Podcasts about Tulane University

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Private research university in New Orleans, Louisiana

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Tulane University

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Latest podcast episodes about Tulane University

Upfit - Ernährung leicht gemacht | Podcast über gesunde Ernährung, Abnehmen, Motivation & Gesundheit
Upfit #114: Stoffwechselfallen: Gibt es guten Zucker? Und was sind eigentlich schlechte Fette? Mit Johannes von ahead nutrition

Upfit - Ernährung leicht gemacht | Podcast über gesunde Ernährung, Abnehmen, Motivation & Gesundheit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 73:33


In Podcast #114 haben wir Gründer und Geschäftsführer Johannes Sörensen zu Gast. Zusammen mit einem Freund gründete er 2017 das Unternehmen ahead nutrition. Die Themen Kohlenhydrate und Zucker sind für ihn richtige Herzensthemen, weshalb wir in dieser Folge auch einen besonderen Fokus auf diese Thematik gelegt haben. Er erklärt uns, warum Zucker nicht gleich Zucker ist und wie wir die Ernährung in unserem Alltag heute besser unseren aktuellen Arbeits- und Lebensbedingungen anpassen können. Außerdem beleuchten wir gemeinsam mit ihm die Problematik rund um Fette, Überkonsum, ständige Verfügbarkeit von Lebensmitteln und daraus resultierende Volkskrankheiten. Was seine Motivation für die Gründung war und wie er mit seinem Unternehmen einen Wandel in der Gesellschaft vollziehen möchte, erfahrt ihr in der aktuellen Podcast-Folge mit Johannes Sörensen. Mehr zu Ahead Nutrition: Webseite: https://www.ahead-nutrition.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ahead_nutrition/ Teste kostenlos unsere neue Wanilla App: https://wanilla.app.link/nvAPldEJ3ib Kommentiert fleißig, stellt Fragen und abonniert unseren Kanal, um zukünftig keine Folge mehr zu verpassen. Webseite: upfit.de Instagram: instagram.com/upfit.de Facebook: facebook.com/upfit.de Youtube: youtube.com/channel/UCWRBa7-h8uCpfoXlbv1pdbQ Weiterführende Informationen: Dass man bei einer Diät besser auf eine Reduktion von Kohlenhydraten statt Fett setzen sollte, bestätigt auch eine Studie aus dem Jahr 2018 der Tulane University in New Orleans. https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M14-0180?articleid=1900694& Nicht Fett macht dick – sondern Zucker: Wo tatsächlich das Problem der Gewichtszunahme liegt, zeigt eine Auswertung von über 50 Ernährungsstudien, die in der medizinischen Fachzeitschrift „Food and Nutrition Research“ veröffentlicht wurde. Dabei hat man nur Studien herangezogen, die ab dem Jahr 2000 durchgeführt wurden. Bei der Analyse der Daten fanden die Forscher heraus, dass ein erhöhter Verzehr von Ballaststoffen und Nüssen kaum zu einer Gewichtszunahme führt. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418611/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/upfit/message

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Author and Speaker Tim Wise and Finance Expert Barry Ritholtz Episode 522

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 141:48


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books 35 mins Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. 1:28 The GREAT Barry Ritholtz who has spent his career helping people spot their own investment errors and to learn how to better manage their own financial behaviors. He is the creator of The Big Picture, often ranked as the number one financial blog to follow by The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and others. Barry Ritholtz is the creator and host of Bloomberg's “Masters in Business” radio podcast, and a featured columnist at the Washington Post. He is the author of the Bailout Nation: How Greed and Easy Money Corrupted Wall Street and Shook the World Economy (Wiley, 2009). In addition to serving as Chairman and Chief Investment Officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management, he is also on the advisory boards of Riskalyze, and Peer Street, two leading financial technology startups bringing transparency and analytics to the investment business.   Barry has named one of the “15 Most Important Economic Journalists” in the United States, and has been called one of The 25 Most Dangerous People in Financial Media. When not working, he can be found with his wife and their two dogs on the north shore of Long Island. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Vox's The Weeds
How the 1918 flu pandemic ended

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:48


Dylan talks to John M. Barry, distinguished scholar at Tulane University and author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, about the Spanish flu of 1918-1919, its parallels to Covid-19, and what that pandemic's end tells us about how this one might end. References: The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Moms Moving On: Navigating Divorce, Single Motherhood & Co-Parenting.
You Are Entitled to Your Feelings After Divorce: How to Keep Toxic Positivity Out of Your Divorce, with Whitney Goodman, LMFT

Moms Moving On: Navigating Divorce, Single Motherhood & Co-Parenting.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 30:34


If you've ever felt down about your divorce, confided in your feelings to someone else, and you were met with a response of "Look on the bright side!" or "It could be worse, you'll get over it!" you know how infuriating it feels to have your feelings shut down. That's called toxic positivity, Toxic positivity involves dismissing negative emotions and responding to distress with false reassurances rather than empathy. It comes from feeling uncomfortable with negative emotions But there's no place for that in divorce. You are entitled to your feelings after divorce, because as we've all learned, you need to feel them to heal them. That's where our guest Whitney Goodman, of the popular Instagram account @sitwithwhit comes in. Whitney is a licensed marriage and family therapist and author of the new book "Toxic Positivity: Keeping It Real In a World Obsessed with Positive Thinking. Whitney Goodman is the radically honest psychotherapist behind the hugely popular Instagram account @sitwithwhit, the author of Toxic Positivity, and the owner of The Collaborative Counseling Center, a private therapy practice in Miami, FL. She helps people who want to improve their relationships and emotional awareness. Whitney earned her undergraduate degree at Tulane University and a graduate degree in Counseling Psychology from The University of Miami. She has additional training and certifications in working with couples, trauma, and clients who have been diagnosed with chronic illness. Whitney has her own column in Psychology Today and has been featured in dozens of domestic and international publications, including The New York Times, Teen Vogue, NY Magazine, Instyle, and Good Morning America.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Radically Pragmatic, a podcast from the Progressive Policy Institute
MOSAIC MOMENT: Growth, Resiliency and Sustainability in New Orleans

Radically Pragmatic, a podcast from the Progressive Policy Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 31:09


On a new episode of Radically Pragmatic, PPI's Mosaic Economic Project examines the findings of the 2021 Greater New Orleans Startup Report. The episode explores topics such as the growth, resiliency, and economic sustainability of New Orleans – including the effects of increased remote work options – and dives into solutions to bridge gaps in race and gender equity in critical areas from entrepreneurship to COVID relief. Hosts Jasmine Stoughton and Crystal Swann were joined by Emily Egan, Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Tulane University, and Ann Marshall Tilton, Community Engagement Manager at the Albert Lepage Center. Read the 2021 Great New Orleans Startup Report: https://freeman.tulane.edu/greater-new-orleans-startup-index Learn more about the Mosaic Economic Project: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/project/the-mosaic-project/ Learn more about the Progressive Policy Institute: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/

Don't Worry, We'll Talk It Out
The State of Education (with Calvin Mackie, PhD)

Don't Worry, We'll Talk It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:00


Today, I talk with the incredible Dr. Calvin Mackie about his non-profit, STEM NOLA. We discuss the culture surrounding education, the impact COVID has had on our educational systems, and the ways his organization is working to reduce educational disparities in children across America. Dr. Mackie is a contributing writer for Forbes Magazine, former engineering professor at Tulane University and an internationally renowned public speaker. He is the founder of STEM NOLA, a non-profit organization which seeks to improve educational disparities in low income children and children of color. Since 2013, STEM NOLA has engaged over 75,000 students – mostly under-served students of color – in hands-on STEM project-based learning.In 1990, he graduated Magna Cum Laude from Morehouse College with a B.S. degree, as a member of the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society. Simultaneously, he was awarded a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech, where he subsequently earned his Master's and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 1996. 

Squawk Pod
2022 Begins: Planes Grounded, Gyms Reopened, & Elon Musk, Shooting for the Stars

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 35:34


Kicking off 2022, CNBC's Meg Tirrell discusses the latest surge in Covid-19 cases, up more than 200% in the last two weeks. 2021's issues at the airport continue in 2022, as well: over 13,000 flights were canceled in the U.S. between Christmas Eve and New Year's Day. CNBC's Phil LeBeau reports on the latest wave of flight cancellations and says airlines have blamed the disruptions on a combination of bad weather and omicron infections that sidelined staff. While a problem for air travel, Covid-19 seems to be less of an issue for the fitness industry; CNBC's Diana Olick reports on investor confidence in gyms, and Planet Fitness CEO lays out his own bullish perspective for the new year. Plus, Tesla's had a big year. The electric vehicle maker beat fourth-quarter and full-year delivery expectations, and the stock is rising to match the success. Walter Isaacson, history professor at Tulane University, advisory partner at Perella Weinberg Partners, and the author tasked with writing Elon Musk's biography, discusses the Tesla CEO and what we can expect from him--and his projects--in 2022.In this episode:Walter Isaacson, @WalterIsaacsonChris Rondeau, @PlanetFitnessDiana Olick, @DianaOlickMeg Tirrell, @megtirrellBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinMike Santoli, @michaelsantoliKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

The O'SHOW
#463 | Aaron Golub

The O'SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 34:22


Aaron Golub is a motivational speaker, entrepreneur & former Division-1 Athlete. Aaron became the first legally blind athlete to play football in a Division 1 game when he was at Tulane University. He was a captain in his senior year, and went on to also become an NFL free agent.

Discover Lafayette
Conrad Comeaux, Lafayette Parish Tax Assessor, Discusses How Local Government is Funded

Discover Lafayette

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 63:10


Lafayette Parish Tax Assessor Conrad Comeaux joins Discover Lafayette to explain how taxes are levied and collected. Who pays for what? How is your home's value assessed? This all really hits home when you get that bill in the mail. Serving as Tax Assessor since 2001, Conrad previously served on the Lafayette Parish Council from 1984 to 1996. A native of Scott, he graduated from USL, now UL-Lafayette, with degrees in biology and chemistry, and received a master's degree in health administration from Tulane University. He has been active in incorporating technology to help his office more efficiently serve the public, and was the first assessor in the state to put property values online and the first in Lafayette Parish to produce a digital map of ownership parcels. He views the office as non-political and says "we are there to do a job." While many people may think that the Tax Assessor sets tax millages and collects taxes, in fact, his office is only involved in determining the value of three things: land, buildings, and "extra features" that affect value (such as fencing, pools, and tennis courts). So when you receive your tax bills, they are coming from the Sheriff and local municipalities, not the Assessor. Louisiana's tax system differs from other states in the manner in which taxes are calculated. In most states the land and improvements are combined to reach a value; here, we separate out features of the property (i.e., the land is valued separately from the improvements) and taxed at different rates. Land and residential buildings are assessed at 10% of their market value; commercial buildings are assessed at 15% of market value. In a similar vein of Louisiana being different, in other states, property taxes are typically the biggest generator of local revenue; here, it is sales taxes. Millages collected throughout Lafayette Parish are very low compared to other parishes in Louisiana. In some years. Lafayette Parish millages are half of those collected in St. Tammany Parish. In fact, St. Tammany Parish school taxes are as high as what we are assessed for all Parish functions. It can be challenging to assess residences in neighborhoods with a wide range of values, and he gave an example of how homes on the front end of Kim Drive vary greatly in value from those closer to the Vermilion River. Conrad's office does "mass appraising," meaning that they look at values within a subdivision, or streets within a subdivision, not each individual home. However, his office is provided with a copy of each Act of Cash Sale filed at the courthouse and they utilize the value listed on the sale as a frame of reference. If you disagree with the assessed value of your home, Conrad encourages you to call his office at (337)291-7080 to bring it to his attention. It will be adjusted if they find a mistake (such as an overestimation of total square footage). Lafayette Parish Tax Assessor Conrad Comeaux will inform the councils of local governments on tax revenues and the implications of their decisions on their votes to maintain or raise millages. Their decisions can have a long-term impact on ensuring adequate levels of funding for mandated government services. Reassessments are typically done every four years. The Assessor's office will examine sales around a particular time frame to update values. As an example, for the 2020 reassessment, they looked at sales occurring six months before and six months after January 2019 to determine current values. With dramatic swings in market values, this process can cause people to scratch their heads wondering how a value was arrived at, but it's important to remember that the assessment is based upon a value from a couple of years back. If your home is damaged by a fire or hurricane and its value is greatly affected, please contact the Assessor's office to report the occurrence and the assessed value will be adjusted accordingly.

The Art of Passive Income
How To Build An ADU And Start Generating Passive Rental Income

The Art of Passive Income

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 26:53


Ryan O'Connell is the founder of How To ADU and an advocate for more housing in California. He moved to Napa, California in 2012 to start nakedwines.com which is now one of the twenty largest wineries in the United States. In traveling all over California's beautiful wine regions, Ryan had too many occasions to meet vineyard workers, winery teams, and hospitality staff that cannot afford to live in the regions where they work. While grateful for the success and growth of California's wine country, Ryan also saw a fundamental problem pushing people out of their communities or driving them to spend far more than a third of their income on housing. Revisiting his political science background, where he holds a B.A. from Tulane University), Ryan set out to explain Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) to California homeowners. He wants to create simple ways for homeowners to reduce California's housing shortage, in a way that benefits them and their communities.Listen in as they discuss:What is an ADUThe process of building ADUsHow does one generate profit and passive income from ADUsAn example of a single-family home that was converted to an ADUCosts associated with ADUsAnd, more!TIP OF THE WEEKMark: My tip of the week could change your life, go to https://www.how-to-adu.com/, tons of information there and you're going to learn a lot in there.Scott: Check out storydot.com, you can turn slides or PowerPoint into an interactive thing that almost becomes like a webpageRyan O'Connell: I learned what I have now by reading Backdoor Revolution by Cole Peterson, he's a very generous person. He cares about housing, he cares about you. I highly recommend his book.WANT TO LISTEN MORE?Did you like this episode? If so, tune into another one of our exciting episodes with special guest Shane Melanson as we discuss the benefits of Commercial Real Estate. Isn't it time to create passive income so you can work where you want, when you want and with whomever you want?

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
Time for a Check Up_Dr. Ramon Rodriguez Alabama Orthopaedic Clinic

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 9:21


This week on Time for a Check up: What is the difference between an ankle fracture and a sprain? Do all fractures need surgery? Dan talked to Dr. Ramon Rodriguez, from the Alabama Orthopaedic Clinic, about these subjects and more. He is the newest foot and ankle specialist at AOC  from Tulane University. 

Learn With Us

Video version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVaTJoLkUZAMark H. Armitage earned a BS in Education from Liberty University and an MS in Biology (parasitology), under Richard Lumsden (Ph.D. Rice and Dean of Tulane University's graduate program) at the Institute for Creation Research in San Diego, CA. He later graduated Ed.S. in Science Education from Liberty University and is a doctoral candidate there.Mark grew up in a military family and lived in Venezuela and Puerto Rico for 15 years. He became a Christian when he was a college senior, studying plant pathology at the University of Florida, and his family withdrew support from him.His experience in the business sector includes Olympus Corporation of America and Carl Zeiss. In 1984 he founded a microscope sales and service company and has been in business for 29 years. He was awarded a US patent for an optical inspection device in 1993.Mark's micrographs have appeared on the covers of eleven scientific journals, and he has many technical publications on microscopic phenomena in such journals as American Laboratory, Southern California Academy of Sciences Bulletin, Parasitology Research, Microscopy and Microanalysis, Microscopy Today and Acta Histochemica, among others. His career in teaching at educational institutions includes Master's College Azusa Pacific University and California State University Northridge.Mark managed a working electron microscopy laboratory (SEM and TEM) at the Institute for Creation Research in San Diego. In 2003 he moved his laboratory to the Creation Research Society Van Andel Creation Research Center in AZ. His lab is still vibrant and is still producing publications.Until recently, Mark served as the Manager for the Electron and Confocal Microscopy Suite in the Biology Department at California State University Northridge. Mark was suddenly terminated by the Biology Department when his discovery of soft tissues in Triceratops horn was published in Acta Histochemica.He is currently seeking relief in a legal action for wrongful termination and religious discrimination by the University.Mark's other unique discoveries include the discovery of two new species of trematodes and the reporting of new hosts for several trematodes. He also discovered short half-life radiohalos in clear diamonds, and the first ever discovery of soft tissues inside a Triceratops horn from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana.He is a lifetime member of the Creation Research Society where he has served on the Board of Directors since 2006. Mark is a member of the Microscopy Society of America, the Southern California Academy of Sciences and the American Society of Parasitologists.UK based independent technology and podcasting company - Contact us for your web applications, IT consulting, podcasting and leadership needs. Subscribe to get the latest news, video updates, behind the scenes info, and of course, the episodes.Nikos Katsikanis LTD Director/Producer: NikosKatsikanis.com

What the heck with Richard Dweck

Jordan Fried is a comedian and filmmaker from Warwick, NY. He studied Digital Media Production and English at Tulane University, where he was a member of Cat Mafia Comedy. He's performed at Rhino Comedy, Eastville Comedy Club, Hell Yes Fest, Binghamton Comedy and Arts Festival, New Orleans Comedy and Arts Festival and Northern Virginia Comedy Festival. He produces the comedy variety show, Circuit Break; Late Night Hump at NJ Weedman's Joint; and he is a founding member of the improv troupes, Duly Noted and The Mutts. Twitter: @JFreeze Instagram : http://Instagram.com/jfreeeze . https://lnhstudios.com

Her Success Matters
Investing in yourself with Meghan McCartan and Leah Jones

Her Success Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 35:59


We discuss: The importance of financial literacy, and why it is never too soon to start investing in financial education.The power of investing in yourself first and foremost in any career.How to get the most out of a professional mentorship, and building a strong foundation to become a successful mentor and leader to others.Leah's children's book on financial literacy, and the positive outcomes she has seen in her son's learning, even at such a young age.Tips, tricks, tools and resources for furthering your financial education at any age and in any career.Resources: InvestmentNews | Christine Shaw | Meghan McCartan | Leah Jones | Hightower AdvisorsGuest Bios About MeghanMeghan McCartan is the managing director and head of marketing for Hightower, overseeing advisor-facing marketing, thought leadership and events, and corporate/M&A initiatives. A big believer in personal marketing efforts to drive growth, Meghan was the architect of the OCMO (Outsourced Chief Marketing Officer) initiative, through which marketing works hand-in-hand with advisory teams to develop and execute strategic marketing and communications plans tailored to their firm. She was recognized as one of “Ten to Watch for 2020” in WealthManagement Magazine for this initiative. As a mom of four girls, Meghan is also passionate about supporting working moms, so she built a conference series which won her Avon's “Women Changing the World” award in 2007. Meghan has over 20 years of industry marketing experience, on both the advisory/broker dealer side as well as financial technology. She holds a master's degree in business administration from Tulane University and a bachelor's degree from William and Mary.About LeahWith almost two decades of asset and private wealth management experience, Leah Jones recognizes that today's world is fluid, and she is always ready to help her clients adapt. Leah joined Hightower as director of financial planning in 2015 and has been in the investment industry since 2003. Leah specializes in developing and implementing complex financial planning strategies and managing investments for her clients. She works extensively advising women and couples through the financial complexities of divorce. Her knowledge and council to clients on investments extends to alternative investments, including hedge funds, private equity and private real estate, investment options often underutilized by private clients.  She is passionate about helping both her clients and children to achieve their life goals. She believes financial literacy education can and should start at a young age. She created a company Good Money Kids to share tips on how to educate kids about basic money concepts and her first children's book Kai Makes Money is expected to be published in December 2021. Leah is the host of two podcasts. The Everything Money podcast provides timely and topical financial information with a goal of helping listeners to make smart financial decisions. Her Divorce Source with Leah Jones is a podcast with the goal of providing practical guidance related to lifestyle and money to women before, during and after a divorce. Leah was recognized as a Top 40 Under 40 Financial Professional by InvestmentNews in 2021. Leah majored in Finance and graduated from Smith School of Business, University of Maryland College Park. She holds citations in CIVICUS and Hinman CEO programs. Leah is a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), Certified Financial Planner (CFP®), Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA®) and Accredited Estate Planner (AEP®). In addition, she has her Series 7, 65 and 63. Leah lives in North Bethesda, Maryland with her husband, son, daughter and Bull Terrier. She likes competitive activity and enjoyed playing basketball, soccer and softball growing up. Outside of work, Leah enjoys trying to keep up with her kids, photography, and travel.  Leah has a lot of experience traveling; she has visited over 20 countries and lived in Spain, Ecuador and Australia.

Roux Fitness
Ep 104: Former Tulane University Offensive Tackle Jimmy Ordeneaux on changing habits and personalized programming

Roux Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 35:56


Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Glenn Kirschner and Tim Wise Episode 492

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 116:54


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more also please donate to GiveWell.org/StandUp and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup 44 Mins Glenn Kirschner is a former federal prosecutor with 30 years of trial experience.  He served in the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia for 24 years, rising to the position of Chief of the Homicide Section.  In that capacity, Glenn supervised 30 homicide prosecutors and oversaw all homicide grand jury investigations and prosecutions in Washington, DC. Prior to joining the DC U.S. Attorney's Office, Glenn served more than six years on active duty as an Army Judge Advocate General (JAG) prosecutor, trying court-martial cases and handling criminal appeals, including espionage and death penalty cases. Glenn tried hundreds of cases in his 30 years as a prosecutor, including more than 50 murder trials, multiple lengthy RICO trials and precedent-setting cases.  Glenn's YouTube Channel Glenn's Podcast 1:04 I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page  

Leading Lines
Episode 101 - Eunice Ofori

Leading Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 36:34


Eunice Ofori is a senior instructional designer at the Center for Engaged Learning and Teaching at Tulane University in New Orleans. She has a PhD in curriculum and instruction with an emphasis on instructional design and technology from Virginia Tech, and her career has focused on the use of instructional technology and sound pedagogy in a variety of teaching contexts. She's also a good friend of podcast producer Julaine Fowlin, the Vanderbilt Center for Teaching's very own assistant director for instructional design. Julaine recently interviewed Eunice about her passion for accessibility in the educational technology space. Eunice shares how she came to this work, what it looks like now, and lots of useful advice for instructors who want to make learning accessible for more students. Links • Eunice Ofori on LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/in/eofori/ • Eunice Ofori on Twitter, https://twitter.com/EuniceO94407204 • SAMR model by Ruben Puentedura, https://www.edutopia.org/article/powerful-model-understanding-good-tech-integration • OneNote's Immersive Reader, https://www.onenote.com/learningtools

Grow Your Law Firm
One Of The Nation's Most Successful Attorneys Shares His Stories And Advice with Morris Bart

Grow Your Law Firm

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 41:26


One Of The Nation's Most Successful Attorneys Shares His Stories And Advice. Welcome to episode 105 of the Grow Your Law Firm podcast, hosted by Ken Hardison. In this episode Ken sits down with Morris Bart and they discuss exactly how he became the second largest personal injury attorney in the country and his advice for other lawyers for marketing, hiring, and persevering.   Mr. Bart has been a trial lawyer for over 40 years. During his career, he has developed a national reputation as a leader in handling pharmaceutical, medical devices, and other Mass Torts litigations. In this area, he has successfully achieved many multi-million dollar recoveries for his clients. Mr. Bart has also been a pioneer in legal marketing in America and has lectured extensively on the subject at Tulane University, Loyola Law School, and University of New Orleans.     What you'll learn about in this episode: Morris Bart's background, and how he went into law and eventually found himself as one of the biggest personal injury lawyers in the country. What Morris did to be on his way to become one of the most respected marketers in his profession. How Morris came up with his ubiquitous tag line “One Call, That's All”. Why television marketing needs to be the cornerstone of any attorney's advertising budget, even in the age of digital. Why having charisma is an important part of an advertising campaign, regardless of the amount of money one has to spend. What Morris has, and hasn't, changed about operating his firm during the pandemic. The issues that Morris has had recently when it comes to hiring new employees and what he's doing to address that. Advice for young lawyers who are trying to succeed in a difficult market.   Resources:  Website: https://www.morrisbart.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/morrisbartlawfirm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MorrisBartLawFirm Twitter: https://twitter.com/morrisbart?lang=en       Additional Resources: PILMMA's Super Summit https://learn.pilmma.org/pilmma-super-summit-2021 The Mastermind Effect: https://www.pilmma.org/the-mastermind-effect/ PILMMA's Free Resources: https://www.pilmma.org/free-resources/ PILMMA Join Page: https://learn.pilmma.org/join-pilmma  

SharkPreneur
741: Balancing Criminal and Family Law with Leland Baldwin

SharkPreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 17:15


Balancing Criminal and Family Law Leland Baldwin, Leland Toman Baldwin Law   – The Sharkpreneur podcast with Seth Greene Episode 741 Leland Baldwin Leland Baldwin attended Sophie Newcomb of Tulane University and the University of Florida College of Law. After graduating she took a job as a lawyer at a big law firm in Tampa, Florida. After she left, she became a State Attorney and tried over 150 jury trials including many murders and serial sex offenders. Now she focuses on family and criminal law.    Listen to this illuminating Sharkpreneur episode with Leland Baldwin about balancing criminal and family law. Here are some of the beneficial topics covered on this week's show: - How criminal and family law can overlap with each other in certain cases. - Why treating people with respect can lead to excellent word of mouth referrals. - How you need to feel like a priority when hiring a criminal or family lawyer. - Why you want a lawyer who will really fight for you and for what is best. - How lawyers shouldn't be afraid to hire their clients if the clients aren't a fit.   Connect with Leland: Guest Contact Info LinkedIn Linkedin.com/in/leland-baldwin-46a07128   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Soul Chat with Queens Recognize Queens®️
Episode 45- Learning to accept love with Shade Ashani

Soul Chat with Queens Recognize Queens®️

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 61:11


Welcome to another episode of Soul Chat with your host Ebony Tutora from Queens Recognize Queens®. In this episode we discuss her research of women without fathers, and how that affects how they show up in the world- specifically in love. We discuss how accepting love that is easy can be challenging when we've learned that love is hard. There's so many amazing talking points you definitely want to have out your pen and notebook. More about Shade: Shadé is a breakthrough coach and New Earth teacher, dedicated to healing ancestral wounding. Many of you have been doing the work, going to yoga class, reading all the right books, but are still stuck. She spent 10 years working towards her own freedom and created her offerings to streamline that process for you. You can shift now. Before becoming a breakthrough coach, Shadé graduated from Columbia University and earned her Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She interviewed hundreds of women ages 18-75 and found an absolute difference between girls who grew up with and without their fathers. She gained a profound understanding of the different ways women are wounded by their fathers and then go on to live as if those wounds are the truth. Shadé wrote a book called In Search of My Father about how healing her relationship with her father set her free to experience healthy love and wealth. She toured the country for four years keynote speaking at conferences, high schools and colleges so she could get her arms around as many women as she could and tell them that they are worthy of love. This is her life's devotion: to bring an end to the unnecessary suffering caused by unworthiness. Shadé is an active philanthropist and has raised half a million dollars for her nonprofit, Kids International, in hopes of making a difference in the lives of orphaned children around the world. Shade was honored by Congress for her work and is a Goodwill Ambassador to The Gambia in West Africa. She wakes up every day, trying to be more like Yahweh. In her spare time, Shadé loves to read, talk about health and wellness, teach and practice yoga, and travel; she's been to every continent... except Antartica. Shadé currently lives in Hawaii where she spends most days hiking with Savannah strapped to her back and helping people around the world get free through her coaching programs. Follow her on IG & Facebook @ Shade Ashani --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/queensrecognizequeen/support

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Boston Globe Columnist Billy Baker on Male Friendship and Prof. Eric Segall the Abortion that is the Supreme Court / Episode 489

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 136:15


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more also please donate to GiveWell.org/StandUp and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup 34 mins Billy Baker is a staff writer for TheBoston Globe, where he writes narrative features and humorous columns. A native of South Boston, he is a graduate of Boston Latin School, Tulane University, and the Columbia Journalism School. He has received the Deborah Howell Award for Writing Excellence from the American Society of News Editors, and was a member of the Globe team that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings. 1:26 Eric J. Segall graduated from Emory University, Phi Beta Kappa 27  and summa cum laude, and from Vanderbilt Law School, where he was the research editor for the Law Review and member of Order of the Coif. He clerked for the Chief Judge Charles Moye Jr. for the Northern District of Georgia, and Albert J. Henderson of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. After his clerkships, Segall worked for Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and the U.S. Department of Justice, before joining the Georgia State faculty in 1991. Segall teaches federal courts and constitutional law I and II. He is the author of the books Originalism as Faith and Supreme Myths: Why the Supreme Court is not a Court and its Justices are not Judges. His articles on constitutional law have appeared in, among others, the Harvard Law Review Forum, the Stanford Law Review On Line, the UCLA Law Review, the George Washington Law Review, the Washington University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, the Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy, and Constitutional Commentary among many others. Segall's op-eds and essays have appeared in the New York Times, the LA Times, The Atlantic, SLATE, Vox, Salon, and the Daily Beast, among others. He has appeared on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and France 24 and all four of Atlanta's local television stations. He has also appeared on numerous local and national radio shows. Listen and Subscribe to Eric's Podcast Supreme Myths and follow him on Tik Tok! Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

American Shoreline Podcast Network
Examining a “Living Laboratory” on Louisiana's Coast: A Conversation with Scientist Molly Keogh | Delta Dispatches

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 40:03


Scientist Molly Keogh, who received her PhD at Tulane University and is now a Postdoctoral Scholar, University of Oregon, Department of Earth Sciences, joins the podcast to discuss her latest paper, “Organic matter accretion, shallow subsidence, and river delta sustainability”, and its relation to Louisiana's coast. Molly, who was featured for her research in the documentary film “Last Call for the Bayou”, also discusses that experience, and her work at the Davis Pond Freshwater Diversion, a “living laboratory” of Louisiana's coast.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – November 29, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 169:46


"Omnicron" fever, Chris Cuomo's days are numbered, ASU v. Kyle Rittenhouse, Rihanna's new PJs, new Cameos, stars are just like US, Eli stops by, and Marc v. the B1G Championship.Happy Cyber Monday! Hope you got some merch because we'll probably never do it again."Omnicron" has taken it over the world.An Oasis cover band is trapped in an England pub with nothing but booze, music and bar food.Eli Zaret and his busted hip show up to talk big MLB contracts, Michigan vs OSU, Bob Stoops to the Sooners, Aaron Rodgers > Matthew Stafford, Jon Vaughn vs Jim Harbaugh, and Killer Cares THIS Thursday.Kyle Rittenhouse's online classmates want him kicked off of campus at Arizona State. ASU needs to get back to what they are good at now that Tulane University took their crown.BranDon has never seen Curb Your Enthusiasm. He prefers South Park: Post COVID.Tony Bennett wraps up his career with Lady Gaga... who he apparently remembers.Chris Cuomo is the best brother ever and helped brother Andrew with accusers like "that wedding girl".Matthew McConaughey is not running for Governor in Texas. Some people are saying he's joining The Rock's 2024 Presidential ticket.George Clooney talked about crashing his motorcycle.Rihanna has the dumbest pajamas possibly ever, but some people can't figure out how they work.Kanye West will get back with Kim Kardashian... as soon as she's done banging Pete Davidson.Jizzlaine Maxwell trial is underway. Jussie Smollett trial is underway.Tom Mazawey interrupts the show to ask Marc to go to Indianapolis with him. Marc is "choosing" to skip Michigan's Big Ten Championship.Drew watched all 8 hours of The Beatles: Get Back... again.Tabloids: Jessica Simpson is living a lie. Tori Spelling is too broke to divorce. Stars are JUST like us. Russell Crowe needs emergency liposuction. Bill and Hillary are inching towards a massive divorce. Kathie Lee and Craig Ferguson are getting it on. Donatella Versace's face is bizarre.Crime Near Drew: George Harry II is a terrible son. Abductions are taking place right around the corner.These celebrities need YOUR money for personalized messages on Cameo!Tom Arnold's sister was the Queen of Meth.Our listeners love Hunter Biden and are really mad that we're not talking about Jared Kushner. Get ready for a Hunter Biden movie.No more merch for you.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

MILLENIALS SEEKING WISDOM
Behind the Façade How to Structure Company Operations for Sustainable Success: Alicia Butler Pierre

MILLENIALS SEEKING WISDOM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:09


Founder & CEO - Equilibria, Inc. Consultant •Speaker •Author •Podcaster Alicia Butler Pierre is the founder and CEO of Equilibria, Inc., a 15-year-old operations management firm. She specializes in increasing bandwidth for fast-growing organizations via business infrastructure. Alicia has a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Louisiana State University, an MBA from Tulane University, and a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certification. Combined, her content has over three-quarters of a million views across various online platforms. Alicia hosts the weekly Business Infrastructure: Curing Back Office Blues podcast. She's also the author of the 2x Amazon bestseller, Behind the Façade: How to Structure Company Operations for Sustainable Success. Committed to doing the right things the right way, Alicia's mantra is "to leave it better than you found it." Connect with Alicia Butler Pierre: https://www.facebook.com/AliciaButlerPierre https://twitter.com/alicia_b_pierre https://www.amazon.com/Alicia-Butler-Pierre/e/B07JJNF5X8?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1578492380&sr=8-1 What is Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast and Why is Everyone Talking About it? __________ Get Mentored by Christian D Evans: www.christiandevans.com __________ You've probably heard about Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast by now. It seems like everyone is talking about it. So what exactly is Christian D Evans Podcast? And is it even worth the hype? Well friends, I'm answering all of your questions in this Podcast Section. I'm going to tell you everything you need to know about Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast, so be sure to check it out! __________ RESOURCES & LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS VIDEO: How to GAIN a positively Unfair Advantage to become a TOP EARNER as a Side Hustler & Business Owner over the next 90 days!: https://www.todaysidegig.com/side-hustle1602595337044 __________ BUSINESS/SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS: “How to impact the world as a Missionary? Ben & Colette Interview”: https://youtu.be/glfpJpL2oaA “Are Your Limiting Beliefs Stopping You from Achieving Your Goals?”: https://youtu.be/ZnNiZGU5YoA “How To Unleash your Potential with Carol Edwards”: https://youtu.be/ZfrIySHr2jA __________ CONNECT WITH ME: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/evansandfamily/ Journey with Christian Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/5BecmOVFSTLB1J08P3INSB?si=rUDkdD4EQ4yGyi9baaKwbQ #journeywithchristiandevans #christiandevans #aliciabutlerpierre #equilibrium #operations #businessoperations #sop

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: Walter Isaacson On His Book “The Code Breaker”

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 24:30


Patrick Madden hosted this Monday's episode of Louisiana Considered. Author, journalist and Tulane University history professor Walter Isaacsondiscusses his new book, “The Code Breaker.” It's a biography of Dr. Jennifer Doudna, winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for her work on the CRISPR gene editing system. The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate Food Writer Ian McNultychronicles his personal history with tomato sandwiches. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fearless Health Podcast
Got Reflux? Here's How To Fix It! - with Dr. Peter Belafsky and Dr. Ramon Franco | Ep. 30

Fearless Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 34:29


Are you one of the millions of Americans who struggles with reflux issues? Don't just be a statistic, or settle for a half-measure when there are viable solutions! Today on the Gut Health Reset Podcast, we are going to address reflux and the common causes. We're going to dive into lifestyle changes that you can make that will potentially help your reflux and to know what's normal and what's not with reflux. We're going to talk about the different types of reflux, the underlying causes and what next steps should be to maybe investigate the cause of your reflux with Dr. Peter Belafsky and Dr. Ramon Franco!- We answer these questions:- What is reflux? What about gerd?- When do you need to become concerned about reflux?- Are antacids good long-term solutions?- How does H. Pylori factor into reflux issues?- What lifestyle changes can help beat reflux issues?- How does coffee factor into reflux issues?- And more!-Schedule a consultation with Alexis: www.altfammed.comSupplements:Constipation Support 1: https://drannmariebarter.com/product/constipation-support-1/ - About Dr. Peter Belafsky and Dr. Ramon Franco:Dr. Belafsky followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather to “join the family business” by becoming a physician. The desire to comfort his patients and ease their pain runs deep. His distinguished career has been guided by the overwhelming drive to help people feel better in order to live happier lives. Since completing medical school and a residency in otolaryngology at Tulane University, followed by a laryngology fellowship at Wake Forrest, Dr. Belafsky has dedicated his extensive research and clinical practice to those suffering with voice and swallowing problems. Every day he sees patients suffering with the pain of reflux. Every day he wants to be able to do more. Reflux Gourmet is another step towards more.Dr. Franco is also the son of an otolaryngologist. His belief that every person deserves the highest quality of healthcare drives his work.Dr. Franco enjoys the academic world of medicine where he strives to increase patient safety while decreasing their financial burden through innovations such as shifting procedures from operating rooms into the office and investing himself in endeavors like alternative reflux therapy. Alginate therapy, the foundation of Reflux Gourmet, aligns perfectly with his view of how medicine should help everyone.You can find them at: https://refluxgourmet.com/ Email: info@refluxgourmet.com -Subscribe for more gut health content and share this podcast with a friend! Take a screenshot of this episode and tag Dr. Ann-Marie Barter:http://instagram.com/drannmariebarter-Dr. Ann-Marie Barter is a Functional Medicine and Chiropractic Doctor at Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic. She is the clinic founder of Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic that has two offices: one in Longmont and one in Denver. They treat an array of health conditions overlooked or under-treated by conventional medicine, called the "grey zone". https://altfammed.com/https://drannmariebarter.com/

Delta Dispatches
Examining a “Living Laboratory” on Louisiana's Coast: A Conversation with Scientist Molly Keogh

Delta Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 40:03


Scientist Molly Keogh, who received her PhD at Tulane University and is now a Postdoctoral Scholar, University of Oregon, Department of Earth Sciences, joins the podcast to discuss her latest paper, “Organic matter accretion, shallow subsidence, and river delta sustainability”, and its relation to Louisiana's coast. Molly, who was featured for her research in the documentary film “Last Call for the Bayou”, also discusses that experience, and her work at the Davis Pond Freshwater Diversion, a “living laboratory” of Louisiana's coast.

The Perkins Platform
Empathy: A Leader's Essential Tool

The Perkins Platform

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 34:00


Join us on Wednesday, November 17 @ 6pm EST for a discussion on the importance of empathy in today's leader with Tara Van Bommel, PhD.  She is an expert in stereotyping and prejudice, with a focus on the role of nonconscious bias and nonverbal behaviors in intergroup interactions. As Director and Statistician in the research department of Catalyst, Tara provides statistical expertise across all areas of research. In addition, Tara leads the research initiatives for Women and the Future of Work. Prior to joining Catalyst Tara worked across a variety of research disciplines, including developmental neuroscience, forensic neuropsychology, and market research. Tara earned her PhD in social psychology from Tulane University. She earned an MS in psychology from Tulane and a BA in psychology from the University of Denver.

Tyus Mcafee podcast
Southern University men's basketball upset Tulane university

Tyus Mcafee podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 1:20


Your Brain on Facts
Secret Cities (do-over, ep 170)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 33:46


Quick, switch over to Vodacast to see the pictures I talk about in the episode! We all lose things -- keys, wallets, patience -- but how do you lose an entire city?  Hear the stories of three American towns built in a hurry but kept off the map, secure Soviet enclaves known by their post codes, ancient cities found by modern technology, and the ingenious engineering of underground dwellings. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, .   Links to all the research resources are on our website.    In the opal-mining region of South Australia, lies the town of Coober Peedy.  You're welcome to visit, but don't expect to see much.  There aren't many buildings, though the landscape is dotted with ventilation shafts.  There's almost no movement at all.  So if the town is here, where are its 3500 residents?  Look down.  My name's Moxie and this is your brain on facts.   In 1943, three ordinary-looking US cities were constructed at record speed, but left off all maps.  Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Richland, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico held laboratories and sprawling industrial plants, as well as residential neighborhoods, schools, churches, and stores.  The three cities had a combined population of more than 125,000 and one extraordinary purpose: to create nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan project, the U.S. military's initiative to develop nuclear weapons.     Their design was driven by unique considerations, such as including buffer zones for radiation leaks or explosions. In each case, there were natural features, topographical features, that were considered to be favorable. In all three cases, they were somewhat remote—in the case of Richland and Los Alamos, very remote—which offered a more secure environment, of course. But also, in the event of a disaster, an explosion or a radiation leak, that would also minimize the potential exposure of people outside the project to any sort of radiation danger.  The sites were  selected far from one another in case German or Japanese bombers somehow managed to penetrate that far into the United States, it would be harder for them in a single bombing run to take out more than one facility.  K-25 plant at Oak Ridge, which was where they enriched uranium using the gaseous diffusion method, was the largest building in the world under a single roof, spanning more than 40 acres.    Before you being any building project, you have to clear the site of things like trees, high spots, people. In 1942, the government approached the families that lived near the Clinch river in Tennessee, some of whom had farmed there for generations, and kicked them out, telling them the land was needed for a “demolition range,” so as to scare off hold-outs with the threat of adjacent explosions.  The town scaled up fast.   Oak Ridge was initially conceived as a town for 13,000 people but grew to 75,000 by the end of the war, the biggest of the secret cities. The laboratories took up most of the space, but rather than constructing basic dormitories for employees, the architects and designers settled on a suburban vision.  To pull this off quickly and secretly, the architects relied on prefabricated housing, in some cases, a house might come in two halves on the back of a truck to be assembled on-site. These were called “alphabet houses;” A houses were the most modest (read: tiny), while D houses included dining rooms.  Housing was assigned based on seniority, though allowances were sometimes made for large families.     And race.  This was the early 40's, after all.  The secret suburbs for factories manufacturing megadeaths were segregated by design.  Their houses were called “hutments,” little more than plywood frames without indoor plumbing, insulation or glass in the windows.  Though two of the first public schools in the south to be desegregated were in Oak Ridge. They even threatened to secede from Tennessee in order to desegregate, so at least there's that.  There were white families in the hutments as well and all of the residents of that lower-class neighborhood were under more surveillance and stricter rules than the families in better housing.  Married couples may be forbidden to live together.  By the end of the war, most of the white families had been moved out of the hutments and but many of the African American families continued to live in the basic dwellings until the early 1950s.    These towns didn't appear on any official maps, and visitors were screened by guards posted at the entrances.  Anyone over 12 had to have official ID.  Firearms, cameras, and even binoculars were prohibited.  Billboards were installed all over town to remind workers to keep their mouths shut about their work, even though most workers knew very little about the project's true scope.  For example, you job may be to watch a gauge for eight hours and flip a switch if it goes to high.  You don't know what you're measuring or what the machine is doing.  All you've been told is to flip the switch when the needle hits a certain number.  In Los Alamos and Richland, the entire neighborhood may have the same mailing address.  At Oak Ridge, street addresses were designed to be confusing to outsiders. Bus routes might be called X-10 or K-25 while dorms had simple names such as M1.  There were no signs on buildings. The town was full of such ciphers, and even employees didn't know how to decode them all.  The use of words such as “atomic” or “uranium” was taboo lest it tip off the enemy.   When the US dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945, the city's secret was out. Many residents celebrated at this turning point in the war, but not all.  Mary Lowe Michel, a typist in Oak Ridge, is quoted in an exhibit on display now at the National Building Museum in DC: “The night that the news broke that the bombs had been dropped, there was joyous occasions in the streets, hugging and kissing and dancing and live music and singing that went on for hours and hours. But it bothered me to know that I, in my very small way, had participated in such a thing, and I sat in my dorm room and cried.”  All three cities remained part of the military industrial complex, continuing to work on nuclear weapons during the cold war as well as broader scientific research.  Today Oak Ridge is heavily involved in renewable energy, minus the barbed wire fence.   For most of the twentieth century, if the US was doing it, so was the USSR.  We had closed cities to build nuclear weapons, and so did the Soviet Union.  We had three, they had….lots. Like, a lot a lot.  Like, multiple screens on the Wikipedia list.  Where the US began to open its closed cities after the war, the USSR was building more and more, and not just for nuclear weapons.  These closed cities were nicknamed “post boxes,” because they would be named for the nearest non-secret city and the end of their post code; or simply “boxes” for their closed nature. During the two decades following World War II, dozens of closed cities were built around the country. Some were naukogradi (“science cities”) or akademgorodoki (“academic cities”), while others developed military technology and later spacecraft.  The official name was closed administrative-territorial formations or zakrytye administrativno-territorial'nye obrazovaniya, or ZATOs.    The cities were largely built by slave labor from the Gulag prison camps, which at the time accounted for 23% of the non-agricultural labor force in the Soviet Union.  They were guarded like gulags, too - surrounded by barbed wire and guards, with no one was allowed to enter or leave without official authorization.  Many residents did not leave the city once between their arrival and their death.  That being said, the captive residents enjoyed access to housing, food, and health care better than Soviet citizens elsewhere.  While most towns in the Soviet Union were run by local communist party committees, military officials oversaw the secret cities that would eventually be home to over 100,000 people.  Even during construction, officials were ordered to use trusted prisoners only, meaning no Germans, POWs, hard criminals, political prisoners.  Nevertheless, even living alongside Gulag prisoners, residents believed they were making a valuable contribution to their country. Nikolai Rabotnov, a resident of Chelyabinsk-65, remembered, “I was sure that within our barbed labyrinth, I inhaled the air of freedom!”   Arzamas-16, today known by its original name Sarov, was one of the most important sites in the early development of the first Soviet atomic bomb and hydrogen and was roughly the Soviet equivalent of Los Alamos.  Scientists, workers, and their families enjoyed privileged living conditions and were sheltered from difficulties like military service and economic crisis.  Leading researchers were paid a very large salary for those times.  Chelyabinsk-65 or Ozersk was home to a plutonium production plant similar to the American facilities built at Richland.  Located near a collective farm in the southern Ural Mountains, Chelyabinsk-65 was more or less built from nothing, where Arzamas-16 was an existing town that was taken over.  After the basics of the city were completed, early years were very difficult for the residents. The cities lacked basic infrastructure and suffered from high rates of alcoholism and poor living conditions. The Mayak Plutonium Plant dumped nuclear waste in the nearby Techa River, causing a health crisis not only for the residents of Chelyabinsk-65 but for all the villages which ran along it.   Conditions at Chelyabinsk-65/Ozersk would not improve until after the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.  You remember that story, it was in our episode For Want of a Nail.  Owing to the plutonium plant, Chelyabinsk-65 is still one of the most polluted places in the world. Some residents refer to it as the “graveyard of the Earth.”  Somehow, though, it's considered a prestigious place to live where.  When the government polled residents after the Cold War had thawed over whether to open the city, they voted to keep it closed.  In fact, half of the nuclear scientists said they would refuse to stay if it was opened.  As one resident explained, “We take pride in the fact that the state trusts us enough to live and work in Ozersk.”   In 1991, the Soviet Union officially disbanded and its fifteen republics became independent, four of which had nuclear weapons deployed on their territories. This was of great concern to the West, as these newly formed nations did not have the financial or technological means to properly store and safeguard these weapons.  With budgets a fraction of what they were in the decades before, the standard of living in the ZATOs quickly declined.  Security went with it, as the soldiers who guarded the ZATOs also saw their wages slashed.   With little prospect of employment and limited security, scientists suddenly had the freedom not only to leave their cities but to leave the country.  Fear quickly spread in the United States that they could help develop nuclear programs in other countries, such as Iran.  In 1991, the Nunn-Lugar Act financed the transportation and dismantlement of the scattered nukes to not only reduce the number of nuclear weapons in the world but to provide the scientists with proper employment.  One result of this effort was the International Science and Technology Center in Moscow, which employed many former atomic scientists on non-weapons programs and still exists today.      If you need to hide a city from your enemies, you'd do well to move it underground.  Built in the late 50s in Wiltshire, England, the massive complex, codename Burlington was designed to safely house up to 4,000 central government personnel in the event of a nuclear strike.  In a former Bath stone quarry the city was to be the site of the main Emergency Government War Headquarters, the country's alternative seat of power if the worst happened.  Over 2/3mi/1km in length, and boasting over 60mi/97km  of roads, the underground site was designed to accommodate the Prime Minister, the Cabinet Office, civil servants and an army of domestic support staff.   Blast proof and completely self-sufficient the secret underground site could accommodate up to 4,000 people  in complete isolation from the outside world  for up to three months.  Though it was fortunately never used, the grid of roads and avenues ran between underground hospitals, canteens, kitchens, warehouses of supplies, dormitories, and offices.  The city was also equipped with the second largest telephone exchange in Britain, a BBC studio from which the PM could address the nation and a pneumatic tube system that could relay messages, using compressed air, throughout the complex.  An underground lake and treatment plant could provide all the drinking water needed.  A dozen huge tanks could store the fuel required to keep the generators in the underground power station running for up to three months.  The air within the complex could also be kept at a constant humidity and heated to around 68F/20C degrees.   The complex was kept on standby in case of future nuclear threats to the UK, until 2005, when the underground reservoir was drained, the supplies removed, the fuel tanks were emptied and the skeleton staff of four were dismissed. Some cities were not secret in their heyday, but were lost to time until recently.  In what's being hailed as a “major breakthrough” for Maya archaeology in February 2018, researchers have identified the ruins of more than 60,000 buildings hidden for centuries under the jungles of Guatemala.  Using LiDAR, or Light Detection And Ranging, scholars digitally removed the tree canopy from aerial images of the area, revealing the ruins of a sprawling pre-Columbian civilization that was far more complex and interconnected than most Maya specialists had supposed.   Mounted on a helicopter, the laser continually aims pulses toward the ground below, so many that a large number streak through the spaces between the leaves and branches, and are reflected back to the aircraft and registered by a GPS unit. By calculating the precise distances between the airborne laser and myriad points on the earth's surface, computer software can generate a three-dimensional digital image of what lies below.  To put the density of this jungle into perspective, archaeologists have been searching the area on foot for years, but did not find a single man-made feature.   “LiDAR is revolutionizing archaeology the way the Hubble Space Telescope revolutionized astronomy,” said Francisco Estrada-Belli, a Tulane University archaeologist and National Geographic Explorer. “We'll need 100 years to go through all [the data] and really understand what we're seeing.”  The project mapped more than 800 sq mi/2,100 sq km of the Maya Biosphere Reserve in the Petén region of northern Guatemala, producing the largest LiDAR data set ever obtained for archaeological research.  The old school of that held that Mayan civilization existed as scattered city-states, but these findings suggest that Central America supported an advanced civilization that was, with as many as 14 million people at its peak around 1,200 years ago, comparable to sophisticated cultures like ancient Greece or China.  The LiDAR even revealed raised highways connecting urban centers and complex irrigation and agricultural terracing systems.  And that was without the use of the wheel or beasts of burden   Despite standing for millennia, these sites are in danger from looting and environmental degradation.  Guatemala is losing more than 10 percent of its forests annually, and habitat loss has accelerated along its border with Mexico as trespassers burn and clear land for agriculture and human settlement.  “By identifying these sites and helping to understand who these ancient people were, we hope to raise awareness of the value of protecting these places,” Marianne Hernandez, president of the Foundation for Maya Cultural and Natural Heritage.   Lidar has also helped scientists to redraw a settlement located on the outskirts of Johannesburg, South Africa, and it tells the beginnings of a fascinating story.  Scientists from the University of Witwatersrand believe the newly discovered city was occupied in the 15th century by Tswana-speaking people who lived in the northern parts of South Africa.  Many similar Tswana city-states fell during regional wars and forced migration in the 1820s, and there was little oral or physical evidence to prove their existence.  Though archaeologists excavated some ancient ruins in the area in the 1960s, they couldn't comprehend the full extent of the settlement. By using LiDAR technology, the team was able to virtually remove vegetation and recreate images of the surrounding landscape, allowing them to produce aerial views of the monuments and buildings in a way that could not have been imagined a generation ago.    Using these new aerial photographs, they can now estimate that as many as 850 homesteads had once existed in and around the city they've given the temporary designation of SKBR.  It's likely that most homesteads housed several family members, meaning this was a city with a large population.  There are also stone towers outside some homesteads, as high as 8ft2.5m high with bases 16ft/5m wide.  The academics believe these may have been bases for grain bins or even burial markers for important people.  Though the team estimates they are still another decade or two away from fully understanding the city's inhabitants and how the city came to be, and ceased to exist.   Modern technology has also helped us find an ancient city in Cambodia.  Constructed around 1150, the palaces and temples of Angkor Wat were, and still are, the biggest religious complex on Earth, covering an area four times larger than Vatican City.   In the 15th Century, the Khmer kings abandoned their city and moved to the coast.  They built a new city, Phnom Penh, the present-day capital of Cambodia.  Life in Angkor slowly ebbed away.  Everything made of wood rotted away; everything made of stone was reclaimed by the jungle.   An international team, led by the University of Sydney's Dr Damian Evans, was able to map out /370 sq km around Angkor in unprecedented detail in less than two weeks - no mean feat given the density of the jungle.  Rampant illegal logging of valuable hardwoods had stripped away much of the primary forest, allowing dense new undergrowth to fill in the gaps. It was unclear whether the lasers could locate enough holes in the canopy to penetrate to the forest floor.  The prevalence of landmines from Cambodia's civil war are another area where shooting Lidar from a helicopter really shines. The findings were staggering.  The archaeologists found undocumented cityscapes etched on to the forest floor, with remnants of boulevards, reservoirs, ponds, dams, dikes, irrigation canals, agricultural plots, low-density settlement complexes and orderly rows of temples. They were all clustered around what the archaeologists realized must be a royal palace, a vast structure surrounded by a network of earthen dikes—the ninth-century fortress of King Jayavarman II. “To suspect that a city is there, somewhere underneath the forest, and then to see the entire structure revealed with such clarity and precision was extraordinary,” Evans told me. “It was amazing.”     These new discoveries have profoundly transformed our understanding of Angkor, the greatest medieval city on Earth.  Most striking of all was evidence of large-scale hydraulic engineering, the defining signature of the Khmer empire, used to store and distribute seasonal monsoon water using a complex network of huge canals and reservoirs.  Harnessing the monsoon provided food security - and made the ruling elite fantastically rich. For the next three centuries they channelled their wealth into the greatest concentration of temples on Earth.  Angkor was a bustling metropolis at its peak, covering /1,000 sq km; It would be another 700 years before London reached a similar size.     Bonus fact: and not to be a pedant, but “monsoon” refers no to the heavy rains in the rainy season from May to September, but to the strong, sustained winds that bring them.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  Some cities are hidden, not for reasons of subterfuge or dereliction, but by necessity.  80% of the world's opal comes from the area of Coober Peedy, but that wealth is nothing to the sun it's going to continue with the Mad Max motif.  It may be 115 degrees F/47C outside, but it's only 74F/23C underground.  When heavy mining equipment was introduced a century ago, people took advantage of it to dug themselves homes, a church, hotels and B&Bs, a museum, casino, a gift shop, and, of course, a pub.  Remember...thanks... Source: http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/history/laser-scans-reveal-maya-megalopolis-below-guatemalan-jungle.aspx https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lost-city-cambodia-180958508/ https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29245289 https://www.citylab.com/design/2018/05/inside-the-secret-cities-that-created-the-atomic-bomb/559601/ https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-to-build-secret-nuclear-city https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/may/03/off-the-map-the-secret-cities-behind-the-atom-bomb-manhattan-project https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/soviet-closed-cities https://metro.co.uk/2015/05/28/theres-a-whole-town-in-australia-that-lives-underground-5219091/ https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2016/09/coober-pedy-opal-mining/ https://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/coober-pedy-underground-homes.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/articles/2005/12/14/burlington_nuclear_bunker_feature.shtml https://theculturetrip.com/africa/south-africa/articles/a-lost-african-city-has-just-been-discovered-by-scientists/ https://www.historicmysteries.com/derinkuyu-underground-city-cappadocia/

On Good Authority
A Veterans Day conversation: Are we serving those who served us?

On Good Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 19:54


Military veterans endure, perhaps, the most physically and mentally demanding profession, from which few walk away without consequence. Medical care for veterans after they have served their country is a crucial resource for life. Tulane University's Dr. Greg Stewart joins On Good Authority to discuss the challenges some of our heroes face when it comes to health care and a new treatment concept for veterans.

Tick Boot Camp
Episode 218: There's Hope - an interview with Doctor Tim Haystead

Tick Boot Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


Dr. Timothy Haystead is a UK educated Doctor of Biochemistry, University Professor, entrepreneur, and world-renowned scientific researcher. Dr. Haystead graduated with a Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Biochemistry from Cardiff University (United Kingdom) and a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Dundee (United Kingdom). He and his wife (a medical doctor) immigrated to the US to “seek adventure” in a new country. Dr. Haystead's career in academia commenced in Seattle, traveled through the University of Virginia, and drew to a stop at the prestigious Duke University. During his adventures in academia, he trained under and worked with four Nobel Laureate scientists. Dr. Haystead's entrepreneurial efforts developed a drug discovery platform to take guess work or “luck” out of the process of identifying disease diagnostic and treatment tools. He founded two companies to develop and commercialize his drug discovery platform. He sold his first company, named Serenex, to Pfizer. He is working to build a new company that he started out of a “garage” in close proximity to Duke University. After meeting and working with the famous Duke University Lyme disease researcher, Dr. Neil Spector, he was inspired to use his drug discovery platform to pioneer diagnostic and treatment tools for Lyme disease. Dr. Haystead's Lyme research has earned the recognition and support of grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), US Department of Defense, Cohen Foundation, and the Bay Area Lyme Foundation. The grant funded research is being conducted in collaboration with researchers from Tulane University, UC Davis, and UNC Chapel Hill. If you would like to learn more about how Dr. Haystead is working to pioneer tools to detect and eliminate Lyme bacteria by destroying its DNA, then tune in now!

Lean Blog Interviews
Sonia Singh: From Lean Coach to Leadership Coach, From Consultant to Coach

Lean Blog Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:14


Show notes and links: https://leanblog.org/431 My guests for Episode #431 of the Lean Blog Interviews Podcast is Sonia Singh, a certified Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt, executive coach, and professor with 19 years of experience in healthcare operations, management consulting, leadership development, and culture transformation. She's worked with dozens of companies in improving their performance, resulting in a collective financial impact of $30M. She's trained and coached over 2000 emerging and experienced leaders.  Sonia is the founder of Sonia Singh International, and one of her offerings is the Influential Leadership Academy, where she helps leaders build emotional intelligence and master their influence.  She was previously an employee at some healthcare systems and Cardinal Health. Sonia holds a degree in Psychology from Northern Illinois University, a Master's degree in Health Administration from Tulane University, and completed her professional coaching training at the University of California, Davis. Today, we discuss topics and questions including: How did you first get introduced to Lean or continuous improvement concepts? What were some of your best experiences working in healthcare improvement? What was a “school of hard knocks” lesson you gained working in healthcare? How did you decide to start working independently? Why go through professional coaching school and how did that change how you coach? It's hard to just ask questions To you, what are the differences between the words “coach” vs “consultant?” What has it been like shifting from lean coach to leadership coach? Getting to root causes of behaviors or reactions? How to help people shift from telling to asking questions? Influential Leadership Academy – who is this targeted to? “It's a strength when you can share your power.” The podcast is sponsored by Stiles Associates, now in their 30th year of business. They are the go-to Lean recruiting firm serving the manufacturing, private equity, and healthcare industries. Learn more. This podcast is part of the #LeanCommunicators network. 

Figure It Out Baseball
Eddie Smith- Louisiana State University | Understand the Art of Hitting

Figure It Out Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 42:40


Eddie Smith is a hitting coach for the Louisiana State University Tigers a Division I program in the SEC. He started his collegiate playing career at Centralia Community College, then transferred and graduated from Notre Dame a Division I school in the ACC. Later, he began his coaching career at the University of Virginia as the Director of Baseball Operations. Soon thereafter in 2012 he coached at Santa Clara University, then in 2013 at Notre Dame. From 2014-2017 he was the Head Coach at Lower Columbia College, then from 2018-2019 he was the hitting coach and recruiting coordinator at Tulane University, a well-known Division I program in the AAC. In 2020, he became a hitting coach at Louisiana State University, where he still remains. In this episode, we start off talking about where Coach Smith found the foundation for his teachings in hitting. We also discuss the important aspects of evaluating hitters and their ability to perform. Coach Smith breaks down what it takes to become a useful hitter and describes his offensive philosophy. We also talk about, the multiple realms of coaching, including; player relationships, diversity of coaching techniques, and the importance of individuality. We finish off this podcast talking about how Coach Smith breaks down his practices, focusing on the hitters' strengths and weaknesses. Lock into this podcast to listen the stories and experiences that helped Coach Smith find his understanding of the game of baseball. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fiob/support

Unified Roundtable Podcast
Unified Roundtable Podcast - S2 E13 - Tulane University

Unified Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 18:24


Today we sit down for a conversation with Sarah Donato with our local training program at Tulane University!Monthly Donors: www.tinyurl.com/MonthlyGiving2021

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Prof Idelber Avelar: is the end in sight for Bolsonaro?

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 27:40


A senate panel in Brazil has backed a report calling for criminal charges against president Jair Bolsonaro for his handling of the Covid pandemic, including crimes against humanity. Professor Idelber Avelar teaches Latin American Studies at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. He joins the show to discuss the developments in Brazil, and what might happen next.

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: State program will help resolve storm-related insurance disputes

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 24:30


Adam Voshosted this Thursday's episode of Louisiana Considered. State Insurance Commissioner Jim Donelondiscusses the Hurricane Ida Mediation Program, which aims to resolve disputes between insurance policyholders and their providers over storm-related insured losses. Mia L. Bagneris, director of Tulane University's Africana Studies Program, tells us about Tulane's three-year Black Studies Book Club lecture and conversation series, which kicked off last week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Relentless Health Value
EP343: What Provider Leadership Teams Need to Know to Operationalize Value-Based Care, With David Carmouche, MD

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:10


Most people who have been in the healthcare industry for a while have heard by now the metaphor about the two canoes. Provider organizations or health systems with some of their payments coming from a fee-for-service (FFS) payment model and some of them coming from value-based arrangements have the challenge of one foot in the FFS canoe and one foot in the value-based canoe. They're probably going through a lot of metaphorical pants is the main takeaway that often comes to mind for me. But wardrobe malfunctions aside, this is a really difficult organizational challenge. That's what I'm talking about in this healthcare podcast with Dr. David Carmouche: how to deal with the operational challenges, the cultural challenges, maybe even (very arguably) the generational challenges here. Top line (very top line), to succeed in value-based care, you gotta have three things aligned: The payment model, the construct of the contract. No kidding, you have to have value-based contracts to succeed in value-based care. The big problem here—which is not to be underestimated—is that there are some areas of the country where it's really tough to find somebody, or enough somebodies, willing to offer a capitated, prospective value-based contract. That would be really frustrating to want to go forward (if you're a provider) in a value-based way but to not have a willing payer partner and/or employer partner to do so. So please step up, payers, policy makers, and employers in those areas of the country. But the construct of the value-based contracts can also not be overlooked. Toward the end of this interview, Dr. Carmouche gets into the different results that were achieved between two patient populations: one served by a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and one in an MSSP (Medicare Shared Savings Program) model. So, the same provider network, the same environment, same geography, same number of lives, different payment model. Stick around for that part of the conversation. It's pretty eye-opening. The second of the three things to be aligned to be successful in value-based care are physician/administrative incentives and the employment models. Seriously, who is thinking that anyone's gonna succeed managing downstream risk when the physicians making the decisions about downstream services used are bonused by how much downstream costs they can drive and everyone is eating what they kill? If culture eats strategy for breakfast, incentives eat culture for lunch, as they say. Leadership skills. Leaders who are going to succeed in a world moving from FFS to VBC have to be mission driven toward that cause. They have to be strategic enough in their approach to take potential short-term revenue hits in pursuit of the longer-term goal—even the medium-term goal, honestly, if you think about the whole context of what's going on here. Leaders also need the skill and aptitude to pull off the change management and adjustments to the organizational culture that are needed. Staffs and teams really need systematic support. Value-based care is a team sport, and teams require leadership. Here's one example of where not having great leadership trickles down to bad results: If nurses or social workers or, in general, people of color or women in an organization feel demeaned or not valued by a critical mass of those in power—and maybe here I mean physicians or other physicians that they work with—then patient safety scores diminish and quality goes down. There's enough studies on the impact of having and not having psychological safety that it's getting harder to dispute what I just said. And if this environment becomes as toxic as the stories that you read about often enough, that's on the C-suite to fix. If the C-suite has value-based aspirations, that C-suite really might want to reprioritize their to-do lists. So, think about stuff like this because toxic environments make consistently delivering high-value care and satisfied patients difficult at best for many reasons. Here's a timely side note: I heard someone say the other day that in light of the pandemic and the FFS inpatient and outpatient volume fluctuations that plummeted and rose at various points during the pandemic, compounded with Medicare FFS rates that some institutions claim are not profitable or profitable enough … someone said that, given these factors, the best way to de-risk is to take on more risk. That's interesting to think about on a number of levels. In this healthcare podcast, as I mentioned, I'm talking about all this and more with Dr. David Carmouche. Dr. Carmouche was recently the executive vice president of value-based care and network operations at Ochsner, which is a very big integrated delivery network in Louisiana. You heard it here first, folks, but Dr. Carmouche will take on a new role in November 2021. He will oversee Walmart's expanding clinical care offerings and operations, including Walmart Health MeMD and its social determinants of health line of business. Here's a quote from the announcement about Dr. Carmouche's move that I thought was interesting: “Connecting with patients in more places and creating a seamless, personalized patient experience is a crucial component in the new healthcare environment, and a space where Ochsner—as well as retail leaders like Walmart—will continue to invest.” Dr. Carmouche has been on this podcast before (EP316 and AEE15), so if you'd like to hear more from him, go back and listen to those two shows.   Also, if you're looking for another episode that digs into the importance of leadership, listen to the one two weeks ago with Gary Campbell (EP341).   You can learn more by visiting Dr. Carmouche's LinkedIn page or by reading From Competition to Collaboration by Tracy Duberman and Robert Sachs.  David Carmouche, MD, views healthcare from three distinct perspectives: as a physician provider, an executive for an insurance company, and as a leader in a health system. Specifically, he built a large, multidisciplinary internal medicine and preventive cardiology practice in Louisiana; served as the chief medical officer for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana; and has a triad of responsibilities with Ochsner Health, the largest nonprofit academic healthcare system in the Gulf South. He was promoted to serve as executive vice president of value-based care and network operations in addition to his duties as president of the Ochsner Health Network and executive director of the Ochsner Accountable Care Network. He is known as an expert in value-based care. He led one of the top 15 performing accountable care organizations in the United States, managing billions in care spend and generating millions in year-over-year shared savings. Dr. Carmouche earned a bachelor's degree from Tulane University and a medical degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. 06:31 How do you operationally deal with conflicting FFS and VBC processes? 07:23 “It's pretty clear in Medicare that our strategy in the future … is one of value.” 11:31 “I think a bigger challenge, though, is that in many markets, there are just no opportunities to have experienced value-based care.” 13:18 “How do we engage in collaborative relationships that would allow us to move into value?” 14:01 “No one wants to rush through their day in a series of seven-minute visits.” 15:53 “In a fee-for-service environment … you're forced to bring people into the office to create an encounter who don't necessarily need to be there.” 19:22 “We haven't really changed how we select and train physicians … in the last hundred years.” 20:32 “We, as physicians, were taught to be accountable for outcomes; and we create probably an unnecessary and unfair burden on ourselves.” 21:30 “In the value-based care world, a physician does have to recast themselves as part of a team.” 22:30 “It is an enormous cultural shift … but ultimately, it's one that the facts … mandate.” 26:58 “You have to have a compelling vision and belief that value-based care offers benefits to all of the actors in the healthcare ecosystem.” 27:24 “You have to be able to communicate effectively across sectors.” 27:43 “You have to have courage.” 28:29 What are the leadership skills required to make value-based care work? You can learn more by visiting Dr. Carmouche's LinkedIn page or by reading From Competition to Collaboration by Tracy Duberman and Robert Sachs.  @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare How do you operationally deal with conflicting FFS and VBC processes? @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “It's pretty clear in Medicare that our strategy in the future … is one of value.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “I think a bigger challenge, though, is that in many markets, there are just no opportunities to have experienced value-based care.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “How do we engage in collaborative relationships that would allow us to move into value?” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “No one wants to rush through their day in a series of seven-minute visits.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “In a fee-for-service environment … you're forced to bring people into the office to create an encounter who don't necessarily need to be there.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “We haven't really changed how we select and train physicians … in the last hundred years.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “We, as physicians, were taught to be accountable for outcomes; and we create probably an unnecessary and unfair burden on ourselves.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “In the value-based care world, a physician does have to recast themselves as part of a team.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “It is an enormous cultural shift … but ultimately, it's one that the facts … mandate.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “You have to have a compelling vision and belief that value-based care offers benefits to all of the actors in the healthcare ecosystem.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare “You have to be able to communicate effectively across all platforms.” @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare What are the leadership skills required to make value-based care work? @CarmoucheMd discusses #vbc on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #valuebasedcare Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Christin Deacon, Gary Campbell, Kristin Begley, David Contorno (AEE17), David Contorno (EP339), Nikki King, Olivia Webb, Brandon Weber, Stacey Richter (INBW30), Brian Klepper (AEE16), Brian Klepper (EP335), Sunita Desai, Care Plans vs Real World (EP333), Dr Tony DiGioia, Al Lewis, John Marchica, Joe Connolly, Marshall Allen, Andrew Eye, Naomi Fried, Dr Rishi Wadhera, Dr Mai Pham, Nicole Bradberry and Kelly Conroy, Lee Lewis, Dr Arshad Rahim, Dr Monica Lypson, Dr Rich Klasco, Dr David Carmouche (AEE15)

The Perkins Platform
Using STEM to Expose, Inspire & Engage Students from Low-Income Backgrounds

The Perkins Platform

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 34:00


Join us on Wednesday, October 27 @ 6pm EST for a conversation with Dr. Calvin Mackie, award winning mentor, inventor, author, former engineering professor, internationally renowned speaker and successful entrepreneur. Dr. Mackie is the founder of STEM NOLA, a non-profit organization founded to expose, inspire and engage communities about the opportunities in STEM. In 7 years, STEM NOLA has engaged over 70,000 mostly low-income low-resourced K-12 students in hands-on project based STEM activities in New Orleans communities.  Mackie graduated from Morehouse College earning a BS in Mathematics in 1990 and was simultaneously awarded a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech, where he subsequently earned his Master's and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 1996. He served on the engineering faculty at Tulane University for 12 years. Mackie has won numerous awards including the 2003 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring in a White House ceremony and currently serves on the Louisiana STEM (LA-STEM) advisory council.

Radically Pragmatic, a podcast from the Progressive Policy Institute
MOSAIC MOMENT: Growing Women-Owned Businesses Through Private Capital

Radically Pragmatic, a podcast from the Progressive Policy Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 40:02


On today's episode of Radically Pragmatic, PPI's Mosaic Economic Project brought together a panel of women to discuss the intersection of access to private capital formation for new and small businesses owned by women and particularly minority women; how the response to the pandemic (government stimulus intervention including PPP) has impacted entrepreneurs and what policies looking forward can and will make a difference in accessing private capital for women entrepreneurs. Joining Jasmine Stoughton, Project Manager of the Mosaic Economic Project is Emily Egan, a graduate of Mosaic's Women Changing Policy Working and Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Tulane University; Kim Armor, Chief Financial Officer and Managing Director at Comcast Ventures; and Emily Waldorf, Senior Vice President of Strategic Development at Comcast. Learn more about the Mosaic Economic Project here: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/project/the-mosaic-project/ Learn more about the Progressive Policy Institute here: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Connect - 631 - Allison Piper Kimball of Wave 27 Ventures

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:44


On this episode of Investor Connect, Hall welcomes Allison Piper Kimball, Managing Partner at Wave 27 Ventures. Allison, MSPH, MBA is also the founder of the Blue Catalyst Group. Angel investing is Allison's third career, after first working as an environmental and occupational health consultant and then spending almost two decades as an executive in the retail electricity industry. Allison served in a variety of roles including as Chief Operating Officer of Texas electricity retailer StarTex Power before and through its sale and transition to Constellation Energy; and then as Chief Operating Officer at Spark Energy, a nationwide retail electricity and natural gas company which she helped take public in 2014. Throughout her career, Allison worked closely with multiple entrepreneurs at all stages of company growth and development, from start up to taking companies in their early years from start up to sale or IPO. Allison leverages this experience to mentor and invest in entrepreneurs and early-stage companies.  Allison is a member of the Houston Angel Network and serves on its board of directors, is an LP in Golden Section Ventures and The Artemis Fund, and serves on the board of Montucky Cold Snacks. Allison is active in regional startup, business model and pitch competitions, and mentoring entrepreneurs. Allison holds an MBA in Finance and Information Systems from Tulane University, a Master of Science in Public Health from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Bachelor of Science from Clarkson University in New York. Allison shares what excites her now, advises startups and investors, discusses how she sees the angel industry evolving, and mentions some of the startups she has invested in. You can contact Allison via email at , and via LinkedIn at .  __________________________________________________________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:    Check out our other podcasts here:   For Investors check out:   For Startups check out:   For eGuides check out:   For upcoming Events, check out    For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group    Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch

If you're like most people you've got a bunch of apps on your phone. Some of them you use every day. Others you have to think about for a moment to try and remember what they do. There are currently around three and a half million apps available for download to Android users worldwide. And over two million apps for folks with Apple devices. So that's a total of somewhere a little south of 6 million apps. By comparison, how many websites do you think there are worldwide? There are 1.2 billion. Given that the number of people who use mobile devices worldwide is larger than the number of people who use standard computers, and given that apps run better on mobile devices than websites do, you'd have to wonder why this number isn't reversed. The answer is, cost. And skill. Anybody can get a hold of Wordpress, Wix, Squarespace, or a number of other website builders and build their own website. And if you go through a domain registration site like Go Daddy, you can buy a website name and put up a website in almost the same time it takes to fill out your credit card information. On the other hand, if you've ever had an idea for an app and looked into getting it built, you'll know it's complicated and expensive. If you decide to go ahead and spend the money to hire a developer to build an app, it's a risky investment. You don't know if it's going to work. And if it does, you don't know if you'll be able to get anyone to find it on an app store. So, you don't know if you'll ever be able to recover your investment. A local app-building company is changing all that. The company is called Bloks.  Bloks is the brainchild of Reed Stephens and Harry Fox. Reed and Harry met when they were working together at the Lepage Entrepreneurship Center at Tulane University's business school. Bloks is an app-building tool that anyone can use. With Bloks you build an app yourself, with modules – the same way you use Wordpress or Wix to build a website. And if your app doesn't work or nobody uses it, well, you don't get to be a billionaire, but it also hasn't cost you anything. Because, Bloks is free. When people write business plans they're typically expected to include some sort of overall goal for their new business. Some people plan on building a company that is attractive enough to be bought by a bigger company. Others are shooting for a specific goal, like acquiring a target number of customers. Then there's the kind of ridiculous goal, inspired by companies like Amazon and Apple, that is commonly referred to as “world domination.” Obviously, for most companies starting out that kind of goal is, politely, unrealistic. Actually, it's delusional. But when you look at what Harry Fox and Reed Stevens have created here with Bloks, it's not beyond the realm of possibility that this company could become a very serious player in the world of online creation. The center of the universe is already our phone. And most of our phone use is all about apps. If they can get Bloks out into the world, Harry and Reed might well be in a position to embark on at least some version of world domination. Out to Lunch is recorded live over lunch at NOLA Pizza in the NOLA Brewing Taproom. You can see photos from this show by Jill Lafleur at our website. Hear about other local tech companies involved with breakthrough advances in both VR and assistive medicine.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Venus Rising
Episode 40: Podcast #040 (S03): Donovan Cleckley

Venus Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 72:17


Welcome back to another interesting episode of Venus Rising. This week I have the pleasure of chatting with  a young freelance writer and literary scholar, Donovan Cleckley. Donovan holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Montevallo and a Master of Arts in English from Tulane University. His research focuses on the relationship between women's rights and gay rights, literature and sexual politics, and the social and political implications of transgenderism as an ideology, an industry, and an institution. Today, I talk with Donovan about the crossroads of his research and passion and the debate concerning the medical transitioning of children, which we also explore in our recent documentary Trans Mission: What's the Rush to Reassign Gender?You can learn more about his work at https://donovancleckley.com or join him in discussion by following him on Twitter.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Writer and Speaker Tim Wise and Comedian and Cultural Commentator Christian Finnegan Episode 455

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 92:08


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. 53:00 Christian Finnegan  is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor based in New York City.   BUY HIS NEW ALBUM--- "Show Your Work: Live at QED"   Finnegan is perhaps best known as one of the original panelists on VH1's Best Week Ever and as Chad, the only white roommate in the “Mad Real World” sketch on Comedy Central's Chappelle's Show. Additional television appearances as himself or performing stand up have included “Conan”, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson”, "Would You Rather...with Graham Norton", “Good Afternoon America” and multiple times on The Today Show and Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and on History's I Love the 1880s. He hosted TV Land's game show "Game Time". As an actor, Finnegan portrayed the supporting role of "Carl" in the film Eden Court, a ticket agent in "Knight and Day" and several guest roles including a talk show host on "The Good Wife". In October 2006, Finnegan's debut stand up comedy CD titled Two For Flinching was released by Comedy Central Records, with a follow-up national tour of college campuses from January to April 2007. “Au Contraire!” was released by Warner Bros. Records in 2009. His third special "The Fun Part" was filmed at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston on April 4, 2013 and debuted on Netflix on April 15, 2014. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

On Good Authority
Paying up: A new era of compensation for college athletes

On Good Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:29


Tulane University's Gabe Feldman, one of the leading voices in the U.S. in the field of sports law, discusses college athletics' new, profiting landscape, one where college athletes can now receive almost unlimited compensation for the first time. It's a period unlike any other in the history of college sports and the beginning of a time of great uncertainty. What does the future hold for the NCAA? Is this the new wild west for college athletics? What will happen to the decades-long system that has controlled the multibillion-dollar industry that is college athletics?  

Social Media and Politics
Covid Mask Wearing in Politicians' Social Media Images and Emotions in German Politics, with Dr. Mirya Holman

Social Media and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 41:00


Dr. Mirya Holman, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, shares her latest research on how politicians depict mask wearing through their social media images. We discuss how computer vision can be used to detect masks in images, as well as what factors correlate with politicians' depicting masks. Later in the episode, we discuss another recent study by Dr. Holman, where emotions in the facial expressions and vocal pitch of German politicians were analyzed during election debates. Here's a link to that study: Gender, Candidate Emotional Expression, and Voter Reactions during Televised Debates (2021)And here's a link to Mirya Holman's Aggressive Winning Scholars (#MHAWS) Newsletter! 

That Entrepreneur Life
Episode 91 - Using Mindfulness to Live and Work Heroically with Christian de la Huerta

That Entrepreneur Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 35:27


Join Andrew Lees, Clint McPherson, and Christian de la Huerta as they discuss the heroic qualities in mindfulness and in really knowing oneself. Christian reflects on a famous line by Victor Frankl that says, “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances.” As he explains the must-have traits for entrepreneurs, redefines heroism, and shares how he tripled his income during COVID, Christian also opens up about his book, Awakening The Soul of Power.In this episode you will learn:Why does having persistence and a sense of mission matter?Meditation is like running the miles before the marathon.Our brains are just like computers…What can we learn from Viktor Frankl? Step into power in ways congruent to who you are.And so much more!About Christian de la Huerta:De la Huerta was born in Havana, Cuba and is the son of prominent Cuban psychiatrist René de la Huerta. His family left Cuba when he was ten, and he spent the rest of his childhood and early adulthood in Milledgeville, Georgia, and Miami, Florida. He is an alumnus of Belen Jesuit Preparatory and then graduated with honors in psychology from Tulane University. After residing in San Francisco for twenty years, de la Huerta is currently residing again in South Florida within the Coconut Grove area.You can find Christian de la Huerta on...Website:https://soulfulpower.com/LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/christiandelahuerta/Twitter:https://twitter.com/soulfulpowerYou can find That Entrepreneur Life on...Website:https://thatentrepreneurlife.com/Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/thatentrepreneurlifeInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/thatentrepreneurlifeusa/Twitter:https://twitter.com/ThatEntreprene1YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFKPkF39Z6r2l9AT4k-tDtgSupport the show (https://thatentrepreneurlife.com/support-the-show)

That Good College Life
Jehovah Jireh - The Lord Will Provide

That Good College Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 26:20


Y'ALL! Shelly Rogers, one of my good friends from Tulane University is joining us on this episode where we talk about the Lord's provision and how it comes in His perfect timing! Shelly has some amazing pieces of wisdom and stories to share that you won't want to miss! 

writing class radio
111: It's a Matter of Time

writing class radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 21:33


Today on our show, we are featuring an essay by former student Sharon Rothberg. Sharon uses a philosophical concept to work out her feelings about the death of her daughter-in-law. Sharon's use of time and all lingo related to time is masterful. The story structure is also exceptional as is the balanced use of humor and vulnerability.This story really shows how writing helps people figure out things we can't really understand. Sharon Rothberg lives in Miami, Florida with her husband of 57 years. She was an English major at Tulane University and taught seventh grade English. She loves to read novels, memoirs, and biographies. Sharon came to class on a whim (and because Andrea convinced her), having nothing in particular she wanted to write about. The class pulled up the grief and trauma she'd been holding inside. Writing the story of her daughter-in-law helped Sharon release her feelings and clarify her understanding of time (that we have) on this planet.Writing Class Radio is a podcast where you'll hear true personal stories and learn a little about how to write your own stories. Writing Class Radio is equal parts heart and art. By heart we mean the truth in a story. By art we mean the craft of writing. No matter what's going on in our lives, writing class is where we tell the truth. It's where we work out our shit, and figure out who we are. There's no place in the world like writing class and we want to bring you in.Writing Class Radio is hosted by Allison Langer (www.allisonlanger.com) and Andrea Askowitz (www.andreaaskowitz.com). This episode was produced by Virginia Lora, Andrea Askowitz and Allison Langer. Theme music by Justina Shandler. Additional music by Kevin Myles Wilson and Poddington Bear.There's more writing class on our website (www.writingclassradio.com), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/writingclassradio/), Instagram and Twitter (@wrtgclassradio).If you love the lessons you get on each episode, you can get them ALL in one place--our three-part video series--for $50. Click Video Classes on our website.Writing Class Radio is now open to submissions from our listeners. Go to the submissions page on our website for guidelines. We pay!If you want to be a part of the movement that helps people better understand each other through storytelling, we are now on Patreon. For $10/month you can join Andrea's submissions conversation. We'll support each other as we try to get our stories published. For $25/month you can join Allison's first draft weekly writers class, where you can write and share your work. Go to www.Patreon.com/writingclassradio or click here to support us.If you love this podcast, tell your friends. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.