a start on understanding them. You want to see how each player moves and thinks to understand what can work for the player. Lead by asking questions to learn more about each player. The more you understand the setup, his mechanics, bat path, his thoughts, and understanding are all crucial understandings. Changing the mind first will create a smoother change. “Mobility plays a ginormous role.” “There are no absolutes, but timing, balance, and bat path are close to absolutes. With that being said, the bat path can be different for each player. You can’t make any change without the relationship piece though. When asking questions, ask about their timing mechanisms, what they are trying to do to the baseball, their thoughts on the tee, and what their approach is. Understand what the hips are doing. “The ground is the number one source of power and energy. Any question that gives you insight is important. Ball flight is important to understand the approach and mechanics. Video is your friend in understanding this. Start with movement preparation drills before you go into swings. Example: Slam balls and PVC pipe connection drills. (This helps showcase the body and how well it moves.) After movement prep work on each hitters routines. Group up each hitter to work on the routine together with other players and they can talk to find solutions to situations. After the grouping you can work on team hitting and allow competition to flow between the athletes. “Everything starts with a setup.” Getting into the right setup for that hitter is paramount. Every hitter needs to start in balance. The head has to be in the center of the body. Don’t get hitters to get into their quads and legs too early. “Hitting is done more flat footed than we think.” Being on the balls of your feet isn’t conducive for balance. A quality sets up the athlete to be consistent and have success. There is a right position/setup for everyone. Mobility is a huge factor. It’s about finding the right balance. Example: If the ankle is a problem you can move it to find the right balance for each hitter. “You’re trying to maximize each individual.” The mirror is a great teacher for each hitter. It gives the hitter instant feedback on what they are feeling. When you’re in a mirror you can feel what you’re trying out. Put an X on the mirror. Tell the athlete to keep their forehead in the X to find the right setup and movement. This helps the player to find the right movement that promotes not a ton of excess movement. Have a balance beam where the hitter has to make a clean forward move and then move backwards. This will help the athlete find the right movement. “Stride our to 50-50, then back to your setup.” The setup is the key that unlocks the best results for the player. “There is not a specific move to have everyone use.” Use trial and error and work it in real time in the cage. “There is no fooling balance.” If the athlete knows where he is at in space, then he will have confidence and conviction behind what he is doing. You’re trying to gather and load against the back leg. This can help the head stay still. You’re trying to promote a powerful and balanced forward move. When gathering, the stride leg is working underneath the front shoulder or underneath the front hip. This prevents the foot from reaching out too far. When you lost balance then the body breaks down it’s efficiency. You want to get your body ready to move it’s weight to put all it’s force into the ball. To test out a forward move: Draw a line of of the back foot and video it. Guys who are in balance don’t go outside of that line. You can use a wall as well. Put the back on the wall and the player should not feel any body part touch the wall. As the front foot picks up the back heel needs to stay grounded in the forward move. The glute possesses the power in the swing. Look for the root cause that is effecting a good move or a bad move for the player. Start looking at timing and then go from there. Teach a player the difference between perceived 50-50 balance and what it actually is and feels. Look at the head first at 50-50 to find the right look for the player. Some guys are 60-40 at foot strike. We as coaches have to help the player find their best setup at foot strike. The move of the player should naturally allow the flute of the athlete to load up. Coil and scap loading takes the hitter off of his line and balance. If the hands are behind the body then the front side has to move more to compensate. Get the hands in the position of launch that stays in line. To do this have the player work on taking their hands back based off of the chalk line in the batter’s box. Some hitters have their hands back too far at launch as well. You just have to work with the player to find the most comfortable and natural launch position for success. You want to create adaptable and adjustable hitters. In the world of hitting nothing is really new. Hitting changes based off of what the pitchers are doing. Example. With sinkers/pitch to contact pitchers, hitters are trying to hit the ball in the air. The timing is crucial for the proper time to barrel up the ball. If you’re late, start earlier so you have more room for error. As the elbows are going down the hands get on plane with the pitch and the bat will lag to create whip with the swing. We are trying to run the barrel north to south to square up the baseball. An east to west barrel can roll over balls that should be squared up. One of the hardest things to do when teaching hitting is timing. Have game footage and practice footage where you can see the difference between the player in game and in practice. The video helps the hitter and coach create an understanding of what happening to the hitter whether that’s his movement, mental game, or pitch mix. Understand what each pitcher is trying to do in order to create a hitting plan. Example: with a sinker pitcher try to hit the ball in the air. The ultimate goal is to hit line drives. Find out what the fastball is doing and try to base things off of that pitch. Then you can eliminate offspeed pitches. Try to find the sequence due to patterns. Feet together go forward: The player starts with the feet together and this works the forward move. The hitter needs to try to get to 50-50 balance. You can use a mirror or video to assess the forward move. You can use a Chuck It to work on the top hand. You can use a frisbee to work on the bottom hand. Bat path drill: You can use a bat and tell the hitter to release the bat at the pitchers head. If the bat path is going east or west then the bat will land pull side or opposite side. The goal of any coach is to have the hitter self assess and coach themselves. The best players can coach themselves. Allow for communication to happen constantly so you can help them. As a coach you are going to leave some days wanting to do better and then there are days where you will feel you did a great job. Journaling is a great way for each player and coach to remember what has worked and what doesn’t. Create your own opinions based off of trial and error. Trial and error will allow for the opinion to be created. “Don’t think like everyone else. Think outside of the box.” Failure will breed success if you stick with it. Keep trying and giving your best. Keep up the energy. “Always remember that it’s about the player.”  

    Kevin Wilson- Professional Hitting Consultant

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2020 62:27

    Subscribe here! Description For over 19 years, Kevin Wilson has been one of the most sought after hitting consultants in the game. Kevin currently works with or has worked with with Minor and Major League players from all 30 MLB organizations. In 2013, Kevin was the hitting coach for the USA Baseball 18U National Team. Team USA beat Japan for the Gold medal at the IBAF World Cup in Taiwan. On the show Kevin and I discuss what #goodbatting is, we talk about how hitting is a conversation. And Kevin walks us through what it sounds like to be in a cage session with him. This episode is packed full of content and here is Kevin Wilson!   Resources Inner game of golf- Timothy Gallwey Inner game of tennis- Timothy Gallwey   Contact  https://twitter.com/KWBaseball https://www.kwbaseball.com/   Show notes courtesy of Zach Casto Understand that the longer you’re in a profession and you continue to grow the better coach you will become. When you have a goo have confidence in yourself to get there. Remember that it’s not about you, it’s about how you can help the players. To be the best coach for each player you have to be a world class listener. Be a hitting mentor rather than coach. You still coach but you help the whole person grow not just the player. Lead by questioning for the players. Example: what’s on your mind? What are you feeling? More often than not the players will answer their own question. This allows the player to be their own best coach. “We all want to be heard.” Meet the player where they are at. Help them with their situation and listen intently. Recognize that you won’t be the best coach for everybody but you will be for somebody. When the players aren’t coming to you, try to create relationships so they you can gain trust with the player. The best coaches are the ones that don’t force the players into doing something one way. You want your players to use what works. The best coaches ask the players about how they’ve grown as a player, how they do things and why, and they also talk about their life. This builds trust and helps the player understand. You gain trust by an intentional conversation with the player so that the players can understand themselves the best that they can do that they are adaptable in the game. Share your experiences with the players so that they can understand that they will get though their struggles. Most problems aren’t mechanical, they are mostly mental issues. If we can create self awareness for the player then they will be more convicted with their actions. “All it takes is 5 minutes to change a life.” If you take 5 minutes and check in with your team a few times a week then the rewards will be beneficial. It’ll take some work at first but at the end it’ll be so beneficial. You’ll find out the little things that will tell you what the players are thinking with their body language. When they are stretching go out and see how they are all doing. This matters so much to the players. They will look forward to seeing you and talking to them. If it means enough to you to create life lessons and help the person then you will do this. The goal of the coach is to take each player and make them a better human being and athlete. When you first get a player, ask the player with questions so that you can be a world class listener. Ask them why they do what they do, so that you can understand them the best way possible. Tell the players that they have the ability to be themselves. “Hitting is a conversation.” Have the player map out their goals and how they want to do it so that they can visualize their plan and get there. The coach is there to help along the way and fill in the blanks. Don’t allow ego to take over. Tell the player that what happens in the cage will happen and not to beat themselves up. Players are searching with something that is repeatable, adjustable, and they have confidence in. Understand how each player learns so that they can understand. The numbers are a result of your processes and purposes. If we don’t explain the why and how behind what we are doing then it won’t be as successful as it could be. If you can pick up tendencies from the pitcher then they can create an adjustable game plan. Game planning is crucial for the hitter. Watch the pitcher warm up, get their timing, and see what pitches work for the game. Find out what pitches he can pitch for a strike so you can eliminate pitches. When it comes to approach: What pitch you hit best and where you hit that pitch the best. This is with less than two strikes. Players must commit to that plan. “The pitcher works for you with less than two strikes.” Players need to understand how hard the pitcher throws for timing and what the pitcher’s out pitch is. “You learn a lot from observing.” Bring your approach to the game and adjust to the pitcher and how you’re being pitched. Talk to your teammates about the pitcher and finding out similarities and paths to success. Teach the game better so that you can teach your players what to look for. Allow opportunities in practice to have unorganized organized games. Example: whiffleball or sandlot baseball. It is through these experiences that you learn baseball IQ. “As a coach we can’t assume that they know anything about the game.” Therefore we must have patience, teach, and reteach the players. Teach them as if they don’t know anything about baseball so that every step is included. “Out of respect for the entire group, assume they know nothing.” To be a better coach, ask a better question and listen. 7 Ball Drill: The player must swing at every pitch as if it’s a hit and run. After the player makes contact he will tell the coach what ball he made contact. After the round, the player will tell the coach where he made the hardest contact consistently out of all of the areas with the balls that he hit. After this, the coach will tell them player to focus on that zone and swing at those. Put the pressure on the pitcher and not the hitter. “How you do everything is how you do anything.” The player needs to do everything the best way possible, be detail oriented, and giving their best effort. Players need to have a purpose behind every single thing that they do. What they eat, how much they sleep, why they swing, and who they hang around with. Be consistent with your habits and attitude with each of your players. They depend on you and you mold them into who you want them to be.

    Tom Sutaris- MiLB Hitting Coach, Colorado Rockies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2020 55:43

    Subscribe here!   Description Today we're joined by Tom Sutaris.   Tom has spent time coaching at every level. He was a high school English teacher and coach, a college coach, and is now the AA hitting coach for the Colorado Rockies.   On the show Tom shares with us some ways he has grown as a coach, especially getting to coach at each level, we talk how to make changes with the player and how to ask questions to get to the root of the problem, and Tom dives deep into how to create a hitting culture.   Resources Energy Bus- Jon Gordon Atomic Habits- James Clear   Contact https://twitter.com/dirtsutaris  

    Billy Berry- Head Baseball Coach, Tennessee Weslyan University

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2020 69:02

    iTunes   Youtube   Google   Spotify   Description Today we have on Billy Berry, Head Baseball Coach at Tennessee Weslyan University  Billy was the head coach of TWU from 2005-2015 and then returned to TWU in July of 2017 after a two year coaching stint at the Baylor School. Billy and TWU have won 2 NAIA national championships during his 2 stints and In his twenty + years of coaching, He has seen over forty former players move on to professional baseball. He wants to continue to help young men use baseball as an avenue to get their education, continue on the bulldog baseball success and have kids that represent the school, their families and the program with pride. So on the show we talk about how he uses the Weslyan tradition to ingrain the culture every year. How he helps players to own their career and holds them accountable, and he discusses how to “attack the day” everyday.   Books Energy Bus Books about programs or seasons   Contact  bberry@tnwesleyan.edu @BillyBerry13 Show notes courtesy of Zach Casto Let everyone who has helped you along the way how much you appreciate them. When you go to a program understand what it does well and what it doesn’t do well. Adopt what works well and advance it. It will be a smooth transition for the players and for the coach. Be humble enough to keep a good tradition going and add on to what works. Create your culture and your team will build their own identity based off of the culture created. Each team will look different but can still adhere and live the culture you create. Be appreciative of the opportunities that you are given. Understand why every opportunity is important on your journey. On day one have a team meeting. Ask the team what sacrifices they are willing to take to win? You are successful in the classroom, on the field, and off the field. The decisions the players and coaches make in those areas will determine how successful the team is going forward. Prepare your players to be accountable and valuing their time and the time of others in life. Prepare them to win on the field and in life. Focus on communication and one on one communication with your players. Have your core values discussed each day of the week. Example: Appreciation (Core Value). Have a classroom session or pull over players one on one and have them tell you about someone they appreciate and why. This bonds players together and everyone gets a deeper understanding of the individual. To have a successful team, the players are responsible for the team first and themselves second. “Culture is a learned trait.” Therefore the culture you want is something you can teach. You want your practices to match the speed of what you want your team to be. Example: practice fast because you want your team to play fast. I’m scrimmages make diving plays, taking risks, and being aggressive on the bases. In scrimmages give your players and teams extra points because of the aggressiveness. Tell them and show them that you won’t be upset with their aggressiveness. You want the practices to be challenging and the games to be easy. If players aren’t practicing hard send them home. You want your coaches to be good leaders in their own way. Whether that’s by example, vocal, etc. This will spread to the players. Your best teams will have the best players as the leaders. The players are the ones who will be driving the team on the best clubs. You want coaches and players who are hungry to achieve and want to work. Have an identity for your program that helps players fit into the program. The identity of the program will help the players understand how to act within their identity. Tell players that when they come into the program that they have a clean slate. It’s up to them to write their own story with this program. Tell them that if they do what they did. In the past then they won’t be successful here, but they have a fresh start. The best players are the ones that own their careers and hold themselves accountable. Address everything that is wrong in the fall. Then once the players understand what they need to do and what it looks like then they will do things themselves. It doesn’t happen with every team though. Some teams need policed more. Your program is going to be what you tolerate. Don’t ask your players to do anything that you wouldn’t expect your players or yourself to do. Making adjustments should be made and discussed the best way possible for that individual player to understand. With hitting, focus on mentality over mechanics. They need to understand how to attack based off of how they are being taught. It’ll take 12 months for a player to make a complete change. You can make small tweaks but the players need to trust the coaches. Be available to your players so that you can work with them one on one. Have conversations that aren’t baseball related to create trust with the players. End every day with some form of competition. Have coach pitch scrimmages, machine scrimmages, and Coach point scrimmages based off of aggressive plays. “Focus on how many days are won, not how many games are won.” 9 Hit drill: Players are in groups and the teams need to get 9 hits in a row. Other teams can smack talk the other teams. Coaches are the judges. Have consequences for the losing team. Time your players to run the bases with weighted plates. Have non baseball related competitions such as dodgeball or tug of war. Have a whiffle ball game as well. “If you really want to see your players compete put them in competitions that aren’t baseball related.” Understand that coaching isn’t about you. It’s about the players and helping them grow as a person and athlete. Have your players wake up every single day and tell the players to attack the day and dominate each situation they are in. You want them to be take seriously. It’s the way they talk and dress. The first impression is so important. If things are going to work the coaches have to create a vision, live that vision, and the players grab onto them.  

    Head Coaches- Wes Brooks (Oxford HS, AL) Butch Chaffin (Cookeville HS, TN)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2020 96:17

    Today were joined by Episode #1 and #5. Butch Chaffin and Wes Brooks.   Wes Brooks is the head coach at Oxford HS in Alabama and Butch Chaffin, Head coach at cookeville HS in Tennessee.    I may have mentioned it several times on the podcast, but I want to reiterate it here. Butch and Wes are two of the best coaches in the country and they absolutely get the most out their guys and love them to death. So on the show, we talk about what’s important to them. We discuss what growing men in your program means, we talk all things culture building, and you can develop a system that works for your program.   Resources Twitter.com ABCA.org Mans search for meaning Legacy   Contact @oldgoldsports @gawbage29   Show notes courtesy of Zach Casto Baseball will teach you a lot about life and reward you with friends and a lifelong memories. If your players see that you love the game then the relationships will come. As a coach you want to touch the lives of your players, make them better people, and help them find out what they want to be. Spend a lot of time in the classroom building the culture. Understand what your players can understand and learn. Trust your gut and do what will work for your players. If you open up to your players, then they will and trust will be created. Players will go the extra mile if they know you care about them. Rush the development of the person. The mature person can learn information use the information given. Demand that your players are going to focus and learn. “You can develop and win at the same time.” If your head coach is in the dugout then the head coach can communicate with the players and teach in the game. You can gain better communication and understanding if you’re teaching and developing all the time. “Development is nonstop.” A good coach in the summer is teaching and developing in practice and in the game. For the player to understand and coach themselves use external cues. “The external cue for each individual is different.” Find out what works best for each player in regards to external cueing. If a player is growing then he is developing. If you’re going to have words for players to understand, then you need to have a definition for each word. This creates a common verbiage. Give your assistant coaches the opportunity to be the head coach of their position. Research and talk with other coaches to add new things to grow. “A good coach has a growth mindset.” Good coaches try new things. If it works they keep it, if not they discard it. You want your staff to be on the same page. As the head coach things work better when it’s your page and your assistants are writing on the outside of the page. As a young coach find around 10-12people who you can talk baseball with and grow. Every coach will have parent problems. Find that core group of guys where you can bounce ideas off of. Talk with your group of coaches on takeaways and what you’ve learned from a speaker. Read books and talk about them with that group of coaches. When bunting you want to control the barrel. Put the index finger out to control the barrel with the bunt. As a coach try this out to see if you can feel it. Be open for trial and error. To have a growth mindset and explore what you like. If you really like it, then keep it for your team. Be open minded to try our new things. As a coach help out other coaches. You will help them grow and they will help you grow. With the coaching group that you have, bounce situational baseball ideas off of them. This will open your eyes and want to try our new things. Try your best as a head coach to make things a priority that the conversations your parents have with your players to be the same conversations that the coaches are having with the player. Example: Share with the parents what a quality at bat is. “Get everyone with two feet in the circle.” Lay out the expectations with your parents on what their players can expect. Parents want their kids to play, but if you set out the expectations and how following what the coaches have put out will help the players. It’ll help the player stay focused and not worried on distractions. As a coach you’re working for all of the parents who are supporting the program. The parent who doesn’t like you won’t ever like you. “If everybody likes you then you’re doing it wrong.” Focus on coaching your team. Be transparent with your players, parents, and community. As a head coach set the boundary where the parents cannot go to the assistant coaches and talk about playing time. The players know and understand why they aren’t playing. Talk to your players about the role of each player. Have a parent only meeting and a player only meeting. Ask both the parents and players the same questions. 1. Write down their son’s individual goals. 2. Write down our team goals. 3. If your son doesn’t accomplish these two goals then what do you want them to experience? At the end of the day, parents want their child to grow as a person, student, and athlete. Don’t hold a grudge against a parent for what they say about you. Before practice you have two teams. One team is to clean up the locker room. The other team is to clean up the team room. Whoever cleans either room better earns a point. In practice those teams will be competing. Then both teams will alternate either running sprints or cleaning up the dugout. Keep score each day. “Try to compete in everything that you do.” Allow for players who love baseball but struggle with playing to be student coaches or managers. Find Out Friday: You will be in a chair during workouts. Players ask one question and you give them an honest answer. “Culture is something you feel.” You compete in the weight room by the strength of the players and putting more weight on the machines and lifts. Ask coaches and players about what went well culture wise and what needs changed. “If you let culture be the teacher then culture will be better.” You want your worst player to be better than the opponents worst player. If a player does something wrong we are going to handle the situation right there. “Don’t have regrets about things away from the game.” Don’t put up with lack of effort and wrong attitude. Do the program the way you want it. Guys get fired because of a lack of culture instead of wins and losses. “The grass is always greener if you don’t water and fertilize where you’re at.” “Be where you’re feet are and do the best at where you’re at.”  

    Ryan Sienko- Catching Coordinator, Los Angeles Dodgers

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2020 66:24

    This episode is sponsored by Athlete's Brand.   iTunes   Youtube   Google   Spotify   Description Today we have on Ryan Sienko- Catching Coordinator for the LA Dodgers Ryan was a catcher at the University of Iowa, played professionally for the Texas Rangers, Chicago White Sox and in independent baseball where he was an All-Star.  His current responsibilities include catching philosophies and drills, deciphering receiving metrics, blocking philosophies and drills, throwing philosophies and drills, coordinating player plans, working with the research and development department, drills and skill work, and traveling to all affiliates to work with the catchers. On the show, we discuss how he evaluates catchers, what data and trends we can look for, and we go through several drills and thought processes with how we can setup up catchers to maximize their potential, on and off the field.     Resources Choose love not fear Getting outside of your comfort zone.  “Ask other people what challenges the face, and how they overcome them."   Contact @Catch_and_Throw https://www.catchandthrow.com/   Show notes courtesy of Zach Casto The catching position has changed where there are very athletic players who are catching. You’re seeing athletes behind there. You can find ways to overcome/improve movement issues To be seen as a catcher be an athlete and hit. The catcher needs to be flexible. Evaluate his strengths and weaknesses. If the catcher is on your team give them a list of what they do well and don’t. This will help the catcher understand what to work on. Walk through with them specific hitters and see if they can pick out weaknesses and strengths of each hitter in order to call the game. Give the catchers the freedom to be creative and try out stances. When you give them freedom they will experiment and find out what works best for them. Coaches need to be open minded and allow their players to try things out. “Be open to trial and error.” When the ball gets by the catcher bad things happen. So find ways to prevent that and receive the best way possible. “If you want to find a really good catcher, notice how well the command of the pitcher is.” We are living in a world where it’s high velocity and low command. The best catchers receive in such a way that it makes every pitcher look good. The most important thing a coach can do to be able to teach a player is to have a strong relationship with the player. A player needs to trust first before any success can happen. “It’s much more about the relationship and the communication.” Lead learning by asking questions where the player can communicate what he is doing in order to understand himself. If the player doesn’t trust us then they won’t get anything out of our teaching. As soon as we can make it relatable to them and for them to understand the why behind each drill, then we will understand how good the player is. As coaches dive into the process with the players. Don’t be on the side, go through things with players and be all in with them. To create trust with the players be transparent with them. Make sure you break data down so that it’s understandable and actionable. Don’t allow your guys to get upset after each game with the daily scores. Let daily scores tell you if the game was a good or bad one. Go weekly to see if there are any trends to make adjustments. Analytics tells us is the player good? And where do we need to work? The recall of catchers is amazing. On specific pitches, ask the catchers what happened and why? Ask them if they can use things they’ve worked on in practice. Ask them to slowly bring in what they are working on. The best part of being a coach is the small bit of influence you made on their career. To be a good catcher you need to create championship caliber men, who roll with the punches, who are also good communicators. Catchers need to be able to talk with both the pitching and catching coaches. Allow your players to give presentation a to talk improve their communication. Serve to Lead is about serving everyone not just pitchers. It’s about serving teammates, coaches, and everyone on the organization. Catchers are typically the best teammate because they are living the Serve to Lead culture. Serve to Lead is the expectation for every catcher in the Dodger organization. “Being a good teammate will elevate your career.” Being a good teammate will help the athlete outside of the field and help improve the world. “Building stronger men builds stronger baseball players.” If the player is a better person then they will make a positive impact in the world. Before you talk about receiving with a catcher make sure they are prepared to talk about how many pitches they are going to receive. All we have to make sure is the catcher is prepared to have the proper set up to receive each pitcher they will see. The catcher needs to understand what each pitch is going to do. Understanding the spin rate, spin efficiency, and break of the pitch. “You’re going to have to adjust with everything they do and be able to adjust.” Catchers need to understand how to receive each pitcher they will see properly. Every catcher has a pitcher they struggle to receive. Allow them to experiment to be able to catch that pitcher. Allowing freedom will create a shared to problems. Sit down with your catchers and find out how to get ahead, what to do when ahead and behind, how are you going to put the hitter away with each pitcher on the staff. Then throw in specific hitters and create a plan for pitch calling. Find out who does damage, who chases, who can handle velocity, who can handle offspeed pitches. To be able to have success with receiving is to have pocket awareness in space. Having players understand where their pocket is in space is crucial. “The reason why we block is to prevent the runner from advancing.” You want your catchers to recognize they need to block and then block a certain way that prevents the runner from advancing. A successful block is one that prevents the runner from advancing. The exchange is the most crucial part of throwing when catching. Get your right foot down, take your left foot and plant, then throw. The best coaches are innovate and question conventional wisdom. Create team building exercises where players learn how to communicate better and communicate with everyone well. If you can get your catchers to talk and communicate well together is a huge win. Talk to everyone and ask a lot of questions. You can learn from everyone’s experiences. Be respectful and understand everyone’s perspective.

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