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American general-interest trade book publisher

  • 751PODCASTS
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  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
Random House

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Latest podcast episodes about Random House

All Of It
Local Chef Spotlight: Carla Lalli Music on her Newest Cookbook

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:30


[REBROADCAST FROM October 20, 2021] James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Carla Lalli Music joins us to discuss her new book, That Sounds So Good: 100 Real-Life Recipes for Every Day of the Week. In the new cookbook, Lalli Music splits the recipes between weekday and weekend cooking so that you can make great food no matter how much time you have.   Fat Noodles with Pan-Roasted Mushrooms and Crushed Herb Sauce 4 to 6 servings This method of cooking mushrooms—by pan-roasting them, then finishing with browned butter—is incredibly effective, whether you're adding them to pasta or not. In the second step, the butter and aromatics wash a ton of flavor over the mushrooms, glossing them up. Kosher salt; freshly ground pepper6 garlic cloves, divided1 lemon½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided1 teaspoon mild chile flakes, such as Aleppo pepper1 shallot1 pound maitake mushroomsChunk of Parmigiano, for grating and serving2 cups lightly packed herbs (leaves and tender stems), such as parsley, mint, and/or arugula2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 pound wide pasta noodles, such as lasagnette or pappardelle Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it very aggressively with salt (figure ¼ cup salt per 6 quarts water). Pick out the smallest garlic clove and finely grate it into a small bowl. Grate in the zest of the lemon, then stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil and the chile flakes. Season oil mixture with salt and pepper and set aside. Thinly slice the remaining 5 garlic cloves and the shallot. Trim the mushrooms; tear into bite-size pieces. Juice the zested lemon into a small bowl. Grate enough Parm to yield ¼ cup (save what's left for passing at the table). Set all aside. Add the herbs to the boiling water and cook until very softened, 2 minutes. (Cooking the herbs both mellows and deepens their flavor; they will have less fresh brightness but take on a richer, more vegetal flavor.) Use a mesh spider or tongs to remove the herbs and hold them under cold running water until cool enough to handle, about 10 seconds. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible. Thinly slice the herbs and stir them into the oil mixture. Taste and adjust with more salt and chile flakes, if desired. Set the herb sauce aside. Lower heat under the boiling water to maintain a simmer—you want to get your mushrooms going before starting the pasta. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high for 1 minute, then add 3 tablespoons olive oil and half the mushrooms. Cook, tossing, until the mushrooms are coated with oil, then cook, undisturbed, until browned on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and toss, then cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are browned all over and cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes more. Transfer mushrooms to a large plate and repeat with the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and mushrooms, then add these mushrooms to the first batch. Bring the water back to a boil. Melt the butter in the Dutch oven over medium heat until it foams, 15 to 30 seconds. Add the sliced garlic and shallot and cook until the garlic and butter are golden brown and the shallot is translucent, about 2 minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot, along with any accumulated juices, and cook, tossing, until well combined. Lower the heat to keep warm. Meanwhile, add the pasta to the boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally, until very al dente, 2 to 3 minutes less than the time indicated on the package. Use a mesh spider to transfer pasta to the pot with the mushrooms, then add 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid. Increase the heat to medium and cook, tossing energetically, until a sauce forms that coats the pasta, 2 minutes. Add the ¼ cup grated cheese, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and another big splash of pasta water and cook, tossing, until cheese is melted and the sauce is clinging to the noodles, 1 to 2 minutes more. Add a few spoonfuls of herb sauce to the pasta and stir to combine. Serve with remaining herb sauce and more cheese at the table. -------------------------From the MarketMild chile flakesShallotTender herbsMaitake mushroomsWide pasta noodles Spin ItInstead of Aleppo pepper, use a smaller quantity of regular red pepper flakes or lots of blackReplace the shallot with ¼ onionThe herbs are truly interchangeable, in any ratio, and can include basil, chives, tarragon, and/or dill Use shiitake, oyster, and/ or cremini mushrooms instead of maitakeBig tubes like rigatoni or paccheri are good too-------------------------At HomeSalt and pepperGarlicLemonOlive oilParmigianoButter Spin ItA few dashes of sherry vinegar or white wine vinegar can replace the lemon juice and zestGrana Padano or pecorino can replace the Parm-------------------------Tall Pot AltIf you don't have a Dutch oven, use a large heavy skillet to cook the mushrooms and combine with the shallot and garlic. Scoop out 2 cups of pasta cooking liquid, then drain the pasta and return to the pot, and build your sauce from there. If the sauce gets tight or sticky, or the cheese clumps together, lower the heat and add more water than you think you should. Cook over low heat, stirring gently but constantly, until the cheese melts and the sauce is smooth. Reprinted from 'That Sounds So Goodby Carla Lalli Music.' Copyright © 2021 by Carla Lalli Music. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Andrea Gentl and Martin Hyers.Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

All Of It
Local Chef Spotlight: Sam Sifton on 'The New York Times Cooking No-Recipe Recipes'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 25:52


[REBROADCAST FROM March 15, 2021] Sam Sifton, food editor of The New York Times and founding editor of NYT Cooking, discusses The New York Times Cooking No-Recipe Recipes, the debut cookbook from the website and its app. The book has over 100 ideas for dishes meant to inspire -- all without specific measurements. Cooks are encouraged to add, subtract, and adapt the recipes to their own diets and palates.   Pasta PuttanescaAnchoviesGarlicOlive oilPastaCanned tomatoesOlivesCapersRed pepper flakesParmesan Sauté some anchovies and a lot of minced garlic in a lot of olive oil while your salted pasta water comes to a boil in a big pot. (How many anchovies? How many you got? I go for a minimum of four, and the same with cloves of garlic.) Add your pasta to the pot. When the fish are melted and the garlic's gone gold, add a large can of tomatoes and stir everything together. Let that simmer a while, and get a little thicker, then add the olives and capers, and red pepper flakes until it's as fiery as you like. Taste for salt and pepper. Keep simmering and, when the pasta is done to your liking, taste the sauce again, drain the pasta, and toss it with the sauce. Shower the dish with grated Parmesan and serve. Tip You can cook the dried pasta directly in the sauce if you like, adding a couple cups of water or chicken stock and covering the pan for 10 minutes or so, stirring occasionally. Reprinted from The New York Times Cooking No-Recipe Recipes. Text copyright © 2021 by Sam Sifton and The New York Times Company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by David Malosh and Food Styling by Simon Andrews. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House.

Before You Kill Yourself
Susan Burton: Anorexia, binge eating and hunger for feelings

Before You Kill Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 53:09


Susan Burton's memoir, Empty, is out now from Random House. She is an editor at This American Life, where the episodes she's produced include Ten Sessions, Five Women, and Tell Me I'm Fat. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Slate, The New Yorker, and others, and she is a former editor of Harper's. Her radio documentaries have won numerous awards, including an Overseas Press Club citation, and she received a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to do stories about teenagers. The film Unaccompanied Minors, which was directed by Freaks and Geeks creator Paul Feig, is based on one of her personal essays. Susan graduated from Yale in 1995. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and their two sons (one of whom she wrote about in Labor Day: True Birth Stories by America's Best Women Writers).Website: http://www.susanburton.net/If you want go from feeling hopeless to hopeful, lonely to connected and like a burden to a blessing, then go to 1-on-1 coaching, go to www.thrivewithleo.com. Let's get to tomorrow, together. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline800-273-TALK [800-273-8255]1-800-SUICIDE [800-784-2433]Teen Line (Los Angeles)800-852-8336The Trevor Project (LGBTQ Youth Hotline)866-488-7386National Domestic Violence Hotline800-799-SAFE [800-799-7233]Crisis Text LineText "Connect" to 741741 in the USALifeline Chathttps://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/International Suicide Hotlines: http://www.suicide.org/international-suicide-hotlines.htmlhttps://www.nowmattersnow.org/skillshttps://sobermeditations.libsyn.com/ www.suicidesafetyplan.com https://scaa.club/

The Gospel of Fire
Ep 208: Jessica Jackley - What It Means to Live In an Interfaith Family

The Gospel of Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 45:45


Jessica is an entrepreneur and investor focused on financial inclusion, the sharing economy, and social justice. She is best known as a cofounder of Kiva, the world's first p2p microlending site, which has facilitated over $1.5B in loans since its founding in 2005. Jessica is currently Founder and CEO of Alltruists, which creates volunteer and giving projects for kids, in a subscription box. She's also Managing Director and cofounder of Untapped Capital, and teaches entrepreneurship at USC. She has an MBA from Stanford, BA from Bucknell, certificate from Harvard, and is the author of CLAY WATER BRICK: Finding Inspiration from Entrepreneurs Who Do the Most with the Least (Random House). She lives in Los Angeles with her husband Reza Aslan and their four young children.

Everything is Fine
Designing An Independent Life

Everything is Fine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 54:05


Kim and Jenn sit down with Bonnie Siegler, a longtime graphic designer whose client list includes Late Night with Seth Meyers, the New Yorker, the Criterion Collection, Random House, 30 Rock, Sex and the City, This American Life and tons more. Bonnie walks us through her early career, creative partnerships —and what it finally took to strike out on her own.Don't forget: We have a Patreon! Sign up for invites to special events, exclusive content, and bonus EIF episodes: patreon.com/everythingisfineOur show's Instagram is @eifpodcast and you can find Kim on her blog Girls of a Certain Age. We're also on Twitter @theeifpodcast and Facebook. If you like the show, please rate or review it and don't forget to share it with your favorite 40+ friends. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

hr2 Hörbuch Zeit
Beer: Der letzte Tod - Dostojewski:Die Sanfte + eine peinliche Geschichte - Jahrhundertstimmen - Eine wundersame Rettung

hr2 Hörbuch Zeit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 33:48


Alex Beer: Der letzte Tod - Ein Fall für August Emmerich | Sprecher: Cornelius Obonya | 6 CD, 6 Std. 40 Min. | 20 € (UVP) | Random House audio || Zum 200. Geburtstag Dostojewskis am 11. November 2021| Fjodor Michailowitsch Dostojewski:Die Sanfte | Aus dem Russischen übersetzt von Wolfgang Kasack | Sprecher: Ulrich Hoffmann | 1 mp3-CD, 1 Std. 50 Min. | 10 Euro | DAV / Produktion von hr2-kultur || Fjodor Michailowitsch Dostojewski: Eine peinliche Geschichte | Aus dem Russischen übersetzt von Christiane Pöhlmann | Sprecher: Friedhelm Ptok | 1 mp3-CD, 1 Std. 43 Min.(gekürzt) | 10 Euro | DAV / Produktion vom BR || Michael Krüger, Prof. Ulrich Herbert, Hans Sarkowicz, Christiane Collorio (Hg.): Jahrhundertstimmen - Deutsche Geschichte in über 200 Originalaufnahmen | 1900 bis 1945 - Teil 1 | 3 mp3-CDs, ca. 24 Std. | 60 € (UVP) | Der Hörverlag / DRA, hr2 || Roswitha Dasch: Eine wundersame Rettung - Tamar ein Kinderschicksal im Holocaust | Sprecherinnen: Iris Berben, Sofia Bertolo und Tamar Dreifuss | 1 CD, 56 Min. | 15 Euro (UVP) | Ab 10 Jahren | Headroom ||

hr2 Hörbuch Zeit
Alex Beer: Der letzte Tod – Ein Fall für August Emmerich

hr2 Hörbuch Zeit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 7:40


Alex Beer: Der letzte Tod - Ein Fall für August Emmerich | Sprecher: Cornelius Obonya | 6 CD, 6 Std. 40 Min. | 20 € (UVP) | Random House audio ||

Corporate Crime Reporter Morning Minute
Tuesday November 2, 2021 DOJ Sues to Block Merger Between Random House and Simon & Schuster

Corporate Crime Reporter Morning Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 1:00


Tuesday November 2, 2021 Justice Department Sues to Block Merger Between Random House and Simon & Schuster

The Athletics Of Business
Episode 136: Pour Passion Into the Process, Part 2 with Phil Wall

The Athletics Of Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 36:46


Phil Wall is an award-winning filmmaker who has written, produced, directed, filmed, and edited three feature documentaries, and is currently in post-production on his fourth. A coach's son, Wall played for his dad at Roanoke Catholic High School and traces his filmmaking journey back to creating highlight videos for his team's championship seasons. He lives in Brooklyn, NY, where he works on independent and commercial narrative content.   Inspiration for The Standard (2:45) The Standard is a feature-length documentary about a 48-hour endurance challenge hosted by special forces combat veterans. Anyone can sign up to participate, but very few finish. GoRuck, a company that makes military-grade bags, apparel, and more, created the event to mimic combat situations and test their products.  Phil had worked on some early marketing videos for the company and participated in one of their 12-hour overnight challenges. Most participants finish this overnight challenge because it's centered on team building, but it was one of the most physically rigorous activities Phil, a longtime athlete, had ever done.  GoRuck ramped up their events a few years later and created their 48-hour challenge, a condensed version of the special forces assessment and selection criteria.   Takeaways From Filming (9:55) Both the participants and the cadre hosting the event enter an agreement: participants train and show up ready to do whatever the cadre tells them to; meanwhile, the cadre's job is to urge them to quit. They target the ones falling behind and give them special attention to convince them to quit, but a switch flips as soon as they do. The attitude turns to one of encouragement for how far they made.  It becomes clear their cadre are playing a role: one that's in indirect conflict with what they actually want. It's that conflict that inspired Phil to film The Standard. Whoever is out in front is winning, and the cadre capitalizes on that to make you feel like you don't belong. But the real standard is not quitting.  You can be the weakest link or lowest common denominator, but you might be the strongest in the next iteration. So it becomes getting to that next thing by redefining your role as needed and supporting those working around you. Recognizing when you're the weakest is invaluable and talking it out with who you're working with is the key to taking that next step forward. Filming The Book Keepers (18:20) Phil's recent documentary, The Book Keepers, is filmed from Phil's perspective. It follows his dad as he travels the country to promote Phil's mom, Carol Wall's, first book after her death. She received a book contract in 2010 for her memoir, Mr. Owita's Guide to Gardening, about her experience with breast cancer and how that coincided with a friendship she developed with a Kenyan gardener.  The book was released in 2014, but her cancer had returned during the final months of editing. She died in December of 2014, just one week before her book was named in the Top 10 of the Year.  Due to her illness, Random House canceled many promotional events and interviews, and she could never properly advocate for her story. So, Phil's dad began attending events on her behalf after her death.  For Phil and his family, it was a journey of loss many others could relate to, and The Book Keepers grew out of the need to capture that power of emotion. Storytelling was a way for not just Phil to heal but his family and his audience as well. The film premiered at the Austin Film Festival in August 2020 and won both the Jury Prize and Audience Award for Best Documentary Feature. What you'll learn in this episode: The inspiration behind Phil Wall's feature documentary, The Standard.  What Phil took away from filming.  Background on Phil's mom, Carol, and her memoir, Mr. Owita's Guide to Gardening. How his dad's journey to promote the memoir after his mother's death inspired his film The Book Keepers.. Additional resources: Phil Wall's website Phil Wall's LinkedIn Phil Wall's Twitter The Standard on Hulu The Book Keepers GoRuck

Inquisikids Daily
Who Was Eliza Hamilton?

Inquisikids Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 6:19


Who Was Eliza Hamilton? Join us today as we learn about one of the women who played a significant role in the young United States, Eliza Hamilton. Sources: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/hamilton-elizabeth-hamilton-1757-1854/ Kulling, Monica, and Valerio Fabbretti. Eliza Hamilton: Founding Mother. Random House, 2018. https://anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/episodes/Who-Was-Benjamin-Franklin-e160jh1 Benjamin Franklin episode https://anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/episodes/George-Washington--Farmer-e136olu George Washington episode https://anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/episodes/Who-was-Thomas-Jefferson-euiij5 Thomas Jefferson episode Send us listener mail! Send an audio message: anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/message Send an email: podcast@inquisikids.com

Cooking Up a Storm with Al Roker
Ina Garten's Parmesan Smashed Potatoes

Cooking Up a Storm with Al Roker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 27:25


Mashed potatoes are a cornerstone of so many Thanksgiving meals, but just what kind to make? Smooth or lumpy, classic or with a twist … the variations are almost endless. Here to help you out with a unique take on the classic dish is the one and only Ina Garten. Beloved for her innovative takes on classic recipes that home cooks can make themselves, her long-running show on the Food Network, Barefoot Contessa, has legions of loyal fans. She'll join us on Cooking Up a Storm with a very special Thanksgiving mashed potato recipe: Parmesan Smashed Potatoes. Parmesan Smashed PotatoesServes 6-8 3 pounds red potatoes, unpeeled1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided1½ cups half-and-half1/4 pound unsalted butter1/2 cup sour cream1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperPlace the potatoes and 1 tablespoon of salt in a 4-quart saucepan with cold water to cover.Bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer, covered, for 25 to 35 minutes, until the potatoes are completely tender. Drain.In a small saucepan, heat the half-and-half and butter.Put the potatoes into the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment and mix them for a few seconds on low speed, to break them up.Slowly add the hot cream and butter to the potatoes, mixing on the lowest speed (the last quarter of the cream and butter should be folded in by hand).Fold in the sour cream, Parmesan cheese, the remaining salt, and pepper; taste for seasoning and serve immediately.If the potatoes are too thick, add more hot cream and butter.Reprinted from The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. Copyright © 1999 by Ina Garten. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House.For this recipe and more, go to: https://www.today.com/podcasts/cooking-up-a-storm.

Rattlecast
ep. 116 - Ernest Hilbert

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 137:52


Ernest Hilbert's debut poetry collection Sixty Sonnets (2009) was described by X. J. Kennedy as “maybe the most arresting sequence we have had since John Berryman checked out of America.” His other books include All of You on the Good Earth (2013); Caligulan (2015), which was selected as the winner of the 2017 Poets' Prize; and Last One Out (2019). Hilbert currently keeps a heavily-encrypted dark web poetry site called Cocytus and a more public website to promote emerging poets called E-Verse Radio. Hilbert graduated with a doctorate in English Language and Literature from Oxford University, where he edited the Oxford Quarterly. Hilbert later served as poetry editor of Random House's magazine Bold Type in New York City and editor of Contemporary Poetry Review, published by the American Poetry Fund in Washington DC. He works as an antiquarian book dealer in Philadelphia, where he lives with his wife, Keeper of the Mediterranean Section at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and their son, Ian. Find the book and more at: https://www.ernesthilbert.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a spooky poem for Halloween. Next Week's Prompt: This was a lot of fun last time, so let's do another random street view poem. Randomstreetview.com is a site that randomly generates photographs of streets all over the world. Find a photo that speaks to you and write a poem about it. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 18: Horror Comics & Terror, Inc.

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 95:44


Happy Halloween! We're joined by comics scribe Daniel "D.G." Chichester to talk about the history of horror comics, Marvel's return to the genre in the early 1990s, and the macabre anti-hero Terror (whom Chichester co-created).  ----more---- Issue 18 Transcript   Mike: [00:00:00] It's small, but feisty, Mike: Welcome to Tencent Takes, the podcast where we dig up comic book characters' graves and misappropriate the bodies, one issue at a time. My name is Mike Thompson, and I am joined by my cohost, the Titan of terror herself, Jessika Frazer. Jessika: It is I. Mike: Today, we are extremely fortunate to have comics writer, Daniel, DG Chichester. Dan: Nice to see you both. Mike: Thank you so much for taking the time. You're actually our first official guest on the podcast. Dan: Wow. Okay. I'm going to take that as a good thing. That's great. Mike: Yeah. Well, if you're new to the show, the purpose of our [00:01:00] podcast as always is to look at the weirdest, silliest, coolest moments of comic books, and talk about them in ways that are fun and informative. In this case, we looking at also the spookiest moments, and how they're woven into the larger fabric of pop culture and history. Today, we're going to be talking about horror comics. We're looking at their overall history as well as their resurrection at Marvel in the early 1990s, and how it helped give birth to one of my favorite comic characters, an undead anti-hero who went by the name of Terror. Dan, before we started going down this road, could you tell us a little bit about your history in the comic book industry, and also where people can find you if they want to learn more about you and your work? Dan: Absolutely. At this point, people may not even know I had a history in comic books, but that's not true. Uh, I began at Marvel as an assistant in the mid-eighties while I was still going to film school and, semi quickly kind of graduated up, to a more official, [00:02:00] assistant editor position. Worked my way up through editorial, and then, segued into freelance writing primarily for, but also for DC and Dark Horse and worked on a lot of, semi-permanent titles, Daredevil's probably the best known of them. But I think I was right in the thick of a lot of what you're going to be talking about today in terms of horror comics, especially at Marvel, where I was fiercely interested in kind of getting that going. And I think pushed for certain things, and certainly pushed to be involved in those such as the Hellraiser and Nightbreed Clive Barker projects and Night Stalkers and, uh, and Terror Incorporated, which we're going to talk about. And wherever else I could get some spooky stuff going. And I continued on in that, heavily until about 96 / 97, when the big crash kind of happened, continued on through about 99 and then have not really been that actively involved since then. But folks can find out what I'm doing now, if they go to story maze.substack.com, where I have a weekly newsletter, which features [00:03:00] new fiction and some things that I think are pretty cool that are going on in storytelling, and also a bit of a retrospective of looking back at a lot of the work that I did. Mike: Awesome. Before we actually get started talking about horror comics, normally we talk about one cool thing that we have read or watched recently, but because this episode is going to be dropping right before Halloween, what is your favorite Halloween movie or comic book? Dan: I mean, movies are just terrific. And there's so many when I saw that question, especially in terms of horror and a lot of things immediately jumped to mind. The movie It Follows, the recent It movie, The Mist, Reanimator, are all big favorites. I like horror movies that really kind of get under your skin and horrify you, not just rack up a body count. But what I finally settled on as a favorite is probably John Carpenter's the Thing, which I just think is one of the gruesomest what is going to happen next? What the fuck is going to happen next?[00:04:00] And just utter dread. I mean, there's just so many things that combined for me on that one. And I think in terms of comics, I've recently become just a huge fan of, and I'm probably going to slaughter the name, but Junji Ito's work, the Japanese manga artist. And, Uzumaki, which is this manga, which is about just the bizarreness of this town, overwhelmed with spirals of all things. And if you have not read that, it is, it is the trippiest most unsettling thing I've read in, in a great long time. So happy Halloween with that one. Mike: So that would be mango, right? Dan: Yeah. Yeah. So you'd make sure you read it in the right order, or otherwise it's very confusing, so. Mike: Yeah, we actually, haven't talked a lot about manga on this. We probably should do a deep dive on it at some point. But, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: Well, I'm going to bring it down a little bit more silly because I've always been a fan of horror and the macabre and supernatural. So always grew up seeking creepy media as [00:05:00] a rule, but I also loves me some silliness. So the last three or so years, I've had a tradition of watching Hocus Pocus with my friend, Rob around Halloween time. And it's silly and it's not very heavy on the actual horror aspect, but it's fun. And it holds up surprisingly well. Mike: Yeah, we have all the Funkos of the Sanderson sisters in our house. Jessika: It's amazing watching it in HD, their costumes are so intricate and that really doesn't come across on, you know, old VHS or watching it on television back in the day. And it's just, it's so fun. How much, just time and effort it looks like they put into it, even though some of those details really weren't going to translate. Dan: How very cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Yeah. So, but I also really like actual horror, so I'm also in the next couple of days is going to be a visiting the 1963 Haunting of Hill House because that's one of my favorites. Yeah. It's so good. And used to own the book that the movie was based on also. And seen all the [00:06:00] iterations and it's the same storyline the recent Haunting of Hill house is based on, which is great. That plot line has been reworked so many times, but it's such a great story, I'm just not shocked in the least that it would run through so many iterations and still be accepted by the public in each of its forms. Mike: Yeah. I really liked that Netflix interpretation of it, it was really good. Dan: They really creeped everything out. Mike: Yeah. There's a YouTuber called Lady Night, The Brave, and she does a really great summary breakdown explaining a lot of the themes and it's like almost two hours I think, of YouTube video, but she does these really lovely retrospectives. So, highly recommend you check that out. If you want to just think about that the Haunting of Hill House more. Jessika: Oh, I do. Yes. Mike: I'm going to split the difference between you two. When I was growing up, I was this very timid kid and the idea of horror just creeped me out. And so I avoided it like the plague. And then when I was in high [00:07:00] school, I had some friends show me some movies and I was like, these are great, why was I afraid of this stuff? And so I kind of dove all the way in. But my preferred genre is horror comedy. That is the one that you can always get me in on. And, I really love this movie from the mid-nineties called the Frighteners, which is a horror comedy starring Michael J. Fox, and it's directed by Peter Jackson. And it was written by Peter Jackson and his partner, Fran Walsh. And it was a few years before they, you know, went on to make a couple of movies based on this little known franchise called Lord of the Rings. But it's really wild. It's weird, and it's funny, and it has some genuine jump scare moments. And there's this really great ghost story at the core of it. And the special effects at the time were considered amazing and groundbreaking, but now they're kind of, you look at, and you're like, oh, that's, high-end CG, high-end in the mid-nineties. Okay. But [00:08:00] yeah, like I said, or comedies are my absolute favorite things to watch. That's why Cabin in the Woods always shows up in our horror rotation as well. Same with Tucker and Dale vs Evil. That's my bread and butter. With comic books, I go a little bit creepier. I think I talked about the Nice House on the Lake, that's the current series that I'm reading from DC that's genuinely creepy and really thoughtful and fun. And it's by James Tynion who also wrote Something That's Killing the Children. So those are excellent things to read if you're in the mood for a good horror comic. Dan: Great choice on the Frighteners. That's I think an unsung classic, that I'm going to think probably came out 10 years too early. Mike: Yeah. Dan: It's such a mashup of different, weird vibes, that it would probably do really, really well today. But at that point in time, it was just, what is this? You know? Cause it's, it's just cause the horrifying thing in it are really horrifying. And, uh, Gary Busey's son, right, plays the evil ghost and he is just trippy, off the wall, you know, horrifying. [00:09:00] Mike: Yeah. And it starts so silly, and then it kind of just continues to go creepier and creepier, and by the time that they do some of the twists revealing his, you know, his agent in the real world, it's a genuine twist. Like, I was really surprised the first time I saw it and I - Dan: Yeah. Mike: was so creeped out, but yeah. Dan: Plus it's got R. Lee Ermey as the army ghost, which is just incredible. So, Mike: Yeah. And, Chi McBride is in it, and, Jeffrey Combs. Dan: Oh, oh that's right, right. right. Mike: Yeah. So yeah, it's a lot of fun. Mike: All right. So, I suppose we should saunter into the graveyard, as it were, and start talking about the history of horror comics. So, Dan, obviously I know that you're familiar with horror comics, Dan: A little bit. Mike: Yeah. What about you, Jess? You familiar with horror comics other than what we've talked about in the show? Jessika: I started getting into it once you and I started, you know, talking more on the [00:10:00] show. And so I grabbed a few things. I haven't looked through all of them yet, but I picked up some older ones. I did just recently pick up, it'll be more of a, kind of a funny horror one, but they did a recent Elvira and Vincent Price. So, yeah, so I picked that up, but issue one of that. So it's sitting on my counter ready for me to read right now. Mike: Well, and that's funny, cause Elvira actually has a really long, storied history in comic books. Like she first appeared in kind of like the revival of House of Mystery that DC did. And then she had an eighties series that had over a hundred issues that had a bunch of now major names involved. And she's continued to have series like, you can go to our website and get autographed copies of her recent series from, I think Dynamite. Jessika: That's cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Nice. Mike: Speaking of horror comedy Elvira is great. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I recently showed Sarah the Elvira Mistress of the Dark movie and she was, I think really sad that I hadn't showed it to her sooner. Jessika: [00:11:00] That's another one I need to go watch this week. Wow. Don't- nobody call me. I'm just watching movies all week. Dan: Exactly. Mike: It's on a bunch of different streaming services, I think right now. Well it turns out that horror comics, have pretty much been a part of the industry since it really became a proven medium. You know, it wasn't long after comics became a legit medium in their own, right that horror elements started showing up in superhero books, which like, I mean, it isn't too surprising. Like the 1930's was when we got the Universal classic movie monsters, so it makes a lot of sense that those kinds of characters would start crossing over into comic books, just to take advantage of that popularity. Jerry Siegel and Joel Schuster, the guys who created Superman, actually created the supernatural investigator called Dr. Occult in New Fun Comics three years before they brought Superman to life. And Dr. Occult still shows up in DC books. Like, he was a major character in the Books of Magic with Neil Gaiman. I think he may show up in Sandman later on. I can't remember. Jessika: Oh, okay. Dan: I wouldn't be surprised. Neil would find ways to mine that. [00:12:00] Mike: Yeah. I mean, that was a lot of what the Sandman was about, was taking advantage of kind of long forgotten characters that DC had had and weaving them into his narratives. And, if you're interested in that, we talk about that in our book club episodes, which we're currently going through every other episode. So the next episode after this is going to be the third episode of our book club, where we cover volumes five and six. So, horror comics though really started to pick up in the 1940s. There's multiple comic historians who say that the first ongoing horror series was Prized Comics, New Adventures of Frankenstein, which featured this updated take on the original story by Mary Shelley. It took place in America. The monster was named Frankenstein. He was immediately a terror. It's not great, but it's acknowledged as being really kind of the first ongoing horror story. And it's really not even that much of a horror story other than it featured Frankenstein's monster. But after that, a number of publishers started to put out adaptations of classic horror stories for awhile. So you had [00:13:00] Avon Publications making it official in 1946 with the comic Erie, which is based on the first real dedicated horror comic. Yeah. This is the original cover to Erie Comics. Number one, if you could paint us a word picture. Dan: Wow. This is high end stuff as it's coming through. Well it looks a lot like a Zine or something, you know it's got a very, Mac paint logo from 1990, you know, it's, it's your, your typical sort of like, ooh, I'm shaky kind of logo. That's Eerie Comics. There's a Nosferatu looking character. Who's coming down some stairs with the pale moon behind him. It, he's got a knife in his hand, so, you know, he's up to no good. And there is a femme fatale at the base of the stairs. She may have moved off of some train tracks to get here. And, uh, she's got a, uh, a low, cut dress, a lot of leg and the arms and the wrists are bound, but all this for only 10. cents. So, I think there's a, there's a bargain there.[00:14:00] Mike: That is an excellent description. Thank you. So, what's funny is that Erie at the time was the first, you know, official horror comic, really, but it only had one issue that came out and then it sort of vanished from sight. It came back with a new series that started with a new number one in the 1950s, but this was the proverbial, the shot that started the war. You know, we started seeing a ton of anthology series focusing on horror, like Adventures into the Unknown, which ran into the 1960s and then Amazing Mysteries and Marvel Tales were repurposed series for Marvel that they basically changed the name of existing series into these. And they started doing kind of macabre, weird stories. And then, we hit the 1950s. And the early part of the 1950s was when horror comics really seemed to take off and experienced this insane success. We've talked about how in the post-WWII America, superhero comics were kind of declining in [00:15:00] popularity. By the mid 1950s, only three heroes actually had their own books and that was Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. Which, I didn't realize that until I was doing research. I didn't, I just assumed that there were other superhero comics at the time. But we started seeing comics about horror and crime and romance really starting to get larger shares of the market. And then EC Comics was one of those doing gangbuster business during this whole era. Like, this was when we saw those iconic series, the Haunt of Fear, the Vault of Horror, the Crypt of Terror, which was eventually rebranded to Tales from the Crypt. Those all launched and they found major success. And then the bigger publishers were also getting in on this boom. During the first half of the 1950s Atlas, which eventually became Marvel, released almost 400 issues across 18 horror titles. And then American Comics Group released almost 125 issues between five different horror titles. Ace comics did almost a hundred issues between five titles. I'm curious. I'm gonna ask both of you, what [00:16:00] do you think the market share of horror comics was at the time? Dan: In terms of comics or in terms of just like newsstand, magazine, distribution. Mike: I'm going to say in terms of distribution. Dan: I mean, I know they were phenomenally successful. I would, be surprised if it was over 60%. Mike: Okay. How about. Jessika: Oh, goodness. Let's throw a number out. I'm going to say 65 just because I want to get close enough, but maybe bump it up just a little bit. This is a contest now. Dan: The precision now, like the 65. Jessika: Yes. Mike: Okay. Well, obviously we don't have like a hard definite number, but there was a 2009 article from reason magazine saying that horror books made up a quarter of all comics by 1953. So, so you guys were overestimating it, but it was still pretty substantial. At the same time, we were also seeing a surge in horror films. Like, the 1950s are known as the atomic age and media reflected [00:17:00] societal anxiety, at the possibility of nuclear war and to a lesser extent, white anxiety about societal changes. So this was the decade that gave us Invasion of the Body Snatchers The Thing from Another World, which led to John Carpenter's The Thing eventually. Um, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Hammer horror films also started to get really huge during this time. So we saw the beginning of stuff like Christopher Lee's, Dracula series of films. So the fifties were like a really good decade for horror, I feel. But at the same time, violent crime in America started to pick up around this period. And people really started focusing on juvenile criminals and what was driving them. So, there were a lot of theories about why this was going on and no one's ever really come up with a definite answer, but there was the psychiatrist named Frederick Wortham who Dan, I yeah. Dan: Oh yeah, psychiatrist in big air quotes, yeah. Mike: In quotes. Yeah. [00:18:00] Yeah. And he was convinced that the rise in crime was due to comics, and he spent years writing and speaking against them. He almost turned it into a cottage industry for himself. And this culminated in 1954, when he published a book called Seduction of the Innocent, that blamed comic books for the rise in juvenile delinquency, and his arguments are laughable. Like, I mean, there's just no way around it. Like you read this stuff and you can't help, but roll your eyes and chuckle. But, at the time comics were a relatively new medium, you know, and people really only associated them with kids. And his arguments were saying, oh, well, Wonder Woman was a lesbian because of her strength and independence, which these days, I feel like that actually has a little bit of credibility, but, like, I don't know. But I don't really feel like that's contributing to the delinquency of the youth. You know, and then he also said that Batman and Robin were in a homosexual relationship. And then my favorite was that Superman comics were [00:19:00] un-American and fascist. Dan: Well. Mike: All right. Dan: There's people who would argue that today. Mike: I mean, but yeah, and then he actually, he got attention because there were televised hearings with the Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency. I mean, honestly, every time I think about Seduction of the Innocent and how it led to the Comics Code Authority. I see the parallels with Tipper Gore's Parent Music Resource Center, and how they got the Parental Advisory sticker on certain music albums, or Joe Lieberman's hearings on video games in the 1990's and how that led to the Electronic Systems Reading Board system, you know, where you provide almost like movie ratings to video games. And Wortham also reminds me a lot of this guy named Jack Thompson, who was a lawyer in the nineties and aughts. And he was hell bent on proving a link between violent video games and school shootings. And he got a lot of media attention at the time until he was finally disbarred for his antics. But there was this [00:20:00] definite period where people were trying to link video games and violence. And, even though the statistics didn't back that up. And, I mean, I think about this a lot because I used to work in video games. I spent almost a decade working in the industry, but you know, it's that parallel of anytime there is a new form of media that is aimed at kids, it feels like there is a moral panic. Dan: Well, I think it goes back to what you were saying before about, you know, even as, as things change in society, you know, when people in society get at-risk, you know, you went to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Right. Which is classically thought to be a response to communism, you know, and the feelings of communist oppression and you know, the different, you know, the other, and it's the same thing. I think every single one of these is just a proof point of if you want to become, suddenly well-known like Lieberman or Wortham or anything, you know, pick the other that the older generation doesn't really understand, right? Maybe now there are more adults playing video games, but it's probably still perceived as a more juvenile [00:21:00] thing or comics or juvenile thing, or certain types of movies are a juvenile thing, you know, pick the other pick on it, hold it up as the weaponized, you know, piece, and suddenly you're popular. And you've got a great flashpoint that other people can rally around and blame, as if one single thing is almost ever the cause of everything. And I always think it's interesting, you know, the EC Comics, you know, issues in terms of, um, Wortham's witch hunt, you know, the interesting thing about those is yet they were gruesome and they are gruesome in there, but they're also by and large, I don't know the other ones as well, but I know the EC Comics by and large are basically morality plays, you know, they're straight up morality plays in the sense that the bad guys get it in the end, almost every time, like they do something, they do some horrific thing, but then the corpse comes back to life and gets them, you know, so there's, there's always a comeuppance where the scales balance. But that was of course never going to be [00:22:00] an argument when somebody can hold up a picture of, you know, a skull, you know, lurching around, you know, chewing on the end trails of something. And then that became all that was talked about. Mike: Yeah, exactly. Well, I mean, spring boarding off of that, you know, worth them and the subcommittee hearings and all that, they led to the comics magazine association of America creating the Comics Code Authority. And this was basically in order to avoid government regulation. They said, no, no, no, we'll police ourselves so that you don't have to worry about this stuff. Which, I mean, again, that's what we did with the SRB. It was a response to that. We could avoid government censorship. So the code had a ton of requirements that each book had to meet in order to receive the Comics Code Seal of Approval on the cover. And one of the things you couldn't do was have quote, scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with walking dead or torture, which I mean,[00:23:00] okay. So the latter half of the 1950's saw a lot of these dedicated horror series, you know, basically being shut down or they drastically changed. This is, you know, the major publishers really freaked out. So Marvel and DC rebranded their major horror titles. They were more focused on suspense or mystery or Sci-Fi or superheroes in a couple of cases, independent publishers, didn't really have to worry about the seal for different reasons. Like, some of them were able to rely on the rep for publishing wholesome stuff like Dell or Gold Key. I think Gold Key at the time was doing a lot of the Disney books. So they just, they were like, whatever. Dan: Right, then EC, but, but EC had to shut down the whole line and then just became mad. Right? I mean, that's that was the transition at which William, you know, Gains - Mike: Yeah. Dan: basically couldn't contest what was going on. Couldn't survive the spotlight. You know, he testified famously at that hearing. But had to give up all of [00:24:00] that work that was phenomenally profitable for them. And then had to fall back to Mad Magazine, which of course worked out pretty well. Mike: Yeah, exactly. By the end of the 1960s, though, publishers started to kind of gently push back a little bit like, Warren publishing, and Erie publications, like really, they didn't give a shit. Like Warren launched a number of horror titles in the sixties, including Vampirilla, which is like, kind of, I feel it's sort of extreme in terms of both sex and horror, because I mean, we, we all know what Vampirilla his costume is. It hasn't changed in the 50, approximately 50 years that it's been out like. Dan: It's like, what can you do with dental floss, Right. When you were a vampire? I mean, that's basically like, she doesn't wear much. Mike: No, I mean, she never has. And then by the end of the sixties, Marvel and DC started to like kind of steer some of their books back towards the horror genre. Like how some Mystery was one of them where it, I think with issue 1 75, that was when they [00:25:00] took away, took it away from John Jones and dial H for Hero. And they were like, no, no, no, no. We're going to, we're going to bring, Cain back as the host and start telling horror morality plays again, which is what they were always doing. And this meant that the Comics Code Authority needed to update their code. So in 1971, they revised it to be a little bit more horror friendly. Jessika: Scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with, walking dead or torture shall not be used. Vampires, ghouls and werewolves shall be permitted to be used when handled in the classic traditions, such as Frankenstein, Dracula, and other high caliber literary works written by Edgar Allen Poe, Saki, Conan Doyle, and other respected authors whose works are read in schools around the world. Mike: But at this point, Marvel and DC really jumped back into the horror genre. This was when we started getting books, like the tomb of Dracula, Ghost Rider, where will finite and son of Satan, and then DC had a [00:26:00] bunch of their series like they had, what was it? So it was originally The Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love, and then it eventually got retitled to Forbidden Tales of the Dark Mansion. Like, just chef's kiss on that title. Dan: You can take that old Erie comic and throw, you know, the Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love as the title on that. And it would work, you know. Mike: I know. Right. So Dan, I'm curious, what is your favorite horror comic or comic character from this era? Dan: I would say, it was son of Satan, because it felt so trippy and forbidden, and I think comics have always, especially mainstream comics you know, I've always responded also to what's out there. Right. I don't think it's just a loosening the restrictions at that point, but in that error, what's going on, you're getting a lot of, I think the films of Race with the Devil and you're getting the Exorcist and you're getting, uh, the Omen, you know, Rosemary's baby. right. Satanism, [00:27:00] the devil, right. It's, it's high in pop culture. So true to form. You know, I think Son of Satan is in some ways, like a response of Marvel, you know, to that saying, let's glom onto this. And for a kid brought up in the Catholic church, there was a certain eeriness to this, ooh, we're reading about this. It's like, is it really going to be Satanism? And cause I was very nervous that we were not allowed even watch the Exorcist in our home, ever. You know, I didn't see the Exorcist until I was like out of high school. And I think also the character as he looks is just this really trippy look, right. At that point, if you're not familiar with the character, he's this buff dude, his hair flares up into horns, he just wears a Cape and he carries a giant trident, he's got a massive pentacle, I think a flaming pentacle, you know, etched in his chest. Um, he's ready to do business, ya know, in some strange form there. So for me, he was the one I glommed on to the most. [00:28:00] Mike: Yeah. Well, I mean, it was that whole era, it was just, it was Gothic horror brought back and Satanism and witchcraft is definitely a part of that genre. Dan: Sure. Mike: So, that said, kind of like any trend horror comics, you know, they have their rise and then they started to kind of fall out of popularity by the end of the seventies or the early eighties. I feel like it was a definite end of the era when both House of Mystery and Ghost Writer ended in 1983. But you know, there were still some individual books that were having success, but it just, it doesn't feel like Marvel did a lot with horror comics during the eighties. DC definitely had some luck with Alan Moore's run of the Swamp Thing. And then there was stuff like Hellblazer and Sandman. Which, as I mentioned, we're doing our book club episodes for, but also gave rise to Vertigo Comics, you know, in the early nineties. Not to say that horror comics still weren't a thing during this time, but it seems like the majority of them were coming from indie publishers. Off the top of my head, one example I think of still is Dead World, which basically created a zombie apocalypse [00:29:00] universe. And it started with Aero comics. It was created in the late eighties, and it's still going today. I think it's coming out from IDW now. But at the same time, it's not like American stopped enjoying horror stuff. Like this was the decade where we got Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm street, Evil Dead, Hellraiser, Poltergeist, Child's Play, just to name a few of the franchises that we were introduced to. And, I mentioned Hellraiser. I love Hellraiser, and Dan, I know that you have a pretty special connection to that brand. Dan: I do. I put pins in my face every night just to kind of keep my complexion, you know? Mike: So, let's transition over to the nineties and Marvel and let's start that off with Epic Comics. Epic started in the eighties, and it was basically a label that would print, create our own comics. And they eventually started to use label to produce, you know, in quotes, mature comics. So Wikipedia says that this was your first editorial job at Marvel was with the [00:30:00] Epic Line. Is that correct? Dan: Well, I'll go back and maybe do just a little correction on Epic's mission if you don't mind. Mike: Yeah, yeah. Dan: You know, first, which is it was always creator owned, and it did start as crude. And, but I don't think that ever then transitioned into more mature comics, sometimes that just was what creator-owned comics were. Right. That was just part of the mission. And so as a creator-owned imprint, it could be anything, it could be the silliest thing, it could be the most mature thing. So it was always, you know, part of what it was doing, and part of the mission of doing creator-owned comics, and Archie Goodwin was the editor in chief of that line, was really to give creators and in to Marvel. If we gave them a nice place to play with their properties, maybe they would want to go play in the mainstream Marvel. So you might get a creator who would never want to work for Marvel, for whatever reason, they would have a great Epic experience doing a range of things, and then they would go into this. So there was always levels of maturity and we always looked at it as very eclectic and challenging, you know, sometimes in a good [00:31:00] way. So I'll have to go back to Wikipedia and maybe correct them. My first job was actually, I was on the Marvel side and it was as the assistant to the assistant, to the editor in chief. So I would do all of the grunt work and the running around that the assistant to the editor in chief didn't want to do. And she would turn to me and say, Dan, you're going to go run around the city and find this thing for Jim Shooter. Now, then I did that for about five or six months, I was still in film school, and then left, which everyone was aghast, you don't leave Marvel comics, by choice. And, but I had, I was still in school. I had a summer job already sort of set up, and I left to go take that exciting summer job. And then I was called over the summer because there was an opening in the Epic line. And they want to know if I'd be interested in taking on this assistant editor's job. And I said, it would have to be part-time cause I still had a semester to finish in school, but they were intrigued and I was figuring, oh, well this is just kind of guaranteed job. [00:32:00] Never knowing it was going to become career-like, and so that was then sort of my second job. Mike: Awesome. So this is going to bring us to the character of Terror. So he was introduced as a character in the Shadow Line Saga, which was one of those mature comics, it was like a mature superhero universe. That took place in a few different series under the Epic imprint. There was Dr. Zero, there was St. George, and then there was Power Line. Right. Dan: That's correct, yep. Mike: And so the Shadow Line Saga took his name from the idea that there were these beings called Shadows, they were basically super powered immortal beings. And then Terror himself first appeared as Shrek. He's this weird looking enforcer for a crime family in St. George. And he becomes kind of a recurring nemesis for the main character. He's kind of like the street-level boss while it's hinting that there's going to be a eventual confrontation between the main character of St. George and Dr. Zero, who is kind of [00:33:00] a Superman character, but it turns out he has been manipulating humanity for, you know, millennia at this point. Dan: I think you've encapsulated it quite well. Mike: Well, thank you. So the Shadow Line Saga, that only lasted for about what a year or two? Dan: Probably a couple of years, maybe a little over. There was about, I believe, eight to nine issues of each of the, the main comics, the ones you just cited. And then we segued those over to, sort of, uh, an omni series we call Critical Mass, which brought together all three characters or storylines. And then try to tell this, excuse the pun, epic, you know story, which will advance them all. And so wrapped up a lot of loose ends and, um, you know, became quite involved now. Mike: Okay. Dan: It ran about seven or eight issues. Mike: Okay. Now a couple of years after Terror was introduced under the Epic label, Marvel introduced a new Ghost Rider series in 1990 that hit that sweet spot of like nineties extreme with a capital X and, and, you know, [00:34:00] it also gave us a spooky anti heroes like that Venn diagram, where it was like spooky and extreme and rides a motorcycle and right in the middle, you had Ghost Rider, but from what I understand the series did really well, commercially for Marvel. Comichron, which is the, the comic sales tracking site, notes that early issues were often in the top 10 books sold each month for 91. Like there are eight issues of Ghost Rider, books that are in the top 100 books for that year. So it's not really surprising that Marvel decided to go in really hard with supernatural characters. And in 1992, we had this whole batch of horror hero books launch. We had Spirits of Vengeance, which was a spinoff from Ghost Rider, which saw a Ghost Rider teaming up with Johnny Blaze, and it was the original Ghost Writer. And he didn't have a hellfire motorcycle this time, but he had a shotgun that would fire hell fire, you know, and he had a ponytail, it was magnificent. And then there was also the Night Stalkers, [00:35:00] which was a trio of supernatural investigators. There was Hannibal King and Blade and oh, I'm blanking on the third one. Dan: Frank Drake. Mike: Yeah. And Frank Drake was a vampire, right? Dan: And he was a descendant of Dracula, but also was a vampire who had sort of been cured. Um, he didn't have a hunger for human blood, but he still had a necessity for some type of blood and possessed all the attributes, you know, of a vampire, you know, you could do all the powers, couldn't go out in the daylight, that sort of thing. So, the best and worst of both worlds. Mike: Right. And then on top of that, we had the Dark Hold, which it's kind of like the Marvel equivalent of the Necronomicon is the best way I can describe it. Dan: Absolutely. Yup. Mike: And that's showed up in Agents of Shield since then. And they just recently brought it into the MCU. That was a thing that showed up in Wanda Vision towards the end. So that's gonna clearly reappear. And then we also got Morbius who is the living vampire from [00:36:00] Spider-Man and it's great. He shows up in this series and he's got this very goth rock outfit, is just it's great. Dan: Which looked a lot like how Len Kaminsky dressed in those days in all honesty. Mike: Yeah, okay. Dan: So Len will now kill me for that, but. Mike: Oh, well, but yeah, so these guys were all introduced via a crossover event called Rise of the Midnight Sons, which saw all of these heroes, you know, getting their own books. And then they also teamed up with Dr. Strange to fight against Lilith the mother of demons. And she was basically trying to unleash her monstrous spawn across the world. And this was at the same time the Terror wound up invading the Marvel Universe. So if you were going to give an elevator pitch for Terror in the Marvel Universe, how would you describe him? Dan: I actually wrote one down, I'll read it to you, cause you, you know, you put that there and was like, oh gosh, I got to like now pitch this. A mythic manifestation of fear exists in our times, a top dollar mercenary for hire using a supernatural [00:37:00] ability to attach stolen body parts to himself in order to activate the inherit ability of the original owner. A locksmith's hand or a marksman, his eye or a kickboxer his legs, his gruesome talent gives him the edge to take on the jobs no one else can, he accomplishes with Savage, restyle, scorn, snark, and impeccable business acumen. So. Mike: That's so good. It's so good. I just, I have to tell you the twelve-year-old Mike is like giddy to be able to talk to you about this. Dan: I was pretty giddy when I was writing this stuff. So that's good. Mike: So how did Terror wind up crossing into the Marvel Universe? Like, because he just showed shows up in a couple of cameos in some Daredevil issues that you also wrote. I believe. Dan: Yeah, I don't know if he'd showed up before the book itself launched that might've, I mean, the timing was all around the same time. But everybody who was involved with Terror, love that Terror and Terror Incorporated, which was really actual title. Love the hell out of [00:38:00] the book, right. And myself, the editors, Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief, we all knew it was weird and unique. And, at one point when I, you know, said to Carl afterwards, well I'm just gonna take this whole concept and go somewhere else with it, he said, you can't, you made up something that, you know, can't really be replicated without people knowing exactly what you're doing. It's not just another guy with claws or a big muscle guy. How many people grab other people's body parts? So I said, you know, fie on me, but we all loved it. So when, the Shadowline stuff kind of went away, uh, and he was sort of kicking out there is still, uh, Carl came to me one day and, and said, listen, we love this character. We're thinking of doing something with horror in Marvel. This was before the Rise of the Midnight Sons. So it kind of came a little bit ahead of that. I think this eventually would become exactly the Rise of the Midnight Sons, but we want to bring together a lot of these unused horror characters, like Werewolf by Night, Man Thing, or whatever, but we want a central kind of [00:39:00] character who, navigates them or maybe introduces them. Wasn't quite clear what, and they thought Terror, or Shrek as he still was at that point, could be that character. He could almost be a Crypt Keeper, maybe, it wasn't quite fully baked. And, so we started to bounce this around a little bit, and then I got a call from Carl and said, yeah, that's off. We're going to do something else with these horror characters, which again would eventually become probably the Midnight Sons stuff. But he said, but we still want to do something with it. You know? So my disappointment went to, oh, what do you mean? How could we do anything? He said, what if you just bring him into the Marvel Universe? We won't say anything about what he did before, and just use him as a character and start over with him operating as this high-end mercenary, you know, what's he going to do? What is Terror Incorporated, and how does he do business within the Marvel world? And so I said, yes, of course, I'm not going to say that, you know, any quicker and just jumped into [00:40:00] it. And I didn't really worry about the transition, you know, I wasn't thinking too much about, okay. How does he get from Shadow Line world, to earth 616 or whatever, Marcus McLaurin, who was the editor. God bless him, for years would resist any discussion or no, no, it's not the same character. Marcus, it's the same character I'm using the same lines. I'm having him referenced the same fact that he's had different versions of the word terrors, his name at one point, he makes a joke about the Saint George complex. I mean, it's the same character. Mike: Yeah. Dan: But , you know, Marcus was a very good soldier to the Marvel hierarchy. So we just really brought him over and we just went all in on him in terms of, okay, what could a character like this play in the Marvel world? And he played really well in certain instances, but he certainly was very different than probably anything else that was going on at the time. Mike: Yeah. I mean, there certainly wasn't a character like him before. So all the Wikias, like [00:41:00] Wikipedia, all the Marvel fan sites, they all list Daredevil 305 as Terror's first official appearance in. Dan: Could be. Mike: Yeah, but I want to talk about that for a second, because that is, I think the greatest villain that I've ever seen in a Marvel comic, which was the Surgeon General, who is this woman who is commanding an army of like, I mean, basically it's like a full-scale operation of that urban myth of - Dan: Yeah. Mike: -the dude goes home with an attractive woman that he meets at the club. And then he wakes up in a bathtub full of ice and he's missing organs. Dan: Yeah. You know, sometimes, you know, that was certainly urban myth territory, and I was a big student of urban myths and that was the sort of thing that I think would show up in the headlines every three to six months, but always one of those probably friend of a friend stories that. Mike: Oh yeah. Dan: Like a razor an apple or something like that, that never actually sort of tracks back. Mike: Well, I mean, the thing now is it's all edibles in candy and they're like, all the news outlets are showing officially [00:42:00] branded edibles. Which, what daddy Warbucks mother fucker. Jessika: Mike knows my stand on this. Like, no, no, nobody is buying expensive edibles. And then putting them in your child's candy. Like, No, no, that's stupid. Dan: No, it's the, it's the, easier version of putting the LSD tab or wasting your pins on children in Snickers bars. Jessika: Right. Dan: Um, but but I think, that, that storyline is interesting, Mike, cause it's the, it's one of the few times I had a plotline utterly just completely rejected by an editor because I think I was doing so much horror stuff at the time. Cause I was also concurrently doing the Hellraiser work, the Night Breed work. It would have been the beginning of the Night Stalkers work, cause I was heavily involved with the whole Midnight Sons work. And I went so far on the first plot and it was so grizzly and so gruesome that, Ralph Macchio who was the editor, called me up and said, yeah, this title is Daredevil. It's not Hellraiser. So I had to kind of back off [00:43:00] and realize, uh, yeah, I put a little too much emphasis on the grisliness there. So. Mike: That's amazing. Dan: She was an interesting, exploration of a character type. Mike: I'm really sad that she hasn't showed back up, especially cause it feels like it'd be kind of relevant these days with, you know, how broken the medical system is here in America. Dan: Yeah. It's, it's funny. And I never played with her again, which is, I think one of my many Achilles heels, you know, as I would sometimes introduce characters and then I would just not go back to them for some reason, I was always trying to kind of go forward onto something new. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Is there anything about Terror's character that you related to at the time, or now even. Dan: Um, probably being very imperious, very complicated, having a thing for long coats. Uh, I think all of those probably, you know, work then and now, I've kind of become convinced weirdly enough over time, that Terror was a character who [00:44:00] and I, you know, I co-created him with Margaret Clark and, and Klaus Janson, but I probably did the most work with him over the years, you know? So I feel maybe a little bit more ownership, but I've sort of become convinced that he was just his own thing, and he just existed out there in the ether, and all I was ultimately was a conduit that I was, I was just channeling this thing into our existence because he came so fully formed and whenever I would write him, he would just kind of take over the page and take over the instance. That's always how I've viewed him, which is different than many of the other things that I've written. Mike: He's certainly a larger than life personality, and in every sense of that expression. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I'm sorry for the terrible pun. Okay. So we've actually talked a bit about Terror, but I [00:45:00] feel like we need to have Jessika provide us with an overall summary of his brief series. Jessika: So the series is based on the titular character, of course, Terror, who is unable to die and has the ability to replace body parts and gains the skill and memory of that limb. So he might use the eye of a sharpshooter to improve his aim or the arm of an artist for a correct rendering. And because of the inability for his body to die, the dude looks gnarly. His face is a sick green color. He has spike whiskers coming out of the sides of his face, and he mostly lacks lips, sometimes he has lips, but he mostly lacks lips. So we always has this grim smile to his face. And he also has a metal arm, which is awesome. I love that. And he interchanges all of the rest of his body parts constantly. So in one scene he'll have a female arm and in another one it'll sport, an other worldly tentacle. [00:46:00] He states that his business is fear, but he is basically a paid mercenary, very much a dirty deeds, although not dirt cheap; Terror charges, quite a hefty sum for his services, but he is willing to do almost anything to get the job done. His first job is ending someone who has likewise immortal, air quotes, which involves finding an activating a half demon in order to open a portal and then trick a demon daddy to hand over the contract of immortality, you know, casual. He also has run-ins with Wolverine, Dr. Strange Punisher, Silver Sable, and Luke Cage. It's action packed, and you legitimately have no idea what new body part he is going to lose or gain in the moment, or what memory is going to pop up for him from the donor. And it keeps the reader guessing because Terror has no limitations. Mike: Yeah. Dan: was, I was so looking forward to hearing what your recap was going to be. I love that, so I just [00:47:00] want to say that. Jessika: Thank you. I had a lot of fun reading this. Not only was the plot and just the narrative itself, just rolling, but the art was fantastic. I mean, the things you can do with a character like that, there truly aren't any limits. And so it was really interesting to see how everything fell together and what he was doing each moment to kind of get out of whatever wacky situation he was in at the time.So. And his, and his quips, I just, the quips were just, they give me life. Mike: They're so good. Like there was one moment where he was sitting there and playing with the Lament Configuration, and the first issue, which I, I never noticed that before, as long as we ready this time and I was like, oh, that's great. And then he also made a St. George reference towards the end of the series where he was talking about, oh, I knew another guy who had a St. George complex. Dan: Right, right. Right, Mike: Like I love those little Easter eggs. Speaking of Easter eggs, there are a lot of Clive Barker Easter eggs throughout that whole series. Dan: [00:48:00] Well, That's it. That was so parallel at the time, you know. Mike: So around that time was when you were editing and then writing for the HellRaiser series and the Night Breed series, right? Dan: Yes. Certainly writing for them. Yeah. I mean, I did some consulting editing on the HellRaiser and other Barker books, after our lift staff, but, primarily writing at that point. Mike: Okay. Cause I have Hellraiser number one, and I think you're listed as an editor on it. Dan: I was, I started the whole Hellraiser anthology with other folks, you know, but I was the main driver, and I think that was one of the early instigators of kind of the rebirth of horror at that time. And, you know, going back to something you said earlier, you know, for many years, I was always, pressing Archie Goodwin, who worked at Warren, and worked on Erie, and worked on all those titles. You know, why can't we do a new horror anthology and he was quite sage like and saying, yeah. It'd be great to do it, but it's not going to sell there's no hook, right? There's no connection, you know, just horror for her sake. And it was when Clive Barker [00:49:00] came into our offices, and so I want to do something with Archie Goodwin. And then the two of them said, Hellraiser can be the hook. Right. Hellraiser can be the way in to sort of create an anthology series, have an identifiable icon, and then we developed out from there with Clive, with a couple of other folks Erik Saltzgaber, Phil Nutman, myself, Archie Goodwin, like what would be the world? And then the Bible that would actually give you enough, breadth and width to play with these characters that wouldn't just always be puzzle box, pinhead, puzzle box, pinhead, you know? And so we developed a fairly large set of rules and mythologies allowed for that. Mike: That's so cool. I mean, there really wasn't anything at all, like Hellraiser when it came out. Like, and there's still not a lot like it, but I - Jessika: Yeah, I was going to say, wait, what else? Mike: I mean, I feel like I've read other books since then, where there's that blending of sexuality and [00:50:00] horror and morality, because at the, at the core of it, Hellraiser often feels like a larger morality play. Dan: Now, you know, I'm going to disagree with you on that one. I mean, I think sometimes we let it slip in a morality and we played that out. But I think Hellraiser is sort of find what you want out of it. Right. You go back to the first film and it's, you know, what's your pleasure, sir? You know, it was when the guy hands up the book and the Centobites, you know, or angels to some demons, to others. So I think the book was at its best and the movies are at their best when it's not so much about the comeuppance as it is about find your place in here. Right? And that can be that sort of weird exploration of many different things. Mike: That's cool. So going back to Terror. Because we've talked about like how much we enjoyed the character and everything, I want to take a moment to talk about each of our favorite Terror moments. Dan: Okay. Mike: So Dan, why don't you start? What was your favorite moment for Terror [00:51:00] to write or going back to read? Dan: It's a great question, one of the toughest, because again, I had such delight in the character and felt such a connection, you know, in sort of channeling him in a way I could probably find you five, ten moments per issue, but, I actually think it was the it's in the first issue. And was probably the first line that sort of came to me. And then I wrote backwards from it, which was this, got your nose bit. And you know, it's the old gag of like when a parent's playing with a child and, you know, grabs at the nose and uses the thumb to represent the nose and says, got your nose. And there's a moment in that issue where I think he's just plummeted out of a skyscraper. He's, you know, fallen down into a police car. He's basically shattered. And this cop or security guard is kind of coming over to him and, and he just reaches out and grabs the guy's nose, you know, rips his arm off or something or legs to start to replace himself and, and just says, got your nose, but it's, but it's all a [00:52:00] build from this inner monologue that he's been doing. And so he's not responding to anything. He's not doing a quip to anything. He's just basically telling us a story and ending it with this, you know, delivery that basically says the guy has a complete condescending attitude and just signals that we're in his space. Like he doesn't need to kind of like do an Arnold response to something it's just, he's in his own little world moments I always just kind of go back to that got your nose moment, which is just creepy and crazy and strange. Mike: As soon as you mentioned that I was thinking of the panel that that was from, because it was such a great moment. I think it was the mob enforcers that had shot him up and he had jumped out of the skyscraper four and then they came down to finish him off and he wound up just ripping them apart so that he could rebuild himself. All right, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: I really enjoyed the part where Terror fights with sharks in order to free Silver Sable and Luke Cage. [00:53:00] It was so cool. There was just absolutely no fear as he went at the first shark head-on and, and then there were like five huge bloodthirsty sharks in the small tank. And Terror's just like, what an inconvenience. Oh, well. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Like followed by a quippy remark, like in his head, of course. And I feel like he's such a solitary character that it makes sense that he would have such an active internal monologue. I find myself doing that. Like, you know, I mean, I have a dog, so he usually gets the brunt of it, but he, you know, it's, it is that you start to form like, sort of an internal conversation if you don't have that outside interaction. Dan: Right. Jessika: And I think a lot of us probably relate to that though this pandemic. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: But the one-liner thoughts, like, again, they make those scenes in my opinion, and it gave pause for levity. We don't have to be serious about this because really isn't life or death for Terror. We know that, and he just reminds us that constantly by just he's always so damn nonchalant. [00:54:00] Dan: Yeah. He does have a very, I'm not going to say suave, but it's, uh, you know, that sort of very, I've got this, you know, sort of attitude to it. Mike: I would, say that he's suave when he wants to be, I mean, like the last issue he's got his whiskers tied back and kind of a ponytail. Dan: Oh yeah. Jessika: Oh yeah. Dan: Richard Pace did a great job with that. Mike: Where he's dancing with his assistant in the restaurant and it's that final scene where he's got that really elegant tuxedo. Like. Dan: Yeah. It's very beautiful. Mike: I say that he can be suave and he wants to be. So I got to say like my favorite one, it was a visual gag that you guys did, and it's in issue six when he's fighting with the Punisher and he's got this, long guns sniper. And he shoots the Punisher point blank, and Terror's, like at this point he's lost his legs for like the sixth time. Like he seems to lose his legs, like once an issue where he's just a torso waddling around on his hands. And so he shoots him the force skids him back. [00:55:00] And I legit could not stop laughing for a good minute. Like I was just cackling when I read that. So I think all of us agree that it's those moments of weird levity that really made the series feel like something special. Dan: I'm not quite sure we're going to see that moment reenacted at the Disney Pavilion, you know, anytime soon. But, that would be pretty awesome if they ever went that route. Mike: Well, yeah, so, I mean, like, let's talk about that for a minute, because one of the main ways that I consume Marvel comics these days is through Marvel unlimited, and Terror is a pretty limited presence there. There's a few issues of various Deadpool series. There's the Marvel team up that I think Robert Kirkman did, where Terror shows up and he has some pretty cool moments in there. And then there's a couple of random issues of the 1990s Luke Cage series Cage, but like the core series, the Marvel max stuff, his appearance in books like Daredevil and Wolverine, they just don't seem to be available for consumption via the. App Like I had to go through my personal [00:56:00] collection to find all this stuff. And like, are the rights just more complicated because it was published under the Epic imprint and that was create her own stuff, like do you know? Dan: No, I mean, it wouldn't be it's choice, right. He's probably perceived as a, if people within the editorial group even know about him, right. I was reading something recently where some of the current editorial staff had to be schooled on who Jack Kirby was. So, I'm not sure how much exposure or, you know, interest there would be, you know, to that. I mean, I don't know why everything would be on Marvin unlimited. It doesn't seem like it requires anything except scanning the stuff and putting it up there. But there wouldn't be any rights issues. Marvel owned the Shadow Line, Marvel owns the Terror Incorporated title, it would have been there. So I'm not really sure why it wouldn't be. And maybe at some point it will, but, that's just an odd emission. I mean, for years, which I always felt like, well, what did I do wrong? I [00:57:00] mean, you can find very little of the Daredevil work I did, which was probably very well known and very well received in, in reprints. It would be like, there'd be reprints of almost every other storyline and then there'd be a gap around some of those things. And now they started to reappear as they've done these omnibus editions. Mike: Well, yeah, I mean, you know, and going back the awareness of the character, anytime I talk about Terror to people, it's probably a three out of four chance that they won't have heard of them before. I don't know if you're a part of the comic book historians group on Facebook? Dan: I'm not. No. Mike: So there's a lot of people who are really passionate about comic book history, and they talk about various things. And so when I was doing research for this episode originally, I was asking about kind of the revamp of supernatural heroes. And I said, you know, this was around the same time as Terror. And several people sat there and said, we haven't heard of Terror before. And I was like, he's great. He's amazing. You have to look them up. But yeah, it seems like, you know, to echo what you stated, it seems like there's just a lack of awareness about the character, which I feel is a genuine shame. And that's part of the [00:58:00] reason that I wanted to talk about him in this episode. Dan: Well, thank you. I mean, I love the spotlight and I think anytime I've talked to somebody about it who knew it, I've never heard somebody who read the book said, yeah, that sucks. Right. I've heard that about other things, but not about this one, invariably, if they read it, they loved it. And they were twisted and kind of got into it. But did have a limited run, right? It was only 13 issues. It didn't get the spotlight, it was sort of promised it kind of, it came out with a grouping of other mercenary titles at the time. There was a new Punisher title. There was a Silver Sable. There was a few other titles in this grouping. Everyone was promised a certain amount of additional PR, which they got; when it got to Terror. It didn't get that it like, they pulled the boost at the last minute that might not have made a difference. And I also think maybe it was a little bit ahead of its time in certain attitudes crossing the line between horror and [00:59:00] humor and overtness of certain things, at least for Marvel, like where do you fit this? I think the readers are fine. Readers are great about picking up on stuff and embracing things. For Marvel, it was kind of probably, and I'm not dissing them. I never got like any negative, you know, we're gonna launch this title, what we're going to dismiss it. But I just also think, unless it's somebody like me driving it or the editor driving it, or Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief of that division at that point, you know, unless they're pushing it, there's plenty of other characters Right. For, things to get behind. But I think again, anytime it kind of comes up, it is definitely the one that I hear about probably the most and the most passionately so that's cool in its own way. Mike: Yeah, I think I remember reading an interview that you did, where you were talking about how there was originally going to be like a gimmick cover or a trading card or something like that. Dan: Yeah. Mike: So what was the, what was the gimmick going to be for Terror number one? Dan: What was the gimmick going to be? I don't know, actually, I if I knew I [01:00:00] can't remember anymore. But it was going to be totally gimmicky, as all those titles and covers were at the time. So I hope not scratch and sniff like a, uh, rotting bodies odor, although that would have been kind of in-character and cool. Mike: I mean, this was the era of the gimmick cover. Dan: Oh, absolutely. Mike: Like,that was when that was when we had Bloodstrike come out and it was like the thermographic printing, so you could rub the blood and it would disappear. Force Works is my favorite one, you literally unfold the cover and it's like a pop-up book. Dan: Somebody actually keyed me in. There actually was like a Terror trading card at one point. Mike: Yeah. Dan: Like after the fact, which I was like, shocked. Mike: I have that, that's from Marvel Universe series four. Dan: Yeah. we did a pretty good job with it actually. And then even as we got to the end of the run, you know, we, and you can sort of see us where we're trying to shift certain aspects of the book, you know, more into the mainstream Marvel, because they said, well, we'll give you another seven issues or something, you know, to kind of get the numbers up. Mike: Right. Dan: And they pulled the plug, you know, even before that. So, uh, that's why [01:01:00] the end kind of comes a bit abruptly and we get that final coda scene, you know, that Richard Pace did such a nice job with. Mike: Yeah. I mean, it felt like it wrapped it up, you know, and they gave you that opportunity, which I was really kind of grateful for, to be honest. Dan: Yeah. and subsequently, I don't know what's going on. I know there was that David Lapham, you know, series, you did a couple of those, which I glanced at, I know I kind of got in the way of it a little bit too, not in the way, but I just said, remember to give us a little created by credits in that, but I didn't read those. And then, I know he was in the League of Losers at one point, which just didn't sound right to me. And, uh. Mike: It's actually. Okay. So I'm going to, I'm going to say this cause, it's basically a bunch of, kind of like the B to C listers for the most part. And. So they're called the Legal Losers. I think it's a really good story, and I actually really like what they do with Terror. He gets, she's now Spider Woman, I think it's, Anya Corazon, but it was her original incarnation of, Arana. And she's got that spider armor that like comes out of her arm. And so she [01:02:00] dies really on and he gets her arm. And then, Dan: That's cool. Mike: What happens is he makes a point of using the armor that she has. And so he becomes this weird amalgamation of Terror and Arana's armored form, which is great. Dan: Was that the Kirkman series? Is that the one that he did or. Mike: yeah. That was part of Marvel Team-Up. Dan: Okay. Mike: it was written by Robert Kirkman. Dan: Well, then I will, I will look it up. Mike: Yeah. And that one's on Marvel unlimited and genuinely a really fun story as I remembered. It's been a couple of years since I read it, but yeah. Dan: Very cool. Mike: So we've talked about this a little bit, but, so

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The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale
Publisher Jordi Nadal on reading, writing, publishing & living

The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 51:23


Jordi Nadal was born in Barcelona in 1962 and holds a degree in Germanic Studies from the University of Barcelona. In 1998 he took the Stanford Professional Publishing Course and then began his career at Vicens Vives, later moving to Herder (Germany). He has been director of EDHASA, editorial and publications director of Círculo de Lectores, consultant at Random House in New York, general director of corporate development for Spain and America at Grupo Plaza & Janés and assistant director at Ediciones Paidós, as well as Deputy General Manager at Planeta Agostini Profesional and Formación. In 2007 he founded Plataforma Editorial. He is the co-author of Meditating Management… and Life (Plataforma Editorial, 2012) and author of, among other books, Libroterapia (Plataforma Editorial, 2017, 2020) and The Invention of the Bicycle (Plataforma Editorial, 2020).   We met via Zoom to discuss his book Book Therapy: Reading Is Life (Mensch Publishing, 2021). Our conversation covers, among other things: how actions and inactions characterize reading; whether or not reading 'betters' a person; Camus and being kind to others in an unhappy world; why we're motivated to share treasures and enthusiasms with friends, and how reading and writing is so very human.    It's a lively, colourful encounter with a passionate reader, writer, publisher and white-shirt enthusiast. 

Middle Grade Ninja
139 Author Diana Rodriguez Wallach

Middle Grade Ninja

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 98:24


Diana Rodriguez Wallach and I discuss cults, demonic possession, and writing YA horror in her new novel, SMALL TOWN MONSTERS. It's a Halloween-themed episode, so we talk about Ed and Lorraine Warren, Stephen King, and that time Diana lived in a haunted house. Writing occasionally comes up as well, so we also discuss her journey through multiple literary agents, how she plots her fiction, her writing and reading habits, the importance of Latinx representation, a revelation about writing from a psychic, and so much more. Diana Rodriguez Wallach is a multi-published author of young adult novels. Her most recent, SMALL TOWN MONSTERS, is a YA Latinx horror novel that will publish in Fall 2021 through Random House's Underlined imprint. Additionally, Diana is the author of the Anastasia Phoenix Series (Entangled Publishing), a trilogy of young adult spy thrillers. The first book in the series, Proof of Lies, has been optioned for film and was chosen as a finalist for the 2018 International Thriller Awards for Best Young Adult Novel. Additionally, Bustle listed her as one of the “Top Nine Latinx Authors to Read for Women's History Month 2017,” and Paste named Proof of Lies one of the “Top 10 Best Young Adult Books for March 2017.” Diana is also the author of three Latina young adult novels: Amor and Summer Secrets, Amigas and School Scandals, and Adios to All The Drama (Kensington Books). Amor and Summer Secrets placed second at the 2009 International Latino Book Awards for Best Young Adult Novel. Diana also penned a YA Greek-myth inspired short-story collection entitled Mirror, Mirror (Buzz Books). In 2011, Diana published an essay in Dear Bully: 70 Authors Tell Their Stories (HarperCollins), which was the only essay from the anthology selected by Scholastic to be used in its classroom materials. Diana is also featured in the anthology, Latina Authors and Their Muses (Twilight Times Books, 2015). Diana has taught as a Creative Writing Instructor for Johns Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth since 2015, and she has led Creative Writing Workshops in inner-city schools throughout the Philadelphia region for over ten years. She previously wrote as a blogger for Quirk Books, and she currently volunteers with the nonprofit organization Mighty Writers, which promotes writing in urban communities. Diana holds a B.S. in Journalism from Boston University, and currently lives in the Philadelphia area with her husband and two children.

All Of It
Carla Lalli Music's New Cookbook 'That Sounds So Good'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:20


James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Carla Lalli Music joins us to discuss her new book, That Sounds So Good: 100 Real-Life Recipes for Every Day of the Week. In the new cookbook, Lalli Music splits the recipes between weekday and weekend cooking so that you can make great food no matter how much time you have.    Fat Noodles with Pan-Roasted Mushrooms and Crushed Herb Sauce 4 to 6 servings This method of cooking mushrooms—by pan-roasting them, then finishing with browned butter—is incredibly effective, whether you're adding them to pasta or not. In the second step, the butter and aromatics wash a ton of flavor over the mushrooms, glossing them up. Kosher salt; freshly ground pepper6 garlic cloves, divided1 lemon½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided1 teaspoon mild chile flakes, such as Aleppo pepper1 shallot1 pound maitake mushroomsChunk of Parmigiano, for grating and serving2 cups lightly packed herbs (leaves and tender stems), such as parsley, mint, and/or arugula2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 pound wide pasta noodles, such as lasagnette or pappardelle Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it very aggressively with salt (figure ¼ cup salt per 6 quarts water). Pick out the smallest garlic clove and finely grate it into a small bowl. Grate in the zest of the lemon, then stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil and the chile flakes. Season oil mixture with salt and pepper and set aside.  Thinly slice the remaining 5 garlic cloves and the shallot. Trim the mushrooms; tear into bite-size pieces. Juice the zested lemon into a small bowl. Grate enough Parm to yield ¼ cup (save what's left for passing at the table). Set all aside.  Add the herbs to the boiling water and cook until very softened, 2 minutes. (Cooking the herbs both mellows and deepens their flavor; they will have less fresh brightness but take on a richer, more vegetal flavor.) Use a mesh spider or tongs to remove the herbs and hold them under cold running water until cool enough to handle, about 10 seconds. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible. Thinly slice the herbs and stir them into the oil mixture. Taste and adjust with more salt and chile flakes, if desired. Set the herb sauce aside.  Lower heat under the boiling water to maintain a simmer—you want to get your mushrooms going before starting the pasta. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high for 1 minute, then add 3 tablespoons olive oil and half the mushrooms. Cook, tossing, until the mushrooms are coated with oil, then cook, undisturbed, until browned on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and toss, then cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are browned all over and cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes more. Transfer mushrooms to a large plate and repeat with the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and mushrooms, then add these mushrooms to the first batch. Bring the water back to a boil. Melt the butter in the Dutch oven over medium heat until it foams, 15 to 30 seconds. Add the sliced garlic and shallot and cook until the garlic and butter are golden brown and the shallot is translucent, about 2 minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot, along with any accumulated juices, and cook, tossing, until well combined. Lower the heat to keep warm. Meanwhile, add the pasta to the boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally, until very al dente, 2 to 3 minutes less than the time indicated on the package. Use a mesh spider to transfer pasta to the pot with the mushrooms, then add 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid. Increase the heat to medium and cook, tossing energetically, until a sauce forms that coats the pasta, 2 minutes. Add the ¼ cup grated cheese, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and another big splash of pasta water and cook, tossing, until cheese is melted and the sauce is clinging to the noodles, 1 to 2 minutes more. Add a few spoonfuls of herb sauce to the pasta and stir to combine. Serve with remaining herb sauce and more cheese at the table. -------------------------From the MarketMild chile flakesShallotTender herbsMaitake mushroomsWide pasta noodles Spin ItInstead of Aleppo pepper, use a smaller quantity of regular red pepper flakes or lots of blackReplace the shallot with ¼ onionThe herbs are truly interchangeable, in any ratio, and can include basil, chives, tarragon, and/or dill Use shiitake, oyster, and/ or cremini mushrooms instead of maitakeBig tubes like rigatoni or paccheri are good too-------------------------At HomeSalt and pepperGarlicLemonOlive oilParmigianoButter Spin ItA few dashes of sherry vinegar or white wine vinegar can replace the lemon juice and zestGrana Padano or pecorino can replace the Parm-------------------------Tall Pot AltIf you don't have a Dutch oven, use a large heavy skillet to cook the mushrooms and combine with the shallot and garlic. Scoop out 2 cups of pasta cooking liquid, then drain the pasta and return to the pot, and build your sauce from there. If the sauce gets tight or sticky, or the cheese clumps together, lower the heat and add more water than you think you should. Cook over low heat, stirring gently but constantly, until the cheese melts and the sauce is smooth. Reprinted from That Sounds So Goodby Carla Lalli Music. Copyright © 2021 by Carla Lalli Music. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Andrea Gentl and Martin Hyers.Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

Qavah The Podcast
Episode 84: Dashama Konah Best of Qavah

Qavah The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Dashama Konah shares, “When I was a little girl, I was raised in foster homes, actually. My parents were both addicted to drugs and my mother was schizophrenic, so very early on, I learned what is suffering - and I learned the very opposite of happiness.” But her life isn't defined by this. Stanford Happiness Hall of Famer, United Nations speaker, Random House author and digital media star Dashama‘s message inspires over 10 million fans on Facebook and has reached over 150 million through media partnerships such as Broadband TV, ATT U-verse and QVC.

i want what SHE has
#194 Sisterhood (and Politics) with Melinda McKnight, Lynne Bailey and Jana Martin

i want what SHE has

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 101:27


Today I am talking sisterhood and politics with three fabulous women, but first up, I share an interview I did, BC (before Covid), of Mikayla Haggerty, Marlea Catoosa, Ruby Friedman from the Golden Fleece 4H Sheep Club Dutchess County. I met them 2 years ago while attending the Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, NY. I wanted hot apple cider and they were selling it, which made me curious about what they were doing there and why. Tune in to find out!Then I share some of the astrological Full Moon report for this Wednesday, and play songs, Circles and Blue to Gold, off the new Sarah Perrotta release, "Blue to Gold."Then around minute 53 I have the honor of welcoming these three women running for local election in the Town of Hurley.Jana Martin has been active in Ulster County community issues since making it her home in 2000. She's a content director and editor for green and advanced technology firms, and an author published by The New York Times, Forbes, Simon & Schuster and Random House. She has taught writing at SUNY New Paltz and Word Café in Woodstock and Kingston. She was an active member of Eagle Valley Search Dogs K9 search and rescue team, is a runner and equestrian, and a proud stepmom to two boys. “Hurley's Town Board needs support for the great work it's already started — and to truly listen to the concerns of this community. I'd be proud to bring my skills and community spirit to the table.” Running for Hurley Town Board.Melinda McKnight grew up in the Hamlet of Port Ewen and attended Kingston High School. Upon graduating, she earned an A.S. degree in Journalism from SUNY Ulster, a B.A. in English and an M.A. in Public History from SUNY Albany. She spent her early career in nonprofit administration where she managed all aspects of operations including, developing exhibits and special events, negotiating contracts, grant writing, budgeting and human resources.  She has served as Adjunct Faculty at SUNY Ulster, taught Continuing Education classes at Ulster BOCES and provided a 12-week character development program based on The Virtues Project at a medium security NYS Prison.  Since 2010, she has worked in the field of Building Performance in a variety of roles in a family-owned company that transitions homes and businesses off fossil fuels. Her current role is Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. She currently serves as Vice President of Klyne Esopus Historical Society Museum, Board Member of Citizens for Local Power and Councilperson on the Town of Hurley Town Board. As a member of the Hurley Town Board, Melinda worked across party lines in writing and passing a Short Term Rental Law (Commended by the Ulster County Planning Board) and in creating a Zoning Task Force and a Climate Smart Task Force. She's running for Hurley Town Supervisor.Lynne Bailey grew up in a rural suburban area of Suffolk County and moved to NYC in 1976 starting her long and diverse professional career. In 2013 she purchased her home in Hurley and in recent years, Lynne has been very involved in community matters, volunteers for the Zoning Task Force and is the communications manager of the Hurley Climate Smart Task Force. Ms. Bailey has long cultivated service-oriented practices, and is eager for the opportunity to serve her community and its residents in the ways she knows best – using modern technology and methods, impeccable recordkeeping and communication skills, for the improvement of local government operations – with the respect and diligence that all residents merit.Service-oriented, accessible, trustworthy, technologically efficient, transparent and accountable. She's running for Hurley Town Clerk/Tax CollectorThey share about why they wanted to get involved in politics, how collaborating and reaching across the political aisle is important, how getting involved in local politics can be very positive and valuable for all of us, some of the challenges they have faced, and how their "sisterhood" has helped them through the difficult moments. So get out and VOTE! Early voting starts October 23rd here in Ulster County and election day is November 2nd!P.S. here's the Rosendale Uke Group I mentioned!Today's show was engineered by Ian Seda of Radio Kingston.Our show music is from Shana Falana !!!Feel free to email me, say hello: she@iwantwhatshehas.org** Please: SUBSCRIBE to the pod and leave a REVIEW wherever you are listening, it helps other users FIND IThttp://iwantwhatshehas.org/podcastITUNES | SPOTIFY | STITCHERITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-want-what-she-has/id1451648361?mt=2SPOTIFY:https://open.spotify.com/show/77pmJwS2q9vTywz7Uhiyff?si=G2eYCjLjT3KltgdfA6XXCASTITCHER: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/she-wants/i-want-what-she-has?refid=stpr'Follow:INSTAGRAM * https://www.instagram.com/iwantwhatshehaspodcast/FACEBOOK * https://www.facebook.com/iwantwhatshehaspodcastTWITTER * https://twitter.com/wantwhatshehas

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Adam Schiff On Colin Powell, Trump For House Speaker(?), Vote Nullification

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 17:30


Today, a conversation about protecting democratic norms like voting rights in the face of attempts by Trump and his allies to rewrite them. On Today's Show:U.S. Representative Adam Schiff (D, CA-28), who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, talks about his new book Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could (Random House, 2021), in which he looks back at his experience as chief prosecutor in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. Plus, the latest news on Capitol Hill as negotiations continue over the Build Back Better agenda.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Rep. Schiff on Monday Morning Politics

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 16:58


U.S. Representative Adam Schiff (D, CA-28), who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, talks about his new book Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could (Random House, 2021), in which he looks back at his experience as chief prosecutor in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. Plus, the latest news on Capitol Hill as negotiations continue over the Build Back Better agenda.

Radicals & Revolutionaries Lab
Best of R&R Lab: Jamia Wilson

Radicals & Revolutionaries Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 62:51


We're still working on a new season of Radicals & Revolutionaries Lab for your listening pleasure, but while you wait, why not revisit some old favorites? We're proud to re-air this episode as we look back on the roots of this show.___________________________________________________________________________________________________This week's radical is Jamia Wilson, writer, activist, speaker, and the new Executive Editor at Random House. She's the former director of the Feminist Press at City University of New York, and her works include Young, Gifted, and Black, Big Ideas for Young Readers, and Step into Your Power.In our conversation we cover the complex dynamics of race vs. nationality, why it's important to expose children to big ideas early, the power of storytelling, and more.Some Questions I Ask:What are you working on right now? What does this new role with Random House mean? (0:45)How does this new position empower you to open doors for others? (2:47)What brought you to Saudi Arabia? (13:08)When did you come back to the U.S.? (16:59)How did you choose American University? (24:46)How has your religious upbringing intersected with your story? (34:35)Has there ever been a time when you wanted to quit? (47:37)In This Episode, You Will Learn:Why helping to shape the cultural landscape excites Jamia (3:33)What kinds of books Jamia writes—and how they affect her (7:20)The real reason representation matters (11:23)How Jamia came to embrace the identity of being an expat (14:57)How Jamia navigated life in the Middle East as a Black American (18:54)Jamia's surreal NYU experience (31:43)Why Jamia puts the collective above the self in her work (44:13)What Jamia's imagined future entails (51:33)Resources:Follow Jamia on Twitter and InstagramJamia's WebsiteBuy Jamia's Books See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

First Draft with Sarah Enni
Arguably Achievable Perfection With Benjamin Dreyer

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:37


First Draft Episode #327: Benjamin Dreyer Benjamin Dreyer, vice president, executive managing editor and copy chief of Random House, and New York Times bestselling author of Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style and Dreyer's English (Adapted for Young Readers): Good Advice for Good Writing. Links to Topics Mentioned In This Episode: “Meet the Guardian of Grammar Who Wants to Help You Be a Better Writer,” by Sarah Lyall in The New York Times Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer's Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting and Surviving Your First Book by Courtney Maum (hear Courtney weigh in on the traditional publishing process in Track Changes: Publishing 101) #1 New York Times bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout, author of Olive Kitteridge, Olive Again, and the recent release Oh William! Shirley Jackson, author of The Haunting of Hill House, The Lottery, and more

Canned Air: A Tribute to Comics and Pop Culture
Canned Air #411 The Art of Nate Lovett

Canned Air: A Tribute to Comics and Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 50:40


We welcome comic creator and illustrator Nate Lovett to first help us recall our favorite ghosts in our Retro Roundtable. We look at ghosts like Beetlejuice, The Maestro from King's Island Phantom Theater, Bruce Willis, The Funny Phantom, and more. Let us know your favorite pics on social media! Then we turn our attention to Nate to discuss his amazing career. Raised on a “healthy” diet of cartoons, comics, and video games, Central Ohio based Nate Lovett has been drawing since he could first hold a crayon. he's been working in comics and illustration professionally since 2007, getting his first real start with Xombie: Reanimated from Devil's Due. From there, his fun, colorful and animated style has led to working on comics, children's books, and concept art for Marvel, Image, Action Lab, Nickelodeon, Random House, Viz, and Hasbro, on projects such as Marvel Comic Presents, Moon Girl & Devil Dinosaur, Paw Patrol, Corn & Peg, Rusty Rivets, G I JOE, Bravest Warriors, Redakai, Monsuno, Hack/Slash and more. Currently he's hard at work on his own all ages Projects, the Sci Fi adventure Carter Kain & The short story PUNK RAWK NINJA. Check Nate out at Nate-Lovett.com! @NateLovett CannedAirPodcast.com Twitter @CannedAirPod Insta @Canned_Air If you'd like to show your support, you can either visit our Patreon page at Patreon.com/CannedAirPod or you can leave us a review on iTunes! Thanks for listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketing The Invisible
How to Publish Your Business-Building Book This Year – In Just 7 Minutes with Christine Kloser

Marketing The Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


 Learn how to overcome confusion and overwhelm to get your book done and published Find out how to make the book you write fit in helping you grow your business Find out how to become an author who retains all the rights and royalties without having to self-publish it Resources/Links: Want to learn more about an opportunity to hit the let's talk button and send some information about your book and potentially have a consultation and set up a call with someone to talk about publishing options? Click here: https://www.capuciapublishing.com Summary Have you been procrastinating and don't know how to best start when it comes to publishing your book? Is your book edited but just there on your computer sitting and collecting cyber dust, and you're not taking the next step to publish it? Have you thought of publishing a book where you don't sign away your rights and share royalties of 50%? Christine Kloser is a USA Today and Wall Street Journal Best-Selling Author and Capucia Publishing CEO. Their author-centric approach to publishing award-winning and best-selling books supports business leaders worldwide. In this episode, Christine shares how you can have your wisdom shared through a book and get it published to the world. She also talks about people's mistakes when writing and publishing, so you avoid wasting your time and energy and become the author who retains all your rights and royalties. Check out these episode highlights: 01:24 - Christine's ideal client: "My ideal client really is a successful professional, either someone who has had an entrepreneurial career or a corporate career, who just knows that they have this book inside of them, they've earned a lot of wisdom, they've, you know, gleaned a lot of information. They've been through a lot -- ups, downs, in, outs of what it takes to be on the path of success. And they want to share that wisdom." 02:02 - What she helps her clients solve: "The big problem we solve is that our authors were strictly fee for service the way we do it. You retain all rights, you retain all royalties, but you have a book that looks like it came out of Random House, you know, rather than self-publishing it on your own, or spending years wasting time and energy trying to get a traditional deal." 03:41 - Symptoms of the problem clients are facing: "Well, it's, you're procrastinating, confused, feeling overwhelmed at like, I don't even know what the best way to publish my book, what's right for me. I don't know where to start." 04:34 - Common mistakes clients commit before consulting Christine: "On the publishing side, one of the biggest mistakes that I see is that people get involved working with publishing “partners” without truly understanding what they're getting involved with, and what that contract really means and what the terms are, and what they're giving up and how it's going to work long-term." 06:49 - Kristine's Valuable Free Action (VFA): "If you've been writing your book without a plan without putting foundation underneath it, put a foundation underneath it." 07:21 - Kristine's Valuable Free Resource (VFR): Check out Christine's website: www.capuciapublishing.com 07:44 - Q: Why shouldn't I have done this sooner? Tweetable Takeaways from this Episode: “If you've been writing your book without a plan, without putting a foundation underneath it, put a foundation underneath it.” -Christine KloserClick To Tweet Transcript (Note, this was transcribed using a transcription software and may not reflect the exact words used in the podcast) Tom Poland 00:10 Greetings everyone, and a warm welcome to another edition of Marketing the Invisible. My name is Tom Poland beaming out to from little Castaways Beach in Queensland, Australia. Joined today by Christine Kloser. Christine, good day,

The Illustration Department Podcast

Marketing Consultant, Lauren Flower-Kim, talks to Giuseppe Castellano about her career as a marketing leader at both Random House and HarperCollins; what role—and power—Marketing Departments have in Children's Publishing; what three ways a book creator can market their book; and more.

Holistic Health Educators Bodcast - Know Your Own Body!
Episode 18: A History of Holistic Health Educators

Holistic Health Educators Bodcast - Know Your Own Body!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 33:12


All right. Hello, everyone, and welcome to today's Call. Different change of pace for today, as opposed to talking about our normal health topics or systems of the body or reproductive health, the nerve regeneration. Today, I get to share with you the story of holistic health educators, where we came from and where we're at now, and why we want your help moving forward, the different capacities that you can be involved in with our organization. So today's actually going to involve a lot of pictures. So if you're listening to this, always feel free to go back and watch the live replay if you want to watch the pictures. Otherwise, I'll be talking through the whole thing. I'm going to go ahead and start sharing my screen. And this is divided up into three parts of where we came from and Karen's story and then where we're at right now and where we're headed, just so you know. So this should be a really fun time. So this is our current motto, educating and empowering parents, as well as educating, empowering leaders around the world. We do have students in these countries throughout the world. It's been so fun being able to hear from their areas of where they live, what they've done to heal. But also, I think sometimes we get this attitude to an America that like we're the only country struggling with these issues. But that's not true at all. Like this is a a lot of the issues we're dealing with in this country we are experiencing around the world. In fact, there are higher levels of diabetes in Asia and India than there is here in America, as well as varying levels of heart disease and lung disease throughout the world. So these issues are so relevant to all these different countries. America is not the only one who's struggling with some exercise or nutrition. We've just developed really fast as a society, kind of outpaced ourselves when it came to adapting our physical health to our new it built environment. And so that's why it's such a relevant global conversation to be happening. And we're really grateful to be online now. But I'm going to go way back to the start in 2008 in rural Wisconsin, when Karen got so annoyed with having to buy organic groceries for her family that she just opened up her own grocery store because that was more cost effective. She first start getting into holistic health. I'm going to switch to this picture of her and our family. She first started getting a holistic health because she was pregnant with my oldest sister and she didn't want to have seizures during her pregnancy. She had epilepsy growing up. And so she is nutrition to essentially resolve her epilepsy. And then as soon as you get into holistic health and you're like, wow, you can reverse diseases with her lifestyle, you just start getting more and more into it. So she started, you know, bringing in homoeopathy and herbs and chiropractor's into our our family's culture. And eventually we were ordering all of our food from us, from a big Cissoko truck. So my truck would back up into our huge driveway and deliver all our groceries for two weeks, because otherwise we were paying eight hundred bucks a week to feed our family at the local, you know, small organic shops. And so then we just started getting our neighbors on board. You know, starting a co-op is we want to order through us. And that eventually led to a grocery store. And then from there, parents like, hey, this is awesome. We have this property, we can start teaching health classes. So she started teaching health classes and then we started renting out larger facilities at hotels and conference rooms and expo centers and started hosting these educational events. So I'm going to show those pictures here. These are at various centers that we've owned, various centers that we've spoken at. And Karen's passion became teaching other people about holistic health care, about how they can take control of their bodies. She knows how to write very enticing descriptions of her, what she'll be talking about in that hour. And so at Expo's, she would just pack the room. There'd be like standing room only because she feel like you can reverse disease from home and you can, you know, live with energy and never be sick again. And that was her goal, is just to empower people with knowledge about how their body works so that they could take this knowledge home and help them self for the rest of their life. So one of her mottos is change the context of the human cell and you change the course of the human body. And I'm positive any of you who have ever heard her speak have gotten the essence of her passion for helping understand how your cells work. Your cells are like little versions of yourself with their own little respiratory tract and then fed system, a digestive track in little skeletal system. She really wants you connecting to your cells because she's seen how that has changed the life and course outcomes of hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people that have come in and heard her speak. Even one time she'll get an email years down the road. And so that was that's where her passion I was in education. And so these are just various like physical locations we had. And then we moved out to Utah, opened up a location out there and kept teaching classes. One thing she did for a while in Wisconsin was a tasting safari. So she really wanted she noticed that kids sometimes hadn't even tried healthy foods before. And so she's like, well, we should their parents don't even know what these kids look like. They've never even had to call Rabie. How can they say they don't like vegetables of them? I don't know why colorable was the first thing that came to mind, because it's kind of out there. But she wanted kids to. Try different health foods, so one thing she did was a tasting safari where we would go into like schools, like the the big auditoriums and elementary schools or at expo centers and have a tasting spa where kids would get this passport to help and try over a hundred different foods. Now, if those of you who are concerned about allergies are like your blood pressure's through the roof right now, I totally understand that they had a sign they had to come into school that day with a list of what all their potential allergens were, but allow this kid to never even try these vegetables before. And basic fruits and nuts and seeds. And they tried homicides and and nuts, seed butters and all that. And so it was just a fun experience. Karen has a lot of vision. So one thing I've been trying to do is just like keep us focused. But this is one of the really fun side things that we did while we were in Wisconsin. So then we for those of you who have attended retreats, retreats are also another really uplifting, fulfilling environment where women would get together and practice yoga or learn how to cook healthy together or share stories with each other. So those are also really special experiences, if you ever want to join us. But there came a point where you can only do so much in person. And so when twenty seventeen came around, that's when Karen's like, listen, we got to go online. And I actually after the twenty twelve, I wasn't involved in my family's business for a while because I was off going to college and starting my own entrepreneurial stuff with my friends and traveling. And I took like an eight year break from working with my mom, actually. And so twenty seventeen runs around. She starts putting the programs online. And the goal of that was to make it more accessible for people around the world so that other people could access this information and these programs. So I came in in twenty nineteen and we just had here. And the first program we worked on besides the TNC was the human body master guide. So around twenty seventeen, we closed the Wisconsin locations, close the Utah locations, except for one educational center in southern Utah. And then we started the Human Body Master Guide, which is like an online encyclopedia of all these different health techniques. So one thing Karen noticed is like you have people who are experts in all these different topics, like central oils and Chinese medicine, pharmaceuticals, chiropractic care, herbs, planthopper therapy, neurotransmitter bouncing myofascial release, massage therapy, nutrition, naturopathic doctors, autoimmune specialists, endocrinology, functional movement, all this emotional release, biofeedback, infectious diseases. And it all matters. It all matters. And they all had solutions to everything. They were like licet. There's an essential oil for that. Or they'd be like, listen, there is a chiropractic adjustment for that, or like, listen, it's all your emotions. So she was like, hmm, we should like really compile this information in one place. So originally she wrote this book called The A-Z Healing Guide, and then that was transformed into the online version of the human body master guide Zakarian. I started road tripping in 2019. That's when I came on board. I came home from living in Taiwan. She's like, hey, I mean, do you want a job because this company would be interested in hiring you? And I was like, wow, I never, ever thought about coming back and working with you. But this would be an amazing opportunity. So, you know, I was passionate about this topic. I was currently working in public, getting my degrees in public health and everything. So I was like, let's do it. So, Karen, I start road tripping around and doing these interviews with different specialists around America. And I say, America, this was like three states. So we were not going coast to coast. We'd love to go coast to coast Wednesday, but we kept it in like Utah in the vicinity for the time being. And the point of this is we just want to capture their stories and their healing techniques. We're like, oh, it's incredible how much like no ego exists among the people who are wanting to educate you in these programs. Like no one's here to sell their product. No one's here to impress you with their big words. They just want you to know what your options are when it comes to treating conditions like in the top right, we have an infectious disease specialist, Ryan Brinkerhoff. Well, those of you who have heard Ryan speak live with us, I'm sure you can relate. He is so down to earth and just wants you to know information. And so we'll be like, what do you do for reoccurring UTIs? And he's like, oh, a simple three step process for reoccurring UTII. You know, he'll talk about women who come in from around the country just to come see him because they've had 17 UTIs and can never get rid of it. He does like a couple ozone implants, hyperbaric chamber and a few erbe, an herbal combination. And then, boom, they're UTIs are gone forever after that. And so I'm just really cool to hear what these solutions are so that you know, what your options are. That's the goal is just like everyone's going to need something different. So at least you can hear what your options are. So that's even by master God. Let's see if this plays are not just what everyone we made the four hour drive successfully. Look, the big little town of Moab, Utah. We're almost. We're coming for you, Dr. Drew. There you are, worth nine and a half hours anyway. So we just started traveling around and filming with these different people, and it was really fun. And I want to show you two minutes of this clip. This was our first commercial we ever made for holistic art educators, for the human body master guide. Those of you who know me know I have like a secret love of dressing up and and acting. And I've actually been collecting dress-Up clothes since I was like probably 12, because my dream is to have this huge dressup closet for my future kids one day, which is like dresses and things from around the world. So I got to play dress up for this. And this is just the first two minutes of our very first commercial ever for the human body. That's your guide. Oh, one minute. Do you ever have health concerns or questions and you've considered feeling naturally, but you don't always know what to trust? Have you found yourself pain and pain and pain just wanting to feel happy in your own skin or help a family member? How about when the doctor tells you the test results came back normal? But you know something's not right or you've been given a diagnosis and you feel there's something more you can do about it. The problem is the health information that's free. You're not always sure you can trust me with specialist after specialist adds up. And a lot of times people don't know what all their options are. That's why we created the human body master course so we could bring the best solutions from multiple types of healing into one place. It's like hearing from all these different professionals in the same room talking about your health condition. These practitioners and experts have been working with people like you for decades, and no one is selling a product from learning about your body to addressing topics like digestive issues, depression, acting. And over two hundred and twenty five other health concerns. You can find answers immediately. My name is Karen. And having been in the health industry for 30 years now. I feel pretty darn confident there is an answer for everything, but I have not always felt that way. Having seizures when I was young, raising children without this information while they had asthma, severe stomach pains, ear infections, even mosquito bites, and not knowing how to ease their pain. Having one of our children so sick, she could not walk from the bedroom to the kitchen. Having spent tens of thousands of dollars visiting doctors all around our country and outside of our country, helplessly looking for answers, I had no know the pain of not having the answers we you are looking for. That is what motivated me to put together the human body master course for you, for my children and my grandchildren, so that they can, with a click of a button, enter the system and find the answers that doctors and professionals around the world offer to over two hundred and twenty five and growing health issues. It is wonderful to know there are answers to your health concerns all around you. You just don't know them yet. Please enjoy meeting with my dear friends. Health care practitioners, naturopath, chiropractics, gemologist herbalists, those 11 made and created essential oils. If you were going to love learning from them and these people are real, tangible people. They are working with clients every single day. They have brought hope to hundreds of thousands of people. And combined, we are excited to not only bring you help, but to help you understand how the human body works so that you can take control and you can master your body. The program contains three. OK, so that is the human body master guide. And you can tell. Karen has a lot of passion about this because she did go through an experience right around when we moved to southern Utah is when my little sister Lily developed a very severe, undiagnosed medical condition. And Karen spent the next four years taking a huge step back from work, trying to help figure out what's wrong with her and any of you who have dealt with a child with chronic disease. Can empathize with that whole process of not feeling like you can move forward with your life until the life of your child has some resolution. And so anyways, so that's was another fire. That was another log on the fire of her passion to organize something like this. And so that's where the human body master came from, in case any of you have access to this guidebook. I want you to know, this is a vision of the human body master guide. We're still adding to it. And we would love to hear from you. Like, if you are a specialist in something and you know what herbs help someone or what techniques help someone or what what process to help someone overcome from inflammation or fibromyalgia or their unique condition, like please collaborate with us, because the goal is to create this online encyclopedia for professionals and moms and people with the human body so that we can hear what other people have done successfully. And if you are a practicing professional, even better. But we want to hear people's personal experiences as well. So that's what I'm saying is please reach out to us if you feel like you have something to contribute to this. And this also is just a growing online encyclopedia that's super cool to be a part of. So thanks for letting me share with you about that. So that's where the human body master guide came from. So I'm just going to quickly touch on a couple of our programs and then wrap up with my my biggest passion related to this. So we just kept developing after that point. Our teens did. Graduates wanted to know where to start with their client. So we created the ten step program. This 10 step program goes over like water and movement and nutrition, digestive health. Breno breathing sounds. You know, it's not just the emotional health and detoxification. And of course, we encourage them approaches and whatever order you think is best for your clients and to be intuitive with how you work with them. But these are amazing foundations of holistic health care. And these ones were filmed in like a little bit more of a casual style, like here's a bag behind the scenes before one of the videos started. They can have their own video cards, fat, protein. Right. I think that's what we love in the protein and I ice. Anyway, I'm just being silly right now. But we had a blast, if you can tell, filming that series together, the 10 step program. And so the point of this program, too, is also just to deliver relevant information in a concise manner is like a a couple of second clip, I think. OK. Welcome to the second, where are you going to? I was going to introduce you because you're going to hold me not I'm not entitled to neurolinguistic programing, but I might not like this programing expert, but I am a lot like Jenny where we like see Random House conferences and we just like sign up for because we're so curious. So like I'll call Jenny sometimes. She's like, I'm in California. I'm like, what are you doing there? They're like, oh, it's a conference about how to reverse cancer, reducing nutrition. I'm like, OK, that's cool to have a good weekend. I got to talk to you. Oh, sorry. I skipped out of that. But anyway, these videos we just go through like our favorite research on each of these subject matters and talk about what we've learned about them, what we've learned about detoxification and and the order of detoxing and brain health and neurolinguistic programing. And Caren and Jenny have so much to say about digestive health and nutritional health in that section. They're both very, very passionate about nutrition. And so the point of this is for it to be like, you know, after class, when like the when the when the professor is given this like long hour long lecture, and then and then you show up to class and you ask your friend, like, hey, what did you cover today? And they're like, OK, I'll show you. And they take you up the whiteboard and give you like the brief, like summarize like layperson description. That's what these videos are meant to be. It's like after all the scientific stuff's been combed through, we're like, OK, cool. Here's like our biggest takeaways from this information. And so it is definitely a little bit more casual than some of our other lecture material here at Holistic Health Educators. But that ends up being something that helps people find how it's relatable to them. So that's a ten step program. And then people use that tends to program and build upon that to get their holistic health coach certification. So this is where you take that knowledge of holistic health and then you add on to it your like coaching techniques, understanding of how our mindset affects our behaviors, and understanding core identity and core belief systems and limiting belief system. So many people are so angry with themselves. Oh, I should have included a video from Terry and maybe I can still pull it up at the end. But she has this awesome clip where she. So this is Coach Terry Garrison. She has this awesome, awesome clip on addressing mindset, emotions and self talk with clients. Actually, if you register to download our curriculum, you'll automatically get sent her email with that video in it, because that's one of the best videos I've ever seen from a coach where she's talking about how I like. We tend to talk to ourselves. Our inner psyche is like this basketball coach is just like always yelling at ourselves, like you need to do better. Like, come on, you're better than this one. You got to stick to your goals. And like we just kind of like had this like negative energy towards our own minds. Sometimes instead of approaching ourselves with like compassion or understanding or or like productive talking or self talk is so much more than just like waking up and looking in the mirror and being like, awesome. It's about how do you talk yourself through your failures and your low moments and your high moments like self dialog is happening 24/7 in our brains. So from a coaching standpoint, if you can influence the way someone talks to themself, everything else in their life will change. So I'm just saying that because like way before trying to set goals with someone, I mean, you can set goals if you want. But what I've noticed, just being coached coaching is the biggest investment I've ever made in myself besides my education. Like I really don't a lot of money into that because I wanted to know these things that they had to teach about mindset and health. And what I've realized is like you can set all the goals you want in the world and set up accountability, like I'm going to get up and make my bed and I'm going to get up and I'm going to eat healthy and I'm going to start exercising five times a week, even though I'm exercising like one or zero times a week. Right now, you can have all these goals and accountability, but if you haven't addressed the core belief systems, it's going to be an uphill battle that whole time. If you can go to their core belief systems about themselves, about whether or not they're worth spending time on their health, about whether or not they feel like they're someone who sticks to things and they're capable or they're not. Whether or not they subconsciously fear judgment from other people for wanting to change, whether or not, like, whatever their subconscious deep down restrictions are, if you can address that boom behavior, change after that is secondary because, you know, it changes their internal core belief system and their behavior will now manifest it. There's this one quote in a book called As a Man Thinketh and I love the section. He says, you know, we think that our thoughts are private. What they're actually not. Our thoughts are manifested by so many things in our life around us. You can tell what someone's thinking about all day long or what or how they think by by what's being manifested in their life. And I thought that was so profound. So anyway, we talk a lot about mindset in the health coach program. So that's like a huge catch up to where we are today and our top programs. Now, the part about where we're going, oh, you already know, we offer like we do like live zoom calls and in-person sessions. And those are super fun. But the part about where we're going, this is the part we're up to this point. It's been like I've been like, yeah, mom, I'll help you make the programs. I think it's super meaningful. I think it's super cool. And I always thought it was awesome. And I wanted to help my mom with her business. But there was a tipping point where this. Became extremely personal to me, and it was after. I'm so this is what I'm saying, OK. I had the opportunity to attend standard education at two phenomenal universities, BYU, a phenomenal school at Johns Hopkins University, phenomenal school, both studying public health because I knew I wanted to do public health. From the time I even heard the word public health was I grew I've been doing since I was four. OK, like my mom's been hosting Disease Prevention Summit since I was like six years old. So anyway, so I knew I wanted to be in public health. And so I was like so excited to get to school and learn how to do public health even more and learn how to like go into pop. You know, I thought I was going to be a lot like how my mom was doing it. Will you go out into the community and you teach people how to reverse disease and you teach them how to feel empowered and teach them how their body works and teach them how foods affect their energy levels and their fertility and all these other things. And so I started going through school and like I was like, wow, this like really good information. I was like, well, where's like the practical health information? You know, it's like this is like great information about systems and program planning and program evaluation and stuff. But I was like, where's the where's the meat of like how to reverse disease and. It just became more and more apparent to me that the need for our country to like approach health from a more preventative and holistic standpoint comes way before just our practice of medicine. It starts at education because. There, in my limited experience, was just not enough practical information being taught in these schools, and it only makes me emotional because I am really passionate about holistic health and empowering people. And it was really heartbreaking to see. Just the absence of that information being taught in these settings, so it would be great to just keep moving forward and integrate these two. So that's where I got super excited. Here's my like, thoughtful picture of photo looking off into the deep valley. But health care reform must involve health care, education reform, because we can't have all these graduating health care professionals who aren't being taught like the basics of human health, of preventative medicine, of of nutrition and health, education. And so that's where it got really personal for me is like I always want to do health care reform. And I never thought that that would mean health care, education reform. But I am so happy to be here in this spot right now and be able to work in between these two worlds, bring them together. So anyway, so that's a little bit about about my story. So where are we going? This is the part that we're so excited about. We have this awesome platform where we host these courses and we are slowly adjusting to this university style layout where you have your core courses and then your electives. So these core Clore courses are things like the ten step program, holistic health coaching techniques and best practices, nutrition, digestive health and healing protocols. In the TNC program, you have one hundred and twenty modalities of healing from around the world TNC special topics, practical applications and human anatomy and physiology. And then you have elective courses. So for those of you who are your students, you're like, I don't see this in my library. These are what we're launching this fall. So about half of these are already filmed. Some of them are already filmed and edited. And we just need to press the publish button, other ones that are still being uploaded and formatted properly. But you'll have electives where you can specialize. So like how do you read your bloodwork better than your doctor? Prenatal and postnatal health care, the empowerment of sound courses and communication skills, trauma responses, relationships and emotional wellness. Then we have like some spyglasses like resin art therapy and different forms of of therapies. Actually, that will just be specialty forces, cooking classes. These are examples. Yoga for pregnant mothers. Crystal cat body flow is a super fun course. But we have people who are organizing courses for us on infectious diseases, Lyme disease, and, you know, underlying I should have included that this is going to be a very popular course. Our course on detoxing how to detox from mold toxicity, Lyme disease and Epstein Barr virus and parasites. And so addressing underlying infections is going to be a specialty. Course will have one on diabetes. We have some people who are wanting to collaborate to create one on self-reliance and gardening and emergency preparedness. So this is where I am recruiting you guys, because we are really happy to provide the core courses about digestive health and nutrition , healing protocols, human anatomy and physiology. And of course, you're always welcome to jump in on some of those two of you like. But these elective courses are also we're so excited about because, you know, you'll be able to learn from different professionals who already specialize in these different topics, from infectious diseases to mother preamps, post-natal health care and all of that. So we're super excited about that. And we're on the path towards just eventually becoming an accredited independent school. We have where we are looking at like. We have some like really basic accreditations, but we're looking at the the different requirements for independent colleges versus just certificate grant being a certificate or a minor degree granting institution. So anyway, just know like that's on our radar. That's that's what our long term goal is, is like we want to be an educational institution that can provide people with their pre doctorate degree or pre nursing degree or or if they just come through our school, they'll be ready to work with professionals by the time they graduate. That's the whole point, is the technical college. And so anyway, so that's like our what's on the radar of what's coming. So for those of you who are not already one of my students, I just want to extend to you a really sincere invite to join forces with us right now. We have like amazing deals just with, of course, bundling going on and amazing opportunities of how you can jump in and whether you just want to be a student or a contributor or a hybrid model of those to like just get in contact with us because, ah, we are running a really awesome enrollment deal right now. And so please just go ahead and reach out to us if this is something that you want to learn more about and jump on board with this and. We'll definitely let you know, customizing in terms of customizing your package of what you want your core class will, because our set in stone, but what you want your electives to be. So that's just a brief overview of where we're going. And yes, that is that. So I'm going to stop sharing this right now anyway. So I just want to give you the guys that detailed background with some photographs. And thank you so much for joining me for this overview of holistic health educators and for those all of you in this field, I'm going to stay right now. This was like a highlight reel. You know, this is like 30 minutes of me being like, look at all these like classes and courses and look at the Expos and the cooking shows. Like I did not include the pictures where we only had one person to show up to our classes. And I didn't include the pictures where, you know, we're like running a grocery store in the middle of rural Wisconsin where people have to drive twenty five minutes to pick up their organic kale. I'm like. And the weeks that it's a good thing, we had 10 extra miles to eat up all the extra produce that was going bad, you know? There's a lot of pictures that I didn't include in here. This is like there are few fields that I think are as as rewarding as this one. Definitely. But that's not meaning that it's easy, especially when you work in the private sector. We do not get any federal funding. That's not to say we wouldn't like the funding. So if you're a grant writer, please contact us. We have a very promising case. But anyway, we're we're operating totally in the private sector, like people pay for this because they want to know how to feel better and they want to know how to prevent disease. And I'm sure you've been in this field and realize like sometimes it's hard to help people catch the vision of that. It's like, hey, like you will feel like a different person a year from now, but you're going to have to make some investments right now. That part is not always easy. So just keep that in mind like I was. I'm really happy to share this history with you. But it's Palmos. So many challenges. And the part that is the most inspiring to me is Karen's dedication to this field. I'm serious. You guys have never met someone who has more passion for a cause, and this woman has for helping people truly understand how their body works. Like she passes me up. She totally passes me up because this woman is like Ben. She is stuck with it through it all. Who've been very inspired by others, though. There you go, round two. Not crying, but what was that? Well, yeah, you won the bet now, but anyway. But I do I do hope that this provides you some inspiration for your personal health towards health care. And sometimes I feel like we're fighting against Goliath. You know, David and Goliath walking around as if we're up against a lot right now. But there is always one thing we can spread in our community is and that's education. There's no way someone can't get more educated about how their body works and not want to be a part of making our system more integrative and more holistic. There's no there's no way. So that's our initiative at holistic health educators is like the easiest way to like take a neutral stance in our communities instead of just sometimes I just want to be a fighter and a warrior and, you know, talk about like the system's right inside out, it's broken. But I have to realize, like that's not the constructive energy that we are hoping to put into the world. Like we are hoping to meet these amazing, passionate health care workers where they're at. They came into this field because they wanted to help people heal. There's no way we could be casting judgment on the whole system like that. So this is the time for us to like find when we share what we have in common. And that's that we want to help people get better and that's that we are passionate about about health care and about empowering people. And if we can remember that neutral ground right down the shared space we have, I really think we'll see big changes happening in the future. So that's that's my message about about integrative medicine and where we're headed. So I'm going to go ahead and wrap this up. But thank you so much for joining us live. And I hope to continue working with you for the next literally like 50 years or so. OK, thanks, everybody.  

Mise-en-Place
Episode 6 - COOKSCAMP 2021 - Part Two

Mise-en-Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:16


When, and if,  someone writes the  ‘origin story' of this podcast, it'll start with a big idea.  And that idea is COOKSCAMP -  an annual jamboree of professional cooks and their colleagues to talk about the future of their careers.  We haven't managed to get the outdoor event on its legs yet, but the Chefs'  Table Society of British Columbia recently organized the first virtual edition for more than 300 campers across Canada and beyond. No woodsmoke in the air,  but lots of great career advice for professional  cooks, including tips on publishing a cookbook in 2021 from author Julie Van Rosendaal and publisher Robert McCullough of Appetite by Random House.  Vancouver  chef Angus An,  also offered a great tutorial on sharpening your media skills to do better demos and other promo events.   Recorded on ZOOM Wednesday September 15th, COOKSCAMP 2021 also features co-host Mijune Pak.

Future Histories
S02E04 - Vincent August zu technologischem Regieren

Future Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 83:16


Setzt man sich mit den Prämissen technologischen Regierens auseinander, so gewinnt man nicht nur ein besseres Verständnis der Gegenwart, sondern auch eine Perspektive auf die drängende Frage: Wie könnten fundamental andere Techno-Logiken aussehen? Shownotes Vincent Augusts Homepage: vincentaugust.de Vincent auf Twitter: https://twitter.com/vinaugust Buch "Technologisches Regieren. Der Aufstieg des Netzwerk-Denkens in der Krise der Moderne. Foucault, Luhmann und die Kybernetik" (2021) von Vincent August: https://www.transcript-verlag.de/978-3-8376-5597-1/technologisches-regieren/?c=310000085 (Open Access) "Political ideas of the network society: Why digitalization research needs critical conceptual history, political theory, and the sociology of knowledge" von Vincent August. In: Journal of Political Science (ZPol): https://www.sowi.hu-berlin.de/de/lehrbereiche/allgemeine-soziologie/team/vincent-august/resolveuid/dadf0b9b82794501b4919dde38010edf (Open Access) "Network Concepts in Social Theory: Foucault and Cybernetics" von Vincent August. In: European Journal of Social Theory, 24 (online first): https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1368431021991046 (Open Access) "Hierarchie, Markt, Netzwerk: Stabilitätsmodelle spätmoderner Demokratien" von Vincent August. In: Leviathan: https://www.nomos-elibrary.de/10.5771/9783748907565-96/hierarchie-markt-netzwerk-stabilitaetsmodelle-spaetmoderner-demokratien?page=1 (paywalled) „Die Ordnung der Transparenz. Jeremy Bentham und die Genealogie einer demokratischen Norm“ von Vincent August https://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/978-3-643-12277-3 Weitere Materialien: Buch "Strangers in Their Own Land. Anger and Mourning on the American Right" von Arlie Russell Hochschild: https://thenewpress.com/books/strangers-their-own-land Jerem Bentham (Wiki): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremy_Bentham Kybernetik: Ackoff, R. L. (1979). The Future of Operational Research is Past. The Journal of the Operational Research Society: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3009290 Ashby, W. R. (1956). An Introduction to Cybernetics: http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/books/IntroCyb.pdf (ganzer Text, PDF) Bateson, G. (1972). Steps to an ecology of mind: Collected essays in anthropology, psychiatry, evolution, and epistemology: https://ejcj.orfaleacenter.ucsb.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/1972.-Gregory-Bateson-Steps-to-an-Ecology-of-Mind.pdf (ganzer Text, PDF) Dokumentation der Macy-Konferenzen: Pias, C. (Hg.). (2003). Cybernetics – Kybernetik: The Macy-Conferences 1946-1953 (Bd. 1): https://www.diaphanes.net/titel/cybernetics-3301 Foerster, H. von & Pörksen, B. (2019). Wahrheit ist die Erfindung eines Lügners: Gespräche für Skeptiker: https://www.carl-auer.de/wahrheit-ist-die-erfindung-eines-lugners Bzgl. Günthers "Kritik an den Wald-und-Wiesen-Kybernetikern" (seine Kritik an Habermas ist andernorts zu finden): Günther, G. (1975). Selbstdarstellung im Spiegel Amerikas. In L. J. Pongratz (Hg.), Philosophie in Selbstdarstellungen: https://www.vordenker.de/ggphilosophy/gg_selbstdarstellung.pdf (ganzer Text, PDF) Kline, R. R. (2015). The Cybernetics Moment: Or Why We Call Our Age the Information Age: https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/title/cybernetics-moment Bzgl. Dispute in der frühen Kybernetik und die Relevanz für die Entstehung der Kognitionswissenschaften: Dupuy, J. P. (2000). The Mechanization of the Mind: On the Origins of Cognitive Science: https://press.princeton.edu/books/ebook/9781400823819/the-mechanization-of-the-mind Technokratie-Kritik: Ellul, J. (1964 [1954]). The Technological Society: With an Introduction by Robert K. Merton: https://monoskop.org/images/5/55/Ellul_Jacques_The_Technological_Society.pdf (ganzer Text, PDF) Schelsky, H. (1961). Der Mensch in der wissenschaftlichen Zivilisation: https://www.springer.com/de/book/9783663002468 Habermas, J. (1973 [1968]). Technik und Wissenschaft als ›Ideologie‹: https://www.suhrkamp.de/buch/juergen-habermas-technik-und-wissenschaft-als-ideologie-t-9783518102879 Marcuse, H. (2002 [1964]). One-dimensional man: https://www.routledge.com/One-Dimensional-Man-Studies-in-the-Ideology-of-Advanced-Industrial-Society/Marcuse/p/book/9780415289771 Von Vincent August empfohlene Sekundärliteratur dazu (allerdings mit reproduziertem Kybernetik-Bild der Debatte): Seefried, E. (2015). Zukünfte: Aufstieg und Krise der Zukunftsforschung. 1945-1980. De Gruyter: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/hzhz-2018-1181/html Beispiele zu technologischem Denken in den Sozialwissenschaften: Raworth, K. (2017). Doughnut economics: Seven ways to think like a 21st-century economist. Random House: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/110/1107761/doughnut-economics/9781847941398.html Für Vincent August ist Technologisches Denken eine unausgesprochene Grundlage von Foucaults neuer Macht-Theorie und -Praxis: Foucault, M. (1983 [1976]). Sexualität und Wahrheit I: Der Wille zum Wissen: https://www.suhrkamp.de/buch/michel-foucault-sexualitaet-und-wahrheit-t-9783518283165 Foucault, M. (2014). Dits et Ecrits: Schriften in vier Bänden (D. Defert & F. Ewald, Hg., 3. Aufl.).  Nr. 86 & 88 (GIP), 194 (Machttheorie): https://www.suhrkamp.de/buch/michel-foucault-schriften-in-vier-baenden-dits-et-ecrits-t-9783518583715 Luhmann, N. (1987). Soziale Systeme: Grundriß einer allgemeinen Theorie: https://www.suhrkamp.de/buch/niklas-luhmann-soziale-systeme-t-9783518282663 Aus der Debatte der 70er Jahre: Wiki zu: Crozier, M. (1975). Western Europe. In M. Crozier, S. P. Huntington & J. Watanuki (Hg.), The Crisis of Democracy: Report on the Governability of Democracies to the Trilateral Commission: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crisis_of_Democracy Crozier, M. & Thoenig, J.-C. (1976). The Regulation of Complex Organized Systems. Administrative Science Quarterly, 21(4), 547–570: https://www.jstor.org/stable/2391716 Aus der Digitalisierungsdebatte etwa: Floridi, L. (2014). The 4th Revolution: How the infosphere is reshaping human reality: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-fourth-revolution-9780199606726?cc=at&lang=en&   thematisch angrenzende Future Histories Episoden: Benjamin Seibel zu politischer Kybernetik: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e01-interview-mit-benjamin-seibel-zu-politischer-kybernetik/ Simon Schaupp zu Kybernetik und radikaler Demokratie: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e18-simon-schaupp-zu-kybernetik-und-radikaler-demokratie/ Joseph Vogl zur Krise des Regierens: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e25-joseph-vogl-zur-krise-des-regierens/ Urs Stäheli zu Entnetzung: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e54-urs-staeheli-zu-entnetzung/ Kalle Kunkel zu Herrschaftstechnologien in der Krise: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e53-kalle-kunkel-zu-herrschaftstechnologien-in-der-krise/   Wenn euch Future Histories gefällt, dann erwägt doch bitte eine Unterstützung auf Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/FutureHistories? Schreibt mir unter office@futurehistories.today und diskutiert mit auf Twitter (#FutureHistories): https://twitter.com/FutureHpodcast oder auf Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/FutureHistories/ www.futurehistories.today   Episode Keywords #VincentAugust, #FutureHistories, #Podcast, #Interview, #TechnologischesRegieren, #Netzwerk, #Neoliberalismus, #Netzwerkdenken, #Kybernetik, #Liberalismus,  #Netzwerkgesellschaft, #Foucault, #AlternativeRegierungskunst, #Gouvernementalität, #Luhmann, #Crozier, #Netzwerk-Paradigma, #Regieren, #Governance, #Digitalisierung, #Herrschaftstechnologien, #Technokratie, #Souveränität, #DasRegierenDerAlgorithmen, #AlgorithmischesRegieren

Calvert Library's Book Bites for Adults
The Flight Attendant by Chris Bohjalian

Calvert Library's Book Bites for Adults

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 16:45


Enjoy our presentation of The Flight Attendant written by Chris Bohjalian and published by Random House. When binge-drinking flight attendant Cassandra wakes up in a Dubai hotel next to a body, she has no idea what happened, and all she can think to do is lie about it. She lies to her coworkers, and eventually to the FBI agents who question her. Could she have killed him? If not, then who did?Please be advised, The Flight Attendant contains depictions or discussions of alcoholism, death and strong language.This title is available as an ebook and audiobook on Libby by Overdrive.Libby ebook: http://bit.ly/FlightAttendant_ebookLibby audiobook:http://bit.ly/FlightAttendant_audiobook  Please visit www.calvertlibrary.info for more information. Music:  Beach Bum Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Badass Women at Any Age
097: Lives Well Lived with Sky Bergman

Badass Women at Any Age

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 32:31


Inspired by her 100 year old grandmother's workout routine, Sky Bergman decided to document her unbelievable routine and lifestyle.  Realizing the positive impact of her grandmother's example, Sky set out in search of other positive and inspiring stories of aging.  The overwhelming response inspired her badass trailblazing journey to becoming a filmmaker.  Now playing on PBS, her directorial debut film, “Lives Well Lived”, celebrates the lives of our elders, sharing  40 inspiring stories of older adults.  Sky is an accomplished, award winning photographer and artist.  Her artwork is included in permanent collections at the LA County Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum , Seattle Art Museum, Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France.  Her commercial work has appeared  on book covers from Random House and Farrar, Straus and Giroux Inc. as well as magazine spreads in Smithsonian, Arthur Frommer's Budget Travel, Reader's Digest and Archeology Odyssey.    Sky is currently a professor of photography and video at Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo.   What You Will Hear in This Episode:  Sky's grandmother's influence and inspiration as an active 90+ woman. How the Lives Well Lived project began and the personal accounts and stories that inspired Sky to turn her project into a film. Lives Well Lived timeline, creative financing, process, team and success.  10 years in the making. Asking for help.  Being kind, genuine and authentic in your purpose. 3 common themes amongst older adults 1) Everyone needs a sense of purpose. 2) Good sense of community 3) Sense of resilience. Ageism and staying relevant as we age. The impact and importance of intergenerational connections. Diversity, equity and inclusion. Advice on following your passion. Quotes: “Instead of saying “why?” say, “why not?”.” “If I don't know how to do something it's ok to admit that I don't know how to do it.” “Happiness is a state of mind, you can be happy with what you have or miserable with what you don't have, you decide.” - Dr. Louis Tedone “Lucky Louis” “The last 100 years is the first time in human history that we've looked to anyone other than our elders for advice.” - Huffington Post Mentioned: Lives Well Lived PBS Intergenerational projects Dr. Louis Tedone Not Done Yet! Not Done Yet! Amazon Bonniemarcusleadership.com The Politics of Promotion Fb @Bonnie.Marcus LinkedIn: @Bonniemarcus Twitter: @selfpromote IG: @self_promote_ Bonniemarcusleadership.com  

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Author of "Chasing the Boogeyman" Richard Chizmar, Interviewed by author Jennifer Anne Gordon

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 31:34


GUEST: He is the co-author (with Stephen King) of the bestselling novella, Gwendy's Button Box and the founder/publisher of Cemetery Dance magazine and the Cemetery Dance Publications book imprint. He has edited more than 35 anthologies and his short fiction has appeared in dozens of publications, including multiple editions of Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and The Year's 25 Finest Crime and Mystery Stories. He has won two World Fantasy awards, four International Horror Guild awards, and the HWA's Board of Trustee's award. Chizmar (in collaboration with Johnathon Schaech) has also written screenplays and teleplays for United Artists, Sony Screen Gems, Lions Gate, Showtime, NBC, and many other companies. He has adapted the works of many bestselling authors including Stephen King, Peter Straub, and Bentley Little. Chizmar is also the creator/writer of the online website, Stephen King Revisited. His fourth short story collection, The Long Way Home, was published in 2019. With Brian Freeman, Chizmar is co-editor of the acclaimed Dark Screams horror anthology series published by Random House imprint, Hydra. His latest book, The Girl on the Porch, was released in hardcover by Subterranean Press, and Widow's Point, a chilling novella about a haunted lighthouse written with his son, Billy Chizmar, was recently adapted into a feature film. Chizmar's work has been translated into more than fifteen languages throughout the world, and he has appeared at numerous conferences as a writing instructor, guest speaker, panelist, and guest of honor. https://richardchizmar.com HOST: Award winning horror author, Jennifer Anne Gordon, talks all things that go bump in the night. Everything from ghosts, goblins, ghouls, scarecrows, serial killers....everything that scares her. — everything scares her. Show with a focus on horror, dark fiction and true crime. www.JenniferAnneGordon.com This is copyrighted by the Authors on the Air Global Radio Network.

Reading McCarthy
Episode 17: Searching for SUTTREE with Dianne Luce

Reading McCarthy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 89:19


Episode 17 is an epic consideration of McCarthy's first great epic novel, Suttree. Our returning guest is Dr. Dianne Luce.  Dianne Luce is a founding member and past president of the Cormac McCarthy Society.  She has co-edited two collections of articles on McCarthy, and she is the author of Reading the World: Cormac McCarthy's Tennessee Period (2009).  Recently she has been writing a two-volume study of McCarthy's writing life at Random House through examination of archival research.  She holds faculty emeritus status from Midlands Tech in Columbia, SC.The title of this episode, by the way, comes from the most excellent Wes Morgan, who has documented many of the places about Knoxville used in the novel on his "Searching for Suttree" website:  https://web.utk.edu/~wmorgan/Suttree/suttree.htmThanks to Thomas Frye, who composed, performed, and produced the music for READING MCCARTHY.  Included are (as Intro): “The World to Come” and as the Outro: “Blues for Blevins.”  Also included, by Peter Josyph and the mighty mighty band Corporal Punishment, “Suttree's Song.”The views of the host and his guests do not necessarily reflect the views of their home institutions or the Cormac McCarthy Society.Our website: https://readingmccarthy.buzzsprout.com/And e-mail: readingmccarthy (@) gmail.com

FUTUREPROOF.
Why do humans waste just about everything? (ft. futurist Byron Reese)

FUTUREPROOF.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 29:12


One of the most engaging interview subjects I've ever had is probably futurist Byron Reese a few years back, when I was writing for Inc.com, and it's great to have the excuse to speak with him again. A successful tech entrepreneur, speaker, author, and inventor with 2 NASDAQ IPO's, Byron's newest book Wasted  launched this past June from Random House, and it was one of my favorites of this past summer. Along with his co-author , Scott Hoffman, Byron interprets waste in a very broad way, looking at the subject through the lens of how we waste natural resources, time, money, and even human potential. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play - and make sure to follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn!

Plants of the Gods: Hallucinogens, Healing, Culture and Conservation podcast
Plants of the Gods: S2E6. Albert Hofmann, Richard Schultes and Gordon Wasson: The Holy Trinity of Ethnomycology, plus the two women who must be added to the Pantheon!

Plants of the Gods: Hallucinogens, Healing, Culture and Conservation podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 35:24


The birth of the Psychedelic Renaissance is often attributed to Richard Schultes' research on peyote and magic mushrooms in the 1930's. Nonetheless, it was his collaboration with both Gordon Wasson and Albert Hofmann that brought this indigenous wisdom and chemistry to a wider world. At the same time, the equally extraordinary contributions of Valentina Wasson and Maria Sabina merit equal recognition and appreciation.   Allen, John W. “Mushroom Pioneers.” Www.erowid.org/Library/Books, 2002. De Rios, Marlene Dobkin. “María Sabina: Her Life and Chants.” Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, vol. 14, no. 3, 1982, pp. 259–260., doi:10.1080/02791072.1982.10471940. Erowid, www.erowid.org/. Estrada, Alvaro. María Sabina, Her Life and Chants. Ross-Erikson, 1981. Forte, Robert. Entheogens and the Future of Religion. Park Street Press, 2012. Furst, Peter T. Hallucinogens and Culture. Chandler & Sharp Publishers, Inc., 1997. Johnson, Cody. Magic Medicine: A Trip through the INTOXICATING History and Modern-Day Use of Psychedelic Plants & Substances. Fair Winds Press, 2018. Letcher, Andy. Shroom: A Cultural History of the Magic Mushroom. Ecco, 2007. Pfister, Donald H. “R. Gordon WASSON: 1898-1986.” Mycologia, vol. 80, no. 1, 1988, p. 11., doi:10.2307/3807487. Riedlinger, Thomas J. Sacred Mushroom Seeker: Essays for R. Gordon Wasson. Dioscorides Press, 1990. Schultes, Richard Evans, and Siri Von Reis. Ethnobotany: Evolution of a Discipline. Timber Press, 2008. Schultes, Richard Evans. “Plantae Mexicanae II, the Identification Of TEONANACATL, a Narcotic Basidiomycete of the Aztecs.” Botanical Museum Leaflets of Harvard University, vol. 7, no. 3, 1939, pp. 37–54. Schultes, Richard Evans. “Teonanacatl: The Narcotic Mushroom of the Aztecs.” American Anthropologist, vol. 42, no. 3, 1940, pp. 429–443., doi:10.1525/aa.1940.42.3.02a00040. Sheldrake, Merlin. Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds & Shape Our Futures. Random House, 2021. Wasson, Gordon. “The Death of Claudius, or Mushrooms for Murders.” Harvard Botanical Museum Leaflets, vol. 23, no. 3, 1972, pp. 101–128.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Monday Morning Politics: The President and the Lawsuits

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 33:50


Emily Bazelon, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, co-host of Slate's "Political Gabfest" podcast, Truman Capote fellow for creative writing and law at Yale Law School and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (Random House, 2019), talks about the Republican governors suing the Biden administration over vaccine mandates and the DOJ suing over the Texas abortion law, plus other national news.

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Why 'Vaccine Mandate' Is A Misnomer

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 25:47


After last week's show of national unity leading up to the 20th anniversary of 9/11, this week Republican governors are suing the Biden administration over vaccine mandates and the DOJ is suing over the Texas abortion law. On Today's Show:Emily Bazelon, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, co-host of Slate's "Political Gabfest" podcast, Truman Capote fellow for creative writing and law at Yale Law School and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (Random House, 2019), breaks down the latest news on the lawsuits.

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast
Ep 281: Ron James (Blackfly, The Ron James Show)

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 44:38


Ron James' stand-up comedy performances have consistently sold out theatres from coast to coast for twenty years, garnering accolades from critics and audiences alike. His one-hour comedy specials on CBC TV have long been a New Year's Eve tradition, the last three garnering a record breaking 1.5 million viewers, with a ninth set to air December 31st. After three years spent acting in Los Angeles as a regular cast member on ‘My Talk Show' (IMAGINE TV) and guest starring in numerous television series, (not to mention being the national spokesman on CNN for Texas Tourism), he returned to Toronto and penned a one man show, ‘Up & Down In Shaky Town'. Filmed for the premiere season of CTV's Comedy Network, it was heralded as ‘one of the ten best events of the television season'. Ron quickly earned a stellar reputation as a comedian who consistently delivered, appearing at every major televised comedy festival from Halifax to Winnipeg to Montreal's prestigious ‘Just For Laughs'. The following two decades saw him win a Gemini Award for writing on ‘This Hour Has 22 Minutes', be anointed Comedian of the Year at the Canadian Comedy Awards, create and star in two television series, ‘Blackfly' on GLOBAL TV (‘an original and uniquely Canadian series'…Globe and Mail ) and ‘The Ron James Show', that ran for five years on CBC and landed him a Screen Award nomination for Best Actor In A Comedy Series. He's received the Dave Broadfoot Award for Comedic Genius, a Doctorate in the Humanities from his alma mater, Acadia University and has recently released his first book, ‘All Over the Map', published by Random House. Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review wherever you watch/listen! Read Ron's new book “All Over the Map” : https://www.amazon.com/All-Over-Map-Ruminations-Canadian/dp/038567113X Follow me on Instagram: @ssettanni & @acomedyadvicepodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hyperbrole-podcast/message

First Draft with Sarah Enni
Practical But Impetuous With Jennifer Niven

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 76:39


First Draft Episode #322: Jennifer Niven Jennifer Niven is the Emmy Award-winning #1 New York Times bestselling author of ten books, including YA novels All the Bright Places, Holding up the Universe, Breathless, and Take Me With You When You Go (with David Levithan). This episode is brought to you by Laura Sibson's Edie in Between, a modern-day Practical Magic about love, loss, and embracing the mystical, available now. And by The Splendor by Breeana Shields, out from Page Street Publishing now. Links to Topics Mentioned In This Episode: Penelope Niven, biographer and author of Carl Sandburg: A Biography and Carl Sandburg: Adventures of a Poet, Thornton Wilder: A Life, Steichen: A Biography, memoirist (Swimming Lessons: Life Lessons From the Pool, From Diving In to Treading Water) and co-author of James Earl Jones's autobiography, Voices and Silences. The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Men Against the Sea by Sebastian Junger Jon Krakauer, author of Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, Under the Banner of Heaven, Missoula, and more Carl Sandburg, three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning poet (for Cornhuskers and Complete Poems) and biographer (for his four-book series, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years). Will Schwalbe, author of The End of Your Life Book Club and Books For Living: Some Thoughts on Reading, Reflecting, and Embracing Life, and co-author of Send: Why People Email So Badly and How to Do It Better with Dave Shipley Jennifer's original agent, John A. Ware, who passed away in 2013. Read his obituary in Publisher's Weekly. Jennifer's current agent, Kerry Sparks at the Levine Greenberg Rostan Literary Agency David Levithan, editorial director at Scholastic and the author of many young adult novels, including Boy Meets Boy, Every Day, and co-author with Rachel Cohn of Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist and Dash and Lily's Book of Dares. Ava Dellaira, author of Love Letters to the Dead and In Search of Us. Listen to her First Draft interviews here and here.

Face the Truth
Face the Truth Podcast- Ep.144 W/Fred Harper!

Face the Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 60:36


It's Greek to me! Fred Harper hangs out for a chat! Fred just released his latest comic book, "Snelson: Comedy is Dying" published by Ahoy Comics, and shares some of his process, hanging out in comedy clubs for "inspiration", fixing up a home in Greece, and loads more. It's fun, check it out! Fred is an illustrator living in New York city, known for his work in The Week Magazine, Wall Street Journal, New York Observer, Investment News, New York Times, Time, Sports Illustrated, National Geographic for Children, Scholastic, Village Voice, Country Weekly, Penguin, The Deal, Ad Age, Muscular Development, Muscle and Fitness, Health, Money, J Walter Thompson, Hermes, Two Seven, Marvel, DC Comics, Premier, Sport, Sporting News, Playboy, Screw, Saks 5th Ave, US Air Force, New York Press, Random House... Check out Fred on: Instagram @deadredfred https://www.fredharper.com/ Buy Fred's latest comic books here: https://www.comicsahoy.com/ Please enjoy and remember to smash that like and subscribe button! https://www.jasonseiler.com/​​​​​​​​​... INSTAGRAM-seilerpaints #facethetruthpodcast​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ #fredharper #jasonseiler​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ ​

The Mindful Experiment Podcast
EP#310 - Brain Boosting Oils

The Mindful Experiment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 43:37


In this episode, I had the pleasure of interviewing Jodi Sternoff Cohen.  Jodi is an expert when it comes to essential oils and in this episode, she will share the benefits of using essential oils to boost your brain, destress, and overall wellness. We discuss how essential oils work, her story and experience with using them plus discuss her new book, "ESSENTIAL OILS TO HEAL THE BRAIN AND BOOST THE BODY: 5 Steps to Calm Anxiety, Sleep Better, Reduce Inflammation, and Regain Control of Health." Tune in to the episode to learn how to unlock more of the potential of your brain utilizing essential oils! Who is Jodi Sternoff Cohen? Jodi Cohen is a bestselling author, award-winning journalist, and founder of Vibrant Blue Oils, a top resource for essential oils online, which welcomes 300,000 visitors every year. Her #1 bestselling book, Healing with Essential Oils, synthesizes decades of leading scientific research to help explain how essential oils can work to support the body and the brain. Random House will publish her second book, Essential Oils to Boost the Brain and Heal the Body, on March 16, 2021. After personally experiencing the profound physical and mental benefits of essential oils in addressing her own anxiety, insomnia, and autoimmunity, Jodi wanted to know why. Today, she holds certifications in nutritional therapy, functional neurology, herbalism, and aromatherapy, along with multiple continuing education courses in plant medicine, brain health, Chinese medicine, and herbalism. Jodi has worked closely with healthcare practitioners, including MDs, NDs, nurse practitioners, chiropractors, acupuncturists, health coaches, nutritionists, and yoga instructors, to implement the most effective essential oil protocols in clinical practice to support underlying imbalances that often lead to disease, including sleep, stress, digestion, inflammation, detoxification, and blood-sugar imbalances. She has since curated and compiled these learnings in her books, blog, and classes to educate more than 65,000 practitioners, individuals and families across the nation on best practices for essential oils to balance the body and the brain. In 2012, she founded Vibrant Blue Oils, a collection of proprietary blends of organic and wild-crafted essential oils—and a popular destination for the hundreds of thousands of health seeking consumers and practitioners who depend on her supply of quality essential oils. Trained as an investigative journalist, Jodi earned her MBA from Columbia University, and has worked as a marketing executive at Microsoft, Time Inc., and US News & World Report—and earlier in her career, as a legislative aide to Senator Ted Kennedy. Today, Jodi devotes her time to helping educate and inspire people to take back and rebalance their health by incorporating the simple, potent practice of essential oils into their lives. She has had the honor of speaking at Columbia Business School, JJ Virgin's MindShare Summit, The Nutritional Therapy Association Conference, and Natalie Lussier's Off the Charts, and featured in several popular wellness publications, including Wellness Mama, Thyroid Pharmacist, and Elephant Journal, among others. See all of Jodi's interviews here. How to Connect With Jodi? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vibrantblueoils Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/vibrantblueoils/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vibrantblueoils/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQWk3IHUWmJtDoajUTuigsQ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vibrantblueoils/ Website: https://vibrantblueoils.com/ ---------------------------------------------------- Connect with Dr. Vic... Website: www.EmpowerYourReality.com Facebook: www.Facebook.com/drvicmanzo Instagram: www.Instagram.com/drvicmanzo LinkedIn: www.LinkedIn.com/in/drmanzo   Check out my books: https://amzn.to/3gzr9XT   Do You Want to learn how DOUBLE Your Profits while working LESS?  https://prosperousmindexperience.gr8.com/   About Dr. Vic... I'm Dr. Vic Manzo Jr., a Pediatric/Family Wellness Chiropractor, Holistic Practitioner, Transformational Mindset Coach, Influential Author, Inspirational Speaker, and the host and creator of The Mindful Experiment Podcast. I teach entrepreneurs and chiropractors how to DOUBLE their profits while working LESS and spending more time with their LOVED ONES in 90 days. Check out my socials and if interesting in a discovery call with me, visit www.TheProsperousMindExperience.com.

Lit for Christmas
Episode Seven: Bayou Zingers & Redbirds

Lit for Christmas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 93:15


Welcome back to the Lit for Christmas party, the podcast where the Christmas spirits flow all year long! For this official seventh episode, Amanda and Marty enjoy a little Southern Comfort cocktail while discussing Fannie Flagg's novella A Redbird Christmas. Tune in for a little downhome trash talk about Sweet Tea, book clubs, and bad endings. BONUS POINTS: Get vaccinated and stay alive! RECIPE FOR BAYOU ZINGER: Ingredients: Ice 1 1/2 oz. Southern Comfort 1/2 oz. Grand Marnier 2 oz. lemon juice 2 oz. iced sweet tea Directions: In a mixing glass, add Southern Comfort, Grand Marnier, and lemon juice. Shake with ice until well blended. Strain into a glass. Top with iced sweet tea. Add ice and wedge of lemon or sprig of mint if desired. NOTE: Adjust measurements to your taste. Amanda and Marty cut back on the lemon juice and added a LOT more sweet tea. Lit for Christmas Party Hosts: Amanda got her undergrad at U of M in English, MFA from Goddard College, and JD from Wayne State University Law School. She's a writer, fleece-legging addict, private poetry hoarder, public child herder, heirloom seed collector, candle dripper, cocktail mixer, and Christmas geek. Marty has an Master's in fiction writing, MFA in poetry writing, and teaches in the English Department at Northern Michigan University in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. He served two terms at Poet Laureate of the Upper Peninsula, and has published the poetry collection The Mysteries of the Rosary from Mayapple Press. For more of Marty's thoughts and writing visit his blog Saint Marty (saintmarty-marty.blogspot.com) or listen to his other podcast Confessions of Saint Marty, also on Anchor.fm. Marty is a writer, blogger, wine sipper, easy drunk, and poetry obsessor who puts his Christmas tree up in mid-October and refuses to take it down until the snow starts melting. Music for this episode: "Jingle Bells Jazzy Style" by Julius H, used courtesy of Pixabay. "A Christmas Treat" by Magic-828, used courtesy of Pixabay. A Christmas Carol sound clips from: The Campbell Theater 1939 radio production of A Christmas Carol, narrated by Orson Welles and starring Lionel Barrymore. "Cardinal" sound clip from: "Cardinal." Beck, Andy. Alfred Music Choral, 2018. This month's Christmas lit: Flagg, Fannie. A Redbird Christmas. Random House, 2004.

Livros que amamos - histórias para crianças

Chico Panzé acordou de mau humor. Seus amigos não conseguem entender como ele pode estar de mau humor num dia tão lindo. Seus amigos tentam encorajá-lo a se animar, e fazer coisas que os deixam alegres. Mas Chico não aguenta tanto pitaco e acaba explodindo. Será que ele apenas precisa de um dia pra curtir sua rabugice? Esse livro se chama “Grumpy Monkey”, escrito por Suzanne Lang, ilustrado por Max Lang, publicado pela Random House e ainda não publicado no Brasil. Foi traduzido pela Natália Fonseca e adaptado por mim, especialmente pra esse episódio. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/denise32/message

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
#93: School of Rocks (Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying DarkHorse Livestream)

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 100:42


In this 93rd in a series of live discussions with Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying (both PhDs in Biology), we discuss the state of the world through an evolutionary lens.In this episode, we discuss school. Beginning with a discussion of our individual experiences in school, we then share an excerpt from chapter 10 (School) of our forthcoming book, A Hunter-Gatherer's Guide to the 21st Century. What is school for, and what does it help make us become? Is genius common, or rare? What is the purpose of the scientific method? How is fear used to corral students (and others)? How does a relationship with risk help young people become more adept adults? Are our bodies necessary to our education, or can we be educated as if we were just brains in jars?Get your Goliath shirts right here: store.darkhorsepodcast.orgHeather's newsletter, Natural Selections (subscribe to get free weekly essays in your inbox): https://naturalselections.substack.comSupport the sponsors of this show:MUDWTR: is a coffee alternative with mushrooms and herbs (and cacao!) and is delicious, with 1/7 the caffeine as coffee. Visit mudwtr.com/darkhorse and use DARKHORSE at check out for $5 off.  Public Goods: Get $15 off your first order at Public Goods, your new everything store, at https://www.publicgoods.com/darkhorse or with code DARKHORSE at checkout.Our book, A Hunter-Gatherer's Guide to the 21st Century, is now available for pre-sale at amazon. Publication date: 9-14-21: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0593086880/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_5BDTABYFKRJKZBT5GSQAhttp://huntergatherersguide.com/DarkHorse merchandise now available at: store.darkhorsepodcast.orgFind more from us on Bret's website (https://bretweinstein.net) or Heather's website (http://heatherheying.com).Become a member of the DarkHorse LiveStreams, and get access to an additional Q&A livestream every month. Join at Heather's Patreon.Like this content? Subscribe to the channel, like this video, follow us on twitter (@BretWeinstein, @HeatherEHeying), and consider helping us out by contributing to either of our Patreons or Bret's Paypal.Looking for clips from #DarkHorseLivestreams? Here are some, updated frequently: @DarkHorse Podcast ClipsTheme Music: Thank you to Martin Molin of Wintergatan for providing us the rights to use their excellent music.Q&A Link: https://youtu.be/KhWapUeBMz0Mentioned in this episode:A Hunter-Gatherer's Guide to the 21st Century: https://huntergatherersguide.comGatto, John Taylor. 1992 (2017 2nd ed). Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling. New Society Publishers.Pirsig, R.M., 1974. Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance: An inquiry into values. Random House. Held, R. and A. Hein. 1963. Movement-Produced Stimulation in the Development of Visually Guided Behavior. J. Comparative and Physiological Psychology 56(5): 872–876. Spiekermann, S., 2018. Carousel kittens: The case for a value-based IoT. IEEE Pervasive Computing, 17(2): 62-65.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bretweinstein)

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - Toni Morrison

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 0:45


Today's Quotation is care of Toni Morrison.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app! Toni Morrison is one of the most celebrated authors in the world. In addition to writing plays, and children's books, her novels have earned her countless prestigious awards including the Pulitzer Prize and the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. Toni Morrison was born on February 18, 1931 in Lorain, Ohio. In 1949, Morrison decided to attend a historically black institution for her college education. She moved to Washington, D.C. to attend Howard University.After teaching at Howard University for seven years, Morrison moved to Syracuse, New York to become an editor for the textbook division of Random House publishing. Within two years, she transferred to the New York City branch of the company and began to edit fiction and books by African-American authors. Although she worked for a publishing company, Morrison did not publish her first novel called The Bluest Eye until she was 39 years old. Three years later, Morrison published her second novel called Sula, that was nominated for the National Book Award. In 1993, Morrison became the first Black woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Three years later, she was also chosen by the National Endowment for the Humanities to give the Jefferson Lecture, and was honored with the National Book Foundation's Medal of Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.Morrison's work continued to influence writers and artists through her focus on African American life and her commentary on race relations. Following this, Morrison's books were featured four times as selections for Oprah's Book Club. While writing and producing, Morrison was also a professor in the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University. Her work earned her an honorary Doctorate degree from the University of Oxford, and the opportunity to be a guest curator at the Louvre museum in Paris. In 2000, she was named a Living Legend by the Library of Congress. Morrison also wrote children's books with her son until his death at 45 years old. Two years later, Morrison published the last book they were working on together and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in that same month. Morrison passed away in 2019 from complications of pneumonia.From https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/toni-morrison For more information about Toni Morrison:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Edwidge Danticat on Morrison, at 04:30: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-018-edwidge-danticatAyad Akhtar on Morrison, at 27:35: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-156-ayad-akhtarElizabeth Gilbert on Morrison, at 31:50: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-155-elizabeth-gilbertEddie S. Glaude, Jr., on Morrison, at 25:15: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-104-eddie-s-glaude-jrToshi Reagon on Morrison, at 08:48: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-065-toshi-reagonViet Thanh Nguyen on Morrison, at 15:18: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-052Elizabeth Alexander on Morrison, at 08:51: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-062-elizabeth-alexander“Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am”: https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/toni-morrison-the-pieces-i-am-documentary/16971/“Toni Morrison and What Our Mothers Couldn't Say”: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/toni-morrison-and-what-our-mothers-couldnt-say

First Draft with Sarah Enni
The Buzzy Feeling With Chandler Baker

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 58:50


First Draft Episode #318: Chandler Baker Chandler Baker, the New York Times bestselling author of Whisper Network talks about her latest feminist thriller, The Husbands. She is also the co-author with Wesley King of YA novel Hello (From Here), out September 7! Links to Topics Mentioned In This Episode: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis Lauren Oliver, New York Times bestselling author of Panic, the Delirium series, and Before I Fall John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author of many young adult novels, including The Fault in Our Stars and Printz-winning Looking For Alaska, joins to discuss his new essay collection, The Anthropocene Reviewed. He is also one half of the vlogbrothers on YouTube and co-creator of educational series Crash Course. Listen to his First Draft interview here. Gayle Forman, #1 New York Times bestselling author of If I Stay and Where She Went, as well as We Are Inevitable, Frankie & Bug, and many more. Miss Snark Absolute Write (whose forum is back up now!) The Society for Children's Book Writers and Illustrator's Blue Boards forum Full Fathom Five, the book packaging company run by James Frey Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live) by Eve Rodsky I Know How She Does It: How Successful Women Make the Most of Their Time by Lisa VanderKamp Nicola Yoon, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Everything, Everything and The Sun Is Also a Star talks about her new YA, Instructions For Dancing and her brand new publishing venture: co-publisher of Joy Revolution, a Random House young adult imprint dedicated to love stories starring people of color. Listen to her First Draft interviews here and here. Kristen Wiig has bought the rights to adapt The Husbands

The Perks Of Being A Book Lover Podcast
Season 5 Ep. 100 Globe Trotter with guest Heather Lennon of Arctis Books 8-11-21

The Perks Of Being A Book Lover Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 59:46


This week we talk with Heather Lennon, the Sales and Marketing Director at Arctis Books, a new publisher of books in translation for middle grade and young adult audiences. I first encountered Arctis books when I saw an instagram post about a middle grade book called Memento Monstrum originally published in German that will be in US bookstores in October. I liked the book so much I messaged Heather and invited her to be on the show to talk about Arctis specifically and books in translation in general, Heather has been in publishing for 20 years, with Random House, North/South Books, and is now helping Arctis Books take off. The company's first book, The End by Swedish author Mats Strandberg, came out in October 2020. It is described by Publisher's Weekly as Nordic noir meets YA in a part whodunit, part romance, part end of the world narrative. The book received a Kirkus starred review and was listed as one of their Best Young Adult Books of 2020. This recognition really gave Arctis the push it needed. Now Arctis has the Odin's Child trilogy by Norwegian author Siri Petterson which has been an international bestseller. Arctis is offering a really interesting, high quality slate of books from Europe with the possibility of presenting literature from other parts of the world in the future. Books Mentioned in this Episode: 1- Circe by Madeleine Miller 2- A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes 3- Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister 4- Everyone Poops by Taro Gomi 5- Odin's Child by Siri Pettersen 6- The Rot by Siri Pettersen 7- Memento Monstrum by Jochen Til 8- All the Colors of Life by Lisa Aisato 9- The End by Mats Strandberg 10- Erik the Red by Tilman Roehrig 11- Robin Hood by Tilman Roehrig 12- Wicked Plants: The Weed that Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart 13- Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart 14- Girl with Gun by Amy Stewart 15- The Witches Heart by Genevieve Gornichec 16- Sweet Bean Paste by Durian Sukegawa 17- A Room With a View by E. M. Forester   Movies: 1- A Room With a View ( 1985)   TV show 1- Sherlock - BBC

FORward Radio program archives
Perks Season 5 Ep. 100 | Heather Lennon | Globe Trotter | 8-11-21

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 59:46


This week we talk with Heather Lennon, the Sales and Marketing Director at Arctis Books, a new publisher of books in translation for middle grade and young adult audiences. I first encountered Arctis books when I saw an instagram post about a middle grade book called Memento Monstrum originally published in German that will be in US bookstores in October. I liked the book so much I messaged Heather and invited her to be on the show to talk about Arctis specifically and books in translation in general, Heather has been in publishing for 20 years, with Random House, North/South Books, and is now helping Arctis Books take off. The company's first book, The End by Swedish author Mats Strandberg, came out in October 2020. It is described by Publisher's Weekly as Nordic noir meets YA in a part whodunit, part romance, part end of the world narrative. The book received a Kirkus starred review and was listed as one of their Best Young Adult Books of 2020. This recognition really gave Arctis the push it needed. Now Arctis has the Odin's Child trilogy by Norwegian author Siri Petterson which has been an international bestseller. Arctis is offering a really interesting, high quality slate of books from Europe with the possibility of presenting literature from other parts of the world in the future. Books Mentioned in this Episode: 1- Circe by Madeleine Miller 2- A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes 3- Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister 4- Everyone Poops by Taro Gomi 5- Odin's Child by Siri Pettersen 6- The Rot by Siri Pettersen 7- Memento Monstrum by Jochen Til 8- All the Colors of Life by Lisa Aisato 9- The End by Mats Strandberg 10- Erik the Red by Tilman Roehrig 11- Robin Hood by Tilman Roehrig 12- Wicked Plants: The Weed that Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart 13- Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart 14- Girl with Gun by Amy Stewart 15- The Witches Heart by Genevieve Gornichec 16- Sweet Bean Paste by Durian Sukegawa 17- A Room With a View by E. M. Forester Movie 1- A Room With a View (1985) TV series 1- Sherlock (BBC)

Aprender de Grandes
#103 Adrián Paenza y 36 años de amistad

Aprender de Grandes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 89:39


Hace unos días me llamó Glenda Vieites, que es una de las directoras de la editorial Penguin Random House y con quien habíamos grabado hace un tiempo un episodio hermosísimo de Aprender de Grandes, y me pidió que entrevistara a Adrián Paenza para escribir un artículo en una de las revistas de la editorial en ocasión del lanzamiento del libro Nº 19 de Adrián. Le dije que sí, obvio, me encantaría. Tuve hace unos días la conversación con Adrián, la hicimos por Zoom, él está en Estados Unidos, y la grabamos. La idea era que después los editores de Random House la iban a editar para la versión de esta revista. Cuando terminamos de grabar con Adrián, yo le dije "Adrián, acabamos de hacer un episodio de Aprender de Grandes" y él me dijo "sí". Entonces, con el permiso de Adrián, transformamos esa conversación que tuvimos en este episodio de Aprender de Grandes. Durante la conversación no sabíamos que esto iba a ser así. La calidad del audio no es excelente porque fue grabado por Zoom pero se entiende bastante bien. Con Adrián como siempre hablamos de un montón de temas y también recordamos muchas de las cosas que vivimos en nuestra amistad, que ya lleva más de 36 años. Creo que muchas de esas cosas les pueden parecer interesantes o divertidas. ¡No se lo pierdan! Soy Gerry Garbulsky y quiero que juntos aprendamos durante toda la vida. Pueden ver los links relevantes de este episodio en http://aprenderdegrandes.com/paenza2021 Inscripción a los cursos de Aprender de Grandes: https://aprenderdegrandes.com/cursos Suscripción al email corto de los lunes con ideas para empezar la semana: https://aprenderdegrandes.com/newsletter Episodios del podcast Aprender de Grandes: https://aprenderdegrandes.com/episodios Aprender de Grandes está disponible en... Youtube: http://youtube.com/AprenderdeGrandes Spotify: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesSpotify Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesApple Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesGoogle Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/aprenderdegrandes/ Stitcher: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesStitcher TuneIn: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesTuneIn ivoox: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesivoox Overcast: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesOvercast Pocket Casts: http://bit.ly/AprenderDeGrandesPocketcast Y en las redes sociales... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aprenderdegrandes/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/apdegran/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/apdegrandes/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/aprenderdegrandes/ Música y sonido: Estudio Pomeranec (http://pomeranec.com/).

First Draft with Sarah Enni
The Four Step Plan With Kerry Winfrey

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 60:28


First Draft Episode #316: Kerry Winfrey Kerry Winfrey, author of romantic comedies Waiting For Tom Hanks, Not Like the Movies, and her newest, Very Sincerely Yours. She is also the author of YA novels Love and Other Alien Experiences and Things Jolie Needs to Do Before She Bites It. Links to Topics Mentioned In This Episode: Superfudge by Judy Blume The Kenyon Review Young Writers Workshop George Saunders, author of Tenth of December: Stories, Lincoln in the Bardo, and A Swim in a Pond in the Rain: In Which Four Russians Give a Master Class on Writing, Reading, and Life, and many more short stories and collections. Lorrie Moore, author of Birds of America, Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?, and many more short stories and collections. Marla Frazee is the two-time Caldecott Honor-winning author and illustrator of The Boss Baby, A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever, All the World, and many more. She joins us to talk about the Farmer series: The Farmer and the Clown, The Farmer and the Monkey, and The Farmer and the Circus, out now. Kerry's writing for HelloGiggles Year of Romantic Comedies Kerry's review of You've Got Mail for Year of RomComs John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author of many young adult novels, including The Fault in Our Stars and Printz-winning Looking For Alaska, joins to discuss his new essay collection, The Anthropocene Reviewed. He is also one half of the vlogbrothers on YouTube and co-creator of educational series Crash Course. Listen to his First Draft interview here. Harvey (movie) Playing House (TV show) features one of Kerry's favorite romantic leading men performances from Keegan Michael-Key. She wrote about his performance here. I spoke with Lennon Parham and Jessica St. Clair, comedians, actors, and screenwriters behind Playing House, in this interview. Angela Velez, author of the forthcoming Lulu and Milagro's Search for Clarity. Jasmine Guillory, New York Times bestselling author of romance novels The Wedding Date, The Wedding Party, While We Were Dating, Party of Two, and The Proposal. Hear her First Draft interview here. Trainwreck (movie) Christian Robinson, illustrator of Caldecott Honor, a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor, and the Newbery Medal-winning and #1 New York Times bestseller Last Stop on Market Street, written by Matt de la Peña (listen to his First Draft interview here), and the #1 New York Times bestseller The Bench, written by Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex. His solo projects include Another and You Matter. Carson Ellis, author and illustrator of Caldecott Honor book Du Iz Tak?, as well as Home, In the Half Room, and many more. Hear her First Draft interview here. Mac Barnett, two-time Caldecott Honor-winning author of Extra Yarn and Sam and Dave Dig a Hole, both illustrated by Jon Klassen (listen to his First Draft interviews here and here) and dozens more children's books, including the Kid Spy series (illustrated by Mike Lowery), CIrcle (also illustrated by Jon Klassen), and the Jack books (illustrated by Greg Pizzoli). Twister (movie)

Deep Background with Noah Feldman
Power in Publishing with Chris Jackson

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 47:50


Chris Jackson, publisher and editor-in-chief of Random House's One World imprint, discusses the new literary movement he's building with writers like Bryan Stevenson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ibram X. Kendi. Jackson explains the power and perils of challenging the dominant narrative.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com