Podcasts about Spent

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  • 2,698PODCASTS
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  • May 23, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Spent

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Latest podcast episodes about Spent

Word In Your Ear
You spent HOW MUCH on speakers?

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 41:18


This week we've been mainly talking about....Could The Smile be the first side-project to eclipse the mothership?Is the kitchen the place we mainly listen to music these days?Bob Neuwirth - the man who helped Dylan become DylanVangelis - the man whose music was more famous than the filmWhy do American newspapers make pop records sound as dull as set books?Here's friend of the pod Owen Parker.https://www.owenparker.co.uk-----------------Make a pact to make better coffee. If you haven't tried Pact Coffee yet, we'll help you get started with 50% off your first and third order when you create a new Pact Plan.Go to https://www.pactcoffee.com/Create your flexible coffee subscription.Enter the code YOUREAR at checkout.And get speciality coffee, through your letterbox.-----------------Tickets for Word In The Park in London on Saturday June 18th here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/were-throwing-a-party-for-paul-mccartneys-80th-and-youre-invited-tickets-259008229587Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world, ad-free and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Word Podcast
You spent HOW MUCH on speakers?

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 41:18


This week we've been mainly talking about....Could The Smile be the first side-project to eclipse the mothership?Is the kitchen the place we mainly listen to music these days?Bob Neuwirth - the man who helped Dylan become DylanVangelis - the man whose music was more famous than the filmWhy do American newspapers make pop records sound as dull as set books?Here's friend of the pod Owen Parker.https://www.owenparker.co.uk-----------------Make a pact to make better coffee. If you haven't tried Pact Coffee yet, we'll help you get started with 50% off your first and third order when you create a new Pact Plan.Go to https://www.pactcoffee.com/Create your flexible coffee subscription.Enter the code YOUREAR at checkout.And get speciality coffee, through your letterbox.-----------------Tickets for Word In The Park in London on Saturday June 18th here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/were-throwing-a-party-for-paul-mccartneys-80th-and-youre-invited-tickets-259008229587Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world, ad-free and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Heimelaga
Mandag 23 mai 2022 - Uttalt

Heimelaga

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 60:13


Spent flytur, sur kløe, Tesla og urin, kort oppsumert.Nyt Episoden, Takk for Lytten

Ryan's Method: Passive Income Podcast
I Spent $21,200 on Launching Amazon FBA Products (STORY)

Ryan's Method: Passive Income Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 13:31


In this episode I'm sharing the story of my biggest Amazon FBA product order for first-time product launches, totalling $21,200 It was a big leap of faith that everything would workout (and to be honest, most of them didn't work out)... check out this episode for the full story!

Black and White Sports Podcast
BLM Tax Filing shows they spent a lot on everything except BLACK LIVES! Baby Daddy GOT PAID!

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 11:17


BLM Tax Filing shows they spent a lot on everything except BLACK LIVES! Baby Daddy GOT PAID!

I Spent A Day With...
I Spent A Day With MARKIPLIER: "The King of Youtube"

I Spent A Day With...

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 29:05


I spent a day with Markiplier to learn the truth about how he balances a massively successful online presence with the mental and physical hardships that come with life.    Sponsors ▸Get SurfShark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/ANTHONY - enter promo code ANTHONY for 83% off and 3 extra months for free! ▸Go to http://betterhelp.com/padilla to get 10% off your first month!

BJ Shea Daily Experience Podcast -- Official
“I can't believe I spent money on BLANK”.

BJ Shea Daily Experience Podcast -- Official

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 29:13


Beat Migs. The average person spends over $300 per month on impulse purchases. Luke warm topic.

Not Safe For Wizards
Winter Dawning - Money Well Spent

Not Safe For Wizards

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 69:02


With a list of shops to check out, the Crown Companions go on a day of shopping. Interesting and terrifying items are purchased. Check Out Our Merch Store: https://nsfwpodcast.myspreadshop.com/ Check Out Diana-Morgan Carter's Merch Shop: https://starpunk-apparel.myspreadshop.com/ CheckOut SecondHand Goddess' Merch Shop: https://secondhandgoddess.myspreadshop.com Listen to The Geekiest Podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-geekiest-podcast Watch Joe Play D&D: Mindflayed Mondays Presents Hunt For the Golden Egg You can find us at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NSFWActualPlay Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsfwappodcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NSFWPodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLZGmp6FJkxOeXLKmvd__w Email: notsafeforwizardspodcast@gmail.com

SPENT.Media
Get Down Ep. 60

SPENT.Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:12


JD and BNos present The Get Down Podcast; the show where we discuss news stories that caught our eye and the movies and shows that we've watched that week. BNos introduces JD to Moviedle and we talk about the newely announced XFL and Disney/ESPN TV deal.  We both watched the newest batman movie, The Batman. BNos watched the first season of Ozark, M. Night Shyamalan's Old, Senior Year with Rebel Wilson, Christina P's Mom Genes, and Taylor Tomlinson's Look at You.  JD is in mid season of the new show The Offer, the show about the making of The Godfather movie.  Come Get Down BNos https://www.instagram.com/bnosanchuk/ https://twitter.com/BNosanchuk JD https://www.instagram.com/qwikwits/ https://twitter.com/thejdstaley SPENT https://twitter.com/spentradio Music by: Music by Wataboi from Pixabay

East Bay Baptist Church
The Day is Far Spent

East Bay Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 38:00


ZakBabyTV
I Spent A Week Alone In A Cabin. Things Went Terribly Wrong!

ZakBabyTV

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 30:27


Eventually Supertrain
A Spookie Minute Spent In A Ghosthouse 38: A Minute By Minute Podcast

Eventually Supertrain

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 9:06


In this episode, Dan discusses the 38th minutes of Spookies and Ghosthouse. Please, listen and enjoy.

Cincinnati Edition
His family spent World War II in an internment camp. Now this Cincinnatian works to ensure history doesn't repeat itself

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:15


Cincinnati native Dennis Kato's family survived America's Japanese internment camps during World War II. Now he researches the camps and shares the story.

My Daily Story
I Spent YEARS Trying To Date My Crush

My Daily Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 11:23


Click on this link to subscribe on Apple podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/my-daily-story/id1610950506 . . . Want to check podcast webpage click on this link https://anchor.fm/my-daily-story-official . . . You should also please follow/subscribe to our other podcast ( My Animated Story ) by clicking on this link

The Jenn & Friends Podcast
Bobby Brown spent how much in one day?!

The Jenn & Friends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 1:13


The Star Report Featuring Jenn Hoby 5-17-22 815am

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Cyber Ninjas spent $8.8 million

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:55


Barry Markson in for Mike Broomhead breaks down the documents that show the audit team the AZ Senate hired spent $8.8 million instead of the $150k quoted See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bright Side
A Man Spent 18 YEARS at the Airport

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 11:52


If you've ever had to take a plane somewhere, you probably know how it feels to have your flight delayed by several hours. But imagine being stuck at the airport for a whopping 18 years! Well, one man didn't have to imagine at all because that's exactly what happened to him… Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I Spent A Day With...
I Spent A Day With POKIMANE: "Streaming Under Scrutiny"

I Spent A Day With...

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 26:26


I spent a day with Pokimane to learn the truth about her rise to becoming one of the most streamed female creators on Twitch and the challenges that come with her career.  Sponsors ▸Go to http://betterhelp.com/padilla to get 10% off your first month! ▸Go to http://purple.com/padilla to get 10% off any order of $200 or more!

Principled
S7E13 | How corporate purpose is foundational to business innovation and success

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:48


What you'll learn in this podcast episode As the business world makes an overdue shift from shareholder to stakeholder capitalism, is it possible that we will see an erosion of innovation? How does a company's purpose impact its success? In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Chief Advisory Officer Ty Francis MBE talks about how corporate purpose and stakeholder capitalism fuel innovation with Mark R. Hatch, CEO of clean energy startup SiLi-ion, Inc., an instigator of the maker movement with the founding of TechShop, author of The Maker Movement Manifesto and The Maker Revolution, and researcher on the influence of “organizational purpose” on innovation and business transformation at Pepperdine University. Mark has dedicated his career to educating the business community on innovation and advanced manufacturing and has spoken at the White House on these topics. Listen in as the two discuss what it means to help people—and companies—around the world do the right thing.   Featured Guest: Mark Hatch Mark R. Hatch is an advanced manufacturing entrepreneur, writer, and sought-after speaker and advisor on innovation, the maker movement, digital strategy, and advanced manufacturing. He has held executive positions for innovation, disruptive technology, entrepreneurship, and intrapreneurship in various industry sectors. Mark is the CEO of clean energy startup SiLi-ion, Inc. and an advisor to Studio MFG, an advanced spatial-web innovation consulting and manufacturing design firm. Mark has dedicated his career to educating the business community on innovation and advanced manufacturing and has spoken about these topics to various audiences—including the White House, TEDx, Global Fortune 500 firms, and Harvard University. He has appeared on prominent media outlets such as ABC, CBS, NBC, Bloomberg, CNN, and Fox, and has been quoted in Bloomberg Business, FastCompany, Forbes, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The LA Times, and The San Francisco Chronicle among other publications. An avid researcher on the influence of “organizational purpose” on innovation and business transformation, Mark is working on his DBA at Pepperdine University and is a faculty member for digital innovation and strategy at Pepperdine's Graziado School of Business. He is also an entrepreneur in residence at UC Berkeley. Mark holds an MBA from the Drucker Center at Claremont Graduate University and a BA in economics from UCI.   Featured Host: Ty Francis Ty Francis MBE is a Welsh-American business development, operations executive, and subject matter expert in Corporate Governance, Ethics, Compliance and Culture and is currently LRN's Head of Advisory Services, and a member of the Executive Team as a Special Advisor to the CEO.  Ty has utilized his expansive network of industry experts and thought leaders to help companies enhance corporate character, culture, D&I and transparency and has launched E&C programs and forums in the US, UK, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Brazil, Singapore, Brazil and the Middle East. He spent over a decade in New York City where he was EVP of Global Programs at the Ethisphere Institute and prior to that led the Corporate Board member business at the New York Stock Exchange's Governance Services division.  In 2019, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Business by the UK's Solent University for his outstanding contribution in the field of corporate governance and international trade. In 2017, Ty was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE), by Queen Elizabeth II, in recognition of services to business.  Ty also studied at Stanford's Rock Centre for Corporate Governance and Oxford University's Said Business School and is a Certified Compliance & Ethics Professional (CCEP).    Principled Podcast Transcription Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders, and workplace change makers. Ty Francis: As the business world makes an overdue shift from shareholder to stakeholder capitalism, is it possible that we'll see an erosion of innovation? How does a company's purpose impact its success? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Ty Francis, Chief Advisory Officer LRN. Today I'm joined by Mark Hatch, an accomplished entrepreneur, advanced manufacturing expert, and sought after speaker on topics of innovation, disruptive technology, and the future of work. Mark holds an MBA from the Drucker Center at Claremont Graduate University. And is presently pursuing a DBA, a doctor of business administration, from Pepperdine University. We are going to be talking today about corporate purpose, stakeholder capitalism, and what it means to help people, and companies around the world do the right thing. After several successful decades in business, Mark is now researching the influence of organizational purpose on innovation and business transformation at Pepperdine, while simultaneously serving as CEO of the clean energy startup, SiLi-ion, amongst other things. Mark Hatch, thanks for joining me on the Principled Podcast. Mark Hatch: Thank you very much, Ty. It's great to be here. Ty Francis: Okay so, for those of us saying to ourselves, "Where have I heard this name before," please tell us a little bit about your professional history. Now, we know you as the founder of TechShop, and an instigator in the maker movement. What else? Oh, yes, you've spoken at White House about advanced manufacturing, and at the Clinton Global Initiative, something my wife [inaudible 00:01:58] was actually involved in during her time at Swiss Re. Mark Hatch:   Oh, how fun. Ty Francis: Yeah, she was at Swiss Re for about 10 years and worked very closely with President Clinton. So, that's a name, it's all too familiar in my household. But I also know you're involved in the Singularity University, which sounds very Star Trekky, which is an interesting side note, especially since we're talking about purpose today. So, I've given an overview, but can you give us a little bit more about your backstory Mark? Mark Hatch:   Oh, hit a couple high points. I'm a former green beret, so I was in the army for three years coming out of high school, which was quite entertaining. And then, I started my first company, an interactive multimedia company back in '80s. One of the things I've discovered that I'm really good at is jumping into something way too early. And then, getting beaten up for years and years until it becomes the obvious next thing. The interesting thing about that interactive media though, was that John McAfee of McAfee Antivirus was one of my first investors. I actually got to know John before he became infamous, I guess. I spent a little bit of time at Avery Dennison, a big package goods company. A little bit of time at Kinkos, where I launched the e-commerce portion for Kinkos. And pulled T1 lines around the United States to wire them all up. Spent a little bit of time doing a health benefits ASP and so forth. But most people, if they know who I am at all, is from the maker movement days wrote a couple books in it, and spent a lot of time traipsing around the globe trying to get people to make things again. Ty Francis: Well, I want to touch a couple of those things. So now, you aren't the average professor, as we've just heard, because you've got some real bites to your bark. Within what you just told me, I did read that you raised over $20 million and turned TechShop into that leading brand in the maker movement, growing it from 1 to 12 locations. And more impressively membership and revenue 20X in five years. I got that right, 20X? Mark Hatch: 20, yeah. As long as you start from a very small base, it's really easy to hit those high numbers. Ty Francis: I think you and I have got a different definition of the word easy.  If that wasn't impressive enough, you also grew that $200 million business at Kinkos by 18%. But I think more impressive than that, and someone who runs a P and L you cut costs by 15 million in a single year. Mark Hatch: In a single year, yeah. Ty Francis: That is both impressive. And I get, your students get a kick out of all that experience. We had a pre-conversation before. And I mentioned that I'm lucky enough to know Sir Richard Branson. And he told me years ago how he went into a bookshop, and pulled a bunch of books off the library that were about business. I think the first 20 he counted, none of the authors had actually been in business, or run a business, and were anecdotal at best. Looking at what you've done and what you've succeeded, how has that happened? And how has that paradigm shifted to you now? Mark Hatch: One, I do actually tend to live in the future. It's a bad habit. I've got a very, very clear view of what I believe is going to happen. And I clearly did not take my desert training in the Special Forces very well, where they beat into your head, never mistake a clear view for a short distance. It will kill you. So, I saw interactive multimedia early. I saw dot com early. I've seen many of these things. What I managed to do with TechShop was raise funds, and grow the base quickly enough so that we actually survive for a solid 10 years. But what I do is innovation. My entire career has been on the edge between in a research and development, or the most recent trends, and then commercializing them, turning them into something that a consumer can understand, and acquire. Ty Francis: So, I am seeing a Star Trek theme in all of this, by the way. Seeing into the future. A Q-esque type person here. But this is fascinating. And you, obviously, have an incredible foundation [inaudible 00:06:08] what you are doing, looking at the past, predicting the future. But I do want to tap more into the research you're doing at Pepperdine. And as part of your DBA, again, I'm looking at this and I have an honorary doctorate, and I feel very, very small right now. Mark Hatch: Congratulations. That's quite impressive actually. Ty Francis: Yeah, but apparently when the air cabin crew asks if there's a doctor on the plane, I'm not allowed to raise my hand. When they say, "What can you help this person with?" I can say, "Well, I've got an interesting anecdote about business." So the DBA you're pursuing right now, I mean, I particularly admire the notion of going back to school for an advanced degree. I've had a limited amount of business success. And during the lockdown, I took three courses, one at a side business university at Oxford, one at Stanford, and one at the London School of Economics. The recurring theme through all of those courses... One was executive leadership. One was DEI and leveraging business through it. And the other was international relations and global politics. Organizational purpose was a common theme through all of those postgraduate and diplomas. And it was fascinating how that was a theme, and linking back into business. So, I want you to talk about your work on organizational purpose. But first of all, can you give me, or us a definition of your definition of organizational purpose? Mark Hatch:    There are like three versions of what purpose means. But to get a little bit technical, the short version is really simple. Like the single word, the single concept is why a corporation exists. That's what purpose means, why? Now, usually, when you use the term, what is your corporate purpose? You're not thinking of the single thing that the word means. You're thinking of a corporate purpose statement, or a development of a series of concepts. Or, as they say in business speak, it's a construct. So, I have adopted George et al's from 2021, which is interesting. Most of this good work has happened just in the last few years. So, purpose in the for profit context captures the essence of an organization's existence by explaining what value it seeks to create for its stakeholders. So, you're creating value. But then he goes on and defines it a little bit more, which I like. "In doing so purpose provides a clear definition of firm's intent, creates the ability for the stakeholders to identify with and be inspired by the firm's mission, vision, and values, and establishes actionable pathways, and an inspirational outcome for the firm." Sorry, that's very technical, but that's the best broad version that includes mission, vision, and values, which people tend to associate with purpose when you ask them what a corporate purpose is. But let me back up a little bit. So, the reason I got intrigued with this was, well first of all, I'm very purpose driven personally. I was, usually, involved with technologies that I found intriguing, and could improve humanity in some way. But my experience at TechShop was at a completely different level. People were joining because of the purpose of this idea that we could remake our lives by going to a shop that had, basically, democratized access to the tools of the industrial revolution. We were giving the average Joe access to tools that they had never had access to, unless they were 80 years old, had come up at three machine shop or something. But we were giving them laser cutters, and 3D printers, and so forth.  And I personally got a level of satisfaction out of that. And I got my staff members to perform at levels I had never seen before. We had members that are evangelists. I mean, it seemed like sometimes they would go out on the street and tell people, "Have you heard of this place? You've got to come in." We had this one member, he quit his job. And he didn't have a great job to begin with, but he quit his job as a night watchman, came up and couch surfed. Like that was a thing for a while, couchsurfing.com where you could go and spend the night at somebody's house randomly. This was well before hotel folks came along. He would evangelize each couch that he slept on became a member, like not the couch, the people. Every place that he went, we got new members. And we thought about maybe paying him just to hang around, and sleep on a new couch every night because he was our best attractor. And so, this got me really interested in this concept of what is your corporate purpose? And how does it play out and impact the organization at large? Ty Francis: I think the biggest question that we have, and I have is when people are talking about this concept, how organizations are dealing with this, how are you articulating this to companies, to brands, to leaders, and how to actually put this into practice? Because many of the conversations I have with boards, with GCs, with anyone, they understand the problem. They see what's happening. They read and they see blogs, and they have conversations with the fellow board members. But it's actually the tangibility of creating a strategy that puts this into place. And something they can follow. I guess what's the sticky sauce? What's the magic wand that you throw over your clients, your peers on how do I actually put this into play? Mark Hatch: So the research that I'm doing specifically came out of kind of the question, how do I deal with the naysayers? How do I convince a board, or a C-suite folks that are like, "Yeah, yeah, yeah, whatever, whatever, whatever. I've got my ESG guy and they're going to keep me between the lanes, and everything's going to be fine." I started down this path as like, what do we actually know about corporate purpose? Where did it spring from? Actually, I go all the way back. What's the original concept of a corporation? Where did that come from? And it goes all the way back. It's crazy. It goes all the way back to pre-Babylonian times. And I won't bore you with all of that, but it turns out you couldn't have a corporation without having a purpose of some kind. It wasn't allowed. The state would not allow it. The king would not allow it. I've got a great quote out of the Law of Corporations 1702, "The sole purpose of a corporation is to improve the society and support the king." Full stop. You can't say, "Okay, I'm here to do like, blah, blah, blah. And I'm going to make this." No, no, no, no. How are you going to help your customers? How are you going to improve society? And how are you going to support the king? And if you don't have an answer to that, I'm sorry, not only will I not give you corporation, if I happen to have given you one, and you have strayed too far, I will shut you down. And this was actually the norm up to about 1880 globally. And there's this great quote. It was Massachusetts Bay Company and they charged this poor sod 200 pounds for overcharging his customer. And then, on Sunday morning, the preacher got engaged talking about the egregious greed, and what can happen. And it was simply against the law. And then, things changed with the 14th amendment, some other bizarre things. But we've had this like weird era, and that's how I would describe it, between 1886 to about 1950, we were set loose. You didn't have to have a purpose at all. You actually didn't need any purpose at all. You could just go down to Delaware and say, "I want to set up a company." And they go, "Great." They still would ask, what are you going to do? And so, in your mind, you had to at least have a customer, or somebody you were going to steal money from. You had to have some idea. So even today in your charters, you have to say, "Okay, I'm going to be in this industry segment," which by the way, you just send them a note and that can change. But about around 1950, that started to shift. So, that was a long winded way of saying, so how do we deal with these guys? And what I wanted to do, and what I'm doing is I'm a practical guy, I'm a practitioner. I don't want to sell them something that doesn't work. What does that mean for your purpose? And so, I'm really intrigued with this idea of empirically based management tools. How do you know something works? Not one of those 19 books that Sir Branson was talking about, but the one that comes out of the trenches. So, I've gone back and I've done a fairly significant review of all of the literature on corporate purpose. What's actually known from a theoretical perspective from doing interviews, which I don't put a lot of weight into because you get what you want out of your interviews. But actual empirical work that's been done in this space. And it turns out those corporations that do have a purpose that's more than simply serving customers, they have substantially superior financial returns. And actually, I think your firm is an example that promulgates that point of view based on research you guys have done in the past. Ty Francis: Our tagline is, principle performance. And I'll add that some research we did last year echoes most of what you're saying. I mean, all of what you're saying. My own advisory team released a report alongside our marketing team. And we called it our LRN Benchmark of Ethical Culture, which is a multi-year, it's a collaborative research effort, which draws data from nearly 8,000 employees, 17 industries, 14 countries. And that study conclusively proves that ethical cultures don't just protect corporate reputations, but they propel the bottom line. Companies with the strongest ethical cultures, strongly outperform by approximately 40% those with weakest ethical cultures. And that was across all measures of business performance, customer satisfaction. You talked about employee loyalty, innovation, adaptability, and growth. It's very simple, and you can make a lot of links to this. But if you keep people happy, if people believe in what you are doing, they will stay. If they stay, they will not leave. If they will not leave, they will not take IP with them. They will not go somewhere else. So, all that money you've invested in hiring them, training them, making them better people they will not take that somewhere else. Mark Hatch: Yeah, your brand positioning, your ability to [inaudible 00:16:32]. The theory is actually pretty well illuminated. Actually, the step that I'm taking... I think we have, in fact, proven that having a higher purpose can, or will result in superior financial success. So, there's my answer to the naysayers. This is really simple besides being the right thing to do, and to feel good about yourself, and your company when you go home at night, and you talk to your kids about what you're doing, your returns are higher. But the next question that I asked is, okay, show me how? Just throwing a purpose together and announcing it from the mountaintop is not the right answer. Now, we are getting results, so kudos to the companies that are executing. But I'm trying to answer the question, okay, how do you operationalize a superior purpose? What are the actual specific financial drivers that create superior firm performance? Innovation, and then specifically radical innovation is historically the largest way that firms create superior returns by far. There are other ways of doing it: brand, financial management, operations, Six Sigma, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But the number one way of improving your financial performance is actually to do innovation. And then radical innovation in particular. That's my little chunk that I'm chewing on is can I show that firms with a higher aspirational purpose actually get superior innovation returns and superior radical innovation returns? And the quantitative numbers have come in. I'm now working on writing it up. And it's clear like it's 0.0001 chance that it's false. In fact, a higher purpose does drive radical innovation in a very significant way. It explains 30% of the variance of that. And like 35 to 37% of all variance in your innovation. It's huge. So, my answer is, okay, install, purpose, and innovate. Point this amazing effort that you've created, point this missile down the range at radical innovation because you're going to get an enormous return out of it. Ty Francis: You've actually answered the next question I was going to ask about, what this means for the future of business, and what is your vision for how company leaders can apply these insights? As you said, it's not enough for somebody to read in a book about what's happening. It's how they can relate that and put that into practice to change the dynamic of their own companies. We're not just talking about this. Investors are asking companies point blank, define your purpose. What are you doing to make the world around you better? Larry Fingers, writing to CEOs every single year. In the UK, the banking industry are asking, "Yes, we get it. You're raising capital for people, but what else are you doing?" It's a little bit, what have you done for me lately kind of thing. Mark Hatch: We've come full circle now. In 1886, we decided, okay, you don't have to have a purpose. But now, we are rewriting the laws. The SEC in the US, the UK, as you mentioned, the French have done it. The Italians have done it. The Germans did it ages ago. But there's an enormous amount of pressure now on corporations to be able to explicitly measure what their social good is. They don't necessarily call it your purpose, but that's what they're getting at. When I came at this, of course, I have the context of working at Singularity University as a speaker. And I know, I know a friend of mine is Salim Ismail, who's driving this whole exponential organization's effort globally. And, in it, he said, sidebar conversation. "So Mark, I've tried to do these exponential innovation efforts without a massively transformative purpose at the beginning of the effort because the corporation was like, 'Yeah, you're making me feel kind of weird about this idea of changing the world and all that. We're an X company, let's just do the execution part and skip the massively transformative purpose part.'" And he said, "Every single time we did that, it failed. Every single time. We got nominal innovation out of it." And it actually makes sense when you think about the internal resistance of individuals in their risk profiles. Typically, you go to work and you want to have things normal. And then, what's going to happen all day long, and you're competent and so forth. But when you start doing innovation and, particularly radical innovation, you don't know what tomorrow looks like. You don't understand who your customer is. You don't know what the value is per se. And you're thrown in the deep end and you got to figure it out. Now, it's not quite that bad, but it is substantially different than your day-to-day. And it's hard. Doing radical innovation is the hardest part of being in business because you don't know how it's going to come out. That as a background, is like, "Oh my goodness, you're kidding me. You just told me that one of the keys to being able to execute this isn't actually reaching for the stars." It's not like, can we get a 15% increase in this? Or can we cut costs by 10% or 5%? It's can you cut cost by 50%? Can we double our market share? Can we open up an entirely new market segment? Just saying those words creates a new tension in somebody's head. You bring them in and say, "Okay, we're going to get 10% here, and 15% there." And everybody goes, "Oh cool, I don't have to change anything. I can go back to my desk and keep stamping those pieces of paper. And I'm good." You come in and say, "I want a 50% increase. And I need a 30% reduction over here," actually you've lost the audience because for the next five minutes, all they're going to be wondering is whether or not they have a job. Am I qualified to do this? That's what got me going. And we live in the most exciting time in all of human history. We've got more technologies coming on stream in amazing and radical ways, and how they're interacting with one another is absolutely stunning. So, this is the best time in all of human history to do radical innovation. This is the best time to go after actually deep purposes. And I feel sorry for these corporations who are going, "Okay, let's try to get a 12% bump over the next two years." They're doomed. In my mind it's like, forget it. You and I and others in this world are going to teach the executive suite that radical innovation is possible, it will drive the bottom line, make them feel better and will, in fact, change the world. And I'm proving it empirically. That's kind of what I'm excited about. Ty Francis: It reminds me of a quote that was a famous NFL coach. And I can't remember it now and I'll come back to you by the end of the podcast. But it was about reaching for perfection that you'll never attain it. But on the way down, you will hit excellence. And I think this is an area why people aren't reaching for the stars is surprising because it's that competitive advantage. When we talk about how this is a competitive advantage, not just on a social scale, but on a business scale, we've been talking to board directors. We had a collaboration with a group called Tapestry Networks. We spoke to 40 directors of publicly traded companies, I mean 40, 50 companies. And they represented about 70 or 80 different companies across their different board positions. We did this specifically to talk about purpose and culture. We released the findings in a report called Activating Culture and Ethics for Boards late last year. And the results, albeit mostly predictable, the boards want to put culture at the top of their priority list, but they still don't fully understand how to measure it. The refreshing part was that they see that the paradigm shifted from board members having a nose in, fingers out ability to more having nose and fingers in because they are starting to see this as a competitive benefit to having both strategy and culture and purpose aligned. And with that, I think they're seeing they have a better understanding of what corporate purpose should be. I think we're trying to see a tangible move in the... I'm using quotation marks here, a "tone from the top" conversation on how boards are impacting priorities, and are influencing culture. So, how does that help your research for what you are doing now for the future of work? Mark Hatch: You've done the surveys, you know what the answers are. But what I'm trying to do is start a small renaissance around, prove it to me. What are the actual ways that you operationalize it? It's like, okay, employee retention. Okay, measure employee retention. But don't just measure employee retention, invest in your employees. If you know that they're going to hang around longer, don't just sit on your hands, and say, "Oh cool, they're going to be here longer. Woo hoo." No, no, no. What that means is you can't actually invest in them in ways that your competitors can't. That's operationalizing this idea of this competitive advantage, invest in your customers, invest in your brand. What are you doing specifically to drive your brand in relations in a deeper way? You've created this competitive advantage. You've got this great purpose now sitting on the shelf. Great. How are you going to operationalize it? And can we measure it? That's my point. It's can we actually measure it and see what the returns are? Ty Francis: The measurement, that's the trick. Everyone knows what they should be doing, but they don't know how they should be doing it. Mark Hatch: And if you don't measure it, then you don't care about it. Ty Francis: Wasn't that the famous misquote from Peter Drucker what you can't manage, you can measure, or the other way around? Mark Hatch: Right. Ty Francis: So we've been talking a lot about boards and purpose, but we know the SEC, and we're talking about the US. Obviously, although I'm American, I'm also Welsh. So, I'm curious if your research extends to Europe, or other regions. I mean, is this universal? Or is it just stage one USA, stage two [inaudible 00:25:55]? Mark Hatch:    It does work at least in the UK. So, I chose my sample's 50/50, US/UK. 50/50, male/female. Native English speakers, try to control for some other variables. This is clearly true in the UK and the US. My suspicion, obviously, is that it's true in a lot of other parts of the world as well. Other research suggests that it is at least pan-European. Gartenberg's work and others. Gartenberg did some quantitative research that had 500,000 companies in it from around the globe. And they were able to show empirically that purpose does, in fact, drive superior financial returns, similar to what your research did. Ty Francis: When you're talking about this corporate purpose, I've noticed working in the States for a long time, that there is in the States and, to a certain extent, in the UK as well, there's a shareholder driven purpose kind of alignment where there's in broader Europe, France, and Germany, and Italy there's more of a stakeholder driven perception. So, there you see in Germany where you've got the different kind of board levels, and with the very straight labor laws in France, you are seeing that connection between leadership, and the employee base having to be aligned because they've got no choice because if they don't like what their companies are doing, they can change it, and quite dramatically. So, that would be interesting to see how that dynamic between the UK and the US, but then certainly further afield of that, how the European companies and organizations are actually using this corporate purpose vehicle to their competitive advantage. Mark Hatch: Right. One might hypothesize that corporate purpose, that's a fundamental driver. But how you operationalize it may vary from region to region. Maybe brand is a better tool than radical innovation. Maybe employee retention is a better one. I'm not sure. I doubt it, frankly. I think innovation is one of the fundamental things that you do as a business. Drucker would say, you're not even an entrepreneur, if you're not doing innovation. You can call yourself a businessman, but you're not an entrepreneur. And so, I suspect that innovation. And then as we're moving, again, the opportunity set available now to innovate is phenomenal. Radical innovation, it should be a fundamental strategy for any business that's trying to drive purpose into their organization, and with their stakeholders. Ty Francis: Well, before we sign off, and before I get a raft of my very angry American listeners asking why this British guy is talking about American football? It was Vince Lombardi, [inaudible 00:28:28]. And his quote was, and I'll see if I can get this right, "Perfection's not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence." Mark Hatch: Yeah. Ty Francis: So Mark Hatch, this has been a fascinating conversation and one that we have merely pricked the surface of. And I'd like to have you back to talk a little bit more definitively, especially when the research is done, to look at those results. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me today and us on this episode.       My name is Ty Francis. I want to thank you all for listening to the Principled Podcast by LRM. If you have enjoyed the conversation today, please do give us a top rating on your favorite podcast app. Goodbye for now. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen. And don't forget to leave us a review.

Beyond Rad Podcast
Episode 160 - Nearly Spent

Beyond Rad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 78:34


Having formed during the pandemic, and spent the bulk of the COVID years developing their sound, Nearly Spent have crafted an energetic, heart-on-sleeve and driving pop-punk soundscape, deftly balancing urgency and melody. Nearly Spent blend the best of throwback pop-punk, whilst delivering with an execution that is both contemporary and thoroughly engaging. Nods to the likes of Broadside and Goalkeeper shine through, as well as flashes of post-hardcore influence; the new EP is a dexterous but cohesive display. Thank you for listening! If there are bands that you would like to hear on the show or if you're a band that would like to join me for an interview, please reach out to me at podcast@beyondradentertainment.com. Follow us on Social: linktr.ee/beyondrad Follow Nearly Spent: https://ingrv.es/nearly-spent-k2u-j

Stories from the Hackery
Isaac Weiser - Web Development Cohort 53

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:44


Isaac Weiser graduated with Web Development Cohort 53. Graduated college in 2020. Perfect timing. Spent a year working at a reptile farm. That experience pushed me towards starting an apprenticeship to become a software developer at Nashville Software School

Church Public
Billions Spent while Babies Starve

Church Public

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:46


LIKE SUBSCRIBE SHARE SUPPORT!Billions Spent while Babies Starve.What is going on with the national formula crisis?The government wants to send another 40 billion to Ukraine, meanwhile babies all over America are literally starving because of a nationwide formula shortage.Also today we will check back in with the Supreme Court Intimidation Protests.And a church is now apparently sponsored by Planned Parenthood?--Thanks for watching! Thanks for listening!At Church Public we create compelling content to equip you to follow Jesus and engage in the public square.Find Me:Website: churchpublic.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChurchPublic/Twitter: https://twitter.com/churchpublicInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/churchpublic/Today is a great day to start your own podcast. Whether you're looking for a new marketing channel, have a message you want to share with the world, or just think it would be fun to have your own talk show...podcasting is an easy, inexpensive, and fun way to expand your reach online.Following the link in the show notes let's Buzzsprout know we sent you, gets you a $20 Amazon gift card if you sign up for a paid plan, and helps support our show.https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1132064Support the show

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
5 - 12 - 22 WHAT DO YOU WISH YOU HADNT SPENT MONEY ON AT YOUR WEDDING

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:40


5 - 12 - 22 WHAT DO YOU WISH YOU HADNT SPENT MONEY ON AT YOUR WEDDING by Maine's Coast 93.1

Ramsey Call of the Day
This Couple Only Spent $500 on Their Wedding

Ramsey Call of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 7:10


The Ramsey Call of the Day is a quick, daily dose of advice on life and money in under ten minutes. Hear from experts like Dave Ramsey, Ken Coleman, Rachel Cruze, Dr. John Delony, and George Kamel. Part of the Ramsey Network. Delivered to you five days a week.

Going Long Podcast with Billy Keels
How a Desire to Help Others Can Lead to Your Own Investing Success - Cary Love

Going Long Podcast with Billy Keels

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 58:52


Want to avoid mistakes in Long Distance Investing?  Download your FREE document at http://keeponcashflow.clickfunnels.com/7mistakes  Going Long Podcast Episode 211: How a Desire to Help Others Can Lead to Your Own Investing Success In the conversation with today's guest, Cary Love,you'll learn the following:   [00:28 - 04:04] Show introduction with comments from Billy. [04:04  - 08:33] Guest introduction and first questions. [07:26 - 15:50] The backstory and decisions made that led Cary to this point in his journey. [13:50 - 17:50] Why Cary feels it often takes a non-financial impact on someone's life to make them realise the importance of being in control of their finances.   [17:50 - 23:02] Why Cary went for Real Estate in particular as an asset to invest in as opposed to other potential types of investment.  [23:02 - 32:28] Brian looks at how it can be for those who are in a successful role at their day job but are at the same time getting into Real Estate investing. [32:28 - 35:53] Some of the activities that Brian got his children to take on to improve their lives while he was working so hard, that would positively impact their lives. [35:53 - 39:00] How it felt to Brian when he first stepped away from his corporate role. [39:00 - 47:05] Some of the things that Brian does to help others on their road to financial freedom through Real Estate investing. Here's what Cary shared with us during today's conversation:    Where in the world Cary is based currently: Granbury, Texas. The most positive thing to happen in the past 24 hours: Spent a wonderful evening with his wife in the Jacuzzi!  Favourite European City: Rome, Italy. A mistake that Cary would like you to learn from so that you don't have to pay full price: Remember that all mistakes are recoverable, and that you can learn from them. Book Recommendations: The Psychology of Money, by Morgan Housel. Be sure to reach out and connect with Cary Love by using the info below:   Website: https://halahpropertymanagement.com/  Email: cary@halahprop.com  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/caryjlove  To see the Video Version of today's conversation just CLICK HERE.   How to leave a review for The Going Long Podcast: https://youxccbxtu.be/qfRqLVcf8UI    Start taking action TODAY so that you can gain more Education and Control over your financial life.   Do you want to have more control and avoid the mistakes that I made getting started in long distance investing?  Then you can DOWNLOAD the 7 Mistakes to Avoid in Long Distance Investing Guide by clicking HERE.   Be sure to connect with Billy!  He's made it easy for you to do…Just go to any of these sites:   Website: www.billykeels.com Youtube: billykeels Facebook: Billy Keels Fan Page Instagram: @billykeels Twitter: @billykeels LinkedIn: Billy Keels

SPENT.Media
Get Down Ep. 59

SPENT.Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 62:14


JD and BNos present The Get Down Podcast; the show where we discuss news stories that caught our eye and the movies and shows that we've watched that week.   Come Get Down BNos https://www.instagram.com/bnosanchuk/ https://twitter.com/BNosanchuk JD https://www.instagram.com/qwikwits/ https://twitter.com/thejdstaley SPENT https://twitter.com/spentradio Music by: Music by Wataboi from Pixabay

Jamie and Stoney
Stoney & Jansen with Heather - Is Fox's Impending Contract With Tom Brady Money Well Spent?

Jamie and Stoney

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:28


Tom Brady has a 10-year, $375-million deal set up to become Fox's lead NFL color analyst once his playing days are done

Stacey Norman
What have you spent money on that has actually made you angry?

Stacey Norman

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:04


These tatted sneakers have us shook and got us thinking about some of our own purchases...

Karson & Kennedy
Our Music Director Mike Mullaney Spent HOW MUCH on Proms This Season?!?!

Karson & Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 4:46


It's Prom season and the price is getting out of hand! At least it is for our music director Mike Mullaney who i'm pretty sure is going to neeed a second job after this phone call!

Skip the Queue
Guided tours and making it personal at the National Gallery, with Katie Weller

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:17


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/https://www.linkedin.com/in/katie-weller-8171688b/ Katie Weller has been appointed Travel Trade Sales Manager at the National Gallery. Joining the fascinating world of art, she is excited to be embarking on a new challenge. Having worked in the tourism, entertainment and leisure industry for over 18 years, her roles have ranged from working at James Villa Holidays as a Travel Advisor, Tour Guide at Shakespeare's Globe to PA for the critically acclaimed band Westlife. Starting her trade career at a top ten visitor attraction- Royal Museums Greenwich as Trade Sales Executive, she developed an award-winning product for the international education market and gained a wealth of knowledge about trade. Katie then went on to work as Trade Manager at the iconic Westminster Abbey and went on to open her own business as a successful sweet shop during the pandemic. She is now very excited to be developing and launching new products at the National Gallery.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world. In today's episode I speak with Katie Weller, Travel Trade Sales Manager at The National Gallery. We discuss the process of developing new paid for guided tours, making the gallery inclusive for all and how travel trade works for attractions. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching to Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Katie, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. It's lovely to meet you.Katie Weller: Thank you so much. I'm really excited to be here.Kelly Molson: Ah, me too. We've been chatting for a little while on LinkedIn, haven't we? So I'm glad that we've got this booked in the diary now. So I'm going to ask you loads of questions. We've got something really exciting to talk about but first, icebreaker questions.Katie Weller: Yes, go for it.Kelly Molson: Okay. What sport would you compete in if you were in the Olympics?Katie Weller: Oh gosh, that's a hard one, isn't it? I'm actually rubbish at sports. Oh gosh. What would I go for? I was always good at javelin. Is that a sport?Kelly Molson: Yeah.Katie Weller: Can I compete in that?Kelly Molson: Absolutely.Katie Weller: Let's go for it. I'm going javelin.Kelly Molson: All right. I like it. Take your anger out.Katie Weller: Exactly.Kelly Molson: All right. Last place that you went on holiday?Katie Weller: Oh, we went to Mykonos in Greece.Kelly Molson: Oh, lovely.Katie Weller: Well, so it was supposed to be... So I'm getting married in a couple of months and so it was my hen do. And we managed to do the hen, but not the wedding. I was happy with that as long as I... Kelly Molson: This bit.Katie Weller: Exactly. And do you know what? It was just so lovely to get on a plane and travel again. So yeah, we had a brilliant time. Spent way too much money, but yeah, absolutely fantastic.Kelly Molson: Oh, lovely. What a treat. I'll bet you had a whale of a time.Katie Weller: Oh, we did.Kelly Molson: We won't ask because what goes on in hen stays on hen.Katie Weller: Exactly. I think it's for the best.Kelly Molson: All right. If you could choose any two famous people to have dinner with, who would they be?Katie Weller: Gosh. Leonardo DiCaprio, just because he's always been my number one. I'd always have him at the table there. And the second one, who would I... Does it have to be someone alive?Kelly Molson: No, it can be anyone you want.Katie Weller: I would go for Van Gogh.Kelly Molson: Wow.Katie Weller: It would be a bit of a messy dinner party, but I think he would just be so amazing to talk with, try and get into his brain. Yeah, I'm going to go Van Gogh and Leo. What a party. Do you like an invite?Kelly Molson: What a mix. Will there be cocktails?Katie Weller: I think we'll need it.Kelly Molson: I'm there. All right. Katie, what is your unpopular opinion?Katie Weller: Oh, do you know what? I've really been thinking about this and I didn't think it was an unpopular opinion, but it clearly is and I've got a lot of passion about it. Crocs should stay in hospitals. I can't even look at them. They're just the most ugliest shoes. How last year they were like trending number one? Why people put them on their feet? It really upsets me. You will never, ever see me in Crocs, ever.Kelly Molson: Wow. That is a massive passion.Katie Weller: Can you feel my anger? This is why I want to do javelin.Kelly Molson: Now, listen, I'm just going to say, I should probably hook you up with Michelle from Eureka, the National Children's Museum, because she was very passionate about wearing Crocs with socks at work.Katie Weller: She wants to do that?Kelly Molson: No, she does do that. Yeah, no, she does.Katie Weller: Each to their own, but not for me.Kelly Molson: All right. Okay.Katie Weller: Fantastic quote.Kelly Molson: They are. Let's see what our listeners feel about that. I think there might be a few people that agree with you on that one.Katie Weller: Yeah, I think since lockdown a lot of people went in that direction. But yeah, not for me. Sorry, guys.Kelly Molson: Those things. Okay. Love it. Katie, tell me a little bit about your background before we get onto what we're going to talk about today.Katie Weller: Yes, really I've been in arts and tourism for about a 20 years, which makes me feel really old now. So I started off as just a theatre steward, so working in the local theatres, and I loved it. How cool to be able to get paid and just watch shows? And back then I thought I was going to be an actor. And obviously life changes, you realise you need to get paid. So I didn't end up going down that route, but I always had a passion for it. So in terms of getting involved in sort of travel trade, that was a bit later on. I was a PA for a very famous boy band, Westlife, if you've heard of them. So I've had lots of random jobs as well. But yeah, it was the Globe Theater. So I was a tour guide there for quite a few years and absolutely loved it. And that's really where I started sort of finding out about travel trade.Katie Weller: We attended a few shows and then from there I started at Royal Museums Greenwich, and that's where I really started my career, built up all of my contacts and really got to learn about travel trade and just loved it. It's such a niche thing. And a lot of people don't understand what travel trade is and how it works.Kelly Molson: Well, actually, for the benefit of our listeners that might not know, can you explain what that actually means?Katie Weller: Yeah, definitely. So you will actually find in a lot of attractions, they have a travel trade and groups department. So travel trade works on a business to business basis. So we would push our product through third party platforms. So I don't know if I'm allowed to mention names on here?Kelly Molson: Yeah, go for it.Katie Weller: Like Virgin Experience Days or Viatour or Golden Tours. I'm not pulling out favourites at all here, but it just means that you are pushing out your reach to new markets, new audiences that you wouldn't necessarily get in otherwise. You pay them a commission and in return they push out your marketing, they'll do campaigns for you and they just drive in different people. So yeah, most attractions have a travel trade team, but a lot of people just don't really understand what it is. But it's a huge income driver to attractions.Kelly Molson: Yeah, great explanation.Katie Weller: I hope that makes sense.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it made perfect sense. And I also really appreciate that you thought we were a little bit like the BBC there and you couldn't mention other brands on it.Katie Weller: I know. I know. Well, just in case. I'm going to get other partners ringing me now like, "Why didn't you mention me?" Sorry.Kelly Molson: All right. So this is really exciting. So we had a little chat on LinkedIn quite a while ago actually now, isn't it? We were chatting. But National Gallery, where you are now, is launching paid for guided tours which are geared towards kind of tourist, domestic and international.Katie Weller: Mm-hmm (affirmative).Kelly Molson: This is really exciting because the National Gallery is a free gallery. So you don't need to pay to go into this. So this is quite a new thing that they're launching. How did this idea come about?Katie Weller: So it's a bit of a long story. With the National Gallery, yes, it's always been free of charge. However, it can be for, not just for an international customer, for a domestic one as well, if you're not necessarily an art buff, you can walk inside the Gallery, it can be quite overwhelming because you don't really know where to start, what to look at. So we know there is a demand for tours because they're coming in anyway. So they're coming in. So other tour companies are charging the customers and they're coming in and doing tours. So the issue with that... It's great because there's a demand there and we know people want to be educated and that's what we want to do. We want to educate them on our amazing collection.Katie Weller: However, sometimes with that, it means that we haven't really got any quality control over what's being said. A lot of people think they're buying an official National Gallery tour and it's not. So we get customers coming through to us. So for us, how it all came about really is my head of department, Claire, she looks after events and our catering team as well. And next year we're closing our Sainsbury Wing. So the entrance is actually going to be the Portico Terrace, so the beautiful steps going up, only because we are just completely redeveloping that side of the Gallery. And it means that we lose a lot of our daytime space. So we would normally get a lot of income coming through from daytime hire, that's going to be lost. So she thought, "Do you know what? Let's bring in travel trade."Katie Weller: We actually worked together at Royal Museums Greenwich so she was head of events there. And she just saw the benefit that travel trade had and she knew there's a demand for tours. So she just decided, "Let's get up and running." So it wasn't really anything off the back of COVID. It was always there as a plan because we knew we had those closures coming up.Kelly Molson: That's interesting. Yeah, because that was going to be one of my questions, actually, was this something that came out of COVID? Because obviously being a free museum during that time, it's really difficult. You've got additional challenges that some of the paid institutes might not have had in terms of raising funding and keeping the building and the paintings safe and looked after. So yeah, it's really interesting that hasn't come from that, which is a good thing.Katie Weller: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I guess an element of it has been about customer feedback, right? Like you said, there is a demand for it because people are already booking tours elsewhere.Katie Weller: Well, yeah, and they're paying anything between 10 pounds... You'll be amazed at what has been pushed down there. PDFs, where customers pay 10 pounds for a PDF and walk around. So that's what I mean about the quality. You think we want to mirror a high quality tour in line with the National Gallery, but some people are paying up to 400 pounds for a tour that's happening during the day. So we want to make sure that it's a fair price but we are delivering a top quality experience as well. I think people... Yes, we are free of charge, but the British Museum, they do the same thing. So you do have paid for tours as well. And I'm such a tourist. When I go abroad, I always pay for a tour because I think it's the best way. You've got an hour, for example. The international market, they're very tight on time. They've got one hour, what's the best way to do it? Actually, not everyone wants to do the free thing where you walk for... People want to have a better understanding of where they are.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's interesting that you mentioned the time thing, isn't it? Because if you've just got that restriction you would want someone to show you the best of the best, "I'm coming to this gallery. What is the best thing that I need to see while here? What's the thing that I can't leave without seeing?" And actually, if you are kind of left to your own devices, you might not find it. You might not know where it is and your time is then gone.Katie Weller: Exactly. So I just think, with the guided tours, we are really going to ensure that it is a highlights tour. You could go on a tour with a curator or you could have a bespoke experience. Most of these tourists, they just want to get a sense of the Gallery. They want to hear brilliant stories that you just can't pick out of a book or, "Let's talk about the fun stuff." I said to the Blue Badge Guides, I was like, "Sex, drugs, rock and roll." I was like, "That's what they want to hear." I was like, "Maybe not too extreme. It is the National Gallery, but let's tell them just brilliant stories and they'll leave and ..." And when you go on tours, do you remember the dates? Not really. You remember the amazing stories that they tell you. So yeah, the guides have been brilliant at putting this all together and we've sort of left them to their own devices because their knowledge far exceeds mine. So yeah, really, really looking forward to pushing them out.Kelly Molson: It's really the stories thing is something that keeps coming up and up again, again, again on the podcast too. We just spoke to Kelly Wessell from London Zoo and she was kind of talking about the visitor experience and engaging people back, like their team, back to the zoo, getting them to fall back in love with the zoo. And she was saying that it is the stories that they know that makes people's experience better on the day. And it's only the stories that the team know, like little things about, I don't know, the giraffe house and how that was constructed. And it's those stories that make the visit more memorable for people. And that's what people are looking for, isn't it? To make that more kind of personalised and more special.Katie Weller: Well, that's it, it's about personalisation. And it does make them feel special because they probably think they might be the only person that's been told that. And also the Blue Badge Guides, we've said to them, "It's flexible. If you want to tell a different story on a different tour, that's absolutely fine." Obviously, they keep to a bit of a structure, but if they've got something cool to tell, go for it.Kelly Molson: So the tours, so how have they been developed? You decided, "We need a tour." How do you work out what are the highlights that people need to see on this tour?Katie Weller: Yeah, so really, it's been six months in the making. I don't know why I gave myself this, but I was like, "April, that's the go." I think it's beginning of financial year. You go, "Yeah, that's fine." But obviously, it's quite hard to push out something new especially in a Gallery as well. So everything can be a bit slower, I guess, and it has to be approved at so many different levels. But really, starting off with the tours, initially, we'd love to have kept it in house, but of course the resource isn't available at the moment. So we decided, "All right, second best thing is to use the Blue Badge Guides." They've just got such a wealth of knowledge and they're accredited. Tourists trusts them. They know what a Blue Badge Guide is. And the joy of having the Blue Badge Guides is that there is such a large pool of them. They can speak in different languages so that means that we can offer multi-language tours as well if you're a private group.Katie Weller: And they guide inside the Gallery anyway so they know the space very well. And they were so excited at this opportunity. I think we went to a show, it was a trade show on the Strand and it was just a happy accident. I bumped into a lovely Blue Badge Guide called Sarah. And she said, "Oh, you're from the National Gallery?" I said, "Oh, well actually I'm looking for some Blue Badge Guides." She was like, "Right, that's it. I'm your main contact going forward." And Sarah Reynolds, her name is, and she's been brilliant at... I just gave her a brief and I just said, "Storytelling." I know I keep going back to this, but I was like, "You need to tell great stories. I don't want the tourists to be drowned in facts. Let's make it fun for them." In terms of highlights, it's a difficult one but it is up to the guide. Obviously, we've got some of the most famous paintings in the world. So we've got Van Gogh Sunflowers. We've got the Turner. We can't guarantee on any given day that they will necessarily see those pieces of art.Katie Weller: So we don't promise that they're going to see those paintings because the paintings move around quite a lot. We might have room closures, depending on what's going on. So the tour is very flexible, so we really do leave it up to them. But as I say, for us, it really is about bringing the Gallery to life and just telling the best stories they can, but yeah, without going into too much depth. It can make people feel unwelcome and a bit out of their comfort zone if you start going into so much detail.Kelly Molson: So this was one of my questions, actually, about accessibility. So I think when we chatted and what you've mentioned at the start of this chat is that the National Gallery, it can seem a bit daunting for people if they're not art buffs or they maybe feel that it's not the place for them.Katie Weller: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So yeah, part of what you've described, in terms of accessibility, different languages and things like that, how do you make people feel that these are inclusive for them, that it is for me or for Joe down the road?Katie Weller: Yeah, I think this is going to be a really interesting year in terms of learning as we go. There's going to be a lot of test and trial. Actually, only last week we had some EDI training, so equality, diversity, inclusivity training that was put on by the Gallery and it really opened my eyes up. It's such a big beast, doesn't it? And there's so many things to tackle. So I think it's really important when you push out a product, you've got to keep developing it. You can't just leave it. It's not done. It's not done with, so we really need to listen to our customer feedback, "How can we make them more inclusive?" So I don't know. I think that would just be a thing as we go and we will have to develop and change it. But we are aware that people have that view of us and we are actually going to be celebrating NG 200 soon and we want to change our customer welcome and we want to make it more friendly.Katie Weller: And that's the whole part with the Sainsbury Wing at the moment, it's not very friendly. It's not a friendly welcome. So we're going to get rid of the big black gates and we're going to make it more open. It's going to feel a lot more airy in there, whereas at the moment it can be, like you say, a bit daunting, I think, for customers. We want the Gallery to be for everyone. So that's really important.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I think that is really important at the moment, because we need to get more people back to seeing these incredible spaces that we have and the incredible artwork that you have. People kind of need to see themselves there to be able to do that, don't they?Katie Weller: Yeah, of course. So we've got a lot of people coming on lunch breaks as well. So if they work around here, people do just come in on their lunch break, which is lovely.Kelly Molson: That is really nice. That's something that I spoke with Jon Young about, from BVA BDRC, which I might have just said wrong because I always say that wrong. But he was saying how he loves that flexibility of just being able to pop somewhere after work because he's in London and I'm like, "Oh yeah, that's really nice." I'm not in London so there isn't really anywhere that you just pop to. And I'm like, "How lovely would that be, just to be on your lunch break and go, 'I'm just going to go and look at Van Gogh on my lunch break?'"Katie Weller: Exactly. Why not? Or Mondays with Monet?Kelly Molson: I love that. Is that a thing? That needs to be a thing.Katie Weller: Do you like it? Yeah, I might do that tour on a Monday, Monday with Monet. I think it's something... I read an article about this. I think that was yesterday, actually. And they were saying people aren't traveling into London as much, maybe two to three times a week, because there's that hybrid way of working which we do at the Gallery as well. And when people are in London, actually, they want to make more of their time while they're here. So I think people are starting to do that. And actually, "What can I do? I'm in London. I've paid to come I'm in. What else can I do when I'm here?" So yeah, I think there's going to be a bit of a change there. But yeah, always welcome. Anyone who's around the National Gallery, come in on your lunch break, come on a tour.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I really love that. Yeah, do the tour. Monet Mondays, like that.Katie Weller: Do you reckon I've got something going there?Kelly Molson: Ticked a massive box there.Katie Weller: Probably right.Kelly Molson: You mentioned the Blue Badge team that you're working with.Katie Weller: Yes.Kelly Molson: And I know that you are leaving it up to them. But there must be some way that you kind of map out what they have to do, like where they take people around the Gallery. Do you have a loose plan of how you work it out or is it just like free reign to them to say, over to you, what do you think you should deliver to someone?Katie Weller: Yeah, as I say, they've got a structure. However, because the Gallery, on any given day, we might have 10 rooms that are shut so it has to be flexible. They can't have set routes. So that's really important because also we are looking at pushing out not only the daytime tours but our exclusive tours as well when we can. So with that, we might have an event being set up. So they might not be able to go in the room that they always go in. So it's really important that they have that flexibility. But they're brilliant at it. And also I've been on the tours obviously just to make sure that they are saying what we want to... Again, it's just reviewing as we go along and really listening to the customer and their feedback and we can change as we go.Katie Weller: But I have full faith in the Blue Badge Guides because they're just so fantastic at what they do. They've got a huge amount of passion for it. So I can't imagine we'll get many complaints from people saying they haven't covered the highlights. Because they've got it, they know what they're doing. It's not in my place to tell them otherwise. But, yeah. But no, we will review as we move forward.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I love that process. It's about iteration, isn't it? So you'll run them, you'll run a feedback process and then find out what your customers are really thinking about it. And then I guess just kind of evolving those tours as you go along.Katie Weller: Absolutely. And it's so important to listen because what if, all of a sudden, well, once international tourism really starts to make a comeback, maybe we can start doing French tours on a Friday. I don't know why I have to make this rhyme, French on Fridays.Kelly Molson: But I like what you do there.Katie Weller: Yeah, I know. I've just realised. So if there's a demand for it, let's go for it. So yeah, that's really an important part of the process for me, just reviewing that feedback on a really regular basis. And next week, we're doing staff tours. So I think it's really important. We are driving out this new product, actually let the staff be part of it. What do they think? What's their feedback? It's just as important.Kelly Molson: That is a really, really relevant point actually, because if they don't know what to expect and they can't answer questions about them either, can they? They don't know what the tour actually holds for them.Katie Weller: Yeah, and working in a big place like the National Gallery, communication is key. And we've actually put together some operational processes in place. We've got some PDFs so if they've got frequently asked questions from customers, they've got something there in front of them. If not, they can obviously come through to me. But that communication element we've really tried to lay the groundwork now so there's not so many issues when the tours do kick off.Kelly Molson: Yeah, you mentioned lates. So you mentioned like evening, after hours or when when the Gallery is not open events, which is really exciting. I think that that is such a treat to go somewhere when it's closed, isn't it? That you are like, "Oh, nobody's in here. This is exciting." And I know that those lates have worked really well for other organisations as well. So prior to the pandemic we worked with Eureka, the National Children's Museum, and they ran a series of lates for adults. And they were incredible. They were so much fun because obviously it's a children's museum so all of the galleries are geared towards children and they're fun and entertainment. But really, the adults just want to get in there and have a bit of a go.Katie Weller: Oh yeah. Well, didn't they do that with their dinosaur sleepovers, that they did it for adults?Kelly Molson: Absolutely. Yes, at the Natural History Museum.Katie Weller: At the Natural History Museum. Yeah.Kelly Molson: And then yoga. They did yoga sessions at the Natural Museum. And I just think that's such a massive opportunity, isn't it? So what might that be that you're going to instill?Katie Weller: So with that, we've had so much excitement. So every time I say, "Oh, the out of hours tours..." Since coming out of the pandemic, people, they want new experiences and they want to do things which are Instagrammable if you like. "Look at me. I'm in an empty National Gallery." It might not be empty. We're probably setting up for events and there's curators walking around and conservation, but that's all part of the experience. Also for me, we're in central London. There's that beautiful hour between six and seven where a lot of the attractions have closed. People are milling about because they're waiting to go to dinner or they're waiting to go to the theatre. Actually. let's plot some tours in and use that time where they can come in and have an absolutely fantastic experience.Katie Weller: People are willing to pay a higher price point because it's more exclusive. So I have no doubt that they will do very well. Our partners are so keen to get those up on sale. And yeah, I can't wait. And we will develop other products as we go, but initially we'll just be pushing out the daytime tours followed by the out of hours.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's a great time as well, what you said, isn't it? Six to seven, because it is a bit of a dead time while, like you said, you're waiting between stuff or maybe waiting for the later train home so it's not busy.Katie Weller: Exactly. And we're right in the middle of London so it's like all these people wandering about, "Come in, come in." But again, we're going to make sure that it really is about that quality experience. So we'll only have 25 people on that tour which makes it a bit more special as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I love that level of exclusivity. It does make it feel like a real treat, doesn't it?Katie Weller: Definitely.Kelly Molson: All right. So let's talk about the benefits. What is this going to bring to the Gallery? Because it's obviously going to bring in revenue, but it's going to hopefully bring in a new audience.Katie Weller: Well, that's it, isn't it? It's bringing in those new markets, those new audiences, which we wouldn't necessarily be able to target otherwise or it would be really, really expensive for us to do so. So that's why we use trade because that maximises our marketing budget as well. So it will be really interesting to sort of review who is coming in and we'll capture all of this data as and when bookings come through. And yeah, we'll just go from there. But I can't remember what your question was now because I've just gone off.Kelly Molson: It was about what is it going to bring the Gallery? But I think one of the things that you just mentioned there is about using trade again. And I think this is quite important to highlight. Because one of the questions that I was going to ask you was where's the price point for these and how do you buy them? Are they available to buy? Can we go and get a tour now? But you're actually going to sell them through a third party.Katie Weller: Yeah, so I guess it's a little bit different here because at the National Gallery, there's no products to necessarily push out. Or there is, but through commercial, like the exhibitions, but we don't touch those. Or they are using us, I guess, as a bit of a trial to see how it goes with the tours, push them out to trade, iron out any problems. And it would make sense for them to sell it B2C, business to client, eventually. So that will probably happen. But initially, if you want to book a ticket it would be through those trade platforms, like I said before, Golden Tours or Expedia or any of those platforms. Because I guess it really is probably geared more towards the international market, but it is domestic as well. And something really important to remember, pre pandemic, the Gallery, 80% were international tourists, 20% were domestic. Obviously, there's been a bit of a change during the pandemic, but it's really important that we don't forget about our international audience.Kelly Molson: Yeah, definitely. And I guess it's a good way to trial it working as well, isn't it, rather than committing? So if you think about the process of where attractions have been able to reopen after the pandemic but it has to be buy a ticket in advance, times ticketing as well. That's a big financial commitment to make in terms of your digital processes. Someone's got to manage that process, get it all up and running. This gives you a way of operating like that but without those digital financial commitments until you know that it's working.Katie Weller: Absolutely. And it makes it nice and easy for the team who will then push it out because everything's done for them. They can just go, "Okay, that process has worked well, that hasn't." And they will review it and I'm positive they will push out the tours. When I say to people that we're doing tours they are, "Has the National Gallery not got tours anyway?" And they do. Sometimes they put on random free tours, but it's not necessarily advertised, "It's this time every day." So it is sort of as and when people will come in, "I'll join this tour." So we just want to put structured tours in place like most other places do, like the British Museum. We did a lot of benchmarking for the price points. I know you mentioned about those. We do have to be careful because we are free of charge. But that's why we did a benchmarking exercise and things might change.Katie Weller: We might push these out and actually those out of hours tours, they might go up in price. They're 35 pounds for the out of hours, which I think is fair. And I think we don't want to outsell... Is that the right word, outsell? Because you think some people, if we go into corporate, they've got a lot of money to spend. But actually your general tourist, you don't want to push it out so that it's not attainable. Does that make sense?Kelly Molson: Yeah, it can't be unaffordable to people, especially to a new demographic that you're hoping to bring to Gallery and that going back to what we said about making it accessible for more people and for all. You don't want to kind of out price yourself. But then also, on the flip side, it is a very exclusive tour. 25 people on a tour, that's very small. That's really kind of exclusive, isn't it, for an out of hours? So yeah, you've got to try and get that balance right to what that's going to look like.Katie Weller: And again, it's all test and trial, isn't it? And I think if they're really in demand, we can push it up a bit, then fantastic. Great. But yeah, again, it's just a matter of reviewing it and seeing what happens. But I'm hoping for lots of sold out tours.Kelly Molson: I have no doubt there will be. But we're recording this. This is the end of March we're recording it. It's the 30th March today. When do the tours go on sale?Katie Weller: So actually one of our partners went live yesterday.Kelly Molson: Oh wow.Katie Weller: So you'll see, over the next couple of weeks, ticketing will go live. It's been a bit challenging because there's been so many loopholes to go through. And there were no contracts in place so I've been working very closely with legal and with finance. And putting these processes in place, it's things that you don't think about when you're developing a product. And we've just had to make sure that we've got that right ahead of going live. And we had to put in a system that would fully support travel trade as well for our ticketing and making sure that we can connect live with partners. So there's been lots of stuff going on in the background. But the tours start April 12th.Kelly Molson: Oh, amazing. Literally, a couple of weeks.Katie Weller: And then I decided to get married a few months... I don't know why I did this to myself.Kelly Molson: When is the wedding?Katie Weller: June, June the 6th. I keep forgetting the date. So obviously, I'm the whole team at the moment. I am travel trade so I've already given Claire, my head of department, the heads up, "I hope you're available because I might need a bit of help." But we'll build and we'll expand as we get into next year and what have you.Kelly Molson: Yeah, definitely. And listen, hopefully, you'll only get married once.Katie Weller: Exactly. Well, let's hope for the best. We got through the pandemic, so...Kelly Molson: Oh, Katie, thank you so much for coming on. It's been a real pleasure to talk to you today. I love the passion and enthusiasm that you've got for this.Katie Weller: It's been lovely. Oh, thank you.Kelly Molson: I'm looking forward to coming and visiting as well.Katie Weller: Yes.Kelly Molson: But before we go, I always ask our guests to recommend a book. So something that they love. It can be a personal choice, it can be a work related book. But yeah, just something that you'd like to share with our listeners.Katie Weller: So this book, you do have to take it with a pinch of salt. But it is such a good talking point. Let me know if you've read it. It's called the Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman.Kelly Molson: I have not read this.Katie Weller: You have to read this. So basically, in a nutshell, without spoiling too much, the Five Love Languages... So basically, he's looking at couples and he says that everyone's got a different love language. So the five of them, I've written them down so I don't forget, words of affirmation. So you might prefer it if your partner is, "Oh, you look lovely today. I love you," that might be your love language. Physical touch, so you might like it if your partner is very touchy, feely. Acts of service, so if they mow the lawn or do the washing up. I know for a lot of all people they're like-Kelly Molson: All of these things.Katie Weller: Yeah, you'd like every one, but they do say you normally have two. Quality time, so going out on day trips, going to the beach and stuff like that. Or receiving gifts, so that might... And they say it fills your love tank. It is a bit cheesy. It fills your love tank. So you normally have one or two that are your most prominent ones. For me, mine is quality time. I love experiencing. That's why I'm in this industry. Experiences and doing things. But my best friend, hers is acts of service. Or if he does the washing up she is so happy. Her love tank is full to the brim.Kelly Molson: That is really funny.Katie Weller: Isn't it?Kelly Molson: I've never heard of this before. I'm going to read this. This is really interesting. Mine would definitely be the time one as well. I think that it's so important. So you find this out about yourself and I guess then that sets you on your path of, "We need to make time for these things in our relationship?"Katie Weller: Well, what's really interesting about it is usually you reflect your love language on someone else because you think that's what they want. And this is where communication breakdown comes from. I think the couples that he's talking about, they're in bad times. And so it's like, "How could you actually communicate? He's cleaned up for you, but actually you are not very touchies because it's not your love language. But if he'd gone on a day trip with you, that might not mean much to him, but to you, "wow." So it's more about understanding what each other's love language is. So actually you might have to do things in a different way to what you would want. Do you know what? It's good for a pub chat.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. This is a book to read.Katie Weller: Oh, you can read it in a day as well. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Love it. I'm going to pop out and buy a copy of this. Oh, but listeners, if you want to win a copy of this, head over to our Twitter account and retweet this episode announcement with the words, "I want Katie's book," and you will be in the chance of finding out your own love language. I feel like this podcast has gone a whole different way.Katie Weller: Well, I know. I know. I can't wait for you to read it. You have to come to the Gallery and we'll go for a lovely coffee and have a chat.Kelly Molson: I think that would be a treat, Katie. I'm going to do that. Thank you. Thanks so much for coming on today.Katie Weller: Oh, you're so welcome.Kelly Molson: Good luck with the tour launch.Katie Weller: Thank you so much. Thank you, Kelly.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese,, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

The Brü Lab
Episode 060 | Tracking Mycotoxins In Beer And Spent Grains w/ Dr. Erica Pack

The Brü Lab

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 72:05


Dr. Erica Pack joins Cade in the lab this week to chat about the fascinating work she's done on tracking mycotoxins in beer and spent grains. The Brü Lab is brought to you by Imperial Yeast who provide brewers with the most viable and fresh yeast on the market. Learn more about what Imperial Yeast has to offer at ImperialYeast.com today. | Read More | Tracking Zearalenone and Type-B Trichothecene Mycotoxins in the Commercial Production of Beer and Brewers' Spent Grains

Make it Mentionable with Alyssa Patmos
How to Deal With Your Inner Critics

Make it Mentionable with Alyssa Patmos

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 18:31


How we perceive a situation directly influences how we respond. But what or who determines your perception—you or your inner critic?Tune in to discover:

Getting It Out
Episode 222 - Be Well

Getting It Out

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 62:55


BE WELL has been an exceptional example of old dogs doing new tricks in the hardcore scene over the last few years. Brian McTernan (vocals) returns to GETTING IT OUT to discuss the band and their brand new EP Hello Sun due out on REVELATION RECORDS May 20th.Music by:SpentBe WellPermanent MistakesIntro music by:Hot ZonePatreon: https://www.patreon.com/GettingitoutpodcastEmail: dan@gettingitout.netWebsite: http://gettingitout.net/Instagram: @getting_it_out_podcastFacebook: www.facebook.com/gettingitoutpodcastTwitter: @GettingItOutPod Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/getting-it-out. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

State of Ukraine
First lady Jill Biden spent part of Mother's Day in Ukraine

State of Ukraine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 3:50


First lady Jill Biden made an unannounced stop in Ukraine on Sunday during a tour of Eastern Europe. She met with Ukraine's first lady, who made her first public appearance since the war began.

Noteworthy with Nathan French
Ep. 129 | The Currency of Time

Noteworthy with Nathan French

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 20:08


Time is a currency that cannot be BOUGHT, it can only be SPENT. How do you SPEND your time?

I Spent A Day With...
I Spent A Day With BRANDON ROGERS: "Concealed By Characters"

I Spent A Day With...

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 26:50


I spent a day with Brandon Rogers to learn the truth about his journey into comedy and how he crafts his characters.  Sponsors ▸Go to http://betterhelp.com/padilla to get 10% off your first month! ▸https://www.dipseastories.com/padilla

Tipping Point With Zach Yentzer
A new fund aims to increase Latino voter turnout; $7 million dollars spent on Tucson internet connects less than 1,000 homes; a visit from Kurtis Dawson, CEO of the YMCA

Tipping Point With Zach Yentzer

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 51:23


Zach talks with Joe Garcia and Lydia Aranda of Chicanos Por La Causa, about their new, nonpartisan $10-million dollar campaign to turnout Latino voters, and what issues Latino voters want candidates to discuss. Zach talks briefly about the piece in the Arizona Daily Star about the City of Tucson spending $7 million dollars to provide less than 1,000 homes with internet; in a special segment sponsored by Vantage West Credit Union, President/CEO of the YMCA of Southern Arizona, Kurtis Dawson, comes by to talk about some big YMCA news and how to support.

The Benny Show
I Spent Last Night With President Trump at a Private Event - You Have to Hear What He Told Me...

The Benny Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 42:33


Hear What Donald Trump said Last Night at Mar a Lago, Biden Says 'MAGA Crowd' is the 'Most Extreme Political Organization that's Existed' in Recent American History, And John Durham Wins a Fight to Get Some Hillary Clinton, Fusion GPS Documents

Lehto's Law
Man Spent 32 Years in Prison Because of Common Name

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 15:13


At least, that's what started the ball rolling. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

Am I the Jerk?
Entitled Brother SPENT his Inheritance, now CLAIMS MINE so I LAWYERED UP

Am I the Jerk?

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 20:36


Full Videos - youtube.com/amithejerk?sub_confirmation=1

Ken Webster Jr
The Left has Spent 24 hours Lying About Roe v Wade Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 37:14


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: the truth about that leaked SCOTUS document you keep hearing about Elon Musk vs NBC News Biden's war on tobacco and vaping special guest Brandon Waltens from Texas Scorecard 

Ken Webster Jr
The Left has Spent 24 hours Lying About Roe v Wade Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 37:08


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: the truth about that leaked SCOTUS document you keep hearing about Elon Musk vs NBC News Biden's war on tobacco and vaping special guest Brandon Waltens from Texas Scorecard 

The Homeschool Solutions Show
325 | Homeschool Like You've Never Homeschooled Before (Sean Allen)

The Homeschool Solutions Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 34:27


Often when we get weary in our homeschools, we settle for what's easy and secure. Unfortunately, if we do this for too long we fall into a rut and we miss the opportunity to capitalize on one of homeschooling's greatest strengths – its flexibility. In this episode we'll talk about the great blessings that can come from simply asking, "What could be?" What would happen if you changed things up a bit? Did something spontaneous and unexpected? Spent more time outside, more time reading, more time exploring the limitless opportunities at your disposal as a homeschooling family. What if you homeschooled as you've never homeschooled before? Host biography Sean Allen is the founder of The Well Ordered Homeschool, husband to his beautiful bride Caroline and a proud father of eight. He has a bachelor of fine arts in graphic design and is passionate about creating materials to assist parents in the incredibly challenging, yet surpassingly beautiful, work of schooling and training their children at home. Connect Sean Allen | Instagram | Facebook | Website Homeschooling.mom | Instagram | Website Thank you to our sponsors! Medi-Share: an affordable Christian alternative to traditional health insurance Have you joined us at one of the Great Homeschool Conventions?  We hope to see you there! For more encouragement on your homeschooling journey, visit the Homeschooling.mom site, and tune in to our sister podcast The Charlotte Mason Show. View full show notes on the blog.

Karson & Kennedy
Someone On The Show Spent SEVEN HOURS In The EMERGENCY ROOM!

Karson & Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 8:30


Every Monday we go around the room and ask... how was your weekend?

Hold Up, Let Me Explain...
How Do You Say...."Broke as F****" in Italian? | How Much Money I Spent in Italy

Hold Up, Let Me Explain...

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 33:26


Como si dice...."broke as fuck" in Italian? Friends!! On todays new episode I'll be talking about how much money I spent in Italy. From flights, to airbnb stays, train tickets, and down to a bowl of pasta...I'm getting specific on how much money I spent in the most iconic place in the world. So grab a pen, paper, and calculator because I'm about to explain...

Back From The Borderline | BPD (EUPD) Recovery Podcast
Reclaiming Your Sexuality After Being Sexualized with Dr. Alexandra Solomon

Back From The Borderline | BPD (EUPD) Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 42:43


On this episode of the podcast, I sat down with licensed clinical psychologist, professor, speaker, author and retreat leader Dr. Alexandra Solomon to discuss how we can rediscover what a connection to the erotic looks like for ourselves and how to become more deeply grounded in pleasure - with or without a partner.THIS EPISODE IS FOR YOU IF YOU HAVE EVER: ■ Felt so disconnected from your erotic nature that you've wondered if maybe you were asexual?■ Spent much of your life feeling like you've performed sexuality rather than actually enjoying sex for yourself? ■Wanted to rip your own fingernails off when you see spiritual gurus on Instagram claiming to help you reconnect with your “divine feminine energy” if only you'd just drop $4k for their “healing course”?  ■ Consistently faked orgasms to make sure your partner feels satisfied, while completely neglecting your own needs, leaving you feeling resentful of sex or dreading it as some kind of forced chore?IN THE FULL EPISODE, WE ALSO EXPLORE:■ The feeling of having a “sexual blockage”■ The experience of dissociating during sex■ Feeling like we have to “perform” sexually to land a partner■ How to actually start reconnecting with your pleasure by finding what Dr. Solomon calls “tiny bites” or “edges”■ Being so preoccupied with what your partner needs and how you look/smell/taste/sound during sex that what you need doesn't even come into the equation■ My experience as a sugar baby and working in private poker rooms in LA and the damage it did to my connection with my sexuality■ Dr. Solomon's view on what I call “the OnlyFans phenomenon” and “sex as self-harm”■ The impact hard-core porn on sites like PornHub is having on intimacy and how this is enforcing “problematic gendered scripts”■ The importance of promoting ethical, thoughtful and “intimacy-promoting” pornography and content creators■ Women & porn (and the shame we feel around watching it)■ Why Dr. Solomon believes faking orgasms is a form of “self-abandonment” (and how we can learn to “disrupt the sexual script” once and for all)RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:Book | Reclaiming Pleasure by Holly RichmondBook | Come As You Are by Emily NagoskiPodcast | Pleasure MechanicsCONNECT WITH ALEXANDRA:https://dralexandrasolomon.com/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/back-from-the-borderline.

Eventually Supertrain
A Spookie Minute Spent In A Ghosthouse 37

Eventually Supertrain

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 20:12


A Spookie Minute Spent In A Ghosthouse 37 by Daniel R. Budnik

I Spent A Day With...
I Spent A Day With HASAN PIKER: "Unraveling the Controversy"

I Spent A Day With...

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 25:34


I spent a day with Hasan Piker to learn the truth about his beginnings at The Young Turks to his rise becoming an influential political commentator on twitch. Sponsors ▸Go to http://betterhelp.com/padilla to get 10% off your first month! ▸Visithttp://joinhoney.com/PADILLA to get Honey for FREE

The Table with Anthony ONeal
THEY Spent Someone College Tuition ($50k) on Wayfair

The Table with Anthony ONeal

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 17:51


Protect yourself from America's fastest-growing crime.  Try 14 days for FREE: https://aura.com/anthony Free trial for new members only, see site for details and course for stats. Competitor comparison are based on my personal experience, results may vary.  My Ex Stole My identity and Bought $1,500 of Hair :https://youtu.be/agkF9UmacOk Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Aaron Doughty Podcast
EP#332 I Spent 241K On Self-Improvement To Learn These 3 Lessons

The Aaron Doughty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 15:26


These 3 lessons will change your life! Download my NEW and FREE guide on How To Raise Your Vibration Permanently here!: ➡️ https://www.AaronDoughty.com/PDF