Podcast appearances and mentions of caitlin dickerson

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caitlin dickerson

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Best podcasts about caitlin dickerson

Latest podcast episodes about caitlin dickerson

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson
Why some Republican border-state governors are shipping migrants to other states

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 41:31


Caitlin Dickerson, Staff writer at The Atlantic, Ruby Robinson, managing attorney at the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center, and Linus Chan, director of the Detainee Rights Clinic and law professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, join the show to discuss why some Republican border-state governors are shipping migrants to other states, including the legality and ramifications of the practice.

In The Thick
A Political Flashpoint

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 42:16


Maria and Julio are joined by Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer for The Atlantic, and Hamed Aleaziz, immigration policy reporter for the LA Times. They unpack immigration policy in the United States, including recent news of the Department of Homeland Security's roll back of a Trump-era public charge rule. They also discuss how media coverage can impact immigrant communities. ITT Staff Picks: In this investigative piece for The Atlantic, Caitlin Dickerson dives into the history and impact of the former Trump administration's family separation policy. “Dramas playing out at the border are often the most attention-grabbing signs of immigration enforcement. How immigrants are treated in the interior of the country is less visible but equally telling,” writes Hamed Aleaziz for the Los Angeles Times. Surveillance tactics by the Department of Homeland Security are increasingly being used against U.S. citizens, reports Gaby Del Valle for The Nation. Photo credit: AP Photo/Eugene Garcia, File

Amanpour
Will Europe's largest nuclear plant be shut down?

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 55:34


The emergency around Ukraine's largest nuclear plant intensifies and Kyiv now says it's considering shutting down the Zaporizhzhia complex. Ukraine blames Russia for shelling the plant and for using it as a military shield, while Russia blames Ukraine. But will Moscow agree to a safety zone? Vladimir Chizhov is Russia's envoy to the European Union and joins the show from Brussels.  Also on today's show: Kenyan President-elect William Ruto; Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer for the Atlantic; Katie Gavin, Naomi McPherson, and Josette Maskin from the indie band MUNA.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1511 Economic Underclass, Political Pawns (Immigration and Asylum Seeking)

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 77:36


Air Date 9/6/2022 Today, we take a look at the precarious state of our immigration and asylum system, the legacy of neoliberalism and imperialism in South and Central America, the inhumanity practiced by both of our political parties (though not equally), and the ever-present possibility that things could get worse. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows and Bonus Content) Join our Discord community! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Biden to End Trump-Era "Remain in Mexico" Border Policy; Immigrants Face Ongoing Trauma, Separation - Democracy Now! - Air Date 8-10-22 We speak to attorney and activist Efrén Olivares with the Southern Poverty Law Center's Immigrant Justice Project about the impact of this policy, as well as ongoing efforts to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border Ch. 2: The Lasting Impacts of Family Separation - The Takeaway - Air Date 8-18-22 Caitlin Dickerson whose latest investigative piece “The Secret History of Family Separation,” chronicles the full scope of the policy, its legacy, and how similar, future iterations may be adopted. Ch. 3: Political Pawns: Immigrant Activists Decry Texas Gov. Abbott for Busing Asylum Seekers to NYC - Democracy Now! - Air Date 8-11-22 “What we're seeing happening right now is Governor Abbott using asylum seekers as political pawns to merely help increase his polling numbers down in Texas,” says Murad Awawdeh, executive director of the ​​New York Immigration Coalition Ch. 4: Capital's migration policy: Daniel Melo Part 1 - This Is Hell! - Air Date 2-28-22 Immigration lawyer Daniel Melo on his article "The Capitalist Imperative Driving Cruel and Bipartisan US Migration Policies" for Black Agenda Report. Ch. 5: Azadeh Shahshahani on Central America Plan, Jon Lloyd on Facebook Disinformation - CounterSpin - Air Date 8-19-22 Azadeh Shahshahani is legal and advocacy director at Project South. She joins us to raise some questions about the US government's claim that this time, they're really bringing stability and security to northern Central America. Ch. 6: The Democrats Long War on Immigrants - Intercepted - Air Date 2-17-21 The activist and writer Harsha Walia joins Intercepted to discuss the Democratic Party's fundamental role in shaping the long arc of U.S. border policy Ch. 7: Capital's migration policy: Daniel Melo Part 2 - This Is Hell! - Air Date 2-28-22 MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 8: The Democrats Long War on Immigrants Part 2 - Intercepted - Air Date 2-17-21 The activist and writer Harsha Walia joins Intercepted to discuss the Democratic Party's fundamental role in shaping the long arc of U.S. border policy FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 9: Final comments on the amorality of economics MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard (https://theobard.bandcamp.com/track/this-fickle-world) Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE: Description: A sign with a red background and white lettering is taped to a piece of cardboard and lies on the concrete ground; it reads “Seeking Asylum is a Human Right”. Credit: “Advocates disrupt transfer of asylum seekers from Villawood” by Kate Ausburn, Flickr | License: CC by 2.0 | Changes: Cropped   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com Listen Anywhere! BestOfTheLeft.com/Listen Listen Anywhere! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com

Time To Say Goodbye
Immigration’s “catalyst moments” with Silky Shah

Time To Say Goodbye

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 74:23


Hello from Washington state! This week, we’re joined by Silky Shah, executive director of Detention Watch Network and repeat pod guest, to chat about immigration (and, briefly, Nathan Fielder’s bizarre new show, “The Rehearsal”). We start by diving into Caitlin Dickerson’s exhaustive report, in The Atlantic, on the Trump administration's family-separation policy. We reflect on the unique horrors of that period, while locating them in a longer history of cruelty toward immigrants, up to the present. Silky also outlines the current immigration landscape, including Biden’s continuation of Trump’s Title 42 policy (which blocks migration ostensibly on public-health grounds). She explains how the misguided theory of deterrence has governed immigration policy under both Democratic and Republican administrations, aided by skewed media narratives, and suggests what the immigrant-rights movement should do to prepare for the next mass-organizing moment. As always, please subscribe via Patreon and Substack to support the show and gain access to our Discord. Our global, 24/7 community of listeners is currently discussing Leo’s 21-year-old girlfriends, basketball, Seoul fashion, “The Rehearsal,” immigration policy, food in the PNW, and so much more. You can also follow us on Twitter and email us at timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

Longform
Episode 500: Caitlin Dickerson

Longform

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 56:09


Caitlin Dickerson is a staff writer for The Atlantic covering immigration. Her latest article, on the secret history of U.S. government's family-separation policy, is ”An American Catastrophe.” “Interviewing separated families, I've found, is just on a whole other scale of pain and trauma. I've watched people have really intense PTSD flashbacks in front of me. I never wanted to risk asking a family to open up in that way if I didn't know that I'd be able to use that material. The worst thing you can do is waste someone's time in a way that causes them pain.” Show notes: @itscaitlinhd Dickerson on Longform Dickerson's Atlantic archive 09:00 Dickerson's New York Times archive 09:00 Dickerson's NPR archive 15:00 The Fifth Risk (Michael Lewis • W.W. Norton • 2019) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Atlantic Interview
Caitlin Dickerson on family separation

The Atlantic Interview

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 39:32


The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with staff writer Caitlin Dickerson about her recent piece, "An American Catastrophe," a comprehensive investigation of the Trump administration's policy of separating migrant children from their families. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Radio Atlantic
Caitlin Dickerson on family separation

Radio Atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 39:32


The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with staff writer Caitlin Dickerson about her recent piece, "An American Catastrophe," a comprehensive investigation of the Trump administration's policy of separating migrant children from their families. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KQED’s Forum
Caitlin Dickerson Investigates ‘Secret History' of Family Separation

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 55:40


“Separating children was not just a side effect, but the intent,” writes The Atlantic's Caitlin Dickerson in her recent investigation of the Trump Administration's Zero Tolerance policy. Border agents separated more than 5000 migrant children from their families under Zero Tolerance, even as policymakers had no plans in place to adequately shelter, care for or even keep track of the surge in children they knew would fall into U.S. custody. We talk to Dickerson about her 18-month look at the origins of the U.S.'s forced separation policy and the bureaucratic machinery that enabled it. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer, The Atlantic - author of the investigation "The Secret History of Family Separation."

The Takeaway
The Lasting Impacts of Family Separation

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 9:47


Under the Trump Administration's “Zero Tolerance” family separation border policy, over 5,600 children were separated from their families.  Despite efforts from the Biden Administration to reunite families, anywhere from 700 hundred to 1000 children have still not officially been reunited with their families. We speak with Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer for The Atlantic, whose latest investigative piece “The Secret History of Family Separation,”—which took 18 months to report and spans nearly 30-thousand words—chronicles the full scope and of the policy, its legacy, and how similar, future iterations may be adopted.

The Takeaway
The Lasting Impacts of Family Separation

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 9:47


Under the Trump Administration's “Zero Tolerance” family separation border policy, over 5,600 children were separated from their families.  Despite efforts from the Biden Administration to reunite families, anywhere from 700 hundred to 1000 children have still not officially been reunited with their families. We speak with Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer for The Atlantic, whose latest investigative piece “The Secret History of Family Separation,”—which took 18 months to report and spans nearly 30-thousand words—chronicles the full scope and of the policy, its legacy, and how similar, future iterations may be adopted.

KERA's Think
The truth about the Trump administration's family separation policy

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 34:20


The Trump administration's family-separation policy had a profound effect on the immigration system. Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer at The Atlantic, joins host Krys Boyd to discuss her 18-month deep dive into the policies and after-effects of separating children from their families at the border, including the first on-record interview about the policy with former U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen and former White House Chief of Staff John Kelly. Her article is called “We Need to Take Away Children.”

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
Why ‘zero tolerance' didn't stop immigrants from coming to US

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 49:26


The Trump administration's “zero tolerance” policy split up thousands of families. The government still can't find the parents of at least 150 kids, says the Atlantic's Caitlin Dickerson. The Inflation Reduction Act incentivizes farmers to make their land more sustainable and use less greenhouse emissions. A decade from now, California agriculture will likely scale down. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is still struggling to repair its image a year after the LA Times revealed that the group had no Black members. SoulCycle is planning to close roughly a quarter of its gyms, while Peloton is laying off 800 employees. With inflation, people are choosing cheaper exercise options and diversifying their workouts.

Consider This from NPR
How The Family Separation Policy Came To Be

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 13:34


In 2018, more than 5,500 children of immigrants were separated from their parents at the border.The Trump administration's "Zero Tolerance" policy, better known as family separation, was short-lived, ending in June of 2018 after facing condemnation from the public and members of Congress.For some families, it took years to reunite, and hundreds of families still have not been brought back together.Caitlin Dickerson's latest cover story for The Atlantic, titled, "We Need To Take Away Children: The Secret History Of The U.S. Government's Family Separation Policy", is an exhaustive investigation into how the policy came about.

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
How the Nightmare of Family Separations at the Border Became Reality (with Caitlin Dickerson)

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 42:27


More than 5,000 children were torn from their parents at the Mexican border during Donald Trump's presidency, and more than 150 children have yet to be reunited. Atlantic writer Caitlin Dickerson spent 18 months investigating how Trump's zero tolerance approach became a reality, despite scores of top government officials who felt it was inhumane and logistically fraught. She speaks with Andy about how Congress' failure to make substantial changes to immigration policy drove this to happen, and could allow it to happen again. Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Caitlin Dickerson on Twitter @itscaitlinhd. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.    Support the show by checking out our sponsors! Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: https://lemonadamedia.com/sponsors/    Check out these resources from today's episode:  Read Caitlin's investigation: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/09/trump-administration-family-separation-policy-immigration/670604/ Find vaccines, masks, testing, treatments, and other resources in your community: https://www.covid.gov/ Order Andy's book, “Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response”: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165  Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.  For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com/show/inthebubble.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Velshi
FBI Raid Sparks Far-Right Rhetoric

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 90:08


Ali Velshi is joined by Jane Harman, Distinguished Fellow and President Emerita at the Wilson Center, Dr. David Priess, Fmr. CIA Officer, Caitlin Dickerson, Staff Writer at The Atlantic, Matthieu Aikins, Pulitzer Prize-winning Contributing Writer at New York Times Magazine, Charlie Savage, Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Correspondent at The New York Times, Barbara McQuade, Fmr. U.S. Attorney for Michigan, Joanne Freeman, Award-winning Historian & Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University, Jon Allen, Senior National Politics Reporter at NBC News, and Rutger Bregman, Historian.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How a Trump-era policy that separated thousands of migrant families came to pass

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 7:47


The Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy formalized the separation of over 5,000 children from their parents as a deliberately cruel measure to deter future migrants, with no tracking process or records that would allow them to be reunited. Atlantic staff writer Caitlin Dickerson joins Geoff Bennett to discuss her investigation into the policy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Trumpcast
Political Gabfest: What's in Trump's Safe?

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 58:55


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and Juliette Kayyem discuss the Mar-a-Lago search; the Inflation Reduction Act; and Caitlin Dickerson's article investigating how separating families at the border became U.S. policy. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “An American Catastrophe: The Secret History of Family Separation” Juliette Kayyem for The Atlantic: “The Bad and Good News About Trump's Violent Supporters” Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving, by Caitlin DeSilvey  Serena Williams and Rob Haskell for Vogue: “Serena Williams Says Farewell to Tennis On Her Own Terms—And In Her Own Words” Claudia Rankine for The New York Times Magazine: “The Meaning of Serena Williams” King Richard Here are this week's chatters: Emily: “Downbad” by PJ Frantz  Juliette: Jim Farber for The New York Times: “Olivia Newton-John, Pop Singer and ‘Grease' Star, Dies at 73” David: Jack Fitzpatrick for Bloomberg Government: “Old Capitol Stones to Be Stored Away After Decades Piled in Park” Listener chatter from Sebastian Cray: The Bingham Cup For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, Juliette, and David discuss Serena Williams' retirement from tennis.   Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PBS NewsHour - World
How a Trump-era policy that separated thousands of migrant families came to pass

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 7:47


The Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy separated over 5,000 children from their parents, with no tracking process or records that would allow them to be reunited. Atlantic staff writer Caitlin Dickerson joins Geoff Bennett to discuss her investigation into the policy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
August 13, 2022 - PBS News Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 22:11


Saturday on PBS News Weekend, The Atlantic reporter Caitlin Dickerson discusses her in-depth investigation into the Trump administration's policy to separate families at the border. Then, we look at a teenage Afghan refugee's dream of becoming a musician, one year after the Taliban takeover. Plus, author Sophia Nelson shares the life lessons she learned during the pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Washington Week (audio) | PBS
Washington Week full episode, August 12, 2022

Washington Week (audio) | PBS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


The FBI executes a search warrant for former President Trump's Mar-a-Lago home. Plus, we examine the findings of an 18-month investigation into the Trump administration's family separation policy. Join moderator Yamiche Alcindor, Evan Perez of CNN, Robert Costa of CBS, Philip Rucker of The Washington Post and Caitlin Dickerson of The Atlantic as they discuss these stories and more.

UNDISTRACTED with Brittany Packnett Cunningham
“People's Kids Are the Center of Their World”- Caitlin Dickerson on the Horrors of Family Separation

UNDISTRACTED with Brittany Packnett Cunningham

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 44:33


On this week's episode, Undistracted host Brittany Packnett Cunningham talks to journalist Caitlin Dickerson about one of the darkest policy moments in American history: the “Zero Tolerance” family separation initiative. Caitlin spent 18 months investigating family separation for The Atlantic. She conducted over 150 interviews in order to unpack the administrative decisions that led us here, as well as the collateral trauma still playing out today. In this conversation, we learn about the intentionality behind “Zero Tolerance,” the families that are still separated, and how actions like this can cause intergenerational wounds. But first, this week's UNtrending news. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Fresh Air
The Secret History Of Family Separation At The Border

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:02


Atlantic journalist Caitlin Dickerson spent 18 months filing lawsuits for documents to put together the story of the Trump administration's policy of separating migrant families at the border.

Slate Daily Feed
Political Gabfest: What's in Trump's Safe?

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 58:55


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and Juliette Kayyem discuss the Mar-a-Lago search; the Inflation Reduction Act; and Caitlin Dickerson's article investigating how separating families at the border became U.S. policy. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “An American Catastrophe: The Secret History of Family Separation” Juliette Kayyem for The Atlantic: “The Bad and Good News About Trump's Violent Supporters” Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving, by Caitlin DeSilvey  Serena Williams and Rob Haskell for Vogue: “Serena Williams Says Farewell to Tennis On Her Own Terms—And In Her Own Words” Claudia Rankine for The New York Times Magazine: “The Meaning of Serena Williams” King Richard Here are this week's chatters: Emily: “Downbad” by PJ Frantz  Juliette: Jim Farber for The New York Times: “Olivia Newton-John, Pop Singer and ‘Grease' Star, Dies at 73” David: Jack Fitzpatrick for Bloomberg Government: “Old Capitol Stones to Be Stored Away After Decades Piled in Park” Listener chatter from Sebastian Cray: The Bingham Cup For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, Juliette, and David discuss Serena Williams' retirement from tennis.   Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
What's in Trump's Safe?

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 58:55


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and Juliette Kayyem discuss the Mar-a-Lago search; the Inflation Reduction Act; and Caitlin Dickerson's article investigating how separating families at the border became U.S. policy. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “An American Catastrophe: The Secret History of Family Separation” Juliette Kayyem for The Atlantic: “The Bad and Good News About Trump's Violent Supporters” Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving, by Caitlin DeSilvey  Serena Williams and Rob Haskell for Vogue: “Serena Williams Says Farewell to Tennis On Her Own Terms—And In Her Own Words” Claudia Rankine for The New York Times Magazine: “The Meaning of Serena Williams” King Richard Here are this week's chatters: Emily: “Downbad” by PJ Frantz  Juliette: Jim Farber for The New York Times: “Olivia Newton-John, Pop Singer and ‘Grease' Star, Dies at 73” David: Jack Fitzpatrick for Bloomberg Government: “Old Capitol Stones to Be Stored Away After Decades Piled in Park” Listener chatter from Sebastian Cray: The Bingham Cup For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, Juliette, and David discuss Serena Williams' retirement from tennis.   Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fresh Air
The Secret History Of Family Separation At The Border

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:02


Atlantic journalist Caitlin Dickerson spent 18 months filing lawsuits for documents to put together the story of the Trump administration's policy of separating migrant families at the border.

Rational Security
The “Very Model of a Modern Major General” Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 61:37


This week, Alan, Quinta, and Scott were joined by special guest Ravi Agrawal, editor-in-chief of Foreign Policy magazine, to hash through the week's big national security news, including:“Canned Strategy.” The war in Ukraine and tensions over Taiwan have led the Biden administration to further revise its long overdue National Security Strategy, which it now intends to release in the fall. What do we already know about Biden's grand strategy? And how should we evaluate it?“Mar-a-Leggo My Federal Records.” Yesterday, the FBI executed a search of former President Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, reportedly in search of classified documents that Trump had retained in violation of federal records laws. How serious a step is this and what does it mean for the broader universe of investigations surrounding Trump and his associates? “Milley Not So Vanilli.” A shocking new report details former President Trump's contentious relationship with his generals—including a particularly contentious relationship with his Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley that has some experts concerned about civ-mil relations. Were Milley and the other generals out of line? Is there reason to be concerned moving forward?For object lessons, Alan gave a double-headed recommendation: for the late David McCullough, and specifically his eponymous biography of John Adams; and the lovely town of Asheville, NC. Quinta passed along Caitlin Dickerson's investigation of the Trump administration's child separation policies in The Atlantic, "The Secret History of the U.S. Government's Family-Separation Policy." Scott celebrated the discovery of the greatest food hack in history, which he acquired via Dan Souza's YouTube series, "What's Eating Dan?": putting cream of tartar on fresh tomatoes (along with salt, pepper, and sugar) to make even mediocre ones delicious. And Ravi urged listeners to check out both Foreign Policy and his podcast there, Global Reboot.Be sure to visit our show page at www.lawfareblog.com and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity.And Rational Security listeners can get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare material supporter at www.patreon.com/lawfare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Centered From Reality
The Forward Party, Child Separation Policy, CPAC & Insulin Cap Cuts

Centered From Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 33:18


In this episode, Alex starts by sharing some hioarious yet distrubing clips of some of the most cringe moments from CPAC Texas over the weekend. Then Alex goes over a new article in the Atlantic that is over 30,000 words and discusses new revelations about the Trump Administration's child separation policies on the southern border. The article is called  An American Catastrophe by Caitlin Dickerson and through hundreds of interviews with Trump officials, she finds that these cruel policies were intentional and meant as scare tactics. Later, Alex discusses how the cap price on insulin was removed from the Inflation Reduction Act. In a vote of 57-43, the Senate Democrats could not get enough Republicans over the 60 vote threshold to avoid the filibuster. Finally, Alex discusses the Forward Party and whether it would work as a third party. 

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME
Ako postaviť Arénu Pellegrini, Kollár a Obický (20. 5. 2022)

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 18:04


Vranov nad Topľou má novú školskú športovú halu. Aréna PKO však nie je arénou parku kultúry a oddychu, ako by ste sa mohli domnievať. Je halou Petra Pellegriniho, Borisa Kollára a Stanislava Obického, nezaradeného poslanca z Vranova. Bizarný názov školskej telocvične je však len začiatkom: na slávnostné otvorenie haly nepustili novinárov, jedni sa vyhovárajú na druhých a celé to vyzerá ako symptomatický príklad slovenského papalášizmu. Čo nám prípad z východu hovorí o fungovaní Slovenska? Tomáš Prokopčák sa pýta Michala Franka. Odporúčanie: Solidarita nie je nekonečná. A nie je ani automatická. Pokojne môže byť len funkciou času: a ak je to pravda, nuž, potom sa musíme pýtať aj tie nepríjemné otázky. Ako dlho budú Poľsko, ale aj také Slovensko schopné a ochotné hostiť utečencov? A ako dlho potrvá naša solidarita s Ukrajinou? Presne tieto otázky a odpovede na ne opisuje Caitlin Dickerson v článku Nemôžete hostiť hostí navždy v magazíne The Atlantic. Tento text je mojim dnešným odporúčaním. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/06/ukraine-refugees-warsaw-polish-border/629630/ – Ak máte pre nás spätnú väzbu, odkaz alebo nápad, napíšte nám na dobrerano@sme.sk – Všetky podcasty denníka SME nájdete na sme.sk/podcasty – Podporte vznik podcastu Dobré ráno a kúpte si digitálne predplatné SME.sk na sme.sk/podcast – Odoberajte aj denný newsletter SME.sk s najdôležitejšími správami na sme.sk/brifing – Ďakujeme, že počúvate podcast Dobré ráno.

Velshi
Insurrection Investigation

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 83:16


Ali Velshi is joined by Hugo Lowell, Congressional Reporter at The Guardian, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, Democrat of Illinois, Mark Simon, Author of ‘Attacked! A Memoir of Extreme Bullying', Caitlin Dickerson, Staff Writer at The Atlantic, Alex Gibney, ‘The Forever Prisoner' Filmmaker, Betsy Woodruff Swan, Politico National Correspondent, Rep. Judy Chu, Democrat of California, Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-winning global health journalist, Dr. Willie Parker, OB/GYN, and Joyce Vance, Former U.S. Attorney.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Has immigration changed much under Biden?

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 32:21


How much has really changed in U.S. immigration policy since President Biden came into office? After seeing graphic images of Haitian migrants being chased by law enforcement on horseback and a recent rejection of an immigration reform bill in Congress, The Atlantic staff writer Caitlin Dickerson breaks down the long history uniting Democratic and Republican administrations when it comes to enforcing immigration policy. She also plays Who Said That? with her friend and senior producer of NPR's Life Kit, Meghan Keane.You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

Slate Daily Feed
Political: Get Those Huddled Masses Out of My Yard

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:57


John, Emily and David discuss the fate of the Build Back Better agenda; vaccine mandates working; and journalist Caitlin Dickerson helps explain the recent U.S. immigration actions and to identify some fresh strategies for change. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jamelle Bouie for The New York Times: “It's All or Nothing for These Democrats, Even if That Means Biden Fails” Josh Marshall for Talking Points Memo: “Kill the Bill” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “Democrats' Free Pass on Immigration Is Over” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “America's Immigration Amnesia” Here's this week's chatter: John: Glamourdaze YouTube video: “A Walk in the Park - c.1900 | Bois de Boulogne Paris - AI Enhanced; Peril, by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa Emily: CNN: “Florida Man Fights Alligator With Trash Can”; Jonathan Mann's folk song celebrating the Florida Man Who Caught An Alligator In A Trash Can   David: The Cult of We: WeWork, Adam Neumann, and the Great Startup Delusion, by Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell  Listener chatter from Matthew Ringel: Veritasium YouTube video, about the history of potash: “These Pools Help Support Half The People On Earth”  For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment John, David, and Emily talk about earlier times in history they would have liked to have been podcasting together. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fresh Air
What's Happening At The U.S.-Mexico Border?

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:46


'Atlantic' immigration reporter Caitlin Dickerson talks about Haitian immigrants at the border, and explains how both Trump and Biden immigration policies are based on a racist system created by the Founding Fathers. "The story of the United States being a nation of immigrants is much more complex than we often discuss and acknowledge as a country," Dickerson says. She explains how the legacy of racist immigration law is very much alive today. Also, Ken Tucker reviews remixed Pere Ubu albums.

Fresh Air
What's Happening At The U.S.-Mexico Border?

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:46


'Atlantic' immigration reporter Caitlin Dickerson talks about Haitian immigrants at the border, and explains how both Trump and Biden immigration policies are based on a racist system created by the Founding Fathers. "The story of the United States being a nation of immigrants is much more complex than we often discuss and acknowledge as a country," Dickerson says. She explains how the legacy of racist immigration law is very much alive today. Also, Ken Tucker reviews remixed Pere Ubu albums.

Political Gabfest
Get Those Huddled Masses Out of My Yard

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:57


John, Emily and David discuss the fate of the Build Back Better agenda; vaccine mandates working; and journalist Caitlin Dickerson helps explain the recent U.S. immigration actions and to identify some fresh strategies for change. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jamelle Bouie for The New York Times: “It's All or Nothing for These Democrats, Even if That Means Biden Fails” Josh Marshall for Talking Points Memo: “Kill the Bill” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “Democrats' Free Pass on Immigration Is Over” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “America's Immigration Amnesia” Here's this week's chatter: John: Glamourdaze YouTube video: “A Walk in the Park - c.1900 | Bois de Boulogne Paris - AI Enhanced; Peril, by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa Emily: CNN: “Florida Man Fights Alligator With Trash Can”; Jonathan Mann's folk song celebrating the Florida Man Who Caught An Alligator In A Trash Can   David: The Cult of We: WeWork, Adam Neumann, and the Great Startup Delusion, by Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell  Listener chatter from Matthew Ringel: Veritasium YouTube video, about the history of potash: “These Pools Help Support Half The People On Earth”  For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment John, David, and Emily talk about earlier times in history they would have liked to have been podcasting together. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chompers
Communication Week Night Interview (9-30-2021)

Chompers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 3:24


Jasmine is back with New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson to talk about the news. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Chompers
Communication Week Morning Interview (9-30-2021)

Chompers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 3:24


Today our friend Jasmine is here to talk to newspaper reporter Caitlin Dickerson from the New York Times! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In The Thick
The Biased Media Frame

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:58


Maria and Julio are joined by Dr. Rashad Richey, political analyst and host of “Indisputable” on The Young Turks Network and Zerlina Maxwell, host of “Zerlina” on Peacock, for a conversation on the latest news. They discuss the media coverage surrounding Gabby Petito's death, and disparities when it comes to the same coverage for people of color. They also talk about the Biden administration's handling of Haitian refugees at the U.S.-Mexico border, and the Republican-led Arizona audit. ITT Staff Picks:For The New York Times, opinion columnist Charles M. Blow writes about the “missing white woman syndrome” and the stark contrast in media coverage for people of color. “These photos from Del Rio haven't cut fresh wounds. They've reopened old ones,” writes Caitlin Dickerson about President Biden having to come to terms with the U.S.' problematic history on immigration policy, for The Atlantic. Hunter Walker reports on the House Select Committee's investigation into the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol and their recent subpoenas of Trump allies for Rolling Stone. Photo credit: AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Velshi
The Biden Agenda Hangs in the Balance

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 89:11


Ali Velshi is joined by Congressman Ritchie Torres, Congresswoman Cori Bush, Politico's Betsy Woodruff Swan, MSNBC's Hayes Brown, the author of "Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother's Will to Survive," Stephanie Land, Dr. Bernard Ashby, the Atlantic's Caitlin Dickerson, former Republican Arizona Attorney General Grant Woods, Facebook critic (and early investor) Roger McNamee, former U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance, and co-hosts of the Southlake podcast, Antonia Hylton and Mike Hixenbaugh

Kentucky Author Forum
Sonia Shah and Caitlin Dickerson

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 46:17


Journalist and award-winning author Sonia Shah discusses her book “The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move” with journalist Caitlin Dickerson. Sonia Shah is a science journalist and author of critically acclaimed books on science, politics and human rights. She was a finalist for the 2021 PEN/E.O Wilson Literary Science Writing Award, and won a Publishers Weekly best nonfiction book of 2020, a best science book of 2020 by Amazon, and a best science and technology book of 2020 by Library Journal. Shah's writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Scientific American, and has been featured on CNN, RadioLab, and Fresh Air. Her TED talk about malaria has been viewed by over 1,000,000 people around the world. Caitlin Dickerson is a staff writer for The Atlantic, where she writes about immigration and the American experience. Dickerson joined The Atlantic in 2021 after four years at The New York Times, where she broke news about changes in deportation and detention policy, and profiled the lives of immigrants. Dickerson has also contributed to the Times' audio work, as a frequent guest and guest-host for The Daily. Dickerson was previously an investigative reporter at NPR, where she won a Peabody Award.

Velshi
Jim Crow 2.0

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 81:36


Ali Velshi is joined by Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Congresswoman Angie Craig, former NRA lobbyist Richard Feldman, Andrea Young of the Georgia ACLU, Professor Christina Greer and Professor Cristina Beltran, Professor Dorothy A. Brown, Dr. Ani Nalbandian, former U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance, and award-winning journalist Caitlin Dickerson.

The News with Shepard Smith
Colorado Gun Control, Requiring The Shot & Border Surge

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 49:11


The Biden administration is under scrutiny as critics say the White House was not prepared for a surge in unaccompanied children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border. Caitlin Dickerson, a journalist who covers immigration at the Atlantic, says one challenge for the administration is addressing Congress on making “meaningful” changes to build more border facilities to address the surge. Rutgers University is the first university to require its students to get the Covid-19 vaccine before coming onto campus for the fall semester. CNBC’s Meg Tirrell reports students will still be allowed to exempt it for medical or religious reasons. CNBC’s Leslie Picker reports New York City plans to build a vaccine venue for eligible Broadway workers. They also plan to build pop-up Covid-19 testing sites to help Broadway theaters reopen by fall. The New York Police Department unveiled new initiatives to address anti-Asian hate crimes. This includes increasing outreach and adding enforcement. Plus former NRA lobbyist, Richard Feldman, discusses gun reform legislation to address continued mass shootings in America.

What A Day
Biden At The Border

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 25:07


A White gunman attacked three spas in the Atlanta area on Tuesday killing eight people including six women of Asian descent. The shootings happened in the larger context of increasing violence and racism faced by Asian-Americans.  Yesterday we talked about the surge in migrants seeking asylum at the US-Mexico border. Today, we spoke to Atlantic staff writer Caitlin Dickerson to get a better sense of how we got here, how the Biden administration differs from Trump and Obama, and what’s to come.  And in headlines: the ADL says 2020 marked a huge surge in White supremacist propaganda, the Movement for Black Lives doesn't support the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, and Uber to treat drivers as workers in England. Show Links: Learning for Justice has put together a toolkit for how to respond to COVID-19 Anti-Asian racism https://www.learningforjustice.org/magazine/how-to-respond-to-coronavirus-racism Donate to the Asian American Legal Defense & Education Fund https://www.aaldef.org/ Donate to the Asian Pacific Environmental Network http://apen4ej.org/ If you need support: Call 1-800-273-TALK Asian languages: 1-877-990-8585 Text "CONNECT" to 741741 Or visit the Asian, Pacific Islander, and South Asian American (APISAA) Therapist Directory https://www.asianmhc.org/apisaa Report hate and harassment: https://www.standagainsthatred.org/report For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Marketplace All-in-One
Why are so many migrant families still separated?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 33:49


The Biden administration is working to repair norms and rollback policies covering so much from the Trump era. So where does immigration sit in the priority list? The White House already rescinded the “zero-tolerance” policy that separated migrant families, but unwinding rules and reuniting those families are very different things. Today, we’ll talk with The Atlantic’s Caitlin Dickerson about the reunification effort and the lasting impact on families. Here are links to everything we talked about on the show today: Dickerson’s piece from The New York Times last year: “Three Years After Family Separation, Her Son Is Back. But Her Life Is Not.” “Trump and Aides Drove Family Separation at Border, Documents Say” also from The New York Times “Biden signs executive orders on family separation and asylum” from Politico Another interview with Dickerson on MSNBC about how Biden is taking steps to tackle the root of immigration from Central America “Biden faces questions about commitment to minimum wage hike” from the Los Angeles Times “CEOs of Reddit and Robinhood and ‘Roaring Kitty’ slated to testify in GameStop hearing” from The Verge “Democrats Want To Bring Back Earmarks” from HuffPost “Restoring Earmarks Is Probably a Good Thing” from Bloomberg Opinion This billboard a listener sent in Finally, how to send us a voice memo

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Why are so many migrant families still separated?

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 33:49


The Biden administration is working to repair norms and rollback policies covering so much from the Trump era. So where does immigration sit in the priority list? The White House already rescinded the “zero-tolerance” policy that separated migrant families, but unwinding rules and reuniting those families are very different things. Today, we’ll talk with The Atlantic’s Caitlin Dickerson about the reunification effort and the lasting impact on families. Here are links to everything we talked about on the show today: Dickerson’s piece from The New York Times last year: “Three Years After Family Separation, Her Son Is Back. But Her Life Is Not.” “Trump and Aides Drove Family Separation at Border, Documents Say” also from The New York Times “Biden signs executive orders on family separation and asylum” from Politico Another interview with Dickerson on MSNBC about how Biden is taking steps to tackle the root of immigration from Central America “Biden faces questions about commitment to minimum wage hike” from the Los Angeles Times “CEOs of Reddit and Robinhood and ‘Roaring Kitty’ slated to testify in GameStop hearing” from The Verge “Democrats Want To Bring Back Earmarks” from HuffPost “Restoring Earmarks Is Probably a Good Thing” from Bloomberg Opinion This billboard a listener sent in Finally, how to send us a voice memo

Velshi
Impeachment, Covid Relief, and Civil Unrest

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2021 86:32


Democrats are poised to push through President Biden's $1.9 trillion Covid relief package, with or without Republican support – but who will actually receive those much-needed $1,400 checks? Biden says he's willing to negotiate on the income cutoff for recipients, which could mean fewer people getting checks in this round of relief. Meanwhile, there are new arrests and charges in the January 6 Capitol insurrection as the clock ticks closer to the historic second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump. Ali Velshi discusses these stories and more with White House economic adviser Jared Bernstein, terrorism analyst Malcolm Nance, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah Jones, Washington Post reporter Eugene Scott, Dr. Camara Jones, Deborah Watts, Axios reporter Alexi McCammond, Atlantic staff writer Caitlin Dickerson, Dr. Andre Campbell, and Alexis Collins.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Immigration Under Biden, Plus Preet Bharara 'Doing Justice'

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2021 35:32


What does immigration look like under President Biden? Sam talks to Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer at The Atlantic, about the likelihood Biden can push through policies that other administrations from both parties tried and failed to do. Plus, Sam chats with former federal prosecutor Preet Bharara about his new podcast, Doing Justice, and how the nation's ideas about rules and law have changed in the past few years. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

The Daily
Trump Shut the Door on Migrants. Will Biden Open It?

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2020 30:48


Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter for The Times, says there is one word that sums up the Trump administration’s approach to border crossing: deterrence. For nearly four years, the U.S. government has tried to discourage migrants, with reinforced walls, family separation policies and threats of deportation.Those policies have led to the appearance of a makeshift asylum-seeker camp of frayed tents and filthy conditions within walking distance of the United States.Today, we ask: What will the legacy of President Trump’s immigration policies be? And will anything change next year?Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter for The New York Times.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.Background reading: This is what we saw inside the tent camp on the U.S.-Mexico border.The Trump administration’s immigration policies have not deterred pregnant women from trying to enter the United States. Here are some of their experiences.A federal judge last week ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, an Obama-era program designed to shield young, undocumented immigrants from deportation.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Here And There with Dave Marash
Here And There 2 November, 2020 Caitlin Dickerson

Here And There with Dave Marash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2020 51:19


Caitlin Dickerson is fast becoming a reporting star at the New York Times.  3 of her recent reports have covered the unnecessary, uninformed surgeries performed on detained women at an ICE detention center, condition for refugees waiting in Mexico for their asylum cases to be heard…and the more than 500 migrant children still separated from their parents.  

PBS NewsHour - Segments
New report finds U.S. is deporting Central American kids to Mexico

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 5:16


U.S. border authorities are allegedly violating an agreement by sending minors into Mexico even if they come from other Central American countries. A new report finds that at least 200 children have been sent to Mexico over the past eight months, although they do not have family there and should have been sent home instead. The New York Times' Caitlin Dickerson joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Vox's The Weeds
Biden’s border options

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 52:11


Dara, Jane, and Matt on the big immigration questions that will face a new administration. Resources: "Would Biden 'rebuild the old program' to reduce Northern Triangle migration?" by Teresa Welsh, Devex "Inside the Refugee Camp on America's Doorstep" by Caitlin Dickerson, NYT White paper Hosts: Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Senior Correspondent, Vox Jane Coaston (@cjane87), Senior politics correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@DLind), Immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Jeff Geld, (@jeff_geld), Editor and Producer The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production Want to support The Weeds, and participate in "The Weeds Live" on election day? Please make a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts About Vox Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow Us: Vox.com Facebook group: The Weeds Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Brian Lehrer Show
30 Issues: DACA, Immigrants Without Documents and the Candidates

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2020 26:01


New York Times immigration reporter Caitlin Dickerson talks about how the Trump administration has tried to cancel DACA, where it stands now, all the Trump administration has done with the wall, family separations and deportations over the past four years, and looks at how Joe Biden would approach immigrants without documents, both new arrivals and people already living here, should he win the election.

Chompers
Communication Week Morning Interview (10-1-2020)

Chompers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2020 3:24


Today our friend Jasmine is here to talk to newspaper reporter Caitlin Dickerson from the New York Times!

Chompers
Communication Week Night Interview (10-1-2020)

Chompers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2020 3:24


Jasmine is back with New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson to talk about the news.

The Daily
‘Stay Black and Die’

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2020 41:35


Demonstrations against police brutality are entering their third month, but meaningful policy action has not happened. We speak with one demonstrator about her journey to the front lines of recent protests — and the lessons she’s learned about the pace of change.Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The New York Times, spoke with Sharhonda Bossier, deputy director at Education Leaders of Color, an advocacy group.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: While protests in most American cities have tapered off, the confrontation between protesters and federal agents in downtown Portland, Ore., continues.Here is our latest reporting on the protests against racism and police violence that spread around the world after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

Broadcasts from the Border
EP1: The Pandemic Paradox

Broadcasts from the Border

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2020 25:06


Immigrants – especially those who are undocumented – are being disproportionately affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Almost 280,000 undocumented immigrants work in the healthcare industry, serving on the front lines of combating the pandemic. However, their hard work in hospitals and clinics comes at a high risk of exposing themselves to the virus, and creates a paradox: they're considered both undocumented and essential at the same time. Caitlin Dickerson, a national immigration reporter for the New York Times, joins us for a conversation on immigration during the novel coronavirus pandemic. Caitlin has been covering immigration since 2016 for the Times and, during the pandemic, has reported on changes to US immigration policy and the experiences of undocumented immigrants, international students and migrants at the US-Mexico border.

Seltzer Death Match
2.12: Water with Glitter in It with Caitlin Dickerson

Seltzer Death Match

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2020 16:15


Club soda vs. mineral water? The world's gone to hell, so who cares! In late 2019, New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson joined us in a shipping container in the backyard of a Bushwick pizza restaurant to compare two things that make no sense to compare. Today's matchup: Sea to Sea club Soda vs. Lurisia mineral water.

Docs Watch
Episode 9: Superpowers and How You Get Them

Docs Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2020 67:28


SUBJECTIVEIn this episode, we talk about where the X-men get their powers. Can your DNA give you super speed AND let you control the weather AND shoot lasers out of your eyes AND do whatever it is that Rogue does? Maybe! It's all about the gene activation. It turns out, the power is in you!OBJECTIVEResources, Citations, and Mentions:The X-men that show up in the Deadpool movies (2016 and 2018) are Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead.Veterans Used In Secret Experiments Sue Military For Answers by Caitlin Dickerson, NPR, Sep 2015Short-Term Superhuman: If We Create Augmented Soldiers, Can We Turn Them Back? by Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Sep 2018Wikipedia - Weapon PlusPre-serum Chris Evans is a combination of CGI and Leander Deeny.Psychic Spies, Acid Guinea Pigs, New Age Soldiers: the True Men Who Stare at Goats by David Hambling, WIRED, Nov 2009DARPA - Blood Pharming, Nov 2013The Pentagon’s Push to Program Soldiers’ Brains by Michael Joseph Gross, The Atlantic, Nov 2018DARPA's Mind-Controlled Arm Will Make You Wish You Were a Cyborg by Maddie Stone, Gizmodo, May 2016DARPA's MBA program: Understanding Warfighter Performance from the Inside Out, Jan 2019GeckSkin from UMassAmherstAbout Vantablack from Surrey NanoSystemsASSESSMENTDeepa: the genomics of X-men gets a 6 out of 10 DNA rocksJen: the X-gene gets a 7.5 out of 10 radioactive spider bitesPLANSpecial thanks to Butterscotch Shenanigans for letting us use their podcast equipment! Check out their game dev comedy podcast Coffee with Butterscotch!Subscribe to our medical ramblings on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts! Rate, review, and tell your friends!Got a question or suggestion? Find us on Twitter @DocsWatchPod, or visit us at docswatchpod.com.Theme Music and SFX: Kevin MacLeod (CC BY) - RetroFuture Clean, Danse Macabre-Big Hit 2

What A Day
Curve Your Enthusiasm

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2020 23:34


We interview New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson about the far-reaching effects the pandemic is having on people in our immigration system: asylum seekers, DACA recipients, undocumented workers, ICE detainees and more.  The Trump administration has finally spoken up about their projections for the loss of life that America might experience as a result of Covid-19. Plus, we discuss the current recommendations on face-masks as protection against the virus.  And in headlines: Hungarian PM Viktor Orban is given unchecked power, Idaho's governor passes transphobic laws, and a fancy baby clothes company pitches in for coronavirus relief.

Congressional Dish
CD208: The Brink of the Iran War

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2020 100:39


2020 began with a bombing in Iraq - ordered by President Trump - which killed one of Iran's highest ranking military officers. In this episode, we take a close look at the recent history of our relationship with the Iranian government in order to understand how we started the year on the brink of another war. Also, since our President is a total wildcard, we look at what Congress authorized for 2020 in terms of war with Iran, Iraq, and Syria.  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Click here to contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank’s online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD041: Why Attack Syria? CD096: Fast Tracking Fast Track (Trade Promotion Authority) CD108: Regime Change CD131: Bombing Libya CD141: Terrorist Gifts & The Ministry of Propaganda (2017 NDAA) CD156: Sanctions – Russia, North Korea & Iran CD172: The Illegal Bombing of Syria CD175: State of War CD190: A Coup for Capitalism CD191: The “Democracies” Of Elliott Abrams CD195: Yemen Bills Bill: S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Congress.gov, December 20, 2019 Sec. 1208: Eliminates the authorization for payments that started in late 2016 “for damage, personal injury, or death that is incident to combat operations of the armed forces in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Somalia, Libya, and Yemen.  Sec. 1210A: Allows the Defense Department to give the State Department and USAID money for “stabilization activities” in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, and Somalia and authorizes an additional $100 million for this year (bringing the limit up to $450 million)  Sec. 1217: Allows the Defense Secretary to use War on Terror money for paying “any key cooperating nation (other than Pakistan)” for logistical, military, or other support that nation gives to our military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, or Syria.  Sec. 1221: Withholds at least half of the $645 million authorized by the 2015 NDAA for “military and other security forces of or associated with the Government of Iraq, including Kurdish and tribal security forces or other local security forces” for “training, equipment, logistics support, supplies, and services, stipends, facility and infrastructure repair and renovation, and sustainment” until the DoD submits a report that includes an estimate of the funding anticipated to support the Iraqi Security Forces through September 2025. The report also needs to include how much and what kind of assistance if being given to forces in Iraq by the Government of Iran. Also, a new stipulation is added saying that our military assistance authorized since 2015 “may only be exercised in consultation with the Government of Iraq.”  Sec. 1222: Changes the authorization from 2015 that allowed the Defense Department to train, equip, supply, give money to and construct facilities for “vetted elements of the Syria opposition” so that the “opposition” is no longer allowed to get the money or training. The new language eliminates all mentions of the “opposition” groups and deletes “promoting the conditions for a negotiated settlement to end the conflict in Syria” from the list of authorized purposes. The new language focuses specifically on providing assistance to combat the Islamic State and al Qaeda. It also limits the kinds of weapons that can be given to Syria groups to “small arms or light weapons” (there is a way for the Defense Secretary to waive this) and it limits the amount that can be spent on construction projects to $4 million per project or $20 million total.  Sec. 1223: Eliminates the authority for the Defense Department to fund “operations and activities of security assistance teams in Iraq” and removes the authority to pay for “construction and renovation of facilities”. The law still allows $30 million for the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq (a $15 million funding cut). The authorization will then sunset 90 days after enactment (mid March 2020). The OSCI can’t get more than $20 million until they appoint a Senior Defense Official to oversee the office, develop a staffing plan “similar to that of other security cooperation offices in the region”, and they create a five-year “security assistance roadmap” that enables “defense institution building and reform.”  Sec. 1284: “Nothing in this Act, or any amendment made by this Act, may be construed to authorize the use of military force, including the use of military force against Iran or any other country.”  Sec. 5322: Creates a “Foreign Malign Influence Response Center” under the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which will “be comprised of analysts from all elements of the intelligence community, including elements with diplomatic an law enforcement functions” and will be the “primary organization” for analyzing all intelligence “pertaining to foreign malign influence.” The foreign countries that will specifically be reported on are, in this order, Russia, Iran, North Korea, China, and “any other country”. “Foreign malign influence” means “any hostile effort undertaken by, at the direction of, or on behalf of or with the substantial support of, the government of a covered foreign country with he objective of influencing, through overt or covert means the (A) political, military, economic or other policies or activities of the United States Government… including any election within the United States or (B) the public opinion within the United States.”  Sec. 5521: “It is the sense of Congress that, regardless of the ultimate number of United States military personnel deployed to Syria, it is a vital interest of the United States to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran, Hezbollah, and other Iranian backed forces from establishing a strong and enduring presence in Syria that can be used to project power in the region and threaten the United States and its allies, including Israel.”A report is required within six months that will include how Iran is militarily training and funding the Syrian government led by President Bashar al-Assad and the threat that Iran’s forces pose to “areas of northeast Syria that are currently controlled by local partner forces of the United States.” The report also must outline “how Iran and Iranian backed forces seek to enhance the long-term influence of such entities in Syria through non-military means such as purchasing strategic real estate in Syria, constructing Shia religious centers in schools, securing loyalty from Sunni tribes in exchange for material assistance, and inducing the Assad government to open Farsi language department at Syrian universities.” The report must also include “How Iran is working with the Russian Federation, Turkey, and other countries to increase the influence of Iran in Syria.” The NDAA assumes the Iranian goals in Syria are "protecting the Assad government, increasing the regional influence of Iran, threatening Israel from a more proximate location, building weapon production facilities and other military infrastructure, and securing a land bridge to connect to run through Iraq and Syria to the stronghold of Hezbollah in southern Lebanon.” The report also must include descriptions of "the efforts of Iran to transfer advanced weapons to Hisballah and to establish a military presence in Syria has led to direct and repeated confrontations with Israel”, "the intelligence and military support that the United States provides to Israel to help Israel identify and appropriately address specific threats to Israel from Iran and Iranian-backed forces in Syria”, “The threat posed to Israel and other allies of the United States in the middle east resulting from the transfer of arms to… Hezbollah”, and “Iranian expenditures in the previous calendar year on military and terrorist activities outside the country, including the amount of such expenditures with respect to each of Hizballah, Houthi rebels in Yemen, Hamas, and proxy forces in Iraq and Syria.” Sec. 6706: The 2017 Intelligence Authorization (Section 501) created a committee made up of the Director of National Intelligence, Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of the Treasury, Attorney General, Secretary of Energy, FBI Director, and the heads of “each of the other elements of the intelligence community” for the purposes of countering “active measures by Russia to exert covert influence over peoples and government by exposing falsehoods, agents of influence, corruption, human rights abuses, terrorism, and assassinations carried out by the security services are political elites of the Russian Federation or their proxies.” This NDAA adds China, Iran, North Korea, “or other nation state” to the target list.  Sec. 6729: Orders an Intelligence Assessment into the revenue sources of North Korea, specifically requiring inquiries into “(1) Trade in coal, iron, and iron ore. (2) Fishing rights in North Korea’s territorial waters (3) Trade in gold, titanium ore, vanadium ore, copper, silver, nickel, zinc, and rare earth minerals.” They also want to know what banking institutions are processing North Korean financial transactions.  Sec. 7412:  Effective starting in June 2020, the President “shall” enact sanctions on a “foreign person” if that person gives money, material or technical support to the Government of Syria, is a military contractor working for the Government of Syria, the Russian government, or the Iranian government, sells items that “significantly facilitates the maintenance or expansion of the Government of Syria’s domestic production of natural has, petroleum, or petroleum products”, or “directly or indirectly, provides significant construction or engineering services to the Government of Syria.” If the sanctions are violated, the President “shall” use his power to “block and prohibit all transactions in property and interests in property of the foreign person” if that property “comes within the United States, are come within the possession or control of United States person.” The foreign persons will also be ineligible for visas into the United States except to permit the United States to comply with the agreement regarding the headquarters of the United Nations or to assist with US law-enforcement. Sec. 7402: Statement of Policy: …”to support a transition to a government in Syria that respects the rule of law, human rights, and peaceful co-existence with its neighbors.”  Sec. 7411: Gives the Secretary of the Treasury until late June to determine “whether reasonable grounds exist for concluding that the Central Bank of Syria is a financial institution of primary money laundering concern.” If it’s a yes, the Secretary of the Treasury “shall” impose “special measures” that could require banks to retain more records about transactions in Syria, give the government information about the people who conduct financial transactions with people in Syria, or prohibit US banks from opening accounts for Syrian banks.  Sec. 7413: Orders the President to submit a strategy to Congress by June 2020 to “deter foreign persons from entering into contracts related to reconstruction” in areas of Syria under the control of the Government of Syria, the Government of Russia, or the Government of Iran.  Sec. 7424: Authorizes the Secretary of State to “provide assistance to support entities that are conducting criminal investigations, supporting prosecutions, or collecting evidence” against those that have committed war crimes in Syria. The assistance can’t be given as long as President Bashar al-Assad is in power, can’t be used to build judicial capacities of the Syrian government, or for prosecutions in the domestic courts of Syria.  Sec. 7438: This title (Sections 7401-7438) sunsets in 5 years.    Bill: H.Con.Res.83 - Directing the President pursuant to section 5(c) of the War Powers Resolution to terminate the use of United States Armed Forces to engage in hostilities in or against Iran. Congress.gov, January 9, 2020   Bill: H. R. 1158 - Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 GPO, January 3, 2019 Sec. 9007:  No funds from this year’s funding or any other law can’t be used to “establish any military installation or base for the purpose of providing for the permanent stationing of United States Forces in Iraq” or to “exercise United States control over any oil resource of Iraq” Bill: H.R.3107 - Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996 Congress.gov, August 5, 1996 Articles/Documents Article: More US service members diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries following Iran strike by Barbara Starr and Zachary Choen, CNN, January 30, 2020 Article: House Votes 'No War Against Iran,' In Rebuke To Trump by Merrit Kennedy, npr, January 30, 2020 Article: Overnight Defense: White House threatens to veto House Iran bills | Dems 'frustrated' after Iran briefing | Lawmakers warn US, UK intel sharing at risk after Huawei decision by Ellen Mitchell, The Hill, January 28, 2020 Article: T‘Demeaned and Humiliated’: What Happened to These Iranians at U.S. Airports by Caleb Hampton and Caitlin Dickerson, The New York Times, January 25, 2020 Article: The Iranian revolution—A timeline of events by Suzanne Maloney and Keian Razipour, Brookings, January 24, 2020 Document: Iran Sanctions by Kenneth Katzman, Congressional Research Service, January 24, 2020 Article: KEY ARCHITECT OF 2003 IRAQ WAR IS NOW A KEY ARCHITECT OF TRUMP IRAN POLICY by Jon Schwarz, The Intercept, January 16, 2020 Article: INSTEX fails to support EU-Iran trade as nuclear accord falters by Alexandra Brzozowski, Euractiv, January 14, 2020 Article: The Members of Congress Who Profit From War by Donald Shaw and David Moore, Sludge, January 13, 2020 Article: Under pressure, Iran admits it shot down jetliner by mistake by Nasser Karimi and Joseph Krauss, AP, January 11, 2020 Article: Jet Crash in Iran Has Eerie Historical Parallel by Karen Zraick, The New York Times, January 11, 2020 Article: U.S. STRIKE ON IRANIAN COMMANDER IN YEMEN THE NIGHT OF SULEIMANI’S ASSASSINATION KILLED THE WRONG MAN by Alex Emmons, The Intercept, January 10, 2020 Article: New Iran revelations suggest Trumps deceptions were deeper than we thought by Paul Waldman and Greg Sargent, The Washington Post, January 10, 2020 Article: On the day U.S. forces killed Soleimani they targeted a senior Iranian official in Yemen by John Hudson, Missy Ryan and Josh Dawsey, The Washington Post, January 10, 2020 Article: Venezuela: Guaido Installs Parallel Parliament After Washington Threatens More Sanctions By Ricardo Vaz, Venezuelanalysis.com, January 8, 2020 Article: US-Iran tensions: Timeline of events leading to Soleimani killing Aljazeera, January 8, 2020 Article: The Quiet Billionaires Behind America’s Predator Drone That Killed Iran’s Soleimani by Deniz Çam and Christopher Helman, Forbes, January 7, 2020 Article: U.S. contractor killed in Iraq, which led to strike on Iranian general, buried in Sacramento by Sawsan Morrar and Sam Stanton, The Sacramento Bee, January 7, 2020 Article: US won’t grant Iran foreign minister visa for UN visit by Matthew Lee, Associated Press, January 7, 2020 Article: Iran's Zarif accuses U.S. of violating U.N. deal by denying him a visa by Michelle Nichols, Reuters, January 7, 2020 Article: What Is the Status of the Iran Nuclear Agreement? by Zachary Laub and Kali Robinson, Council on Foreign Relations, January 7, 2020 Article: For Some Never Trumpers, Killing of Suleimani Was Finally Something to Like by Michael Crowley, The New York Times, January 6, 2020 Article: Who Was The Iraqi Commander Also Killed In The Baghdad Drone Strike? by Matthew S. Schwartz, npr, January 4, 2020 Article: Will There Be a Draft? Young People Worry After Military Strike by Sarah Mervosh, The New York Times, January 3, 2020 Article: Four Years Ago, Trump Had No Clue Who Iran’s Suleimani Was. Now He May Have Kicked Off WWIII. by Mehdi Hasan, The Intercept, January 3, 2020 Article: WITH SULEIMANI ASSASSINATION, TRUMP IS DOING THE BIDDING OF WASHINGTON’S MOST VILE CABAL by Jeremy Scahill, The Intercept, January 3, 2020 Article: America is guilty of everything we accuse Iran of doing by Ryan Cooper, The Week, January 3, 2020 Article: Hashd deputy Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis: Iran's man in Baghdad Aljazeera, January 3, 2020 Article: Well, that escalated quickly By Derek Davison, Foreign Exchanges, January 2, 2020 Article: After Embassy Attack, U.S. Is Prepared to Pre-emptively Strike Militias in Iraq By Thomas Gibbons-Neff, The New York Times, January 2, 2020 Article: U.S. Sanctions Have Cost Iran $200 Billion RFE/RL staff, OilPrice.com, January 2, 2020 Article: Protesters storm US embassy compound in Baghdad Aljazeera, December 31, 2019 Article: US strikes hit Iraqi militia blamed in contractor’s death Ellen Knickmeyer and Qassim Abdul-Zahra, AP, December 30, 2019 Article: Saudi Arabia oil attacks: UN 'unable to confirm Iranian involvement' BBC News, December 11, 2019 Article: Six charts that show how hard US sanctions have hit Iran by Franklin Foer, BBC News, December 9, 2019 Article: At War with the Truth by Craig Whitlock, The Washington Post, December 9, 2019 Article: Foundation for Defense of Democracies Militarist Monitor, October 18, 2019 Article: Gulf tanker attacks: Iran releases photos of 'attacked' ship BBC News, October 14, 2019 Article: US-Iran standoff: A timeline of key events Aljazeera, September 25, 2019 Article: US Offered Millions To Indian Captain Of Iran Oil Tanker Heading To Syria NDTV, September 5, 2019 Press Release: Remarks by High Representative/Vice-President Federica Mogherini following the Foreign Affairs Council by European Union External Action, July 15, 2019 Article: Pentagon nominee Esper, a former Raytheon lobbyist, must extend recusal, says Warren By Joe Gould, DefenseNews, July 15, 2019 Article: INSTEX: Doubts linger over Europe's Iran sanctions workaround By Siobhan Dowling, Aljazeera, July 1, 2019 Press Release: Chair's statement following the 28 June 2019 meeting of the Joint Commission of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action by European Union External Action, June 28, 2019 Article: Iran executes 'defence ministry contractor' over spying for CIA Aljazeera, June 22, 2019 Article: Saudi oil tankers show 'significant damage' after attack – Riyadh By Patrick Wintour, The Guardian, May 13, 2019 Article: Bolton: US deploying bombers to Middle East in warning to Iran Aljazeera, May 6, 2019 Statement: Statement from the National Security Advisor Ambassador John Bolton WhiteHouse.gov, May 5, 2019 Article: Iran responds in kind to Trump's IRGC 'terrorist' designation Aljazeera, April 8, 2019 Statement: Designation of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a Foreign Terrorist Organization WhiteHouse.gov, April 8, 2019 Document: The European Deterrence Initiative: A Budgetary Overview By Pat Towell and Aras D. Kazlauskas, Congressional Research Center, August 8, 2018 Article: Mike Pompeo speech: What are the 12 demands given to Iran? By Aljazeera News, May 21, 2018 Article: Trump Jr. and Other Aides Met With Gulf Emissary Offering Help to Win Election By Mark Mazzetti, Ronen Bergman and David D. Kirkpatrick, The New York Times, May 19, 2018 Article: If the Iran deal had been a Senate-confirmed treaty, would Trump have been forced to stay in? Nope. By Andrew Rudalevige , The Washington Post, May 9, 2018 Article: Trump Abandons Iran Nuclear Deal He Long Scorned By Mark Landler, The New York Times, May 8, 2018 Article: Valiant picks up another government business in $135M cash deal By Robert J. Terry, The Washington Business Journal, April 19, 2018 Article: 64 Years Later, CIA Finally Releases Details of Iranian Coup By Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian, Foreign Policy, June 20, 2017 Article: CIA Creates New Mission Center to Turn Up the Heat on Iran By Shane Harris, The Wall Street Journal, June 2, 2017 Article: CIA establishes mission center focused on North Korea By Max Greenwood, The Hill, May 10, 2017 Article: The Shadow Commander By Dexter Filkins, The New Yorker, September 23, 2013 Article: Iran and Iraq remember war that cost more than a million lives By Ian Black, The Guardian, September 23, 2010 Document: Executive Order 12959—Prohibiting Certain Transactions With Respect to Iran Administration of William J. Clinton, GPO, May 7, 1995 Document: Middle East Peace Process, Executive Order 12957—Prohibiting Certain Transactions With Respect to the Development of Iranian Petroleum Resources Administration of William J. Clinton, GPO, March 15, 1995 Additional Resources Biography: Reuel Marc Gerecht Foundation for Defense of Democracies Budget: EUROPEAN DETERRENCE INITIATIVE, Department of Defense Budget Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 By Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, March 2019 Budget: EUROPEAN REASSURANCE INITIATIVE, Department of Defense Budget Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, February 2017 Fundraising Summary: Sen. James E Risch - Idaho OpenSecrets.org Joint Resolution: Public Law 107–40 107th Congress GPO, Congress.gov, September 18, 2001 Podcast Episode: GHOSTS OF MOSSADEGH: THE IRAN CABLES, U.S. EMPIRE, AND THE ARC OF HISTORY Document: TITLE 31—MONEY AND FINANCE GovInfo.gov Video: Why I Voted Against The Sactions Bill Bernie Sanders Video: MORE THAN JUST RUSSIA — THERE’S A STRONG CASE FOR THE TRUMP TEAM COLLUDING WITH SAUDI ARABIA, ISRAEL, AND THE UAE By Jeremy Scahill, The Intercept Vote Results: ROLL CALL 33, Merchant Mariners of World War II Congressional Medal Act Clerk of House of Representatives Vote Results: ROLL CALL 34, Merchant Mariners of World War II Congressional Medal Act Clerk of House of Representatives Sound Clip Sources Press Conference: Trump tells GOP donors that Soleimani was 'saying bad things' before strike, The Hill, January 10, 2020 Hearing: From Sanctions to the Soleimani Strike to Escalation: Evaluating the Administration’s Iran Policy, United States House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs, January 14, 2020 Watch on Youtube Watch on CSPAN Witnesses DID NOT SHOW: Mike Pompeo Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations Avril Haines, Columbia University (formerly NSA and CIA) Stephen Hadley Transcript: 44:55 Richard Haass: Here, I would highlight the American decision in 2018 to exit the 2015 nuclear agreement, the JCPOA, and the decision to introduce significant sanctions against Iran. These sanctions constituted a form of economic warfare. Iran was not in a position to respond in kind and instead instituted a series of military actions meant to make the United States and others pay a price for these sanctions and therefore to conclude they needed to be removed. It is also important, I believe, to point out here that the United States did not provide a diplomatic alternative to Iran when it imposed these sanctions. This was the context in which the targeted killing of Qassem Suleimani took place. This event needs to be assessed from two vantage points. One is legality. It would have been justified to attack Suleimani if he was involved in mounting a military action that was imminent. If there is evidence that can responsibly be made public supporting that these criteria were met of imminence, it should be. If, however, it turns out criteria were not met, that what took place was an action of choice rather than the necessity, I fear it will lead to an open ended conflict between the United States and Iran. Fought in many places with many tools and few red lines that will be observed. The President tweeted yesterday that the question of this imminence doesn't really matter. I would respectfully disagree. Imminence is central to the concept of preemption, which is treated in international law as a legitimate form of self defense. Preventive attacks though are something very different. They are mounted against a gathering threat rather than an imminent one, and a world of regular preventive actions would be one in which conflict was prevalent. 47:20 Richard Haass: First, there were other, and I believe better ways to reestablish deterrence with Iran. Secondly, the killing interrupted what I believe were useful political dynamics in both Iran and Iraq. Thirdly, U.S.-Iraqi ties were deeply strained. Fourthly, we've been forced to send more forces to the region rather than make them available elsewhere. Fifthly, given all worldwide challenges, I do not believe it is in our strategic interest to have a new war in the middle East. And six, Iran has already announced plans to take steps at odds with the JCPOA, which will shrink the window it needs to build a nuclear weapon if it decides to do so. And if this happens, it will present both the United States and Israel with difficult and potentially costly choices. 50:16 Richard Haass: Let me just make a few recommendations and I know my time is growing short. One, the United States should work closely with its allies and other signatories of the JCPOA to put together the outlines of a new agreement. Call it JCPOA 2.0 and present Iran with a new deal. It would establish longer term or better yet open-ended limits on Iran, nuclear and missile programs. In exchange for sanctions relief, Congress should approve any such agreement to remove the concern that this pack could be easily undone by any President, and such initiatives should emerge from consultation with allies. Our policy toward Iran has become overly unilateral and is less effective for it. 1:02:50 Stephen Hadley: The problem was that the strike occurred in Iraq. The fear of becoming the central battleground in a military confrontation between the United States and Iran is being used to justify calls for the expulsion of us forces from Iraq. But a U.S. withdrawal would only reward Kata'ib Hezbollah's campaign of violence, strengthen the uranium backed militias, weaken the Iraqi government, undermine Iraqi sovereignty, and jeopardize the fight against ISIS. A terrible outcome for both the United States and Iraq. To keep U.S. Forces in Iraq, Iraqi authorities will have to manage the domestic political fallout from the strike on Suleimani. U.S. Administration and the Congress can help by making public statements reaffirming that America respects the sovereignty and independence of Iraq that U.S. Forces are in Iraq to train Iraqi security forces and to help them protect the Iraqi people from a resurgent ISIS that the United States will coordinate with the Iraqi government on matters involving the U.S. Troop presence, that so long as U.S. Troops and diplomats in Iraq are not threatened, America's confrontation with Iran will not be played out on Iraqi territory, and that the United States supports the aspirations of the Iraqi people for a government that can meet their needs and expectations, and is free of corruption, sectarianism and outside influence. 1:49:30 Richard Haass: The other thing I think you heard from all three of us is the importance of repairing the U.S.-Iraqi relationship. I mean, think about it. Qasem Soleimani's principle goal was to drive the United States out of Iraq. Why in the world would we want to facilitate his success there after his death? We ought to make sure that doesn't happen. And Steve Hadley gave, I thought, a lot of good ideas about ways we could signal almost to help the Iraqi government manage the Iraqi politics. We could also look at some creative things. When I was in the Pentagon years ago, when we were building what became Central Command, we used to look at the idea of presence without stationing. There's ways to have a regular force presence without necessarily having forces be permanent. This may help the Iraqi government manage the politics of it without a serious diminuition of our capabilities. 1:58:20 Richard Haass: I think there's a fundamental difference between taking out a member of a terrorist organization and taking out an individual who is, who was an official of a nation state, who happens to use terrorist organizations to promote what the state sees as its agenda. I'm not saying it's necessarily wrong, I'm saying it's a big step. We've crossed a line here. So I think one thing this committee needs to think about is when it looks at AUMF's, none is on the books that allows us to do this as best I understand. So I think it's a legitimate question for this committee to say, do we need to think about an AUMF towards Iran that deals with this set of scenarios, where Iran would use military force to promote its ends, and also with the one that both Steve Hadley and I have talked about here, about the gathering threat on the Iranian nuclear side. 2:07:50 Avril Haines: Clearly the strike had an enormous impact on our relationship with Iraq. Iraq has come out and indicated that they did not provide consent for this particular strike on their territory. And it has brought the parliament to the point where they've actually passed to vote calling for the U.S. Forces to leave. And we've seen that the Prime Minister has indicated that in fact, they want a delegation to talk about leaving Iraq. And I think, as Dr. Haass noted, this is in many respects exactly what Solemani had wanted. And as a consequence, we're now in a position where I think it will be likely that it is unsustainable for us to have the presence that we've had. I hope that's not true. I hope that we can in fact, get through this period with them and that their domestic politics don't erupt in such a way that it makes it impossible for us to stay. 2:42:15 Rep. Adriano Espaillat: My question to you individually, this is a yes or no answer question, is whether or not you feel you gathered enough information or evidence, that from the inspectors or otherwise that you feel that Iran complied with the provisions established by the JCPOA. Mr Hass, do you feel that they complied? Yes or no? Richard Haass: Based on everything I've read, the international inspectors made the case that Iran was in compliance. Rep. Adriano Espaillat: Ms. Haines? Avril Haines: Yeah, same. Rep. Adriano Espaillat: Mr. Hadley? Stephen Hadley: So far as I know, yes. Interview: Pompeo on Soleimani Justification: I Don't Know Who Used "Imminent Threat" First, "But It Reflects What We Saw", Bret Baier with Fox News Channel Interviews Mike Pompeo, RealClear Politics, January 13, 2020 Speakers Mike Pompeo Bret Baier Transcript: Mike Pompeo: Not only when I was CIA director did I see the history and then what was the current activity for the first year and a half of this administration. But when I was a member of Congress serving on the house intelligence committee, I saw too, Suleimani's been a bad actor for decades in the region. He has the blood of hundreds of Americans on his hand. He's killed, or contributed to the killing of hundreds of thousands of people in Syria, Muslims, mostly throughout the region. This was a bad actor. And when we came to the point where we could see that he was plotting imminent attacks in the region to threaten Americans, a big attack, we recommended to the President he take this action. The president made the right decision. Press Conference: Pompeo Imposes Sanctions on Iran, Sticking to Assertion That U.S. Faced Imminent Threat, White House Press Briefing, The New York Times, January 10, 2020 Transcript: Mike Pompeo: We had specific information on an imminent threat, and that threat included attacks on U.S. embassies, period. Full stop. Reporter: What's your definition of imminent? Mike Pompeo: This was going to happen, and American lives were at risk, and we would have been culpably negligent, as the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said, that we would've been culpably negligent had we not recommended the President that he take this action with Qasam Suleimani. He made the right call and America is safer as a result of that. I don't know exactly which minute, we don't know exactly which day it would have been executed, but it was very clear. Qasam Suleimani himself was plotting a broad, large scale attack against American interests, and those attacks were imminent. Press Conference: The most troubling part of Mike Lee's broadside against the Trump administrations Iran briefing, The Washington Post, January 8, 2020 Transcript: Mike Lee: They're appearing before a coordinate branch of government, a coordinate branch of government responsible for their funding, for their confirmation, for any approval of any military action they might undertake. They had to leave after 75 minutes while they're in the process of telling us that we need to be good little boys and girls and run along and not debate this in public. I find that absolutely insane. I think it's unacceptable. And so I don't know what they had in mind. I went in there hoping to get more specifics as far as the factual, legal, moral justification for what they did. I'm still undecided on that issue in part because we never got to the details. Every time we got close, they'd say, well, we can't discuss that here because it's really sensitive. We're in a skiff. We're in a secure underground bunker where all electronic devices have to be checked at the door and they still refuse to tell us. I find that really upsetting. Interview: CNN Interview with Mike Pompeo The Hill, January 3, 2020 Transcript: Mike Pompeo: We know it was imminent. This was an intelligence based assessment that drove our decision making process. Hearing: Full Committee Hearing: “U.S. Policy in Syria and the Broader Region” House Armed Services Committee, December 11, 2019 Witnesses Mark Esper - Secretary of Defense General Mark Milley - Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Transcript: 25:20 Mark Esper: Since May of this year, nearly 14,000 U.S. military personnel have deployed to the region to serve as a tangible demonstration of our commitment to our allies and our partners. These additional forces are not intended to signal an escalation, but rather to reassure our friends and buttress our efforts at deterrence. 25:40 Mark Esper: We are also focused on internationalizing the response to Iran's aggression by encouraging increased burden sharing and cooperation with allies and partners from around the world. The International Maritime Security Construct, which protects freedom of navigation in the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman, and the more nascent integrated air and missile defense effort led by Saudi Arabia are two such examples. Through these activities, we are sending a clear message to Iran that the international community will not tolerate its malign activities. Hearing: Review of the FY2020 Budget Request for the State Department Senate Appropriations Committee Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs, April 9, 2019 Watch on CSPAN Witnesses Mike Pompeo Transcript: 15:15 Sen. Lindsay Graham (SC): Do you agree with me that having a stabilizing force in Northeastern Syria will prevent Iran from coming down and taking over their oil? Mike Pompeo: It is an important part of our overall Middle East strategy, including our counter-Iran strategy. Sen. Lindsay Graham (SC): So, containing Iran, would include you having a policy in Syria that would keep them from benefiting from our withdrawal. Mike Pompeo: That's right. It's one piece of it. Yes. Sen. Lindsay Graham (SC): Okay. Hearing: State Department Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request House Foreign Affairs Committee, May 23, 2018 Witnesses Mike Pompeo Transcript: 18:05 Mike Pompeo: On Monday I unveiled a new direction for the President’s Iran strategy. We will apply unprecedented financial pressure; coordinate with our DOD colleagues on deterrents efforts; support the Iranian people, perhaps most importantly; and hold out the prospect for a new deal with Iran. It simply needs to change its behavior. Speech: Pompeo vows U.S., Mideast allies will ‘crush’ Iranian operatives around the world, Heritage Foundation, May 21, 2018 Transcript: Mike Pompeo: We will apply unprecedented financial pressure on the Iranian regime. The sanctions are going back in full effect and new ones are coming. These will indeed end up being the strongest sanctions in history when we are complete. Mike Pompeo: As President Trump said two weeks ago, he is ready, willing and able to negotiate a new deal. But the deal is not the objective. Our goal is to protect the American people. Speech: Bolton: 'Our Goal Should Be Regime Change in Iran' Fox News, January 1, 2018 Transcript: John Bolton: Our goal should be regime change in Iran. Hearing: IRANIAN TERROR OPERATIONS ON AMERICAN SOIL SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT, INVESTIGATIONS, AND MANAGEMENT and the SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE of the House Homeland Security Committee, October 26, 2011 Watch on CSPAN Witnesses: Reuel Marc Gerecht: CIA Officer who became a director at the Project for a New American Century. Also a former fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. Supported the Afghanistan regime change and Iraq regime change. Currently a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracy, which was founded after 9/11 and it funds “experts” who pushed Congress to fight the “war on terror”. Transcript: 1:30:25 Reuel Marc Gerecht: Again, I have nothing against sanctions. I think there are lots of sanctions the United States should tighten. I'm in favor of most of what we might call central bank sanctions, the Iran oil free zone. There are lots of different things you can do, but again, I just emphasize the people who rule around Iran rose up essentially through killing people. They have maintained a coercive system. It's become more coercive with time, not less. They do not respond in the same rational economic ways that we do. Iran would not look like the country it is today if they were concerned about the bottom line. So, I don't think that you are going to really intimidate these people, get their attention unless you shoot somebody. It's a pretty blunt, but I don't think you get to get around it. I think for example, if we believe that the Guard Corps is responsible for this operation, then you should hold Qasem Soleimani responsible. Qasem Soleimani travels a lot. He's all over the place. Go get him. Either try to capture him or kill him. 1:32:10 Reuel Marc Gerecht: You could aggressively harrass many of their operations overseas. There's no doubt about that. But you would have to have a consensus to do that. I mean, the need is to say the White House, the CIA would have to be on board to do that. You would have to have the approval to do that. We all know it's Washington, D C these things are difficult to do. So you may find out that this type of covert action is actually much more difficult to do than going after, say Qasem Soleimani when he travels. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)